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Sample records for gabaergic systems induced

  1. The role of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems on serotonin- induced feeding behavior in chicken.

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    Mortezaei, Sepideh Seyedali; Zendehdel, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab; Hasani, Keyvan

    2013-12-01

    It has been reported that serotonin can modulate glutamate and GABA release in central nervous system (CNS). The present study was designed to examine the role of glutamatergic and GABAergic systems on serotonin- induced feeding behavior in chickens. In Experiment 1 intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of MK- 801(NMDA receptor antagonist, 15 nmol) performed followed by serotonin (10 μg). In experiments 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 prior to serotonin injection, chickens received CNQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, 390 nmol), AIDA (mGluR1 antagonist, 2 nmol), LY341495 (mGluR2 antagonist, 150 nmol), UBP1112 (mGluR3 antagonist, 2 nmol), picrotoxin (GABA A receptor antagonist, 0.5 μg), CGP54626 (GABAB receptor antagonist, 20 ng) respectively. Cumulative food intake was determined at 3 h post injection. The results of this study showed that the hypophagic effect of serotonin was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with MK- 801 and CNQX (p 0.05). Also, the inhibitory effect of serotonin on food intake was amplified by picrotoxin (p 0.05). These results suggest that serotonin as a modulator probably interacts with glutamatergic (via NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors) and GABAergic (via GABAA receptor) systems on feeding behavior in chicken.

  2. Methanol extract of Longanae Arillus augments pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through the modification of GABAergic systems.

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    Ma, Yuan; Ma, Hong; Eun, Jae Soon; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hong, Jin-Tae; Lee, Myung-Koo; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2009-03-18

    This experiment was performed to investigate whether methanol extract of Longanae Arillus (MELA) has hypnotic effects and/or enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through the GABAergic systems. MELA prolonged sleep time and reduced sleep latency induced by pentobarbital similar to muscimol, a GABAA receptors agonist. MELA also increased sleep rate and sleep time in the combined administration with pentobarbital at the sub-hypnotic dosage and showed synergic effects with muscimol in potentiating sleep onset and enhancing sleep time induced by pentobarbital. However, MELA itself did not induce sleep at higher dose which was used in this experiment. In addition, both of MELA and pentobarbital increased chloride influx in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells. MELA increased GABAA receptors gamma-subunit expression and had no effect on the expression of alpha- and beta-subunits, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells, showing different expression of subunits from pentobarbital. In conclusion, MELA itself does not induce sleep, but it augments pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through the modification of GABAergic systems.

  3. Positive effects of β-amyrin on pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice via GABAergic neurotransmitter system.

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    Jeon, Se Jin; Park, Ho Jae; Gao, Qingtao; Lee, Hyung Eun; Park, Se Jin; Hong, Eunyoung; Jang, Dae Sik; Shin, Chan Young; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-09-15

    Sleep loss, insomnia, is considered a sign of imbalance of physiological rhythm, which can be used as pre-clinic diagnosis of various neuropsychiatric disorders. The aim of the present study is to understand the pharmacological actions of α- or β-amyrin, natural triterpene compound, on the sleep in mice. To analyze the sleeping behavior, we used the well-known pentobarbital-induced sleeping model after single administration of either α- or β-amyrin. The sleeping onset time was remarkably decreased and duration was prolonged by β-amyrin (1, 3, or 10mg/kg) but not by α-amyrin (1, 3, or 10mg/kg). These effects were significantly blocked by GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Moreover, β-amyrin increased brain GABA level compared to the vehicle administration. Overall, the present study suggests that β-amyrin would enhance the total sleeping behavior in pentobarbital-induced sleeping model via the activation of GABAergic neurotransmitter system through GABA content in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Gomisin N isolated from Schisandra chinensis augments pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through the modification of the serotonergic and GABAergic system.

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    Zhang, Chenning; Mao, Xin; Zhao, Xu; Liu, Zhi; Liu, Bing; Li, Huan; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2014-07-01

    The fruits of Schisandra chinensis have been used for the treatment of insomnia in oriental countries for more than thousands of years. However, the pharmacological properties and the mechanism of sedative and hypnotic effects have not yet been studied. Gomisin N is one of the major bioactive constituents from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis, and in this paper we reported a detailed study on the effects and mechanisms of Gomisin N on its sedative and hypnotic activity for the first time. These results implied that Gomisin N possessed weak sedative effects on locomotion activity in normal mice, and produced a dose-dependent(5-45 mg/kg, i.p.) increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-treated mice, thus, itself did not induce sleep at higher dose which was used in this experiment (45 mg/kg, i.p.). It also can reverse the rodent models of insomnia induced by p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and caffeine, which could exhibit a synergistic effect with 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) as well; furthermore, the hypnotic effects of Gomisin N were inhibited by flumazenil (a specific GABAA-BZD receptor antagonist). Altogether, these results indicated that Gomisin N produced beneficial sedative and hypnotic bioactivity, which might be mediated by the modification of the serotonergic and GABAergic system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cocaine withdrawal enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep in rats: evidence of GABAergic modulation.

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    Ma, Yuan; Ma, Hong; Hong, Jin-Tae; Kim, Yun-Bae; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2008-12-01

    We intended to clarify whether pentobarbital-induced sleep in rats is affected during cocaine withdrawal and whether GABAergic systems are involved in this sleep. Cocaine (20mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to rats once per day for 6 days. Pentobarbital (42mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) to the rats 1 day (acute withdrawal), 8 days (subacute withdrawal), or 14 days (subchronic withdrawal) after withdrawal from cocaine. All rats were fasted for 24h prior to the pentobarbital injection. Pentobarbital-induced sleeping time was significantly increased during both acute and subacute withdrawal, while sleeping onset latency was not affected. However, sleeping time recovered to normal 14 days after withdrawal. Protein levels of GABAA receptor gamma-subunits and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) were increased in both acute and subacute cocaine withdrawal in the hypothalamus, but were normal after 14 days of withdrawal. These results indicate that pentobarbital-induced sleeping time in cocaine withdrawal is transiently increased. Hypersomnia in cocaine withdrawal might be influenced by functional changes in the GABAergic systems.

  6. Desensitization of GABAergic receptors as a mechanism of zolpidem-induced somnambulism.

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    Juszczak, Grzegorz R

    2011-08-01

    Sleepwalking is a frequently reported side effect of zolpidem which is a short-acting hypnotic drug potentiating activity of GABA(A) receptors. Paradoxically, the most commonly used medications for somnambulism are benzodiazepines, especially clonazepam, which also potentiate activity of GABA(A) receptors. It is proposed that zolpidem-induced sleepwalking can be explained by the desensitization of GABAergic receptors located on serotonergic neurons. According to the proposed model, the delay between desensitization of GABA receptors and a compensatory decrease in serotonin release constitutes the time window for parasomnias. The occurrence of sleepwalking depends on individual differences in receptor desensitization, autoregulation of serotonin release and drug pharmacokinetics. The proposed mechanism of interaction between GABAergic and serotonergic systems can be also relevant for zolpidem abuse and zolpidem-induced hallucinations. It is therefore suggested that special care should be taken when zolpidem is used in patients taking at the same time selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. GABAergic Neural Activity Involved in Salicylate-Induced Auditory Cortex Gain Enhancement

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    Lu, Jianzhong; Lobarinas, Edward; Deng, Anchun; Goodey, Ronald; Stolzberg, Daniel; Salvi, Richard J.; Sun, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Although high doses of sodium salicylate impair cochlear function, it paradoxically enhances sound-evoked activity in the auditory cortex (AC) and augments acoustic startle reflex responses, neural and behavioral metrics associated with hyperexcitability and hyperacusis. To explore the neural mechanisms underlying salicylate-induced hyperexcitability and “increased central gain”, we examined the effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonists and antagonists on salicylate-induced hyperexcitability in the AC and startle reflex responses. Consistent with our previous findings, local or systemic application of salicylate significantly increased the amplitude of sound-evoked AC neural activity, but generally reduced spontaneous activity in the AC. Systemic injection of salicylate also significantly increased the acoustic startle reflex. S-baclofen or R-baclofen, GABA-B agonists, which suppressed sound-evoked AC neural firing rate and local field potentials, also suppressed the salicylate-induced enhancement of the AC field potential and the acoustic startle reflex. Local application of vigabatrin, which enhances GABA concentration in the brain, suppressed the salicylate-induced enhancement of AC firing rate. Systemic injection of vigabatrin also reduced the salicylate-induced enhancement of acoustic startle reflex. Collectively, these results suggest that the sound-evoked behavioral and neural hyperactivity induced by salicylate may arise from a salicylate-induced suppression GABAergic inhibition in the AC. PMID:21664433

  8. Caffeine-Induced Suppression of GABAergic Inhibition and Calcium-Independent Metaplasticity

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    Masako Isokawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic inhibition plays a critical role in the regulation of neuron excitability; thus, it is subject to modulations by many factors. Recent evidence suggests the elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i and calcium-dependent signaling molecules underlie the modulations. Caffeine induces a release of calcium from intracellular stores. We tested whether caffeine modulated GABAergic transmission by increasing [Ca2+]i. A brief local puff-application of caffeine to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells transiently suppressed GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs by 73.2 ± 6.98%. Time course of suppression and the subsequent recovery of IPSCs resembled DSI (depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition, mediated by endogenous cannabinoids that require a [Ca2+]i rise. However, unlike DSI, caffeine-induced suppression of IPSCs (CSI persisted in the absence of a [Ca2+]i rise. Intracellular applications of BAPTA and ryanodine (which blocks caffeine-induced calcium release from intracellular stores failed to prevent the generation of CSI. Surprisingly, ruthenium red, an inhibitor of multiple calcium permeable/release channels including those of stores, induced metaplasticity by amplifying the magnitude of CSI independently of calcium. This metaplasticity was accompanied with the generation of a large inward current. Although ionic basis of this inward current is undetermined, the present result demonstrates that caffeine has a robust Ca2+-independent inhibitory action on GABAergic inhibition and causes metaplasticity by opening plasma membrane channels.

  9. Toxoplasma gondii Infections Alter GABAergic Synapses and Signaling in the Central Nervous System

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    Brooks, Justin M.; Carrillo, Gabriela L.; Su, Jianmin; Lindsay, David S.; Blader, Ira J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During infections with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is utilized as a carbon source for parasite metabolism and also to facilitate parasite dissemination by stimulating dendritic-cell motility. The best-recognized function for GABA, however, is its role in the nervous system as an inhibitory neurotransmitter that regulates the flow and timing of excitatory neurotransmission. When this pathway is altered, seizures develop. Human toxoplasmosis patients suffer from seizures, suggesting that Toxoplasma interferes with GABA signaling in the brain. Here, we show that while excitatory glutamatergic presynaptic proteins appeared normal, infection with type II ME49 Toxoplasma tissue cysts led to global changes in the distribution of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67), a key enzyme that catalyzes GABA synthesis in the brain. Alterations in GAD67 staining were not due to decreased expression but rather to a change from GAD67 clustering at presynaptic termini to a more diffuse localization throughout the neuropil. Consistent with a loss of GAD67 from the synaptic terminals, Toxoplasma-infected mice develop spontaneous seizures and are more susceptible to drugs that induce seizures by antagonizing GABA receptors. Interestingly, GABAergic protein mislocalization and the response to seizure-inducing drugs were observed in mice infected with type II ME49 but not type III CEP strain parasites, indicating a role for a polymorphic parasite factor(s) in regulating GABAergic synapses. Taken together, these data support a model in which seizures and other neurological complications seen in Toxoplasma-infected individuals are due, at least in part, to changes in GABAergic signaling. PMID:26507232

  10. MHC-I promotes apoptosis of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal dorsal horn and contributes to cancer induced bone pain.

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    Fu, Qiaochu; Shi, Dai; Zhou, Yaqun; Zheng, Hua; Xiang, Hongbing; Tian, Xuebi; Gao, Feng; Manyande, Anne; Cao, Fei; Tian, Yuke; Ye, Dawei

    2016-12-01

    Cancer induced bone pain (CIBP) remains one of the most intractable clinical problems due to poor understanding of its underlying mechanisms. Recent studies demonstrate the decline of inhibitory interneurons, especially GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord, can evoke generation of chronic pain. It has also been reported that neuronal MHC-I expression renders neurons vulnerable to cytotoxic CD8 + T cells and finally lead to neurons apoptosis in a variety neurological disorders. However, whether MHC-I could induce the apoptosis of GABAergic interneurons in spinal cord and contribute to the development of CIBP remains unknown. In this study, we investigated roles of MHC-I and underlying mechanisms in CIBP on a rat model. Our results showed that increased MHC-I expression on GABAergic interneurons could deplete GABAergic interneurons by inducing their apoptosis in the spinal dorsal horn of tumor-bearing rats. Pretreatment of MHC-I RNAi-lentivirus could prevent the apoptosis of GABAergic interneurons and therefore alleviated mechanical allodynia induced by tumor cells intratibial injection. Additionally, we also found that CD8 + T cells were colocalized with MHC-I and GABAergic neurons and presented a significant and persistent increase in the spinal cord of tumor-bearing rats. Taken together, these findings indicated that MHC-I could evoke CIBP by promoting apoptosis of GABAergic interneurons in the dorsal horn, and this apoptosis was closely related to local CD8 + T cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Piriform cortical glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons express coordinated plasticity for whisker-induced odor recall.

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    Liu, Yahui; Gao, Zilong; Chen, Changfeng; Wen, Bo; Huang, Li; Ge, Rongjing; Zhao, Shidi; Fan, Ruichen; Feng, Jing; Lu, Wei; Wang, Liping; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2017-11-10

    Neural plasticity occurs in learning and memory. Coordinated plasticity at glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons during memory formation remains elusive, which we investigate in a mouse model of associative learning by cellular imaging and electrophysiology. Paired odor and whisker stimulations lead to whisker-induced olfaction response. In mice that express this cross-modal memory, the neurons in the piriform cortex are recruited to encode newly acquired whisker signal alongside innate odor signal, and their response patterns to these associated signals are different. There are emerged synaptic innervations from barrel cortical neurons to piriform cortical neurons from these mice. These results indicate the recruitment of associative memory cells in the piriform cortex after associative memory. In terms of the structural and functional plasticity at these associative memory cells in the piriform cortex, glutamatergic neurons and synapses are upregulated, GABAergic neurons and synapses are downregulated as well as their mutual innervations are refined in the coordinated manner. Therefore, the associated activations of sensory cortices triggered by their input signals induce the formation of their mutual synapse innervations, the recruitment of associative memory cells and the coordinated plasticity between the GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which work for associative memory cells to encode cross-modal associated signals in their integration, associative storage and distinguishable retrieval.

  12. Blood meal acquisition enhances arbovirus replication in mosquitoes through activation of the GABAergic system.

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    Zhu, Yibin; Zhang, Rudian; Zhang, Bei; Zhao, Tongyan; Wang, Penghua; Liang, Guodong; Cheng, Gong

    2017-11-02

    Mosquitoes are hematophagous insects that carry-on and transmit many human viruses. However, little information is available regarding the common mechanisms underlying the infection of mosquitoes by these viruses. In this study, we reveal that the hematophagous nature of mosquitoes contributes to arboviral infection after a blood meal, which suppresses antiviral innate immunity by activating the GABAergic pathway. dsRNA-mediated interruption of the GABA signaling and blockage of the GABA A receptor by the specific inhibitors both significantly impaired arbovirus replication. Consistently, inoculation of GABA enhanced arboviral infection, indicating that GABA signaling facilitates the arboviral infection of mosquitoes. The ingestion of blood by mosquitoes resulted in robust GABA production from glutamic acid derived from blood protein digestion. The oral introduction of glutamic acid increased virus acquisition by mosquitoes via activation of the GABAergic system. Our study reveals that blood meals enhance arbovirus replication in mosquitoes through activation of the GABAergic system.

  13. Comprehensive association analysis of 27 genes from the GABAergic system in Japanese individuals affected with schizophrenia.

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    Balan, Shabeesh; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hashimoto, Takanori; Toyota, Tomoko; Shimamoto, Chie; Maekawa, Motoko; Takagai, Shu; Wakuda, Tomoyasu; Kameno, Yosuke; Kurita, Daisuke; Yamada, Kohei; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Tasuku; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2017-07-01

    Involvement of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in schizophrenia pathogenesis through disrupted neurodevelopment has been highlighted in numerous studies. However, the function of common genetic variants of this system in determining schizophrenia risk is unknown. We therefore tested the association of 375 tagged SNPs in genes derived from the GABAergic system, such as GABA A receptor subunit genes, and GABA related genes (glutamate decarboxylase genes, GABAergic-marker gene, genes involved in GABA receptor trafficking and scaffolding) in Japanese schizophrenia case-control samples (n=2926; 1415 cases and 1511 controls). We observed nominal association of SNPs in nine GABA A receptor subunit genes and the GPHN gene with schizophrenia, although none survived correction for study-wide multiple testing. Two SNPs located in the GABRA1 gene, rs4263535 (P allele =0.002; uncorrected) and rs1157122 (P allele =0.006; uncorrected) showed top hits, followed by rs723432 (P allele =0.007; uncorrected) in the GPHN gene. All three were significantly associated with schizophrenia and survived gene-wide multiple testing. Haplotypes containing associated variants in GABRA1 but not GPHN were significantly associated with schizophrenia. To conclude, we provided substantiating genetic evidence for the involvement of the GABAergic system in schizophrenia susceptibility. These results warrant further investigations to replicate the association of GABRA1 and GPHN with schizophrenia and to discern the precise mechanisms of disease pathophysiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Frequent occurrence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in GABAergic neurons of the chick visual system

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    A.S. Torrão

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Double-labeling immunohistochemical methods were used to investigate the occurrence of the alpha8 and alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunits in presumptive GABAergic neurons of the chick nervous system. Nicotinic receptor immunoreactivity was often found in cells exhibiting GABA-like immunoreactivity, especially in the visual system. The alpha8 subunit appeared to be present in presumptive GABAergic cells of the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus, nucleus of the basal optic root of the accessory optic system, and the optic tectum, among several other structures. The alpha5 subunit was also found in GABA-positive neurons, as observed in the lentiform nucleus of the mesencephalon and other pretectal nuclei. The numbers of alpha8- and alpha5-positive neurons that were also GABA-positive represented high percentages of the total number of neurons containing nicotinic receptor labeling in several brain areas, which indicates that most of the alpha8 and alpha5 nicotinic receptor subunits are present in GABAergic cells. Taken together with data from other studies, our results indicate an important role of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the functional organization of GABAergic circuits in the visual system.

  15. The Effects of GABAergic Polarity Changes on Episodic Neural Network Activity in Developing Neural Systems

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    Wilfredo Blanco

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Early in development, neural systems have primarily excitatory coupling, where even GABAergic synapses are excitatory. Many of these systems exhibit spontaneous episodes of activity that have been characterized through both experimental and computational studies. As development progress the neural system goes through many changes, including synaptic remodeling, intrinsic plasticity in the ion channel expression, and a transformation of GABAergic synapses from excitatory to inhibitory. What effect each of these, and other, changes have on the network behavior is hard to know from experimental studies since they all happen in parallel. One advantage of a computational approach is that one has the ability to study developmental changes in isolation. Here, we examine the effects of GABAergic synapse polarity change on the spontaneous activity of both a mean field and a neural network model that has both glutamatergic and GABAergic coupling, representative of a developing neural network. We find some intuitive behavioral changes as the GABAergic neurons go from excitatory to inhibitory, shared by both models, such as a decrease in the duration of episodes. We also find some paradoxical changes in the activity that are only present in the neural network model. In particular, we find that during early development the inter-episode durations become longer on average, while later in development they become shorter. In addressing this unexpected finding, we uncover a priming effect that is particularly important for a small subset of neurons, called the “intermediate neurons.” We characterize these neurons and demonstrate why they are crucial to episode initiation, and why the paradoxical behavioral change result from priming of these neurons. The study illustrates how even arguably the simplest of developmental changes that occurs in neural systems can present non-intuitive behaviors. It also makes predictions about neural network behavioral changes

  16. Anatomical recovery of the GABAergic system after a complete spinal cord injury in lampreys.

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    Romaus-Sanjurjo, D; Valle-Maroto, S M; Barreiro-Iglesias, A; Fernández-López, B; Rodicio, M C

    2018-03-15

    Lampreys recover locomotion spontaneously several weeks after a complete spinal cord injury. Dysfunction of the GABAergic system following SCI has been reported in mammalian models. So, it is of great interest to understand how the GABAergic system of lampreys adapts to the post-injury situation and how this relates to spontaneous recovery. The spinal cord of lampreys contains 3 populations of GABAergic neurons and most of the GABAergic innervation of the spinal cord comes from these local cells. GABAB receptors are expressed in the spinal cord of lampreys and they play important roles in the control of locomotion. The aims of the present study were to quantify: 1) the changes in the number of GABAergic neurons and innervation of the spinal cord and 2) the changes in the expression of the gabab receptor subunits b1 and b2 in the spinal cord of the sea lamprey after SCI. We performed complete spinal cord transections at the level of the fifth gill of mature larval lampreys and GABA immunohistochemistry or gabab in situ hybridization experiments. Animals were analysed up to 10 weeks post-lesion (wpl), when behavioural analyses showed that they recovered normal appearing locomotion (stage 6 in the Ayer's scale of locomotor recovery). We observed a significant decrease in the number of GABA-ir cells and fibres 1 h after lesion both rostral and caudal to the lesion site. GABA-ir cell numbers and innervation were recovered to control levels 1 to 2 wpl. At 1, 4 and 10 wpl the expression of gabab1 and gabab2 transcripts was significantly decreased in the spinal cord compared to control un-lesioned animals. This is the first study reporting the quantitative long-term changes in the number of GABAergic cells and fibres and in the expression of gabab receptors in the spinal cord of any vertebrate following a traumatic SCI. Our results show that in lampreys there is a full recovery of the GABAergic neurons and a decrease in the expression of gabab receptors when functional

  17. Glucocorticoid Induces Incoordination between Glutamatergic and GABAergic Neurons in the Amygdala.

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    Guang-Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Stressful life leads to mood disorders. Chronic mild stress is presumably major etiology for depression, and acute severe stress leads to anxiety. These stressful situations may impair hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and in turn induce synapse dysfunction. However, it remains elusive how the stress hormones mess up subcellular compartments and interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons, which we have investigated in mouse amygdala, a structure related to emotional states.Dexamethasone was chronically given by intraperitoneal injection once a day for one week or was acutely washed into the brain slices. The neuronal spikes and synaptic transmission were recorded by whole-cell patching in amygdala neurons of brain slices. The chronic or acute administration of dexamethasone downregulates glutamate release as well as upregulates GABA release and GABAergic neuron spiking. The chronic administration of dexamethasone also enhances the responsiveness of GABA receptors.The upregulation of GABAergic neurons and the downregulation of glutamatergic neurons by glucocorticoid impair their balance in the amygdala, which leads to emotional disorders during stress.

  18. Presynaptic control of nociceptor signalling: Differential influence of Mu Opioid and GABAergic Systems

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    Ruth C Riley

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of pre- and postsynaptic controls to the flow of nociceptive information at the level of the spinal cord has been one of Ron Melzack's longstanding interests and a key issue in the formulation of the gate control theory. The authors review their own studies, in which they monitored internalization of the neurokinin-1 receptor to examine specifically the action of two classically inhibitory systems - mu opioid and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA - on noxious stimulus-evoked tachykinin signalling in the rat spinal cord. Evidence that opioids and GABAergic controls operate differently on the central consequences of any noxious stimulus-induced substance P release is provided. Whereas at least 80% of the tachykinin signalling remained intact after even the highest concentration of spinal morphine or D-Ala2, NMe-phe4, Glyol5-enkephalin administration, spinal administration of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen had a dramatic inhibitory effect. These findings are discussed in light of the disappointing clinical utility of baclofen and neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists to combat pain.

  19. In vivo temporal property of GABAergic neural transmission in collateral feed-forward inhibition system of hippocampal-prefrontal pathway.

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    Takita, Masatoshi; Kuramochi, Masahito; Izaki, Yoshinori; Ohtomi, Michiko

    2007-05-30

    Anatomical evidence suggests that rat CA1 hippocampal afferents collaterally innervate excitatory projecting pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, creating a disynaptic, feed-forward inhibition microcircuit in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We investigated the temporal relationship between the frequency of paired synaptic transmission and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic receptor-mediated modulation of the microcircuit in vivo under urethane anesthesia. Local perfusions of a GABAa antagonist (-)-bicuculline into the mPFC via microdialysis resulted in a statistically significant disinhibitory effect on intrinsic GABA action, increasing the first and second mPFC responses following hippocampal paired stimulation at interstimulus intervals of 100-200 ms, but not those at 25-50 ms. This (-)-bicuculline-induced disinhibition was compensated by the GABAa agonist muscimol, which itself did not attenuate the intrinsic oscillation of the local field potentials. The perfusion of a sub-minimal concentration of GABAb agonist (R)-baclofen slightly enhanced the synaptic transmission, regardless of the interstimulus interval. In addition to the tonic control by spontaneous fast-spiking GABAergic neurons, it is clear the sequential transmission of the hippocampal-mPFC pathway can phasically drive the collateral feed-forward inhibition system through activation of a GABAa receptor, bringing an active signal filter to the various types of impulse trains that enter the mPFC from the hippocampus in vivo.

  20. The peripheral GABAergic system as a target in endocrine disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladkevich, A; Korf, J; Hakobyan, VP; Melkonyan, KV

    2006-01-01

    In addition to its well-recognized function as a cerebral inhibitory transmitter, less well established is the role of GABA in peripheral nervous and endocrine systems. We Summarize current evidence that GABA serves as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the autonomic nervous system and as a

  1. GABA-ergic neurons in the leach central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    GABA is a candidate for an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the leech central nervous system because of the well-documented inhibitory action of GABA in other invertebrates. To demonstrate that GABA meets the criteria used to identify a substance as a neurotransmitter, the author examined GABA metabolism and synaptic interactions of inhibitory motor neurons in two leech species, Hirudo medicinalis and Haementeria ghilianii. Segmental ganglia of the leech ventral nerve cord and identified inhibitors have the capacity to synthesize GABA when incubated in the presence of the precursor glutamate. Application of GABA to cell bodies of excitatory motor neurons or muscle fibers innervated by the inhibitors hyperpolarizes the membrane potential of the target cell and activates a chloride ion conductance channel, similar to the inhibitory membrane response following intracellular stimulation of the inhibitor. Bicuculline methiodide (5 x 10 -5 M), GABA receptor antagonist, blocks reversibly the response to applied GABA and the inhibitory synaptic inputs onto the postsynaptic neurons or muscle fibers without interfering with their excitatory inputs. Furthermore, the inhibitors are included among approximately 25 neurons per segmental ganglion that take up GABA by a high affinity uptake system, as revealed by 3 H-GABA-autoradiography. The development of the capacities to synthesize and to take up GABA were examined in leech embryos. The embryos are able to synthesize GABA at early stages of the development of the nervous system, before any neurons have extended neutrites

  2. GABAergic modulation of DC stimulation-induced motor cortex excitability shifts in humans.

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    Nitsche, Michael A; Liebetanz, David; Schlitterlau, Anett; Henschke, Undine; Fricke, Kristina; Frommann, Kai; Lang, Nicolas; Henning, Stefan; Paulus, Walter; Tergau, Frithjof

    2004-05-01

    Weak transcranial DC stimulation (tDCS) of the human motor cortex results in excitability shifts during and after the end of stimulation, which are most probably localized intracortically. Anodal stimulation enhances excitability, whereas cathodal stimulation reduces it. Although the after-effects of tDCS are NMDA receptor-dependent, nothing is known about the involvement of additional receptors. Here we show that pharmacological strengthening of GABAergic inhibition modulates selectively the after-effects elicited by anodal tDCS. Administration of the GABA(A) receptor agonist lorazepam resulted in a delayed, but then enhanced and prolonged anodal tDCS-induced excitability elevation. The initial absence of an excitability enhancement under lorazepam is most probably caused by a loss of the anodal tDCS-generated intracortical diminution of inhibition and enhancement of facilitation, which occurs without pharmacological intervention. The reasons for the late-occurring excitability enhancement remain unclear. Because intracortical inhibition and facilitation are not changed in this phase compared with pre-tDCS values, excitability changes originating from remote cortical or subcortical areas could be involved.

  3. Depolarization-induced release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from GABAergic neurons caused by reversal of glutamate transporters

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    Jensen, J B; Pickering, D S; Schousboe, A

    2000-01-01

    Cultured neocortical neurons, which predominantly consist of GABAergic neurons exhibit a pronounced stimulus-coupled GABA release. Since the cultures may contain a small population of glutamatergic neurons and the GABAergic neurons have a high content of glutamate it was of interest to examine...... if glutamate in addition to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) could be released from these cultures. The neurons were preloaded with [(3)H]D-aspartate and subsequently its release was followed during depolarization induced by a high potassium concentration or the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4......-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonists, AMPA and kainate. Depolarization of the neurons with 55 mM potassium increased the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate by more than 10-fold. When the non-specific calcium-channel blockers cobalt or lanthanum were included in the stimulation buffer with potassium...

  4. GABAergic Mechanisms in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jonge, Jeroen C; Vinkers, Christiaan H; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, and impairments in cognitive functioning. Evidence from postmortem studies suggests that alterations in cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) neurons contribute to the clinical features...... of schizophrenia. In vivo measurement of brain GABA levels using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers the possibility to provide more insight into the relationship between problems in GABAergic neurotransmission and clinical symptoms of schizophrenia patients. This study reviews and links alterations...... in the GABA system in postmortem studies, animal models, and human studies in schizophrenia. Converging evidence implicates alterations in both presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia, and GABA may thus play an important role in the pathophysiology...

  5. Disruptions to the cerebellar GABAergic system in juvenile guinea pigs following preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Julia C; Palliser, Hannah K; Dyson, Rebecca M; Berry, Mary J; Hirst, Jonathan J

    2018-04-01

    Children that are born preterm are at an increased risk of developing cognitive problems and behavioural disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). There is increasing interest in the role of the cerebellum in these processes and the potential involvement of GABAergic pathways in neurodevelopmental disorders. We propose that preterm birth, and the associated loss of the trophic intrauterine environment, alters the development of the cerebellum, contributing to ongoing neurobehavioral disorders. Guinea pigs were delivered preterm (GA62) or spontaneously at term (GA69), and tissues collected at corrected postnatal day (PND) 28. Neurodevelopmental and GABAergic markers myelin basic protein (MBP), neuronal nuclei (NeuN), calbindin (Purkinje cells), and GAD67 (GABA synthesis enzyme) were analysed in cerebellar lobules IX and X by immunohistochemistry. Protein expression of GAD67 and GAT1 (GABA transporter enzyme) were quantified by western blot, whilst neurosteroid-sensitive GABA A receptor subunits were measured by RT-PCR. MBP immunostaining was increased in lobule IX of preterm males, and reduced in lobule X of preterm females when compared to their term counterparts. GAD67 staining was decreased in lobule IX and X of the preterm males, but only in lobule X of the preterm females compared to term cohorts for each sex. Internal granule cell layer width of lobule X was decreased in preterm cohorts of both sexes compared to terms. There were no differences between gestational age groups for NeuN staining, GAD67 and GAT1 protein expression as measured by western blotting, or GABA A receptor subunits as measured by RT-PCR between preterm and term for either sex. The present findings suggest that components of the cerebellar GABAergic system of the ex-preterm cerebellum are disrupted. The higher expression of myelin in the preterm males may be due to a deficit in axonal pruning, whereas females have a deficit in myelination at 28 corrected days of

  6. Activation of GABAergic pathway by hypocretin in the median raphe nucleus (MRN) mediates stress-induced theta rhythm in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Tse; Jou, Shuo-Bin; Yi, Pei-Lu; Chang, Fang-Chia

    2012-07-15

    The frequency of electroencephalograms (EEGs) is predominant in theta rhythm during stress (e.g., footshock) in rats. Median raphe nucleus (MRN) desynchronizes hippocampal theta waves via activation of GABAergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB), a theta rhythm pacemaker. Increased hypocretin mediates stress responses in addition to the maintenance of wakefulness. Hypocretin receptors are abundant in the MRN, suggesting a possible role of hypocretin in modulating stress-induced theta rhythm. Our results indicated that the intensity of theta waves was enhanced by footshock and that a hypocretin receptor antagonist (TCS1102) suppressed the footshock-induced theta waves. Administration of hypocretin-1 (1 and 10 μg) and hypocretin-2 (10 μg) directly into the MRN simulated the effect of footshock and significantly increased theta waves. Co-administration of GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline, into the MRN blocked the increase of theta waves induced by hypocretins or footshock. These results suggested that stress enhances the release of hypocretins, activates GABAergic neurons in the MRN, blocks the ability of MRN to desynchronize theta waves, and subsequently increases the intensity of theta rhythm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition partially mimics the ethanol-induced increase of the Golgi cell-dependent component of the tonic GABAergic current in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin R Diaz

    Full Text Available Cerebellar granule cells (CGNs are one of many neurons that express phasic and tonic GABAergic conductances. Although it is well established that Golgi cells (GoCs mediate phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs, their role in mediating tonic currents in CGNs (CGN-I(tonic is controversial. Earlier studies suggested that GoCs mediate a component of CGN-I(tonic that is present only in preparations from immature rodents. However, more recent studies have detected a GoC-dependent component of CGN-I(tonic in preparations of mature rodents. In addition, acute exposure to ethanol was shown to potentiate the GoC component of CGN-I(tonic and to induce a parallel increase in spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency at CGNs. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these effects of ethanol on GABAergic transmission in CGNs are mediated by inhibition of the Na(+/K(+-ATPase. We used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology techniques in cerebellar slices of male rats (postnatal day 23-30. Under these conditions, we reliably detected a GoC-dependent component of CGN-I(tonic that could be blocked with tetrodotoxin. Further analysis revealed a positive correlation between basal sIPSC frequency and the magnitude of the GoC-dependent component of CGN-I(tonic. Inhibition of the Na(+/K(+-ATPase with a submaximal concentration of ouabain partially mimicked the ethanol-induced potentiation of both phasic and tonic GABAergic currents in CGNs. Modeling studies suggest that selective inhibition of the Na(+/K(+-ATPase in GoCs can, in part, explain these effects of ethanol. These findings establish a novel mechanism of action of ethanol on GABAergic transmission in the central nervous system.

  8. GABAergic mediation of stress-induced secretion of corticosterone and oxytocin, but not prolactin, by the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques de Souza, Leandro; Franci, Celso Rodrigues

    2008-11-07

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) participates in mediating the response to stressful stimuli. Within the HPA, neurons in the medial parvocellular region of paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus integrate excitatory and inhibitory signals triggering secretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), the main secretagogue of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Stressful situations alter CRH secretion as well as other hormones, including prolactin and oxytocin. Most inputs to the PVN are of local origin, half of which are GABAergic neurons, and both GABA-A and GABA-B receptors are present in the PVN. The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of GABA-A and GABA-B receptors in the PVN's control of stress-induced corticosterone, oxytocin and prolactin secretion. Rats were microinjected with saline or different doses (0.5, 5 and 50 pmol) of GABA-A (bicuculine) or GABA-B (phaclofen) antagonists in the PVN. Ten minutes later, they were subjected to a stressor (ether inhalation) and blood samples were collected 30 min before and 10, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after the stressful stimulus to measure hormone levels by radioimmunoassay. Our results indicate that GABA acts in the PVN to inhibit stress-induced corticosterone secretion via both its receptor subtypes, especially GABA-B. In contrast, GABA in the PVN stimulates oxytocin secretion through GABA-B receptors and does not alter prolactin secretion.

  9. Repeated potentiation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulates behavioural and GABAergic deficits induced by early postnatal phencyclidine (PCP) treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerby, Celia; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Fejgin, Kim

    2013-01-01

    whether behavioural and GABAergic functional deficits induced by the NMDA receptor channel blocker, phencyclidine (PCP), could be reversed by repeated administration of two drugs known to enhance GABAergic transmission: the positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (m......GluR5), ADX47273, and the partial agonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR), SSR180711. Adolescent rats (4-5 weeks) subjected to PCP treatment during the second postnatal week displayed a consistent deficit in prepulse inhibition (PPI), which was reversed by a one-week treatment...... with ADX47273 and SSR180711 decreased the induction of spontaneous inhibitory current caused by acute and direct agonism of mGluR5s and α7 nAChRs in slices. These results show that repeated administration of ADX47273 or SSR180711 reverses certain behavioural and functional deficits induced by PCP, likely...

  10. Betaine attenuates memory impairment after water-immersion restraint stress and is regulated by the GABAergic neuronal system in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Kazuo; Kido, Kiwamu; Nakashima, Natsuki; Matsukura, Takuya; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Hiramatsu, Masayuki

    2017-02-05

    GABA mediated neuronal system regulates hippocampus-dependent memory and stress responses by controlling plasticity and neuronal excitability. Here, we demonstrate that betaine ameliorates water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS)-induced memory impairments. This improvement was inhibited by a betaine/GABA transporter-1 (GABA transporter-2: GAT2) inhibitor, NNC 05-2090. In this study, we investigated whether memory amelioration by betaine was mediated by the GABAergic neuronal system. Adult male mice were co-administered betaine and GABA receptor antagonists after WIRS. We also examined whether memory impairment after WIRS was attenuated by GABA receptor agonists. The memory functions were evaluated using a novel object recognition test 3-6 days after WIRS and/or the step-down type passive avoidance test at 7-8 days. The co-administration of the GABA A receptor antagonist bicuculline (1mg/kg) or the GABA B receptor antagonist phaclofen (10mg/kg) 1h after WIRS suppressed the memory-improving effects induced by betaine. Additionally, the administration of the GABA A receptor agonist muscimol (1mg/kg) or the GABA B receptor agonist baclofen (10mg/kg) 1h after WIRS attenuated memory impairments. These results were similar to the data observed with betaine. The treatment with betaine after WIRS significantly decreased the expression of GABA transaminase, and this effect was partially blocked by NNC 05-2090 in the hippocampus. WIRS caused a transient increase in hippocampal GABA levels and the changes after WIRS were not affected by betaine treatment in an in vivo microdialysis study. These results suggest that the beneficial effects of betaine may be mediated in part by changing the GABAergic neuronal system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. GABAergic system impairment in the hippocampus and superior temporal gyrus of patients with paranoid schizophrenia: A post-mortem study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Johann; Brisch, Ralf; Schiltz, Kolja; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Mawrin, Christian; Krzyżanowska, Marta; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Braun, Katharina; Schmitt, Andrea; Bogerts, Bernhard; Gos, Tomasz

    2016-11-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is a key enzyme in GABA synthesis and alterations in GABAergic neurotransmission related to glial abnormalities are thought to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This study aimed to identify potential differences regarding the neuropil expression of GAD between paranoid and residual schizophrenia. GAD65/67 immunostained histological sections were evaluated by quantitative densitometric analysis of GAD-immunoreactive (ir) neuropil. Regions of interest were the hippocampal formation (CA1 field and dentate gyrus [DG]), superior temporal gyrus (STG), and laterodorsal thalamic nucleus (LD). Data from 16 post-mortem schizophrenia patient samples (10 paranoid and 6 residual schizophrenia cases) were compared with those from 16 matched controls. Overall, schizophrenia patients showed a lower GAD-ir neuropil density (P=0.014), particularly in the right CA1 (P=0.033). However, the diagnostic subgroups differed significantly (P<0.001), mainly because of lower right CA1 GAD-ir neuropil density in paranoid versus residual patients (P=0.036) and controls (P<0.003). Significant GAD-ir neuropil reduction was also detected in the right STG layer V of paranoid versus residual schizophrenia cases (P=0.042). GAD-ir neuropil density correlated positively with antipsychotic dosage, particularly in CA1 (right: r=0.850, P=0.004; left: r=0.800, P=0.010). Our finding of decreased relative density of GAD-ir neuropil suggests hypofunction of the GABAergic system, particularly in hippocampal CA1 field and STG layer V of patients with paranoid schizophrenia. The finding that antipsychotic medication seems to counterbalance GABAergic hypofunction in schizophrenia patients suggests the possibility of exploring new treatment avenues which target this system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ursolic acid enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors via GABAergic neurotransmission in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Se Jin; Park, Ho Jae; Gao, Qingtao; Pena, Irene Joy Dela; Park, Se Jin; Lee, Hyung Eun; Woo, Hyun; Kim, Hee Jin; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Hong, Eunyoung; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2015-09-05

    Prunella vulgaris is widely used as a herbal medicine for cancers, inflammatory diseases, and other infections. Although it has long been used, few studies have examined its effects on central nervous system function. Here, we first observed that ethanolic extracts of P. vulgaris (EEPV) prolonged pentobarbital-induced sleep duration in mice. It is known that EEPV consists of many active components including triterpenoid (ursolic acid and oleanolic acid), which have many biological activities. Therefore, we evaluated which EEPV components induced sleep extension in pentobarbital-mediated sleeping model in mice. Surprisingly, despite their structural similarity and other common functions such as anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and tissue protection, only ursolic acid enhanced sleep duration in pentobarbital-treated mice. These results were attenuated by bicuculline treatment, which is a GABAA receptor antagonist. The present results suggest that ursolic acid from P. vulgaris enhances sleep duration through GABAA receptor activation and could be a therapeutic candidate for insomnia treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Green and gold kiwifruit peel ethanol extracts potentiate pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice via a GABAergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyejin; Lee, Young-Chul; Han, Kyoung-Sik; Singh, Harjinder; Yoon, Minseok; Park, Ji-Hae; Cho, Chang-Won; Cho, Suengmok

    2013-01-01

    Kiwifruit is one of the most popular fruits worldwide, and it has various biological properties, including antioxidant, anti-allergic, and cardiovascular protective effects. The peel of kiwifruit, which is a by-product of processing, is a good source of flavonoids; however, its bioactivity has not been widely investigated. In this study, we evaluated the hypnotic effects of green (GRPE, Actinidia deliciosa) and gold (GOPE, Actinidia chinensis) kiwifruit peel ethanol extracts and their solvent fractions, and the possible underlying mechanisms. Oral GRPE and GOPE administration (125-1000mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent decrease in sleep latency and an increase in sleep duration in pentobarbital-treated mice. Among three different solvent fractions of GRPE and GOPE, ethyl acetate (EA) fractions had the greatest effect on sleep duration at 250mg/kg. The total flavonoid contents of solvent fractions were proportional to sleep duration. Like diazepam (a GABA(A)-benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor agonist), the hypnotic effects of GRPE, GOPE, and their EA fractions were fully inhibited by flumazenil (a GABA(A)-BZD receptor antagonist). These results suggest that potentiation effects of GRPE and GOPE on pentobarbital-induced sleep in mice may be modulated by a GABAergic mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Leptin potentiates GABAergic synaptic transmission in the developing rodent hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien eGuimond

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that leptin is not only a hormone regulating energy homeostasis but also a neurotrophic factor impacting a number of brain regions, including the hippocampus. Although leptin promotes the development of GABAergic transmission in the hypothalamus, little is known about its action on the GABAergic system in the hippocampus. Here we show that leptin modulates GABAergic transmission onto developing CA3 pyramidal cells of newborn rats. Specifically, leptin induces a long-lasting potentiation (LLP-GABAA of miniature GABAA receptor-mediated postsynaptic current (GABAA-PSC frequency. Leptin also increases the amplitude of evoked GABAA-PSCs in a subset of neurons along with a decrease in the coefficient of variation and no change in the paired-pulse ratio, pointing to an increased recruitment of functional synapses. Adding pharmacological blockers to the recording pipette showed that the leptin-induced LLP-GABAA requires postsynaptic calcium released from internal stores, as well as postsynaptic MAPK/ERK kinases 1 and/or 2 (MEK1/2, phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K and calcium-calmodulin kinase kinase (CaMKK. Finally, study of CA3 pyramidal cells in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice revealed a reduction in the basal frequency of miniature GABAA-PSCs compared to wild type littermates. In addition, presynaptic GAD65 immunostaining was reduced in the CA3 stratum pyramidale of mutant animals, both results converging to suggest a decreased number of functional GABAergic synapses in ob/ob mice. Overall, these results show that leptin potentiates and promotes the development of GABAergic synaptic transmission in the developing hippocampus likely via an increase in the number of functional synapses, and provide insights into the intracellular pathways mediating this effect. This study further extends the scope of leptin’s neurotrophic action to a key regulator of hippocampal development and function, namely GABAergic transmission.

  15. Non-Invasive Evaluation of the GABAergic/Glutamatergic System in Autistic Patients Observed by MEGA-Editing Proton MR Spectroscopy Using a Clinical 3 Tesla Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Masafumi; Taki, Masako M.; Nose, Ayumi; Kubo, Hitoshi; Mori, Kenji; Nishitani, Hiromu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Amino acids related to neurotransmitters and the GABAergic/glutamatergic system were measured using a 3 T-MRI instrument in 12 patients with autism and 10 normal controls. All measurements were performed in the frontal lobe (FL) and lenticular nuclei (LN) using a conventional sequence for n-acetyl aspartate (NAA) and glutamate (Glu), and the…

  16. Participation of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown essential oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldwein, C.G.; Silva, L.L.; Reckziegel, P.; Barros, F.M.C.; Bürger, M.E.; Baldisserotto, B.; Mallmann, C.A.; Schmidt, D.; Caron, B.O.; Heinzmann, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the possible involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba essential oil (EO). We propose a new animal model using silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) exposed to an anesthetic bath to study the mechanism of action of EO. To observe the induction and potentiation of the anesthetic effect of EO, juvenile silver catfish (9.30 ± 1.85 g; 10.15 ± 0.95 cm; N = 6) were exposed to various concentrations of L. alba EO in the presence or absence of diazepam [an agonist of high-affinity binding sites for benzodiazepinic (BDZ) sites coupled to the GABAA receptor complex]. In another experiment, fish (N = 6) were initially anesthetized with the EO and then transferred to an anesthetic-free aquarium containing flumazenil (a selective antagonist of binding sites for BDZ coupled to the GABAA receptor complex) or water to assess recovery time from the anesthesia. In this case, flumazenil was used to observe the involvement of the GABA-BDZ receptor in the EO mechanism of action. The results showed that diazepam potentiates the anesthetic effect of EO at all concentrations tested. Fish exposed to diazepam and EO showed faster recovery from anesthesia when flumazenil was added to the recovery bath (12.0 ± 0.3 and 7.2 ± 0.7, respectively) than those exposed to water (9.2 ± 0.2 and 3.5 ± 0.3, respectively). In conclusion, the results demonstrated the involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of L. alba EO on silver catfish. PMID:22473320

  17. Participation of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba (Mill. N.E. Brown essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.G. Heldwein

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the possible involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba essential oil (EO. We propose a new animal model using silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen exposed to an anesthetic bath to study the mechanism of action of EO. To observe the induction and potentiation of the anesthetic effect of EO, juvenile silver catfish (9.30 ± 1.85 g; 10.15 ± 0.95 cm; N = 6 were exposed to various concentrations of L. alba EO in the presence or absence of diazepam [an agonist of high-affinity binding sites for benzodiazepinic (BDZ sites coupled to the GABA A receptor complex]. In another experiment, fish (N = 6 were initially anesthetized with the EO and then transferred to an anesthetic-free aquarium containing flumazenil (a selective antagonist of binding sites for BDZ coupled to the GABA A receptor complex or water to assess recovery time from the anesthesia. In this case, flumazenil was used to observe the involvement of the GABA-BDZ receptor in the EO mechanism of action. The results showed that diazepam potentiates the anesthetic effect of EO at all concentrations tested. Fish exposed to diazepam and EO showed faster recovery from anesthesia when flumazenil was added to the recovery bath (12.0 ± 0.3 and 7.2 ± 0.7, respectively than those exposed to water (9.2 ± 0.2 and 3.5 ± 0.3, respectively. In conclusion, the results demonstrated the involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of L. alba EO on silver catfish.

  18. Participation of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown essential oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heldwein, C.G.; Silva, L.L. [Departamento de Farmácia Industrial, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Reckziegel, P. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Barros, F.M.C. [Departamento de Farmácia Industrial, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bürger, M.E.; Baldisserotto, B. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Mallmann, C.A. [Departamento de Medicina Veterinária Preventiva, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Schmidt, D.; Caron, B.O. [Departamento de Ciências Agronômicas e Ambientais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Campus de Frederico Westphalen, Frederico Westphalen, RS (Brazil); Heinzmann, B.M. [Departamento de Farmácia Industrial, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2012-04-05

    The objective of this study was to identify the possible involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba essential oil (EO). We propose a new animal model using silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) exposed to an anesthetic bath to study the mechanism of action of EO. To observe the induction and potentiation of the anesthetic effect of EO, juvenile silver catfish (9.30 ± 1.85 g; 10.15 ± 0.95 cm; N = 6) were exposed to various concentrations of L. alba EO in the presence or absence of diazepam [an agonist of high-affinity binding sites for benzodiazepinic (BDZ) sites coupled to the GABA{sub A} receptor complex]. In another experiment, fish (N = 6) were initially anesthetized with the EO and then transferred to an anesthetic-free aquarium containing flumazenil (a selective antagonist of binding sites for BDZ coupled to the GABA{sub A} receptor complex) or water to assess recovery time from the anesthesia. In this case, flumazenil was used to observe the involvement of the GABA-BDZ receptor in the EO mechanism of action. The results showed that diazepam potentiates the anesthetic effect of EO at all concentrations tested. Fish exposed to diazepam and EO showed faster recovery from anesthesia when flumazenil was added to the recovery bath (12.0 ± 0.3 and 7.2 ± 0.7, respectively) than those exposed to water (9.2 ± 0.2 and 3.5 ± 0.3, respectively). In conclusion, the results demonstrated the involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of L. alba EO on silver catfish.

  19. Participation of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba (Mill.) N.E. Brown essential oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heldwein, C.G.; Silva, L.L.; Reckziegel, P.; Barros, F.M.C.; Bürger, M.E.; Baldisserotto, B.; Mallmann, C.A.; Schmidt, D.; Caron, B.O.; Heinzmann, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the possible involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of Lippia alba essential oil (EO). We propose a new animal model using silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) exposed to an anesthetic bath to study the mechanism of action of EO. To observe the induction and potentiation of the anesthetic effect of EO, juvenile silver catfish (9.30 ± 1.85 g; 10.15 ± 0.95 cm; N = 6) were exposed to various concentrations of L. alba EO in the presence or absence of diazepam [an agonist of high-affinity binding sites for benzodiazepinic (BDZ) sites coupled to the GABA A receptor complex]. In another experiment, fish (N = 6) were initially anesthetized with the EO and then transferred to an anesthetic-free aquarium containing flumazenil (a selective antagonist of binding sites for BDZ coupled to the GABA A receptor complex) or water to assess recovery time from the anesthesia. In this case, flumazenil was used to observe the involvement of the GABA-BDZ receptor in the EO mechanism of action. The results showed that diazepam potentiates the anesthetic effect of EO at all concentrations tested. Fish exposed to diazepam and EO showed faster recovery from anesthesia when flumazenil was added to the recovery bath (12.0 ± 0.3 and 7.2 ± 0.7, respectively) than those exposed to water (9.2 ± 0.2 and 3.5 ± 0.3, respectively). In conclusion, the results demonstrated the involvement of the GABAergic system in the anesthetic effect of L. alba EO on silver catfish

  20. The space where aging acts: focus on the GABAergic synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozycka, Aleksandra; Liguz-Lecznar, Monika

    2017-08-01

    As it was established that aging is not associated with massive neuronal loss, as was believed in the mid-20th Century, scientific interest has addressed the influence of aging on particular neuronal subpopulations and their synaptic contacts, which constitute the substrate for neural plasticity. Inhibitory neurons represent the most complex and diverse group of neurons, showing distinct molecular and physiological characteristics and possessing a compelling ability to control the physiology of neural circuits. This review focuses on the aging of GABAergic neurons and synapses. Understanding how aging affects synapses of particular neuronal subpopulations may help explain the heterogeneity of aging-related effects. We reviewed the literature concerning the effects of aging on the numbers of GABAergic neurons and synapses as well as aging-related alterations in their presynaptic and postsynaptic components. Finally, we discussed the influence of those changes on the plasticity of the GABAergic system, highlighting our results concerning aging in mouse somatosensory cortex and linking them to plasticity impairments and brain disorders. We posit that aging-induced impairments of the GABAergic system lead to an inhibitory/excitatory imbalance, thereby decreasing neuron's ability to respond with plastic changes to environmental and cellular challenges, leaving the brain more vulnerable to cognitive decline and damage by synaptopathic diseases. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ergosteryl 2-naphthoate, An Ergosterol Derivative, Exhibits Antidepressant Effects Mediated by the Modification of GABAergic and Glutamatergic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhu Lin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytosterols are a kind of natural component including sitosterol, campesterol, avenasterol, ergosterol (Er and others. Their main natural sources are vegetable oils and their processed products, followed by grains, by-products of cereals and nuts, and small amounts of fruits, vegetables and mushrooms. In this study, three new Er monoester derivatives were obtained from the reflux reaction with Er: organic acids (furoic acid, salicylic acid and 2-naphthoic acid, 1-Ethylethyl-3-(3-dimethyllaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDCI and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP in dichloromethane. Their chemical structures were defined by IR and NMR. The present study was also undertaken to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of Er and its derivatives in male adult mice models of depression, and their probable involvement of GABAergic and glutamatergic systems by the forced swim test (FST. The results indicated that Er and its derivatives display antidepressant effects. Moreover, one derivative of Er, ergosteryl 2-naphthoate (ErN, exhibited stronger antidepressant activity in vivo compared to Er. Acute administration of ErN (5 mg/kg, i.p. and a combination of ErN (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p., and tianeptine (15 mg/kg, i.p. reduced the immobility time in the FST. Pretreatment with bicuculline (a competitive γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA antagonist, 4 mg/kg, i.p. and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA, an agonist at the glutamate site, 75 mg/kg, i.p. effectively reversed the antidepressant-like effect of ErN (5 mg/kg, i.p.. However, prazosin (a α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p. and haloperidol (a non-selective D2 receptor antagonist, 0.2 mg/kg, i.p. did not eliminate the reduced immobility time. Altogether, these results indicated that ErN produced antidepressant-like activity, which might be mediated by GABAergic and glutamatergic systems.

  2. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Deficits Reduce Glucose Metabolism and Function of Cholinergic and GABAergic Systems in the Cingulate Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da Un; Oh, Jin Hwan; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jihyeon; Cho, Zang Hee; Chang, Jin Woo; Chang, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Reduced brain glucose metabolism and basal forebrain cholinergic neuron degeneration are common features of Alzheimer's disease and have been correlated with memory function. Although regions representing glucose hypometabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease are targets of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, the interaction between cholinergic denervation and glucose hypometabolism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate glucose metabolism changes caused by cholinergic deficits. We lesioned basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in rats using 192 immunoglobulin G-saporin. After 3 weeks, lesioned animals underwent water maze testing or were analyzed by ¹⁸F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. During water maze probe testing, performance of the lesioned group decreased with respect to time spent in the target quadrant and platform zone. Cingulate cortex glucose metabolism in the lesioned group decreased, compared with the normal group. Additionally, acetylcholinesterase activity and glutamate decarboxylase 65/67 expression declined in the cingulate cortex. Our results reveal that spatial memory impairment in animals with selective basal forebrain cholinergic neuron damage is associated with a functional decline in the GABAergic and cholinergic system associated with cingulate cortex glucose hypometabolism.

  3. Anticonvulsant activity of Citrus aurantium blossom essential oil (neroli): involvment of the GABAergic system.

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    Azanchi, Taravat; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Asgarpanah, Jinous

    2014-11-01

    Citrus aurantium L. blossoms are an important medicinal plant part in Iran and some other countries. It is used in traditional medicine as an antiseizure and anticonvulsant natural agent. Early in vitro research of the anticonvulsant activity of the blossom extracts were done but there has been no investigation focused on the blossom essential oil and its anticonvulsant activity. The anticonvulsant activity of the essential oil of C. aurantium blossoms (neroli) was investigated. The anticonvulsant activity of neroli was assessed in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsion by i.v. and i.p. methods and maximal electroshock (MES) in mice, with diazepam as the standard drug. While mechanistic studies were conducted using flumazenil, a GABA A-benzodiazepine receptor complex site antagonist. Neroli produced protection against clonic by i.v adminiatration of PTZ at 20 and 40 mg/kg, compared with protection with benzodiazepine. The mean onset and percentage protection against convulsion in neroli-treated mice were reduced by flumazenil. Intraperitonaeal PTZ also decreased the latency of clonic seizure in the neroli (40 mg/kg) treated group. We also showed that neroli (20 and 40 mg/kg), exhibited inhibition of the tonic convulsion induced by MES and decreased the mortality rate. Neroli was analyzed by GC and GC-MS and twenty three constituents, representing 91.0 % of the chromatographical oil were identified. The major components of neroli were characterized as linalool (28.5%), linalyl acetate (19.6%), nerolidol (9.1%) E,E-farnesol (9.1%), α-terpineol (4.9%) and limonene (4.6%) which might be responsible for the anticonvulsant activity. The results suggest that neroli possesses biologically active constituent(s) that have anticonvulsant activity which supports the ethnomedicinal claims of the use of the plant in the management of seizure.

  4. GABAergic system in the endocrine pancreas: a new target for diabetes treatment

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    Wan Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yun Wan,1 Qinghua Wang,1–3 Gerald J Prud’homme4,5 1Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Huashan Hospital, Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science of St Michael’s Hospital, 3Departments of Physiology and Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, 4Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, 5Department of Laboratory Medicine, Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Excessive loss of functional pancreatic β-cell mass, mainly due to apoptosis, is a major factor in the development of hyperglycemia in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes (T1D and T2D. In T1D, β-cells are destroyed by immunological mechanisms. In T2D, while metabolic factors are known to contribute to β-cell failure and subsequent apoptosis, mounting evidence suggests that islet inflammation also plays an important role in the loss of β-cell mass. Therefore, it is of great importance for clinical intervention to develop new therapies. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA, a major neurotransmitter, is also produced by islet β-cells, where it functions as an important intraislet transmitter in regulating islet-cell secretion and function. Importantly, recent studies performed in rodents, including in vivo studies of xenotransplanted human islets, reveal that GABA exerts β-cell regenerative effects. Moreover, it protects β-cells against apoptosis induced by cytokines, drugs, and other stresses, and has anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory activities. It ameliorates the manifestations of diabetes in preclinical models, suggesting potential applications for the treatment of diabetic patients. This review outlines the actions of GABA relevant to β-cell regeneration, including its signaling mechanisms and potential interactions with other mediators. These studies increase our

  5. Neural Stem Cell or Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived GABA-ergic Progenitor Cell Grafting in an Animal Model of Chronic Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

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    Upadhya, Dinesh; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Geetha A; Zanirati, Gabriele; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2016-08-17

    Grafting of neural stem cells (NSCs) or GABA-ergic progenitor cells (GPCs) into the hippocampus could offer an alternative therapy to hippocampal resection in patients with drug-resistant chronic epilepsy, which afflicts >30% of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) cases. Multipotent, self-renewing NSCs could be expanded from multiple regions of the developing and adult brain, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). On the other hand, GPCs could be generated from the medial and lateral ganglionic eminences of the embryonic brain and from hESCs and hiPSCs. To provide comprehensive methodologies involved in testing the efficacy of transplantation of NSCs and GPCs in a rat model of chronic TLE, NSCs derived from the rat medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and MGE-like GPCs derived from hiPSCs are taken as examples in this unit. The topics comprise description of the required materials, reagents and equipment, methods for obtaining rat MGE-NSCs and hiPSC-derived MGE-like GPCs in culture, generation of chronically epileptic rats, intrahippocampal grafting procedure, post-grafting evaluation of the effects of grafts on spontaneous recurrent seizures and cognitive and mood impairments, analyses of the yield and the fate of graft-derived cells, and the effects of grafts on the host hippocampus. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Oxytocin-induced antinociception in the spinal cord is mediated by a subpopulation of glutamatergic neurons in lamina I-II which amplify GABAergic inhibition

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    Schlichter Rémy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that oxytocin (OT, secreted in the superficial spinal cord dorsal horn by descending axons of paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN neurons, produces antinociception and analgesia. The spinal mechanism of OT is, however, still unclear and requires further investigation. We have used patch clamp recording of lamina II neurons in spinal cord slices and immunocytochemistry in order to identify PVN-activated neurons in the superficial layers of the spinal cord and attempted to determine how this neuronal population may lead to OT-mediated antinociception. Results We show that OT released during PVN stimulation specifically activates a subpopulation of lamina II glutamatergic interneurons which are localized in the most superficial layers of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord (lamina I-II. This OT-specific stimulation of glutamatergic neurons allows the recruitment of all GABAergic interneurons in lamina II which produces a generalized elevation of local inhibition, a phenomenon which might explain the reduction of incoming Aδ and C primary afferent-mediated sensory messages. Conclusion Our results obtained in lamina II of the spinal cord provide the first clear evidence of a specific local neuronal network that is activated by OT release to induce antinociception. This OT-specific pathway might represent a novel and interesting therapeutic target for the management of neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

  7. Study of GABAergic extra-synaptic tonic inhibition in single neurons and neural populations by traversing neural scales: application to propofol-induced anaesthesia.

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    Hutt, Axel; Buhry, Laure

    2014-12-01

    Anaesthetic agents are known to affect extra-synaptic GABAergic receptors, which induce tonic inhibitory currents. Since these receptors are very sensitive to small concentrations of agents, they are supposed to play an important role in the underlying neural mechanism of general anaesthesia. Moreover anaesthetic agents modulate the encephalographic activity (EEG) of subjects and hence show an effect on neural populations. To understand better the tonic inhibition effect in single neurons on neural populations and hence how it affects the EEG, the work considers single neurons and neural populations in a steady-state and studies numerically and analytically the modulation of their firing rate and nonlinear gain with respect to different levels of tonic inhibition. We consider populations of both type-I (Leaky Integrate-and-Fire model) and type-II (Morris-Lecar model) neurons. To bridge the single neuron description to the population description analytically, a recently proposed statistical approach is employed which allows to derive new analytical expressions for the population firing rate for type-I neurons. In addition, the work shows the derivation of a novel transfer function for type-I neurons as considered in neural mass models and studies briefly the interaction of synaptic and extra-synaptic inhibition. We reveal a strong subtractive and divisive effect of tonic inhibition in type-I neurons, i.e. a shift of the firing rate to higher excitation levels accompanied by a change of the nonlinear gain. Tonic inhibition shortens the excitation window of type-II neurons and their populations while maintaining the nonlinear gain. The gained results are interpreted in the context of recent experimental findings under propofol-induced anaesthesia.

  8. GABAergic dysfunction in pediatric neuro-developmental disorders

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    Constance L Smith-Hicks

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The GABAergic system is central to the development and functional maturation of the nervous system. Emerging evidence support the role of GABAergic dysfunction in neuro-developmental disorders. This review presents the molecules and mechanisms that underlie GABA system dysfunction in several neuro-developmental disorders presenting in childhood. The impact on synaptic plasticity, neuronal circuit function and behavior, followed by targeted treatment strategies are discussed.

  9. Mice deficient in transmembrane prostatic acid phosphatase display increased GABAergic transmission and neurological alterations.

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    Heidi O Nousiainen

    Full Text Available Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, the first diagnostic marker and present therapeutic target for prostate cancer, modulates nociception at the dorsal root ganglia (DRG, but its function in the central nervous system has remained unknown. We studied expression and function of TMPAP (the transmembrane isoform of PAP in the brain by utilizing mice deficient in TMPAP (PAP-/- mice. Here we report that TMPAP is expressed in a subpopulation of cerebral GABAergic neurons, and mice deficient in TMPAP show multiple behavioral and neurochemical features linked to hyperdopaminergic dysregulation and altered GABAergic transmission. In addition to increased anxiety, disturbed prepulse inhibition, increased synthesis of striatal dopamine, and augmented response to amphetamine, PAP-deficient mice have enlarged lateral ventricles, reduced diazepam-induced loss of righting reflex, and increased GABAergic tone in the hippocampus. TMPAP in the mouse brain is localized presynaptically, and colocalized with SNARE-associated protein snapin, a protein involved in synaptic vesicle docking and fusion, and PAP-deficient mice display altered subcellular distribution of snapin. We have previously shown TMPAP to reside in prostatic exosomes and we propose that TMPAP is involved in the control of GABAergic tone in the brain also through exocytosis, and that PAP deficiency produces a distinct neurological phenotype.

  10. Role of the NR2A/2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in glutamate-induced glutamic acid decarboxylase alteration in cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro.

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    Monnerie, H; Hsu, F-C; Coulter, D A; Le Roux, P D

    2010-12-29

    The vulnerability of brain neuronal cell subpopulations to neurologic insults varies greatly. Among cells that survive a pathological insult, for example ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that may compromise brain function. The present study is a follow-up of our previous studies that investigated the effect of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67)'s expression in surviving DIV 11 cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro [Monnerie and Le Roux, (2007) Exp Neurol 205:367-382, (2008) Exp Neurol 213:145-153]. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated decrease in GAD expression was found following glutamate exposure. Here we examined which NMDAR subtype(s) mediated the glutamate-induced change in GAD protein levels. Western blotting techniques on cortical neuron cultures showed that glutamate's effect on GAD proteins was not altered by NR2B-containing diheteromeric (NR1/NR2B) receptor blockade. By contrast, blockade of triheteromeric (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) receptors fully protected against a decrease in GAD protein levels following glutamate exposure. When receptor location on the postsynaptic membrane was examined, extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was observed to be sufficient to decrease GAD protein levels similar to that observed after glutamate bath application. Blocking diheteromeric receptors prevented glutamate's effect on GAD proteins after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation. Finally, NR2B subunit examination with site-specific antibodies demonstrated a glutamate-induced, calpain-mediated alteration in NR2B expression. These results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic NMDAR stimulation in cultured GABAergic cortical neurons depends upon subunit composition and receptor location (synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) on the neuronal membrane. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered

  11. Localization of the brainstem GABAergic neurons controlling paradoxical (REM sleep.

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    Emilie Sapin

    Full Text Available Paradoxical sleep (PS is a state characterized by cortical activation, rapid eye movements and muscle atonia. Fifty years after its discovery, the neuronal network responsible for the genesis of PS has been only partially identified. We recently proposed that GABAergic neurons would have a pivotal role in that network. To localize these GABAergic neurons, we combined immunohistochemical detection of Fos with non-radioactive in situ hybridization of GAD67 mRNA (GABA synthesis enzyme in control rats, rats deprived of PS for 72 h and rats allowed to recover after such deprivation. Here we show that GABAergic neurons gating PS (PS-off neurons are principally located in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and the dorsal part of the deep mesencephalic reticular nucleus immediately ventral to it (dDpMe. Furthermore, iontophoretic application of muscimol for 20 min in this area in head-restrained rats induced a strong and significant increase in PS quantities compared to saline. In addition, we found a large number of GABAergic PS-on neurons in the vlPAG/dDPMe region and the medullary reticular nuclei known to generate muscle atonia during PS. Finally, we showed that PS-on neurons triggering PS localized in the SLD are not GABAergic. Altogether, our results indicate that multiple populations of PS-on GABAergic neurons are distributed in the brainstem while only one population of PS-off GABAergic neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDpMe region exist. From these results, we propose a revised model for PS control in which GABAergic PS-on and PS-off neurons localized in the vlPAG/dDPMe region play leading roles.

  12. A new role for GABAergic transmission in the control of male rat sexual behavior expression.

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    Rodríguez-Manzo, Gabriela; Canseco-Alba, Ana

    2017-03-01

    GABAergic transmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) exerts a tonic inhibitory influence on mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons' activity. Blockade of VTA GABA A receptors increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Increases in NAcc dopamine levels typically accompany sexual behavior display. Copulation to satiety is characterized by the instatement of a long lasting (72h) sexual behavior inhibition and the mesolimbic system appears to be involved in this phenomenon. GABAergic transmission in the VTA might play a role in the maintenance of this long lasting sexual inhibitory state. To test this hypothesis, in the present work we investigated the effect of GABA A receptor blockade in sexually exhausted males 24h after copulation to satiety, once the sexual inhibitory state is established, and compared it with its effect in sexually experienced rats. Results showed that low doses of systemically administered bicuculline induced sexual behavior expression in sexually exhausted rats, but lacked an effect on copulation of sexually experienced animals. Intra-VTA bilateral infusion of bicuculline did not modify sexual behavior of sexually experienced rats, but induced sexual behavior expression in all the sexually exhausted males. Hence, GABA plays a role in the control of sexual behavior expression at the VTA. The role played by GABAergic transmission in male sexual behavior expression of animals with distinct sexual behavior conditions is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Control of REM sleep by ventral medulla GABAergic neurons.

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    Weber, Franz; Chung, Shinjae; Beier, Kevin T; Xu, Min; Luo, Liqun; Dan, Yang

    2015-10-15

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a distinct brain state characterized by activated electroencephalogram and complete skeletal muscle paralysis, and is associated with vivid dreams. Transection studies by Jouvet first demonstrated that the brainstem is both necessary and sufficient for REM sleep generation, and the neural circuits in the pons have since been studied extensively. The medulla also contains neurons that are active during REM sleep, but whether they play a causal role in REM sleep generation remains unclear. Here we show that a GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric-acid-releasing) pathway originating from the ventral medulla powerfully promotes REM sleep in mice. Optogenetic activation of ventral medulla GABAergic neurons rapidly and reliably initiated REM sleep episodes and prolonged their durations, whereas inactivating these neurons had the opposite effects. Optrode recordings from channelrhodopsin-2-tagged ventral medulla GABAergic neurons showed that they were most active during REM sleep (REMmax), and during wakefulness they were preferentially active during eating and grooming. Furthermore, dual retrograde tracing showed that the rostral projections to the pons and midbrain and caudal projections to the spinal cord originate from separate ventral medulla neuron populations. Activating the rostral GABAergic projections was sufficient for both the induction and maintenance of REM sleep, which are probably mediated in part by inhibition of REM-suppressing GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey. These results identify a key component of the pontomedullary network controlling REM sleep. The capability to induce REM sleep on command may offer a powerful tool for investigating its functions.

  14. Alterations of prefrontal cortex GABAergic transmission in the complex psychotic-like phenotype induced by adolescent delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol exposure in rats.

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    Zamberletti, Erica; Beggiato, Sarah; Steardo, Luca; Prini, Pamela; Antonelli, Tiziana; Ferraro, Luca; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    Although several findings indicate an association between adolescent cannabis abuse and the risk to develop schizophrenia later in life, the evidence for a causal relationship is still inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated the emergence of psychotic-like behavior in adult female rats chronically exposed to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence. To this aim, female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with THC during adolescence (PND 35-45) and, in adulthood (PND 75), a series of behavioral tests and biochemical assays were performed in order to investigate the long-term effects of adolescent THC exposure. Adolescent THC pretreatment leads to long-term behavioral alterations, characterized by recognition memory deficits, social withdrawal, altered emotional reactivity and sensitization to the locomotor activating effects of acute PCP. Moreover, since cortical disinhibition seems to be a key feature of many different animal models of schizophrenia and GABAergic hypofunction in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been observed in postmortem brains from schizophrenic patients, we then investigated the long-lasting consequences of adolescent THC exposure on GABAergic transmission in the adult rat PFC. Biochemical analyses revealed that adolescent THC exposure results in reduced GAD67 and basal GABA levels within the adult PFC. GAD67 expression is reduced both in parvalbumin (PV)- and cholecystokinin (CCK)-containing interneurons; this alteration may be related to the altered emotional reactivity triggered by adolescent THC, as silencing PFC GAD67 expression through a siRNA-mediated approach is sufficient to impact rats' behavior in the forced swim test. Finally, the cellular underpinnings of the observed sensitized response to acute PCP in adult THC-treated rats could be ascribed to the increased cFos immunoreactivity and glutamate levels in the PFC and dorsal striatum. The present findings support the hypothesis that adolescent THC exposure may

  15. The neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ alters hippocampal excitatory synaptic transmission by modulation of the GABAergic system

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    YuYing eHuang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP induces Parkinson’s disease (PD-like symptoms following administration to mice, monkeys and humans. A common view is that MPTP is metabolized to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+ to induce its neurodegenerative effects on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Moreover, the hippocampus contains dopaminergic fibers, which are projecting from the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and pars compacta and contain the whole machinery required for dopamine synthesis making them sensitive to MPTP and MPP+. Here we present data showing that acute bath-application of MPP+ elicited a dose-dependent facilitation followed by a depression of synaptic transmission of hippocampal Schaffer collaterals-CA1 synapses in mice. The effects of MPP+ were not mediated by D1/D5- and D2-like receptor activation. Inhibition of the dopamine transporters (DAT did not prevent but increased the depression of excitatory postsynaptic field potentials. In the search for a possible mechanism, we observed that MPP+ reduced the appearance of polyspikes in population spikes recorded in str. pyramidale and increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents. The acute effect of MPP+ on synaptic transmission was attenuated by co-application of a GABAA receptor antagonist. Taking these data together, we suggest that MPP+ affects hippocampal synaptic transmission by enhancing some aspects of

  16. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of [{sup 18}F]FETO with respect to the adrenocortical and GABAergic system in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitterhauser, Markus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, AKH Wien, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Department of Pharmaceutic Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna (Austria); Hospital Pharmacy of the General Hospital of Vienna (Austria); Wadsak, Wolfgang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, AKH Wien, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Vienna (Austria); Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Wabnegger, Leila; Sieghart, Werner [Institute for Brain Research, University of Vienna (Austria); Viernstein, Helmut [Department of Pharmaceutic Technology and Biopharmaceutics, University of Vienna (Austria); Kletter, Kurt [Department of Nuclear Medicine, AKH Wien, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Dudczak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, AKH Wien, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria)

    2003-10-01

    11{beta}-Hydroxylase (CYP11B1, P450{sub 11{beta}}) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of cortisol and aldosterone and has been shown to be a good target for the in vivo imaging of adrenocortical incidentalomas in nuclear medicine. [{sup 11}C]Metomidate (MTO), a potent inhibitor of this enzyme, is used for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of adrenocortical pathology. The synthesis of (R)-1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-imidazole-5-carboxylic acid 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethylester (FETO), a close analogue to MTO and etomidate (ETO), has been presented recently, and the present investigation aimed to characterise the in vivo distribution of FETO. Since ETO is a well-known anaesthetic drug acting via the GABAergic system, the interaction of FETO with GABA{sub A} receptors was also evaluated. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 1.73-3.06 MBq of FETO into a tail vein after venodilatation in a 40 C water bath. Rats were sacrificed by exsanguination from the abdominal aorta under deep ether anaesthesia after 10 (n=6), 30 (n=6) or 60 min (n=6); organs were removed, weighed and counted. For binding experiments, rat cerebellar membranes were incubated for 90 min at 4 C in TC-50 buffer, 150 mM NaCl and 2 nM of [{sup 3}H]flunitrazepam in the absence or presence of 10 {mu}M diazepam or various concentrations of ETO, MTO and FETO. In vivo evaluation evinced very high uptake in the adrenal glands (7.52%{+-}1.19% ID/g at 30 min), followed by lung (1.18%{+-}0.19% ID/g, 10 min), liver (0.59%{+-}0.13% ID/g, 10 min) and duodenum (0.7%{+-}0.29% ID/g, 60 min). No defluorination nor fluoroethyl-ester cleavage was observed. When brain regions were compared with the thalamus (the reference region), highest relative uptake was seen in the cortex (2.34), followed by ''rest brain'' (2.13) and cerebellum (1.96). FETO and ETO were able to increase the binding of [{sup 3}H]flunitrazepam with similar potencies and to a comparable extent. It is concluded

  17. GABAergic projections to the oculomotor nucleus in the goldfish (Carassius auratus

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    M. Angeles eLuque

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian oculomotor nucleus receives a strong -aminobutyric acid (GABAergic synaptic input, whereas such projections have rarely been reported in fish. In order to determine whether this synaptic organization is preserved across vertebrates, we investigated the GABAergic projections to the oculomotor nucleus in the goldfish by combining retrograde transport of biotin dextran amine, injected into the antidromically identified oculomotor nucleus, and GABA immunohistochemistry. The main source of GABAergic afferents to the oculomotor nucleus was the ipsilateral anterior octaval nucleus, with only a few, if any, GABAergic neurons being located in the contralateral tangential and descending nuclei of the octaval column. In mammals there is a nearly exclusive ipsilateral projection from vestibular neurons to the oculomotor nucleus via GABAergic inhibitory inputs; thus, the vestibulooculomotor GABAergic circuitry follows a plan that appears to be shared throughout the vertebrate phylogeny. The second major source of GABAergic projections was the rhombencephalic reticular formation, primarily from the medial area but, to a lesser extent, from the inferior area. A few GABAergic oculomotor projecting neurons were also observed in the ipsilateral nucleus of the medial longitudinal fasciculus. The GABAergic projections from neurons located in both the reticular formation surrounding the abducens nucleus and the nucleus of the medial reticular formation have primarily been related to the control of saccadic eye movements. Finally, all retrogradely labeled internuclear neurons of the abducens nucleus, and neurons in the cerebellum (close to the caudal lobe, were negative for GABA. These data suggest that the vestibuloocular and saccadic inhibitory GABAergic systems appear early in vertebrate phylogeny to modulate the firing properties of the oculomotor nucleus motoneurons.

  18. Role of tonic GABAergic currents during pre- and early postnatal rodent development

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    Werner eKilb

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last three decades it became evident that the GABAergic system plays an essential role for the development of the central nervous system, by influencing the proliferation of neuronal precursors, neuronal migration and differentiation, as well as by controlling early activity patterns and thus formation of neuronal networks. GABA controls neuronal development via depolarizing membrane responses upon activation of ionotropic GABA receptors. However, many of these effects occur before the onset of synaptic GABAergic activity and thus require the presence of extrasynaptic tonic currents in neuronal precursors and immature neurons. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the role of tonic GABAergic currents during early brain development. In this review we compare the temporal sequence of the expression and functional relevance of different GABA receptor subunits, GABA synthesizing enzymes and GABA transporters. We also refer to other possible endogenous agonists of GABAA receptors. In addition, we describe functional consequences mediated by the GABAergic system during early developmental periods and discuss current models about the origin of extrasynaptic GABA and/or other endogenous GABAergic agonists during early developmental states. Finally, we present evidence that tonic GABAergic activity is also critically involved in the generation of physiological as well as pathophysiological activity patterns before and after the establishment of functional GABAergic synaptic connections.

  19. Molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent GABAergic synapse development and plasticity and its implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

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    Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha

    2011-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons are critical for the normal function and development of neural circuits, and their dysfunction is implicated in a large number of neurodevelopmental disorders. Experience and activity-dependent mechanisms play an important role in GABAergic circuit development, also recent studies involve a number of molecular players involved in the process. Emphasizing the molecular mechanisms of GABAergic synapse formation, in particular basket cell perisomatic synapses, this paper draws attention to the links between critical period plasticity, GABAergic synapse maturation, and the consequences of its dysfunction on the development of the nervous system.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Activity-Dependent GABAergic Synapse Development and Plasticity and Its Implications for Neurodevelopmental Disorders

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    Bidisha Chattopadhyaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic interneurons are critical for the normal function and development of neural circuits, and their dysfunction is implicated in a large number of neurodevelopmental disorders. Experience and activity-dependent mechanisms play an important role in GABAergic circuit development, also recent studies involve a number of molecular players involved in the process. Emphasizing the molecular mechanisms of GABAergic synapse formation, in particular basket cell perisomatic synapses, this paper draws attention to the links between critical period plasticity, GABAergic synapse maturation, and the consequences of its dysfunction on the development of the nervous system.

  1. Neurobiological consequences of juvenile stress: A GABAergic perspective on risk and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Anne; Müller, Iris; Ardi, Ziv; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Gruber, David; Ivens, Sebastian; Segal, Menahem; Behr, Joachim; Heinemann, Uwe; Stork, Oliver; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2017-03-01

    ALBRECHT, A., MÜLLER, I., ARDI, Z., ÇALIŞKAN, G., GRUBER, D., IVENS, S., SEGAL, M., BEHR, J., HEINEMANN, U., STORK, O., and RICHTER-LEVIN, G. Neurobiological consequences of juvenile stress: A GABAergic perspective on risk and resilience. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV XXX-XXX, 2016.- Childhood adversity is among the most potent risk factors for developing mood and anxiety disorders later in life. Therefore, understanding how stress during childhood shapes and rewires the brain may optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies for these disorders. To this end, animal models of stress exposure in rodents during their post-weaning and pre-pubertal life phase have been developed. Such 'juvenile stress' has a long-lasting impact on mood and anxiety-like behavior and on stress coping in adulthood, accompanied by alterations of the GABAergic system within core regions for the stress processing such as the amygdala, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. While many regionally diverse molecular and electrophysiological changes are observed, not all of them correlate with juvenile stress-induced behavioral disturbances. It rather seems that certain juvenile stress-induced alterations reflect the system's attempts to maintain homeostasis and thus promote stress resilience. Analysis tools such as individual behavioral profiling may allow the association of behavioral and neurobiological alterations more clearly and the dissection of alterations related to the pathology from those related to resilience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Key Metabolic Enzymes Underlying Astrocytic Upregulation of GABAergic Plasticity

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    Przemysław T. Kaczor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic plasticity is recognized as a key mechanism of shaping the activity of the neuronal networks. However, its description is challenging because of numerous neuron-specific mechanisms. In particular, while essential role of glial cells in the excitatory plasticity is well established, their involvement in GABAergic plasticity only starts to emerge. To address this problem, we used two models: neuronal cell culture (NC and astrocyte-neuronal co-culture (ANCC, where we chemically induced long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses (iLTP. iLTP could be induced both in NC and ANCC but in ANCC its extent was larger. Importantly, this functional iLTP manifestation was accompanied by an increase in gephyrin puncta size. Furthermore, blocking astrocyte Krebs cycle with fluoroacetate (FA in ANCC prevented enhancement of both mIPSC amplitude and gephyrin puncta size but this effect was not observed in NC, indicating a key role in neuron-astrocyte cross-talk. Blockade of monocarboxylate transport with α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (4CIN abolished iLTP both in NC and ANCC and in the latter model prevented also enlargement of gephyrin puncta. Similarly, blockade of glycogen phosphorylase with BAYU6751 prevented enlargement of gephyrin puncta upon iLTP induction. Finally, block of glutamine synthetase with methionine sulfoxide (MSO nearly abolished mIPSC increase in both NMDA stimulated cell groups but did not prevent enlargement of gephyrin puncta. In conclusion, we provide further evidence that GABAergic plasticity is strongly regulated by astrocytes and the underlying mechanisms involve key metabolic enzymes. Considering the strategic role of GABAergic interneurons, the plasticity described here indicates possible mechanism whereby metabolism regulates the network activity.

  3. GABAergic effect on resting-state functional connectivity: Dynamics under pharmacological antagonism.

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    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Singh, Kavita Kaur D/O Ranjit; Yeow, Ling Yun; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang

    2017-04-01

    Resting state functional connectivity MRI measures synchronous activity among brain regions although the mechanisms governing the temporally coherent BOLD signals remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) levels are correlated with functional connectivity. To understand whether changes in GABA transmission alter functional connectivity, we modulated the GABAergic activity by a GABA A receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Resting and evoked electrophysiology and BOLD signals were measured in isoflurane-anesthetized rats under infusion of low-dose bicuculline or vehicle individually. Both somatosensory BOLD activations and evoked potentials induced by forepaw stimulation were increased significantly under bicuculline compared to vehicle, indicating increased excitability. Gradually elevated resting BOLD correlation within and between the somatosensory and visual cortices, as well as between somatosensory and caudate putamen but not within subcortical areas were found with the infusion of bicuculline. Increased cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the cortical and subcortical areas where the receptor density is high, but it didn't correlate with BOLD connectivity except in the primary somatosensory cortex. Furthermore, resting EEG coherence in the alpha and beta bands exhibited consistent change with the BOLD correlation. The increased cortico-cortical and cortico-striatal connectivity without dependence on the receptor distribution indicate that the functional connectivity may be mediated by long-range projection via the cortical and striatal GABAergic inter-neurons. Our results indicate an important role of the GABAergic system on neural and hemodynamic oscillations, which further supports the neuronal basis of functional connectivity MRI and its correlation with neurotransmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sodium salicylate suppresses GABAergic inhibitory activity in neurons of rodent dorsal raphe nucleus.

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    Yan Jin

    Full Text Available Sodium salicylate (NaSal, a tinnitus inducing agent, can activate serotonergic (5-HTergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN and can increase serotonin (5-HT level in the inferior colliculus and the auditory cortex in rodents. To explore the underlying neural mechanisms, we first examined effects of NaSal on neuronal intrinsic properties and the inhibitory synaptic transmissions in DRN slices of rats by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that NaSal hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential, decreased the input resistance, and suppressed spontaneous and current-evoked firing in GABAergic neurons, but not in 5-HTergic neurons. In addition, NaSal reduced GABAergic spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in 5-HTergic neurons. We next examined whether the observed depression of GABAergic activity would cause an increase in the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons using optogenetic technique in DRN slices of the transgenic mouse with channelrhodopsin-2 expressed in GABAergic neurons. When the GABAergic inhibition was enhanced by optical stimulation to GABAergic neurons in mouse DRN, NaSal significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential, increased the input resistance and increased current-evoked firing of 5-HTergic neurons. However, NaSal would fail to increase the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons when the GABAergic synaptic transmission was blocked by picrotoxin, a GABA receptor antagonist. Our results indicate that NaSal suppresses the GABAergic activities to raise the excitability of local 5-HTergic neural circuits in the DRN, which may contribute to the elevated 5-HT level by NaSal in the brain.

  5. Sodium salicylate suppresses GABAergic inhibitory activity in neurons of rodent dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan; Luo, Bin; Su, Yan-Yan; Wang, Xin-Xing; Chen, Liang; Wang, Ming; Wang, Wei-Wen; Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Sodium salicylate (NaSal), a tinnitus inducing agent, can activate serotonergic (5-HTergic) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and can increase serotonin (5-HT) level in the inferior colliculus and the auditory cortex in rodents. To explore the underlying neural mechanisms, we first examined effects of NaSal on neuronal intrinsic properties and the inhibitory synaptic transmissions in DRN slices of rats by using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that NaSal hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential, decreased the input resistance, and suppressed spontaneous and current-evoked firing in GABAergic neurons, but not in 5-HTergic neurons. In addition, NaSal reduced GABAergic spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in 5-HTergic neurons. We next examined whether the observed depression of GABAergic activity would cause an increase in the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons using optogenetic technique in DRN slices of the transgenic mouse with channelrhodopsin-2 expressed in GABAergic neurons. When the GABAergic inhibition was enhanced by optical stimulation to GABAergic neurons in mouse DRN, NaSal significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential, increased the input resistance and increased current-evoked firing of 5-HTergic neurons. However, NaSal would fail to increase the excitability of 5-HTergic neurons when the GABAergic synaptic transmission was blocked by picrotoxin, a GABA receptor antagonist. Our results indicate that NaSal suppresses the GABAergic activities to raise the excitability of local 5-HTergic neural circuits in the DRN, which may contribute to the elevated 5-HT level by NaSal in the brain.

  6. Maturation of the GABAergic Transmission in Normal and Pathologic Motoneurons

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    Anne-Emilie Allain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA acting on Cl−-permeable ionotropic type A (GABAA receptors (GABAAR is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system of vertebrates. In immature brain structures, GABA exerts depolarizing effects mostly contributing to the expression of spontaneous activities that are instructive for the construction of neural networks but GABA also acts as a potent trophic factor. In the present paper, we concentrate on brainstem and spinal motoneurons that are largely targeted by GABAergic interneurons, and we bring together data on the switch from excitatory to inhibitory effects of GABA, on the maturation of the GABAergic system and GABAAR subunits. We finally discuss the role of GABA and its GABAAR in immature hypoglossal motoneurons of the spastic (SPA mouse, a model of human hyperekplexic syndrome.

  7. Acute morphine alters GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala during naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal: role of cyclic AMP

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    Michal eBajo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The central amygdala (CeA plays an important role in opioid addiction. Therefore, we examined the effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal (WD on GABAergic transmission in rat CeA neurons using whole-cell recordings with naloxone in the bath. The basal frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs increased in CeA neurons from WD compared to placebo rats. Acute morphine (10 M had mixed effects (> 20% change from baseline on mIPSCs in placebo and WD rats. In most CeA neurons (64% from placebo rats, morphine significantly decreased mIPSC frequency and amplitude. In 32% of placebo neurons, morphine significantly increased mIPSC amplitudes but had no effect on mIPSC frequency. In WD rats, acute morphine significantly increased mIPSC frequency but had no effect on mIPSC amplitude in 41% of CeA neurons. In 45% of cells, acute morphine significantly decreased mIPSC frequency and amplitude. Pre-treatment with the cyclic AMP inhibitor (R-adenosine, cyclic 3’,5’-(hydrogenphosphorothioate triethylammonium (RP, prevented acute morphine-induced potentiation of mIPSCs. Pre-treatment of slices with the Gi/o G-protein subunit inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX did not prevent the acute morphine-induced enhancement or inhibition of mIPSCs. PTX and RP decreased basal mIPSC frequencies and amplitudes only in WD rats. The results suggest that inhibition of GABAergic transmission in the CeA by acute morphine is mediated by PTX-insensitive mechanisms, although PTX-sensitive mechanisms cannot be ruled out for non-morphine responsive cells; by contrast, potentiation of GABAergic transmission is mediated by activated cAMP signaling that also mediates the increased basal GABAergic transmission in WD rats. Our data indicate that during the acute phase of WD, the CeA opioid and GABAergic systems undergo neuroadaptative changes conditioned by a previous chronic morphine exposure and dependence.

  8. Development of Cortical GABAergic Innervation

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    Alex M Thomson

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mature neocortex contains many different classes of GABAergic inhibitory interneurones, distributed, with some degree of selectivity, through six layers and through many different regions. Some of the events in the early lives of these neurones that may determine their ultimate destination, their maturation and their selective innervation of targets appropriate for each subtype, are discussed. Both time and place of birth influence the class of interneurone that an early post-mitotic interneuronal precursor will become, driven by the selective expression of different combinations of transcription factors in different regions of their birth-places in the ganglionic eminence and ventricular zone. The long distance migration of these precursors along tangential routes in marginal, subventricular and intermediate zones and their final radial movement, into the developing cortex, is regulated by chemical cues, both attractant and repellent. Once they arrive at their final destination, they must integrate into the developing circuitry. As they mature within the cortex, their axons grow and branch in highly specific patterns that may be partially determined by the genetic blueprint for each interneuronal class and partly by the environment in which they find themselves. Finally, as each interneurone class begins to form synapses with only certain postsynaptic targets, cell-cell recognition, most probably via protein-protein interactions across the synaptic cleft, facilitate the formation of appropriate synapses.

  9. Cryopreservation of GABAergic Neuronal Precursors for Cell-Based Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Cryopreservation protocols are essential for stem cells storage in order to apply them in the clinic. Here we describe a new standardized cryopreservation protocol for GABAergic neural precursors derived from the medial glanglionic eminence (MGE), a promising source of GABAergic neuronal progenitors for cell therapy against interneuron-related pathologies. We used 10% Me2SO as cryoprotectant and assessed the effects of cell culture amplification and cellular organization, as in toto explants, neurospheres, or individualized cells, on post-thaw cell viability and retrieval. We confirmed that in toto cryopreservation of MGE explants is an optimal preservation system to keep intact the interneuron precursor properties for cell transplantation, together with a high cell viability (>80%) and yield (>70%). Post-thaw proliferation and self-renewal of the cryopreserved precursors were tested in vitro. In addition, their migration capacity, acquisition of mature neuronal morphology, and potency to differentiate into multiple interneuron subtypes were also confirmed in vivo after transplantation. The results show that the cryopreserved precursor features remained intact and were similar to those immediately transplanted after their dissection from the MGE. We hope this protocol will facilitate the generation of biobanks to obtain a permanent and reliable source of GABAergic precursors for clinical application in cell-based therapies against interneuronopathies. PMID:28122047

  10. Cryopreservation of GABAergic Neuronal Precursors for Cell-Based Therapy.

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    Daniel Rodríguez-Martínez

    Full Text Available Cryopreservation protocols are essential for stem cells storage in order to apply them in the clinic. Here we describe a new standardized cryopreservation protocol for GABAergic neural precursors derived from the medial glanglionic eminence (MGE, a promising source of GABAergic neuronal progenitors for cell therapy against interneuron-related pathologies. We used 10% Me2SO as cryoprotectant and assessed the effects of cell culture amplification and cellular organization, as in toto explants, neurospheres, or individualized cells, on post-thaw cell viability and retrieval. We confirmed that in toto cryopreservation of MGE explants is an optimal preservation system to keep intact the interneuron precursor properties for cell transplantation, together with a high cell viability (>80% and yield (>70%. Post-thaw proliferation and self-renewal of the cryopreserved precursors were tested in vitro. In addition, their migration capacity, acquisition of mature neuronal morphology, and potency to differentiate into multiple interneuron subtypes were also confirmed in vivo after transplantation. The results show that the cryopreserved precursor features remained intact and were similar to those immediately transplanted after their dissection from the MGE. We hope this protocol will facilitate the generation of biobanks to obtain a permanent and reliable source of GABAergic precursors for clinical application in cell-based therapies against interneuronopathies.

  11. Not a single but multiple populations of GABAergic neurons control sleep.

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    Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Peyron, Christelle; Fort, Patrice

    2017-04-01

    The role of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) in sleep induction and maintenance is well accepted since most insomnia treatments target GABAa receptors. However, the population(s) of GABAergic neurons involved in the beneficial effect of GABA on sleep remains to be identified. This is not an easy task since GABAergic neurons are widely distributed in all brain structures. A recently growing number of populations of GABAergic neurons have been involved in sleep control. We first review here possible candidates for inducing non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep including the GABAergic neurons of the ventrolateral preoptic area, the parafacial zone in the brainstem, the nucleus accumbens and the cortex. We also discuss the role of several populations of GABAergic neurons in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep control. Indeed, it is well accepted that muscle atonia occurring during REM sleep is due to a GABA/glycinergic hyperpolarization of motoneurons. Recent evidence strongly suggests that these neurons are located in the ventral medullary reticular formation. It has also recently been shown that neurons containing the neuropeptide melanin concentrating hormone and GABA located in the lateral hypothalamic area control REM sleep expression. Finally, a population of REM-off GABAergic neurons located in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray has been shown to gate REM sleep by inhibiting glutamatergic neurons located in the sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus. In summary, recent data clearly indicate that multiple populations of GABAergic neurons located throughout the brain from the cortex to the medulla oblongata control NREM and REM sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. GABA regulates the multidirectional tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons in living neonatal mice.

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    Hiroyuki Inada

    Full Text Available Cortical GABAergic interneurons originate from ganglionic eminences and tangentially migrate into the cortical plate at early developmental stages. To elucidate the characteristics of this migration of GABAergic interneurons in living animals, we established an experimental design specialized for in vivo time-lapse imaging of the neocortex of neonate mice with two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. In vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT-Venus transgenic mice from birth (P0 through P3, we observed multidirectional tangential migration of genetically-defined GABAergic interneurons in the neocortical marginal zone. The properties of this migration, such as the motility rate (distance/hr, the direction moved, and the proportion of migrating neurons to stationary neurons, did not change through P0 to P3, although the density of GABAergic neurons at the marginal zone decreased with age. Thus, the characteristics of the tangential motility of individual GABAergic neurons remained constant in development. Pharmacological block of GABA(A receptors and of the Na⁺-K⁺-Cl⁻ cotransporters, and chelating intracellular Ca²⁺, all significantly reduced the motility rate in vivo. The motility rate and GABA content within the cortex of neonatal VGAT-Venus transgenic mice were significantly greater than those of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, suggesting that extracellular GABA concentration could facilitate the multidirectional tangential migration. Indeed, diazepam applied to GAD67-GFP mice increased the motility rate substantially. In an in vitro neocortical slice preparation, we confirmed that GABA induced a NKCC sensitive depolarization of GABAergic interneurons in VGAT-Venus mice at P0-P3. Thus, activation of GABA(AR by ambient GABA depolarizes GABAergic interneurons, leading to an acceleration of their multidirectional motility in vivo.

  13. Pathogenesis of peroxisomal deficiency disorders (Zellweger syndrome may be mediated by misregulation of the GABAergic system via the diazepam binding inhibitor

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    Breitling Rainer

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zellweger syndrome (ZS is a fatal inherited disease caused by peroxisome biogenesis deficiency. Patients are characterized by multiple disturbances of lipid metabolism, profound hypotonia and neonatal seizures, and distinct craniofacial malformations. Median live expectancy of ZS patients is less than one year. While the molecular basis of peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism is known in considerable detail, it is unclear how peroxisome deficiency leads to the most severe neurological symptoms. Recent analysis of ZS mouse models has all but invalidated previous hypotheses. Hypothesis We suggest that a regulatory rather than a metabolic defect is responsible for the drastic impairment of brain function in ZS patients. Testing the hypothesis Using microarray analysis we identify diazepam binding inhibitor/acyl-CoA binding protein (DBI as a candidate protein that might be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of ZS. DBI has a dual role as a neuropeptide antagonist of GABA(A receptor signaling in the brain and as a regulator of lipid metabolism. Repression of DBI in ZS patients could result in an overactivation of GABAergic signaling, thus eventually leading to the characteristic hypotonia and seizures. The most important argument for a misregulation of GABA(A in ZS is, however, provided by the striking similarity between ZS and "benzodiazepine embryofetopathy", a malformation syndrome observed after the abuse of GABA(A agonists during pregnancy. Implications of the hypothesis We present a tentative mechanistic model of the effect of DBI misregulation on neuronal function that could explain some of the aspects of the pathology of Zellweger syndrome.

  14. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

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    Bogdan Aurel Sava

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-GFP transgenic mice (postnatal days 2-4. In 46 % of the pyramidal neurons bath-application of taurine at concentrations ≥ 300 mM significantly enhanced the frequency of postsynaptic currents (PSCs by 744.3 ± 93.8 % (n = 120 cells. This taurine-induced increase of PSC frequency was abolished by 0.2 mM tetrodotoxine, 1 mM strychnine or 3 mM gabazine, but was unaffected by the glutamatergic antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX and (± R(--3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, suggesting that taurine specifically activates GABAergic network activity projecting to pyramidal neurons. Cell-attached recordings revealed that taurine enhanced the frequency of action potentials in pyramidal neurons, indicating an excitatory action of the GABAergic PSCs. In order to identify the presynaptic targets of taurine we demonstrate that bath application of taurine induced in GAD67-GFP labeled interneurons an inward current that is mainly mediated by glycine receptors and can generate action potentials in these cells. We conclude from these results that taurine can enhance network excitability in the immature neocortex by selectively activating GABAergic interneurons via interactions with glycine receptors.

  15. Reduced GABAergic inhibition explains cortical hyperexcitability in the wobbler mouse model of ALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis; Moser, Jakob; Lauritzen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    underlie this dysfunction. Here, we studied the GABAergic system in cortex using patch-clamp recordings in the wobbler mouse, a model of ALS. In layer 5 pyramidal neurons of motor cortex, the frequency of GABA(A) receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents was reduced by 72% in wobbler......Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive degenerative disease of the central nervous system. Symptomatic and presymptomatic ALS patients demonstrate cortical hyperexcitability, which raises the possibility that alterations in inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system could...... interneurons and reduced vesicular GABA transporter immunoreactivity in the neuropil. Finally, we observed an increased input resistance and excitability of wobbler excitatory neurons, which could be explained by lack of GABA(A) receptor-mediated influences. In conclusion, we demonstrate decreases in GABAergic...

  16. Kölliker-Fuse GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons project to distinct targets.

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    Geerling, Joel C; Yokota, Shigefumi; Rukhadze, Irma; Roe, Dan; Chamberlin, Nancy L

    2017-06-01

    The Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) is known primarily for its respiratory function as the "pneumotaxic center" or "pontine respiratory group." Considered part of the parabrachial (PB) complex, KF contains glutamatergic neurons that project to respiratory-related targets in the medulla and spinal cord (Yokota, Oka, Tsumori, Nakamura, & Yasui, 2007). Here we describe an unexpected population of neurons in the caudal KF and adjacent lateral crescent subnucleus (PBlc), which are γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and have an entirely different pattern of projections than glutamatergic KF neurons. First, immunofluorescence, in situ hybridization, and Cre-reporter labeling revealed that many of these GABAergic neurons express FoxP2 in both rats and mice. Next, using Cre-dependent axonal tracing in Vgat-IRES-Cre and Vglut2-IRES-Cre mice, we identified different projection patterns from GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in this region. GABAergic neurons in KF and PBlc project heavily and almost exclusively to trigeminal sensory nuclei, with minimal projections to cardiorespiratory nuclei in the brainstem, and none to the spinal cord. In contrast, glutamatergic KF neurons project heavily to the autonomic, respiratory, and motor regions of the medulla and spinal cord previously identified as efferent targets mediating KF cardiorespiratory effects. These findings identify a novel, GABAergic subpopulation of KF/PB neurons with a distinct efferent projection pattern targeting the brainstem trigeminal sensory system. Rather than regulating breathing, we propose that these neurons influence vibrissal sensorimotor function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Functional hallmarks of GABAergic synapse maturation and the diverse roles of neurotrophins

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    Rosemarie eGrantyn

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional impairment of the adult brain can result from deficits in the ontogeny of GABAergic synaptic transmission. Gene defects underlying autism spectrum disorders, Rett’s syndrome or some forms of epilepsy, but also a diverse set of syndromes accompanying perinatal trauma, hormonal imbalances, intake of sleep-inducing or mood-improving drugs or, quite common, alcohol intake during pregnancy can alter GABA signaling early in life. The search for therapeutically relevant endogenous molecules or exogenous compounds able to alleviate the consequences of dysfunction of GABAergic transmission in the embryonic or postnatal brain requires a clear understanding of its site- and state-dependent development. At the level of single synapses, it is necessary to discriminate between presynaptic and postsynaptic alterations, and to define parameters that can be regarded as both suitable and accessible for the quantification of developmental changes. Here we focus on the performance of GABAergic synapses in two brain structures, the hippocampus and the superior colliculus, describe some novel aspects of neurotrophin effects during the development of GABAergic synaptic transmission and examine the applicability of the following rules: 1 Synaptic transmission starts with GABA, 2 Nascent/immature GABAergic synapses operate in a ballistic mode (multivesicular release, 3 Immature synaptic terminals release vesicles with higher probability than mature synapses, 4 Immature GABAergic synapses are prone to paired pulse and tetanic depression, 5 Synapse maturation is characterized by an increasing dominance of synchronous over asynchronous release, 6 In immature neurons GABA acts as a depolarizing transmitter, 7 Synapse maturation implies IPSC shortening due to an increase in alpha1 subunit expression, 8 Extrasynaptic (tonic conductances can inhibit the development of synaptic (phasic GABA actions.

  18. Functional diversity of supragranular GABAergic neurons in the barrel cortex

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    Luc J Gentet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the neocortex forms a distributed system comprised of several functional areas, its vertical columnar organization is largely conserved across areas and species, suggesting the existence of a canonical neocortical microcircuit. In order to elucidate the principles governing the organization of such a cortical diagram, a detailed understanding of the dynamics binding different types of cortical neurons into a coherent algorithm is essential. Within this complex circuitry, GABAergic interneurons, while forming approximately only 15-20% of all cortical neurons, appear critical in maintaining a dynamic balance between excitation and inhibition. Despite their importance, cortical GABAergic neurons have not been extensively studied in vivo and their precise role in shaping the local microcircuit sensory response still remains to be determined. Their paucity, combined with their molecular, anatomical and physiological diversity, has made it difficult to even establish a consensual nomenclature.However, recent technological advances in microscopy and mouse genetics have fostered a renewed interest in neocortical interneurons by putting them within visible reach of experimenters. The anatomically well-defined whisker-to-barrel pathway of the rodent is particularly amenable to studies attempting to link cortical circuit dynamics to behavior. To each whisker corresponds a discrete cortical unit equivalent to a single column, specialized in the encoding and processing of the sensory information it receives. In this review, we will focus on the functional role that each subtype of supragranular GABAergic neuron embedded within such a single neocortical unit may play in shaping the dynamics of the local circuit during somatosensory integration.

  19. Modulation of the GABAergic pathway for the treatment of fragile X syndrome.

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    Lozano, Reymundo; Hare, Emma B; Hagerman, Randi J

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and the most common single-gene cause of autism. It is caused by mutations on the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR1) and lack of fragile X mental retardation protein, which in turn, leads to decreased inhibition of translation of many synaptic proteins. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) hypothesis states that the neurological deficits in individuals with FXS are due mainly to downstream consequences of overstimulation of the mGluR pathway. The main efforts have focused on mGluR5 targeted treatments; however, investigation on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system and its potential as a targeted treatment is less emphasized. The fragile X mouse models (Fmr1-knock out) show decreased GABA subunit receptors, decreased synthesis of GABA, increased catabolism of GABA, and overall decreased GABAergic input in many regions of the brain. Consequences of the reduced GABAergic input in FXS include oversensitivity to sensory stimuli, seizures, and anxiety. Deficits in the GABA receptors in different regions of the brain are associated with behavioral and attentional processing deficits linked to anxiety and autistic behaviors. The understanding of the neurobiology of FXS has led to the development of targeted treatments for the core behavioral features of FXS, which include social deficits, inattention, and anxiety. These symptoms are also observed in individuals with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, therefore the targeted treatments for FXS are leading the way in the treatment of other neurodevelopmental syndromes and autism. The GABAergic system in FXS represents a target for new treatments. Herein, we discuss the animal and human trials of GABAergic treatment in FXS. Arbaclofen and ganaxolone have been used in individuals with FXS. Other potential GABAergic treatments, such as riluzole, gaboxadol, tiagabine, and vigabatrin, will be also discussed. Further

  20. Pharmacological treatment of fragile X syndrome with GABAergic drugs in a knockout mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heulens, Inge; D'Hulst, Charlotte; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter P.; Kooy, R. Frank

    2012-01-01

    Molecular and electrophysiological studies have provided evidence for a general downregulation of the GABAergic system in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. GABA(A) receptors are the main inhibitory receptors in the brain and the GABA(A) receptor was proposed as a novel target for treatment of the fragile X

  1. Glutamate alteration of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in GABAergic neurons: the role of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnerie, Hubert; Le Roux, Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Brain cell vulnerability to neurologic insults varies greatly, depending on their neuronal subpopulation. Among cells that survive a pathological insult such as ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that could compromise brain function. We previously reported that surviving cortical GABAergic neurons exposed to glutamate in vitro displayed an NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated alteration in the levels of the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) [Monnerie, H., Le Roux, P., 2007. Reduced dendrite growth and altered glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65- and 67-kDa isoform protein expression from mouse cortical GABAergic neurons following excitotoxic injury in vitro. Exp. Neurol. 205, 367-382]. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which glutamate excitotoxicity caused a change in cortical GABAergic neurons' GAD protein levels. Removing extracellular calcium prevented the NMDAR-mediated decrease in GAD protein levels, measured using Western blot techniques, whereas inhibiting calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels had no effect. Glutamate's effect on GAD protein isoforms was significantly attenuated by preincubation with the cysteine protease inhibitor N-Acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN). Using class-specific protease inhibitors, we observed that ALLN's effect resulted from the blockade of calpain and cathepsin protease activities. Cell-free proteolysis assay confirmed that both proteases were involved in glutamate-induced alteration in GAD protein levels. Together these results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic stimulation of NMDAR in cultured cortical neurons leads to altered GAD protein levels from GABAergic neurons through intracellular calcium increase and protease activation including calpain and cathepsin. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered balance between excitation

  2. Cortical GABAergic neurons are more severely impaired by alkalosis than acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuyan; Sun, Piyun; Sun, Zhongren; Zhang, Jingyu; Zhou, Jinlong; Gu, Yingli

    2013-12-05

    Acid-base imbalance in various metabolic disturbances leads to human brain dysfunction. Compared with acidosis, the patients suffered from alkalosis demonstrate more severe neurological signs that are difficultly corrected. We hypothesize a causative process that the nerve cells in the brain are more vulnerable to alkalosis than acidosis. The vulnerability of GABAergic neurons to alkalosis versus acidosis was compared by analyzing their functional changes in response to the extracellular high pH and low pH. The neuronal and synaptic functions were recorded by whole-cell recordings in the cortical slices. The elevation or attenuation of extracellular pH impaired these GABAergic neurons in terms of their capability to produce spikes, their responsiveness to excitatory synaptic inputs and their outputs via inhibitory synapses. Importantly, the dysfunction of these active properties appeared severer in alkalosis than acidosis. The severer impairment of cortical GABAergic neurons in alkalosis patients leads to more critical neural excitotoxicity, so that alkalosis-induced brain dysfunction is difficultly corrected, compared to acidosis. The vulnerability of cortical GABAergic neurons to high pH is likely a basis of severe clinical outcomes in alkalosis versus acidosis.

  3. Ascl1 as a novel player in the Ptf1a transcriptional network for GABAergic cell specification in the retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Mazurier

    Full Text Available In contrast with the wealth of data involving bHLH and homeodomain transcription factors in retinal cell type determination, the molecular bases underlying neurotransmitter subtype specification is far less understood. Using both gain and loss of function analyses in Xenopus, we investigated the putative implication of the bHLH factor Ascl1 in this process. We found that in addition to its previously characterized proneural function, Ascl1 also contributes to the specification of the GABAergic phenotype. We showed that it is necessary for retinal GABAergic cell genesis and sufficient in overexpression experiments to bias a subset of retinal precursor cells towards a GABAergic fate. We also analysed the relationships between Ascl1 and a set of other bHLH factors using an in vivo ectopic neurogenic assay. We demonstrated that Ascl1 has unique features as a GABAergic inducer and is epistatic over factors endowed with glutamatergic potentialities such as Neurog2, NeuroD1 or Atoh7. This functional specificity is conferred by the basic DNA binding domain of Ascl1 and involves a specific genetic network, distinct from that underlying its previously demonstrated effects on catecholaminergic differentiation. Our data show that GABAergic inducing activity of Ascl1 requires the direct transcriptional regulation of Ptf1a, providing therefore a new piece of the network governing neurotransmitter subtype specification during retinogenesis.

  4. Presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic synaptic transmission by adenosine in mouse hypothalamic hypocretin neurons.

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    Xia, J X; Xiong, J X; Wang, H K; Duan, S M; Ye, J N; Hu, Z A

    2012-01-10

    Hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, a new wakefulness-promoting center, have been recently regarded as an important target involved in endogenous adenosine-regulating sleep homeostasis. The GABAergic synaptic transmissions are the main inhibitory afferents to hypocretin neurons, which play an important role in the regulation of excitability of these neurons. The inhibitory effect of adenosine, a homeostatic sleep-promoting factor, on the excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmissions in hypocretin neurons has been well documented, whether adenosine also modulates these inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmissions in these neurons has not been investigated. In this study, the effect of adenosine on inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in hypocretin neurons was examined by using perforated patch-clamp recordings in the acute hypothalamic slices. The findings demonstrated that adenosine suppressed the amplitude of evoked IPSCs in a dose-dependent manner, which was completely abolished by 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT), a selective antagonist of adenosine A1 receptor but not adenosine A2 receptor antagonist 3,7-dimethyl-1-(2-propynyl) xanthine. A presynaptic origin was suggested as following: adenosine increased paired-pulse ratio as well as reduced GABAergic miniature IPSC frequency without affecting the miniature IPSC amplitude. Further findings demonstrated that when the frequency of electrical stimulation was raised to 10 Hz, but not 1 Hz, a time-dependent depression of evoked IPSC amplitude was detected in hypocretin neurons, which could be partially blocked by CPT. However, under a higher frequency at 100 Hz stimulation, CPT had no action on the depressed GABAergic synaptic transmission induced by such tetanic stimulation in these hypocretin neurons. These results suggest that endogenous adenosine generated under certain stronger activities of synaptic transmissions exerts an inhibitory effect on GABAergic synaptic transmission in hypocretin

  5. Prefrontal cortical GABAergic dysfunction contributes to age-related working memory impairment.

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    Bañuelos, Cristina; Beas, B Sofia; McQuail, Joseph A; Gilbert, Ryan J; Frazier, Charles J; Setlow, Barry; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2014-03-05

    Working memory functions supported by the prefrontal cortex decline in normal aging. Disruption of corticolimbic GABAergic inhibitory circuits can impair working memory in young subjects; however, relatively little is known regarding how aging impacts prefrontal cortical GABAergic signaling and whether such changes contribute to cognitive deficits. The current study used a rat model to evaluate the effects of aging on expression of prefrontal GABAergic synaptic proteins in relation to working memory decline, and to test whether pharmacological manipulations of prefrontal GABAergic signaling can improve working memory abilities in aged subjects. Results indicate that in aged medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), expression of the vesicular GABA transporter VGAT was unchanged; however, there was a significant increase in expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67, and a significant decrease in the primary neuronal GABA transporter GAT-1 and in both subunits of the GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R). Expression of VGAT, GAD67, and GAT-1 was not associated with working memory ability. In contrast, among aged rats, GABA(B)R expression was significantly and negatively associated with working memory performance, such that lower GABA(B)R expression predicted better working memory. Subsequent experiments showed that systemic administration of a GABA(B)R antagonist, CGP55845, dose-dependently enhanced working memory in aged rats. This enhancing effect of systemic CGP55845 was reproduced by direct intra-mPFC administration. Together, these data suggest that age-related dysregulation of GABAergic signaling in prefrontal cortex may play a causal role in impaired working memory and that targeting GABA(B)Rs may provide therapeutic benefit for age-related impairments in executive functions.

  6. Organization of GABAergic synaptic circuits in the rat ventral tegmental area.

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    Alessandro Ciccarelli

    Full Text Available The ventral tegmental area (VTA is widely implicated in drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders. This brain region is densely populated by dopaminergic (DA neurons and also contains a sparse population of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic cells that regulate the activity of the principal neurons. Therefore, an in-depth knowledge of the organization of VTA GABAergic circuits and of the plasticity induced by drug consumption is essential for understanding the mechanisms by which drugs induce stable changes in brain reward circuits. Using immunohistochemistry, we provide a detailed description of the localization of major GABA(A and GABA(B receptor subunits in the rat VTA. We show that DA and GABAergic cells express both GABA(A and GABA(B receptors. However VTA neurons differ considerably in the expression of GABA(A receptor subunits, as the α1 subunit is associated predominantly with non-DA cells, whereas the α3 subunit is present at low levels in both types of VTA neurons. Using an unbiased stereological method, we then demonstrate that α1-positive elements represent only a fraction of non-DA neurons and that the ratio of DA and non-DA cells is quite variable throughout the rostro-caudal extent of the VTA. Interestingly, DA and non-DA cells receive a similar density of perisomatic synapses, whereas axo-dendritic synapses are significantly more abundant in non-DA cells, indicating that local interneurons receive prominent GABAergic inhibition. These findings reveal a differential expression of GABA receptor subtypes in the two major categories of VTA neurons and provide an anatomical basis for interpreting the plasticity of inhibitory circuits induced by drug exposure.

  7. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

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    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  8. Subtypes of GABAergic neurons project axons in the neocortex

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    Shigeyoshi Higo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons in the neocortex have been regarded as interneurons and speculated to modulate the activity of neurons locally. Recently, however, several experiments revealed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons project cortico-cortically with long axons. In this study, we illustrate Golgi-like images of the nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons using a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d reaction and follow the emanating axon branches in cat brain sections. These axon branches projected cortico-cortically with other non-labeled arcuate fibers, contra-laterally via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure. The labeled fibers were not limited to the neocortex but found also in the fimbria of the hippocampus. In order to have additional information on these GABAergic neuron projections, we investigated green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled GABAergic neurons in GAD67-Cre knock-in / GFP Cre-reporter mice. GFP-labeled axons emanate densely, especially in the fimbria, a small number in the anterior commissure, and very sparsely in the corpus callosum. These two different approaches confirm that not only nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons but also other subtypes of GABAergic neurons project long axons in the cerebral cortex and are in a position to be involved in information processing.

  9. Antipsychotics promote GABAergic interneuron genesis in the adult rat brain: Role of heat-shock protein production.

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    Kaneta, Hiroo; Ukai, Wataru; Tsujino, Hanako; Furuse, Kengo; Kigawa, Yoshiyasu; Tayama, Masaya; Ishii, Takao; Hashimoto, Eri; Kawanishi, Chiaki

    2017-09-01

    Current antipsychotics reduce positive symptoms and reverse negative symptoms in conjunction with cognitive behavioral issues with the goal of restoring impaired occupational and social functioning. However, limited information is available on their influence on gliogenesis or their neurogenic properties in adult schizophrenia brains, particularly on GABAergic interneuron production. In the present study, we used young adult subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived progenitor cells expressing proteoglycan NG2 cultures to examine the oligodendrocyte and GABAergic interneuron genesis effects of several kinds of antipsychotics on changes in differentiation function induced by exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. We herein demonstrated that antipsychotics promoted or restored changes in the oligodendrocyte/GABAergic interneuron differentiation functions of NG2(+) cells induced by the exposure to MK-801, which was considered to be one of the drug-induced schizophrenia model. We also demonstrated that antipsychotics restored heat-shock protein (HSP) production in NG2(+) cells with differentiation impairment. The antipsychotics olanzapine, aripiprazole, and blonanserin, but not haloperidol increased HSP90 levels, which were reduced by the exposure to MK-801. Our results showed that antipsychotics, particularly those recently synthesized, exerted similar GABAergic interneuron genesis effects on NG2(+) neuronal/glial progenitor cells in the adult rat brain by increasing cellular HSP production, and also suggest that HSP90 may play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and is a key target for next drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adenosine A₂A receptors in striatal glutamatergic terminals and GABAergic neurons oppositely modulate psychostimulant action and DARPP-32 phosphorylation.

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    Hai-Ying Shen

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are located postsynaptically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons, antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor functions, and are also located presynaptically at corticostriatal terminals, facilitating glutamate release. To address the hypothesis that these two A2AR populations differently control the action of psychostimulants, we characterized A2AR modulation of cocaine-induced effects at the level of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75, c-Fos expression, and psychomotor activity using two lines of cell-type selective A2AR knockout (KO mice with selective A2AR deletion in GABAergic neurons (striatum-A2AR-KO mice, or with A2AR deletion in both striatal GABAergic neurons and projecting cortical glutamatergic neurons (forebrain-A2AR-KO mice. We demonstrated that striatum-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs exclusively in striatal GABAergic terminals whereas forebrain-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs in both striatal GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals leading to a blunted A2AR-mediated facilitation of synaptosomal glutamate release. The inactivation of A2ARs in GABAergic neurons reduced striatal DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and increased its phosphorylation at Thr-75. Conversely, the additional deletion of corticostriatal glutamatergic A2ARs produced opposite effects on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75. This distinct modulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation was associated with opposite responses to cocaine-induced striatal c-Fos expression and psychomotor activity in striatum-A2AR KO (enhanced and forebrain-A2AR KO mice (reduced. Thus, A2ARs in glutamatergic corticostriatal terminals and in GABAergic striatal neurons modulate the action of psychostimulants and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in opposite ways. We conclude that A2ARs in glutamatergic terminals prominently control the action of psychostimulants and define a novel mechanism by which A2ARs fine-tune striatal activity by integrating GABAergic, dopaminergic and

  11. Hilar GABAergic interneuron activity controls spatial learning and memory retrieval.

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    Yaisa Andrews-Zwilling

    Full Text Available Although extensive research has demonstrated the importance of excitatory granule neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in normal learning and memory and in the pathogenesis of amnesia in Alzheimer's disease (AD, the role of hilar GABAergic inhibitory interneurons, which control the granule neuron activity, remains unclear.We explored the function of hilar GABAergic interneurons in spatial learning and memory by inhibiting their activity through Cre-dependent viral expression of enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0--a light-driven chloride pump. Hilar GABAergic interneuron-specific expression of eNpHR3.0 was achieved by bilaterally injecting adeno-associated virus containing a double-floxed inverted open-reading frame encoding eNpHR3.0 into the hilus of the dentate gyrus of mice expressing Cre recombinase under the control of an enhancer specific for GABAergic interneurons. In vitro and in vivo illumination with a yellow laser elicited inhibition of hilar GABAergic interneurons and consequent activation of dentate granule neurons, without affecting pyramidal neurons in the CA3 and CA1 regions of the hippocampus. We found that optogenetic inhibition of hilar GABAergic interneuron activity impaired spatial learning and memory retrieval, without affecting memory retention, as determined in the Morris water maze test. Importantly, optogenetic inhibition of hilar GABAergic interneuron activity did not alter short-term working memory, motor coordination, or exploratory activity.Our findings establish a critical role for hilar GABAergic interneuron activity in controlling spatial learning and memory retrieval and provide evidence for the potential contribution of GABAergic interneuron impairment to the pathogenesis of amnesia in AD.

  12. Development of GPCR modulation of GABAergic transmission in chicken nucleus laminaris neurons.

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    Zheng-Quan Tang

    Full Text Available Neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL of birds act as coincidence detectors and encode interaural time difference to localize the sound source in the azimuth plane. GABAergic transmission in a number of CNS nuclei including the NL is subject to a dual modulation by presynaptic GABA(B receptors (GABA(BRs and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs. Here, using in vitro whole-cell patch clamp recordings from acute brain slices of the chick, we characterized the following important but unknown properties pertaining to such a dual modulation: (1 emergence of functional GABA synapses in NL neurons; (2 the temporal onset of neuromodulation mediated by GABA(BRs and mGluRs; and (3 the physiological conditions under which GABA(BRs and mGluRs are activated by endogenous transmitters. We found that (1 GABA(AR-mediated synaptic responses were observed in about half of the neurons at embryonic day 11 (E11; (2 GABA(BR-mediated modulation of the GABAergic transmission was detectable at E11, whereas the modulation by mGluRs did not emerge until E15; and (3 endogenous activity of GABA(BRs was induced by both low- (5 or 10 Hz and high-frequency (200 Hz stimulation of the GABAergic pathway, whereas endogenous activity of mGluRs was induced by high- (200 Hz but not low-frequency (5 or 10 Hz stimulation of the glutamatergic pathway. Furthermore, the endogenous activity of mGluRs was mediated by group II but not group III members. Therefore, autoreceptor-mediated modulation of GABAergic transmission emerges at the same time when the GABA synapses become functional. Heteroreceptor-mediated modulation appears at a later time and is receptor type dependent in vitro.

  13. Modulation of the GABAergic pathway for the treatment of fragile X syndrome

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    Lozano R

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Reymundo Lozano,1,2 Emma B Hare,1,2 Randi J Hagerman1,2 1MIND Institute, 2Department of Pediatrics, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and the most common single-gene cause of autism. It is caused by mutations on the fragile X mental retardation gene (FMR1 and lack of fragile X mental retardation protein, which in turn, leads to decreased inhibition of translation of many synaptic proteins. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR hypothesis states that the neurological deficits in individuals with FXS are due mainly to downstream consequences of overstimulation of the mGluR pathway. The main efforts have focused on mGluR5 targeted treatments; however, investigation on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA system and its potential as a targeted treatment is less emphasized. The fragile X mouse models (Fmr1-knock out show decreased GABA subunit receptors, decreased synthesis of GABA, increased catabolism of GABA, and overall decreased GABAergic input in many regions of the brain. Consequences of the reduced GABAergic input in FXS include oversensitivity to sensory stimuli, seizures, and anxiety. Deficits in the GABA receptors in different regions of the brain are associated with behavioral and attentional processing deficits linked to anxiety and autistic behaviors. The understanding of the neurobiology of FXS has led to the development of targeted treatments for the core behavioral features of FXS, which include social deficits, inattention, and anxiety. These symptoms are also observed in individuals with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders, therefore the targeted treatments for FXS are leading the way in the treatment of other neurodevelopmental syndromes and autism. The GABAergic system in FXS represents a target for new treatments. Herein, we discuss the animal and human trials of GABAergic treatment in FXS. Arbaclofen and

  14. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean,

  15. Synapsin function in GABA-ergic interneurons is required for short-term olfactory habituation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanandappa, Madhumala K; Blanco Redondo, Beatriz; Michels, Birgit; Rodrigues, Veronica; Gerber, Bertram; VijayRaghavan, K; Buchner, Erich; Ramaswami, Mani

    2013-10-16

    In Drosophila, short-term (STH) and long-term habituation (LTH) of olfactory avoidance behavior are believed to arise from the selective potentiation of GABAergic synapses between multiglomerular local circuit interneurons (LNs) and projection neurons in the antennal lobe. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we show that synapsin (syn) function is necessary for STH and that syn(97)-null mutant defects in STH can be rescued by syn(+) cDNA expression solely in the LN1 subset of GABAergic local interneurons. As synapsin is a synaptic vesicle-clustering phosphoprotein, these observations identify a presynaptic mechanism for STH as well as the inhibitory interneurons in which this mechanism is deployed. Serine residues 6 and/or 533, potential kinase target sites of synapsin, are necessary for synapsin function suggesting that synapsin phosphorylation is essential for STH. Consistently, biochemical analyses using a phospho-synapsin-specific antiserum show that synapsin is a target of Ca(2+) calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylation in vivo. Additional behavioral and genetic observations demonstrate that CaMKII function is necessary in LNs for STH. Together, these data support a model in which CaMKII-mediated synapsin phosphorylation in LNs induces synaptic vesicle mobilization and thereby presynaptic facilitation of GABA release that underlies olfactory STH. Finally, the striking observation that LTH occurs normally in syn(97) mutants indicates that signaling pathways for STH and LTH diverge upstream of synapsin function in GABAergic interneurons.

  16. Phase dependent sign changes of GABAergic synaptic input explored in-silicio and in-vitro.

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    Stiefel, Klaus M; Wespatat, Valérie; Gutkin, Boris; Tennigkeit, Frank; Singer, Wolf

    2005-08-01

    Inhibitory interactions play a crucial role in the synchronization of neuronal activity. Here we investigate the effect of GABAergic PSPs on spike timing in cortical neurons that exhibit an oscillatory modulation of their membrane potential. To this end we combined numerical simulations with in-vitro patch-clamp recordings from layer II/III pyramidal cells of the rat visual cortex. Special emphasis was placed on exploring how the reversal potential of the GABAergic synaptic currents (EGABA) and the phase relations of the PSPs relative to the oscillation cycles affect the timing of spikes riding on the depolarizing peaks of the oscillations. The simulations predicted: (1) With EGABA more negative than the oscillation minima PSPs are hyperpolarizing at all phases and thus delay or prevent spikes. (2) With EGABA being more positive than the oscillation maxima PSPs are depolarizing in a phase-independent way and lead to a phase advance of spikes. (3) In the intermediate case where EGABA lies within oscillation maxima and minima PSPs are either hyper- or depolarizing depending on their phase relations to the V(m) oscillations and can therefore either delay or advance spikes. Experiments conducted in this most interesting last configuration with biphasic PSPs agreed with the model predictions. Additional theoretical investigations revealed the effect of these PSP induced shifts in spike timing on synchronization in neuronal circuits. The results suggest that GABAergic mechanisms can assume highly specific timing functions in oscillatory networks.

  17. Upregulation of barrel GABAergic neurons is associated with cross-modal plasticity in olfactory deficit.

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    Hong Ni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Loss of a sensory function is often followed by the hypersensitivity of other modalities in mammals, which secures them well-awareness to environmental changes. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cross-modal sensory plasticity remain to be documented. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multidisciplinary approaches, such as electrophysiology, behavioral task and immunohistochemistry, were used to examine the involvement of specific types of neurons in cross-modal plasticity. We have established a mouse model that olfactory deficit leads to a whisking upregulation, and studied how GABAergic neurons are involved in this cross-modal plasticity. In the meantime of inducing whisker tactile hypersensitivity, the olfactory injury recruits more GABAergic neurons and their fine processes in the barrel cortex, as well as upregulates their capacity of encoding action potentials. The hyperpolarization driven by inhibitory inputs strengthens the encoding ability of their target cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The upregulation of GABAergic neurons and the functional enhancement of neuronal networks may play an important role in cross-modal sensory plasticity. This finding provides the clues for developing therapeutic approaches to help sensory recovery and substitution.

  18. Role of astrocytic transport processes in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Sarup, A; Bak, L K

    2004-01-01

    The fine tuning of both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission is to a large extent dependent upon optimal function of astrocytic transport processes. Thus, glutamate transport in astrocytes is mandatory to maintain extrasynaptic glutamate levels sufficiently low to prevent excitotoxic...... neuronal damage. In GABA synapses hyperactivity of astroglial GABA uptake may lead to diminished GABAergic inhibitory activity resulting in seizures. As a consequence of this the expression and functional activity of astrocytic glutamate and GABA transport is regulated in a number of ways...

  19. GABAergic circuit dysfunction in the Drosophila Fragile X syndrome model.

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    Gatto, Cheryl L; Pereira, Daniel; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of FMR1 gene function, is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. The FMR1 protein (FMRP) translational regulator mediates activity-dependent control of synapses. In addition to the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) hyperexcitation FXS theory, the GABA theory postulates that hypoinhibition is causative for disease state symptoms. Here, we use the Drosophila FXS model to assay central brain GABAergic circuitry, especially within the Mushroom Body (MB) learning center. All 3 GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunits are reportedly downregulated in dfmr1 null brains. We demonstrate parallel downregulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting GABA synthesis enzyme, although GABAergic cell numbers appear unaffected. Mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) single-cell clonal studies show that dfmr1 null GABAergic neurons innervating the MB calyx display altered architectural development, with early underdevelopment followed by later overelaboration. In addition, a new class of extra-calyx terminating GABAergic neurons is shown to include MB intrinsic α/β Kenyon Cells (KCs), revealing a novel level of MB inhibitory regulation. Functionally, dfmr1 null GABAergic neurons exhibit elevated calcium signaling and altered kinetics in response to acute depolarization. To test the role of these GABAergic changes, we attempted to pharmacologically restore GABAergic signaling and assay effects on the compromised MB-dependent olfactory learning in dfmr1 mutants, but found no improvement. Our results show that GABAergic circuit structure and function are impaired in the FXS disease state, but that correction of hypoinhibition alone is not sufficient to rescue a behavioral learning impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. New insights into the classification and nomenclature of cortical GABAergic interneurons

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    DeFelipe, Javier; López-Cruz, Pedro L.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Anderson, Stewart; Burkhalter, Andreas; Cauli, Bruno; Fairén, Alfonso; Feldmeyer, Dirk; Fishell, Gord; Fitzpatrick, David; Freund, Tamás F.; González-Burgos, Guillermo; Hestrin, Shaul; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R.; Huang, Josh; Jones, Edward G.; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kisvárday, Zoltán; Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Lewis, David A.; Marín, Oscar; Markram, Henry; McBain, Chris J.; Meyer, Hanno S.; Monyer, Hannah; Nelson, Sacha B.; Rockland, Kathleen; Rossier, Jean; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Rudy, Bernardo; Scanziani, Massimo; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Staiger, Jochen F.; Tamás, Gábor; Thomson, Alex; Wang, Yun; Yuste, Rafael; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic classification and accepted nomenclature of neuron types is much needed but is currently lacking. This article describes a possible taxonomical solution for classifying GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex based on a novel, web-based interactive system that allows experts to classify neurons with pre-determined criteria. Using Bayesian analysis and clustering algorithms on the resulting data, we investigated the suitability of several anatomical terms and neuron names for cortical GABAergic interneurons. Moreover, we show that supervised classification models could automatically categorize interneurons in agreement with experts’ assignments. These results demonstrate a practical and objective approach to the naming, characterization and classification of neurons based on community consensus. PMID:23385869

  1. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  2. A Method to Culture GABAergic Interneurons Derived from the Medial Ganglionic Eminence

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    Franchi, Sira A.; Macco, Romina; Astro, Veronica; Tonoli, Diletta; Savino, Elisa; Valtorta, Flavia; Sala, Kristyna; Botta, Martina; de Curtis, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms guiding interneuron development is a central aspect of the current research on cortical/hippocampal interneurons, which is highly relevant to brain function and pathology. In this methodological study we have addressed the setup of protocols for the reproducible culture of dissociated cells from murine medial ganglionic eminences (MGEs), to provide a culture system for the analysis of interneurons in vitro. This study includes the detailed protocols for the preparation of the dissociated cells, and for their culture on optimal substrates for cell migration or differentiation. These cultures enriched in interneurons may allow the investigation of the migratory behavior of interneuron precursors and their differentiation in vitro, up to the formation of morphologically identifiable GABAergic synapses. Live imaging of MGE–derived cells plated on proper substrates shows that they are useful to study the migratory behavior of the precursors, as well as the behavior of growth cones during the development of neurites. Most MGE-derived precursors develop into polarized GABAergic interneurons as determined by axonal, dendritic, and GABAergic markers. We present also a comparison of cells from WT and mutant mice as a proof of principle for the use of these cultures for the analysis of the migration and differentiation of GABAergic cells with different genetic backgrounds. The culture enriched in interneurons described here represents a useful experimental system to examine in a relatively easy and fast way the morpho-functional properties of these cells under physiological or pathological conditions, providing a powerful tool to complement the studies in vivo. PMID:29358905

  3. Involvement of GABAergic pathway in the sedative activity of apigenin, the main flavonoid from Passiflora quadrangularis pericarp

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    Andressa C. Gazola

    Full Text Available Abstract In the current study we showed that oral administration of an aqueous extract of Passiflora quadrangularis L., Passifloraceae, pericarp results in a significant prolongation of the sleep duration in mice evaluated in the ethyl ether-induced hypnosis test which indicates sedative effects. Apigenin, the main flavonoid of the extract, induced a similar sedative response when applied alone, at a dose equivalent to that found in the extract, suggesting that apigenin is mediating the sedative effects of P. quadrangularis extract. In addition, the sedative effect of apigenin was blocked by pretreatment with the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (1 mg/kg, suggesting an interaction of apigenin with gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA receptors. However, apigenin at concentrations 0.1–50 µM failed to enhance GABA-induced currents through GABAA receptors (α1β2γ2S expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Nevertheless, based on our results, we suggest that the in vivo sedative effect of the P. quadrangularis extract and its main flavonoid apigenin maybe be due to an enhancement of the GABAergic system.

  4. Immunohistochemical localization of GABAergic key molecules in the main olfactory bulb of the Korean roe deer, Capreolus pygargus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongtae; Takayama, Chitoshi; Park, Changnam; Ahn, Meejung; Moon, Changjong; Shin, Taekyun

    2015-09-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) negatively regulates the excitatory activity of neurons and is a predominant neurotransmitter in the nervous system. The olfactory bulb, the main center in the olfactory system, is modulated by inhibitory interneurons that use GABA as their main neurotransmitter. The present study aimed to evaluate GABAergic transmission in the main olfactory bulb (MOB) of the Korean roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) by examining the immunohistochemical localization of GABAergic key molecules, including glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT), GABA transporters (GATs; GAT-1 and GAT-3), and potassium sodium chloride co-transporter 2 (KCC2). GAD, VGAT, and KCC2 were expressed in the glomerular layer (GL), external plexiform layer (ePL), mitral cell layer (ML), and granule cell layer (GrL). Intense GAT-1 expression was observed in the GL; GAT-1 expression was discernible in the ePL, ML, and GrL. However, intense GAT-3 expression was extensively observed in all layers of the MOB. These results suggest that substantial GABAergic synapses are present in the GL, ePL, ML, and GrL. Furthermore, the released GABA may be removed by GAT-1 and GAT-3 in the GL, and the majority of GABA, which is present in the ePL to GrL, may undergo reuptake by GAT-3. This is the first morphological and descriptive study of GABAergic transmission in the MOB of Korean roe deer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Excitatory drive from the Subthalamic nucleus attenuates GABAergic transmission in the Substantia Nigra pars compacta via endocannabinoids.

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    Freestone, Peter S; Wu, Xi Hau; de Guzman, Gabriel; Lipski, Janusz

    2015-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are cannabis-like substances produced in the brain where their primary function is to regulate synaptic transmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release in a retrograde fashion. We have recently demonstrated a novel mechanism regulating GABAergic transmission from neurons in the Substantia Nigra pars reticulata (SNr) to dopaminergic neurons in the Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNc) mediated by eCBs. Production of eCBs was initiated by spillover of glutamate, yet the source of the glutamate was not determined (Freestone et al., 2014; Neuropharmacology 79 p467). The present study aimed at elucidating the potential role of glutamatergic terminals arising from neurons in the Subthalamic nucleus (STN) in driving the eCB-mediated modulation of this inhibitory transmission. GABAergic IPSCs or IPSPs evoked in SNc neurons by electrical stimuli delivered to the SNr region were transiently inhibited by electrical or pharmacological (U-tube application of muscarinic agonist carbachol [100 µM]) stimulation of the STN (to 74±5% and 69±4% respectively). In both stimulation protocols, the attenuation of GABAergic transmission was abolished by cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist rimonabant (3 µM), and reduced by group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist CPCCOEt (100 µM), consistent with a glutamate-initiated and eCB-mediated mechanism. The carbachol-induced attenuation of GABAergic transmission was abolished by M3 muscarinic receptor antagonist 4-DAMP (10 µM), confirming a specific activation of STN neurons. These results demonstrate that glutamatergic projection from the STN to dopaminergic SNc neurons underlies an eCB-mediated inhibition of GABAergic input to these neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Endocannabinoids and prostaglandins both contribute to GnRH neuron-GABAergic afferent local feedback circuits

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    Glanowska, Katarzyna M.

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons form the final common pathway for central control of fertility. Regulation of GnRH neurons by long-loop gonadal steroid feedback through steroid receptor-expressing afferents such as GABAergic neurons is well studied. Recently, local central feedback circuits regulating GnRH neurons were identified. GnRH neuronal depolarization induces short-term inhibition of their GABAergic afferents via a mechanism dependent on metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activation. GnRH neurons are enveloped in astrocytes, which express mGluRs. GnRH neurons also produce endocannabinoids, which can be induced by mGluR activation. We hypothesized the local GnRH-GABA circuit utilizes glia-derived and/or cannabinoid mechanisms and is altered by steroid milieu. Whole cell voltage-clamp was used to record GABAergic postsynaptic currents (PSCs) from GnRH neurons before and after action potential-like depolarizations were mimicked. In GnRH neurons from ovariectomized (OVX) mice, this depolarization reduced PSC frequency. This suppression was blocked by inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis with indomethacin, by a prostaglandin receptor antagonist, or by a specific glial metabolic poison, together suggesting the postulate that prostaglandins, potentially glia-derived, play a role in this circuit. This circuit was also inhibited by a CB1 receptor antagonist or by blockade of endocannabinoid synthesis in GnRH neurons, suggesting an endocannabinoid element, as well. In females, local circuit inhibition persisted in androgen-treated mice but not in estradiol-treated mice or young ovary-intact mice. In contrast, local circuit inhibition was present in gonad-intact males. These data suggest GnRH neurons interact with their afferent neurons using multiple mechanisms and that these local circuits can be modified by both sex and steroid feedback. PMID:21917995

  7. Temporal coding at the immature depolarizing GABAergic synapse

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    Guzel Valeeva

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the developing hippocampus, GABA exerts depolarizing and excitatory actions and contributes to the generation of neuronal network driven Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs. Here, we studied spike time coding at immature GABAergic synapses and its impact on synchronization of the neuronal network during GDPs in the neonatal (postnatal days P2-6 rat hippocampal slices. Using extracellular recordings, we found that the delays of action potentials (APs evoked by synaptic activation of GABA(A receptors are long (mean, 65 ms and variable (within a time window of 10-200 ms. During patch-clamp recordings, depolarizing GABAergic responses were mainly subthreshold and their amplification by persistent sodium conductance was required to trigger APs. AP delays at GABAergic synapses shortened and their variability reduced with an increase in intracellular chloride concentration during whole-cell recordings. Negative shift of the GABA reversal potential (EGABA with low concentrations of bumetanide, or potentiation of GABA(A receptors with diazepam reduced GDPs amplitude, desynchronized neuronal firing during GDPs and slowed down GDPs propagation. Partial blockade of GABA(A receptors with bicuculline increased neuronal synchronization and accelerated GDPs propagation. We propose that spike-timing at depolarizing GABA synapses is determined by intracellular chloride concentration. At physiological levels of intracellular chloride GABAergic depolarization does not reach the action potential threshold and amplification of GABAergic responses by non-inactivating sodium conductance is required for postsynaptic AP initiation. Slow and variable excitation at GABAergic synapse determines the level of neuronal synchrony and the rate of GDPs propagation in the developing hippocampus.

  8. Genetics and Function of Neocortical GABAergic Interneurons in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

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    E. Rossignol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A dysfunction of cortical and limbic GABAergic circuits has been postulated to contribute to multiple neurodevelopmental disorders in humans, including schizophrenia, autism, and epilepsy. In the current paper, I summarize the characteristics that underlie the great diversity of cortical GABAergic interneurons and explore how the multiple roles of these cells in developing and mature circuits might contribute to the aforementioned disorders. Furthermore, I review the tightly controlled genetic cascades that determine the fate of cortical interneurons and summarize how the dysfunction of genes important for the generation, specification, maturation, and function of cortical interneurons might contribute to these disorders.

  9. Adenosine A1 receptor stimulation reduces D1 receptor-mediated GABAergic transmission from striato-nigral terminals and attenuates l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in dopamine-denervated mice.

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    Mango, Dalila; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Ledonne, Ada; Cappellacci, Loredana; Petrelli, Riccardo; Nisticò, Robert; Berretta, Nicola; Fisone, Gilberto; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio

    2014-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABAAR)-mediated postsynaptic currents were recorded in brain slices from substantia nigra pars reticulate neurons. The selective adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), increased the frequency, but not the amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in the presence of the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 (SKF) and phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitors (papaverine or AE90074). Under these conditions, DPCPX also increased the amplitude of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs). The effect of DPCPX was also examined in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD), generated by unilateral denervation of the dopaminergic input to the striatum. In this model, SKF alone was sufficient to increase sIPSCs frequency and eIPSCs amplitude, and these effects were not potentiated by DPCPX. To confirm a depressive effect of A1Rs on the synaptic release of GABA we used the selective A1R agonist 5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N(6)-(±)-(endo-norborn-2-yl)adenosine (5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA) which has limited peripheral actions. We found that 5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA decreased sIPSCs frequency, without affecting their amplitude, and decreased eIPSCs amplitude. Importantly, in the PD mouse model, 5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA prevented the increase in sIPSC frequency and eIPSC amplitude produced by SKF. Since exaggerated DA transmission along the striato-nigral pathway is involved in the motor complications (e.g. dyskinesia) caused by prolonged and intermittent administration of l-DOPA, we examined the effect of A1R activation in mice with unilateral DA denervation. We found that 5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA, administered in combination with l-DOPA, reduced the development of abnormal involuntary movements. These results indicate the potential benefit of A1R agonists for the treatment of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and hyperkinetic disorders providing a mechanistic framework for the study of the interaction between DA and adenosine in the striatonigral

  10. Genetic Deletion of the Clathrin Adaptor GGA3 Reduces Anxiety and Alters GABAergic Transmission.

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    Kendall R Walker

    Full Text Available Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF binding protein 3 (GGA3 is a monomeric clathrin adaptor that has been shown to regulate the trafficking of the Beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1, which is required for production of the Alzheimer's disease (AD-associated amyloid βpeptide. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity owing to impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We report here that GGA3 deletion results in novelty-induced hyperactivity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors. Given the pivotal role of GABAergic transmission in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviors, we performed electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices and found increased phasic and decreased tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGC. Moreover, we found that the number of inhibitory synapses is increased in the dentate gyrus of GGA3 null mice in further support of the electrophysiological data. Thus, the increased GABAergic transmission is a leading candidate mechanism underlying the reduced anxiety-like behaviors observed in GGA3 null mice. All together these findings suggest that GGA3 plays a key role in GABAergic transmission. Since BACE1 levels are elevated in the brain of GGA3 null mice, it is possible that at least some of these phenotypes are a consequence of increased processing of BACE1 substrates.

  11. Genetic Deletion of the Clathrin Adaptor GGA3 Reduces Anxiety and Alters GABAergic Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Modgil, Amit; Albrecht, David; Lomoio, Selene; Haydon, Philip G; Moss, Stephen J; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF binding protein 3 (GGA3) is a monomeric clathrin adaptor that has been shown to regulate the trafficking of the Beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1), which is required for production of the Alzheimer's disease (AD)-associated amyloid βpeptide. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity owing to impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We report here that GGA3 deletion results in novelty-induced hyperactivity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors. Given the pivotal role of GABAergic transmission in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviors, we performed electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices and found increased phasic and decreased tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGC). Moreover, we found that the number of inhibitory synapses is increased in the dentate gyrus of GGA3 null mice in further support of the electrophysiological data. Thus, the increased GABAergic transmission is a leading candidate mechanism underlying the reduced anxiety-like behaviors observed in GGA3 null mice. All together these findings suggest that GGA3 plays a key role in GABAergic transmission. Since BACE1 levels are elevated in the brain of GGA3 null mice, it is possible that at least some of these phenotypes are a consequence of increased processing of BACE1 substrates.

  12. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean, carnation, cucumber, radish, tobacco, and tomato under conditions in which the inducing bacteria and the challenging pathogen remained spatially separated. Bacterial strains differ in their ability to ...

  13. Distinct Translaminar Glutamatergic Circuits to GABAergic Interneurons in the Neonatal Auditory Cortex

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    Rongkang Deng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic activity is important in neocortical development and plasticity. Because the maturation of GABAergic interneurons is regulated by neural activity, the source of excitatory inputs to GABAergic interneurons plays a key role in development. We show, by laser-scanning photostimulation, that layer 4 and layer 5 GABAergic interneurons in the auditory cortex in neonatal mice (GABAergic interneurons showed two spatial patterns of translaminar connection: inputs originating predominantly from supragranular or from supragranular and infragranular layers, including the subplate, which relays early thalamocortical activity. Sensory deprivation altered the development of translaminar inputs. Thus, distinct translaminar circuits to GABAergic interneurons exist throughout development, and the maturation of excitatory synapses is input-specific. Glutamatergic signaling from subplate and intracortical sources likely plays a role in the maturation of GABAergic interneurons.

  14. Fluoxetine impairs GABAergic signaling in hippocampal slices from neonatal rats

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    Enrico eCherubini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine (Prozac, an antidepressant known to selectively inhibit serotonin reuptake, is widely used to treat mood disorders in women suffering from depression during pregnancy and postpartum period. Several lines of evidence suggest that this drug, which crosses the human placenta and is secreted into milk during lactation, exerts its action not only by interfering with serotoninergic but also with GABAergic transmission. GABA is known to play a crucial role in the construction of neuronal circuits early in postnatal development. The immature hippocampus is characterized by an early type of network activity, the so-called Giant Depolarizing Potentials (GDPs, generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA, both depolarizing and excitatory. Here we tested the hypothesis that fluoxetine may interfere with GABAergic signaling during the first postnatal week, thus producing harmful effects on brain development. At micromolar concentrations fluoxetine severely depressed GDPs frequency (IC50 22 M in a reversible manner and independently of its action on serotonin reuptake. This effect was dependent on a reduced GABAergic (but not glutamatergic drive to principal cells most probably from parvalbumin-positive fast spiking neurons. Cholecystokinin-positive GABAergic interneurons were not involved since the effects of the drug persisted when cannabinoid receptors were occluded with WIN55,212-2, a CB1/CB2 receptor agonist. Fluoxetine effects on GABAergic transmission were associated with a reduced firing rate of both principal cells and interneurons further suggesting that changes in network excitability account for GDPs disruption. This may have critical consequences on the functional organization and stabilization of neuronal circuits early in postnatal development.

  15. Attenuated GABAergic Signaling in Intestinal Epithelium Contributes to Pathogenesis of Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Surbhi; Ahuja, Vineet; Paul, Jaishree

    2017-10-01

    Neuromediators produced by enteric nervous system regulate inflammatory processes via interacting with enteric immune system. Role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is also a neuromediator, has been implicated in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis, where they modulate the immune responses. However, its role in ulcerative colitis (UC) has not been defined. This study was carried out to investigate the role of GABA and its signaling components in pathogenesis of UC. Peripheral blood, colon mucosal biopsy, and fecal specimens were collected from UC and control groups. Quantification of GABA was done using ELISA. Expression of GABAergic signal system components was analyzed through RT-PCR analysis. Enumeration of GABA-producing bacteria was done by qPCR analysis. Activity of p38 MAPK and expression of proinflammatory cytokines were determined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis, respectively. GABA levels were significantly reduced in patients with UC as compared to control group when measured in serum and colon biopsy. Altered expression of GABAergic signal system was observed in UC patients. Reduced abundance of selected GABA-producing bacteria was detected in stool samples of UC patients as compared to control. p38 MAPK activity and expression of its downstream effector cytokines were found to be increased in UC patients as compared to control. Reduced levels of GABA were observed in patients with UC, and this leads to hyperactivation of p38 MAPK and overexpression of downstream effector cytokines suggesting a role of GABA in pathogenesis of UC.

  16. [Local GABA-ergic modulation of serotonergic neuron activity in the nucleus raphe magnus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniushkin, A N; Merkulova, N A; Orlova, A O; Iniushkina, E M

    2009-07-01

    In voltage-clamp experimental on slices of the rat brainstem the effects of 5-HT and GABA on serotonergic neurons of nucleus raphe magnus were investigated. Local applications of 5-HT induced an increase in IPCSs frequency and amplitude in 45% of serotonergic cells. The effect suppressed by the blocker of fast sodium channels tetradotoxin. Antagonist of GABA receptor gabazine blocked IPSCs in neurons both sensitive and non-sensitive to 5-HT action. Applications of GABA induced a membrane current (I(GABA)), which was completely blocked by gabazine. The data suggest self-control of the activity of serotonergic neurons in nucleus raphe magnus by negative feedback loop via local GABAergic interneurons.

  17. GABAergic and glutamatergic identities of developing midbrain Pitx2 neurons.

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    Waite, M R; Skidmore, J M; Billi, A C; Martin, J F; Martin, D M

    2011-02-01

    Pitx2, a paired-like homeodomain transcription factor, is expressed in post-mitotic neurons within highly restricted domains of the embryonic mouse brain. Previous reports identified critical roles for PITX2 in histogenesis of the hypothalamus and midbrain, but the cellular identities of PITX2-positive neurons in these regions were not fully explored. This study characterizes Pitx2 expression with respect to midbrain transcription factor and neurotransmitter phenotypes in mid-to-late mouse gestation. In the dorsal midbrain, we identified Pitx2-positive neurons in the stratum griseum intermedium (SGI) as GABAergic and observed a requirement for PITX2 in GABAergic differentiation. We also identified two Pitx2-positive neuronal populations in the ventral midbrain, the red nucleus, and a ventromedial population, both of which contain glutamatergic precursors. Our data suggest that PITX2 is present in regionally restricted subpopulations of midbrain neurons and may have unique functions that promote GABAergic and glutamatergic differentiation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

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    Carmen E Flores

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter Ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons.

  19. The role of the GABA system in amphetamine-type stimulant use disorders

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    Dongliang eJiao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abuse of amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS has become a global public health problem. ATS causes severe neurotoxicity, which could lead to addiction and could induce psychotic disorders or cognitive dysfunctions. However, until now, there has been a lack of effective medicines for treating ATS-related problems. Findings from recent studies indicate that in addition to the traditional dopamine-ergic system, the GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic system plays an important role in ATS abuse. However the exact mechanisms of the GABA-ergic system in amphetamine-type stimulant use disorders are not fully understood. This review discusses the role of the GABA-ergic system in ATS use disorders, including ATS induced psychotic disorders and cognitive dysfunctions. We conclude that the GABA-ergic system are importantly involved in the development of ATS use disorders through multiple pathways, and that therapies or medicines that target specific members of the GABA-ergic system may be novel effective interventions for the treatment of ATS use disorders.

  20. Histamine H3 Heteroreceptors Suppress Glutamatergic and GABAergic Synaptic Transmission in the Rat Insular Cortex

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    Hiroki Takei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Histamine H3 receptors are autoreceptors that regulate histamine release from histaminergic neuronal terminals. The cerebral cortex, including the insular cortex (IC, expresses abundant H3 receptors; however, the functions and mechanisms of H3 receptors remain unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate the functional roles of H3 in synaptic transmission in layer V of the rat IC. Unitary excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (uEPSCs and uIPSCs were obtained through paired whole-cell patch-clamp recording in cerebrocortical slice preparations. The H3 receptor agonist, R-α-methylhistamine (RAMH, reduced the uEPSC amplitude obtained from pyramidal cell to pyramidal cell or GABAergic interneuron connections. Similarly, RAMH reduced the uIPSC amplitude in GABAergic interneuron to pyramidal cell connections. RAMH-induced decreases in both the uEPSC and uIPSC amplitudes were accompanied by increases in the failure rate and paired-pulse ratio. JNJ 5207852 dihydrochloride or thioperamide, H3 receptor antagonists, inhibited RAMH-induced suppression of uEPSCs and uIPSCs. Unexpectedly, thioperamide alone increased the uIPSC amplitude, suggesting that thioperamide was likely to act as an inverse agonist. Miniature EPSC or IPSC recordings support the hypothesis that the activation of H3 receptors suppresses the release of glutamate and GABA from presynaptic terminals. The colocalization of H3 receptors and glutamate decarboxylase or vesicular glutamate transport protein 1 in presynaptic axon terminals was confirmed through double pre-embedding microscopy, using a combination of pre-embedding immunogold and immunoperoxidase techniques. The suppressive regulation of H3 heteroreceptors on synaptic transmission might mediate the regulation of sensory information processes, such as gustation and visceral sensation, in the IC.

  1. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

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    Pamela eLachance-Touchette

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X that were found in a cohort of families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1-/- GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  2. Aberrant Epigenetic Gene Regulation in GABAergic Interneuron Subpopulations in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of Mouse Offspring Following Developmental Exposure to Hexachlorophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yousuke; Abe, Hajime; Nakajima, Kota; Ideta-Otsuka, Maky; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2018-05-01

    Maternal hexachlorophene (HCP) exposure causes transient disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis in mouse offspring. We examined epigenetically hypermethylated and downregulated genes related to this HCP-induced disrupted neurogenesis. Mated female mice were dietary exposed to 0 or 100 ppm HCP from gestational day 6 to postnatal day (PND) 21 on weaning. The hippocampal dentate gyrus of male offspring was subjected to methyl-capture sequencing and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses on PND 21. Validation analyses on methylation identified three genes, Dlx4, Dmrt1, and Plcb4, showing promoter-region hypermethylation. Immunohistochemically, DLX4+, DMRT1+, and PLCB4+ cells in the dentate hilus co-expressed GAD67, a γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neuron marker. HCP decreased all of three subpopulations as well as GAD67+ cells on PND 21. PLCB4+ cells also co-expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, GRM1. HCP also decreased transcript level of synaptic plasticity-related genes in the dentate gyrus and immunoreactive granule cells for synaptic plasticity-related ARC. On PND 77, all immunohistochemical cellular density changes were reversed, whereas the transcript expression of the synaptic plasticity-related genes fluctuated. Thus, HCP-exposed offspring transiently reduced the number of GABAergic interneurons. Among them, subpopulations expressing DLX4, DMRT1, or PLCB4 were transiently reduced in number through an epigenetic mechanism. Considering the role of the Dlx gene family in GABAergic interneuron migration and differentiation, the decreased number of DLX4+ cells may be responsible for reducing those GABAergic interneurons regulating neurogenesis. The effect on granule cell synaptic plasticity was sustained until the adult stage, and reduced GABAergic interneurons active in GRM1-PLCB4 signaling may be responsible for the suppression on weaning.

  3. Midbrain and forebrain patterning delivers immunocytochemically and functionally similar populations of neuropeptide Y containing GABAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaira, S K; Nefzger, C M; Beh, S J; Pouton, C W; Haynes, J M

    2011-09-01

    Neurons differentiated in vitro from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the potential to serve both as models of disease states and in drug discovery programs. In this study, we use sonic hedgehog (SHH) and fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) to enrich for forebrain and midbrain phenotypes from mouse ESCs. We then investigate, using Ca(2+) imaging and [(3)H]-GABA release studies, whether the GABAergic neurons produced exhibit distinct functional phenotypes. At day 24 of differentiation, reverse transcriptase-PCR showed the presence of both forebrain (Bf-1, Hesx1, Pgc-1α, Six3) and midbrain (GATA2, GATA3) selective mRNA markers in developing forebrain-enriched cultures. All markers were present in midbrain cultures except for Bf-1 and Pgc-1α. Irrespective of culture conditions all GABA immunoreactive neurons were also immunoreactive to neuropeptide Y (NPY) antibodies. Forebrain and midbrain GABAergic neurons responded to ATP (1 mM), L-glutamate (30 μM), noradrenaline (30 μM), acetylcholine (30 μM) and dopamine (30 μM), with similar elevations of intracellular Ca(2+)([Ca(2+)](i)). The presence of GABA(A) and GABA(B) antagonists, bicuculline (30 μM) and CGP55845 (1 μM), increased the elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in response to dopamine (30 μM) in midbrain, but not forebrain GABAergic neurons. All agonists, except dopamine, elicited similar [(3)H]-GABA release from forebrain and midbrain cultures. Dopamine (30 μM) did not stimulate significant [(3)H]-GABA release in midbrain cultures, although it was effective in forebrain cultures. This study shows that differentiating neurons toward a midbrain fate restricts the expression of forebrain markers. Forebrain differentiation results in the expression of forebrain and midbrain markers. All GABA(+) neurons contain NPY, and show similar agonist-induced elevations of [Ca(2+)](i) and [(3)H]-GABA release. This study indicates that the pharmacological phenotype of these particular neurons may be independent of the addition of

  4. Sleep and Sedative States Induced by Targeting the Histamine and Noradrenergic Systems

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    Xiao Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sedatives target just a handful of receptors and ion channels. But we have no satisfying explanation for how activating these receptors produces sedation. In particular, do sedatives act at restricted brain locations and circuitries or more widely? Two prominent sedative drugs in clinical use are zolpidem, a GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulator, and dexmedetomidine (DEX, a selective α2 adrenergic receptor agonist. By targeting hypothalamic neuromodulatory systems both drugs induce a sleep-like state, but in different ways: zolpidem primarily reduces the latency to NREM sleep, and is a controlled substance taken by many people to help them sleep; DEX produces prominent slow wave activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG resembling stage 2 NREM sleep, but with complications of hypothermia and lowered blood pressure—it is used for long term sedation in hospital intensive care units—under DEX-induced sedation patients are arousable and responsive, and this drug reduces the risk of delirium. DEX, and another α2 adrenergic agonist xylazine, are also widely used in veterinary clinics to sedate animals. Here we review how these two different classes of sedatives, zolpidem and dexmedetomideine, can selectively interact with some nodal points of the circuitry that promote wakefulness allowing the transition to NREM sleep. Zolpidem enhances GABAergic transmission onto histamine neurons in the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN to hasten the transition to NREM sleep, and DEX interacts with neurons in the preoptic hypothalamic area that induce sleep and body cooling. This knowledge may aid the design of more precise acting sedatives, and at the same time, reveal more about the natural sleep-wake circuitry.

  5. Induced topological pressure for topological dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Zhitao; Chen, Ercai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, inspired by the article [J. Jaerisch et al., Stochastics Dyn. 14, 1350016, pp. 1-30 (2014)], we introduce the induced topological pressure for a topological dynamical system. In particular, we prove a variational principle for the induced topological pressure

  6. GABAergic signaling as therapeutic target for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada eCellot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available GABA, the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, early in postnatal life exerts a depolarizing and excitatory action. This depends on accumulation of chloride inside the cell via the cation-chloride importer NKCC1, being the expression of the chloride exporter KCC2 very low at birth. The developmentally regulated expression of KCC2 results in extrusion of chloride with age and a shift of GABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. The depolarizing action of GABA leads to intracellular calcium rise through voltage-dependent calcium channels and/or NMDA receptors. GABA-mediated calcium signals regulate a variety of developmental processes from cell proliferation migration, differentiation, synapse maturation and neuronal wiring. Therefore, it is not surprising that some forms of neuro-developmental disorders such as Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs are associated with alterations of GABAergic signaling and impairment of the excitatory/inhibitory balance in selective neuronal circuits. In this review we will discuss how changes of GABAA-mediated neurotransmission affect several forms of ASDs including the Fragile X, the Angelman and Rett syndromes. Then, we will describe various animal models of ASDs with GABAergic dysfunctions, highlighting their behavioral deficits and the possibility to rescue them by targeting selective components of the GABAergic synapse. In particular, we will discuss how in some cases, reverting the polarity of GABA responses from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with the diuretic bumetanide, a selective blocker of NKCC1, may have beneficial effects on ASDs, thus opening new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of these devastating disorders.

  7. Propionate enters GABAergic neurons, inhibits GABA transaminase, causes GABA accumulation and lethargy in a model of propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morland, Cecilie; Frøland, Anne-Sofie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Gundersen, Vidar; Rise, Frode; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2018-02-16

    Propionic acidemia is the accumulation of propionate in blood due to dysfunction of propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The condition causes lethargy and striatal degeneration with motor impairment in humans. How propionate exerts its toxic effect is unclear. Here, we show that intravenous administration of propionate causes dose-dependent propionate accumulation in the brain and transient lethargy in mice. Propionate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, entered GABAergic neurons, as could be seen from increased neuronal histone H4 acetylation in the striatum and neocortex. Propionate caused an increase in GABA (γ-amino butyric acid) levels in the brain, suggesting inhibition of GABA breakdown. In vitro propionate inhibited GABA transaminase with a K i of ∼1 mmol/l. In isolated nerve endings, propionate caused increased release of GABA to the extracellular fluid. In vivo , propionate reduced cerebral glucose metabolism in both striatum and neocortex. We conclude that propionate-induced inhibition of GABA transaminase causes accumulation of GABA in the brain, leading to increased extracellular GABA concentration, which inhibits neuronal activity and causes lethargy. Propionate-mediated inhibition of neuronal GABA transaminase, an enzyme of the inner mitochondrial membrane, indicates entry of propionate into neuronal mitochondria. However, previous work has shown that neurons are unable to metabolize propionate oxidatively, leading us to conclude that propionyl-CoA synthetase is probably absent from neuronal mitochondria. Propionate-induced inhibition of energy metabolism in GABAergic neurons may render the striatum, in which >90% of the neurons are GABAergic, particularly vulnerable to degeneration in propionic acidemia. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. HCN Channel Modulation of Synaptic Integration in GABAergic Interneurons in Malformed Rat Neocortex

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    John J. Hablitz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cortical malformations are often associated with pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Alterations in hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, non-specific cation (HCN channels have been shown to contribute to malformation associated hyperexcitability. We have recently demonstrated that expression of HCN channels and Ih current amplitudes are reduced in layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons of rats with freeze lesion induced malformations. These changes were associated with an increased EPSP temporal summation. Here, we examine the effects of HCN channel inhibition on synaptic responses in fast spiking, presumptive basket cells and accommodating, presumptive Martinotti, GABAergic interneurons in slices from freeze lesioned animals. In control animals, fast spiking cells showed small sag responses which were reduced by the HCN channel antagonist ZD7288. Fast spiking cells in lesioned animals showed absent or reduced sag responses. The amplitude of single evoked EPSPs in fast spiking cells in the control group was not affected by HCN channel inhibition with ZD7288. EPSP ratios during short stimulus trains at 25 Hz were not significantly different between control and lesion groups. ZD7288 produced an increase in EPSP ratios in the control but not lesion groups. Under voltage clamp conditions, ZD7288 did not affect EPSC ratios. In the control group, accommodating interneurons showed robust sag responses which were significantly reduced by ZD7288. HCN channel inhibition increased EPSP ratios and area in controls but not the lesioned group. The results indicate that HCN channels differentially modulate EPSPs in different classes of GABAergic interneurons and that this control is reduced in malformed rat neocortex.

  9. Hyper-inducible expression system for streptomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herai, Sachio; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Higashibata, Hiroki; Maseda, Hideaki; Ikeda, Haruo; Ōmura, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2004-01-01

    Streptomycetes produce useful enzymes and a wide variety of secondary metabolites with potent biological activities (e.g., antibiotics, immunosuppressors, pesticides, etc.). Despite their importance in the pharmaceutical and agrochemical fields, there have been no reports for practical expression systems in streptomycetes. Here, we developed a “PnitA-NitR” system for regulatory gene expression in streptomycetes based on the expression mechanism of Rhodococcus rhodochrous J1 nitrilase, which is highly induced by an inexpensive and safe inducer, ε-caprolactam. Heterologous protein expression experiments demonstrated that the system allowed suppressed basal expression and hyper-inducible expression, yielding target protein levels of as high as ≈40% of all soluble protein. Furthermore, the system functioned in important streptomycete strains. Thus, the PnitA-NitR system should be a powerful tool for improving the productivity of various useful products in streptomycetes. PMID:15377796

  10. Hippocampal dendritic spines remodeling and fear memory are modulated by GABAergic signaling within the basolateral amygdala complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachero, Marcelo; Calfa, Gaston D; Molina, Victor A

    2015-05-01

    GABAergic signaling in the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) plays a crucial role on the modulation of the stress influence on fear memory. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggests that the dorsal hippocampus (DH) is a downstream target of BLA neurons in contextual fear. Given that hippocampal structural plasticity is proposed to provide a substrate for the storage of long-term memories, the main aim of this study is to evaluate the modulation of GABA neurotransmission in the BLA on spine density in the DH following stress on contextual fear learning. The present findings show that prior stressful experience promoted contextual fear memory and enhanced spine density in the DH. Intra-BLA infusion of midazolam, a positive modulator of GABAa sites, prevented the facilitating influence of stress on both fear retention and hippocampal dendritic spine remodeling. Similarly to the stress-induced effects, the blockade of GABAa sites within the BLA ameliorated fear memory emergence and induced structural remodeling in the DH. These findings suggest that GABAergic transmission in BLA modulates the structural changes in DH associated to the influence of stress on fear memory. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A very large number of GABAergic neurons are activated in the tuberal hypothalamus during paradoxical (REM) sleep hypersomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapin, Emilie; Bérod, Anne; Léger, Lucienne; Herman, Paul A; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Peyron, Christelle

    2010-07-26

    We recently discovered, using Fos immunostaining, that the tuberal and mammillary hypothalamus contain a massive population of neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep (PS) hypersomnia. We further showed that some of the activated neurons of the tuberal hypothalamus express the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) neuropeptide and that icv injection of MCH induces a strong increase in PS quantity. However, the chemical nature of the majority of the neurons activated during PS had not been characterized. To determine whether these neurons are GABAergic, we combined in situ hybridization of GAD(67) mRNA with immunohistochemical detection of Fos in control, PS deprived and PS hypersomniac rats. We found that 74% of the very large population of Fos-labeled neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia were GAD-positive. We further demonstrated combining MCH immunohistochemistry and GAD(67)in situ hybridization that 85% of the MCH neurons were also GAD-positive. Finally, based on the number of Fos-ir/GAD(+), Fos-ir/MCH(+), and GAD(+)/MCH(+) double-labeled neurons counted from three sets of double-staining, we uncovered that around 80% of the large number of the Fos-ir/GAD(+) neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia do not contain MCH. Based on these and previous results, we propose that the non-MCH Fos/GABAergic neuronal population could be involved in PS induction and maintenance while the Fos/MCH/GABAergic neurons could be involved in the homeostatic regulation of PS. Further investigations will be needed to corroborate this original hypothesis.

  12. A very large number of GABAergic neurons are activated in the tuberal hypothalamus during paradoxical (REM sleep hypersomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sapin

    Full Text Available We recently discovered, using Fos immunostaining, that the tuberal and mammillary hypothalamus contain a massive population of neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep (PS hypersomnia. We further showed that some of the activated neurons of the tuberal hypothalamus express the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH neuropeptide and that icv injection of MCH induces a strong increase in PS quantity. However, the chemical nature of the majority of the neurons activated during PS had not been characterized. To determine whether these neurons are GABAergic, we combined in situ hybridization of GAD(67 mRNA with immunohistochemical detection of Fos in control, PS deprived and PS hypersomniac rats. We found that 74% of the very large population of Fos-labeled neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia were GAD-positive. We further demonstrated combining MCH immunohistochemistry and GAD(67in situ hybridization that 85% of the MCH neurons were also GAD-positive. Finally, based on the number of Fos-ir/GAD(+, Fos-ir/MCH(+, and GAD(+/MCH(+ double-labeled neurons counted from three sets of double-staining, we uncovered that around 80% of the large number of the Fos-ir/GAD(+ neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia do not contain MCH. Based on these and previous results, we propose that the non-MCH Fos/GABAergic neuronal population could be involved in PS induction and maintenance while the Fos/MCH/GABAergic neurons could be involved in the homeostatic regulation of PS. Further investigations will be needed to corroborate this original hypothesis.

  13. Enhancement of a robust arcuate GABAergic input to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in a model of polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Aleisha M; Prescott, Mel; Marshall, Christopher J; Yip, Siew Hoong; Campbell, Rebecca E

    2015-01-13

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), the leading cause of female infertility, is associated with an increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse frequency, implicating abnormal steroid hormone feedback to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. This study investigated whether modifications in the synaptically connected neuronal network of GnRH neurons could account for this pathology. The PCOS phenotype was induced in mice following prenatal androgen (PNA) exposure. Serial blood sampling confirmed that PNA elicits increased LH pulse frequency and impaired progesterone negative feedback in adult females, mimicking the neuroendocrine abnormalities of the clinical syndrome. Imaging of GnRH neurons revealed greater dendritic spine density that correlated with increased putative GABAergic but not glutamatergic inputs in PNA mice. Mapping of steroid hormone receptor expression revealed that PNA mice had 59% fewer progesterone receptor-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARN). To address whether increased GABA innervation to GnRH neurons originates in the ARN, a viral-mediated Cre-lox approach was taken to trace the projections of ARN GABA neurons in vivo. Remarkably, projections from ARN GABAergic neurons heavily contacted and even bundled with GnRH neuron dendrites, and the density of fibers apposing GnRH neurons was even greater in PNA mice (56%). Additionally, this ARN GABA population showed significantly less colocalization with progesterone receptor in PNA animals compared with controls. Together, these data describe a robust GABAergic circuit originating in the ARN that is enhanced in a model of PCOS and may underpin the neuroendocrine pathophysiology of the syndrome.

  14. The selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist PNU-282987 [N-[(3R)-1-Azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride] enhances GABAergic synaptic activity in brain slices and restores auditory gating deficits in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajós, M; Hurst, R S; Hoffmann, W E; Krause, M; Wall, T M; Higdon, N R; Groppi, V E

    2005-03-01

    Schizophrenic patients are thought to have an impaired ability to process sensory information. This deficit leads to disrupted auditory gating measured electrophysiologically as a reduced suppression of the second of paired auditoryevoked responses (P50) and is proposed to be associated with decreased function and/or expression of the homomeric alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Here, we provide evidence that N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride (PNU-282987), a novel selective agonist of the alpha7 nAChR, evoked whole-cell currents from cultured rat hippocampal neurons that were sensitive to the selective alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) and enhanced GABAergic synaptic activity when applied to hippocampal slices. Amphetamine-induced sensory gating deficit, determined by auditory-evoked potentials in hippocampal CA3 region, was restored by systemic administration of PNU-282987 in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats. Auditory gating of rat reticular thalamic neurons was also disrupted by amphetamine; however, PNU-282987 normalized gating deficit only in a subset of tested neurons (6 of 11). Furthermore, PNU-282987 improved the inherent hippocampal gating deficit occurring in a subpopulation of anesthetized rats, and enhanced amphetamine-induced hippocampal oscillation. We propose that the alpha7 nAChR agonist PNU-282987, via modulating/enhancing hippocampal GABAergic neurotransmission, improves auditory gating and enhances hippocampal oscillatory activity. These results provide further support for the concept that drugs that selectively activate alpha7 nAChRs may offer a novel, potential pharmacotherapy in treatment of schizophrenia.

  15. Reelin secreted by GABAergic neurons regulates glutamate receptor homeostasis.

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    Cecilia Gonzalez Campo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reelin is a large secreted protein of the extracellular matrix that has been proposed to participate to the etiology of schizophrenia. During development, reelin is crucial for the correct cytoarchitecture of laminated brain structures and is produced by a subset of neurons named Cajal-Retzius. After birth, most of these cells degenerate and reelin expression persists in postnatal and adult brain. The phenotype of neurons that bind secreted reelin and whether the continuous secretion of reelin is required for physiological functions at postnatal stages remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Combining immunocytochemical and pharmacological approaches, we first report that two distinct patterns of reelin expression are present in cultured hippocampal neurons. We show that in hippocampal cultures, reelin is secreted by GABAergic neurons displaying an intense reelin immunoreactivity (IR. We demonstrate that secreted reelin binds to receptors of the lipoprotein family on neurons with a punctate reelin IR. Secondly, using calcium imaging techniques, we examined the physiological consequences of reelin secretion blockade. Blocking protein secretion rapidly and reversibly changes the subunit composition of N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs to a predominance of NR2B-containing NMDARs. Addition of recombinant or endogenously secreted reelin rescues the effects of protein secretion blockade and reverts the fraction of NR2B-containing NMDARs to control levels. Therefore, the continuous secretion of reelin is necessary to control the subunit composition of NMDARs in hippocampal neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that the heterogeneity of reelin immunoreactivity correlates with distinct functional populations: neurons synthesizing and secreting reelin and/or neurons binding reelin. Furthermore, we show that continuous reelin secretion is a strict requirement to maintain the composition of NMDARs. We propose

  16. Electromagnetically induced transparency in quantum dot systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yiwen; Zhu Kadi; Wu Zhuojie; Yuan Xiaozhong; Yao Ming

    2006-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in quantum dot exciton systems in which the exciton behaves as a two-level system is investigated theoretically. It is shown that due to strong exciton-phonon coupling EIT can occur in such a quantum dot system and ultraslow light can propagate. The nonlinear optical absorption and Kerr coefficient based on EIT are also calculated. The numerical results show that giant nonlinear optical effects can be obtained while the frequency of the signal field differs only by an amount of LO phonon frequency from the exciton frequency in quantum dot systems

  17. Induced systemic resistance by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades for their plant growth-promoting effects through effective suppression of soilborne plant diseases. The modes of action that play a role in disease suppression by these bacteria include siderophore-mediated competition for iron, antibiosis, production of lytic enzymes, and induced systemic resistance (ISR). The involvement of ISR is typically studied in systems in which the Pseudomonas bacteria and the pathogen are inoculated and rema...

  18. Induced Systemic Resistance by Beneficial Microbes

    OpenAIRE

    Corn\\xe M.J. Pieterse; Christos Zamioudis; Roeland L. Berendsen; David M. Weller; Saskia C.M. Van Wees; Peter A.H.M. Bakker

    2014-01-01

    Beneficial microbes in the microbiome of plant roots improve plant health. Induced systemic resistance (ISR) emerged as an important mechanism by which selected plant growth–promoting bacteria and fungi in the rhizosphere prime the whole plant body for enhanced defense against a broad range of pathogens and insect herbivores. A wide variety of root-associated mutualists, including Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Trichoderma, and mycorrhiza species sensitize the plant immune system for enhanced defense...

  19. Direct Induction and Functional Maturation of Forebrain GABAergic Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Xuyang Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA-releasing interneurons play an important modulatory role in the cortex and have been implicated in multiple neurological disorders. Patient-derived interneurons could provide a foundation for studying the pathogenesis of these diseases as well as for identifying potential therapeutic targets. Here, we identified a set of genetic factors that could robustly induce human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs into GABAergic neurons (iGNs with high efficiency. We demonstrated that the human iGNs express neurochemical markers and exhibit mature electrophysiological properties within 6–8 weeks. Furthermore, in vitro, iGNs could form functional synapses with other iGNs or with human-induced glutamatergic neurons (iENs. Upon transplantation into immunodeficient mice, human iGNs underwent synaptic maturation and integration into host neural circuits. Taken together, our rapid and highly efficient single-step protocol to generate iGNs may be useful to both mechanistic and translational studies of human interneurons.

  20. Type 7 adenylyl cyclase is involved in the ethanol and CRF sensitivity of GABAergic synapses in mouse central amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen T. Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe GABAergic system in the central amygdala (CeA plays a major role in ethanol dependence and in the anxiogenic response to ethanol withdrawal. Previously, we found that both ethanol and corticotropin releasing factor (CRF increase GABAergic transmission in mouse and rat CeA neurons, in part by enhancing the release of GABA via activation of presynaptic CRF1 receptors. CRF1 receptors are coupled to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC, which produces the second messenger cyclic AMP. There are nine isoforms of AC, but we recently found that CRF1 receptors in the pituitary were coupled to the Type 7 AC (AC7. Therefore, using an in vitro electrophysiological approach in brain slices, here we have investigated a possible role of the AC7 signaling pathway in ethanol and CRF effects on CeA GABAergic synapses of genetically modified mice with diminished brain Adcy7 activity (HET compared to their littermate male wild type (WT mice. We found no significant differences in basal membrane properties, mean baseline amplitude of evoked GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs, or paired-pulse facilitation (PPF of GABAA-IPSPs between HET and WT mice. In CeA neurons of WT mice, ethanol superfusion significantly augmented (by 39% GABAA-IPSPs and decreased PPF (by 25%, suggesting increased presynaptic GABA release. However, these effects were absent in HET mice. CRF superfusion also significantly augmented IPSPs (by 38% and decreased PPF (by 23% in WT CeA neurons, and still elicited a significant but smaller (by 13% increase of IPSP amplitude, but no effect on PPF, in HET mice. These electrophysiological data suggest that AC7 plays an important role in ethanol and CRF modulation of presynaptic GABA release in CeA and thus may underlie ethanol-related behaviors such as anxiety and dependence.

  1. Seizure frequency correlates with loss of dentate gyrus GABAergic neurons in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Paul S; Abrams, Emily; Wen, Xiling

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy occurs in one of 26 people. Temporal lobe epilepsy is common and can be difficult to treat effectively. It can develop after brain injuries that damage the hippocampus. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms involving the hippocampal dentate gyrus have been proposed. This study evaluated a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy to test which pathological changes in the dentate gyrus correlate with seizure frequency and help prioritize potential mechanisms for further study. FVB mice (n = 127) that had experienced status epilepticus after systemic treatment with pilocarpine 31-61 days earlier were video-monitored for spontaneous, convulsive seizures 9 hr/day every day for 24-36 days. Over 4,060 seizures were observed. Seizure frequency ranged from an average of one every 3.6 days to one every 2.1 hr. Hippocampal sections were processed for Nissl stain, Prox1-immunocytochemistry, GluR2-immunocytochemistry, Timm stain, glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunocytochemistry, glutamic acid decarboxylase in situ hybridization, and parvalbumin-immunocytochemistry. Stereological methods were used to measure hilar ectopic granule cells, mossy cells, mossy fiber sprouting, astrogliosis, and GABAergic interneurons. Seizure frequency was not significantly correlated with the generation of hilar ectopic granule cells, the number of mossy cells, the extent of mossy fiber sprouting, the extent of astrogliosis, or the number of GABAergic interneurons in the molecular layer or hilus. Seizure frequency significantly correlated with the loss of GABAergic interneurons in or adjacent to the granule cell layer, but not with the loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons. These findings prioritize the loss of granule cell layer interneurons for further testing as a potential cause of temporal lobe epilepsy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Drug-induced modification of the system properties associated with spontaneous human electroencephalographic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liley, David T.; Cadusch, Peter J.; Gray, Marcus; Nathan, Pradeep J.

    2003-11-01

    The benzodiazepine (BZ) class of minor tranquilizers are important modulators of the γ-amino butyric acid (GABAA)/BZ receptor complex that are well known to affect the spectral properties of spontaneous electroencephalographic activity. While it is experimentally well established that the BZs reduce total alpha band (8 13 Hz) power and increase total beta band (13 30 Hz) power, it is unclear what the physiological basis for this effect is. Based on a detailed theory of cortical electrorhythmogenesis it is conjectured that such an effect is explicable in terms of the modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission within locally connected populations of excitatory and inhibitory cortical neurons. Motivated by this theory, fixed order autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models were fitted to spontaneous eyes-closed electroencephalograms recorded from subjects before and approximately 2 h after the oral administration of a single 1 mg dose of the BZ alprazolam. Subsequent pole-zero analysis revealed that BZs significantly transform the dominant system pole such that its frequency and damping increase. Comparisons of ARMA derived power spectra with fast Fourier transform derived spectra indicate an enhanced ability to identify benzodiazepine induced electroencephalographic changes. This experimental result is in accord with the theoretical predictions implying that alprazolam enhances inhibition acting on inhibitory neurons more than inhibition acting on excitatory neurons. Further such a result is consistent with reported cortical neuronal distributions of the various GABAA receptor pharmacological subtypes. Therefore physiologically specified fixed order ARMA modeling is expected to become an important tool for the systematic investigation and modeling of a wide range of cortically acting compounds.

  3. Monoterpenoids (thymol, carvacrol and S-(+)-linalool) with anesthetic activity in silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen): evaluation of acetylcholinesterase and GABAergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, A E; Garlet, Q I; da Cunha, J A; Bandeira, G; Brusque, I C M; Salbego, J; Heinzmann, B M; Baldisserotto, B

    2017-10-19

    This study evaluated the anesthetic potential of thymol and carvacrol, and their influence on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the muscle and brain of silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen). The AChE activity of S-(+)-linalool was also evaluated. We subsequently assessed the effects of thymol and S-(+)-linalool on the GABAergic system. Fish were exposed to thymol and carvacrol (25, 50, 75, and 100 mg/L) to evaluate time for anesthesia and recovery. Both compounds induced sedation at 25 mg/L and anesthesia with 50-100 mg/L. However, fish exposed to carvacrol presented strong muscle contractions and mortality. AChE activity was increased in the brain of fish at 50 mg/L carvacrol and 100 mg/L thymol, and decreased in the muscle at 100 mg/L carvacrol. S-(+)-linalool did not alter AChE activity. Anesthesia with thymol was reversed by exposure to picrotoxin (GABAA antagonist), similar to the positive control propofol, but was not reversed by flumazenil (antagonist of benzodiazepine binding site), as observed for the positive control diazepam. Picrotoxin did not reverse the effect of S-(+)-linalool. Thymol exposure at 50 mg/L is more suitable than carvacrol for anesthesia in silver catfish, because this concentration did not cause any mortality or interference with AChE activity. Thymol interacted with GABAA receptors, but not with the GABAA/benzodiazepine site. In contrast, S-(+)-linalool did not act in GABAA receptors in silver catfish.

  4. Achyranthes aspera Attenuates epilepsy in experimental animals: possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle Lakshminarayanashastry; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V; Prasad, Nunna Bheema Lingeswara; Godavarthi, Ashok

    2017-06-01

    The present study was aimed to examine the possible anticonvulsant property of aerial parts of Achyranthes aspera using various experimental models of epilepsy in mice. Petroleum ether extract of aerial parts of A. aspera (PeAA), methanolic eAA (MeAA) and aqueous eAA (AeAA) was initially evaluated against six-hertz seizure model in mice, based on the outcomes the effective extract was further evaluated against maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) models in mice. In addition, the potent extract was evaluated against the PTZ model by co-administering with flumazenil (FMZ), and also evaluated for its effect on GABA levels in brain and NMDA-induced lethality in mice. Furthermore, the probable locomotor deficit-inducing property of the extract was evaluated by actophotometer test in mice. In results, only MeAA showed protection against six-hertz-induced seizures in mice, based on these outcomes only MeAA was evaluated in MES and PTZ models. Notably, the MeAA (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg) has offered mild and dose dependent protection against MES and PTZ-induced seizures in mice. Alongside, the MeAA (400 mg/kg) showed a significant increase in GABA levels in the brain compared to control, and in line with these findings the anti-PTZ effect of MeAA (400 mg/kg, p.o.) was blocked when co-administered with flumazenil (5 mg/kg, i.p.). However, the MeAA has not shown significant protection against NMDA-induced mortality and also did not cause significant change in locomotor activity compared to before treatment. These findings suggest that MeAA possess mild anticonvulsant activity and the outcomes further confirmed the involvement of GABAergic mechanism behind the anticonvulsant activity of MeAA.

  5. Kv2.2: a novel molecular target to study the role of basal forebrain GABAergic neurons in the sleep-wake cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanstyne, Tracey O; Subedi, Kalpana; Le, Wei Wei; Hoffman, Gloria E; Meredith, Andrea L; Mong, Jessica A; Misonou, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) has been implicated as an important brain region that regulates the sleep-wake cycle of animals. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) neurons are the most predominant neuronal population within this region. However, due to the lack of specific molecular tools, the roles of the BF GABAergic neurons have not been fully elucidated. Previously, we have found high expression levels of the Kv2.2 voltage-gated potassium channel on approximately 60% of GABAergic neurons in the magnocellular preoptic area and horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca of the BF and therefore proposed it as a potential molecular target to study this neuronal population. In this study, we sought to determine the functional roles of the Kv2.2-expressing neurons in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Sleep analysis between two genotypes and within each genotype before and after sleep deprivation. Animal sleep research laboratory. Adult mice. Wild-type and Kv2.2 knockout mice with C57/BL6 background. EEG/EMG recordings from the basal state and after sleep-deprivation which was induced by mild agitation for 6 h. Immunostaining of a marker of neuronal activity indicates that these Kv2.2-expressing neurons appear to be preferentially active during the wake state. Therefore, we tested whether Kv2.2-expressing neurons in the BF are involved in arousal using Kv2.2-deficient mice. BF GABAergic neurons exhibited augmented expression of c-Fos. These knockout mice exhibited longer consolidated wake bouts than wild-type littermates, and that phenotype was further exacerbated by sleep deprivation. Moreover, in-depth analyses of their cortical electroencephalogram revealed a significant decrease in the delta-frequency activity during the nonrapid eye movement sleep state. These results revealed the significance of Kv2.2-expressing neurons in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle.

  6. Deficiency of GABAergic synaptic inhibition in the Kölliker-Fuse area underlies respiratory dysrhythmia in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdala, Ana Paula; Toward, Marie A; Dutschmann, Mathias; Bissonnette, John M; Paton, Julian F R

    2016-01-01

    Life threatening breathing irregularity and central apnoeas are highly prevalent in children suffering from Rett syndrome. Abnormalities in inhibitory synaptic transmission have been associated with the physiopathology of this syndrome, and may underlie the respiratory disorder. In a mouse model of Rett syndrome, GABAergic terminal projections are markedly reduced in the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus (KF) in the dorsolateral pons, an important centre for control of respiratory rhythm regularity. Administration of a drug that augments endogenous GABA localized to this region of the pons reduced the incidence of apnoea and the respiratory irregularity of Rett female mice. Conversely, the respiratory disorder was recapitulated by blocking GABAergic transmission in the KF area of healthy rats. This study helps us understand the mechanism for generation of respiratory abnormality in Rett syndrome, pinpoints a brain site responsible and provides a clear anatomical target for the development of a translatable drug treatment. Central apnoeas and respiratory irregularity are a common feature in Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder most often caused by mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2). We used a MECP2 deficient mouse model of RTT as a strategy to obtain insights into the neurobiology of the disease and into mechanisms essential for respiratory rhythmicity during normal breathing. Previously, we showed that, systemic administration of a GABA reuptake blocker in MECP2 deficient mice markedly reduced the occurrence of central apnoeas. Further, we found that, during central apnoeas, post-inspiratory drive (adductor motor) to the upper airways was enhanced in amplitude and duration in Mecp2 heterozygous female mice. Since the pontine Kölliker-Fuse area (KF) drives post-inspiration, suppresses inspiration, and can reset the respiratory oscillator phase, we hypothesized that synaptic inhibition in this area is essential for respiratory rhythm

  7. Loss of GABAergic inputs in APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

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    Tutu Oyelami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by symptoms which include seizures, sleep disruption, loss of memory as well as anxiety in patients. Of particular importance is the possibility of preventing the progressive loss of neuronal projections in the disease. Transgenic mice overexpressing EOFAD mutant PS1 (L166P and mutant APP (APP KM670/671NL Swedish (APP/PS1 develop a very early and robust Amyloid pathology and display synaptic plasticity impairments and cognitive dysfunction. Here we investigated GABAergic neurotransmission, using multi-electrode array (MEA technology and pharmacological manipulation to quantify the effect of GABA Blockers on field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP, and immunostaining of GABAergic neurons. Using MEA technology we confirm impaired LTP induction by high frequency stimulation in APPPS1 hippocampal CA1 region that was associated with reduced alteration of the pair pulse ratio after LTP induction. Synaptic dysfunction was also observed under manipulation of external Calcium concentration and input-output curve. Electrophysiological recordings from brain slice of CA1 hippocampus area, in the presence of GABAergic receptors blockers cocktails further demonstrated significant reduction in the GABAergic inputs in APP/PS1 mice. Moreover, immunostaining of GAD65 a specific marker for GABAergic neurons revealed reduction of the GABAergic inputs in CA1 area of the hippocampus. These results might be linked to increased seizure sensitivity, premature death and cognitive dysfunction in this animal model of AD. Further in depth analysis of GABAergic dysfunction in APP/PS1 mice is required and may open new perspectives for AD therapy by restoring GABAergic function.

  8. Environmental enrichment has no effect on the development of dopaminergic and GABAergic fibers during methylphenidate treatment of early traumatized gerbils

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    Teuchert-Noodt Gertraud

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is widely believed, that environmental factors play a crucial role in the etiology and outcome of psychiatric diseases such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. A former study from our laboratory has shown that both methylphenidate (MP and handling have a positive effect on the dopaminergic fiber density in the prefrontal cortex (PFC of early traumatized gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus. The current study was performed to investigate if enriched environment during MP application has an additional influence on the dopaminergic and GABAergic fiber densities in the PFC and amygdala in this animal model. Animals received a single early dose of methamphetamine (MA; 50 mg/kg; i.p. on postnatal day (PD 14, which is known to cause multiple changes in the subsequent development of several neurotransmitter systems including the dopaminergic systems, and were then treated with oral daily applications of MP (5 mg/kg from PD30–60. Animals treated this way were either transferred to an enriched environment after weaning (on PD30 or were kept under impoverished rearing conditions. There was no effect of an enriched environment on the dopaminergic or GABAergic fiber density neither in the PFC nor in the amygdala. With regard to former studies these results underline the particular impact of MP in the treatment of ADHD.

  9. TRPV1 in GABAergic interneurons mediates neuropathic mechanical allodynia and disinhibition of the nociceptive circuitry in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Ho; Back, Seung Keun; Davies, Alexander J; Jeong, Heejin; Jo, Hyun Jung; Chung, Geehoon; Na, Heung Sik; Bae, Yong Chul; Kim, Sang Jeong; Kim, Joong Soo; Jung, Sung Jun; Oh, Seog Bae

    2012-05-24

    Neuropathic pain and allodynia may arise from sensitization of central circuits. We report a mechanism of disinhibition-based central sensitization resulting from long-term depression (LTD) of GABAergic interneurons as a consequence of TRPV1 activation in the spinal cord. Intrathecal administration of TRPV1 agonists led to mechanical allodynia that was not dependent on peripheral TRPV1 neurons. TRPV1 was functionally expressed in GABAergic spinal interneurons and activation of spinal TRPV1 resulted in LTD of excitatory inputs and a reduction of inhibitory signaling to spinothalamic tract (STT) projection neurons. Mechanical hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury was attenuated in TRPV1(-/-) mice but not in mice lacking TRPV1-expressing peripheral neurons. Mechanical pain was reversed by a spinally applied TRPV1 antagonist while avoiding the hyperthermic side effect of systemic treatment. Our results demonstrate that spinal TRPV1 plays a critical role as a synaptic regulator and suggest the utility of central nervous system-specific TRPV1 antagonists for treating neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Estrogen administration modulates hippocampal GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus of trimethyltin-treated rats

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    Valentina eCorvino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Given the well-documented involvement of estrogens in the modulation of hippocampal functions in both physiological and pathological conditions, the present study investigates the effects of 17-beta estradiol (E2 administration in the rat model of hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by trimethyltin (TMT administration (8mg/kg, characterized by loss of pyramidal neurons in CA1, CA3/hilus hippocampal subfields associated with astroglial and microglial activation, seizures and cognitive impairment. After TMT/saline treatment, ovariectomized animals received two doses of E2 (0.2 mg/kg i.p. or vehicle, and were sacrificed 48h or 7 days after TMT-treatment. Our results indicate that in TMT-treated animals E2 administration induces the early (48h upregulation of genes involved in neuroprotection and synaptogenesis, namely Bcl2, trkB, Cadherin and cyclin-dependent-kinase-5. Increased expression levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (gad 67, neuropeptide Y (Npy, parvalbumin , Pgc-1α and Sirtuin 1genes, the latter involved in parvalbumin (PV synthesis, were also evident. Unbiased stereology performed on rats sacrificed 7 days after TMT treatment showed that although E2 does not significantly influence the extent of TMT-induced neuronal death, significantly enhances the TMT-induced modulation of GABAergic interneuron population size in selected hippocampal subfields. In particular, E2 administration causes, in TMT treated rats, a significant increase in the number of GAD67-expressing interneurons in CA1 stratum oriens, CA3 pyramidal layer, hilus and dentate gyrus, accompanied by a parallel increase in NPY-expressing cells, essentially in the same regions, and of PV-positive cells in CA1 pyramidal layer. The present results add information concerning the role of in vivo E2 administration on mechanisms involved in cellular plasticity in the adult brain.

  11. Hypokinesia upon pallidal deep brain stimulation of dystonia: support of a GABAergic mechanism

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    Florian eAmtage

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past, many studies have documented the beneficial effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS in the globus pallidus internus for treatment of primary segmental or generalized dystonia. Recently however, several reports focused on DBS-induced hypokinesia or freezing of gait as a side effect in these patients. Here we report on two patients suffering from freezing of gait after successful treatment of their dystonic movement disorder with pallidal high frequency stimulation (HFS. Several attempts to reduce the freezing of gait resulted in worsening of the control of dystonia. In one patient levodopa treatment was initialized which was somewhat successful to relieve freezing of gait. We discuss the possible mechanisms of hypokinetic side effects of pallidal DBS which can be explained by the hypothesis of selective GABA release as the mode of action of HFS. Pallidal HFS is also effective in treating idiopathic Parkinson’s disease as a hypokinetic disorder which at first sight seems to be a paradox. In our view, however, the GABAergic hypothesis can explain this and other clinical observations.

  12. Dendritic and Axonal Wiring Optimization of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    The way in which a neuronal tree expands plays an important role in its functional and computational characteristics. We aimed to study the existence of an optimal neuronal design for different types of cortical GABAergic neurons. To do this, we hypothesized that both the axonal and dendritic trees of individual neurons optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. We took the branching points of real three-dimensional neuronal reconstructions of the axonal and dendritic trees of different types of cortical interneurons and searched for the minimal wiring arborization structure that respects the branching points. We compared the minimal wiring arborization with real axonal and dendritic trees. We tested this optimization problem using a new approach based on graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques. We concluded that neuronal wiring is near-optimal in most of the tested neurons, although the wiring length of dendritic trees is generally nearer to the optimum. Therefore, wiring economy is related to the way in which neuronal arborizations grow irrespective of the marked differences in the morphology of the examined interneurons.

  13. Falcarindiol allosterically modulates GABAergic currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrembek, Paulina; Negri, Roberto; Kaczor, Przemysław; Czyżewska, Marta; Appendino, Giovanni; Mozrzymas, Jerzy Wladyslaw

    2012-04-27

    Falcarindiol (1), a C-17 polyacetylenic diol, shows a pleiotropic profile of bioactivity, but the mechanism(s) underlying its actions are largely unknown. Large amounts of 1 co-occur in water hemlock (Oenanthe crocata) along with the convulsant polyacetylenic toxin oenanthotoxin (2), a potent GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) inhibitor. Since these compounds are structurally and biogenetically related, it was considered of interest to evaluate whether 1 could affect GABAergic activity, and for this purpose a model of hippocampal cultured neurons was used. Compound 1 significantly increased the amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents, accelerated their onset, and prolonged the decay kinetics. This compound enhanced also the amplitude of currents elicited by 3 μM GABA and accelerated their fading, reducing, however, currents evoked by a saturating (10 mM) GABA concentration. Moreover, kinetic analysis of responses to 10 mM GABA revealed that 1 upregulated the rate and extent of desensitization and slowed the current onset and deactivation. Taken together, these data show that 1 exerts a potent modulatory action on GABA(A)Rs, possibly by modulating agonist binding and desensitization, overall potentially decreasing the toxicity of co-occurring GABA-inhibiting convulsant toxins. © 2012 American Chemical Society and American Society of Pharmacognosy

  14. Induced seismicity associated with enhanced geothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, Ernest; Majer, Ernest L.; Baria, Roy; Stark, Mitch; Oates, Stephen; Bommer, Julian; Smith, Bill; Asanuma, Hiroshi

    2006-09-26

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) offer the potential to significantly add to the world energy inventory. As with any development of new technology, some aspects of the technology has been accepted by the general public, but some have not yet been accepted and await further clarification before such acceptance is possible. One of the issues associated with EGS is the role of microseismicity during the creation of the underground reservoir and the subsequent extraction of the energy. The primary objectives of this white paper are to present an up-to-date review of the state of knowledge about induced seismicity during the creation and operation of enhanced geothermal systems, and to point out the gaps in knowledge that if addressed will allow an improved understanding of the mechanisms generating the events as well as serve as a basis to develop successful protocols for monitoring and addressing community issues associated with such induced seismicity. The information was collected though literature searches as well as convening three workshops to gather information from a wide audience. Although microseismicity has been associated with the development of production and injection operations in a variety of geothermal regions, there have been no or few adverse physical effects on the operations or on surrounding communities. Still, there is public concern over the possible amount and magnitude of the seismicity associated with current and future EGS operations. It is pointed out that microseismicity has been successfully dealt with in a variety of non-geothermal as well as geothermal environments. Several case histories are also presented to illustrate a variety of technical and public acceptance issues. It is concluded that EGS Induced seismicity need not pose any threat to the development of geothermal resources if community issues are properly handled. In fact, induced seismicity provides benefits because it can be used as a monitoring tool to understand the

  15. 3,4,5-Trimethoxycinnamic acid (TMCA), one of the constituents of Polygalae Radix enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors via GABAAergic systems in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Il; Han, Jin-Yi; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2013-10-01

    These experiments were performed to investigate whether 3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamic acid (TMCA), one of the constituents derived from Polygalae Radix, enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors, and to alter sleep architecture through the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems in mice. TMCA decreased the locomotor activity. TMCA prolonged total sleep time, and reduced sleep latency induced by pentobarbital, similar to muscimol, a GABAA agonist. From the electrocencephalogram recording for 6 h after TMCA administration, the number of sleep/wake cycles were reduced by TMCA. TMCA also increased the total sleep time and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. In addition, TMCA increased Cl(-) influx in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells of mice. TMCA increased the activation of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the expressions of γ-subunit of GABAA receptors in the cerebellar granule cells. However, α- and β-subunits proteins of GABAA receptors were not increased. Therefore, TMCA would increase pentobarbital induced-sleep and NREM sleep in mice. These results indicate that TMCA may enhance sleep and alter sleep architecture through GABAAergic systyems.

  16. Elements of molecular machinery of GABAergic signaling in the vertebrate cholinergic neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurullin, Leniz F; Nikolsky, Evgeny E; Malomouzh, Artem I

    2018-04-01

    It is generally accepted that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a signaling molecule abundant in central synapses. In a number of studies though, it has been shown that GABA signaling functions in the peripheral nervous system as well, in particular, in the synapses of sympathetic ganglia. However, there exists no firm evidence on the presence of GABAergic signaling cascade in the intercellular junctions of the somatic nerve system. By the use of immunohistochemistry methods, in the synaptic area of cholinergic neuromuscular contact in rat diaphragm, we have detected glutamate decarboxylase, the enzyme involved in synthesis of GABA, molecules of GABA, and also GAT-2, a protein responsible for transmembrane transport of GABA. Earlier we have also shown that metabotropic GABA B receptors have overlapping localization in the same compartment. Moreover, activation of GABA B receptors affects the intensity of acetylcholine release. These data taken together, allows us to suggest that in the mammalian cholinergic neuromuscular junction, GABA is synthesized and performs certain synaptic signaling function. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  17. Histamine facilitates GABAergic transmission in the rat entorhinal cortex: Roles of H1and H2receptors, Na+-permeable cation channels, and inward rectifier K+channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilz, Nicholas I; Lei, Saobo

    2017-05-01

    In the brain, histamine (HA) serves as a neuromodulator and a neurotransmitter released from the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN). HA is involved in wakefulness, thermoregulation, energy homeostasis, nociception, and learning and memory. The medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) receives inputs from the TMN and expresses HA receptors (H 1 , H 2 , and H 3 ). We investigated the effects of HA on GABAergic transmission in the MEC and found that HA significantly increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) with an EC 50 of 1.3 µM, but failed to significantly alter sIPSC amplitude. HA-induced increases in sIPSC frequency were sensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX), required extracellular Ca 2+ , and persisted when GDP-β-S, a G-protein inactivator, was applied postsynaptically via the recording pipettes, indicating that HA increased GABA release by facilitating the excitability of GABAergic interneurons in the MEC. Recordings from local MEC interneurons revealed that HA significantly increased their excitability as determined by membrane depolarization, generation of an inward current at -65 mV, and augmentation of action potential firing frequency. Both H 1 and H 2 receptors were involved in HA-induced increases in sIPSCs and interneuron excitability. Immunohistochemical staining showed that both H 1 and H 2 receptors are expressed on GABAergic interneurons in the MEC. HA-induced depolarization of interneurons involved a mixed ionic mechanism including activation of a Na + -permeable cation channel and inhibition of a cesium-sensitive inward rectifier K + channel, although HA also inhibited the delayed rectifier K + channels. Our results may provide a cellular mechanism, at least partially, to explain the roles of HA in the brain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dopamine D1-histamine H3 Receptor Heteromers Provide a Selective Link to MAPK Signaling in GABAergic Neurons of the Direct Striatal Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Hoffmann, Hanne; Gonzalez-Sepúlveda, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Vignes, Michel; McCormick, Peter J.; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Moratalla, Rosario; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Previously, using artificial cell systems, we identified receptor heteromers between the dopamine D1 or D2 receptors and the histamine H3 receptor. In addition, we demonstrated two biochemical characteristics of the dopamine D1 receptor-histamine H3 receptor heteromer. We have now extended this work to show the dopamine D1 receptor-histamine H3 receptor heteromer exists in the brain and serves to provide a novel link between the MAPK pathway and the GABAergic neurons in the direct striatal efferent pathway. Using the biochemical characteristics identified previously, we found that the ability of H3 receptor activation to stimulate p44 and p42 extracellular signal-regulated MAPK (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation was only observed in striatal slices of mice expressing D1 receptors but not in D1 receptor-deficient mice. On the other hand, the ability of both D1 and H3 receptor antagonists to block MAPK activation induced by either D1 or H3 receptor agonists was also found in striatal slices. Taken together, these data indicate the occurrence of D1-H3 receptor complexes in the striatum and, more importantly, that H3 receptor agonist-induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in striatal slices is mediated by D1-H3 receptor heteromers. Moreover, H3 receptor-mediated phospho-ERK 1/2 labeling co-distributed with D1 receptor-containing but not with D2 receptor-containing striatal neurons. These results indicate that D1-H3 receptor heteromers work as processors integrating dopamine- and histamine-related signals involved in controlling the function of striatal neurons of the direct striatal pathway. PMID:21173143

  19. Neuroinflammation increases GABAergic tone and impairs cognitive and motor function in hyperammonemia by increasing GAT-3 membrane expression. Reversal by sulforaphane by promoting M2 polarization of microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Gonzalez-Usano, Alba; Agusti, Ana; Balzano, Tiziano; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-04-18

    Hyperammonemia induces neuroinflammation and increases GABAergic tone in the cerebellum which contributes to cognitive and motor impairment in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The link between neuroinflammation and GABAergic tone remains unknown. New treatments reducing neuroinflammation and GABAergic tone could improve neurological impairment. The aims were, in hyperammonemic rats, to assess whether: (a) Enhancing endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanisms by sulforaphane treatment reduces neuroinflammation and restores learning and motor coordination. (b) Reduction of neuroinflammation by sulforaphane normalizes extracellular GABA and glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway and identify underlying mechanisms. (c) Identify steps by which hyperammonemia-induced microglial activation impairs cognitive and motor function and how sulforaphane restores them. We analyzed in control and hyperammonemic rats, treated or not with sulforaphane, (a) learning in the Y maze; (b) motor coordination in the beam walking; (c) glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway and extracellular GABA by microdialysis; (d) microglial activation, by analyzing by immunohistochemistry or Western blot markers of pro-inflammatory (M1) (IL-1b, Iba-1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) microglia (Iba1, IL-4, IL-10, Arg1, YM-1); and (e) membrane expression of the GABA transporter GAT-3. Hyperammonemia induces activation of astrocytes and microglia in the cerebellum as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Hyperammonemia-induced neuroinflammation is associated with increased membrane expression of the GABA transporter GAT-3, mainly in activated astrocytes. This is also associated with increased extracellular GABA in the cerebellum and with motor in-coordination and impaired learning ability in the Y maze. Sulforaphane promotes polarization of microglia from the M1 to the M2 phenotype, reducing IL-1b and increasing IL-4, IL-10, Arg1, and YM-1 in the cerebellum. This is associated with astrocytes deactivation and normalization of GAT-3 membrane

  20. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release and changes in the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca++]i) were studied in cultured GABAergic cerebral cortical neurons, from mice, upon depolarization with either an unphysiologically high potassium concentration (55 mM) or the physiological excitatory...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... in nature whereas that induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate is not....

  1. Direction-selective circuitry in rat retina develops independently of GABAergic, cholinergic and action potential activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Sun

    Full Text Available The ON-OFF direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs in the mammalian retina code image motion by responding much more strongly to movement in one direction. They do so by receiving inhibitory inputs selectively from a particular sector of processes of the overlapping starburst amacrine cells, a type of retinal interneuron. The mechanisms of establishment and regulation of this selective connection are unknown. Here, we report that in the rat retina, the morphology, physiology of the ON-OFF DSGCs and the circuitry for coding motion directions develop normally with pharmacological blockade of GABAergic, cholinergic activity and/or action potentials for over two weeks from birth. With recent results demonstrating light independent formation of the retinal DS circuitry, our results strongly suggest the formation of the circuitry, i.e., the connections between the second and third order neurons in the visual system, can be genetically programmed, although emergence of direction selectivity in the visual cortex appears to require visual experience.

  2. ‘Amygdala activation and GABAergic gene expression in hippocampal sub-regions at the interplay of stress and spatial learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osnat eHadad-Ophir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular processes in GABAergic local circuit neurons critically contribute to information processing in the hippocampus and to stress-induced activation of the amygdala. In the current study, we determined expression changes in GABA-related factors induced in subregions of the dorsal hippocampus as well as in the BLA of rats 5h after spatial learning in a Morris Water maze, using laser microdissection and quantitative real-time PCR. Spatial learning resulted in highly selective pattern of changes in hippocampal subregions: gene expression levels of neuropeptide Y were reduced in the hilus of the dentate gyrus, whereas somatostatin was increased in the stratum oriens of CA3. The GABA-synthesizing enzymes GAD65 and GAD67 as well as the neuropeptide cholecystokinin were reduced in stratum oriens of CA1. In the BLA, expression of GAD65 and GAD67 were reduced compared to a handled Control group. These expression patterns were further compared to alterations in a group of rats that have been exposed to the water maze but were not provided with an invisible escape platform. In this Water Exposure group, no expression changes were observed in any of the hippocampal subregions, but a differential regulation of all selected target genes was evident in the BLA. These findings suggest that expression changes of GABAergic factors in the hippocampus are associated with spatial learning, while additional stress effects modulate expression alterations in the BLA. Indeed, while in both experimental groups plasma corticosterone levels were enhanced, only Water Exposure stress activated the basolateral amygdala, as indicated by increased levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2. Altered GABAergic function in the BLA may thus contribute to memory consolidation in the hippocampus, in relation to levels of stress and emotionality associated with the experience.

  3. Sensitization of neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala via the decreased GABAergic inhibition contributes to the development of neuropathic pain-related anxiety-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Fang, Dong; Kong, Ling-Yu; Jin, Zi-Run; Cai, Jie; Kang, Xue-Jing; Wan, You; Xing, Guo-Gang

    2014-10-04

    Despite high prevalence of anxiety accompanying with chronic pain, the mechanisms underlying pain-related anxiety are largely unknown. With its well-documented role in pain and emotion processing, the amygdala may act as a key player in pathogenesis of neuropathic pain-related anxiety. Pain-related plasticity and sensitization of CeA (central nucleus of the amygdala) neurons have been shown in several models of chronic pain. In addition, firing pattern of neurons with spike output can powerfully affect functional output of the brain nucleus, and GABAergic neurons are crucial in the modulation of neuronal excitability. In this study, we first investigated whether pain-related plasticity (e.g. alteration of neuronal firing patterns) and sensitization of CeA neurons contribute to nerve injury-evoked anxiety in neuropathic rats. Furthermore, we explored whether GABAergic disinhibition is responsible for regulating firing patterns and intrinsic excitabilities of CeA neurons as well as for pain-related anxiety in neuropathic rats. We discovered that spinal nerve ligation (SNL) produced neuropathic pain-related anxiety-like behaviors in rats, which could be specifically inhibited by intra-CeA administration of anti-anxiety drug diazepam. Moreover, we found potentiated plasticity and sensitization of CeA neurons in SNL-induced anxiety rats, of which including: 1) increased burst firing pattern and early-adapting firing pattern; 2) increased spike frequency and intrinsic excitability; 3) increased amplitude of both after-depolarized-potential (ADP) and sub-threshold membrane potential oscillation. In addition, we observed a remarkable reduction of GABAergic inhibition in CeA neurons in SNL-induced anxiety rats, which was proved to be important for altered firing patterns and hyperexcitability of CeA neurons, thereby greatly contributing to the development of neuropathic pain-related anxiety. Accordantly, activation of GABAergic inhibition by intra-CeA administration of

  4. Neuron-astrocyte interaction enhance GABAergic synaptic transmission in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław eKaczor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain and mechanisms of GABAergic inhibition have been intensely investigated in the past decades. Recent studies provided evidence for an important role of astrocytes in shaping GABAergic currents. One of the most obvious, but yet poorly understood, mechanisms of the cross-talk between GABAergic currents and astrocytes is metabolism including neurotransmitter homeostasis. In particular, how modulation of GABAergic currents by astrocytes depends on key enzymes involved in cellular metabolism remains largely unknown. To address this issue, we have considered two simple models of neuronal cultures: nominally astrocyte-free neuronal culture (NC and neuronal-astrocytic co-cultures (ANCC and miniature Inhibitory Postsynaptic Currents (mIPSCs were recorded in control conditions and in the presence of respective enzyme blockers. We report that enrichment of neuronal culture with astrocytes results in a marked increase in mIPSC frequency. This enhancement of GABAergic activity was accompanied by increased number of GAD65 and vGAT puncta, indicating that at least a part of the frequency enhancement was due to increased number of synaptic contacts. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase (with MSO strongly reduced mIPSC frequency in ANCC but had no effect in NC. Moreover, treatment of ANCC with inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase (BAYU6751 or with selective inhibitor of astrocytic Krebs cycle,fluoroacetate, resulted in a marked reduction of mIPSC frequency in ANCC having no effect in NC. We conclude that GABAergic synaptic transmission strongly depends on neuron-astrocyte interaction in a manner dependent on key metabolic enzymes as well as on the Krebs cycle.

  5. Prior stress promotes the generalization of contextual fear memories: Involvement of the gabaergic signaling within the basolateral amygdala complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, C L; Otamendi, A; Calfa, G D; Molina, V A

    2018-04-20

    Fear generalization occurs when a response, previously acquired with a threatening stimulus, is transferred to a similar one. However, it could be maladaptive when stimuli that do not represent a real threat are appraised as dangerous, which is a hallmark of several anxiety disorders. Stress exposure is a major risk factor for the occurrence of anxiety disorders and it is well established that it influences different phases of fear memory; nevertheless, its impact on the generalization of contextual fear memories has been less studied. In the present work, we have characterized the impact of acute restraint stress prior to contextual fear conditioning on the generalization of this fear memory, and the role of the GABAergic signaling within the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA) on the stress modulatory effects. We have found that a single stress exposure promoted the generalization of this memory trace to a different context that was well discriminated in unstressed conditioned animals. Moreover, this effect was dependent on the formation of a contextual associative memory and on the testing order (i.e., conditioning context first vs generalization context first). Furthermore, we observed that increasing GABA-A signaling by intra-BLA midazolam administration prior to the stressful session exposure prevented the generalization of fear memory, whereas intra-BLA administration of the GABA-A antagonist (Bicuculline), prior to fear conditioning, induced the generalization of fear memory in unstressed rats. We concluded that stress exposure, prior to contextual fear conditioning, promotes the generalization of fear memory and that the GABAergic transmission within the BLA has a critical role in this phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. GABAergic synapse properties may explain genetic variation in hippocampal network oscillations in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim S Heistek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive ability and the properties of brain oscillation are highly heritable in humans. Genetic variation underlying oscillatory activity might give rise to differences in cognition and behavior. How genetic diversity translates into altered properties of oscillations and synchronization of neuronal activity is unknown. To address this issue, we investigated cellular and synaptic mechanisms of hippocampal fast network oscillations in eight genetically distinct inbred mouse strains. The frequency of carbachol-induced oscillations differed substantially between mouse strains. Since GABAergic inhibition sets oscillation frequency, we studied the properties of inhibitory synaptic inputs (IPSCs received by CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells of three mouse strains that showed the highest, lowest and intermediate frequencies of oscillations. In CA3 pyramidal cells, the frequency of rhythmic IPSC input showed the same strain differences as the frequency of field oscillations. Furthermore, IPSC decay times in both CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells were faster in mouse strains with higher oscillation frequencies than in mouse strains with lower oscillation frequency, suggesting that differences in GABAA-receptor subunit composition exist between these strains. Indeed, gene expression of GABAA-receptor β2 (Gabrb2 and β3 (Gabrb2 subunits was higher in mouse strains with faster decay kinetics compared with mouse strains with slower decay kinetics. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons in mouse strains with higher oscillation frequencies and faster decay kinetics fired action potential at higher frequencies. These data indicate that differences in genetic background may result in different GABAA-receptor subunit expression, which affects the rhythm of pyramidal neuron firing and fast network activity through GABA synapse kinetics.

  7. Hypothalamic vasopressinergic projections innervate central amygdala GABAergic neurons: implications for anxiety and stress coping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Salvador Hernandez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The arginine-vasopressin (AVP-containing hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory neurons (VPMNNs are known for their role in hydro-electrolytic balance control via their projections to neurohypophysis. Recently, projections from these same neurons to hippocampus, habenula, and other brain regions, in which vasopressin infusion modulates contingent social and emotionally-affected behaviors, have been reported. Here, we present evidence that VPMNN collaterals also project to the amygdaloid complex, and establish synaptic connections with neurons in central amygdala (CeA. The density of AVP innervation in amygdala was substantially increased in adult rats that had experienced neonatal maternal separation (MS, consistent with our previous observations that MS enhances VPMNN number in the paraventricular (PVN and supraoptic (SON nuclei of the hypothalamus. In the CeA, V1a AVP receptor mRNA was only observed in GABAergic neurons, demonstrated by complete co-localization of V1a transcripts in neurons expressing Gad1 and Gad2 transcripts in CeA using the RNAscope method. V1b and V2 receptors mRNA were not detected, using the same method. Water-deprivation for 24 hrs, which increased the metabolic activity of VPMNNs, also increased anxiety-like behavior measured using the elevated plus maze test, and this effect was mimicked by bilateral microinfusion of VP into the CeA. Anxious behavior induced by either water deprivation or VP infusion was reversed by CeA infusion of V1a antagonist. VPMNNs are thus a newly discovered source of central amygdala inhibitory circuit modulation, through which both early-life and adult stress coping signals are conveyed from the hypothalamus to the amygdala.

  8. Decreased rhythmic GABAergic septal activity and memory-associated theta oscillations after hippocampal amyloid-beta pathology in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villette, Vincent; Poindessous-Jazat, Frédérique; Simon, Axelle; Léna, Clément; Roullot, Elodie; Bellessort, Brice; Epelbaum, Jacques; Dutar, Patrick; Stéphan, Aline

    2010-08-18

    The memory deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease result to a great extent from hippocampal network dysfunction. The coordination of this network relies on theta (symbol) oscillations generated in the medial septum. Here, we investigated in rats the impact of hippocampal amyloid beta (Abeta) injections on the physiological and cognitive functions that depend on the septohippocampal system. Hippocampal Abeta injections progressively impaired behavioral performances, the associated hippocampal theta power, and theta frequency response in a visuospatial recognition test. These alterations were associated with a specific reduction in the firing of the identified rhythmic bursting GABAergic neurons responsible for the propagation of the theta rhythm to the hippocampus, but without loss of medial septal neurons. Such results indicate that hippocampal Abeta treatment leads to a specific functional depression of inhibitory projection neurons of the medial septum, resulting in the functional impairment of the temporal network.

  9. GABAergic Neurons in the Rat Medial Septal Complex Express Relaxin-3 Receptor (RXFP3 mRNA

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    Hector Albert-Gascó

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The medial septum (MS complex modulates hippocampal function and related behaviors. Septohippocampal projections promote and control different forms of hippocampal synchronization. Specifically, GABAergic and cholinergic projections targeting the hippocampal formation from the MS provide bursting discharges to promote theta rhythm, or tonic activity to promote gamma oscillations. In turn, the MS is targeted by ascending projections from the hypothalamus and brainstem. One of these projections arises from the nucleus incertus in the pontine tegmentum, which contains GABA neurons that co-express the neuropeptide relaxin-3 (Rln3. Both stimulation of the nucleus incertus and septal infusion of Rln3 receptor agonist peptides promotes hippocampal theta rhythm. The Gi/o-protein-coupled receptor, relaxin-family peptide receptor 3 (RXFP3, is the cognate receptor for Rln3 and identification of the transmitter phenotype of neurons expressing RXFP3 in the septohippocampal system can provide further insights into the role of Rln3 transmission in the promotion of septohippocampal theta rhythm. Therefore, we used RNAscope multiplex in situ hybridization to characterize the septal neurons expressing Rxfp3 mRNA in the rat. Our results demonstrate that Rxfp3 mRNA is abundantly expressed in vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT mRNA- and parvalbumin (PV mRNA-positive GABA neurons in MS, whereas ChAT mRNA-positive acetylcholine neurons lack Rxfp3 mRNA. Approximately 75% of Rxfp3 mRNA-positive neurons expressed vGAT mRNA (and 22% were PV mRNA-positive, while the remaining 25% expressed Rxfp3 mRNA only, consistent with a potential glutamatergic phenotype. Similar proportions were observed in the posterior septum. The occurrence of RXFP3 in PV-positive GABAergic neurons gives support to a role for the Rln3-RXFP3 system in septohippocampal theta rhythm.

  10. Increasing extracellular cGMP in cerebellum in vivo reduces neuroinflammation, GABAergic tone and motor in-coordination in hyperammonemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Balzano, Tiziano; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Malaguarnera, Michele; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2018-03-01

    Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to cognitive impairment and motor in-coordination in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Hyperammonemia-induced neuroinflammation mediates the neurological alterations in hepatic encephalopathy. Intracerebral administration of extracellular cGMP restores some but not all types of cognitive impairment. Motor in-coordination, is mainly due to increased GABAergic tone in cerebellum. We hypothesized that extracellular cGMP would restore motor coordination in hyperammonemic rats by normalizing GABAergic tone in cerebellum and that this would be mediated by reduction of neuroinflammation. The aims of this work were to assess whether chronic intracerebral administration of cGMP to hyperammonemic rats: 1) restores motor coordination; 2) reduces neuroinflammation in cerebellum; 3) reduces extracellular GABA levels and GABAergic tone in cerebellum; and also 4) to provide some advance in the understanding on the molecular mechanisms involved. The results reported show that rats with chronic hyperammonemia show neuroinflammation in cerebellum, including microglia and astrocytes activation and increased levels of IL-1b and TNFa and increased membrane expression of the TNFa receptor. This is associated with increased glutaminase expression and extracellular glutamate, increased amount of the GABA transporter GAT-3 in activated astrocytes, increased extracellular GABA in cerebellum and motor in-coordination. Chronic intracerebral administration of extracellular cGMP to rats with chronic hyperammonemia reduces neuroinflammation, including microglia and astrocytes activation and membrane expression of the TNFa receptor. This is associated with reduced nuclear NF-κB, glutaminase expression and extracellular glutamate, reduced amount of the GABA transporter GAT-3 in activated astrocytes and reduced extracellular GABA in cerebellum and restoration of motor coordination. The data support that extracellular cGMP restores motor coordination in

  11. Action of tachykinins in the hippocampus: facilitation of inhibitory drive to GABAergic interneurons.

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    Ogier, R; Wrobel, L J; Raggenbass, M

    2008-10-15

    By acting on neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors, neuropeptides of the tachykinin family can powerfully excite rat hippocampal GABAergic interneurons located in the CA1 region and by this way indirectly inhibit CA1 pyramidal neurons. In addition to contact pyramidal neurons, however, GABAergic hippocampal interneurons can also innervate other interneurons. We thus asked whether activation of tachykinin-sensitive interneurons could indirectly inhibit other interneurons. The study was performed in hippocampal slices of young adult rats. Synaptic events were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. We found that substance P enhanced GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a majority of the interneurons tested. Miniature, action potential-independent inhibitory postsynaptic currents were unaffected by substance P, as were evoked inhibitory synaptic currents. This suggests that the peptide acted at the somatodendritic membrane of interneurons, rather than at their axon terminals. The effect of substance P was mimicked by a selective NK1 receptor agonist, but not by neurokinin 2 (NK2) or neurokinin 3 (NK3) receptor agonists, and was suppressed by a NK1 selective receptor antagonist. In contrast to substance P, oxytocin, another peptide capable of activating hippocampal interneurons, had no effect on the inhibitory synaptic drive onto interneurons. We conclude that tachykinins, by acting on NK1 receptors, can influence the hippocampal activity by indirectly inhibiting both pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons. Depending on the precise balance between these effects, tachykinins may either activate or depress hippocampal network activity.

  12. Expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and identification of GABAergic cells in the ischemic rat dentate gyrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Finsen, Bente

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the glutamic acid dexcarboxylase (GAD) mRNA and protein isoforms as markers for ischemic loss of GABAergic neurons in the dentate hilus. Stereological counts of these neurons were performed in rats surviving 8 days after 10 min of transient forebrain ischemia, and in control...

  13. Expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and identification of GABAergic cells in the ischemic rat dentate gyrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Finsen, Bente

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the glutamic acid dexarboxylase (GAD) mRNA and protein isoforms as markers for ischemic loss of GABAergic neurons in the dentate hilus. Stereological counts of these neurons were performed in rats surviving 8 days after 10 min of transient forebrain ischemia, and in control...

  14. GABAergic interneuron to astrocyte signalling: a neglected form of cell communication in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, Gabriele; Mariotti, Letizia; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2014-10-19

    GABAergic interneurons represent a minority of all cortical neurons and yet they efficiently control neural network activities in all brain areas. In parallel, glial cell astrocytes exert a broad control of brain tissue homeostasis and metabolism, modulate synaptic transmission and contribute to brain information processing in a dynamic interaction with neurons that is finely regulated in time and space. As most studies have focused on glutamatergic neurons and excitatory transmission, our knowledge of functional interactions between GABAergic interneurons and astrocytes is largely defective. Here, we critically discuss the currently available literature that hints at a potential relevance of this specific signalling in brain function. Astrocytes can respond to GABA through different mechanisms that include GABA receptors and transporters. GABA-activated astrocytes can, in turn, modulate local neuronal activity by releasing gliotransmitters including glutamate and ATP. In addition, astrocyte activation by different signals can modulate GABAergic neurotransmission. Full clarification of the reciprocal signalling between different GABAergic interneurons and astrocytes will improve our understanding of brain network complexity and has the potential to unveil novel therapeutic strategies for brain disorders. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of the Hippocampal Network by VGLUT3-Positive CCK- GABAergic Basket Cells

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    Caroline Fasano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal interneurons release the inhibitory transmitter GABA to regulate excitation, rhythm generation and synaptic plasticity. A subpopulation of GABAergic basket cells co-expresses the GABA/glycine vesicular transporters (VIAAT and the atypical type III vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT3; therefore, these cells have the ability to signal with both GABA and glutamate. GABAergic transmission by basket cells has been extensively characterized but nothing is known about the functional implications of VGLUT3-dependent glutamate released by these cells. Here, using VGLUT3-null mice we observed that the loss of VGLUT3 results in a metaplastic shift in synaptic plasticity at Shaeffer’s collaterals – CA1 synapses and an altered theta oscillation. These changes were paralleled by the loss of a VGLUT3-dependent inhibition of GABAergic current in CA1 pyramidal layer. Therefore presynaptic type III metabotropic could be activated by glutamate released from VGLUT3-positive interneurons. This putative presynaptic heterologous feedback mechanism inhibits local GABAergic tone and regulates the hippocampal neuronal network.

  16. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in mice

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    Chun eYang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic & PV neurons with the size (>20 µm and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min bath application of adenosine (100 μM decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM. Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1-receptor mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically-projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required for

  17. Microglial morphology and dynamic behavior is regulated by ionotropic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission.

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    Aurora M Fontainhas

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Microglia represent the primary resident immune cells in the CNS, and have been implicated in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Under basal or "resting" conditions, microglia possess ramified morphologies and exhibit dynamic surveying movements in their processes. Despite the prominence of this phenomenon, the function and regulation of microglial morphology and dynamic behavior are incompletely understood. We investigate here whether and how neurotransmission regulates "resting" microglial morphology and behavior. METHODS: We employed an ex vivo mouse retinal explant system in which endogenous neurotransmission and dynamic microglial behavior are present. We utilized live-cell time-lapse confocal imaging to study the morphology and behavior of GFP-labeled retinal microglia in response to neurotransmitter agonists and antagonists. Patch clamp electrophysiology and immunohistochemical localization of glutamate receptors were also used to investigate direct-versus-indirect effects of neurotransmission by microglia. RESULTS: Retinal microglial morphology and dynamic behavior were not cell-autonomously regulated but are instead modulated by endogenous neurotransmission. Morphological parameters and process motility were differentially regulated by different modes of neurotransmission and were increased by ionotropic glutamatergic neurotransmission and decreased by ionotropic GABAergic neurotransmission. These neurotransmitter influences on retinal microglia were however unlikely to be directly mediated; local applications of neurotransmitters were unable to elicit electrical responses on microglia patch-clamp recordings and ionotropic glutamatergic receptors were not located on microglial cell bodies or processes by immunofluorescent labeling. Instead, these influences were mediated indirectly via extracellular ATP, released in response to glutamatergic neurotransmission through probenecid-sensitive pannexin hemichannels

  18. Diversity among principal and GABAergic neurons of the anterior olfactory nucleus

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    Rachel eKay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the cellular components of neural circuits is an essential step in discerning regional function. The anterior olfactory nucleus (AON is reciprocally connected to both the ipsi- and contralateral olfactory bulb (OB and piriform cortex (PC, and, as a result, can broadly influence the central processing of odor information. While both the AON and PC are simple cortical structures, the regions differ in many ways including their general organization, internal wiring and synaptic connections with other brain areas. The present work used targeted whole-cell patch clamping to investigate the morphological and electrophysiological properties of the AON’s two main neuronal populations: excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Retrograde fluorescent tracers placed into either the OB or PC identified projection neurons. Two classes were observed with different physiological signatures and locations (superficial and deep pyramidal neurons, suggesting the AON contains independent efferent channels. Transgenic mice in which GABA-containing cells expressed green fluorescent protein were used to assess inhibitory neurons. These cells were further identified as containing one or more of seven molecular markers including three calcium-binding proteins (calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin or four neuropeptides (somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin. The proportion of GABAergic cells containing these markers varied across subregions reinforcing notions that the AON has local functional subunits. At least five classes of inhibitory cells were observed: fast-spiking multipolar, regular-spiking multipolar, superficial neurogliaform, deep neurogliaform, and horizontal neurons. While some of these cell types are similar to those reported in the PC and other cortical regions, the AON also has unique populations. These studies provide the first examination of the cellular components of this simple

  19. [Gabaergic hypothesis of epilepsy and clinical experience: controversial actions of the new generation gabamimetic antiepileptic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, B

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in CNS can elevate level of neuronal excitability by the mechanisms of hyperpolarization. Gabaergic hypothesis of epileptogenesis influenced development of a group of gabamimetic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Powerful conventional AEDs barbiturates and benzodiazepines can directly activate GABA-A receptor but their usefulness is limited by development of dependence and tolerance to antiseizure activity. The second generation AEDs have been achieved by a rationale synthesis of compounds that could mimic or augment the activity of endogenous GABA. Vigabatrin (VGB) irreversibly inhibits GABA-T activity, tiagabine (TGB) inhibits GABA-reuptake system (GAT-1) and gabapentin (GPT) enhances GABA turnover in CNS. New drugs with selective and specific influence on GABA neurotransmission are non-toxic and well-tolerated, but some side-effects (aggravation of seizures, visual field deficit and psychotic reactions) seems to be strictly connected with their pharmacodynamic properties. Absence and probably myoclonic seizures noted in about 10% of patients under VGB seems to be the result of disturbed GABA inhibition in thalamic interneurons and non-controlled hyperactivity of excitatory neocortex-thalamus-neocotrex circuits. Perimetric examination might reveal peripheral, persistent binasal visual field deficit in about 30% of patients treated with VGB. This is probably the effect of cytotoxic influence of enormous accumulation of GABA in retinal neurons. Barbiturates and benzodiazepines can exacerbate intellectual functioning and behaviour. Some emotional and reactive disturbances are more characteristic for newer drugs. Serious depressive reactions and psychoses were observed respectively in 12.5 and 2.5% epileptics under VGB and anecdotically after TGB or GPT therapy. Newer selective and specific gabamimetic AEDs play an essential role as add-on therapy of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy, but they did not bring

  20. Mechanisms of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hase, S.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    2001-01-01

    Some of non-pathogenic rhizosphere bacteria reduce disease by activating a resistance mechanism in the plant called rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR). Rhizobacteria-mediated ISR resembles classic pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in that both types of

  1. Caloric restriction selectively reduces the GABAergic phenotype of mouse hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvie, Brooke C; King, Connie M; Hughes, Alexander R; Dicken, Matthew S; Dennison, Christina S; Hentges, Shane T

    2017-01-15

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons release peptide products that potently inhibit food intake and reduce body weight. These neurons also release the amino acid transmitter GABA, which can inhibit downstream neurons. Although the release of peptide transmitters from POMC neurons is regulated by energy state, whether similar regulation of GABA release might occur had not been examined. The present results show that the GABAergic phenotype of POMC neurons is decreased selectively by caloric deficit and not altered by high-fat diet or stress. The fact the GABAergic phenotype of POMC neurons is sensitive to energy state suggests a dynamic physiological role for this transmitter and highlights the importance of determining the functional consequence of GABA released from POMC neurons in terms of the regulation of normal energy balance. In addition to peptide transmitters, hypothalamic neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons, also release amino acid transmitters that can alter energy balance regulation. While recent studies show that the GABAergic nature of AgRP neurons is increased by caloric restriction, whether the GABAergic phenotype of POMC neurons is also regulated in an energy-state-dependent manner has not been previously examined. The present studies used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect Gad1 and Gad2 mRNA in POMC neurons, as these encode the glutamate decarboxylase enzymes GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. The results show that both short-term fasting and chronic caloric restriction significantly reduce the percentage of POMC neurons expressing Gad1 mRNA in both male and female mice, with less of an effect on Gad2 expression. Neither acute nor chronic intermittent restraint stress altered Gad1 expression in POMC neurons. Maintenance on a high-fat diet also did not affect the portion POMC neurons expressing Gad1, suggesting that the GABAergic phenotype of POMC neurons is particularly sensitive

  2. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM REDUCES PARVALBUMIN EXPRESSION IN GABAERGIC NEURONS OF CORTEX AND HIPPOCAMPUS: IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL FINDINGS AND FUNCTIONAL CORRELATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GABAergic interneurons comprise the bulk of local inhibitory neuronal circuitry in cortex and hippocampus and a subpopulation of these interneurons contain the calcium binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). A previous report indicated that severe hypothyroidism reduced PV immunoreact...

  3. Female contact modulates male aggression via a sexually dimorphic GABAergic circuit in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Quan; Song, Yuanquan; Yang, Chung-Hui; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2014-01-01

    Intraspecific male-male aggression, which is important for sexual selection, is regulated by environment, experience and internal states through largely undefined molecular and cellular mechanisms. To understand the basic neural pathway underlying the modulation of this innate behavior, we established a behavioral assay in Drosophila melanogaster and investigated the relationship between sexual experience and aggression. In the presence of mating partners, adult male flies exhibited elevated levels of aggression, which was largely suppressed by prior exposure to females via a sexually dimorphic neural mechanism. The suppression involved the ability of male flies to detect females by contact chemosensation through the pheromone-sensing ion channel ppk29 and was mediated by male-specific GABAergic neurons acting on the GABAA receptor RDL in target cells. Silencing or activating this circuit led to dis-inhibition or elimination of sex-related aggression, respectively. We propose that the GABAergic inhibition represents a critical cellular mechanism that enables prior experience to modulate aggression.

  4. Triple Function of Synaptotagmin 7 Ensures Efficiency of High-Frequency Transmission at Central GABAergic Synapses

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    Chong Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmin 7 (Syt7 is thought to be a Ca2+ sensor that mediates asynchronous transmitter release and facilitation at synapses. However, Syt7 is strongly expressed in fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing GABAergic interneurons, and the output synapses of these neurons produce only minimal asynchronous release and show depression rather than facilitation. To resolve this apparent contradiction, we examined the effects of genetic elimination of Syt7 on synaptic transmission at the GABAergic basket cell (BC-Purkinje cell (PC synapse in cerebellum. Our results indicate that at the BC-PC synapse, Syt7 contributes to asynchronous release, pool replenishment, and facilitation. In combination, these three effects ensure efficient transmitter release during high-frequency activity and guarantee frequency independence of inhibition. Our results identify a distinct function of Syt7: ensuring the efficiency of high-frequency inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  5. Development of Cortical GABAergic Neurons: Interplay of progenitor diversity and environmental factors on fate specification

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    Juliana Alves Brandão

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cortical GABAergic interneurons constitute an extremely diverse population of cells organized in a well-defined topology of precisely interconnected cells. They play a crucial role regulating inhibitory-excitatory balance in brain circuits, gating sensory perception and regulating spike timing to brain oscillations during distinct behaviors. Dysfunctions in the establishment of proper inhibitory circuits have been associated to several brain disorders such as autism, epilepsy and schizophrenia. In the rodent adult cortex, inhibitory neurons are generated during the second gestational week from distinct progenitor lineages located in restricted domains of the ventral telencephalon. However, only recently, studies have revealed some of the mechanisms generating the heterogeneity of neuronal subtypes and their modes of integration in brain networks. Here we will discuss some the events involved in the production of cortical GABAergic neuron diversity with focus on the interaction between intrinsically driven genetic programs and environmental signals during development.

  6. General anesthesia as a possible GABAergic modulator affects visual processing in children

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    Carlijn eVan Den Boomen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available GABA inhibitory interneurons play an important role in visual processing, as is revealed by studies administering drugs in human and monkey adults. Investigating this process in children requires different methodologies, due to ethical considerations. The current study aimed to investigate whether a new method, being general anesthesia using Sevoflurance, can be used to trace the effects of GABAergic modulation on visual brain functioning in children. To this aim, visual processing was investigated in children aged 4-12 years who were scheduled for minor urologic procedures under general anesthesia in day care treatment. In a visual segmentation task, the difference in Event-Related Potential (ERP response to homogeneous and textured stimuli was investigated. In addition, psychophysical performance on visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured. Results were compared between before and shortly after anesthesia. In two additional studies, effects at one day after anesthesia and possible effects of task-repetition were investigated. ERP results showed longer latency and lower amplitude of the Texture Negativity component shortly after compared to before anesthesia. No effects of anesthesia on psychophysical measurements were found. No effects at one day after anesthesia or of repetition were revealed either. These results show that GABAergic modulation through general anesthesia affects ERP reflections of visual segmentation in a similar way in children as benzodiazepine does in adults, but that effects are not permanent. This demonstrates that ERP measurement after anesthesia is a successful method to study effects of GABAergic modulation in children.

  7. Spontaneous Vesicle Fusion Is Differentially Regulated at Cholinergic and GABAergic Synapses

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    Haowen Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The locomotion of C. elegans is balanced by excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter release at neuromuscular junctions. However, the molecular mechanisms that maintain the balance of synaptic transmission remain enigmatic. Here, we investigated the function of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in triggering spontaneous release at cholinergic and GABAergic synapses. Recordings of the miniature excitatory/inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs and mIPSCs, respectively showed that UNC-2/CaV2 and EGL-19/CaV1 channels are the two major triggers for spontaneous release. Notably, however, Ca2+-independent spontaneous release was observed at GABAergic but not cholinergic synapses. Functional screening led to the identification of hypomorphic unc-64/Syntaxin-1A and snb-1/VAMP2 mutants in which mEPSCs are severely impaired, whereas mIPSCs remain unaltered, indicating differential regulation of these currents at cholinergic and GABAergic synapses. Moreover, Ca2+-independent spontaneous GABA release was nearly abolished in the hypomorphic unc-64 and snb-1 mutants, suggesting distinct mechanisms for Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent spontaneous release.

  8. Multiple distinct subtypes of GABAergic neurons in mouse visual cortex identified by triple immunostaining

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    Yuri Gonchar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of cortical interneurons use GABA (gamma amino butyric acid as inhibitory neurotransmitter. GABAergic neurons are morphologically, connectionally, electrically and chemically heterogeneous. In rat cerebral cortex three distinct groups of GABAergic interneurons have been identifi ed by the expression of parvalbumin (PV, calretinin (CR and somatostatin (SOM. Recent studies in mouse cerebral cortex have revealed a different organization in which the CR and SOM populations are partially overlapping. Because CR and SOM neurons derive from different progenitors located in different embryonic structures, the coexpression of CR + SOM suggests that the chemical differentiation of interneurons is regulated postmitotically. Here, we have taken an important fi rst step towards understanding this process by triple immunostaining mouse visual cortex with a panel of antibodies, which has been used extensively for classifying developing interneurons. We have found at least 13 distinct groups of GABAergic neurons which include PV, CR, SOM, CCK (cholecystokinin, CR + SOM, CR + NPY (neuropeptide Y, CR + VIP (vasointestinal polypeptide, SOM + NPY, SOM + VIP, VIP + ChAT (choline acetyltransferase, CCK + NPY, CR + SOM + NPY and CR + SOM + VIP expressing cells. Triple immunostaining with PV, CR and SOM antibodies during postnatal development further showed that PV is never colocalized with CR and SOM. Importantly, expression of SOM and CR + SOM developed after the percentage of CR cells that do not express SOM has reached the mature level, suggesting that the chemical differentiation of SOM and CR + SOM neurons is a postnatal event, which may be controlled by transcriptional regulation.

  9. Cytosolic Accumulation of L-Proline Disrupts GABA-Ergic Transmission through GAD Blockade

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    Gregg W. Crabtree

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Proline dehydrogenase (PRODH, which degrades L-proline, resides within the schizophrenia-linked 22q11.2 deletion suggesting a role in disease. Supporting this, elevated L-proline levels have been shown to increase risk for psychotic disorders. Despite the strength of data linking PRODH and L-proline to neuropsychiatric diseases, targets of disease-relevant concentrations of L-proline have not been convincingly described. Here, we show that Prodh-deficient mice with elevated CNS L-proline display specific deficits in high-frequency GABA-ergic transmission and gamma-band oscillations. We find that L-proline is a GABA-mimetic and can act at multiple GABA-ergic targets. However, at disease-relevant concentrations, GABA-mimesis is limited to competitive blockade of glutamate decarboxylase leading to reduced GABA production. Significantly, deficits in GABA-ergic transmission are reversed by enhancing net GABA production with the clinically relevant compound vigabatrin. These findings indicate that accumulation of a neuroactive metabolite can lead to molecular and synaptic dysfunction and help to understand mechanisms underlying neuropsychiatric disease.

  10. INDUCIBLE TRANSPORT SYSTEM FOR CITRULLINE IN STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BIBB, W R; STRAUGHN, W R

    1964-04-01

    Bibb, William R. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), and W. R. Straughan. Inducible transport system for citrulline in Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 87:815-822. 1964.-With Streptococcus faecalis F24, it was demonstrated: that the citrulline transport mechanism, induced by growth in arginine, follows enzyme kinetics; that cell membranes from induced and noninduced cells differ considerably in their ability to adsorb citrulline; that protoplasts demonstrate a similar selectivity; and that, throughout various alterations of the growth medium and growth conditions, a consistent difference in citrulline uptake between induced and noninduced cells was present. A proposed explanation based on experimental findings is offered.

  11. ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROID ABUSE: MULTIPLE MECHANISMS OF REGULATION OF GABAERGIC SYNAPSES IN NEUROENDOCRINE CONTROL REGIONS OF THE RODENT FOREBRAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlander, Joseph G.; Porter, Donna M.; Penatti, Carlos A. A.; Henderson, Leslie P.

    2011-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone originally developed for clinical purposes, but now predominantly taken at suprapharmacological levels as drugs of abuse. To date, nearly 100 different AAS compounds that vary in metabolic fate and physiological effects have been designed and synthesised. While administered for their ability to enhance muscle mass and performance, untoward side effects of AAS use include changes in reproductive and sexual behaviours. Specifically, AAS, depending on the type of compound administered, can delay or advance pubertal onset, lead to irregular oestrous cyclicity, diminished male and female sexual behaviours, and accelerate reproductive senescence. Numerous brains regions and neurotransmitter signalling systems are involved in the generation of these behaviours, and are potential targets for both chronic and acute actions of the AAS. However critical to all of these behaviours is neurotransmission mediated by GABAA receptors within a nexus of interconnected forebrain regions that includes the medial preoptic area (mPOA), the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Here we review how exposure to AAS alters GABAergic transmission and neural activity within these forebrain regions, taking advantage of in vitro systems and both wild-type and genetically altered mouse strains, in order to better understand how these synthetic steroids affect the neural systems that underlie the regulation of reproduction and the expression of sexual behaviours. PMID:21554430

  12. Migration-induced architectures of planetary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuszkiewicz, Ewa; Podlewska-Gaca, Edyta

    2012-06-01

    The recent increase in number of known multi-planet systems gives a unique opportunity to study the processes responsible for planetary formation and evolution. Special attention is given to the occurrence of mean-motion resonances, because they carry important information about the history of the planetary systems. At the early stages of the evolution, when planets are still embedded in a gaseous disc, the tidal interactions between the disc and planets cause the planetary orbital migration. The convergent differential migration of two planets embedded in a gaseous disc may result in the capture into a mean-motion resonance. The orbital migration taking place during the early phases of the planetary system formation may play an important role in shaping stable planetary configurations. An understanding of this stage of the evolution will provide insight on the most frequently formed architectures, which in turn are relevant for determining the planet habitability. The aim of this paper is to present the observational properties of these planetary systems which contain confirmed or suspected resonant configurations. A complete list of known systems with such configurations is given. This list will be kept by us updated from now on and it will be a valuable reference for studying the dynamics of extrasolar systems and testing theoretical predictions concerned with the origin and the evolution of planets, which are the most plausible places for existence and development of life.

  13. Identification of a novel, fast-acting GABAergic antidepressant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, K M J; Ramaker, M J; Barkley-Levenson, A M; Sidhu, P S; Elkin, P K; Reddy, M K; Guthrie, M L; Cook, J M; Rawal, V H; Arnold, L A; Dulawa, S C; Palmer, A A

    2018-02-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for depression exhibit slow onset, side effects and limited efficacy. Therefore, identification of novel fast-onset antidepressants is desirable. GLO1 is a ubiquitous cellular enzyme responsible for the detoxification of the glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG). We have previously shown that MG is a competitive partial agonist at GABA-A receptors. We examined the effects of genetic and pharmacological inhibition of GLO1 in two antidepressant assay models: the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swim test (FST). We also examined the effects of GLO1 inhibition in three models of antidepressant onset: the chronic FST (cFST), chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm and olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). Genetic knockdown of Glo1 or pharmacological inhibition using two structurally distinct GLO1 inhibitors (S-bromobenzylglutathione cyclopentyl diester (pBBG) or methyl-gerfelin (MeGFN)) reduced immobility in the TST and acute FST. Both GLO1 inhibitors also reduced immobility in the cFST after 5 days of treatment. In contrast, the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) reduced immobility after 14, but not 5 days of treatment. Furthermore, 5 days of treatment with either GLO1 inhibitor blocked the depression-like effects induced by CMS on the FST and coat state, and attenuated OBX-induced locomotor hyperactivity. Finally, 5 days of treatment with a GLO1 inhibitor (pBBG), but not FLX, induced molecular markers of the antidepressant response including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) induction and increased phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response-binding protein (pCREB) to CREB ratio in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Our findings indicate that GLO1 inhibitors may provide a novel and fast-acting pharmacotherapy for depression.

  14. Identification of a novel, fast acting GABAergic anti-depressant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Katherine M. J.; Ramaker, Marcia J.; Barkley-Levenson, Amanda M.; Sidhu, Preetpal S.; Elkin, Pavel; Reddy, M. Kashi; Guthrie, Margaret L.; Cook, James M.; Rawal, Viresh H.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Dulawa, Stephanie C.; Palmer, Abraham A.

    2017-01-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for depression exhibit slow onset, side effects and limited efficacy. Therefore, identification of novel fast-onset antidepressants is desirable. GLO1 is a ubiquitous cellular enzyme responsible for the detoxification of the glycolytic byproduct methylglyoxal (MG). We have previously shown that MG is a competitive partial agonist at GABA-A receptors. We examined the effects of genetic and pharmacological inhibition of GLO1 in two antidepressant assay models: the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swim test (FST). We also examined the effects of GLO1 inhibition in three models of antidepressant onset: the chronic FST (cFST), chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm, and olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). Genetic knockdown of Glo1 or pharmacological inhibition using two structurally distinct GLO1 inhibitors (S-bromobenzylglutathione cyclopentyl diester (pBBG) or methyl gerfelin (MeGFN)) reduced immobility in the TST and acute FST. Both GLO1 inhibitors also reduced immobility in the cFST after 5 days of treatment. In contrast, the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) reduced immobility after 14, but not 5 days of treatment. Furthermore, 5 days of treatment with either GLO1 inhibitor blocked the depression-like effects induced by CMS on the FST and coat state, and attenuated OBX-induced locomotor hyperactivity. Finally, 5 days of treatment with a GLO1 inhibitor (pBBG), but not FLX, induced molecular markers of the antidepressant response including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) induction and increased phosphorylated cyclic-AMP response binding protein (pCREB) to CREB ratio in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Our findings indicate that GLO1 inhibitors may provide a novel and fast-acting pharmacotherapy for depression. PMID:28322281

  15. Functional diversity of supragranular GABAergic neurons in the barrel cortex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentet, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the neocortex forms a distributed system comprised of several functional areas, its vertical columnar organization is largely conserved across areas and species, suggesting the existence of a canonical neocortical microcircuit. In order to elucidate the principles governing the organization

  16. Distinct populations of GABAergic neurons in mouse rhombomere 1 express but do not require the homeodomain transcription factor PITX2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Mindy R.; Skaggs, Kaia; Kaviany, Parisa; Skidmore, Jennifer M.; Causeret, Frédéric; Martin, James F.; Martin, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    Hindbrain rhombomere 1 (r1) is located caudal to the isthmus, a critical organizer region, and rostral to rhombomere 2 in the developing mouse brain. Dorsal r1 gives rise to the cerebellum, locus coeruleus, and several brainstem nuclei, whereas cells from ventral r1 contribute to the trochlear and trigeminal nuclei as well as serotonergic and GABAergic neurons of the dorsal raphe. Recent studies have identified several molecular events controlling dorsal r1 development. In contrast, very little is known about ventral r1 gene expression and the genetic mechanisms regulating its formation. Neurons with distinct neurotransmitter phenotypes have been identified in ventral r1 including GABAergic, serotonergic, and cholinergic neurons. Here we show that PITX2 marks a distinct population of GABAergic neurons in mouse embryonic ventral r1. This population appears to retain its GABAergic identity even in the absence of PITX2. We provide a comprehensive map of markers that places these PITX2-positive GABAergic neurons in a region of r1 that intersects and is potentially in communication with the dorsal raphe. PMID:21925604

  17. Sildenafil reduces neuroinflammation in cerebellum, restores GABAergic tone, and improves motor in-coordination in rats with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agusti, Ana; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Balzano, Tiziano; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Ibañez-Grau, Andrea; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Fustero, Santos; Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2017-05-01

    Patients with liver disease may develop hepatic encephalopathy (HE), with cognitive impairment and motor in-coordination. Rats with HE due to portacaval shunts (PCS) show motor in-coordination. We hypothesized that in PCS rats: (i) Motor in-coordination would be due to enhanced GABAergic tone in cerebellum; (ii) increased GABAergic tone would be due to neuroinflammation; (iii) increasing cGMP would reduce neuroinflammation and GABAergic tone and restore motor coordination. To assess these hypotheses, we assessed if (i) treatment with sildenafil reduces neuroinflammation; (ii) reduced neuroinflammation is associated with reduced GABAergic tone and restored motor coordination. Rats were treated with sildenafil to increase cGMP. Microglia and astrocytes activation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, extracellular GABA by microdialysis, and motor coordination in the beam walking. PCS rats show neuroinflammation in cerebellum, with microglia and astrocytes activation, increased IL-1b and TNF-a and reduced YM-1 and IL-4. Membrane expression of the GABA transporter GAT1 is reduced, while GAT3 is increased. Extracellular GABA and motor in-coordination are increased. Sildenafil treatment eliminates neuroinflammation, microglia and astrocytes activation; changes in membrane expression of GABA transporters; and restores motor coordination. This study supports an interplay between cGMP-neuroinflammation and GABAergic neurotransmission in impairing motor coordination in PCS rats. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Distinct populations of GABAergic neurons in mouse rhombomere 1 express but do not require the homeodomain transcription factor PITX2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Mindy R; Skaggs, Kaia; Kaviany, Parisa; Skidmore, Jennifer M; Causeret, Frédéric; Martin, James F; Martin, Donna M

    2012-01-01

    Hindbrain rhombomere 1 (r1) is located caudal to the isthmus, a critical organizer region, and rostral to rhombomere 2 in the developing mouse brain. Dorsal r1 gives rise to the cerebellum, locus coeruleus, and several brainstem nuclei, whereas cells from ventral r1 contribute to the trochlear and trigeminal nuclei as well as serotonergic and GABAergic neurons of the dorsal raphe. Recent studies have identified several molecular events controlling dorsal r1 development. In contrast, very little is known about ventral r1 gene expression and the genetic mechanisms regulating its formation. Neurons with distinct neurotransmitter phenotypes have been identified in ventral r1 including GABAergic, serotonergic, and cholinergic neurons. Here we show that PITX2 marks a distinct population of GABAergic neurons in mouse embryonic ventral r1. This population appears to retain its GABAergic identity even in the absence of PITX2. We provide a comprehensive map of markers that places these PITX2-positive GABAergic neurons in a region of r1 that intersects and is potentially in communication with the dorsal raphe. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-06

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2–mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  1. GABAergic neuron-specific loss of Ube3a causes Angelman syndrome-like EEG abnormalities and enhances seizure susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Matthew C.; Wallace, Michael L.; Sidorov, Michael S.; Burette, Alain C.; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M.; King, Ian F.; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J.; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) – all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. PMID:27021170

  2. Induced Ellipticity for Inspiraling Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Lisa; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2018-01-01

    Although gravitational waves tend to erase eccentricity of an inspiraling binary system, ellipticity can be generated in the presence of surrounding matter. We present a semianalytical method for understanding the eccentricity distribution of binary black holes (BHs) in the presence of a supermassive BH in a galactic center. Given a matter distribution, we show how to determine the resultant eccentricity analytically in the presence of both tidal forces and evaporation up to one cutoff and one matter-distribution-independent function, paving the way for understanding the environment of detected inspiraling BHs. We furthermore generalize Kozai–Lidov dynamics to situations where perturbation theory breaks down for short time intervals, allowing more general angular momentum exchange, such that eccentricity is generated even when all bodies orbit in the same plane.

  3. Bicarbonate trigger for inducing lipid accumulation in algal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robert; Peyton, Brent; Cooksey, Keith E.

    2015-08-04

    The present invention provides bicarbonate containing and/or bicarbonate-producing compositions and methods to induce lipid accumulation in an algae growth system, wherein the algae growth system is under light-dark cycling condition. By adding said compositions at a specific growth stage, said methods lead to much higher lipid accumulation and/or significantly reduced total time required for accumulating lipid in the algae growth system.

  4. Glutamatergic and GABAergic gene sets in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: association to overlapping traits in ADHD and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naaijen, J; Bralten, J; Poelmans, G; Glennon, J C; Franke, B; Buitelaar, J K

    2017-01-10

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often co-occur. Both are highly heritable; however, it has been difficult to discover genetic risk variants. Glutamate and GABA are main excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the brain; their balance is essential for proper brain development and functioning. In this study we investigated the role of glutamate and GABA genetics in ADHD severity, autism symptom severity and inhibitory performance, based on gene set analysis, an approach to investigate multiple genetic variants simultaneously. Common variants within glutamatergic and GABAergic genes were investigated using the MAGMA software in an ADHD case-only sample (n=931), in which we assessed ASD symptoms and response inhibition on a Stop task. Gene set analysis for ADHD symptom severity, divided into inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms, autism symptom severity and inhibition were performed using principal component regression analyses. Subsequently, gene-wide association analyses were performed. The glutamate gene set showed an association with severity of hyperactivity/impulsivity (P=0.009), which was robust to correcting for genome-wide association levels. The GABA gene set showed nominally significant association with inhibition (P=0.04), but this did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. None of single gene or single variant associations was significant on their own. By analyzing multiple genetic variants within candidate gene sets together, we were able to find genetic associations supporting the involvement of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems in ADHD and ASD symptom severity in ADHD.

  5. Taurine enhances excitability of mouse cochlear neural stem cells by selectively promoting differentiation of glutamatergic neurons over GABAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Zhu, Gang-Hua; Xie, Ding-Hua; Wu, Wei-Jing; Hu, Peng

    2015-05-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid present in high concentrations in mammalian tissues, and has been implicated in several processes involving brain development and neurotransmission. However, the role of taurine in inner ear neural development is still largely unknown. Here we report that taurine enhanced the viability and proliferation of in vitro mouse cochlear neural stem cell culture, as well as improved neurite outgrowth. Moreover, prolonged taurine treatment also increased the neural electrical activity by escalating changes of intracellular calcium concentration, the number of spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations in cells, and the frequencies of Ca(2+) spikes. Most importantly, we found that this escalated neural excitability by taurine was due to combined effect of increase in the population of excitatory glutamatergic neuron and decrease in inhibitory GABAergic neuron population. This is the first report on the effect of taurine to selectively promote neural stem cell differentiation by altering neuron type commitment. Our study has supported the potential of taurine as treatment against hearing loss caused by neuron degeneration, or even as an agent to improve sensitivity of hearing by increasing overall excitability of auditory nervous system.

  6. Prefrontal cortical GABAergic signaling and impaired behavioral flexibility in aged F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beas, B S; McQuail, J A; Ban Uelos, C; Setlow, B; Bizon, J L

    2017-03-14

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critical for the ability to flexibly adapt established patterns of behavior in response to a change in environmental contingencies. Impaired behavioral flexibility results in maladaptive strategies such as perseveration on response options that no longer produce a desired outcome. Pharmacological manipulations of prefrontal cortical GABAergic signaling modulate behavioral flexibility in animal models, and prefrontal cortical interneuron dysfunction is implicated in impaired behavioral flexibility that accompanies neuropsychiatric disease. As deficits in behavioral flexibility also emerge during the normal aging process, the goal of this study was to determine the role of GABAergic signaling, specifically via prefrontal cortical GABA(B) receptors, in such age-related deficits. Young and aged rats were trained in a set shifting task performed in operant chambers. First, rats learned to discriminate between two response levers to obtain a food reward on the basis of a cue light illuminated above the correct lever. Upon acquisition of this initial discrimination, the contingencies were shifted such that rats had to ignore the cue light and respond on the levers according to their left/right positions. Both young and aged rats acquired the initial discrimination similarly; however, aged rats were impaired relative to young following the set shift. Among aged rats, GABA(B) receptor expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was strongly correlated with set shifting, such that lower expression was associated with worse performance. Subsequent experiments showed that intra-mPFC administration of the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen enhanced set shifting performance in aged rats. These data directly link GABAergic signaling via GABA(B) receptors to impaired behavioral flexibility associated with normal aging. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Glutamatergic and GABAergic TCA cycle and neurotransmitter cycling fluxes in different regions of mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ambadipudi, Susmitha; Patel, Anant B

    2013-10-01

    The (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies together with the infusion of (13)C-labeled substrates in rats and humans have provided important insight into brain energy metabolism. In the present study, we have extended a three-compartment metabolic model in mouse to investigate glutamatergic and GABAergic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and neurotransmitter cycle fluxes across different regions of the brain. The (13)C turnover of amino acids from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose was monitored ex vivo using (1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy. The astroglial glutamate pool size, one of the important parameters of the model, was estimated by a short infusion of [2-(13)C]acetate. The ratio Vcyc/VTCA was calculated from the steady-state acetate experiment. The (13)C turnover curves of [4-(13)C]/[3-(13)C]glutamate, [4-(13)C]glutamine, [2-(13)C]/[3-(13)C]GABA, and [3-(13)C]aspartate from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose were analyzed using a three-compartment metabolic model to estimate the rates of the TCA cycle and neurotransmitter cycle associated with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. The glutamatergic TCA cycle rate was found to be highest in the cerebral cortex (0.91 ± 0.05 μmol/g per minute) and least in the hippocampal region (0.64 ± 0.07 μmol/g per minute) of the mouse brain. In contrast, the GABAergic TCA cycle flux was found to be highest in the thalamus-hypothalamus (0.28 ± 0.01 μmol/g per minute) and least in the cerebral cortex (0.24 ± 0.02 μmol/g per minute). These findings indicate that the energetics of excitatory and inhibitory function is distinct across the mouse brain.

  8. Synaptic Organization of Perisomatic GABAergic Inputs onto the Principal Cells of the Mouse Basolateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereczki, Viktória K.; Veres, Judit M.; Müller, Kinga; Nagy, Gergö A.; Rácz, Bence; Barsy, Boglárka; Hájos, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Spike generation is most effectively controlled by inhibitory inputs that target the perisomatic region of neurons. Despite the critical importance of this functional domain, very little is known about the organization of the GABAergic inputs contacting the perisomatic region of principal cells (PCs) in the basolateral amygdala. Using immunocytochemistry combined with in vitro single-cell labeling we determined the number and sources of GABAergic inputs of PCs at light and electron microscopic levels in mice. We found that the soma and proximal dendrites of PCs were innervated primarily by two neurochemically distinct basket cell types expressing parvalbumin (PVBC) or cholecystokinin and CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CCK/CB1BC). The innervation of the initial segment of PC axons was found to be parceled out by PVBCs and axo-axonic cells (AAC), as the majority of GABAergic inputs onto the region nearest to the soma (between 0 and 10 μm) originated from PVBCs, while the largest portion of the axon initial segment was innervated by AACs. Detailed morphological investigations revealed that the three perisomatic region-targeting interneuron types significantly differed in dendritic and axonal arborization properties. We found that, although individual PVBCs targeted PCs via more terminals than CCK/CB1BCs, similar numbers (15–17) of the two BC types converge onto single PCs, whereas fewer (6–7) AACs innervate the axon initial segment of single PCs. Furthermore, we estimated that a PVBC and a CCK/CB1BC may target 800–900 and 700–800 PCs, respectively, while an AAC can innervate 600–650 PCs. Thus, BCs and AACs innervate ~10 and 20% of PC population, respectively, within their axonal cloud. Our results collectively suggest, that these interneuron types may be differently affiliated within the local amygdalar microcircuits in order to fulfill specific functions in network operation during various brain states. PMID:27013983

  9. Substance P excites GABAergic neurons in the mouse central amygdala through neurokinin 1 receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosulina, L.; Strippel, C.; Romo-Parra, H.; Walter, A. L.; Kanyshkova, T.; Sartori, S. B.; Lange, M. D.; Singewald, N.

    2015-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is implicated in stress regulation and affective and anxiety-related behavior. Particularly high expression has been found in the main output region of the amygdala complex, the central amygdala (CE). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms of SP in CE in vitro, taking advantage of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (GAD67-GFP) knockin mice that yield a reliable labeling of GABAergic neurons, which comprise 95% of the neuronal population in the lateral section of CE (CEl). In GFP-positive neurons within CEl, SP caused a membrane depolarization and increase in input resistance, associated with an increase in action potential firing frequency. Under voltage-clamp conditions, the SP-specific membrane current reversed at −101.5 ± 2.8 mV and displayed inwardly rectifying properties indicative of a membrane K+ conductance. Moreover, SP responses were blocked by the neurokinin type 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist L-822429 and mimicked by the NK1R agonist [Sar9,Met(O2)11]-SP. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed localization of NK1R in GFP-positive neurons in CEl, predominantly in PKCδ-negative neurons (80%) and in few PKCδ-positive neurons (17%). Differences in SP responses were not observed between the major types of CEl neurons (late firing, regular spiking, low-threshold bursting). In addition, SP increased the frequency and amplitude of GABAergic synaptic events in CEl neurons depending on upstream spike activity. These data indicate a NK1R-mediated increase in excitability and GABAergic activity in CEl neurons, which seems to mostly involve the PKCδ-negative subpopulation. This influence can be assumed to increase reciprocal interactions between CElon and CEloff pathways, thereby boosting the medial CE (CEm) output pathway and contributing to the anxiogenic-like action of SP in the amygdala. PMID:26334021

  10. Enhancement of pentobarbital-induced sleep by apigenin through chloride ion channel activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Wook; Kim, Chung-Soo; Hu, Zhenzhen; Han, Jin-Yi; Kim, Si Kwan; Yoo, Sung-Kwang; Yeo, Yeong Man; Chong, Myong Soo; Lee, Kinam; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2012-02-01

    This experiment was performed to investigate whether apigenin has hypnotic effects and/or enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through the GABAergic systems. Apigenin prolonged sleep time induced by pentobarbital similar to muscimol, a GABA(A) receptors agonist. Apigenin also increased sleep rate and sleep time in the combined administration with pentobarbital at the sub-hypnotic dosage, and showed synergic effects with muscimol in potentiating sleep onset and enhancing sleep time induced by pentobarbital. In addition, both of apigeinin and pentobarbital increased chloride influx in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells. Apigenin increased glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and had no effect on the expression of GABA(A) receptor α-, β-, γ-subunits in n hippocampus of mouse brain, showing different expression of subunits from pentobarbital treatment group. In conclusion, it is suggested that apigenin augments pentobarbital-induced sleep behaviors through chloride ion channel activation.

  11. GABAergic gene expression in postmortem hippocampus from alcoholics and cocaine addicts; corresponding findings in alcohol-naïve P and NP rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Anne Enoch

    Full Text Available By performing identical studies in humans and rats, we attempted to distinguish vulnerability factors for addiction from neurobiological effects of chronic drug exposure. We focused on the GABAergic system within the hippocampus, a brain region that is a constituent of the memory/conditioning neuronal circuitry of addiction that is considered to be important in drug reinforcement behaviors in animals and craving and relapse in humans.Using RNA-Seq we quantified mRNA transcripts in postmortem total hippocampus from alcoholics, cocaine addicts and controls and also from alcohol-naïve, alcohol preferring (P and non-preferring (NP rats selectively bred for extremes of alcohol-seeking behavior that also show a general addictive tendency. A pathway-targeted analysis of 25 GABAergic genes encoding proteins implicated in GABA synthesis, metabolism, synaptic transmission and re-uptake was undertaken.Directionally consistent and biologically plausible overlapping and specific changes were detected: 14/25 of the human genes and 12/25 of the rat genes showed nominally significant differences in gene expression (global p values: 9×10⁻¹⁴, 7×10⁻¹¹ respectively. Principal FDR-corrected findings were that GABBR1 was down-regulated in alcoholics, cocaine addicts and P rats with congruent findings in NSF, implicated in GABAB signaling efficacy, potentially resulting in increased synaptic GABA. GABRG2, encoding the gamma2 subunit required for postsynaptic clustering of GABAA receptors together with GPHN, encoding the associated scaffolding protein gephryin, were both down-regulated in alcoholics and cocaine addicts but were both up-regulated in P rats. There were also expression changes specific to cocaine addicts (GAD1, GAD2, alcoholics (GABRA2 and P rats (ABAT, GABRG3.Our study confirms the involvement of the GABAergic system in alcoholism but also reveals a hippocampal GABA input in cocaine addiction. Congruent findings in human addicts and P rats

  12. Tetracycline-inducible gene expression system in Leishmania mexicana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraeva, N.; Ishemgulova, A.; Lukeš, Julius; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 198, č. 1 (2014), s. 11-13 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Leishmania mexicana * Gene expression * Tet-inducible system Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.787, year: 2014

  13. BIOCONAID System (Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming). Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Dana B.; And Others

    The system described represents a new technique for enhancing the fidelity of flight simulators during high acceleration maneuvers. This technique forces the simulator pilot into active participation and energy expenditure similar to the aircraft pilot undergoing actual accelerations. The Bionic Control of Acceleration Induced Dimming (BIOCONAID)…

  14. Systemic induced tolerance against root-knot nematodes in rice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    riboflavin was sprayed on this plant mutated in the NIM1/NPR1 gene. However, the spray of. NahG plant with riboflavin solution (10μM) induced the same resistance as in normal plants. In light of these observations Dong, H and Beer, S.V., (2000) concluded that the foliar spray of riboflavin elicits systemic resistance in ...

  15. Flow induced noise modelling for industrial piping systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijrath, H.; Ǎbom, M.

    2003-01-01

    Noise from e.g. gas-transport piping systems becomes more and more a problem for plants located close to urban areas. Too high noise levels are unacceptable and will put limitations on the plant capacity. Flow-induced noise of valves, orifices and headers installed in the installation plays a

  16. BDP-30, a systemic resistance inducer from Boerhaavia diffusa L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... absolute sequence identity with trichosanthin, a ribosome-inactivating protein from Trichosanthes kirilowii, and a 78% and 100% homology respectively with an RIP from Bryonia dioica, bryodin. Further, effort was made to look at the fate of TMV in induced resistant Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi, a systemic host of the virus, ...

  17. Shear-induced transitions in a ternary polymeric system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zvelindovsky, AV; Sevink, GJA; Fraaije, JGEM

    The first three-dimensional simulation of shear-induced phase transitions in a polymeric system has been performed. The method is based on dynamic density-functional theory. The pathways between a bicontinuous phase with developing gyroid mesostructure and a lamellar/cylinder phase coexistence are

  18. Systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana induced by biocontrol bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Wees, A.C.M. van; Pelt, J.A. van; Trijssenaar, A.; Westende, Y.A.M. van 't; Bolink, E.M.; Loon, L.C. van

    1996-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a pathogen-inducible defense mechanism in plants effective against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens. The resistant state is dependent on endogenous accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and is associated with the activation of a specific set of genes encoding

  19. Noise-induced multimode behavior in excitable systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D E; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Han, S K

    2002-01-01

    Based on experiments with electronic circuits, we show how a system of coupled excitable units can possess several noise-induced oscillatory modes. We characterize the multimode organization in terms of the coherence resonance effect. Multiple gain of regularity is found to be related to different...

  20. Bacterial elicitors and plant signaling in induced systemic resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pelt, J.A. van; Sluis, I. van der; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Plant root colonizing, fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades for their plant growth promoting properties and their effective suppression of soil borne plant diseases. The modes of action that play a role in disease suppression by these bacteria include siderophore-mediated competition for iron, antibiosis, and induced systemic resistance (ISR). The involvement of ISR is typically studied in systems in which the Pseudomonas bacteria and the pathogen are inoculated and rema...

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, David; Walker, Kendall; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Hampton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Dulla, Chris G

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors, while simultaneously recording cortical field potentials in acute brain slices 2-4 weeks following CCI. Cortical electrical stimulation evoked polyphasic, epileptiform field potentials and disrupted the input-output relationship in deep layers of CCI-injured cortex. High-speed glutamate biosensor imaging showed that glutamate signaling was significantly increased in the injured cortex. Elevated glutamate responses correlated with epileptiform activity, were highest directly adjacent to the injury, and spread via deep cortical layers. Immunoreactivity for markers of GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased throughout CCI cortex. Lastly, spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency decreased and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current increased after CCI injury. Our results suggest that specific cortical neuronal microcircuits may initiate and facilitate the spread of epileptiform activity following TBI. Increased glutamatergic signaling due to loss of GABAergic control may provide a mechanism by which TBI can give rise to post-traumatic epilepsy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Cortical GABAergic Interneurons in Cross-Modal Plasticity following Early Blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Desgent

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early loss of a given sensory input in mammals causes anatomical and functional modifications in the brain via a process called cross-modal plasticity. In the past four decades, several animal models have illuminated our understanding of the biological substrates involved in cross-modal plasticity. Progressively, studies are now starting to emphasise on cell-specific mechanisms that may be responsible for this intermodal sensory plasticity. Inhibitory interneurons expressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA play an important role in maintaining the appropriate dynamic range of cortical excitation, in critical periods of developmental plasticity, in receptive field refinement, and in treatment of sensory information reaching the cerebral cortex. The diverse interneuron population is very sensitive to sensory experience during development. GABAergic neurons are therefore well suited to act as a gate for mediating cross-modal plasticity. This paper attempts to highlight the links between early sensory deprivation, cortical GABAergic interneuron alterations, and cross-modal plasticity, discuss its implications, and further provide insights for future research in the field.

  3. Corticospinal tract insult alters GABAergic circuitry in the mammalian spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Russ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During perinatal development, corticospinal tract (CST projections into the spinal cord help refine spinal circuitry. Although the normal developmental processes that are controlled by the arrival of corticospinal input are becoming clear, little is known about how perinatal cortical damage impacts specific aspects of spinal circuit development, particularly the inhibitory microcircuitry that regulates spinal reflex circuits. In this study, we sought to determine how ischemic cortical damage impacts the synaptic attributes of a well-characterized population of inhibitory, GABAergic interneurons, called GABApre neurons, which modulates the efficiency of proprioceptive sensory terminals in the sensorimotor reflex circuit. We found that putative GABApre interneurons receive CST input and, using an established mouse model of perinatal stroke, that cortical ischemic injury results in a reduction of CST density within the intermediate region of the spinal cord, where these interneurons reside. Importantly, CST alterations were restricted to the side contralateral to the injury. Within the synaptic terminals of the GABApre interneurons, we observed a dramatic upregulation of the 65-isoform of the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65. In accordance with the CST density reduction, GAD65 was elevated on the side of the spinal cord contralateral to cortical injury. This effect was not seen for other GABApre synaptic markers or in animals that received sham surgery. Our data reveal a novel effect of perinatal stroke that involves severe deficits in the architecture of descending spinal pathways, which in turn appear to promote molecular alterations in a specific spinal GABAergic circuit.

  4. Detoxification of ammonia in mouse cortical GABAergic cell cultures increases neuronal oxidative metabolism and reveals an emerging role for release of glucose-derived alanine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Anker, Malene

    2011-01-01

    in a mouse neuronal-astrocytic co-culture model of the GABAergic system. We found that 5 mM ammonium chloride affected energy metabolism by increasing the neuronal TCA cycle activity and switching the astrocytic TCA cycle toward synthesis of substrate for glutamine synthesis. Furthermore, ammonia exposure...... enhanced the synthesis and release of alanine. Collectively, our results demonstrate that (1) formation of glutamine is seminal for detoxification of ammonia; (2) neuronal oxidative metabolism is increased in the presence of ammonia; and (3) synthesis and release of alanine is likely to be important......Cerebral hyperammonemia is believed to play a pivotal role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a debilitating condition arising due to acute or chronic liver disease. In the brain, ammonia is thought to be detoxified via the activity of glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme...

  5. Electromagnetically induced transparency in an open multilevel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tian; Lu Meiju; Weinstein, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency in a multilevel system is investigated in 173 Yb. The level structure investigated is ''open'' in that the light that gives rise to the transparency also resonantly couples the atoms to excited states which do not exhibit electromagnetically induced transparency. The resulting reduction of transparency is investigated experimentally and theoretically. It is found that, while the transparency is poor in certain regimes, it can be made to perform arbitrarily well in the limit of a large intensity imbalance between the optical fields.

  6. Observation of electromagnetically induced Talbot effect in an atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Dan; Sheng, Jiteng; Zhang, Yiqi; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2018-01-01

    The electromagnetically induced Talbot effect (EITE) resulting from the repeated self-reconstruction of a spatially intensity-modulated probe field is experimentally demonstrated in a three-level atomic configuration. The probe beam is launched into an optically induced lattice (established by the interference of two coupling fields) inside a rubidium vapor cell and is diffracted by the electromagnetically induced grating that was formed. The diffraction pattern repeats itself at the planes of integer multiple Talbot lengths. In addition, a fractional EITE is also investigated. The experimental observations agree well with the theoretical predictions. This investigation may potentially pave the way for studying the nonlinear and quantum dynamical features that have been predicted for established periodic optical systems.

  7. Age-related changes in rostral basal forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic projection neurons: relationship with spatial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos, Cristina; LaSarge, Candi L; McQuail, Joseph A; Hartman, John J; Gilbert, Ryan J; Ormerod, Brandi K; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    Both cholinergic and GABAergic projections from the rostral basal forebrain contribute to hippocampal function and mnemonic abilities. While dysfunction of cholinergic neurons has been heavily implicated in age-related memory decline, significantly less is known regarding how age-related changes in codistributed GABAergic projection neurons contribute to a decline in hippocampal-dependent spatial learning. In the current study, confocal stereology was used to quantify cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase [ChAT] immunopositive) neurons, GABAergic projection (glutamic decarboxylase 67 [GAD67] immunopositive) neurons, and total (neuronal nuclei [NeuN] immunopositive) neurons in the rostral basal forebrain of young and aged rats that were first characterized on a spatial learning task. ChAT immunopositive neurons were significantly but modestly reduced in aged rats. Although ChAT immunopositive neuron number was strongly correlated with spatial learning abilities among young rats, the reduction of ChAT immunopositive neurons was not associated with impaired spatial learning in aged rats. In contrast, the number of GAD67 immunopositive neurons was robustly and selectively elevated in aged rats that exhibited impaired spatial learning. Interestingly, the total number of rostral basal forebrain neurons was comparable in young and aged rats, regardless of their cognitive status. These data demonstrate differential effects of age on phenotypically distinct rostral basal forebrain projection neurons, and implicate dysregulated cholinergic and GABAergic septohippocampal circuitry in age-related mnemonic decline. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adolescent THC Exposure Causes Enduring Prefrontal Cortical Disruption of GABAergic Inhibition and Dysregulation of Sub-Cortical Dopamine Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Justine; Szkudlarek, Hanna J; Kramar, Cecilia P; Jobson, Christina E L; Moura, Kyra; Rushlow, Walter J; Laviolette, Steven R

    2017-09-12

    Chronic adolescent marijuana use has been linked to the later development of psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia. GABAergic hypofunction in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a cardinal pathological feature of schizophrenia and may be a mechanism by which the PFC loses its ability to regulate sub-cortical dopamine (DA) resulting in schizophrenia-like neuropsychopathology. In the present study, we exposed adolescent rats to Δ-9-tetra-hydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component in marijuana. At adulthood, we characterized the functionality of PFC GABAergic neurotransmission and its regulation of sub-cortical DA function using molecular, behavioral and in-vivo electrophysiological analyses. Our findings revealed a persistent attenuation of PFC GABAergic function combined with a hyperactive neuronal state in PFC neurons and associated disruptions in cortical gamma oscillatory activity. These PFC abnormalities were accompanied by hyperactive DAergic neuronal activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and behavioral and cognitive abnormalities similar to those observed in psychiatric disorders. Remarkably, these neuronal and behavioral effects were reversed by pharmacological activation of GABA A receptors in the PFC. Together, these results identify a mechanistic link between dysregulated frontal cortical GABAergic inhibition and sub-cortical DAergic dysregulation, characteristic of well-established neuropsychiatric endophenotypes.

  9. Anticonvulsant mechanism of saponins fraction from adventitious roots of Ficus religiosa: possible modulation of GABAergic, calcium and sodium channel functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damanpreet Singh

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In our previous studies, quantified saponins-rich fraction from adventitious root extract of Ficus religiosa L., Moraceae, showed anticonvulsant effect in acute, as well as chronic mice models of epilepsy. The present study was designed to reveal putative anticonvulsant mechanism of quantified saponins-rich fraction using target specific animal models. The anticonvulsant effect of quantified saponins-rich fraction was initially studied in maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazol test at 1, 2 and 4 mg/kg; i.p. doses. Based on the results of initial anticonvulsant testing, different groups of mice were injected with vehicle or quantified saponins-rich fraction (4 mg/kg; i.p., 30 min prior to an injection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (100 mg/kg; s.c., bicuculline (5 mg/kg; i.p., strychnine hydrochloride (2 mg/kg; i.p., BAY k-8644 (37.5 µg; i.c.v., veratridine (500 µg/kg; i.p. and the convulsive episodes were studied. Treatment with the extract (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg showed significant protection in maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazol-induced convulsion tests, in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, quantified saponins-rich fraction at 4 mg/kg dose showed significant increase in latency to clonic convulsions, decrease in seizure severity and increase in average wave amplitude in bicuculline, BAY k-8644 and veratridine tests, respectively, as compared to vehicle control. However, SRF treatment failed to abolish N-methyl-D-aspartic acid and strychnine-induced convulsions, indicated by insignificant change in the appearance of turning behavior and onset of tonic extension, respectively, as compared to vehicle control. From the results of present study, it is concluded that quantified saponins-rich fraction suppress maximal electroshock, pentylenetetrazol, bicuculline, BAY k-8644 and veratridine-induced convulsions, indicating its GABAergic, Na+ and Ca2+ channel modulatory effects. Further it can be correlated that quantified saponins

  10. Laser induced fluorescence imaging system for localization of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Xie, Shusen

    2007-11-01

    A laser induced fluorescence imaging system for localization of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma is developed. In this fluorescence imaging system, the fluorescence intensity with information of detected objection is gained by an image intensifier, which makes color information of the fluorescence image eliminated and the result is a monochrome image of the fluorescence with thermally induced noise. The monochrome fluorescence image is sent to a CCD and captured by an image board, which is controlled by a computer. Image processing is carried out to improve the image quality and therefore improve the system's ability to differentiate carcinomas from normal tissue. Gaussian smoothing is implemented in order to reduce the noise. Image binarizing process is realized to obtain an optimal threshold of the image. Image pixels with grey value below this threshold are assigned as diseased and those above are normal. A pseudo color processing is then accomplished to get better visual perception and understanding of the image, greatly increasing the detail resolution of the grey image. The processed image is then displayed on the screen of the computer in real time. The real time laser induced fluorescence imaging system with the image processing methods developed is efficient for localization of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  11. Pressure-induced phase transition in a ternary microemulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Michihiro; Seto, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    Static and dynamic structure of a ternary microemulsion system including AOT (Aerosol-OT; dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt) were investigated in order to clarify the mechanism of the structural phase transition induced by pressure. From the static measurement by means of small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS), it was observed that the dense water-in-oil droplet structure at ambient temperature and pressure transformed to two-phase coexistence with the lamellar phase and the bicontinuous phase with increasing pressure as the case of increasing temperature. The characteristic features of pressure-induced phase transition were quite similar to the temperature-induced one below the phase transition temperature and pressure, however, above the transition temperature and pressure, they were different. From the dynamical measurement by means of the neutron spin echo (NSE), membrane dynamics at high-pressure phase was observed completely different from the high temperature phase. The result showed that with increasing temperature the membrane became flexible and, on the other hand, it became rigid with increasing pressure. These differences suggested the different mechanism of the pressure-induced phase transition from the temperature-induced one. (author)

  12. Postnatal maturation of GABAergic modulation of sensory inputs onto lateral amygdala principal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Daniel; Ehrlich, Ingrid

    2015-10-01

    Throughout life, fear learning is indispensable for survival and neural plasticity in the lateral amygdala underlies this learning and storage of fear memories. During development, properties of fear learning continue to change into adulthood, but currently little is known about changes in amygdala circuits that enable these behavioural transitions. In recordings from neurons in lateral amygdala brain slices from infant up to adult mice, we show that spontaneous and evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmissions mature into adolescence. At this time, increased inhibitory activity and signalling has the ability to restrict the function of excitation by presynaptic modulation, and may thus enable precise stimulus associations to limit fear generalization from adolescence onward. Our results provide a basis for addressing plasticity mechanisms that underlie altered fear behaviour in young animals. Convergent evidence suggests that plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA) participates in acquisition and storage of fear memory. Sensory inputs from thalamic and cortical areas activate principal neurons and local GABAergic interneurons, which provide feed-forward inhibition that tightly controls LA activity and plasticity via pre- and postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors. GABAergic control is also critical during fear expression, generalization and extinction in adult animals. During rodent development, properties of fear and extinction learning continue to change into early adulthood. Currently, few studies have assessed physiological changes in amygdala circuits that may enable these behavioural transitions. To obtain first insights, we investigated changes in spontaneous and sensory input-evoked inhibition onto LA principal neurons and then focused on GABAB receptor-mediated modulation of excitatory sensory inputs in infant, juvenile, adolescent and young adult mice. We found that spontaneous and sensory-evoked inhibition increased during development

  13. Effects of long-term exercise and low-level inhibition of GABAergic synapses on motor control and the expression of BDNF in the motor related cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takahiro; Ninuma, Shuta; Hayashi, Masataka; Okuda, Akane; Asaka, Tadayoshi; Maejima, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays important roles in neuroplasticity in the brain. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of long-term exercise combined with low-level inhibition of GABAergic synapses on motor control and the expression of BDNF in the motor-related cortex. Methods ICR mice were divided into four groups based on the factors exercise and GABA A receptor inhibition. We administered the GABA A receptor antagonist bicuculline intraperitoneally (0.25 mg/kg). Mice exercised on a treadmill 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Following behavioral tests, BDNF expression in the motor cortex and cerebellar cortex was assayed using RT-PCR and ELISA. Results Exercise increased BDNF protein in the motor cortex and improved motor coordination in the rotarod test either in the presence or absence of bicuculline. BDNF mRNA expression in the motor cortex and muscle coordination in the wire hang test decreased after administration of bicuculline, whereas bicuculline administration increased mRNA and protein expression of BDNF in the cerebellum. Discussion The present study revealed that long-term exercise increased BDNF expression in the motor cortex and facilitated a transfer of motor learning from aerobic exercise to postural coordination. Thus, aerobic exercise is meaningful for conditioning motor learning to rehabilitate patients with central nervous system (CNS) disorders. However, long-term inhibition of GABA A receptors decreased the expression of cortical BDNF mRNA and decreased muscle coordination, despite the increase of BDNF in the cerebellum, suggesting that we have to consider the term of the inhibition of the GABAergic receptor for future clinical application to CNS patients.

  14. Statin Induced Myopathy a Patient with Multiple Systemic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgül Uçar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins are the most successful class of drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and dyslipidaemia. However, the popular profile of statins in terms of efficacy has been maligned by theiradverse effects. Statin induced myopathy, which can be seen at any time during the course of therapy, is a clinically important cause of statin intolerance and discontinuation. When a patient with multiple systemic diseases who use numerous medications represent with myalgia and muscle cramps, statin induced myopathy may not be remembered at first. We present a patient with multiple systemic diseases, alcohol and morphine abuse in whom myopathy developed. After exclusion of other etiologies, we concluded that myopathy was related to statin therapy.

  15. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, A; Leang, C; Ueki, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR

    2014-03-25

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis.

  16. Lactose-Inducible System for Metabolic Engineering of Clostridium ljungdahlii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridium ljungdahlii has increased its attractiveness as a chassis for autotrophic production of organic commodities and biofuels from syngas and microbial electrosynthesis and established it as a model organism for the study of the basic physiology of acetogenesis. In an attempt to expand the genetic toolbox for C. ljungdahlii, the possibility of adapting a lactose-inducible system for gene expression, previously reported for Clostridium perfringens, was investigated. The plasmid pAH2, originally developed for C. perfringens with a gusA reporter gene, functioned as an effective lactose-inducible system in C. ljungdahlii. Lactose induction of C. ljungdahlii containing pB1, in which the gene for the aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase AdhE1 was downstream of the lactose-inducible promoter, increased expression of adhE1 30-fold over the wild-type level, increasing ethanol production 1.5-fold, with a corresponding decrease in acetate production. Lactose-inducible expression of adhE1 in a strain in which adhE1 and the adhE1 homolog adhE2 had been deleted from the chromosome restored ethanol production to levels comparable to those in the wild-type strain. Inducing expression of adhE2 similarly failed to restore ethanol production, suggesting that adhE1 is the homolog responsible for ethanol production. Lactose-inducible expression of the four heterologous genes necessary to convert acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetone diverted ca. 60% of carbon flow to acetone production during growth on fructose, and 25% of carbon flow went to acetone when carbon monoxide was the electron donor. These studies demonstrate that the lactose-inducible system described here will be useful for redirecting carbon and electron flow for the biosynthesis of products more valuable than acetate. Furthermore, this tool should aid in optimizing microbial electrosynthesis and for basic studies on the physiology of acetogenesis. PMID:24509933

  17. Systemic sarcoidosis induced by etanercept: first Brazilian case report

    OpenAIRE

    Unterstell, Natasha; Bressan, Aline Lopes; Serpa, Laura Araújo; Castro, Pérola Peres da Fonseca e; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The antagonists of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) are increasingly being used in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Several adverse effects of these drugs have been reported, including the paradoxical development of sarcoidosis, especially with the use of etanercept. We present the first Brazilian case report of systemic sarcoidosis induced by etanercept and a literature review. Os medicamentos antagonistas do fator de necrose tumoral alfa (TNF-α) estão sendo cada ...

  18. Frequency loss induced quench protection system for high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijagbemi, K.; Noyes, P.; Stiers, E.; Pamidi, S.

    2017-12-01

    A novel circuit design for Frequency Loss Induced Quench (FLIQ) protection system for safely driving REBCO coated conductor superconducting coils to quench is reported. The details of the H-bridge circuit design with Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT)s and the various elements used to build a prototype are reported. The results of a successful test of the circuit conducted to demonstrate the validity of the circuit design is presented.

  19. Urinary incontinence monitoring system using laser-induced graphene sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Nag, Anindya

    2017-12-25

    This paper presents the design and development of a sensor patch to be used in a sensing system to deal with the urinary incontinence problem primarily faced by women and elderly people. The sensor patches were developed from laser-induced graphene from low-cost commercial polyimide (PI) polymers. The graphene was manually transferred to a commercial tape, which was used as sensor patch for experimentation. Salt solutions with different concentrations were tested to determine the most sensitive frequency region of the sensor. The results are encouraging to further develop this sensor in a platform for a fully functional urinary incontinence detection system.

  20. A comparative perspective on minicolumns and inhibitory GABAergic interneurons in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann Raghanti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neocortical columns are functional and morphological units whose architecture may have been under selective evolutionary pressure in different mammalian lineages in response to encephalization and specializations of cognitive abilities. Inhibitory interneurons make a substantial contribution to the morphology and distribution of minicolumns within the cortex. In this context, we review differences in minicolumns and GABAergic interneurons among species and discuss possible implications for signaling among and within minicolumns. Furthermore, we discuss how abnormalities of both minicolumn disposition and inhibitory interneurons might be associated with neuropathological processes, such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism, and schizophrenia. Specifically, we will explore the possibility that phylogenetic variability in calcium-binding protein-expressing interneuron subtypes is directly related to differences in minicolumn morphology among species and might contribute to neuropathological susceptibility in humans.

  1. The sedative activity of flavonoids from Passiflora quadrangularis is mediated through the GABAergic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazola, Andressa Corneo; Costa, Geison Modesti; Zucolotto, Silvana Maria; Castellanos, Leonardo; Ramos, Freddy Alejandro; de Lima, Thereza Christina Monteiro; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the sedative activity of the aqueous leaf extract of Passiflora quadrangularis, a species that is widely cultivated and consumed in South America, and to identify its main constituents and elucidate the involvement of the GABAergic pathway in its mechanism of action. The bioguided fractionation of the crude extract showed a positive relationship between the sedative activity of the extract and its flavonoids. The methods employed to identify and isolate its main flavonoids resulted in the identification of vitexin-2''-O-xyloside, vitexin-2''-O-glucoside, orientin-2''-O-xyloside and orientin-2''-O-glucoside. Vitexin-2"-O-xyloside, the major flavonoid of the extract, showed sedative activity after oral administration in mice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A single GABAergic neuron mediates feedback of odor-evoked signals in the mushroom body of larval Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liria Monica Masuda-Nakagawa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition has a central role in defining the selectivity of the responses of higher order neurons to sensory stimuli. However, the circuit mechanisms of regulation of these responses by inhibitory neurons are still unclear. In Drosophila, the mushroom bodies (MBs are necessary for olfactory memory, and by implication for the selectivity of learned responses to specific odors. To understand the circuitry of inhibition in the calyx (the input dendritic region of the MBs, and its relationship with MB excitatory activity, we used the simple anatomy of the Drosophila larval olfactory system to identify any inhibitory inputs that could contribute to the selectivity of MB odor responses. We found that a single neuron accounts for all detectable GABA innervation in the calyx of the MBs, and that this neuron has presynaptic terminals in the calyx and postsynaptic branches in the MB lobes (output axonal area. We call this neuron the larval anterior paired lateral (APL neuron, because of its similarity to the previously described adult APL neuron. Reconstitution of GFP partners (GRASP suggests that the larval APL makes extensive contacts with the MB intrinsic neurons, Kenyon Cells (KCs, but few contacts with incoming projection neurons. Using calcium imaging of neuronal activity in live larvae, we show that the larval APL responds to odors, in a mannner that requires output from KCs. Our data suggest that the larval APL is the sole GABAergic neuron that innervates the MB input region and carries inhibitory feedback from the MB output region, consistent with a role in modulating the olfactory selectivity of MB neurons.

  3. Reciprocal cholinergic and GABAergic modulation of the small ventrolateral pacemaker neurons of Drosophila's circadian clock neuron network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelito, Katherine R; Shafer, Orie T

    2012-04-01

    The relatively simple clock neuron network of Drosophila is a valuable model system for the neuronal basis of circadian timekeeping. Unfortunately, many key neuronal classes of this network are inaccessible to electrophysiological analysis. We have therefore adopted the use of genetically encoded sensors to address the physiology of the fly's circadian clock network. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) and cAMP sensors, we have investigated the physiological responses of two specific classes of clock neuron, the large and small ventrolateral neurons (l- and s-LN(v)s), to two neurotransmitters implicated in their modulation: acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Live imaging of l-LN(v) cAMP and Ca(2+) dynamics in response to cholinergic agonist and GABA application were well aligned with published electrophysiological data, indicating that our sensors were capable of faithfully reporting acute physiological responses to these transmitters within single adult clock neuron soma. We extended these live imaging methods to s-LN(v)s, critical neuronal pacemakers whose physiological properties in the adult brain are largely unknown. Our s-LN(v) experiments revealed the predicted excitatory responses to bath-applied cholinergic agonists and the predicted inhibitory effects of GABA and established that the antagonism of ACh and GABA extends to their effects on cAMP signaling. These data support recently published but physiologically untested models of s-LN(v) modulation and lead to the prediction that cholinergic and GABAergic inputs to s-LN(v)s will have opposing effects on the phase and/or period of the molecular clock within these critical pacemaker neurons.

  4. Prenatal corticosteroids modify glutamatergic and GABAergic synapse genomic fabric: insights from a novel animal model of infantile spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacobas, D A; Iacobas, S; Chachua, T; Goletiani, C; Sidyelyeva, G; Velíšková, J; Velíšek, L

    2013-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to corticosteroids has long-term postnatal somatic and neurodevelopmental consequences. Animal studies indicate that corticosteroid exposure-associated alterations in the nervous system include hypothalamic function. Infants with infantile spasms, a devastating epileptic syndrome of infancy with characteristic spastic seizures, chaotic irregular waves on interictal electroencephalogram (hypsarhythmia) and mental deterioration, have decreased concentrations of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in cerebrospinal fluid, strongly suggesting hypothalamic dysfunction. We have exploited this feature to develop a model of human infantile spasms by using repeated prenatal exposure to betamethasone and a postnatal trigger of developmentally relevant spasms with NMDA. The spasms triggered in prenatally primed rats are more severe compared to prenatally saline-injected ones and respond to ACTH, a treatment of choice for infantile spasms in humans. Using autoradiography and immunohistochemistry, we have identified a link between the spasms in our model and the hypothalamus, especially the arcuate nucleus. Transcriptomic analysis of the arcuate nucleus after prenatal priming with betamethasone but before trigger of spasms indicates that prenatal betamethasone exposure down-regulates genes encoding several important proteins participating in glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission. Interestingly, there were significant sex-specific alterations after prenatal betamethasone in synapse-related gene expression but no such sex differences were found in prenatally saline-injected controls. A pairwise relevance analysis revealed that, although the synapse gene expression in controls was independent of sex, these genes form topologically distinct gene fabrics in males and females and these fabrics are altered by betamethasone in a sex-specific manner. These findings may explain the sex differences with respect to both normal behaviour and the occurrence

  5. Facial stimulation induces long-term depression at cerebellar molecular layer interneuron–Purkinje cell synapses in vivo in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Lai eQiu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar long-term synaptic plasticity has been proposed to provide a cellular mechanism for motor learning. Numerous studies have demonstrated the induction and mechanisms of synaptic plasticity at parallel fiber–Purkinje cell (PF–PC, parallel fiber–molecular layer interneurons (PF–MLI and mossy fiber–granule cell (MF–GC synapses, but no study has investigated sensory stimulation-evoked synaptic plasticity at MLI–PC synapses in the cerebellar cortex of living animals. We studied the expression and mechanism of MLI–PC GABAergic synaptic plasticity induced by a train of facial stimulation in urethane-anesthetized mice by cell-attached recordings and pharmacological methods. We found that 1 Hz, but not a 2 Hz or 4 Hz, facial stimulation induced a long-term depression (LTD of GABAergic transmission at MLI–PC synapses, which was accompanied with a decrease in the stimulation-evoked pause of spike firing in PCs, but did not induce a significant change in the properties of the sensory-evoked spike events of MLIs. The MLI–PC GABAergic LTD could be prevented by blocking cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptors, and could be pharmacologically induced by a CB1 receptor agonist. Additionally, 1 Hz facial stimulation delivered in the presence of a metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1 antagonist, JNJ16259685, still induced the MLI–PC GABAergic LTD, whereas blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors during 1 Hz facial stimulation abolished the expression of MLI–PC GABAergic LTD. These results indicate that sensory stimulation can induce an endocannabinoid (eCB-dependent LTD of GABAergic transmission at MLI–PC synapses via activation of NMDA receptors in cerebellar cortical Crus II in vivo in mice. Our results suggest that the sensory stimulation-evoked MLI–PC GABAergic synaptic plasticity may play a critical role in motor learning in animals.

  6. Novel Nuclear Protein Complexes of Dystrophin 71 Isoforms in Rat Cultured Hippocampal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rodríguez-Muñoz

    Full Text Available The precise functional role of the dystrophin 71 in neurons is still elusive. Previously, we reported that dystrophin 71d and dystrophin 71f are present in nuclei from cultured neurons. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the intranuclear distribution of dystrophin 71 isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71f, during the temporal course of 7-day postnatal rats hippocampal neurons culture for 1h, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 21 days in vitro (DIV. By immunofluorescence assays, we detected the highest level of nuclear expression of both dystrophin Dp71 isoforms at 10 DIV, during the temporal course of primary culture. Dp71d and Dp71f were detected mainly in bipolar GABAergic (≥60% and multipolar Glutamatergic (≤40% neurons, respectively. We also characterized the existence of two nuclear dystrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC: dystrophin 71d or dystrophin 71f bound to β-dystroglycan, α1-, β-, α2-dystrobrevins, α-syntrophin, and syntrophin-associated protein nNOS (Dp71d-DAPC or Dp71f-DAPC, respectively, in the hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, both complexes were localized in interchromatin granule cluster structures (nuclear speckles of neuronal nucleoskeleton preparations. The present study evinces that each Dp71's complexes differ slightly in dystrobrevins composition. The results demonstrated that Dp71d-DAPC was mainly localized in bipolar GABAergic and Dp71f-DAPC in multipolar Glutamatergic hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results show that dystrophin 71d, dystrophin 71f and DAP integrate protein complexes, and both complexes were associated to nuclear speckles structures.

  7. Novel Nuclear Protein Complexes of Dystrophin 71 Isoforms in Rat Cultured Hippocampal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Cárdenas-Aguayo, María Del Carmen; Alemán, Víctor; Osorio, Beatriz; Chávez-González, Oscar; Rendon, Alvaro; Martínez-Rojas, Dalila; Meraz-Ríos, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The precise functional role of the dystrophin 71 in neurons is still elusive. Previously, we reported that dystrophin 71d and dystrophin 71f are present in nuclei from cultured neurons. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the intranuclear distribution of dystrophin 71 isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71f), during the temporal course of 7-day postnatal rats hippocampal neurons culture for 1h, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 21 days in vitro (DIV). By immunofluorescence assays, we detected the highest level of nuclear expression of both dystrophin Dp71 isoforms at 10 DIV, during the temporal course of primary culture. Dp71d and Dp71f were detected mainly in bipolar GABAergic (≥60%) and multipolar Glutamatergic (≤40%) neurons, respectively. We also characterized the existence of two nuclear dystrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC): dystrophin 71d or dystrophin 71f bound to β-dystroglycan, α1-, β-, α2-dystrobrevins, α-syntrophin, and syntrophin-associated protein nNOS (Dp71d-DAPC or Dp71f-DAPC, respectively), in the hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, both complexes were localized in interchromatin granule cluster structures (nuclear speckles) of neuronal nucleoskeleton preparations. The present study evinces that each Dp71's complexes differ slightly in dystrobrevins composition. The results demonstrated that Dp71d-DAPC was mainly localized in bipolar GABAergic and Dp71f-DAPC in multipolar Glutamatergic hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results show that dystrophin 71d, dystrophin 71f and DAP integrate protein complexes, and both complexes were associated to nuclear speckles structures.

  8. Towards the Understanding of Induced Seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritto, Roland [Array Information Technology, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Dreger, Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Heidbach, Oliver [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam (Germany, German Research Center for Geosciences; Hutchings, Lawrence [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-29

    This DOE funded project was a collaborative effort between Array Information Technology (AIT), the University of California at Berkeley (UCB), the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam - German Research Center for Geosciences (GFZ) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). It was also part of the European research project “GEISER”, an international collaboration with 11 European partners from six countries including universities, research centers and industry, with the goal to address and mitigate the problems associated with induced seismicity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). The goal of the current project was to develop a combination of techniques, which evaluate the relationship between enhanced geothermal operations and the induced stress changes and associated earthquakes throughout the reservoir and the surrounding country rock. The project addressed the following questions: how enhanced geothermal activity changes the local and regional stress field; whether these activities can induce medium sized seismicity M > 3; (if so) how these events are correlated to geothermal activity in space and time; what is the largest possible event and strongest ground motion, and hence the potential hazard associated with these activities. The development of appropriate technology to thoroughly investigate and address these questions required a number of datasets to provide the different physical measurements distributed in space and time. Because such a dataset did not yet exist for an EGS system in the United State, we used current and past data from The Geysers geothermal field in northern California, which has been in operation since the 1960s. The research addressed the need to understand the causal mechanisms of induced seismicity, and demonstrated the advantage of imaging the physical properties and temporal changes of the reservoir. The work helped to model the relationship between injection and production and medium sized magnitude events that have

  9. Optomechanically induced absorption in parity-time-symmetric optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Guo, Y. Q.; Pei, P.; Yi, X. X.

    2017-06-01

    We explore the optomechanically induced absorption (OMIA) in a parity-time- (PT -) symmetric optomechanical system (OMS). By numerically calculating the Lyapunov exponents, we find out the stability border of the PT -symmetric OMS. The results show that in the PT -symmetric phase the system can be either stable or unstable depending on the coupling constant and the decay rate. In the PT -symmetric broken phase the system can have a stable state only for small gain rates. By calculating the transmission rate of the probe field, we find that there is an inverted optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) at δ =-ωM and an OMIA at δ =ωM for the PT -symmetric optomechanical system. At each side of δ =-ωM there is an absorption window due to the resonance absorption of the two generated supermodes. Comparing with the case of optomechanics coupled to a passive cavity, we find that the active cavity can enhance the resonance absorption. The absorption rate at δ =ωM increases as the coupling strength between the two cavities increases. Our work provides us with a promising platform for controlling light propagation and light manipulation in terms of PT symmetry, which might have potential applications in quantum information processing and quantum optical devices.

  10. Reducing Technology-Induced Errors: Organizational and Health Systems Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Senthriajah, Yalini; Kushniruk, Andre W; Palojoki, Sari; Saranto, Kaija; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Technology-induced errors are a growing concern for health care organizations. Such errors arise from the interaction between healthcare and information technology deployed in complex settings and contexts. As the number of health information technologies that are used to provide patient care rises so will the need to develop ways to improve the quality and safety of the technology that we use. The objective of the panel is to describe varying approaches to improving software safety from and organizational and health systems perspective. We define what a technology-induced error is. Then, we discuss how software design and testing can be used to improve health information technologies. This discussion is followed by work in the area of monitoring and reporting at a health district and national level. Lastly, we draw on the quality, safety and resilience literature. The target audience for this work are nursing and health informatics researchers, practitioners, administrators, policy makers and students.

  11. Magnetically induced electric fields and currents in the circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Thomas S

    2005-01-01

    Blood flow in an applied magnetic field gives rise to induced voltages in the aorta and other major arteries of the central circulatory system that can be observed as superimposed electrical signals in the electrocardiogram (ECG). The largest magnetically induced voltage occurs during pulsatile blood flow into the aorta, and results in an increased signal at the location of the T-wave in the ECG. Studies involving the measurement of blood pressure, blood flow rate, heart sounds, and cardiac valve displacements have been conducted with monkeys and dogs exposed to static fields up to 1.5 tesla (T) under conditions producing maximum induced voltages in the aorta. Results of these studies gave no indication of alterations in cardiac functions or hemodynamic parameters. Cardiac activity monitored by ECG biotelemetry during continuous exposure of rats to a 1.5-T field for 10 days gave no evidence for any significant changes relative to the 10 days prior to and following exposure. Theoretical modeling of magnetic field interactions with blood flow has included a complete solution of the equation describing the flow of an electrically conductive fluid in the presence of a magnetic field (the Navier-Stokes equation) using the finite element technique. Magnetically induced voltages and current densities as a function of the applied magnetic field strength have been calculated for the aorta and surrounding tissues structures, including the sinoatrial node. Induced current densities in the region of the sinoatrial node are predicted to be >100 mA/m2 at field levels >5 T in an adult human under conditions of maximum electrodynamic coupling with aortic blood flow. Magnetohydrodynamic interactions are predicted to reduce the volume flow rate of blood in the human aorta by a maximum of 1.3%, 4.9%, and 10.4% at field levels of 5, 10, and 15 T, respectively.

  12. Asymmetric noise-induced large fluctuations in coupled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Szwaykowska, Klimka; Carr, Thomas W.

    2017-10-01

    Networks of interacting, communicating subsystems are common in many fields, from ecology, biology, and epidemiology to engineering and robotics. In the presence of noise and uncertainty, interactions between the individual components can lead to unexpected complex system-wide behaviors. In this paper, we consider a generic model of two weakly coupled dynamical systems, and we show how noise in one part of the system is transmitted through the coupling interface. Working synergistically with the coupling, the noise on one system drives a large fluctuation in the other, even when there is no noise in the second system. Moreover, the large fluctuation happens while the first system exhibits only small random oscillations. Uncertainty effects are quantified by showing how characteristic time scales of noise-induced switching scale as a function of the coupling between the two coupled parts of the experiment. In addition, our results show that the probability of switching in the noise-free system scales inversely as the square of reduced noise intensity amplitude, rendering the virtual probability of switching an extremely rare event. Our results showing the interplay between transmitted noise and coupling are also confirmed through simulations, which agree quite well with analytic theory.

  13. Restoration of Mecp2 expression in GABAergic neurons is sufficient to rescue multiple disease features in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ure, Kerstin; Lu, Hui; Wang, Wei; Ito-Ishida, Aya; Wu, Zhenyu; He, Ling-Jie; Sztainberg, Yehezkel; Chen, Wu; Tang, Jianrong; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2016-06-21

    The postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome, caused by mutations in MECP2, produces a diverse array of symptoms, including loss of language, motor, and social skills and the development of hand stereotypies, anxiety, tremor, ataxia, respiratory dysrhythmias, and seizures. Surprisingly, despite the diversity of these features, we have found that deleting Mecp2 only from GABAergic inhibitory neurons in mice replicates most of this phenotype. Here we show that genetically restoring Mecp2 expression only in GABAergic neurons of male Mecp2 null mice enhanced inhibitory signaling, extended lifespan, and rescued ataxia, apraxia, and social abnormalities but did not rescue tremor or anxiety. Female Mecp2(+/-) mice showed a less dramatic but still substantial rescue. These findings highlight the critical regulatory role of GABAergic neurons in certain behaviors and suggest that modulating the excitatory/inhibitory balance through GABAergic neurons could prove a viable therapeutic option in Rett syndrome.

  14. Salmonella enterica Induces And Subverts The Plant Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Victoria Garcia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Whereas it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI. Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, the data gathered suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity.

  15. Salmonella enterica induces and subverts the plant immune system

    KAUST Repository

    García, Ana V.

    2014-04-04

    Infections with Salmonella enterica belong to the most prominent causes of food poisoning and infected fruits and vegetables represent important vectors for salmonellosis. Although it was shown that plants raise defense responses against Salmonella, these bacteria persist and proliferate in various plant tissues. Recent reports shed light into the molecular interaction between plants and Salmonella, highlighting the defense pathways induced and the means used by the bacteria to escape the plant immune system and accomplish colonization. It was recently shown that plants detect Salmonella pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as the flagellin peptide flg22, and activate hallmarks of the defense program known as PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI). Interestingly, certain Salmonella strains carry mutations in the flg22 domain triggering PTI, suggesting that a strategy of Salmonella is to escape plant detection by mutating PAMP motifs. Another strategy may rely on the type III secretion system (T3SS) as T3SS mutants were found to induce stronger plant defense responses than wild type bacteria. Although Salmonella effector delivery into plant cells has not been shown, expression of Salmonella effectors in plant tissues shows that these bacteria also possess powerful means to manipulate the plant immune system. Altogether, these data suggest that Salmonella triggers PTI in plants and evolved strategies to avoid or subvert plant immunity. 2014 Garca and Hirt.

  16. Radiation induced effects in the developing central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, P.; Dubner, D.; Michelin, S.C.; Perez, M.R. Del

    1997-01-01

    The embryo and the human foetus are particularly sensitive to ionizing radiation and this sensitivity presents various qualitative and quantitative functional changes during intra-uterine development. Apart from radiation induced carcinogenesis, the most serious consequence of prenatal exposure in human beings is severe mental retardation. The principal data on radiation effects on human beings in the development of the central nervous system come form epidemiological studies carried out in individuals exposed in utero during the atomic explosion at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These observations demonstrate the existence of a time of maximum radiosensitivity between the weeks 8 and 15 of the gestational period, a period in which the proliferation and neuronal migration takes place. Determination of the characteristics of dose-response relationship and the possible existence of a threshold dose of radiation effects on the development of the central nervous system is relevant to radiation protection against low dose radiation and the establishment of dose limits for occupational exposure and the public. Studies were conducted on the generation of nitrous-oxide and its relation with the production of active species of oxygen in brains of exposed rats in utero exposed to doses of up to 1 Gy during their maximum radiosensitivity. The possible role of the mechanism of radiation induced damage in the development of the central nervous system is discussed

  17. Inducible repair system in Haemophilus influenzae unaccompanied by mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notani, N.K.; Setlow, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    Weigle reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated HPlc1 phage was observed after ultraviolet or mitomycin C treatment of Haemophilus influenzae cells. The amount of reactivation was considerably increased when the treated cells were incubated in growth medium before infection. The presence of chloramphenicol during this incubation abolished the reactivation. No mutation of this phage accompanied the reactivation. When cells were treated so as to produce a maximal reactivation of phage, neither reactivation nor mutation of cells was observed. It is concluded that H. influenzae has an inducible repair system that is not accompanied by mutation

  18. Tourniquet-induced systemic inflammatory response in extremity surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wakai, A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Tourniquet-induced reperfusion injury in animals produces significant systemic inflammatory effects. This study investigated whether a biologic response occurs in a clinically relevant model of tourniquet-induced reperfusion injury. METHODS: Patients undergoing elective knee arthroscopy were prospectively randomized into controls (no tourniquet) and subjects (tourniquet-controlled). The effects of tourniquet-induced reperfusion on monocyte activation state, neutrophil activation state, and transendothelial migration (TEM) were studied. Changes in the cytokines implicated in reperfusion injury, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-10 were also determined. RESULTS: After 15 minutes of reperfusion, neutrophil and monocyte activation were significantly increased. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pooled subject (ischemia-primed) plasma significantly increased TEM. In contrast, TEM was not significantly altered by ischemia-primed plasma pretreatment of the endothelial monolayer. Significant elevation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1beta were observed in subjects compared with controls after 15 minutes of reperfusion. There was no significant difference in serum IL-10 levels between the groups at all the time points studied. CONCLUSION: These results indicate a transient neutrophil and monocyte activation after tourniquet-ischemia that translates into enhanced neutrophil transendothelial migration with potential for tissue injury.

  19. Biomedical implications of heavy metals induced imbalances in redox systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bechan; Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals.

  20. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bechan Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity, central nervous system (neurotoxicity, DNA (genotoxicity, and kidney (nephrotoxicity in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s. This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals.

  1. Lightning-induced overvoltages in low-voltage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeidalen, Hans Kristian

    1997-12-31

    Lightning-induced overvoltages (LIOs) are a main source of failures in low-voltage overhead line systems. This thesis deals mainly with calculations of LIOs aiming to enable the design of a proper voltage protection. Models for calculation of LIOs are adapted from the literature or developed based on measurements. The models used are believed to be fairly accurate for the first few microseconds, which is usually sufficient for predicting the maximum induced voltage in the system. The lightning channel is modelled by the Modified Transmission Line (MTL) model with the Transmission Line (TL) model as a special case. The coupling between the electrical fields from a lightning channel and an overhead line is modelled by Agrawal`s model. The attenuation of electrical fields over a lossy ground is modelled by Norton`s- or the Surface Impedance methods. The validity of all the applied models is analysed. In addition, measurements have been performed in order to develop models of distribution transformers and low-voltage power installation (LVPI) networks. Simple models of typical transformers and LVPIs are developed for calculations when specific data are unavailable. The practical range of values and its influence on the LIOs in a system is investigated. The main frequency range of interest related to LIOs is 10 kHz - 1 MHz in which all the models are accurate. The adapted or developed models are used to calculate LIOs in low-voltage systems. The influence of various key parameters in the system is investigated. Most important are the return stroke amplitude and rise time, the overhead line height and location, the termination of overhead line segments, neutral grounding, and the ground conductivity. 135 refs., 136 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Chromium-induced DNA damge is mutagenic in mammalian systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, S.; Dixon, K. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    To study the mutagenic mechanism of hexavalent chromium compounds, a SV40 virus-based shuttle vector system was used for mutation analysis. The plasmid pZ189 allowed us to induce mutations in mammalian cells, identify them in a bacterial system, and then sequence them. Naked DNA pZ189 was treated with Cr{sup 6+}, Cr{sup 5+} and Cr{sup 3+} compounds. The studies showed that DNA strand breaks were induced in the reduction process of Cr{sup 6+} by glutathione. On the average, 0.66 {mu}M Cr{sup 6+} induced about one nick/DNA molecule. The treated DNA also showed a decrease of biological activity upon transformation into E. coli cells. Hydroxyl radical (HO{center_dot}) scavengers, Tris and mannitol, suppressed the Cr-induced DNA damage. The DNA damage caused by the co-incubation of Cr{sup 6+} with glutathione was ionic-strength and pH dependent, which supported the hypothesis that Cr{sup 5+}, an intermediate agent, was the critical agent in Cr reduction causing DNA damage through radical species. Further, Cr{sup 5+} induced DNA damage in a kinetic pattern similar to the co-incubation of Cr{sup 6+} and glutathione. In contrast, Cr{sup 3+}, the final product of Cr{sup 6+} reduction, was not shown to be a DNA-damaging agent in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). To evaluate if the Cr-treated DNA was mutagenic, a mutagenesis assay was carried out in which the chromium-treated plasmid was replicated in CV-1 monkey cells and mutation spectra were analyzed. Mutation frequency increased significantly for both Cr{sup 6+} and Cr{sup 5+} treated DNAs; the frequency was 0.18% and 0.80% for Cr{sup 6+} 1 and 10{mu}M respectively, and 0.14% and 0.21% for Cr{sup 5+} 0.25 and 0.125 {mu}M respectively compared to 0.01% in the untreated vector. The experiments suggested that one mechanism of Cr mutagenesis might be mediated by DNA damage caused by reactive radical species.

  3. Innervation by a GABAergic neuron depresses spontaneous release in glutamatergic neurons and unveils the clamping phenotype of synaptotagmin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierda, Keimpe D B; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev

    2014-01-01

    from mice cultured on astrocyte islands with "homotypic" glutamatergic or GABAergic pairs and autaptic neurons. We measured mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies simultaneously from both neurons. Neuronal pairs formed both interneuronal synaptic and autaptic connections indiscriminately. We find that whereas m......EPSC and mIPSC frequencies did not deviate between autaptic and synaptic connections, the frequency of mEPSCs in mixed pairs was strongly depressed compared with either autaptic neurons or glutamatergic pairs. Simultaneous imaging of synapses, or comparison to evoked release amplitudes, showed......EPSC frequencies were increased by a factor of four in the synaptotagmin-1-null neurons, which is in line with data obtained from mixed cultures. The effect persisted after incubation with BAPTA-AM. We conclude that spontaneous GABA release exerts control over mEPSC release, and GABAergic innervation...

  4. Inducible Promoter Systems for Gene Perturbation Experiments in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Bennett; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Assessing molecular changes that occur through altering a gene's activity is often hampered by difficulties that arise due to the typically static nature of the introduced perturbation. This is especially problematic when investigating molecular events at specific stages and/or in certain tissues or organs during Arabidopsis development. To circumvent these issues, we have employed chemically inducible artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) for the specific knockdown of developmental regulators. For our own research, we have combined this gene perturbation approach with a floral induction system, which allows the simultaneous induction of a large number of flowers on the inflorescence of a single plant, and the ability to knock down a gene's activity at any given stage of development. To enable the plant community to avail of the full benefits of these systems, we describe, in this chapter, strategies for amiRNA-mediated gene perturbations and address some common problems that can be encountered when generating inducible amiRNA constructs, growing these plants, and collecting floral buds for analysis.

  5. Renal denervation enhances GABA-ergic input into the PVN leading to blood pressure lowering in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Masaaki; Takesue, Ko; Hirooka, Yoshitaka

    2017-05-01

    Sympathoexcitation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in the brain controls sympathetic outflow through γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic mechanisms. Renal denervation (RDN) exerts a long-term antihypertensive effect in hypertension with CKD; however, the effects of RDN on sympathetic nerve activity and GABA-ergic modulation in the PVN are not clear. We aimed to elucidate whether RDN modulates sympathetic outflow through GABA-ergic mechanisms in the PVN in hypertensive mice with CKD. In 5/6-nephrectomized male Institute of Cancer Research mice (Nx) at 4 weeks after nephrectomy, systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly increased, accompanied by sympathoexcitation. The Nx-mice underwent RDN or sham operation, and the mice were divided into three groups (Control, Nx-Sham, and Nx-RDN). At 2 weeks after RDN, SBP was significantly decreased and urinary sodium excretion was increased in Nx-RDN compared with Nx-Sham. Urinary norepinephrine excretion (uNE) levels did not differ significantly between Nx-RDN and Nx-Sham. At 6 weeks after RDN, SBP continued to decrease and uNE levels also decreased in Nx-RDN compared with Nx-Sham. Bicuculline microinjection into the PVN increased mean arterial pressure and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in all groups. The pressor responses and change in lumbar sympathetic nerve activity were significantly attenuated in Nx-Sham, but were enhanced in Nx-RDN at 6 weeks after RDN. The findings from the present study indicate that RDN has a prolonged antihypertensive effect and, at least in the late phase, decreases sympathetic nerve activity in association with enhanced GABA-ergic input into the PVN in mice with CKD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Unique pH dynamics in GABAergic synaptic vesicles illuminates the mechanism and kinetics of GABA loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Yoshihiro; Takase, Miki; Watanabe, Shoji; Ishida, Junji; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Takamori, Shigeo

    2016-09-20

    GABA acts as the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, shaping neuronal and circuit activity. For sustained synaptic transmission, synaptic vesicles (SVs) are required to be recycled and refilled with neurotransmitters using an H(+) electrochemical gradient. However, neither the mechanism underlying vesicular GABA uptake nor the kinetics of GABA loading in living neurons have been fully elucidated. To characterize the process of GABA uptake into SVs in functional synapses, we monitored luminal pH of GABAergic SVs separately from that of excitatory glutamatergic SVs in cultured hippocampal neurons. By using a pH sensor optimal for the SV lumen, we found that GABAergic SVs exhibited an unexpectedly higher resting pH (∼6.4) than glutamatergic SVs (pH ∼5.8). Moreover, unlike glutamatergic SVs, GABAergic SVs displayed unique pH dynamics after endocytosis that involved initial overacidification and subsequent alkalization that restored their resting pH. GABAergic SVs that lacked the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) did not show the pH overshoot and acidified further to ∼6.0. Comparison of luminal pH dynamics in the presence or absence of VGAT showed that VGAT operates as a GABA/H(+) exchanger, which is continuously required to offset GABA leakage. Furthermore, the kinetics of GABA transport was slower (τ > 20 s at physiological temperature) than that of glutamate uptake and may exceed the time required for reuse of exocytosed SVs, allowing reuse of incompletely filled vesicles in the presence of high demand for inhibitory transmission.

  7. GABAergic Control of Nigrostriatal and Mesolimbic Dopamine in the Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Nikolaus

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study assessed the effects of the GABAA receptor (R agonist muscimol (MUS, and the GABAAR antagonist bicuculline (BIC on neocortical and subcortical radioligand binding to dopamine D2/3Rs in relation to motor and exploratory behaviors in the rat.Methods: D2/3R binding was measured with small animal SPECT in baseline and after challenge with either 1 mg/kg MUS or 1 mg/kg BIC, using [123I]IBZM as radioligand. Motor/exploratory behaviors were assessed for 30 min in an open field prior to radioligand administration. Anatomical information was gained with a dedicated small animal MRI tomograph. Based on the Paxinos rat brain atlas, regions of interest were defined on SPECT-MRI overlays. Estimations of the binding potentials in baseline and after challenges were obtained by computing ratios of the specifically bound compartments to the cerebellar reference region.Results: After MUS, D2/3R binding was significantly reduced in caudateputamen, nucleus accumbens, thalamus, substania nigra/ventral tegmental area, and posterior hippocampus relative to baseline (0.005 ≤ p ≤ 0.012. In all these areas, except for the thalamus, D2/3R binding was negatively correlated with grooming in the first half and positively correlated with various motor/exploratory behaviors in the second half of the testing session. After BIC, D2/3R binding was significantly elevated in caudateputamen (p = 0.022 and thalamus (p = 0.047 relative to baseline. D2/3R binding in caudateputamen and thalamus was correlated negatively with sitting duration and sitting frequency and positively with motor/exploratory behaviors in the first half of the testing time.Conclusions: Findings indicate direct GABAergic control over nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine levels in relation to behavioral action. This may be of relevance for neuropsychiatric conditions such as anxiety disorder and schizophrenia, which are characterized by both dopaminergic and GABAergic dysfunction.

  8. Trajectory of the main GABAergic interneuron populations from early development to old age in the rat primary auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia eOuellet

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In both humans and rodents, decline in cognitive function is a hallmark of the aging process, the basis for this decrease has yet to be fully characterized. However, using aged rodent models, deficits in auditory processing have been associated with significant decreases in inhibitory signaling attributed to a loss of GABAergic interneurons. Not only are these interneurons crucial for pattern detection and other large-scale population dynamics, but they have also been linked to mechanisms mediating plasticity and learning, making them a prime candidate for study and modelling of modifications to cortical communication pathways in neurodegenerative diseases. Using the rat primary auditory cortex (A1 as a model, we probed the known markers of GABAergic interneurons with immunohistological methods, using antibodies against gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA, parvalbumin (PV, somatostatin (SOM, calretinin (CR, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, neuropeptide Y (NPY and cholecystokinin (CCK to document the changes observed in interneuron populations across the rat’s lifespan. This analysis provided strong evidence that several but not all GABAergic neurons were affected by the aging process, showing most dramatic changes in expression of parvalbumin (PV and somatostatin (SOM expression. With this evidence, we show how understanding these trajectories of cell counts may be factored into a simple model to quantify changes in inhibitory signalling across the course of life, which may be applied as a framework for creating more advanced simulations of interneuronal implication in normal cerebral processing, normal aging, or pathological processes.

  9. Two-phase flow induced parametric vibrations in structural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Fumio

    1980-01-01

    This paper is divided into two parts concerning piping systems and a nuclear fuel pin system. The significant experimental results concerning the random vibration induced in an L-shaped pipe by air-water two-phase flow and the theoretical analysis of the vibration are described in the first part. It was clarified for the first time that the parametric excitation due to the periodic changes of system mass, centrifugal force and Coriolis force was the mechanism of exciting the vibration. Moreover, the experimental and theoretical analyses of the mechanism of exciting vibration by air-water two-phase flow in a straight, horizontal pipe were carried out, and the first natural frequency of the piping system was strongly related to the dominant frequency of void signals. The experimental results on the vibration of a nuclear fuel pin model in parallel air-water two-phase flow are reported in the latter part. The relations between vibrational strain variance and two-phase flow velocity or pressure fluctuation, and the frequency characteristics of vibrational strain variance were obtained. The theoretical analysis of the dynamic interaction between air-water two-phase flow and a fuel pin structure, and the vibrational instability of fuel pins in alternate air and water slugs or in large bubble flow are also reported. (Kako, I.)

  10. Modeling drug- and chemical- induced hepatotoxicity with systems biology approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin eBhattacharya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We provide an overview of computational systems biology approaches as applied to the study of chemical- and drug-induced toxicity. The concept of ‘toxicity pathways’ is described in the context of the 2007 US National Academies of Science report, Toxicity testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy. Pathway mapping and modeling based on network biology concepts are a key component of the vision laid out in this report for a more biologically-based analysis of dose-response behavior and the safety of chemicals and drugs. We focus on toxicity of the liver (hepatotoxicity – a complex phenotypic response with contributions from a number of different cell types and biological processes. We describe three case studies of complementary multi-scale computational modeling approaches to understand perturbation of toxicity pathways in the human liver as a result of exposure to environmental contaminants and specific drugs. One approach involves development of a spatial, multicellular virtual tissue model of the liver lobule that combines molecular circuits in individual hepatocytes with cell-cell interactions and blood-mediated transport of toxicants through hepatic sinusoids, to enable quantitative, mechanistic prediction of hepatic dose-response for activation of the AhR toxicity pathway. Simultaneously, methods are being developing to extract quantitative maps of intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulatory networks perturbed by environmental contaminants, using a combination of gene expression and genome-wide protein-DNA interaction data. A predictive physiological model (DILIsymTM to understand drug-induced liver injury (DILI, the most common adverse event leading to termination of clinical development programs and regulatory actions on drugs, is also described. The model initially focuses on reactive metabolite-induced DILI in response to administration of acetaminophen, and spans multiple biological scales.

  11. Epigenetic regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pek Siew; Li, Jasmine; Holloway, Adele F; Rao, Sudha

    2013-07-01

    T cells are exquisitely poised to respond rapidly to pathogens and have proved an instructive model for exploring the regulation of inducible genes. Individual genes respond to antigenic stimulation in different ways, and it has become clear that the interplay between transcription factors and the chromatin platform of individual genes governs these responses. Our understanding of the complexity of the chromatin platform and the epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to transcriptional control has expanded dramatically in recent years. These mechanisms include the presence/absence of histone modification marks, which form an epigenetic signature to mark active or inactive genes. These signatures are dynamically added or removed by epigenetic enzymes, comprising an array of histone-modifying enzymes, including the more recently recognized chromatin-associated signalling kinases. In addition, chromatin-remodelling complexes physically alter the chromatin structure to regulate chromatin accessibility to transcriptional regulatory factors. The advent of genome-wide technologies has enabled characterization of the chromatin landscape of T cells in terms of histone occupancy, histone modification patterns and transcription factor association with specific genomic regulatory regions, generating a picture of the T-cell epigenome. Here, we discuss the multi-layered regulation of inducible gene expression in the immune system, focusing on the interplay between transcription factors, and the T-cell epigenome, including the role played by chromatin remodellers and epigenetic enzymes. We will also use IL2, a key inducible cytokine gene in T cells, as an example of how the different layers of epigenetic mechanisms regulate immune responsive genes during T-cell activation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Prospects and challenges for practical application of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Selected strains of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria are able to induce a systemic resistance (ISR) in plants, which is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). The generally non-specific character of induced resistance constitutes an increase in the

  13. First experience with the new Coupling Loss Induced Quench system

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Dudarev, A V; Kirby, G; Sperin, K A; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    New-generation high-field superconducting magnets pose a challenge relating to the protection of the coil winding pack in the case of a quench. The high stored energy per unit volume calls for a very efficient quench detection and fast quench propagation in order to avoid damage due to overheating. A new protection system called Coupling-Loss Induced Quench (CLIQ) was recently, developed and tested at CERN. This method provokes a fast change in the magnet transport current by means of a capacitive discharge. The resulting change in the local magnetic field induces inter-filament and inter-strand coupling losses which heat up the superconductor and eventually initiate a quench in a large fraction of the coil winding pack. The method is extensively tested on a Nb-Ti single-wire test solenoid magnet in the CERN Cryogenic Laboratory in order to assess its performance, optimize its operating parameters, and study new electrical configurations. Each parameter is thoroughly analyzed and its impact on the quench effi...

  14. Two clusters of GABAergic ellipsoid body neurons modulate olfactory labile memory in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiping; Li, Xiaoting; Guo, Jing; Li, Yan; Guo, Aike

    2013-03-20

    In Drosophila, aversive olfactory memory is believed to be stored in a prominent brain structure, the mushroom body (MB), and two pairs of MB intrinsic neurons, the dorsal paired medial (DPM) and the anterior paired lateral (APL) neurons, are found to regulate the consolidation of middle-term memory (MTM). Here we report that another prominent brain structure, the ellipsoid body (EB), is also involved in the modulation of olfactory MTM. Activating EB R2/R4m neurons does not affect the learning index, but specifically eliminates anesthesia-sensitive memory (ASM), the labile component of olfactory MTM. We further demonstrate that approximately two-thirds of these EB neurons are GABAergic and are responsible for the suppression of ASM. Using GRASP (GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners), we reveal potential synaptic connections between the EB and MB in regions covering both the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of EB neurons, suggesting the presence of bidirectional connections between these two important brain structures. These findings suggest the existence of direct connections between the MB and EB, and provide new insights into the neural circuit basis for olfactory labile memory in Drosophila.

  15. Convergent Transcriptional Programs Regulate cAMP Levels in C. elegans GABAergic Motor Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Wang, Xiaolin; Wei, Shuai; Fu, Tao; Dzakah, Emmanuel Enoch; Waqas, Ahmed; Walthall, Walter W; Shan, Ge

    2017-10-23

    Both transcriptional regulation and signaling pathways play crucial roles in neuronal differentiation and plasticity. Caenorhabditis elegans possesses 19 GABAergic motor neurons (MNs) called D MNs, which are divided into two subgroups: DD and VD. DD, but not VD, MNs reverse their cellular polarity in a developmental process called respecification. UNC-30 and UNC-55 are two critical transcription factors in D MNs. By using chromatin immunoprecipitation with CRISPR/Cas9 knockin of GFP fusion, we uncovered the global targets of UNC-30 and UNC-55. UNC-30 and UNC-55 are largely converged to regulate over 1,300 noncoding and coding genes, and genes in multiple biological processes, including cAMP metabolism, are co-regulated. Increase in cAMP levels may serve as a timing signal for respecification, whereas UNC-55 regulates genes such as pde-4 to keep the cAMP levels low in VD. Other genes modulating DD respecification such as lin-14, irx-1, and oig-1 are also found to affect cAMP levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Fabián; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms of action potential generation is critical to establish the way neural circuits generate and coordinate activity. Accordingly, we investigated the dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) using in vivo intracellular recordings in cats in order to preserve anatomically-intact axo-dendritic distributions and naturally-occurring spatiotemporal patterns of synaptic activity in this structure that regulates the thalamic relay to neocortex. We found a wide operational range of voltage thresholds for action potentials, mostly due to intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and not synaptic activity driven by network oscillations. Varying levels of synchronous synaptic inputs produced fast rates of membrane potential depolarization preceding the action potential onset that were associated with lower thresholds and increased excitability, consistent with TRN neurons performing as coincidence detectors. On the other hand the presence of action potentials preceding any given spike was associated with more depolarized thresholds. The phase-plane trajectory of the action potential showed somato-dendritic propagation, but no obvious axon initial segment component, prominent in other neuronal classes and allegedly responsible for the high onset speed. Overall, our results suggest that TRN neurons could flexibly integrate synaptic inputs to discharge action potentials over wide voltage ranges, and perform as coincidence detectors and temporal integrators, supported by a dynamic action potential threshold.

  17. GABAergic inhibition of leg motoneurons is required for normal walking behavior in freely moving Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Swetha B. M.; Paranjpe, Pushkar D.; Reddy, O. Venkateswara; Thiagarajan, Devasena; Palliyil, Sudhir; Reichert, Heinrich

    2018-01-01

    Walking is a complex rhythmic locomotor behavior generated by sequential and periodical contraction of muscles essential for coordinated control of movements of legs and leg joints. Studies of walking in vertebrates and invertebrates have revealed that premotor neural circuitry generates a basic rhythmic pattern that is sculpted by sensory feedback and ultimately controls the amplitude and phase of the motor output to leg muscles. However, the identity and functional roles of the premotor interneurons that directly control leg motoneuron activity are poorly understood. Here we take advantage of the powerful genetic methodology available in Drosophila to investigate the role of premotor inhibition in walking by genetically suppressing inhibitory input to leg motoneurons. For this, we have developed an algorithm for automated analysis of leg motion to characterize the walking parameters of wild-type flies from high-speed video recordings. Further, we use genetic reagents for targeted RNAi knockdown of inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in leg motoneurons together with quantitative analysis of resulting changes in leg movement parameters in freely walking Drosophila. Our findings indicate that targeted down-regulation of the GABAA receptor Rdl (Resistance to Dieldrin) in leg motoneurons results in a dramatic reduction of walking speed and step length without the loss of general leg coordination during locomotion. Genetically restricting the knockdown to the adult stage and subsets of motoneurons yields qualitatively identical results. Taken together, these findings identify GABAergic premotor inhibition of motoneurons as an important determinant of correctly coordinated leg movements and speed of walking in freely behaving Drosophila. PMID:29440493

  18. Multiple embryonic origins of nitric oxide synthase-expressing GABAergic neurons of the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza eMagno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical GABAergic interneurons in rodents originate in three subcortical regions: the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE, the lateral/caudal ganglionic eminence (LGE/CGE and the preoptic area (POA. Each of these neuroepithelial precursor domains contributes different interneuron subtypes to the cortex. nNOS-expressing neurons represent a heterogenous population of cortical interneurons. We examined the development of these cells in the mouse embryonic cortex and their abundance and distribution in adult animals. Using genetic lineage tracing in transgenic mice we find that nNOS type I cells originate only in the MGE whereas type II cells have a triple origin in the MGE, LGE/CGE and POA. The two populations are born at different times during development, occupy different layers in the adult cortex and have distinct neurochemical profiles. nNOS neurons are more numerous in the adult cortex than previously reported and constitute a significant proportion of the cortical interneuron population. Our data suggest that the heterogeneity of nNOS neurons in the cortex can be attributed to their multiple embryonic origins which likely impose distinct genetic specification programs.

  19. Different correlation patterns of cholinergic and GABAergic interneurons with striatal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital eAdler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is populated by a single projection neuron group, the medium spiny neurons (MSNs, and several groups of interneurons. Two of the electrophysiologically well-characterized striatal interneuron groups are the tonically active neurons (TANs, which are presumably cholinergic interneurons, and the fast spiking interneurons (FSIs, presumably parvalbumin (PV expressing GABAergic interneurons. To better understand striatal processing it is thus crucial to define the functional relationship between MSNs and these interneurons in the awake and behaving animal. We used multiple electrodes and standard physiological methods to simultaneously record MSN spiking activity and the activity of TANs or FSIs from monkeys engaged in a classical conditioning paradigm. All three cell populations were highly responsive to the behavioral task. However, they displayed different average response profiles and a different degree of response synchronization (signal correlation. TANs displayed the most transient and synchronized response, MSNs the most diverse and sustained response and FSIs were in between on both parameters. We did not find evidence for direct monosynaptic connectivity between the MSNs and either the TANs or the FSIs. However, while the cross correlation histograms of TAN to MSN pairs were flat, those of FSI to MSN displayed positive asymmetrical broad peaks. The FSI-MSN correlogram profile implies that the spikes of MSNs follow those of FSIs and both are driven by a common, most likely cortical, input. Thus, the two populations of striatal interneurons are probably driven by different afferents and play complementary functional roles in the physiology of the striatal microcircuit.

  20. Apparatus, system, and method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberger, Jr., Andrew J; Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R

    2014-11-18

    In laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), an apparatus includes a pulsed laser configured to generate a pulsed laser signal toward a sample, a constructive interference object and an optical element, each located in a path of light from the sample. The constructive interference object is configured to generate constructive interference patterns of the light. The optical element is configured to disperse the light. A LIBS system includes a first and a second optical element, and a data acquisition module. The data acquisition module is configured to determine an isotope measurement based, at least in part, on light received by an image sensor from the first and second optical elements. A method for performing LIBS includes generating a pulsed laser on a sample to generate light from a plasma, generating constructive interference patterns of the light, and dispersing the light into a plurality of wavelengths.

  1. Methodology for simulation of geomagnetically induced currents in power systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boteler David

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the geomagnetic hazard to power systems it is useful to be able to simulate the geomagnetically induced currents (GIC that are produced during major geomagnetic disturbances. This paper examines the methodology used in power system analysis and shows how it can be applied to modelling GIC. Electric fields in the area of the power network are used to determine the voltage sources or equivalent current sources in the transmission lines. The power network can be described by a mesh impedance matrix which is combined with the voltage sources to calculate the GIC in each loop. Alternatively the power network can be described by a nodal admittance matrix which is combined with the sum of current sources into each node to calculate the nodal voltages which are then used to calculate the GIC in the transmission lines and GIC flowing to ground at each substation. Practical calculations can be made by superposition of results calculated separately for northward and eastward electric fields. This can be done using magnetic data from a single observatory to calculate an electric field that is a uniform approximation of the field over the area of the power system. It is also shown how the superposition of results can be extended to use data from two observatories: approximating the electric field by a linear variation between the two observatory locations. These calculations provide an efficient method for simulating the GIC that would be produced by historically significant geomagnetic storm events.

  2. Design of remote laser-induced fluorescence system's acquisition circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Lou, Yue; Wang, Ran; Yan, Debao; Li, Xin; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Dong; Zhao, Qi

    2017-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence system(LIfS) has been found its significant application in identifying one kind of substance from another by its properties even it's thimbleful, and becomes useful in plenty of fields. Many superior works have reported LIfS' theoretical analysis , designs and uses. However, the usual LIPS is always constructed in labs to detect matter quite closely, for the system using low-power laser as excitation source and charge coupled device (CCD) as detector. Promoting the detectivity of LIfS is of much concern to spread its application. Here, we take a high-energy narrow-pulse laser instead of commonly used continuous wave laser to operate sample, thus we can get strong fluorescent. Besides, photomultiplier (PMT) with high sensitivity is adopted in our system to detect extremely weak fluorescence after a long flight time from the sample to the detector. Another advantage in our system, as the fluorescence collected into spectroscopy, multiple wavelengths of light can be converted to the corresponding electrical signals with the linear array multichannel PMT. Therefore, at the cost of high-powered incentive and high-sensitive detector, a remote LIFS is get. In order to run this system, it is of importance to turn light signal to digital signal which can be processed by computer. The pulse width of fluorescence is deeply associated with excitation laser, at the nanosecond(ns) level, which has a high demand for acquisition circuit. We design an acquisition circuit including, I/V conversion circuit, amplifying circuit and peak-holding circuit. The simulation of circuit shows that peak-holding circuit can be one effective approach to reducing difficulty of acquisition circuit.

  3. The endocannabinoid system in anxiety, fear memory and habituation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehle, S; Rey, A Aparisi; Remmers, F

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in anxiety and fear has been accumulated, providing leads for novel therapeutic approaches. In anxiety, a bidirectional influence of the ECS has been reported, whereby anxiolytic and anxiogenic responses have been obtained after both increases and decreases of the endocannabinoid tone. The recently developed genetic tools have revealed different but complementary roles for the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor on GABAergic and glutamatergic neuronal populations. This dual functionality, together with the plasticity of CB1 receptor expression, particularly on GABAergic neurons, as induced by stressful and rewarding experiences, gives the ECS a unique regulatory capacity for maintaining emotional homeostasis. However, the promiscuity of the endogenous ligands of the CB1 receptor complicates the interpretation of experimental data concerning ECS and anxiety. In fear memory paradigms, the ECS is mostly involved in the two opposing processes of reconsolidation and extinction of the fear memory. Whereas ECS activation deteriorates reconsolidation, proper extinction depends on intact CB1 receptor signalling. Thus, both for anxiety and fear memory processing, endocannabinoid signalling may ensure an appropriate reaction to stressful events. Therefore, the ECS can be considered as a regulatory buffer system for emotional responses. PMID:21768162

  4. Local and Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Experimentally Induced Gingivitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishman, Shaneen J.; Seymour, Gregory J.; Ford, Pauline J.

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual. PMID:24227893

  5. Anxiolytic activity of a phytochemically characterized Passiflora incarnata extract is mediated via the GABAergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmann, Oliver; Wang, Jie; McGregor, Gerard P; Butterweck, Veronika

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess the anxiolytic properties of a phytochemically characterized commercial extract from Passiflora incarnata (PI; Passifloraceae) in the elevated plus maze test in mice. Using an HPLC method, the flavonoids homoorientin, orientin, vitexin, and isovitexin were identified as major compounds. Following oral administration, the extract exerted an anxiolytic effect that was comparable to diazepam (1.5 mg/kg) at a dose of 375 mg/kg and exhibited a U-shaped dose-response curve. In addition, antagonism studies using the GABA (A)/benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil and the 5-HT (1A)-receptor antagonist WAY-100 635 were conducted. The active dose was effectively antagonized by flumazenil, but not by WAY-100 635. This study is the first demonstration of the IN VIVO, GABA-mediated anxiolytic activity of an HPLC- characterized extract of Passiflora incarnata.

  6. Noise-induced transitions and resonant effects in nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikin, Alexei

    2003-02-01

    Our every-day experience is connected with different acoustical noise or music. Usually noise plays the role of nuisance in any communication and destroys any order in a system. Similar optical effects are known: strong snowing or raining decreases quality of a vision. In contrast to these situations noisy stimuli can also play a positive constructive role, e.g. a driver can be more concentrated in a presence of quiet music. Transmission processes in neural systems are of especial interest from this point of view: excitation or information will be transmitted only in the case if a signal overcomes a threshold. Dr. Alexei Zaikin from the Potsdam University studies noise-induced phenomena in nonlinear systems from a theoretical point of view. Especially he is interested in the processes, in which noise influences the behaviour of a system twice: if the intensity of noise is over a threshold, it induces some regular structure that will be synchronized with the behaviour of neighbour elements. To obtain such a system with a threshold one needs one more noise source. Dr. Zaikin has analyzed further examples of such doubly stochastic effects and developed a concept of these new phenomena. These theoretical findings are important, because such processes can play a crucial role in neurophysics, technical communication devices and living sciences. Unsere alltägliche Erfahrung ist mit verschiedenen akustischen Einfluessen wie Lärm, aber auch Musik verbunden. Jeder weiss, wie Lärm stören kann und Kommunikation behindert oder gar unterbindet. Ähnliche optische Effekte sind bekannt: starkes Schneetreiben oder Regengüsse verschlechtern die Sicht und lassen uns Umrisse nur noch schemenhaft erkennen. Jedoch koennen ähnliche Stimuli auch sehr positive Auswirkungen haben: Autofahrer fahren bei leiser Musik konzentrierter -- die Behauptung von Schulkindern, nur bei dröhnenden Bässen die Mathehausaufgaben richtig rechnen zu können, ist allerdings nicht wissenschaftlich

  7. Inducing sex reversal of the urogenital system of marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfree, Marilyn B; Chew, Keng Yih; Shaw, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    Marsupials differ from eutherian mammals in their reproductive strategy of delivering a highly altricial young after a short gestation. The young, with its undeveloped organ systems completes its development post-natally, usually within a pouch. The young is dependent on milk with a composition that varies through lactation to support its growth and changing needs as it matures over a lengthy period. Gonadal differentiation occurs after birth, providing a unique opportunity to examine the effects of hormonal manipulations on its sexual differentiation of the highly accessible young. In marsupials a difference in the migration of the urinary ducts around the genital ducts from eutherian mammals results in the unique tammar reproductive tract which has three vaginae and two cervices, and two distinctly separate uteri. In the tammar wallaby, a small member of the kangaroo family, we showed that virilisation of the Wolffian duct, prostate and phallus depends on an alternate androgen pathway, which has now been shown to be important for virilisation in humans. Through hormonal manipulations over differing time periods we have achieved sex reversal of both ovaries and testes, germ cells, genital ducts, prostate and phallus. Whilst we understand many of the mechanisms behind sexual differentiation there are still many lessons to be learned from understanding how sex reversal is achieved by using a model such as the tammar wallaby. This will help guide investigations into the major questions of how and why sex determination is achieved in other species. This review discusses the control and development of the marsupial urogenital system, largely drawn from our studies in the tammar wallaby and our ability to manipulate this system to induce sex reversal. Copyright © 2013 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The GAD-given Right of Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells to Become GABAergic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Istvan

    2002-01-01

    Janus, the ancient Roman God of Gates and Doors had two faces: one looked into the past, and the other, into the future. Do neurons possess a Janus face when it comes to neurotransmitters, or a given neuron is to be forever solely γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) ergic, glutamatergic, dopaminergic, peptidergic, or YOURPREFERREDTRANSMITTERergic? The answer is that the terminals of many neurons are homes to even more than two neurotransmitters. All this in spite of the “one neuron–one transmitter” usual misinterpretation of Sir Henry Hallett Dale's postulate, originally meant to indicate that a metabolic process taking place in the cell body can influence all processes of the same neuron. A large variety of neurons in the CNS, many of them GABAergic, produce and release chemicals that satisfy some of the criteria used to define neurotransmitters. The usual scenario for a dual-transmitter terminal is that the fast-acting transmitter such as GABA or glutamate is stored in regular synaptic vesicles, whereas a neuropeptide is stored in dense core vesicles 1. The vesicular zinc found in many glutamatergic terminals also may be considered to be a second neurotransmitter, based on its vesicular packaging with the aid of a specific vesicular transporter, and its postsynaptic actions through high-affinity binding sites and permeation through certain channels 2. Whenever a “fast” and a “slow” neurotransmitter are present in the same presynaptic terminal, it is customary to assume that their release can be differentially regulated 1. There is little convincing experimental support for this phenomenon in the mammalian CNS. The coexistence of two “fast” neurotransmitters in the same terminal is less frequent, but not unheard of. In neonatal sympathetic neurons cocultured with cardiac myocytes, norepinephrine and acetylcholine coexist and have opposite actions on the cardiac muscle cells 3. Very recently we learned that brain-derived neurotrophic factor acting at the

  9. Distribution and compartmental organization of GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons in the mouse Nucleus Accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eGangarossa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus accumbens (NAc is a critical brain region involved in many reward-related behaviors. The NAc comprises major compartments the core and the shell, which encompass several subterritories. GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs constitute the output neurons of the NAc core and shell. While the functional organization of the NAc core outputs resembles the one described for the dorsal striatum, a simple classification of the NAc shell neurons has been difficult to define due to the complexity of the compartmental segregation of cells. We used a variety of BAC transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescence (EGFP or the Cre-recombinase (Cre under the control of the promoter of dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors and of adenosine A2a receptor to dissect the microanatomy of the NAc. Moreover, using various immunological markers we characterized in detail the distribution of MSNs in the mouse NAc. In addition, cell-type specific ERK phosphorylation in the NAc subterritories was analyzed following acute administration of SKF81297 (a D1R-like agonist, quinpirole (a D2R-like agonist, apomorphine (a non-selective DA receptor agonist, raclopride (a D2R-like antagonist, and psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine and d-amphetamine. Each drug generated a unique topography and cell-type specific activation of ERK in the NAc. Our results show the existence of marked differences in the receptor expression pattern and functional activation of MSNs within the shell subterritories. This study emphasizes the anatomical and functional heterogeneity of the NAc, which will have to be considered in its further study.

  10. Differential expression of metabotropic glutamate and GABAB receptors at neocortical glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eBragina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and GABAB receptors are highly expressed at presynaptic sites. To verify the possibility that the two classes of metabotropic receptors contribute to axon terminals heterogeneity, we studied the localization of mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7 and GABAB1 in VGLUT1-, VGLUT2- and VGAT-positive terminals in the cerebral cortex of adult rats. VGLUT1-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (~5%, mGluR5 (~6%, mGluR2/3 (~22%, mGluR7 (~17%, and GABAB1 (~40%; VGLUT2-positive terminals expressed mGluR1α (~10%, mGluR5 (~11%, mGluR2/3 (~20%, mGluR7 (~28%, and GABAB1 (~25%; whereas VGAT-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (~27%, mGluR5 (~24%, mGluR2/3 (~38%, mGluR7 (~31%, and GABAB1 (~19%. Control experiments ruled out the possibility that post-synaptic mGluRs and GABAB1 might have significantly biased our results. We also performed functional assays in synaptosomal preparations, and showed that all agonists modify Glu and GABA levels, which return to baseline upon exposure to antagonists.Overall, these findings indicate that mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7 and GABAB1 expression differ significantly between glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals, and that the robust expression of heteroreceptors may contribute to the homeostatic regulation of the balance between excitation and inhibition.

  11. Fear conditioning selectively disrupts noradrenergic facilitation of GABAergic inhibition in the basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelly, M J; Ariwodola, O J; Weiner, J L

    2017-02-01

    Inappropriate fear memory formation is symptomatic of many psychopathologies, and delineating the neurobiology of non-pathological fear learning may provide critical insight into treating these disorders. Fear memory formation is associated with decreased inhibitory signaling in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), and disrupted noradrenergic signaling may contribute to this decrease. BLA noradrenergic neurotransmission has been implicated in fear memory formation, and distinct adrenoreceptor (AR) subtypes modulate excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in this region. For example, α1-ARs promote GABA release from local inhibitory interneurons, while β3-ARs potentiate neurotransmission at lateral paracapsular (LPC) GABAergic synapses. Conversely, β1/2-ARs amplify excitatory signaling at glutamatergic synapses in the BLA. As increased BLA excitability promotes fear memory formation, we hypothesized that fear learning shifts the balanced regional effects of noradrenergic signaling toward excitation. To test this hypothesis, we used the fear-potentiated startle paradigm in combination with whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology to examine the effects of AR activation on BLA synaptic transmission following fear conditioning in male Long-Evans rats. We first demonstrated that inhibitory neurotransmission is decreased at both local and LPC synapses following fear conditioning. We next measured noradrenergic facilitation of BLA inhibitory signaling at local and LPC synapses using α1-and β3-AR agonists (1 μM A61603 and 10 μM BRL37344), and found that the ability of these agents to facilitate inhibitory neurotransmission is disrupted following fear conditioning. Conversely, we found that fear learning does not disrupt noradrenergic modulation of glutamatergic signaling via a β1/2-AR agonist (1 μM isoproterenol). Taken together, these studies suggest that fear learning increases BLA excitability by selectively disrupting the inhibitory effects of noradrenaline

  12. Antioxidants L-carnitine and D-methionine modulate neuronal activity through GABAergic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Calvin; Gopal, Kamakshi V; Moore, Ernest J; Gross, Guenter W

    2014-07-01

    Antioxidants are well known for their neuroprotective properties against reactive oxygen species in cortical neurons and auditory cells. We recently identified L-carnitine and D-methionine to be among agents that provide such protection. Here, we investigated their neuronal modulatory actions. We used cultured neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays to assess the effects of L-carnitine and D-methionine on network function. Spike production and burst properties of neuronal networks were used as parameters to monitor pharmacological responses. L-Carnitine and D-methionine reduced spike activity with 100% efficacy with EC50 values of 0.22 (± 0.01) mM and 1.06 (± 0.05) mM, respectively. In the presence of 1.0-40 μM of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, the sigmoidal concentration-response curves of both compounds exhibited stepwise shifts, without a change in efficacy. Under a maximal bicuculline concentration of 40 μM, the EC50 increased to 3.57 (± 0.26) mM for L-carnitine and to 10.52 (± 0.97) mM for D-methionine, more than a tenfold increase. The agonist-antagonist interactions with bicuculline were estimated by Lineweaver-Burk plot analyses to be competitive, corroborated by the computed dissociation constants of bicuculline. For both compounds, the effects on the network burst pattern, activity reversibility, and bicuculline antagonism resembled that elicited by the GABAA agonist muscimol. We showed that the antioxidants L-carnitine and D-methionine modulate cortical electrical spike activity primarily through GABAA receptor activation. Our findings suggest the involvement of GABAergic mechanisms that perhaps contribute to the protective actions of these compounds.

  13. Distribution of GABAergic interneurons and dopaminergic cells in the functional territories of the human striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernácer, Javier; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The afferent projections of the striatum (caudate nucleus and putamen) are segregated in three territories: associative, sensorimotor and limbic. Striatal interneurons are in part responsible for the integration of these different types of information. Among them, GABAergic interneurons are the most abundant, and can be sorted in three populations according to their content in the calcium binding proteins calretinin (CR), parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin (CB). Conversely, striatal dopaminergic cells (whose role as interneurons is still unclear) are scarce. This study aims to analyze the interneuron distribution in the striatal functional territories, as well as their organization regarding to the striosomal compartment. We used immunohistochemical methods to visualize CR, PV, CB and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive striatal neurons. The interneuronal distribution was assessed by stereological methods applied to every striatal functional territory. Considering the four cell groups altogether, their density was higher in the associative (2120±91 cells/mm(3)) than in the sensorimotor (959±47 cells/mm(3)) or limbic (633±119 cells/mm(3)) territories. CB- and TH-immunoreactive(-ir) cells were distributed rather homogeneously in the three striatal territories. However, the density of CR and PV interneurons were more abundant in the associative and sensorimotor striatum, respectively. Regarding to their compartmental organization, CR-ir interneurons were frequently found in the border between compartments in the associative and sensorimotor territories, and CB-ir interneurons abounded at the striosome/matrix border in the sensorimotor domain. The present study demonstrates that the architecture of the human striatum in terms of its interneuron composition varies in its three functional territories. Furthermore, our data highlight the importance of CR-ir striatal interneurons in the integration of associative information, and the selective role of PV-ir interneurons in

  14. Functional interaction and cross-tolerance between ethanol and Δ9-THC: possible modulation by mouse cerebellar adenosinergic A1/GABAergic-A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Saeed

    2014-08-15

    We have previously shown a functional motor interaction between ethanol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) that involved cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAergic A receptor modulation. We now report the development of cross-tolerance between intracerebellar Δ(9)-THC and intraperitoneal ethanol using ataxia as the test response in male CD-1 mice. The drugs [Δ(9)-THC (20 μg), N(6)-cyclohexyladenosine, CHA (12 ng), muscimol (20 ng)] used in the study were directly microinfused stereotaxically via guide cannulas into the cerebellum except ethanol. Δ(9)-THC, infused once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last infusion by acute ethanol (2g/kg) and Rotorod evaluation, virtually abolished ethanol ataxia indicating development of cross-tolerance. The cross-tolerance was also observed when the order of ethanol and Δ(9)-THC treatment was reversed, i.e., ethanol injected once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last ethanol injection by Δ(9)-THC infusion. The cross-tolerance appeared within 24-48 h, lasted over 72 h and was maximal in 5-day ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-treated animals. Finally, tolerance in chronic ethanol/Δ(9)-THC/-treated animals developed not only to ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-induced ataxia, respectively, but also to the ataxia potentiating effect of CHA and muscimol, indicating modulation by cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAA receptors. A practical implication of these results could be that marijuana smokers may experience little or no negative effects such as ataxia following alcohol consumption. Clinically, such antagonism of ethanol-induced ataxia can be observed in marijuana users thereby encouraging more alcohol consumption and thus may represent a risk factor for the development of alcoholism in this segment of population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Amorphous silica nanoparticles impair vascular homeostasis and induce systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemmar A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abderrahim Nemmar,1 Sulayma Albarwani,2 Sumaya Beegam,1 Priya Yuvaraju,1 Javed Yasin,3 Samir Attoub,4 Badreldin H Ali5 1Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 2Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khod, Sultanate of Oman; 3Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 4Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 5Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khod, Sultanate of Oman Abstract: Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs are being used in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and many other industrial applications entailing human exposure. However, their potential vascular and systemic pathophysiologic effects are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the acute (24 hours systemic toxicity of intraperitoneally administered 50 nm and 500 nm SiNPs in mice (0.5 mg/kg. Both sizes of SiNPs induced a platelet proaggregatory effect in pial venules and increased plasma concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Elevated plasma levels of von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen and a decrease in the number of circulating platelets were only seen following the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. The direct addition of SiNPs to untreated mouse blood significantly induced in vitro platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent fashion, and these effects were more pronounced with 50 nm SiNPs. Both sizes of SiNPs increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and interleukin 1β concentration. However, tumor necrosis factor α concentration was only increased after the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. Nevertheless, plasma markers of oxidative stress, including 8-isoprostane

  16. Detoxification of ammonia in mouse cortical GABAergic cell cultures increases neuronal oxidative metabolism and reveals an emerging role for release of glucose-derived alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leke, Renata; Bak, Lasse K; Anker, Malene; Melø, Torun M; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Portela, Luis V; Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-04-01

    Cerebral hyperammonemia is believed to play a pivotal role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a debilitating condition arising due to acute or chronic liver disease. In the brain, ammonia is thought to be detoxified via the activity of glutamine synthetase, an astrocytic enzyme. Moreover, it has been suggested that cerebral tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism is inhibited and glycolysis enhanced during hyperammonemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the ammonia-detoxifying mechanisms as well as the effects of ammonia on energy-generating metabolic pathways in a mouse neuronal-astrocytic co-culture model of the GABAergic system. We found that 5 mM ammonium chloride affected energy metabolism by increasing the neuronal TCA cycle activity and switching the astrocytic TCA cycle toward synthesis of substrate for glutamine synthesis. Furthermore, ammonia exposure enhanced the synthesis and release of alanine. Collectively, our results demonstrate that (1) formation of glutamine is seminal for detoxification of ammonia; (2) neuronal oxidative metabolism is increased in the presence of ammonia; and (3) synthesis and release of alanine is likely to be important for ammonia detoxification as a supplement to formation of glutamine.

  17. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, F. J.; De la Rosa, J.; Gallegos, F. J.

    2006-02-01

    Fluorescence methods are being used increasingly in the measurement of species concentrations in gases, liquids and solids. Laser induced fluorescence is spontaneous emission from atoms or molecules that have been excited by laser radiation. Here we present a time resolved fluorescence instrument that consists of a 5 μJ Nitrogen laser (337.1 nm), a sample holder, a quartz optical fiber, a spectrometer, a PMT and a PC that allows the measurement of visible fluorescence spectra (350-750 nm). Time response of the system is approximately 5 ns. The instrument has been used in the measurement of colored bond paper, antifreeze, diesel, cochineal pigment and malignant tissues. The data acquisition was achieved through computer control of a digital oscilloscope (using General Purpose Interface Bus GPIB) and the spectrometer via serial (RS232). The instrument software provides a graphic interface that lets make some data acquisition tasks like finding fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes. The software was developed using the Lab-View 6i graphic programming package and can be easily managed in order to add more functions to it.

  18. Acrolein consumption induces systemic dyslipidemia and lipoprotein modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg A.; Lesgards, Jean-Francois; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Prough, Russell A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Liu, SiQi; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-01-01

    Aldehydes such as acrolein are ubiquitous pollutants present in automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. Such aldehydes are also constituents of several food substances and are present in drinking water, irrigation canals, and effluents from manufacturing plants. Oral intake represents the most significant source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. To study the effects of short-term oral exposure to acrolein on lipoprotein levels and metabolism, adult mice were gavage-fed 0.1 to 5 mg acrolein/kg bwt and changes in plasma lipoproteins were assessed. Changes in hepatic gene expression related to lipid metabolism and cytokines were examined by qRT-PCR analysis. Acrolein feeding did not affect body weight, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, electrolytes, cytokines or liver enzymes, but increased plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Similar results were obtained with apoE-null mice. Plasma lipoproteins from acrolein-fed mice showed altered electrophoretic mobility on agarose gels. Chromatographic analysis revealed elevated VLDL cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides levels with little change in LDL or HDL. NMR analysis indicated shifts from small to large VLDL and from large to medium-small LDL with no change in the size of HDL particles. Increased plasma VLDL was associated with a significant decrease in post-heparin plasma hepatic lipase activity and a decrease in hepatic expression of hepatic lipase. These observations suggest that oral exposure to acrolein could induce or exacerbate systemic dyslipidemia and thereby contribute to cardiovascular disease risk.

  19. Methylglyoxal induces systemic symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Jiao, Taiwei; Chen, Yushuai; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show a wide range of symptoms including diarrhea, abdominal pain, changes in bowel habits, nausea, vomiting, headache, anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment. Methylglyoxal has been proved to be a potential toxic metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria. The present study was aimed at investigating the correlation between methylglyoxal and irritable bowel syndrome. Rats were treated with an enema infusion of methylglyoxal. Fecal water content, visceral sensitivity, behavioral tests and serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were assessed after methylglyoxal exposure. Our data showed that fecal water content was significantly higher than controls after methylglyoxal exposure except that of 30 mM group. Threshold volumes on balloon distension decreased in the treatment groups. All exposed rats showed obvious head scratching and grooming behavior and a decrease in sucrose preference. The serum 5-HT values were increased in 30, 60, 90 mM groups and decreased in 150 mM group. Our findings suggested that methylglyoxal could induce diarrhea, visceral hypersensitivity, headache as well as depression-like behaviors in rats, and might be the key role in triggering systemic symptoms of IBS.

  20. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Muthuramu, Ilayaraja; Amin, Ruhul; Postnov, Andrey; Mishra, Mudit; Jacobs, Frank; Gheysens, Olivier; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; De Geest, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher (p < 0.05) in 0.2% cholesterol 10% coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (h...

  1. The cholinergic agonist carbachol increases the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic currents in dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C; Brown, R E

    2014-01-31

    Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons play an important role in feeding, mood control and stress responses. One important feature of their activity across the sleep-wake cycle is their reduced firing during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep which stands in stark contrast to the wake/REM-on discharge pattern of brainstem cholinergic neurons. A prominent model of REM sleep control posits a reciprocal interaction between these cell groups. 5-HT inhibits cholinergic neurons, and activation of nicotinic receptors can excite DRN 5-HT neurons but the cholinergic effect on inhibitory inputs is incompletely understood. Here, in vitro, in DRN brain slices prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, a brief (3 min) bath application of carbachol (50 μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in GFP-negative, putative 5-HT neurons but did not affect miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) IPSCs. Carbachol had no direct postsynaptic effect. Thus, carbachol likely increases the activity of local GABAergic neurons which synapse on 5-HT neurons. Removal of dorsal regions of the slice including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) region where GABAergic neurons projecting to the DRN have been identified, abolished the effect of carbachol on sIPSCs whereas the removal of ventral regions containing the oral region of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) did not. In addition, carbachol directly excited GFP-positive, GABAergic vlPAG neurons. Antagonism of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors completely abolished the effects of carbachol. We suggest cholinergic neurons inhibit DRN 5-HT neurons when acetylcholine levels are lower i.e. during quiet wakefulness and the beginning of REM sleep periods, in part via excitation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors located on local vlPAG and DRN GABAergic neurons. Higher firing rates or burst firing of cholinergic neurons associated with attentive wakefulness or phasic REM sleep periods

  2. Ubiquitin-dependent system controls radiation induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delic, J.; Magdelenat, H.; Glaisner, S.; Magdelenat, H.; Maciorowski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The selective proteolytic pathway, dependent upon 'N-end rule' protein recognition/ubiquitination and on the subsequent proteasome dependent processing of ubiquitin conjugates, operates in apoptosis induced by γ-irradiation. The proteasome inhibitor peptide aldehyde, MG132, efficiently induced apoptosis and was also able (at doses lower than those required for apoptosis induction) to potentiate apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Its specificity is suggested by the induction of the ubiquitin (UbB and UbC) and E1 (ubiquitin activating enzyme) genes and by an altered ubiquitination pattern. More selectively, a di-peptide competitor of the 'N-end rule' of ubiquitin dependent protein processing inhibited radiation induced apoptosis. This inhibition is also followed by an altered ubiquitination pattern and by activation of Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). These data strongly suggest that early apoptosis radiation induced events are controlled by ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic processing. (author)

  3. Specification of spatial identities of cerebellar neuron progenitors by ptf1a and atoh1 for proper production of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mayumi; Seto, Yusuke; Taya, Shinichiro; Owa, Tomoo; Inoue, Yukiko U; Inoue, Takayoshi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Nabeshima, Yo-Ichi; Hoshino, Mikio

    2014-04-02

    In the cerebellum, the bHLH transcription factors Ptf1a and Atoh1 are expressed in distinct neuroepithelial regions, the ventricular zone (VZ) and the rhombic lip (RL), and are required for producing GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively. However, it is unclear whether Ptf1a or Atoh1 is sufficient for specifying GABAergic or glutamatergic neuronal fates. To test this, we generated two novel knock-in mouse lines, Ptf1a(Atoh1) and Atoh1(Ptf1a), that are designed to express Atoh1 and Ptf1a ectopically in the VZ and RL, respectively. In Ptf1a(Atoh1) embryos, ectopically Atoh1-expressing VZ cells produced glutamatergic neurons, including granule cells and deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. Correspondingly, in Atoh1(Ptf1a) animals, ectopically Ptf1a-expressing RL cells produced GABAergic populations, such as Purkinje cells and GABAergic interneurons. Consistent results were also obtained from in utero electroporation of Ptf1a or Atoh1 into embryonic cerebella, suggesting that Ptf1a and Atoh1 are essential and sufficient for GABAergic versus glutamatergic specification in the neuroepithelium. Furthermore, birthdating analyses with BrdU in the knock-in mice or with electroporation studies showed that ectopically produced fate-changed neuronal types were generated at temporal schedules closely simulating those of the wild-type RL and VZ, suggesting that the VZ and RL share common temporal information. Observations of knock-in brains as well as electroporated brains revealed that Ptf1a and Atoh1 mutually negatively regulate their expression, probably contributing to formation of non-overlapping neuroepithelial domains. These findings suggest that Ptf1a and Atoh1 specify spatial identities of cerebellar neuron progenitors in the neuroepithelium, leading to appropriate production of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively.

  4. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Amajad Iqbal; Oommen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g) were unintentionally exposed to noise due to construction (75-95 db, 3-4 hours/day, 5 days a week for 7-8 weeks) in the vicinity of the animal care facility. Glutamate/GABA levels and their metabolic enzymes were evaluated in different rat brain regions (cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum) and compared with age and gender matched nonexposed rats. Chronic noise stress decreased glutamate levels and glutaminase activity 27% and 33% in the cortex, 15% and 24% in the cerebellum. Glutamate levels increased 10% in the hippocampus, 28% in striatum and glutaminase activity 15% in striatum. Glutamine synthetase activity increased significantly in all brain regions studied, that is, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum (P Noise stress-increased GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity 20% and 45% in the cortex, 13% and 28% in the hippocampus respectively. GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity decreased 15% and 14%, respectively in the striatum. GABA transaminase activity was significantly reduced in the cortex (55%), hippocampus (17%), and cerebellum (33%). Chronic noise stress differentially affected glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, which may alter glutamate and GABA neurotransmission.

  5. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome increases immobility-induced neuromuscular weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Heidrun; Helming, Marc; Unterbuchner, Christoph; Lenz, Andrea; Neff, Frauke; Martyn, J A Jeevendra; Blobner, Manfred

    2008-03-01

    Inflammation and immobility are comorbid etiological factors inducing muscle weakness in critically ill patients. This study establishes a rat model to examine the effect of inflammation and immobilization alone and in combination on muscle contraction, histology, and acetylcholine receptor regulation. Prospective, randomized, experimental study. Animal laboratory of a university hospital. Sprague-Dawley rats. To produce systemic inflammation, rats (n = 34) received three consecutive intravenous injections of Corynebacterium parvum on days 0, 4, and 8. Control rats (n = 21) received saline. Both groups were further divided to have one hind limb either immobilized by pinning of knee and ankle joints or sham-immobilized (surgical leg). The contralateral nonsurgical leg of each animal served as control (nonsurgical leg). After 12 days, body weight and muscle mass were significantly reduced in all C. parvum animals compared with saline-injected rats. Immobilization led to local muscle atrophy. Normalized to muscle mass, tetanic contraction was reduced in the surgical leg after immobilization (7.64 +/- 1.91 N/g) and after inflammation (8.71 +/- 2.0 N/g; both p < .05 vs. sham immobilization and saline injection, 11.03 +/- 2.26 N/g). Histology showed an increase in inflammatory cells in all C. parvum-injected animals. Immobilization in combination with C. parvum injection had an additive effect on inflammation. Acetylcholine receptors were increased in immobilized muscles and in all muscles of C. parvum-injected animals. The muscle weakness in critically ill patients can be replicated in our novel rat model. Inflammation and immobilization independently lead to muscle weakness.

  6. Condensation induced water hammer in steam supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, P.B.; Antaki, G.A.; Rawls, G.B.; Gutierrez, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    The accidental mixing of steam and water usually leads to condensation induced water hammer. THis phenomenon is not uncommon in the power and process industries, and is of particular concern due to the high energies which accompany steam transients. The paper discusses the conditions which lead to a recent condensation induced water hammer in a 150 psig steam supply header. The insuing structural damage, inspection and repairs are described. Finally, a list of design cautions are presented to help minimize the potential for condensation induced water hammer in steam lines

  7. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, Ernie [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Nelson, James [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Robertson-Tait, Ann [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Savy, Jean [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Wong, Ivan [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This Protocol is a living guidance document for geothermal developers, public officials, regulators and the general public that provides a set of general guidelines detailing useful steps to evaluate and manage the effects of induced seismicity related to EGS projects.

  8. BDP-30, a systemic resistance inducer from Boerhaavia diffusa L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-11

    62 and CT-VIA-32, were purified from Cyamopsis tetragonoloba plants that were induced to resist virus infection following treatment with CIP-29, with. CT-VIA-62 sharing sequence homology with a lectin that possessed a ...

  9. Dynamic Characteristics of Flow Induced Vibration in a Rotor-Seal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow induced vibration is an important factor affecting the performance of the rotor-seal system. From the point of view of flow induced vibration, the nonlinear models of the rotor-seal system are presented for the analysis of the fluid force, which is induced by the interaction between the unstable fluid flow in the seal and the vibrating rotor. The nonlinear characteristics of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system are analyzed, and the nonlinear phenomena in the unbalanced rotor-seal system are investigated using the nonlinear models. Various nonlinear phenomena of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system, such as synchronization phenomenon and amplitude mutation, are reproduced.

  10. Environmental enrichment as a therapeutic avenue for anxiety in aged Wistar rats: Effect on cat odor exposition and GABAergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampedro-Piquero, P; Castilla-Ortega, E; Zancada-Menendez, C; Santín, L J; Begega, A

    2016-08-25

    The use of more ethological animal models to study the neurobiology of anxiety has increased in recent years. We assessed the effect of an environmental enrichment (EE) protocol (24h/day over a period of two months) on anxiety-related behaviors when aged Wistar rats (21months old) were confronted with cat odor stimuli. Owing to the relationship between GABAergic interneurons and the anxiety-related neuronal network, we examined changes in the expression of Parvalbumin (PV) and 67kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-67) immunoreactive cells in different brain regions involved in stress response. Behavioral results revealed that enriched rats traveled further and made more grooming behaviors during the habituation session. In the cat odor session, they traveled longer distances and they showed more active interaction with the odor stimuli and less time in freezing behavior. Zone analysis revealed that the enriched group spent more time in the intermediate zone according to the proximity of the predator odor. Regarding the neurobiological data, the EE increased the expression of PV-positive cells in some medial prefrontal regions (cingulate (Cg) and prelimbic (PL) cortices), whereas the GAD-67 expression in the basolateral amygdala was reduced in the enriched group. Our results suggest that EE is able to reduce anxiety-like behaviors in aged animals even when ethologically relevant stimuli are used. Moreover, GABAergic interneurons could be involved in mediating this resilient behavior. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. NMDAR hypofunction and somatostatin-expressing GABAergic interneurons and receptors: A newly identified correlation and its effects in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemah Alherz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This review investigates the association between N-methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR hypofunction and somatostatin-expressing GABAergic interneurons (SST+ and how it contributes to the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia (SZ. This is based on evidence that NMDAR antagonists caused symptoms resembling SZ in healthy individuals. NMDAR hypofunction in GABAergic interneurons results in the modulation of the cortical network oscillation, particularly in the gamma range (30–80 Hz. These gamma-band oscillation (GBO abnormalities were found to lead to the cognitive deficits observed in the disorder. Postmortem mRNA studies have shown that SST decreased more significantly than any other biomarker in schizophrenic subjects. The functional role of Somatostatin (SST in the aetiology of SZ can be studied through its receptors. Genetic knockout studies in animal models in Huntington's disease (HD have shown that a specific SST receptor, SSTR2, is increased along with the increased NMDAR activity, with opposing patterns observed in SZ. A direct correlation between SSTR and NMDAR is hence inferred in this review with the hope of finding a potential new therapeutic target for the treatment of SZ and related neurological conditions.

  12. Mass Spectrometry of Single GABAergic Somatic Motorneurons Identifies a Novel Inhibitory Peptide, As-NLP-22, in the Nematode Ascaris suum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konop, Christopher J.; Knickelbine, Jennifer J.; Sygulla, Molly S.; Wruck, Colin D.; Vestling, Martha M.; Stretton, Antony O. W.

    2015-12-01

    Neuromodulators have become an increasingly important component of functional circuits, dramatically changing the properties of both neurons and synapses to affect behavior. To explore the role of neuropeptides in Ascaris suum behavior, we devised an improved method for cleanly dissecting single motorneuronal cell bodies from the many other cell processes and hypodermal tissue in the ventral nerve cord. We determined their peptide content using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The reduced complexity of the peptide mixture greatly aided the detection of peptides; peptide levels were sufficient to permit sequencing by tandem MS from single cells. Inhibitory motorneurons, known to be GABAergic, contain a novel neuropeptide, As-NLP-22 (SLASGRWGLRPamide). From this sequence and information from the A. suum expressed sequence tag (EST) database, we cloned the transcript ( As-nlp-22) and synthesized a riboprobe for in situ hybridization, which labeled the inhibitory motorneurons; this validates the integrity of the dissection method, showing that the peptides detected originate from the cells themselves and not from adhering processes from other cells (e.g., synaptic terminals). Synthetic As-NLP-22 has potent inhibitory activity on acetylcholine-induced muscle contraction as well as on basal muscle tone. Both of these effects are dose-dependent: the inhibitory effect on ACh contraction has an IC50 of 8.3 × 10-9 M. When injected into whole worms, As-NLP-22 produces a dose-dependent inhibition of locomotory movements and, at higher levels, complete paralysis. These experiments demonstrate the utility of MALDI TOF/TOF MS in identifying novel neuromodulators at the single-cell level.

  13. Effects of cocaine history on postsynaptic GABA receptors on dorsal raphe serotonin neurons in a stress-induced relapse model in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Kirby, Lynn G

    2016-01-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system plays an important role in stress-related psychiatric disorders and substance abuse. Stressors and stress hormones can inhibit the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN)-5-HT system, which composes the majority of forebrain-projecting 5-HT. This inhibition is mediated via stimulation of GABA synaptic activity at DRN-5-HT neurons. Using swim stress-induced reinstatement of morphine conditioned place-preference, recent data from our laboratory indicate that morphine history sensitizes DRN-5-HT neurons to GABAergic inhibitory effects of stress. Moreover, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition of the serotonergic DRN is required for this reinstatement. In our current experiment, we tested the hypothesis that GABAergic sensitization of DRN-5-HT neurons is a neuroadaptation elicited by multiple classes of abused drugs across multiple models of stress-induced relapse by applying a chemical stressor (yohimbine) to induce reinstatement of previously extinguished cocaine self-administration in Sprague-Dawley rats. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of GABA synaptic activity in DRN-5-HT neurons were conducted after the reinstatement. Behavioral data indicate that yohimbine triggered reinstatement of cocaine self-administration. Electrophysiology data indicate that 5-HT neurons in the cocaine group exposed to yohimbine had increased amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents compared to yoked-saline controls exposed to yohimbine or unstressed animals in both drug groups. These data, together with previous findings, indicate that interaction between psychostimulant or opioid history and chemical or physical stressors may increase postsynaptic GABA receptor density and/or sensitivity in DRN-5-HT neurons. Such mechanisms may result in serotonergic hypofunction and consequent dysphoric mood states which confer vulnerability to stress-induced drug reinstatement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. Can a Positive Allosteric Modulation of GABAergic Receptors Improve Motor Symptoms in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease? The Potential Role of Zolpidem in the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD are unsatisfactorily controlled by currently used anti-Parkinsonian dopaminergic drugs. Various studies suggest that therapeutic strategies based on nondopaminergic drugs might be helpful in PD. Zolpidem, an imidazopyridine widely used as sleep inducer, shows high affinity only for GABAA receptors containing the α-1 subunit and facilitates GABAergic neurotransmission through a positive allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. Various observations, although preliminary, consistently suggest that in PD patients zolpidem may induce beneficial (and sometimes remarkable effects on motor symptoms even after single doses and may also improve dyskinesias. Since a high density of zolpidem binding sites is in the two main output structures of the basal ganglia which are abnormally overactive in PD (internal globus pallidus, GPi, and substantia nigra pars reticulata, SNr, it was hypothesized that in PD patients zolpidem may induce through GABAA receptors an inhibition of GPi and SNr (and, possibly, of the subthalamic nucleus also, resulting in an increased activity of motor cortical areas (such as supplementary motor area, which may give rise to improvement of motor symptoms of PD. Randomized clinical trials are needed in order to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of zolpidem in treating motor symptoms of PD.

  15. Piracetam and aniracetam antagonism of centrally active drug-induced antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, N; Ghelardini, C; Bartolini, A

    1996-04-01

    The effects of the nootropic drugs piracetam and aniracetam on antinociception induced by baclofen, bicuculline, and picrotoxin and on baclofen-induced muscle relaxation were studied in mice. Antinociception was investigated using both the hot plate (thermal stimulus) and abdominal constriction (chemical stimulus) tests. Both behaviour inhibition and muscle relaxation were observed by using the rota-rod test. Piracetam (30 mg/kg, IP) and aniracetam (10 mg/kg, PO) reduced baclofen, bicuculline, and picrotoxin antinociception without modifying analgesia induced by non-GABAergic drugs such as morphine, physostigmine, clomipramine, and diphenhydramine. In this concentration range, piracetam, and aniracetam were also able to reduce the inhibition of rota-rod performance. At higher doses piracetam (100 mg/kg, IP) and aniracetam (100 mg/kg, PO) were able to completely prevent baclofen antinociception. However, when prevention of GABAergic antinociception was complete, piracetam and aniracetam were able to block non-GABAergic antinociception also. comparing the effects of piracetam and aniracetam with those exerted by the GABAB antagonist CGP 35348, a reduction of non-GABAergic analgesia was also observed using higher doses of CGP 35348 (2.5 micrograms per mouse ICV). The present results indicate that piracetam and aniracetam, by preventing both of the investigated effects of baclofen, have some selectivity against GABAB-mediated inhibition. The well-known activity of piracetam and aniracetam on learning and memory might, therefore, depend, at least in part, on the removal of inhibitory GABAB mechanisms that impair attention and cognitive functions.

  16. Regulation of substantia nigra pars reticulata GABAergic neuron activity by hydrogen peroxide via flufenamic acid-sensitive channels and KATP channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R Lee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr GABAergic neurons are key output neurons of the basal ganglia. Given the role of these neurons in motor control, it is important to understand factors that regulate their firing rate and pattern. One potential regulator is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, a reactive oxygen species that is increasingly recognized as a neuromodulator. We used whole-cell current clamp recordings of SNr GABAergic neurons in guinea-pig midbrain slices to determine how H2O2 affects the activity of these neurons and to explore the classes of ion channels underlying those effects. Elevation of H2O2 levels caused an increase in the spontaneous firing rate of SNr GABAergic neurons, whether by application of exogenous H2O2 or amplification of endogenous H2O2 through inhibition of glutathione peroxidase with mercaptosuccinate. This effect was reversed by flufenamic acid, implicating transient receptor potential (TRP channels. Conversely, depletion of endogenous H2O2 by catalase, a peroxidase enzyme, decreased spontaneous firing rate and firing precision of SNr neurons, demonstrating tonic control of firing rate by H2O2. Elevation of H2O2 in the presence of flufenamic acid revealed an inhibition of tonic firing that was prevented by blockade of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP channels with glibenclamide. In contrast to guinea-pig SNr neurons, the dominant effect of H2O2 elevation in mouse SNr GABAergic neurons was hyperpolarization, indicating a species difference in H2O2-dependent regulation. Thus, H2O2 is an endogenous modulator of SNr GABAergic neurons, acting primarily through presumed TRP channels in guinea pig, with additional modulation via KATP channels to regulate SNr output.

  17. Regulation of Substantia Nigra Pars Reticulata GABAergic Neuron Activity by H2O2 via Flufenamic Acid-Sensitive Channels and KATP Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christian R.; Witkovsky, Paul; Rice, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    Substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) GABAergic neurons are key output neurons of the basal ganglia. Given the role of these neurons in motor control, it is important to understand factors that regulate their firing rate and pattern. One potential regulator is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen species that is increasingly recognized as a neuromodulator. We used whole-cell current clamp recordings of SNr GABAergic neurons in guinea-pig midbrain slices to determine how H2O2 affects the activity of these neurons and to explore the classes of ion channels underlying those effects. Elevation of H2O2 levels caused an increase in the spontaneous firing rate of SNr GABAergic neurons, whether by application of exogenous H2O2 or amplification of endogenous H2O2 through inhibition of glutathione peroxidase with mercaptosuccinate. This effect was reversed by flufenamic acid (FFA), implicating transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Conversely, depletion of endogenous H2O2 by catalase, a peroxidase enzyme, decreased spontaneous firing rate and firing precision of SNr neurons, demonstrating tonic control of firing rate by H2O2. Elevation of H2O2 in the presence of FFA revealed an inhibition of tonic firing that was prevented by blockade of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels with glibenclamide. In contrast to guinea-pig SNr neurons, the dominant effect of H2O2 elevation in mouse SNr GABAergic neurons was hyperpolarization, indicating a species difference in H2O2-dependent regulation. Thus, H2O2 is an endogenous modulator of SNr GABAergic neurons, acting primarily through presumed TRP channels in guinea-pig SNr, with additional modulation via KATP channels to regulate SNr output. PMID:21503158

  18. Discharge profiles across the sleep-waking cycle of identified cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Cissé, Youssouf; Mainville, Lynda; Morales, Marisela; Jones, Barbara E

    2014-03-26

    Distributed within the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT and PPT), cholinergic neurons in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum have long been thought to play a critical role in stimulating cortical activation during waking (W) and paradoxical sleep (PS, also called REM sleep), yet also in promoting PS with muscle atonia. However, the discharge profile and thus precise roles of the cholinergic neurons have remained uncertain because they lie intermingled with GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which might also assume these roles. By applying juxtacellular recording and labeling in naturally sleeping-waking, head-fixed rats, we investigated the discharge profiles of histochemically identified cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons in the LDT, SubLDT, and adjoining medial part of the PPT (MPPT) in relation to sleep-wake states, cortical activity, and muscle tone. We found that all cholinergic neurons were maximally active during W and PS in positive correlation with fast (γ) cortical activity, as "W/PS-max active neurons." Like cholinergic neurons, many GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were also "W/PS-max active." Other GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were "PS-max active," being minimally active during W and maximally active during PS in negative correlation with muscle tone. Conversely, some glutamatergic neurons were "W-max active," being maximally active during W and minimally active during PS in positive correlation with muscle tone. Through different discharge profiles, the cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons of the LDT, SubLDT, and MPPT thus appear to play distinct roles in promoting W and PS with cortical activation, PS with muscle atonia, or W with muscle tone.

  19. Discharge Profiles across the Sleep–Waking Cycle of Identified Cholinergic, GABAergic, and Glutamatergic Neurons in the Pontomesencephalic Tegmentum of the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Cissé, Youssouf; Mainville, Lynda; Morales, Marisela

    2014-01-01

    Distributed within the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT and PPT), cholinergic neurons in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum have long been thought to play a critical role in stimulating cortical activation during waking (W) and paradoxical sleep (PS, also called REM sleep), yet also in promoting PS with muscle atonia. However, the discharge profile and thus precise roles of the cholinergic neurons have remained uncertain because they lie intermingled with GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which might also assume these roles. By applying juxtacellular recording and labeling in naturally sleeping–waking, head-fixed rats, we investigated the discharge profiles of histochemically identified cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons in the LDT, SubLDT, and adjoining medial part of the PPT (MPPT) in relation to sleep–wake states, cortical activity, and muscle tone. We found that all cholinergic neurons were maximally active during W and PS in positive correlation with fast (γ) cortical activity, as “W/PS-max active neurons.” Like cholinergic neurons, many GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were also “W/PS-max active.” Other GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were “PS-max active,” being minimally active during W and maximally active during PS in negative correlation with muscle tone. Conversely, some glutamatergic neurons were “W-max active,” being maximally active during W and minimally active during PS in positive correlation with muscle tone. Through different discharge profiles, the cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons of the LDT, SubLDT, and MPPT thus appear to play distinct roles in promoting W and PS with cortical activation, PS with muscle atonia, or W with muscle tone. PMID:24672016

  20. Stress-induced obesity and the emotional nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallman, Mary F

    2010-03-01

    Stress and emotional brain networks foster eating behaviors that can lead to obesity. The neural networks underlying the complex interactions among stressors, body, brain and food intake are now better understood. Stressors, by activating a neural stress-response network, bias cognition toward increased emotional activity and degraded executive function. This causes formed habits to be used rather than a cognitive appraisal of responses. Stress also induces secretion of glucocorticoids, which increases motivation for food, and insulin, which promotes food intake and obesity. Pleasurable feeding then reduces activity in the stress-response network, reinforcing the feeding habit. These effects of stressors emphasize the importance of teaching mental reappraisal techniques to restore responses from habitual to thoughtful, thus battling stress-induced obesity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Induced magnetism in transition metal intercalated graphitic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-10-26

    We investigate the structure, chemical bonding, electronic properties, and magnetic behavior of a three-dimensional graphitic network in aba and aaa stacking with intercalated transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu). Using density functional theory, we find induced spin-polarization of the C atoms both when the graphene sheets are aba stacked (forming graphite) and aaa stacked (resembling bi-layer graphene). The magnetic moment induced by Mn, Fe, and Co turns out to vary from 1.38 μB to 4.10 μB, whereas intercalation of Ni and Cu does not lead to a magnetic state. The selective induction of spin-polarization can be utilized in spintronic and nanoelectronic applications.

  2. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Bechan; Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reduc...

  3. Stress-induced obesity and the emotional nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Dallman, Mary F

    2009-01-01

    Stress and emotional brain networks foster eating behaviors that may lead to obesity. The neural networks underlying the complex interactions among stressors, body, brain and food intake are now better understood. Stressors, by activating a neural stress-response network, bias cognition toward increased emotional activity and degraded executive function. This causes formed habits to be used rather than a cognitive appraisal of responses. Stress also induces secretion of both glucocorticoids, ...

  4. Condensate induced water hammer in a steam distribution system results in fatality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debban, H.L.; Eyre, L.E.

    1996-02-01

    Water hammer event s in steam distribution piping interrupt service and have the potential to cause serious injury and property damage. Conditions of condensation induced water hammer are discussed and recommendations aimed to improve safety of steam systems are presented. Condensate induced water hammer events at Hanford, a DOE facility, are examined.

  5. Transcriptomics and knockout mutant analysis of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, B.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    A classic example of induced resistance is triggered after infection by a necrotizing pathogen, rendering uninfected,distal parts more resistant to subsequent pathogen attack, and is often referred to as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). A phenotypically comparable type of induced resistance is

  6. Condensate induced water hammer in a steam distribution system results in fatality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debban, H.L.; Eyre, L.E.

    1996-02-01

    Water hammer event s in steam distribution piping interrupt service and have the potential to cause serious injury and property damage. Conditions of condensation induced water hammer are discussed and recommendations aimed to improve safety of steam systems are presented. Condensate induced water hammer events at Hanford, a DOE facility, are examined

  7. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuramu, Ilayaraja; Amin, Ruhul; Postnov, Andrey; Mishra, Mudit; Jacobs, Frank; Gheysens, Olivier; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; De Geest, Bart

    2017-07-18

    Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher ( p coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (hazard ratio 2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 4.64) during eight weeks of follow-up. The effects of coconut oil on cardiac remodeling occurred in the absence of weight gain and of systemic insulin resistance. Wet lung weight was 1.76-fold ( p coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial capillary density ( p coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial glucose uptake was 1.86-fold ( p coconut oil mice and was accompanied by higher myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase levels and higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase levels. The coconut oil diet increased oxidative stress. Myocardial triglycerides and free fatty acids were lower ( p coconut oil mice. In conclusion, coconut oil aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy.

  8. Ozone-induced systemic and pulmonary effects are diminished in adrenalectomized rats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set is an excel file pertaining to the study that examined ozone-induced systemic and pulmonary effects in rats that underwent SHAM surgery (control),...

  9. Expression of COUP-TFII Nuclear Receptor in Restricted GABAergic Neuronal Populations in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Klausberger, Thomas; Karayannis, Theofanis; Suen, Wai Yee; Huck, Jojanneke; Tomioka, Ryohei; Rockland, Kathleen; Capogna, Marco; Studer, Michèle; Morales, Marisela; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The COUP-TFII nuclear receptor, also known as NR2F2, is expressed in the developing ventral telencephalon and modulates the tangential migration of a set of subpallial neuronal progenitors during forebrain development. Little information is available about its expression patterns in the adult brain. We have identified the cell populations expressing COUP-TFII and the contribution of some of them to network activity in vivo. Expression of COUP-TFII by hippocampal pyramidal and dentate granule cells, as well as neurons in the neocortex, formed a gradient increasing from undetectable in the dorsal to very strong in the ventral sectors. In the dorsal hippocampal CA1 area, COUP-TFII was restricted to GABAergic interneurons and expressed in several, largely nonoverlapping neuronal populations. Immunoreactivity was present in calretinin-, neuronal nitric oxide synthase-, and reelin-expressing cells, as well as in subsets of cholecystokinin- or calbindin-expressing or radiatum-retrohippocampally projecting GABAergic cells, but not in parvalbumin-and/or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In vivo recording and juxtacellular labeling of COUP-TFII-expressing cells revealed neurogliaform cells, basket cells in stratum radiatum and tachykinin-expressing radiatum dentate innervating interneurons, identified by their axodendritic distributions. They showed cell type-selective phase-locked firing to the theta rhythm but no activation during sharp wave/ripple oscillations. These basket cells in stratum radiatum and neurogliaform cells fired at the peak of theta oscillations detected extracellularly in stratum pyramidale, unlike previously reported ivy cells, which fired at the trough. The characterization of COUP-TFII-expressing neurons suggests that this developmentally important transcription factor plays cell type-specific role(s)in the adult hippocampus. PMID:20130170

  10. Accelerated intoxication of GABAergic synapses by botulinum neurotoxin A disinhibits stem cell-derived neuron networks prior to network silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip H Beske

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs are extremely potent toxins that specifically cleave SNARE proteins in peripheral synapses, preventing neurotransmitter release. Neuronal responses to BoNT intoxication are traditionally studied by quantifying SNARE protein cleavage in vitro or monitoring physiological paralysis in vivo. Consequently, the dynamic effects of intoxication on synaptic behaviors are not well understood. We have reported that mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons (ESNs are highly sensitive to BoNT based on molecular readouts of intoxication. Here we study the time-dependent changes in synapse- and network-level behaviors following addition of BoNT/A to spontaneously active networks of glutamatergic and GABAergic ESNs. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings indicated that BoNT/A rapidly blocked synaptic neurotransmission, confirming that ESNs replicate the functional pathophysiology responsible for clinical botulism. Quantitation of spontaneous neurotransmission in pharmacologically isolated synapses revealed accelerated silencing of GABAergic synapses compared to glutamatergic synapses, which was consistent with the selective accumulation of cleaved SNAP-25 at GAD1+ presynaptic terminals at early timepoints. Different latencies of intoxication resulted in complex network responses to BoNT/A addition, involving rapid disinhibition of stochastic firing followed by network silencing. Synaptic activity was found to be highly sensitive to SNAP-25 cleavage, reflecting the functional consequences of the localized cleavage of the small subpopulation of SNAP-25 that is engaged in neurotransmitter release in the nerve terminal. Collectively these findings illustrate that use of synaptic function assays in networked neurons cultures offers a novel and highly sensitive approach for mechanistic studies of toxin:neuron interactions and synaptic responses to BoNT.

  11. Liposomally encapsulated diclofenac for sonophoresis induced systemic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, S P; Singh, R; Asati, R K

    1995-01-01

    Liposomes containing diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory agent were incorporated into an ointment base for topical application. The drug loaded liposomes were characterized for various physico-chemical attributes and drug efflux profile in in vitro. The systemic availability of drug from liposomes following topical application was evaluated in rats. The effect of sonophoresis on the drug release profile in vitro and systemic availability in vivo was established. The application of liposomal diclofenac resulted in localization of the drug at the site of application with slow systemic availability; however, with the application of ultrasound pulsed drug systemic levels could be achieved.

  12. Towards Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Models of Chemotherapy-Induced Neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, M

    2017-05-01

    Neutropenia is a serious toxic complication of chemotherapeutic treatment. For years, mathematical models have been developed to better predict hematological outcomes during chemotherapy in both the traditional pharmaceutical sciences and mathematical biology disciplines. An increasing number of quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP) models that combine systems approaches, physiology, and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics have been successfully developed. Here, I detail the shift towards QSP efforts, emphasizing the importance of incorporating systems-level physiological considerations in pharmacometrics. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  13. Novel BCH Code Design for Mitigation of Phase Noise Induced Cycle Slips in DQPSK Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leong, M. Y.; Larsen, Knud J.; Jacobsen, G.

    2014-01-01

    We show that by proper code design, phase noise induced cycle slips causing an error floor can be mitigated for 28 Gbau d DQPSK systems. Performance of BCH codes are investigated in terms of required overhead......We show that by proper code design, phase noise induced cycle slips causing an error floor can be mitigated for 28 Gbau d DQPSK systems. Performance of BCH codes are investigated in terms of required overhead...

  14. Virus-induced Systemic Vasculitides: New Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Guillevin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The best therapeutic strategy in virus-induced vasculitides should take into account the etiology of the disease and be adapted to the pathogenesis. The combination of antiviral treatments and plasma exchanges has been proven effective in polyarteritis nodosa (PAN. In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related vasculitis this strategy is also effective and does not jeopardize, like cytotoxic agents, the outcome of AIDS. In vasculitis related to HCV-associated cryoglobulinemia, plasma exchanges improve the outcome but the poor effectiveness of antiviral drugs is not able to favor, usually, a definite recovery of the patients and relapses are frequent.

  15. The influence of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on transmission systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertson, V.; Kappenman, J.; Damsky, B.

    1990-01-01

    Charged particles emitted by the sun from flares or similar phenomena can enter the magnetic field of the earth and induce large currents within the earth. These currents follow a circular path around the magnetic poles and are large enough to produce earth surface potentials up to 10 volts per mile. Such currents have been known to last for many minutes, effectively a dc mode which can saturate power or current transformers. Factors known to influence susceptibility to the phenomenon include grounding philosophy, transformer core construction, transmission line length and orientation, and local geology. In this paper plans for a mitigation scheme and a warning network are explained

  16. A new maltose-inducible high-performance heterologous expression system in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jie; Fu, Gang; Zhang, Dawei; Wen, Jianping

    2017-08-01

    To improve heterologous proteins production, we constructed a maltose-inducible expression system in Bacillus subtilis. An expression system based on the promoter for maltose utilization constructed in B. subtilis. Successively, to improve the performance of the P malA -derived system, mutagenesis was employed by gradually shortening the length of P malA promoter and altering the spacing between the predicted MalR binding site and the -35 region. Furthermore, deletion of the maltose utilization genes (malL and yvdK) improved the P malA promoter activity. Finally, using this efficient maltose-inducible expression system, we enhanced the production of luciferase and D-aminoacylase, compared with the P hpaII system. A maltose-inducible expression system was constructed and evaluated. It could be used for high level expression of heterologous proteins production.

  17. Diabetes Impairs Wnt3 Protein-induced Neurogenesis in Olfactory Bulbs via Glutamate Transporter 1 Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Tamami; Hidaka, Ryo; Fujimaki, Shin; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes is associated with impaired cognitive function. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats exhibit a loss of neurogenesis and deficits in behavioral tasks involving spatial learning and memory; thus, impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis may contribute to diabetes-associated cognitive deficits. Recent studies have demonstrated that adult neurogenesis generally occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the subventricular zone, and the olfactory bulbs (OB) and is defective in patients with diabetes. We hypothesized that OB neurogenesis and associated behaviors would be affected in diabetes. In this study, we show that inhibition of Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in the OB causes several behavioral deficits in STZ-induced diabetic rats, including impaired odor discrimination, cognitive dysfunction, and increased anxiety. Notably, the sodium- and chloride-dependent GABA transporters and excitatory amino acid transporters that localize to GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals decreased in the OB of diabetic rats. Moreover, GAT1 inhibitor administration also hindered Wnt3-induced neurogenesis in vitro Collectively, these data suggest that STZ-induced diabetes adversely affects OB neurogenesis via GABA and glutamate transporter systems, leading to functional impairments in olfactory performance. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Bifurcation of transition paths induced by coupled bistable systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chengzhe; Mitarai, Namiko

    2016-06-07

    We discuss the transition paths in a coupled bistable system consisting of interacting multiple identical bistable motifs. We propose a simple model of coupled bistable gene circuits as an example and show that its transition paths are bifurcating. We then derive a criterion to predict the bifurcation of transition paths in a generalized coupled bistable system. We confirm the validity of the theory for the example system by numerical simulation. We also demonstrate in the example system that, if the steady states of individual gene circuits are not changed by the coupling, the bifurcation pattern is not dependent on the number of gene circuits. We further show that the transition rate exponentially decreases with the number of gene circuits when the transition path does not bifurcate, while a bifurcation facilitates the transition by lowering the quasi-potential energy barrier.

  19. Crisis-induced unstable dimension variability in a dynamical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Geraldo T.; Viana, Ricardo L.; Lopes, Sergio R.; Grebogi, Celso

    2008-01-01

    Unstable dimension variability is an extreme form of non-hyperbolic behavior in chaotic systems whose attractors have periodic orbits with a different number of unstable directions. We propose a new mechanism for the onset of unstable dimension variability based on an interior crisis, or a collision between a chaotic attractor and an unstable periodic orbit. We give a physical example by considering a high-dimensional dissipative physical system driven by impulsive periodic forcing

  20. Melatonin sees the light: blocking GABA-ergic transmission in the paraventricular nucleus induces daytime secretion of melatonin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Garidou, M. L.; Palm, I. F.; van der Vliet, J.; Simonneaux, V.; Pévet, P.; Buijs, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    Despite a pronounced inhibitory effect of light on pineal melatonin synthesis, usually the daily melatonin rhythm is not a passive response to the surrounding world. In mammals, and almost every other vertebrate species studied so far, the melatonin rhythm is coupled to an endogenous pacemaker, i.e.

  1. Mobility induces global synchronization of oscillators in periodic extended systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peruani, Fernando; Nicola, Ernesto M; Morelli, Luis G

    2010-01-01

    We study the synchronization of locally coupled noisy phase oscillators that move diffusively in a one-dimensional ring. Together with the disordered and the globally synchronized states, the system also exhibits wave-like states displaying local order. We use a statistical description valid for a large number of oscillators to show that for any finite system there is a critical mobility above which all wave-like solutions become unstable. Through Langevin simulations, we show that the transition to global synchronization is mediated by a shift in the relative size of attractor basins associated with wave-like states. Mobility disrupts these states and paves the way for the system to attain global synchronization.

  2. Climate-induced tree mortality: Earth system consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Henry D.; Macalady, Alison K.; Breshears, David D.; Allen, Craig D.; Stephenson, Nathan L.; Saleska, Scott; Huxman, Travis E.; McDowell, Nathan G.

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest uncertainties in global environmental change is predicting changes in feedbacks between the biosphere and the Earth system. Terrestrial ecosystems and, in particular, forests exert strong controls on the global carbon cycle and influence regional hydrology and climatology directly through water and surface energy budgets [Bonan, 2008; Chapin et al., 2008].According to new research, tree mortality associated with elevated temperatures and drought has the potential to rapidly alter forest ecosystems, potentially affecting feedbacks to the Earth system [Allen et al., 2010]. Several lines of recent research demonstrate how tree mortality rates in forests may be sensitive to climate change—particularly warming and drying. This emerging consequence of global change has important effects on Earth system processes (Figure 1).

  3. Evaluation of novel inducible promoter/repressor systems for recombinant protein expression in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Silvia; Hörmann, Angelika; Tauer, Christopher; Sonnleitner, Margot; Egger, Esther; Grabherr, Reingard; Heinl, Stefan

    2016-03-10

    Engineering lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is of growing importance for food and feed industry as well as for in vivo vaccination or the production of recombinant proteins in food grade organisms. Often, expression of a transgene is only desired at a certain time point or period, e.g. to minimize the metabolic burden for the host cell or to control the expression time span. For this purpose, inducible expression systems are preferred, though cost and availability of the inducing agent must be feasible. We selected the plasmid free strain Lactobacillus plantarum 3NSH for testing and characterization of novel inducible promoters/repressor systems. Their feasibility in recombinant protein production was evaluated. Expression of the reporter protein mCherry was monitored with the BioLector(®) micro-fermentation system. Reporter gene mCherry expression was compared under the control of different promoter/repressor systems: PlacA (an endogenous promoter/repressor system derived from L. plantarum 3NSH), PxylA (a promoter/repressor system derived from Bacillus megaterium DSMZ 319) and PlacSynth (synthetic promoter and codon-optimized repressor gene based on the Escherichia coli lac operon). We observed that PlacA was inducible solely by lactose, but not by non-metabolizable allolactose analoga. PxylA was inducible by xylose, yet showed basal expression under non-induced conditions. Growth on galactose (as compared to exponential growth phase on glucose) reduced basal mCherry expression at non-induced conditions. PlacSynth was inducible with TMG (methyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside) and IPTG (isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside), but also showed basal expression without inducer. The promoter PlacSynth was used for establishment of a dual plasmid expression system, based on T7 RNA polymerase driven expression in L. plantarum. Comparative Western blot supported BioLector(®) micro-fermentation measurements. Conclusively, overall expression levels were moderate (compared to a

  4. Modulation of Olfactory Bulb Network Activity by Serotonin: Synchronous Inhibition of Mitral Cells Mediated by Spatially Localized GABAergic Microcircuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Loren J.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    Although inhibition has often been proposed as a central mechanism for coordinating activity in the olfactory system, relatively little is known about how activation of different inhibitory local circuit pathways can generate coincident inhibition of principal cells. We used serotonin (5-HT) as a pharmacological tool to induce spiking in ensembles…

  5. BDP-30, a systemic resistance inducer from Boerhaavia diffusa L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-11

    Jan 11, 2015 ... exogenous application of chemicals such as salicylic acid or its synthetic analogues, leading to a long-term resistance to sub- sequent attack by diverse pathogens (Sticher et al. 1997;. Vallad and Goodman 2004; Fu and Dong 2013). In both local and systemic tissues of such plants, pathogenesis-related ...

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-induced systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ngou J. Graafland H, Segondy M. Antibodies against polypeptides of purified. Epstein-Barr virus in sera grown from patients with connective tissue diseases'. J Autoimmun 1992; 5: 243-249. 4. Stancek D, Rovensky J. Enhancement of Epstein-Barr virus antibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

  7. Dry Process Induced Phase Transited Drug Delivery System: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An in-situ formed phase transited, nondisintegrating, controlled release, asymmetric membrane capsular system for the poorly water soluble model drug ketoprofen was developed and evaluated in vitro to assess for osmotic and controlled release and in vivo to assess the ability of the fabricated dosage form to control GI ...

  8. Wet Process Induced Phase Transited Drug Delivery System as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non-disintegrating, asymmetric membrane capsular system for a poorly water soluble drug, flurbiprofen, was developed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Asymmetric membrane capsules were made by phase inversion. The effect of varying osmotic pressure of the dissolution medium on drug release was studied.

  9. Miniaturized test system for soil respiration induced by volatile pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, Karin; Chapman, Stephen J.; Campbell, Colin D.; Harms, Hauke; Hoehener, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    A miniaturized method based on 96-well microtitre plates was developed and used to study respiration in pristine and contaminated soils following addition of volatile substrates. Small soil samples were exposed to fuel components, which were volatilized from spatially separate reservoirs of 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN) as an organic carrier. Respiration was determined as CO 2 production by means of a pH-indicator and bicarbonate-containing agar, or as 14 CO 2 evolution from 14 C-labelled substrates. Substrate concentrations inducing maximum microbial activity or inhibition were determined and CO 2 production profiles examined by multivariate analysis. When high concentrations of fuel components were applied, distinction of hydrocarbon exposed soils from unexposed soil was achieved within 6 h of incubation. With low concentrations, adequate distinction was achieved after 24 h, probably as a result of community adaptation. Nutrient limitation was identified with the 14 C method for toluene, and the optimal N and P amendment determined. Further potential applications of this rapid and inexpensive method are outlined. - A new method to study soil respiration is used when volatile organic contaminants are added

  10. Coconut Oil Aggravates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiomyopathy without Inducing Obesity, Systemic Insulin Resistance, or Cardiac Steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilayaraja Muthuramu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies evaluating the effects of high-saturated fat diets on cardiac function are most often confounded by diet-induced obesity and by systemic insulin resistance. We evaluated whether coconut oil, containing C12:0 and C14:0 as main fatty acids, aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC in C57BL/6 mice. Mortality rate after TAC was higher (p < 0.05 in 0.2% cholesterol 10% coconut oil diet-fed mice than in standard chow-fed mice (hazard ratio 2.32, 95% confidence interval 1.16 to 4.64 during eight weeks of follow-up. The effects of coconut oil on cardiac remodeling occurred in the absence of weight gain and of systemic insulin resistance. Wet lung weight was 1.76-fold (p < 0.01 higher in coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial capillary density (p < 0.001 was decreased, interstitial fibrosis was 1.88-fold (p < 0.001 higher, and systolic and diastolic function was worse in coconut oil mice than in standard chow mice. Myocardial glucose uptake was 1.86-fold (p < 0.001 higher in coconut oil mice and was accompanied by higher myocardial pyruvate dehydrogenase levels and higher acetyl-CoA carboxylase levels. The coconut oil diet increased oxidative stress. Myocardial triglycerides and free fatty acids were lower (p < 0.05 in coconut oil mice. In conclusion, coconut oil aggravates pressure overload-induced cardiomyopathy.

  11. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in phencyclidine-induced cognitive deficits modelling schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigano, Daniela; Guidali, Cinzia; Petrosino, Stefania; Realini, Natalia; Rubino, Tiziana; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Parolaro, Daniela

    2009-06-01

    Recent advances in the neurobiology of cannabinoids have renewed interest in the association between cannabis and schizophrenia. Our studies showed that chronic-intermittent phencyclidine (PCP) treatment of rats, an animal model of schizophrenia-like cognitive deficit, impaired recognition memory in the novel object recognition (NOR) test and induced alterations in CB1 receptor functionality and in endocannabinoid levels mainly in the prefrontal cortex. In this region, we observed a significant reduction in GTPgammaS binding (-41%) accompanied by an increase in the levels of the endocannabinoid 2-AG (+38%) in PCP-treated rats, suggesting that a maladaptation of the endocannabinoid system might contribute to the glutamatergic-related cognitive symptoms encountered in schizophrenia disorders. Moreover, we evaluated the ability of the main psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), to modulate the cognitive dysfunctions and neuroadaptations in the endocannabinoid system induced by PCP. Chronic THC co-treatment worsened PCP-induced cognitive impairment, without inducing any effect per se, and in parallel, it provoked a severe reduction in the levels of the other endocannabinoid, AEA, vs. either vehicle (-73%) or PCP (-64%), whereas it reversed the PCP-induced increase in 2-AG levels. These results point to the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in this pharmacological model of cognitive dysfunction, with a potentially different role of AEA and 2-AG in schizophrenia-like behaviours and suggest that prolonged cannabis use might aggravate cognitive performances induced by chronic PCP by throwing off-balance the endocannabinoid system.

  12. Financial tools to induce cooperation in power asymmetrical water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaro, Simona; Castelletti, Andrea; Giuliani, Matteo; Characklis, Gregory W.

    2017-04-01

    In multi-purpose water systems, power asymmetry is often responsible of inefficient and inequitable water allocations. Climate Change and anthropogenic pressure are expected to exacerbate such disparities at the expense of already disadvantaged groups. The intervention of a third party, charged with redefining water sharing policies to give greater consideration to equity and social justice, may be desirable. Nevertheless, to be accepted by private actors, this interposition should be coupled with some form of compensation. For a public agency, compensation measures may be burdensome, especially when the allowance is triggered by natural events whose timing and magnitude are subject to uncertainty. In this context, index based insurance contracts may represent a viable alternative option and reduce the cost of achieving socially desirable outcomes. In this study we explore soft measures to achieve global change mitigation by designing a hybrid coordination mechanism composed of i) a direct normative constraint and ii) an indirect financial compensatory tool. The performance of an index-based insurance (i.e. hedging) contract to be used as a compensation tool is evaluated relative to more traditional alternatives. First, the performance of the status quo system, or baseline (BL), is contrasted to an idealized scenario in which a central planner (CP) maximizes global efficiency. Then, the CP management is analyzed in order to identify an efficient water rights redistribution to be legally imposed on the advantaged stakeholders in the BL scenario. Finally, a hedging contract is designed to compensate those stakeholders more negatively affected by the legal constraint. The approach is demonstrated on a multi-purpose water system in Italy, where different decision makers individually manage the same resource. The system is characterized by a manifest power asymmetry: the upstream users, i.e., hydropower companies, are free to release their stored water in time

  13. Emergency control of unstable behavior of nonlinear systems induced by fault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Pinsky

    1998-01-01

    -functions significantly simplifying analysis and control of fault phenomena. The design of an mergency controller is based on the technique for computing fault-induced jumps of the system states, which is described in the paper. An emergency controller instantaneously returning states of a sample nonlinear system to its stability basin is designed.

  14. Pregnancy-Induced Changes in Systemic Gene Expression among Healthy Women and Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittal, Anuradha; Pachter, Lior; Nelson, J Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background Pregnancy induces drastic biological changes systemically, and has a beneficial effect on some autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, specific systemic changes that occur as a result of pregnancy have not been thoroughly examined in healthy women or women wit...

  15. Wounding induces local resistance but systemic susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea in pepper plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Tania; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Veloso, Javier; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Díaz, José

    2015-03-15

    Cotyledon wounding in pepper caused the early generation of hydrogen peroxide both locally (cotyledons) and systemically (upper true leaves). However, 72 h later there is a different wound response between local and systemic organs, as shown by resistance to the pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea, that increased locally and decreased systemically. Signaling by ethylene and jasmonic acid was assessed by using two inhibitors: 1-methylcyclopropene (MCP, inhibitor of ethylene receptors) and ibuprofen (inhibitor of jasmonate biosynthesis). MCP did not affect the modulation of resistance levels to Botrytis by wounding, ruling out the involvement of ethylene signaling. Ibuprofen did not inhibit wound-induced resistance at the local level, but inhibited wound-induced systemic susceptibility. Moreover, changes of biochemical and structural defenses in response to wounding were studied. Peroxidase activity and the expression of a peroxidase gene (CAPO1) increased locally as a response to wounding, but no changes were observed systemically. Lignin deposition was induced in wounded cotyledons, but was repressed in systemic leaves of wounded plants, whereas soluble phenolics did not change locally and decreased systemically. The expression of two other genes involved in plant defense (CABPR1 and CASC1) was also differentially regulated locally and systemically, pointing to a generalized increase in plant defenses at the local level and a systemic decrease as a response to wounding. Wound-induced defenses at the local level coincided with resistance to the necrotroph fungus B. cinerea, whereas depleted defenses in systemic leaves of wounded plants correlated to induced susceptibility against this pathogen. It may be that the local response acts as a sink of energy resources to mount a defense against pathogens, whereas in systemic organs the resources for defense are lower. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Field-induced phase transitions in antiferromagnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smeets, J.P.M.

    1984-05-01

    Neutron scattering experiments and magnetization measurements are carried out on cobalt bromide hexahydrate, of which 48% of the water molecules are replaced by deuterium oxide molecules. Results were compared with data obtained from non-deuterated cobalt bromide hexahydrate. Neutron scattering experiments showed the importance of the deuterium fraction. Interplay exists between the crystallographic system and the magnetic system, which is influenced by changing the deuterium fraction. Neutron scattering and magnetization experiments on partially deuterated RbFeCl 3 .2H 2 O and CsFeCl 3 .2H 2 O were performed to study the magnetic phase transitions in these quasi one-dimensional Ising compounds. The observed behaviour in the various phases can be described by the nucleation theory of chain reversals. (Auth.)

  17. Noise-induced temporal dynamics in Turing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Schumacher, Linus J.

    2013-04-25

    We examine the ability of intrinsic noise to produce complex temporal dynamics in Turing pattern formation systems, with particular emphasis on the Schnakenberg kinetics. Using power spectral methods, we characterize the behavior of the system using stochastic simulations at a wide range of points in parameter space and compare with analytical approximations. Specifically, we investigate whether polarity switching of stochastic patterns occurs at a defined frequency. We find that it can do so in individual realizations of a stochastic simulation, but that the frequency is not defined consistently across realizations in our samples of parameter space. Further, we examine the effect of noise on deterministically predicted traveling waves and find them increased in amplitude and decreased in speed. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  18. Rattler-induced aging dynamics in jammed granular systems

    OpenAIRE

    Giacco, Ferdinando; de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Lippiello, Eugenio

    2017-01-01

    Granular materials jam when developing a network of contact forces able to resist the applied stresses. Through numerical simulations of the dynamics of the jamming process, we show that the jamming transition does not occur when the kinetic energy vanishes. Rather, as the system jams, the kinetic energy becomes dominated by rattlers particles, that scatter withing their cages. The relaxation of the kinetic energy in the jammed configuration exhibits a double power-law decay, which we interpr...

  19. Robotic reactions: delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  20. Robotic reactions: Delay-induced patterns in autonomous vehicle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, Gábor; Moehlis, Jeff; Bullo, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Fundamental design principles are presented for vehicle systems governed by autonomous cruise control devices. By analyzing the corresponding delay differential equations, it is shown that for any car-following model short-wavelength oscillations can appear due to robotic reaction times, and that there are tradeoffs between the time delay and the control gains. The analytical findings are demonstrated on an optimal velocity model using numerical continuation and numerical simulation.

  1. Hyperammonemia-induced toxicity for the developing central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Cagnon, L.; Braissant, O.

    2007-01-01

    In pediatric patients, hyperammonemia can be caused by various acquired or inherited disorders such as urea cycle deficiencies or organic acidemias. The brain is much more susceptible to the deleterious effects of ammonium during development than in adulthood. Hyperammonemia can provoke irreversible damages to the developing central nervous system that lead to cortical atrophy, ventricular enlargement and demyelination, responsible for cognitive impairment, seizures and cerebral palsy. Until ...

  2. CELECOXIB ATTENUATES SYSTEMIC LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED BRAIN INFLAMMATION AND WHITE MATTER INJURY IN THE NEONATAL RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAN, L.-W.; KAIZAKI, A.; TIEN, L.-T.; PANG, Y.; TANAKA, S.; NUMAZAWA, S.; BHATT, A. J.; CAI, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced white matter injury in the neonatal rat brain is associated with inflammatory processes. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can be induced by inflammatory stimuli, such as cytokines and pro-inflammatory molecules, suggesting that COX-2 may be considered as the target for anti-inflammation. The objective of the present study was to examine whether celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, can reduce systemic LPS-induced brain inflammation and brain damage. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of LPS (2 mg/kg) was performed in postnatal day 5 (P5) of Sprague-Dawley rat pups and celecoxib (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered i.p. 5 min after LPS injection. The body weight and wire hanging maneuver test were performed 24 hr after the LPS exposure, and brain injury was examined after these tests. Systemic LPS exposure resulted in an impairment of behavioral performance and acute brain injury, as indicated by apoptotic death of oligodendrocytes (OLs) and loss of OL immunoreactivity in the neonatal rat brain. Treatments with celecoxib significantly reduced systemic LPS-induced neurobehavioral disturbance and brain damage. Celecoxib administration significantly attenuated systemic LPS-induced increments in the number of activated microglia and astrocytes, concentrations of IL-1β and TNFα, and protein levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAPK in the neonatal rat brain. The protection of celecoxib was also associated with a reduction of systemic LPS-induced COX-2+ cells which were double labeled with GFAP+ (astrocyte) cells. The overall results suggest that celecoxib was capable of attenuating the brain injury and neurobehavioral disturbance induced by systemic LPS exposure, and the protective effects are associated with its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:23485816

  3. A possible role of the non-GAT1 GABA transporters in transfer of GABA from GABAergic to glutamatergic neurons in mouse cerebellar neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suñol, C; Babot, Z; Cristòfol, R

    2010-01-01

    Cultures of dissociated cerebellum from 7-day-old mice were used to investigate the mechanism involved in synthesis and cellular redistribution of GABA in these cultures consisting primarily of glutamatergic granule neurons and a smaller population of GABAergic Golgi and stellate neurons......3 transporters. Only a small population of cells were immuno-stained for GAD while many cells exhibited VGlut-1 like immuno-reactivity which, however, never co-localized with GAD positive neurons. This likely reflects the small number of GABAergic neurons compared to the glutamatergic granule......M concentrations (95%). Essentially all neurons showed GABA like immunostaining albeit with differences in intensity. The results indicate that GABA which is synthesized in a small population of GAD-positive neurons is redistributed to essentially all neurons including the glutamatergic granule cells. GAT1...

  4. Bistability of the naturally induced lactose utilization system of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajic, Jelena; Wall, Michael

    2006-03-01

    In the absence of the preferred sugar glucose, lactose utilization machinery in the bacterium E. coli is activated. The genetic circuit responsible for this response, lac operon, has been observed to exhibit bistability when induced by an artificial inducer, TMG. Here we investigate conditions under which bistability might be observed in response to lactose. The aim of our study is to establish whether the natural system exhibits bistability, as is often assumed despite the lack of experimental support.

  5. Compression induced folding of a sheet: An integrable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Haim; Witten, Thomas A.

    2012-02-01

    The apparently intractable shape of a fold in a compressed elastic film lying on a fluid substrate is found to have an exact solution. Such systems buckle at a nonzero wave vector set by the bending stiffness of the film and the weight of the substrate fluid. Our solution describes the entire progression from a weakly displaced sinusoidal buckling to a single large fold that contacts itself. The pressure decrease is exactly quadratic in the lateral displacement. We demonstrate a subtle connection to the sine-Gordon problem, which reveals a new symmetry in the folding phenomenon.

  6. Compression induced folding of a sheet: an integrable system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Haim; Witten, Thomas A

    2011-10-14

    The apparently intractable shape of a fold in a compressed elastic film lying on a fluid substrate is found to have an exact solution. Such systems buckle at a nonzero wave vector set by the bending stiffness of the film and the weight of the substrate fluid. Our solution describes the entire progression from a weakly displaced sinusoidal buckling to a single large fold that contacts itself. The pressure decrease is exactly quadratic in the lateral displacement. We identify a complex wave vector whose magnitude remains invariant with compression.

  7. Acid-induced assembly of a reconstituted silk protein system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabai, A. Pasha; Weigandt, Katie M.; Blair, Daniel L.

    2017-08-01

    Silk cocoons are reconstituted into an aqueous suspension, and protein stability is investigated by comparing the protein's response to hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride. Aggregation occurs for systems mixed with hydrochloric acid, while sodium chloride over the same range of concentrations does not cause aggregation. We measure the structures present on the protein and aggregate length scales in these solutions using both optical and small-angle neutron scattering, while mass spectrometry techniques shed light on a possible mechanism for aggregate formation. We find that the introduction of acid modulates the aggregate size and pervaded volume of the protein, an effect that is not observed with salt.

  8. Hyperammonemia-induced toxicity for the developing central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnon, Laurène; Braissant, Olivier

    2007-11-01

    In pediatric patients, hyperammonemia can be caused by various acquired or inherited disorders such as urea cycle deficiencies or organic acidemias. The brain is much more susceptible to the deleterious effects of ammonium during development than in adulthood. Hyperammonemia can provoke irreversible damages to the developing central nervous system that lead to cortical atrophy, ventricular enlargement and demyelination, responsible for cognitive impairment, seizures and cerebral palsy. Until recently, the mechanisms leading to these irreversible cerebral damages were poorly understood. Using experimental models allowing the analysis of the neurotoxic effects of ammonium on the developing brain, these last years have seen the emergence of new clues showing that ammonium exposure alters several amino acid pathways and neurotransmitter systems, as well as cerebral energy metabolism, nitric oxide synthesis, oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition and signal transduction pathways. Those alterations may explain neuronal loss and impairment of axonal and dendritic growth observed in the different models of congenital hyperammonemia. Some neuroprotective strategies such as the potential use of NMDA receptor antagonists, nitric oxide inhibitors, creatine and acetyl-l-carnitine have been suggested to counteract these toxic effects. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms involved in the chain of events leading to neuronal dysfunction under hyperammonemia may be useful to develop new potential strategies for neuroprotection.

  9. Insult-induced adaptive plasticity of the auditory system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua R Gold

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The brain displays a remarkable capacity for both widespread and region-specific modifications in response to environmental challenges, with adaptive processes bringing about the reweighting of connections in neural networks putatively required for optimising performance and behaviour. As an avenue for investigation, studies centred around changes in the mammalian auditory system, extending from the brainstem to the cortex, have revealed a plethora of mechanisms that operate in the context of sensory disruption after insult, be it lesion-, noise trauma, drug-, or age-related. Of particular interest in recent work are those aspects of auditory processing which, after sensory disruption, change at multiple – if not all – levels of the auditory hierarchy. These include changes in excitatory, inhibitory and neuromodulatory networks, consistent with theories of homeostatic plasticity; functional alterations in gene expression and in protein levels; as well as broader network processing effects with cognitive and behavioural implications. Nevertheless, there abounds substantial debate regarding which of these processes may only be sequelae of the original insult, and which may, in fact, be maladaptively compelling further degradation of the organism’s competence to cope with its disrupted sensory context. In this review, we aim to examine how the mammalian auditory system responds in the wake of particular insults, and to disambiguate how the changes that develop might underlie a correlated class of phantom disorders, including tinnitus and hyperacusis, which putatively are brought about through maladaptive neuroplastic disruptions to auditory networks governing the spatial and temporal processing of acoustic sensory information.

  10. Novel and tightly regulated resorcinol and cumate-inducible expression systems for Streptomyces and other actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbal, Liliya; Fedorenko, Victor; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2014-10-01

    Inducible expression is a versatile genetic tool for controlling gene transcription, determining gene functions and other uses. Herein, we describe our attempts to create several inducible systems based on a cumate or a resorcinol switch, a hammerhead ribozyme, the LacI repressor, and isopropyl β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). We successfully developed a new cumate (p-isopropylbenzoic acid)-inducible gene switch in actinobacteria that is based on the CymR regulator, the operator sequence (cmt) from the Pseudomonas putida cumate degradation operon and P21 synthetic promoter. Resorcinol-inducible expression system is also functional and is composed of the RolR regulator and the PA3 promoter fused with the operator (rolO) from the Corynebacterium glutamicum resorcinol catabolic operon. Using the gusA (β-glucuronidase) gene as a reporter, we showed that the newly generated expression systems are tightly regulated and hyper-inducible. The activity of the uninduced promoters is negligible in both cases. Whereas the induction factor reaches 45 for Streptomyces albus in the case of cumate switch and 33 in the case of resorcinol toggle. The systems are also dose-dependent, which allows the modulation of gene expression even from a single promoter. In addition, the cumate system is versatile, given that it is functional in different actinomycetes. Finally, these systems are nontoxic and inexpensive, as these are characteristics of cumate and resorcinol, and they are easy to use because inducers are water-soluble and easily penetrate cells. Therefore, the P21-cmt-CymR and PA3-rolO-RolR systems are powerful tools for engineering actinobacteria.

  11. Tyre induced vibrations of the car-trailer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beregi, S.; Takács, D.; Stépán, G.

    2016-02-01

    The lateral and yaw dynamics of the car-trailer combination are analysed by means of a single track model. The equations of motion are derived rigorously by means of the Appell-Gibbs equations for constant longitudinal velocity of the vehicle. The tyres are described with the help of the so-called delayed tyre model, which is based on a brush model with pure rolling contact. The lateral forces and aligning torques of the tyre/road interaction are calculated via the instantaneous lateral deformations in the contact patches. The linear stability analysis of the rectilinear motion is performed via the analytically determined characteristic function of the system. Stability charts are constructed with respect to the vehicle longitudinal velocity and the payload position on the trailer. Self-excited lateral vibrations are detected with different vibration modes at low and at high longitudinal speeds of the vehicle. The effects of the tyre parameters are also investigated.

  12. Field induced order in magnetic systems: Marginal case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, D., E-mail: daniel@cbpf.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150-Urca, 22290-180 RJ (Brazil); Continentino, M.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Campus da Praia Vermelha, Niteroi, RJ 24.210-340 (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    The bond operator representation and the one-loop renormalization group treatment are used to study the spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic with single-ion anisotropy and transversal magnetic fields in three-dimensional cubic lattices. We start from a disordered spin-liquid phase to an ordered phase, at a critical field H{sub c1} above which the system enters an XY-antiferromagnetic phase. This transition is interpreted as belonging to a universality class with a dynamical critical exponent z=1. In this marginal case logarithmic corrections are found to the physical quantities. These theoretical predictions are compared with the scaling of the magnetization as a function of field and temperature for the organic compound NiCl{sub 2}-4SC(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}.

  13. Resonant scattering induced thermopower in one-dimensional disordered systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel; Smit, Wilbert J.; Sigrist, Manfred

    2015-05-01

    This study analyzes thermoelectric properties of a one-dimensional random conductor which shows localization effects and simultaneously includes resonant scatterers yielding sharp conductance resonances. These sharp features give rise to a distinct behavior of the Seebeck coefficient in finite systems and incorporate the degree of localization as a means to enhance thermoelectric performance, in principle. The model for noninteracting electrons is discussed within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism such that analytical treatment is possible for a wide range of properties, if a special averaging scheme is applied. The approximations in the averaging procedure are tested with numerical evaluations showing good qualitative agreement, with some limited quantitative disagreement. The validity of low-temperature Mott's formula is determined and a good approximation is developed for the intermediate temperature range. In both regimes the intricate interplay between Anderson localization due to disorder and conductance resonances of the disorder potential is analyzed.

  14. Square root module to combat dispersion-induced nonlinear distortion in Radio-over-Fiber Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Prat Gomà, Josep Joan; Santos Blanco, M. Concepción; Omella Cáncer, Mireia Esther

    2006-01-01

    Reduced dispersion-induced harmonics levels are reported for analogue radio-over-fiber systems by using a linearized receiver incorporating a memoryless electronic circuit with square root (SQRT)-like transfer function, and performing amplitude modulation (AM) at the transmitter. A practical implementation demonstrates the effectiveness of the AM-SQRT approach in linearizing the optical transmission system with respect to the conventional intensity modulation and direct detection system. P...

  15. Policy-induced market introduction of Generation IV reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heek, Aliki Irina van; Roelofs, Ferry

    2011-01-01

    Almost 10 years ago the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) started the Generation IV Initiative (GenIV) with 9 other national governments with a positive ground attitude towards nuclear energy. Some of these Generation IV systems, like the fast reactors, are nearing the demonstration stage. The question on how their market introduction will be implemented becomes increasingly urgent. One main topic for future reactor technologies is the treatment of radioactive waste products. Technological solutions to this issue are being developed. One possible process is the transformation of long-living radioactive nuclides into short living ones; a process known as transmutation, which can be done in a nuclear reactor only. Various Generation IV reactor concepts are suitable for this process, and of these systems most experience has been gained with the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). However, both these first generation SFR plants and their Generation IV successors are designed as electricity generating plants, and therefore supposed to be commercially viable in the electricity markets. Various studies indicate that the generation costs of a combined LWR-(S)FR nuclear generating park (LWR: light water reactor) will be higher than that of an LWR-only park. To investigate the effects of the deployment of the different reactors and fuel cycles on the waste produced, resources used and costs incurred as a function of time, a dynamic fuel cycle assessment is performed. This study will focus on the waste impact of the introduction of a fraction of fast reactors in the European nuclear reactor park with a cost increase as described in the previous paragraph. The nuclear fuel cycle scenario code DANESS is used for this, as well as the nuclear park model of the EU-27 used for the previous study. (orig.)

  16. Distinct Localization of SNAP47 Protein in GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons in the Mouse and the Rat Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Münster-Wandowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptosomal-associated protein of 47 kDa (SNAP47 isoform is an atypical member of the SNAP family, which does not contribute directly to exocytosis and synaptic vesicle (SV recycling. Initial characterization of SNAP47 revealed a widespread expression in nervous tissue, but little is known about its cellular and subcellular localization in hippocampal neurons. Therefore, in the present study we applied multiple-immunofluorescence labeling, immuno-electron microscopy and in situ hybridization (ISH and analyzed the localization of SNAP47 in pre- and postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the mouse and rat hippocampus. While the immunofluorescence signal for SNAP47 showed a widespread distribution in both mouse and rat, the labeling pattern was complementary in the two species: in the mouse the immunolabeling was higher over the CA3 stratum radiatum, oriens and cell body layer. In contrast, in the rat the labeling was stronger over the CA1 neuropil and in the CA3 stratum lucidum. Furthermore, in the mouse high somatic labeling for SNAP47 was observed in GABAergic interneurons (INs. On the contrary, in the rat, while most INs were positive, they blended in with the high neuropil labeling. ISH confirmed the high expression of SNAP47 RNA in INs in the mouse. Co-staining for SNAP47 and pre- and postsynaptic markers in the rat revealed a strong co-localization postsynaptically with PSD95 in dendritic spines of pyramidal cells and, to a lesser extent, presynaptically, with ZnT3 and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1 in glutamatergic terminals such as mossy fiber (MF boutons. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the pre- and postsynaptic localization at glutamatergic synapses. Furthermore, in the mouse hippocampus SNAP47 was found to be localized at low levels to dendritic shafts and axon terminals of putative INs forming symmetric synapses, indicating that this protein could be trafficked to both post- and presynaptic

  17. Neuregulin repellent signaling via ErbB4 restricts GABAergic interneurons to migratory paths from ganglionic eminence to cortical destinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cortical GABAergic interneurons (INs are generated in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE and migrate tangentially into cortex. Because most, if not all, migrating MGE-derived INs express the neuregulin (NRG receptor, ErbB4, we investigated influences of Nrg1 isoforms and Nrg3 on IN migration through ventral telencephalon (vTel and within cortex. Results During IN migration, NRG expression domains and distributions of ErbB4-expressing, MGE-derived INs are complementary with minimal overlap, both in vTel and cortex. In wild-type mice, within fields of NRG expression, these INs are focused at positions of low or absent NRG expression. However, in ErbB4-/- HER4heart mutant mice in which INs lack ErbB4, these complementary patterns are degraded with considerable overlap evident between IN distribution and NRG expression domains. These findings suggest that NRGs are repellents for migrating ErbB4-expressing INs, a function supported by in vitro and in vivo experiments. First, in collagen co-cultures, MGE-derived cells preferentially migrate away from a source of secreted NRGs. Second, cells migrating from wild-type MGE explants on living forebrain slices from wild-type embryonic mice tend to avoid endogenous NRG expression domains, whereas this avoidance behavior is not exhibited by ErbB4-deficient cells migrating from MGE explants and instead they have a radial pattern with a more uniform distribution. Third, ectopic NRG expression in the IN migration pathway produced by in utero electroporation blocks IN migration and results in cortex distal to the blockade being largely devoid of INs. Finally, fewer INs reach cortex in ErbB4 mutants, indicating that NRG-ErbB4 signaling is required for directing IN migration from the MGE to cortex. Conclusions Our results show that NRGs act as repellents for migrating ErbB4-expressing, MGE-derived GABAergic INs and that the patterned expression of NRGs funnels INs as they migrate from the MGE

  18. FM-AM Conversion Induced by Polarization Mode Dispersion in Fiber Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Dong, Huang; Sheng-Zhi, Zhao; Jian-Jun, Wang; Ming-Zhong, Li; Dang-Peng, Xu; Hong-Huan, Lin; Rui, Zhang; Ying, Deng; Xiao-Min, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    The conversion of the frequency modulated pulse induced from frequency modulation (FM) to amplitude modulation (AM) by the polarization mode dispersion (PMD) is theoretically and experimentally investigated. When there is no polarizer at the output end of a fiber system, the amplitude modulation depth is stable by 8%. Random amplitude modulation is observed when a polarizer is placed at the output end of the fiber system. The observed minimum and maximum modulation depths in our experiment are 5% and 80%, respectively. Simulation results show that the amplitude modulation is stable by 4% induced mainly by group velocity dispersion (GVD) when there is no polarizer, and the amplitude modulation depth displays the random variation character induced by the GVD and PMD. Lastly, a new fiber system scheme is proposed and little amplitude modulation is observed at the top of the output pulse

  19. Voltage induced control and magnetoresistance of magnetically frustrated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalitsov, A.; Chshiev, M.; Canals, B.; Lacroix, C.

    2010-03-01

    The discovery of giant magnetoresistance [1] (GMR) in magnetic nanostructures has generated a new field of spin-based electronics (spintronics) [2]. This advent has considerably increased an interest in related phenomenon in bulk materials, colossal magnetoresistance [3] (CMR), which is several orders higher than GMR, and can be viewed as an ``intrinsic'' property of material. The CMR is typically observed in certain manganite compounds with characteristic magnetic fields of several Tesla. Such fields make them inappropriate for use in spintronic applications where appropriate scale should be about Oersteds. Here we promote magnetically frustrated (MF) bulk materials [4] as a possible alternative for spintronic applications with high magnetoresistance (MR) which can be controlled with relatively small voltages. We demonstrate that MR of MF systems may reach extremely high values and their magnetic configuration may be controlled by applied voltage. The proposed phenomenon is the bulk material analog of spin transfer torque [5] used in spin-valve structures. This work was supported by Nanosciences Foundation (France). [1] M. Baibich et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 2472 (1988); [2] S. Wolf, Science, 294, 1488 (2001); [3] S. Jin et al, Science, 264, 413 (1994); [4] J. Gardner et al, arXiv:0906.3661; [5] J. Slonczewski, JMMM 159, L1 (1996).

  20. Enhancement of cortical network activity in vitro and promotion of GABAergic neurogenesis by stimulation with an electromagnetic field with a 150 MHz carrier wave pulsed with an alternating 10 and 16 Hz modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eGramowski-Voss

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various stimuli were identified capable of enhancing neurogenesis, a process which is dysfunctional in the senescent brain and in neurodegenerative and certain neuropsychiatric diseases. Applications of electromagnetic fields to brain tissue have been shown to affect cellular properties and their importance for therapies in medicine is recognized.In this study, differentiating murine cortical networks on multiwell microelectrode arrays were repeatedly exposed to an extremely low electromagnetic field (ELEMF with alternating 10 and 16 Hz frequencies piggy-backed onto a 150 MHz carrier frequency. The ELEMF exposure stimulated the electrical network activity and intensified the structure of bursts. Further, the exposure with an electromagnetic field within the first 28 days of the differentiation the network activity induced also reorganization within the burst structure. This effect was already most pronounced at 14 days in vitro after 10 days of exposure. Overall, the development of cortical activity under these conditions was accelerated. These functional electrophysiological changes were accompanied by morphological ones. The percentage of neurons in the neuron glia co-culture was increased without affecting the total number of cells, indicating an enhancement of neurogenesis. The ELEMF exposure selectively promoted the proliferation of a particular population of neurons, evidenced by the increased proportion of GABAergic neurons. The results support the initial hypothesis that this kind of ELEMF stimulation is a treatment option for specific indications with promising potential for CNS applications, especially for degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

  1. Development of a code system DEURACS for theoretical analysis and prediction of deuteron-induced reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Nakayama Shinsuke; Kouno Hiroshi; Watanabe Yukinobu; Iwamoto Osamu; Ye Tao; Ogata Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    We have developed an integrated code system dedicated for theoretical analysis and prediction of deuteron-induced reactions, which is called DEUteron-induced Reaction Analysis Code System (DEURACS). DEURACS consists of several calculation codes based on theoretical models to describe respective reaction mechanisms and it was successfully applied to (d,xp) and (d,xn) reactions. In the present work, the analysis of (d,xn) reactions is extended to higher incident energy up to nearly 100 MeV and ...

  2. Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, S.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than

  3. Explanation of diagnostic criteria for radiation-induced nervous system disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai

    2012-01-01

    National occupational health standard-Diagnostic Criteria for Radiation-Induced Nervous System Disease has been issued and implemented by the Ministry of health. This standard contained three independent criteria of the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injury. These three kinds of disease often go together in clinic,therefore,the three diagnostic criteria were merged into radioactive nervous system disease diagnostic criteria for entirety and maneuverability of the standard. This standard was formulated based on collection of the clinical practice experience, extensive research of relevant literature and foreign relevant publications. It is mainly applied to diagnosis and treatment of occupational radiation-induced nervous system diseases, and to nervous system diseases caused by medical radiation exposure as well. In order to properly implement this standard, also to correctly deal with radioactive nervous system injury, the main contents of this standard including dose threshold, clinical manifestation, indexing standard and treatment principle were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  4. Peripheral Antinociception Induced by Aripiprazole Is Mediated by the Opioid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cristina Mendes Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia and related disorders. Our previous study showed that this compound also induces antinociceptive effects. The present study aimed to assess the participation of the opioid system in this effect. Methods. Male Swiss mice were submitted to paw pressure test and hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 2 μg. Aripiprazole was injected 10 min before the measurement. Naloxone, clocinnamox, naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and bestatin were given 30 min before aripiprazole. Nociceptive thresholds were measured in the 3rd hour after PGE2 injection. Results. Aripiprazole (100 μg/paw injected locally into the right hind paw induced an antinociceptive effect that was blocked by naloxone (50 μg/paw, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist. The role of μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors was investigated using the selective antagonists, clocinnamox (40 μg/paw, naltrindole (15, 30, and 60 μg/paw, and nor-binaltorphimine (200 μg/paw, respectively. The data indicated that only the δ-opioid receptor antagonist inhibited the peripheral antinociception induced by aripiprazole. Bestatin (400 μg, an aminopeptidase-N inhibitor, significantly enhanced low-dose (25 μg/paw aripiprazole-induced peripheral antinociception. Conclusion. The results suggest the participation of the opioid system via δ-opioid receptor in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by aripiprazole.

  5. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them (22 of 50) significantly inhibited or induced the T3SS expression of R. solanacearum. Based on the strong induction activity on T3SS, the T3SS inducer oleanolic acid (OA) was chosen for further study. We found that OA induced the expression of T3SS through the HrpG-HrpB pathway. Some type III effector genes were induced in T3SS inducing medium supplemented with OA. In addition, OA targeted only the T3SS and did not affect other virulence determinants. Finally, we observed that induction of T3SS by OA accelerated disease progress on tobacco. Overall our results suggest that plant-derived compounds are an abundant source of R. solanacearum T3SS regulators, which could prove useful as tools to interrogate the regulation of this key virulence pathway. PMID:26732647

  6. [Risk factors and management of systemic reactions induced by subcutaneous immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liping; Wen, Zhaoming; Yang, Na

    2014-10-21

    To explore the risk factors (causes or possible causes) of systemic reactions induced by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) through clinical observations and develop countermeasures for preventing further SCIT-induced systemic reactions. Each patient on SCIT at our department from December 1993 to September 2013 was inquired about systemic reactions induced by SCIT. Individuals with systemic reactions immediately after SCIT were included. Clinical history and manifestations were inquired and recorded carefully. Risk factors of systemic reactions were probed and analyzed. SCIT schedule was adjusted according to the risk factors and the patients on continuous SCIT were followed up until the end of SCIT course. A total of 70 reactions were observed in 35 patients during the observation period. A large majority (97.1% (68/70) ) of systemic reactions occurred at a maximal concentration of 10(-2). Risk factor included an injection of maximal dosage (0.6-1.0 ml of 10(-2) vial, 27.2% (28/103) ), a further injection of large dosage (0.1-0.5 ml of 10(-2) vial) during pollen season (20.4% (21/103) ), incremental dose regardless of marked local reaction (12.6% (13/103) ), suspected incorrect injection procedure(12.6% (13/103) ) and an injection with a wrong vial of higher concentration (9.7% (10/103) ). Countermeasures were taken accordingly, include stopping injection of maximal dosage, avoiding SCIT of 10(-2) vial on pollen season, decreasing SCIT dosage on existence of large local reactions, performing SCIT only at medical institutions capable of managing anaphylaxis and implementing normalized injection procedures. Most patients (n = 29) finished the course of SCIT successfully without further systemic reactions. Six patients ceased SCIT for personal reasons or on medical advice. Probing the risk factors of systemic reactions induced by SCIT and adopting countermeasures accordingly prevent further systemic reactions. It may provide rationales for preventing or minimizing

  7. An in vivo transfection system for inducible gene expression and gene silencing in murine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Eric K; Lechler, Christian; Kohnke-Ertel, Birgit; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Sage, Julien; Schmid, Roland M; Ehmer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Hydrodynamic tail vein injection (HTVI) of transposon-based integration vectors is an established system for stably transfecting mouse hepatocytes in vivo that has been successfully employed to study key questions in liver biology and cancer. Refining the vectors for transposon-mediated hepatocyte transfection will further expand the range of applications of this technique in liver research. In the present study, we report an advanced transposon-based system for manipulating gene expression in hepatocytes in vivo. Transposon-based vector constructs were generated to enable the constitutive expression of inducible Cre recombinase (CreER) together with tetracycline-inducible transgene or miR-small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression (Tet-ON system). Transposon and transposase expression vectors were co-injected into R26R-mTmG reporter mice by HTVI. Cre-mediated gene recombination was induced by tamoxifen, followed by the administration of doxycycline to drive tetracycline-inducible gene or shRNA expression. Expression was visualized by immunofluorescence staining in livers of injected mice. After HTVI, Cre recombination by tamoxifen led to the expression of membrane-bound green fluorescent protein in transfected hepatocytes. Activation of inducible gene or shRNA expression was detected by immunostaining in up to one-third of transfected hepatocytes, with an efficiency dependent on the promoter driving the Tet-ON system. Our vector system combines Cre-lox mediated gene mutation with inducible gene expression or gene knockdown, respectively. It provides the opportunity for rapid and specific modification of hepatocyte gene expression and can be a useful tool for genetic screening approaches and analysis of target genes specifically in genetically engineered mouse models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A screening system to identify transcription factors that induce binding site-directed DNA demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Maeda, Shiori; Furuhata, Erina; Shimizu, Yuri; Nishimura, Hajime; Kishima, Mami; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2017-12-08

    DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that is involved in many biological systems such as differentiation and disease. We and others recently showed that some transcription factors (TFs) are involved in the site-specific determination of DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner, although the reports of such TFs are limited. Here, we develop a screening system to identify TFs that induce binding site-directed DNA methylation changes. The system involves the ectopic expression of target TFs in model cells followed by DNA methylome analysis and overrepresentation analysis of the corresponding TF binding motif at differentially methylated regions. It successfully identified binding site-directed demethylation of SPI1, which is known to promote DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner. We extended our screening system to 15 master TFs involved in cellular differentiation and identified eight novel binding site-directed DNA demethylation-inducing TFs (RUNX3, GATA2, CEBPB, MAFB, NR4A2, MYOD1, CEBPA, and TBX5). Gene ontology and tissue enrichment analysis revealed that these TFs demethylate genomic regions associated with corresponding biological roles. We also describe the characteristics of binding site-directed DNA demethylation induced by these TFs, including the targeting of highly methylated CpGs, local DNA demethylation, and the overlap of demethylated regions between TFs of the same family. Our results show the usefulness of the developed screening system for the identification of TFs that induce DNA demethylation in a site-directed manner.

  9. Enhanced Chondrocyte Proliferation in a Prototyped Culture System with Wave-Induced Agitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilarek Maciej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the actual challenges in tissue engineering applications is to efficiently produce as high of number of cells as it is only possible, in the shortest time. In static cultures, the production of animal cell biomass in integrated forms (i.e. aggregates, inoculated scaffolds is limited due to inefficient diffusion of culture medium components observed in such non-mixed culture systems, especially in the case of cell-inoculated fiber-based dense 3D scaffolds, inside which the intensification of mass transfer is particularly important. The applicability of a prototyped, small-scale, continuously wave-induced agitated system for intensification of anchorage-dependent CP5 chondrocytes proliferation outside and inside three-dimensional poly(lactic acid (PLA scaffolds has been discussed. Fibrous PLA-based constructs have been inoculated with CP5 cells and then maintained in two independent incubation systems: (i non-agitated conditions and (ii culture with wave-induced agitation. Significantly higher values of the volumetric glucose consumption rate have been noted for the system with the wave-induced agitation. The advantage of the presented wave-induced agitation culture system has been confirmed by lower activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH released from the cells in the samples of culture medium harvested from the agitated cultures, in contrast to rather high values of LDH activity measured for static conditions. Results of the proceeded experiments and their analysis clearly exhibited the feasibility of the culture system supported with continuously wave-induced agitation for robust proliferation of the CP5 chondrocytes on PLA-based structures. Aside from the practicability of the prototyped system, we believe that it could also be applied as a standard method offering advantages for all types of the daily routine laboratory-scale animal cell cultures utilizing various fiber-based biomaterials, with the use of only regular laboratory

  10. Ménage à trois: the role of neurotransmitters in the energy metabolism of astrocytes, glutamatergic, and GABAergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki

    2012-08-01

    This work is a computational study based on a new detailed metabolic network model comprising well-mixed compartments representing separate cytosol and mitochondria of astrocytes, glutamatergic and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons, communicating through an extracellular space compartment and fed by arterial blood flow. Our steady-state analysis assumes statistical mass balance of both carbons and amino groups. The study is based on Bayesian flux balance analysis, which uses Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling techniques and provides a quantitative description of steady states when the two exchangers aspartate-glutamate carrier (AGC1) and oxoglutarate carrier (OGC) in the malate-aspartate shuttle in astrocyte are not in equilibrium, as recent studies suggest. It also highlights the importance of anaplerotic reactions, pyruvate carboxylase in astrocyte and malic enzyme in neurons, for neurotransmitter synthesis and recycling. The model is unbiased with respect to the glucose partitioning between cell types, and shows that determining the partitioning cannot be done by stoichiometric constraints alone. Furthermore, the intercellular lactate trafficking is found to depend directly on glucose partitioning, suggesting that a steady state may support different scenarios. At inhibitory steady state, characterized by high rate of GABA release, there is elevated oxidative activity in astrocyte, not in response to specific energetic needs.

  11. Chronically reinforced, operant olfactory conditioning increases the number of newborn GABAergic olfactory periglomerular neurons in the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Rodríguez, Miguel; Esquivelzeta-Rabell, José F; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel

    2012-12-01

    The mammalian brain preserves the ability to replace olfactory periglomerular cells (PGC) throughout life. Even though we have detailed a great deal the mechanisms underlying stem and amplifying cells maintenance and proliferation, as well as those modulating migration and differentiation, our knowledge on PGC phenotypic plasticity is at best fragmented and controversial. Here we explored whether chronically reinforced olfactory conditioning influences the phenotype of newborn PGC. Accordingly, olfactory conditioned rats showed increased numbers of GAD 65/67 positive PGC. Because such phenotypic change was not accompanied neither by increments in the total number of PGC, or periglomerular cell nuclei labeled with bromodeoxyuridine, nor by reductions in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), calbindin (CB) or calretinin (CR) immunoreactive PGC, we speculate that increments in the number of GABAergic PGC occur at the expense of other PGC phenotypes. In any event, these results support that adult newborn PGC phenotype may be subjected to phenotypic plasticity influenced by sensory stimulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Repeated Blockade of NMDA Receptors during Adolescence Impairs Reversal Learning and Disrupts GABAergic Interneurons in Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitao eLi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is of particular significance to schizophrenia, since psychosis onset typically occurs in this critical period. Based on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia, in this study, we investigated whether and how repeated NMDA receptor blockade during adolescence would affect GABAergic interneurons in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and mPFC-mediated cognitive functions. Specifically, adolescent rats were subjected to intraperitoneal administration of MK-801 (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 mg/kg, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, for 14 days and then tested for reference memory and reversal learning in the water maze. The density of parvabumin (PV-, calbindin (CB- and calretinin (CR-positive neurons in mPFC were analyzed at either 24 hours or 7 days after drug cessation. We found that MK-801 treatment delayed reversal learning in the water maze without affecting initial acquisition. Strikingly, MK-801 treatment also significantly reduced the density of PV+ and CB+ neurons, and this effect persisted for 7 days after drug cessation at the dose of 0.2 mg/kg. We further demonstrated that the reduction in PV+ and CB+ neuron densities was ascribed to a downregulation of the expression levels of PV and CB, but not to neuronal death. These results parallel the behavioral and neuropathological changes of schizophrenia and provide evidence that adolescent NMDA receptors antagonism offers a useful tool for unraveling the etiology of the disease.

  13. CoIN: co-inducible nitrate expression system for secondary metabolites in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemann, Philipp; Soukup, Alexandra A; Folz, Jacob S; Wang, Pin-Mei; Noack, Andreas; Keller, Nancy P

    2018-01-01

    Sequencing of fungal species has demonstrated the existence of thousands of putative secondary metabolite gene clusters, the majority of them harboring a unique set of genes thought to participate in production of distinct small molecules. Despite the ready identification of key enzymes and potential cluster genes by bioinformatics techniques in sequenced genomes, the expression and identification of fungal secondary metabolites in the native host is often hampered as the genes might not be expressed under laboratory conditions and the species might not be amenable to genetic manipulation. To overcome these restrictions, we developed an inducible expression system in the genetic model Aspergillus nidulans . We genetically engineered a strain of A. nidulans devoid of producing eight of the most abundant endogenous secondary metabolites to express the sterigmatocystin Zn(II) 2 Cys 6 transcription factor-encoding gene aflR and its cofactor aflS under control of the nitrate inducible niiA / niaD promoter. Furthermore, we identified a subset of promoters from the sterigmatocystin gene cluster that are under nitrate-inducible AflR/S control in our production strain in order to yield coordinated expression without the risks from reusing a single inducible promoter. As proof of concept, we used this system to produce β-carotene from the carotenoid gene cluster of Fusarium fujikuroi . Utilizing one-step yeast recombinational cloning, we developed an inducible expression system in the genetic model A. nidulans and show that it can be successfully used to produce commercially valuable metabolites.

  14. PPS nanoparticles as versatile delivery system to induce systemic and broad mucosal immunity after intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Armando; van der Vlies, André J; Martino, Mikael M; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Simeoni, Eleonora

    2011-01-17

    Degradable polymer nanoparticles (NPs, 50 nm) based on polypropylene sulfide (PPS) were conjugated to thiolated antigen and adjuvant proteins by reversible disulfide bonds and evaluated in mucosal vaccination. Ovalbumin was used as a model antigen, and antigen-conjugated NPs were administered intranasally in the mouse. We show penetration of nasal mucosae, transit via M cells, and uptake by antigen-presenting cells in the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue. Ovalbumin-conjugated NPs induced cytotoxic T lymphocytic responses in lung and spleen tissues, as well as humoral response in mucosal airways. Co-conjugation of the TLR5 ligand flagellin further enhanced humoral responses in the airways as well as in the distant vaginal and rectal mucosal compartments and induced cellular immune responses with a Th1 bias, in contrast with free flagellin. The PPS NP platform thus appears interesting as a platform for intranasally-administered mucosal vaccination for inducing broad mucosal immunity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Position of Effective Spins Induced by Dilution in Two-Dimensional Spin-Peierls Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Chitoshi; Miyara, Shouta

    2018-01-01

    The site- and bond-dilution effects of the nonmagnetic ground state of a two-dimensional S = 1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model, coupled with the lattice distortions on a square lattice, are investigated by performing quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In the nondiluted system, a phase diagram parameterized by the interchain interaction and the elastic constant is obtained, and the values of the lattice distortions in the dimerized phase are evaluated precisely. In the diluted system, we compare two ground-state energies assuming two patterns of lattice distortions with magnetic moments (effective spins) induced near the diluted parts and induced at the midpoint between the diluted parts. As a result, we find that it is difficult to induce effective spins near diluted parts for large elastic constants, small interchain interactions, and large concentrations of dilution.

  16. Recent advances in the understanding of sepsis-induced alterations in the neuroendocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Fazal; Atika, Bibi; Oliveira-Pelegrin, Gabriela Ravanelli; Rocha, Maria José Alves

    2013-12-01

    Sepsis is a fatal systemic inflammatory disease. It is caused by an immune system inflammatory response to the entry of microorganisms or their products into the blood circulatory system. The pathophysiological mechanisms of sepsis are still poorly understood. The presence of microorganisms in the systemic circulation causes activation of the immune system, which in turn leads to a robust release of inflammatory cytokines. These inflammatory cytokines result in alterations across all important physiological systems, including the neuroendocrine system. Neuroendocrine responses differ between the acute and the late phase of sepsis. In the acute phase there are robust alterations in the secretion of neuroendocrine hormones in response to body demand. In the late phase, the plasma concentrations of some hormones remain low, despite heavy systemic demand, whereas several others increase despite of diminished needs. In this review, we give a brief overview on sepsis-induced major alterations in neuroendocrine secretions, and summarize current knowledge about mechanisms and targets for their treatment.

  17. A LabVIEW-Based Virtual Instrument System for Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qijun; Wang, Lufei; Zu, Lily

    2011-01-01

    We report the design and operation of a Virtual Instrument (VI) system based on LabVIEW 2009 for laser-induced fluorescence experiments. This system achieves synchronous control of equipment and acquisition of real-time fluorescence data communicating with a single computer via GPIB, USB, RS232, and parallel ports. The reported VI system can also accomplish data display, saving, and analysis, and printing the results. The VI system performs sequences of operations automatically, and this system has been successfully applied to obtain the excitation and dispersion spectra of α-methylnaphthalene. The reported VI system opens up new possibilities for researchers and increases the efficiency and precision of experiments. The design and operation of the VI system are described in detail in this paper, and the advantages that this system can provide are highlighted.

  18. Acute stress-induced cortisol elevations mediate reward system activity during subconscious processing of sexual stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, N.Y.L.; Both, S.; van Heemst, D.; van der Grond, J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress is thought to alter motivational processes by increasing dopamine (DA) secretion in the brain's "reward system", and its key region, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). However, stress studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), mainly found evidence for stress-induced decreases in

  19. EFFECTS OF SYSTEMIC NEUTROPHIL DEPLETION ON LPS-INDUCED AIRWAY DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of Systemic Neutrophil Depletion on LPS-induced Airway DiseaseJordan D. Savov, Stephen H. Gavett*, David M. Brass, Daniel L. Costa*, David A. SchwartzPulmonary and Critical Care Division, Dept of Medicine ? Duke University Medical Center* National Health and E...

  20. CRH engagement of the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system mediates stress-induced anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Jordan G.; Al-Hasani, Ream; Siuda, Edward R.; Hong, Daniel Y.; Norris, Aaron J.; Ford, Christopher P.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The locus coeruleus noradrenergic (LC-NE) system is one of the first systems engaged following a stressful event. While numerous groups have demonstrated that LC-NE neurons are activated by many different stressors, the underlying neural circuitry and the role of this activity in generating stress-induced anxiety has not been elucidated. Using a combination of in vivo chemogenetics, optogenetics, and retrograde tracing we determine that increased tonic activity of the LC-NE system is necessary and sufficient for stress-induced anxiety and aversion. Selective inhibition of LC-NE neurons during stress prevents subsequent anxiety-like behavior. Exogenously increasing tonic, but not phasic, activity of LC-NE neurons is alone sufficient for anxiety-like and aversive behavior. Furthermore, endogenous corticotropin releasing hormone+ (CRH+) LC inputs from the amygdala increase tonic LC activity, inducing anxiety-like behaviors. These studies position the LC-NE system as a critical mediator of acute stress-induced anxiety and offer a potential intervention for preventing stress-related affective disorders. PMID:26212712

  1. Multi-electron beam system for high resolution electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bruggen, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of a multi-electron beam system is described which is dedicated for electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with sub-10 nm resolution. EBID is a promising mask-less nanolithography technique which has the potential to become a viable technique for the fabrication of 20-2 nm

  2. Dietary L-arginine supplementation modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether dietary supplementation with L-arginine (Arg) could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammatory response through LPS/TLR-4 signaling pathway in broilers. The experiment was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatm...

  3. Flow induced vibration of subsea gas production systems caused by choke valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, N.E.; Groot, R. de; Gharaibah, E.; Slot, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the design of subsea flow systems the integrity and reliability is paramount. As the equipment must be designed to operate at a large variety of conditions, inherent to the many processes, evaluation of the integrity is complex. . Flow induced pulsations and vibrations can cause serious design

  4. Flow induced vibration of subsea gas production system caused by choke valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, N.E.; Groot, R. de; Gharaibah, E.; Slot, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the design of subsea flow systems the integrity and reliability is paramount. As the equipment must be designed to operate at a large variety of conditions, inherent to the many processes, evaluation of the integrity is complex. . Flow induced pulsations and vibrations can cause serious design

  5. Cannabinoid Modulation of Backpropagating Action Potential-Induced Calcium Transients in Layer 2/3 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Lawrence S.; Levine, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) play a prominent role in regulating synaptic signaling throughout the brain. In layer 2/3 of the neocortex, eCB-mediated suppression of GABA release results in an enhanced excitability of pyramidal neurons (PNs). The eCB system is also involved in spike timing-dependent plasticity that is dependent on backpropagating action potentials (bAPs). Dendritic backpropagation plays an important role in many aspects of neuronal function, and can be modulated by intrinsic dendritic conductances as well as by synaptic inputs. The present studies explored a role for the eCB system in modulating backpropagation in PN dendrites. Using dendritic calcium imaging and somatic patch clamp recordings from mouse somatosensory cortical slices, we found that activation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors potentiated bAP-induced calcium transients in apical dendrites of layer 2/3 but not layer 5 PNs. This effect was mediated by suppression of GABAergic transmission, because it was prevented by a GABAA receptor antagonist and was correlated with cannabinoid suppression of inhibitory synaptic activity. Finally, we found that activity-dependent eCB release during depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition enhanced bAP-induced dendritic calcium transients. Taken together, these results point to a potentially important role for the eCB system in regulating dendritic backpropagation in layer 2/3 PNs. PMID:22693342

  6. Computer circuit analysis of induced currents in the MFTF-B magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnuson, G.D.; Woods, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was made of the induced current behavior of the MFTF-B magnet system. Although the magnet system consists of 22 coils, because of its symmetry we considered only 11 coils in the analysis. Various combinations of the coils were dumped either singly or in groups, with the current behavior in all magnets calculated as a function of time after initiation of the dump

  7. Recovery from UV-induced potentially lethal damage in systemic lupus erythematosus skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamansky, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    The repair of ultraviolet light-induced potentially lethal damage was investigated in density-inhibited skin fibroblast cell strains derived from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The effect of exposure to polychromatic ultraviolet light composed of environmentally relevant wavelengths or to the more commonly studied, short wavelength (254 nm) ultraviolet light was studied. Systemic lupus erythematosus cells, which are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light under growth promoting conditions, were able to repair potentially lethal damage as well as normal cells. (author)

  8. A framework of induced hyperspace dynamical systems equipped with the hit-or-miss topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yangeng; Wei Guo; Campbell, William H.; Bourquin, Steven

    2009-01-01

    For any dynamical system (E,d,f), where E is Hausdorff locally compact second countable (HLCSC), let F (resp., 2 E ) denote the space of all closed subsets (resp., non-empty closed subsets) of E equipped with the hit-or-miss topology τ f . Both F and 2 E are again HLCSC (F actually compact), thus metrizable. Let ρ be such a metric (three metrics available). The main purpose is to determine the conditions on f that ensure the continuity of the induced hyperspace maps 2 f :F→F and 2 f :2 E →2 E defined by 2 f (F)=f(F). With this setting, the induced hyperspace systems (F,ρ,2 f ) and (2 E ,ρ,2 f ) are compact and locally compact dynamical systems, respectively. Consequently, dynamical properties, particularly metric related dynamical properties, of the given system (E,d,f) can be explored through these hyperspace systems. In contrast, when the Vietoris topology τ v is equipped on 2 E , the space of the induced hyperspace topological dynamical system (2 E ,τ v ,2 f ) is not metrizable if E is not compact metrizable, e.g., E=R n , implying that metric related dynamical concepts cannot be defined for (2 E ,τ v ,2 f ). Moreover, two examples are provided to illustrate the advantages of the hit-or-miss topology as compared to the Vietoris topology.

  9. A combined laser-induced breakdown and Raman spectroscopy Echelle system for elemental and molecular microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehse, Marek [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Mory, David [LTB Lasertechnik Berlin, Rudower Chaussee 29, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Florek, Stefan [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Science, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Weritz, Friederike [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Gornushkin, Igor, E-mail: igor.gornushkin@bam.d [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Panne, Ulrich [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard-Willstaetter Str. 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Chemistry Department, Brook-Taylor-Strasse 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Raman and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is integrated into a single system for molecular and elemental microanalyses. Both analyses are performed on the same approx 0.002 mm{sup 2} sample spot allowing the assessment of sample heterogeneity on a micrometric scale through mapping and scanning. The core of the spectrometer system is a novel high resolution dual arm Echelle spectrograph utilized for both techniques. In contrast to scanning Raman spectroscopy systems, the Echelle-Raman spectrograph provides a high resolution spectrum in a broad spectral range of 200-6000 cm{sup -1} without moving the dispersive element. The system displays comparable or better sensitivity and spectral resolution in comparison to a state-of-the-art scanning Raman microscope and allows short analysis times for both Raman and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy performance of the system is characterized by ppm detection limits, high spectral resolving power (15,000), and broad spectral range (290-945 nm). The capability of the system is demonstrated with the mapping of heterogeneous mineral samples and layer by layer analysis of pigments revealing the advantages of combining the techniques in a single unified set-up.

  10. Presynaptic Glycine Receptors Increase GABAergic Neurotransmission in Rat Periaqueductal Gray Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwi-Hyung Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG is involved in the central regulation of nociceptive transmission by affecting the descending inhibitory pathway. In the present study, we have addressed the functional role of presynaptic glycine receptors in spontaneous glutamatergic transmission. Spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs were recorded in mechanically dissociated rat PAG neurons using a conventional whole-cell patch recording technique under voltage-clamp conditions. The application of glycine (100 µM significantly increased the frequency of sEPSCs, without affecting the amplitude of sEPSCs. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency was blocked by 1 µM strychnine, a specific glycine receptor antagonist. The results suggest that glycine acts on presynaptic glycine receptors to increase the probability of glutamate release from excitatory nerve terminals. The glycine-induced increase in sEPSC frequency completely disappeared either in the presence of tetrodotoxin or Cd2+, voltage-gated Na+, or Ca2+ channel blockers, suggesting that the activation of presynaptic glycine receptors might depolarize excitatory nerve terminals. The present results suggest that presynaptic glycine receptors can regulate the excitability of PAG neurons by enhancing glutamatergic transmission and therefore play an important role in the regulation of various physiological functions mediated by the PAG.

  11. Anxiolytic-like effect of Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) in mice: involvement with GABAergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Francisca Helvira Cavalcante; Venâncio, Edith Teles; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino; de França Fonteles, Marta Maria; de Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; Viana, Glauce Socorro Barros; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço

    2010-08-01

    Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol) is a monoterpenic phenol present in the essencial oil of many plants. It is the major component of the essential oil fraction of oregano and thyme. This work presents the behavioral effects of carvacrol in animal models of elevated plus maze (EPM), open field, Rotarod and barbiturate-induced sleeping time tests in mice. Carvacrol (CVC) was administered orally, in male mice, at single doses of 12.5; 25 and 50 mg/kg while diazepam 1 or 2 mg/kg was used as standard drug and flumazenil (2.5 mg/kg) was used to elucidate the possible anxiolytic mechanism of CVC on the plus maze test. The results showed that CVC, at three doses, had no effect on the spontaneous motor activity in the Rotarod test nor in the number of squares crossed in the open-field test. However, CVC decreased the number of groomings in the open-field test. In the plus maze test, CVC, at three doses significantly increased all the observed parameters in the EPM test and flumazenil was able to reverse the effects of diazepam and CVC. Therefore, CVC did not alter the sleep latency and sleeping time in the barbiturate-induced sleeping time test. These results show that CVC presents anxiolytic effects in the plus maze test which are not influenced by the locomotor activity in the open-field test.

  12. A theoretical analysis of the feasibility of a singularity-induced micro-electroporation system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Troszak

    Full Text Available Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane lipid bilayer due to a pulsed electric field, has important implications in the biotechnology, medicine, and food industries. Traditional macro and micro-electroporation devices have facing electrodes, and require significant potential differences to induce electroporation. The goal of this theoretical study is to investigate the feasibility of singularity-induced micro-electroporation; an electroporation configuration aimed at minimizing the potential differences required to induce electroporation by separating adjacent electrodes with a nanometer-scale insulator. In particular, this study aims to understand the effect of (1 insulator thickness and (2 electrode kinetics on electric field distributions in the singularity-induced micro-electroporation configuration. A non-dimensional primary current distribution model of the micro-electroporation channel shows that while increasing insulator thickness results in smaller electric field magnitudes, electroporation can still be performed with insulators thick enough to be made with microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, a secondary current distribution model of the singularity-induced micro-electroporation configuration with inert platinum electrodes and water electrolyte indicates that electrode kinetics do not inhibit charge transfer to the extent that prohibitively large potential differences are required to perform electroporation. These results indicate that singularity-induced micro-electroporation could be used to develop an electroporation system that consumes minimal power, making it suitable for remote applications such as the sterilization of water and other liquids.

  13. 3-Acetonyl-3-hydroxyoxindole: a new inducer of systemic acquired resistance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanmei; Zhang, Zhongkai; Jia, Yantao; Shen, Yuemao; He, Hongping; Fang, Rongxiang; Chen, Xiaoying; Hao, Xiaojiang

    2008-04-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defence mechanism which plays a central role in protecting plants from microbial pathogen attack. Guided by bioassays, a new chemical inducer of SAR was isolated from the extracts of Strobilanthes cusia and identified to be 3-acetonyl-3-hydroxyoxindole (AHO), a derivative of isatin. Tobacco plants treated with AHO exhibited enhanced resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and to the fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum (powdery mildew), accompanied by increased levels of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (PR-1) expression, salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity. To study the mode of action of AHO, its ability to induce PR-1 expression and TMV resistance in nahG transgenic plants expressing salicylate hydroxylase, which prevents the accumulation of SA, was analysed. AHO treatment did not induce TMV resistance or PR-1 expression in nahG transgenic plants, suggesting that AHO acts upstream of SA in the SAR signalling pathway. In addition, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry, five AHO-induced plant proteins were identified which were homologous to the effector proteins with which SA interacts. Our data suggest that AHO may represent a novel class of inducer that stimulates SA-mediated defence responses.

  14. Flutamide-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in an In Vitro Rat Hepatocyte System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al Maruf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flutamide (FLU is a competitive antagonist of the androgen receptor which has been reported to induce severe liver injury in some patients. Several experimental models suggested that an episode of inflammation during drug treatment predisposes animals to tissue injury. The molecular cytotoxic mechanisms of FLU in isolated rat hepatocytes using an in vitro oxidative stress inflammation system were investigated in this study. When a nontoxic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generating system (glucose/glucose oxidase with peroxidase or iron(II [Fe(II] (to partly simulate in vivo inflammation was added to the hepatocytes prior to the addition of FLU, increases in FLU-induced cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation (LPO were observed that were decreased by 6-N-propyl-2-thiouracil or deferoxamine, respectively. N-Acetylcysteine decreased FLU-induced cytotoxicity in this system. Potent antioxidants, for example, Trolox ((±-6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid, resveratrol (3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene, and DPPD (N,N′-diphenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine also significantly decreased FLU-induced cytotoxicity and LPO and increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP and glutathione (GSH levels in the H2O2 generating system with peroxidase. TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, a known reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger and superoxide dismutase mimetic, also significantly decreased toxicity caused by FLU in this system. These results raise the possibility that the presence or absence of inflammation may be another susceptibility factor for drug-induced hepatotoxicity.

  15. Role of the amygdala GABA-A receptors in ACPA-induced deficits during conditioned fear learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Roghani, Farnaz; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-05-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is a key structure for the emotional processing and storage of memories associated with emotional events, especially fear. On the other hand, endocannabinoids and CB1 receptors play a key role in learning and memory partly through long-term synaptic depression of GABAergic synapses in the BLA. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of GABA-A receptor agonist and antagonist in the fear-related memory acquisition deficits induced by ACPA (a selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonist). This study used context and tone fear conditioning paradigms to assess fear-related memory in male NMRI mice. Our results showed that the pre-training intraperitoneal administration of ACPA (0.5mg/kg) or (0.1 and 0.5mg/kg) decreased the percentage of freezing time in the contextual and tone fear conditioning, respectively. This indicated an impaired context- or tone-dependent fear memory acquisition. Moreover, the pre-training intra-BLA microinjection of GABA-A receptor agonist, muscimol, at 0.05 and 0.5μg/mouse impaired context-dependent fear memory, while the same doses of GABA-A antagonist, bicuculline, impaired tone-dependent fear memory. However, a subthreshold dose of muscimol or bicuculline increased the effect of ACPA at 0.1 and 0.5 or 0.05mg/kg on context- or tone-dependent fear memory, respectively. In addition, bicuculline at the lower dose increased the ACPA response on locomotor activity compared to its respective group. Such findings highlighted an interaction between BLA GABAergic and cannabinoidergic systems during the acquisition phase of conditioned fear memories. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Induced seismicity hazard and risk by enhanced geothermal systems: an expert elicitation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trutnevyte, Evelina; Azevedo, Inês L.

    2018-03-01

    Induced seismicity is a concern for multiple geoenergy applications, including low-carbon enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). We present the results of an international expert elicitation (n = 14) on EGS induced seismicity hazard and risk. Using a hypothetical scenario of an EGS plant and its geological context, we show that expert best-guess estimates of annualized exceedance probabilities of an M ≥ 3 event range from 0.2%-95% during reservoir stimulation and 0.2%-100% during operation. Best-guess annualized exceedance probabilities of M ≥ 5 event span from 0.002%-2% during stimulation and 0.003%-3% during operation. Assuming that tectonic M7 events could occur, some experts do not exclude induced (triggered) events of up to M7 too. If an induced M = 3 event happens at 5 km depth beneath a town with 10 000 inhabitants, most experts estimate a 50% probability that the loss is contained within 500 000 USD without any injuries or fatalities. In the case of an induced M = 5 event, there is 50% chance that the loss is below 50 million USD with the most-likely outcome of 50 injuries and one fatality or none. As we observe a vast diversity in quantitative expert judgements and underlying mental models, we conclude with implications for induced seismicity risk governance. That is, we suggest documenting individual expert judgements in induced seismicity elicitations before proceeding to consensual judgements, to convene larger expert panels in order not to cherry-pick the experts, and to aim for multi-organization multi-model assessments of EGS induced seismicity hazard and risk.

  17. Integrated protective systems for operational acceleration-induced loss of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, P E

    1991-01-01

    Systems that can protect pilots from not only acceleration-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) but also from exposure to chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons are discussed. Hazards such as fire, drowning, and ballistic injury are not considered. Physiological stresses, protection methods, and their impact on G capability at increased altitudes are examined, as are stresses induced by the environment (heat stress, cold stress, and cold water immersion). Sustained and short-duration acceleration effects are described. Requirements for protection against chemical, biological, radiological, and laser weapons and the incorporation of mission-enhancement devices are addressed. Concepts for integration of all of these elements are discussed.

  18. Oleanolic Acid Induces the Type III Secretion System of Ralstonia solanacearum

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Dousheng; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xuejiao; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, can naturally infect a wide range of host plants. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a major virulence determinant in this bacterium. Studies have shown that plant-derived compounds are able to inhibit or induce the T3SS in some plant pathogenic bacteria, though no specific T3SS inhibitor or inducer has yet been identified in R. solanacearum. In this study, a total of 50 different compounds were screened and almost half of them ...

  19. In vitro comparison of laser induced lithotripsy on artificial stones by means of different laser systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, R.; Hecht, V.; Reich, O.; Seitz, M.; Stief, C. G.; Bader, M. J.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: In this study, clinically available pulsed laser systems emitting either in the infrared (IR) - or visible (VIS) spectral region were compared in a standardized manner with respect to their impact on phantom stones in an underwater laboratory set-up. Methods: There were three pulsed laser systems emitting light either in the IR (λ=2100nm: Ho: YAG-laser) or VIS (λ=532nm/1064nm: FREDDY-laser and 598nm: FLPD-laser) spectral range available for this investigation. After determination of the ablation threshold different fragmentation rates were determined in relation to the fluence (depending on pulse energy and fiber diameter) using artificial stones. Results: The threshold value of the laser pulse energy to induce an ablation of artificial stones induced by the different laser systems showed that even the lowest laser settings induced significant ablation with no regards to the repetition rate and fiber diameter. The VIS-lasers showed higher fragmentation rates than the IR-lasers. Conclusions: VIS-lasers are solely useful for laser induced shockwave lithotripsy, while IR-lasers are also in use for other clinical applications (e.g. coagulation and ablation). Investigations on artificial stone fragmentation are useful to compare clinical laser parameter settings but can partially be transferred to clinically urinary stone fragmentation.

  20. A Safeguard System for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Rejuvenated T Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Ando

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs has created promising new avenues for therapies in regenerative medicine. However, the tumorigenic potential of undifferentiated iPSCs is a major safety concern for clinical translation. To address this issue, we demonstrated the efficacy of suicide gene therapy by introducing inducible caspase-9 (iC9 into iPSCs. Activation of iC9 with a specific chemical inducer of dimerization (CID initiates a caspase cascade that eliminates iPSCs and tumors originated from iPSCs. We introduced this iC9/CID safeguard system into a previously reported iPSC-derived, rejuvenated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (rejCTL therapy model and confirmed that we can generate rejCTLs from iPSCs expressing high levels of iC9 without disturbing antigen-specific killing activity. iC9-expressing rejCTLs exert antitumor effects in vivo. The system efficiently and safely induces apoptosis in these rejCTLs. These results unite to suggest that the iC9/CID safeguard system is a promising tool for future iPSC-mediated approaches to clinical therapy.

  1. Regulation of diet-induced adipose tissue and systemic inflammation by salicylates and pioglitazone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Sunny Kim

    Full Text Available It is increasingly accepted that chronic inflammation participates in obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Salicylates and thiazolidinediones (TZDs both have anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperglycemic properties. The present study compared the effects of these drugs on obesity-induced inflammation in adipose tissue (AT and AT macrophages (ATMs, as well as the metabolic and immunological phenotypes of the animal models. Both drugs improved high fat diet (HFD-induced insulin resistance. However, salicylates did not affect AT and ATM inflammation, whereas Pioglitazone improved these parameters. Interestingly, HFD and the drug treatments all modulated systemic inflammation as assessed by changes in circulating immune cell numbers and activation states. HFD increased the numbers of circulating white blood cells, neutrophils, and a pro-inflammatory monocyte subpopulation (Ly6C(hi, whereas salicylates and Pioglitazone normalized these cell numbers. The drug treatments also decreased circulating lymphocyte numbers. These data suggest that obesity induces systemic inflammation by regulating circulating immune cell phenotypes and that anti-diabetic interventions suppress systemic inflammation by normalizing circulating immune phenotypes.

  2. Experimental gingivitis induces systemic inflammatory markers in young healthy individuals: a single-subject interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, Jörg; Grote, Karsten; Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Schieffer, Bernhard; Stiesch, Meike

    2013-01-01

    We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, Pgingivitis. Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/Default.aspx.

  3. Interleukin-6 and lung inflammation: evidence for a causative role in inducing respiratory system resistance increments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that has been shown to be increased in some pathological conditions involving the respiratory system such as those experimentally induced in animals or spontaneously occurring in humans. Experimental data demonstrating that interleukin-6 plays a significant role in commonly occurring respiratory system inflammatory diseases are reviewed here. Those diseases, i.e. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are characterised by mechanical derangements of the respiratory system, for the most part due to increased elastance and airway resistance. Recent findings showing that interleukin-6 has a causative role in determining an increase in airway resistance are reviewed. The end-inflation occlusion method was used to study the mechanical properties of the respiratory system before and after interleukin-6 administration. The cytokine was shown to induce significant, dose-dependent increments in both the resistive pressure dissipation due to frictional forces opposing the airflow in the airway (ohmic resistance) and the additional resistive pressure dissipation due to the visco-elastic properties of the system, i.e. stress relaxation (visco-elastic resistance). There were no alterations in respiratory system elastance. Even when administered to healthy mammals, interleukin-6 determines a significant effect on respiratory system resistance causing an increase in the mechanical work of breathing during inspiration. IL-6 hypothetically plays an active role in the pathogenesis of respiratory system diseases and the mechanisms that may be involved are discussed here.

  4. Quality control systems for aberrant mRNAs induced by aberrant translation elongation and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    RNA processing is an essential gene expression step and plays a crucial role to achieve diversity of gene products in eukaryotes. Various aberrant mRNAs transiently produced during RNA processing reactions are recognized and eliminated by specific quality control systems. It has been demonstrated that these mRNA quality control systems stimulate the degradation of aberrant mRNA to prevent the potentially harmful products derived from aberrant mRNAs. Recent studies on quality control systems induced by abnormal translation elongation and termination have revealed that both aberrant mRNAs and proteins are subjected to rapid degradation. In NonStop Decay (NSD) quality control system, a poly(A) tail of nonstop mRNA is translated and the synthesis of poly-lysine sequence results in translation arrest followed by co-translational degradation of aberrant nonstop protein. In No-Go Decay (NGD) quality control system, the specific amino acid sequences of the nascent polypeptide induce ribosome stalling, and the arrest products are ubiquitinated and rapidly degraded by the proteasome. In Nonfunctional rRNA Decay (NRD) quality control system, aberrant ribosomes composed of nonfunctional ribosomal RNAs are also eliminated when aberrant translation elongation complexes are formed on mRNA. I describe recent progresses on the mechanisms of quality control systems and the relationships between quality control systems. This article is part of a Special issue entitled: RNA Decay mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in rat blood, heart and brain during induced systemic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septelia I. Wanandi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia results in an increased generation of ROS. Until now, little is known about the role of MnSOD - a major endogenous antioxidant enzyme - on the cell adaptation response against hypoxia. The aim of this study was to  determine the MnSOD mRNA expression and levels of specific activity in blood, heart and brain of rats during induced systemic hypoxia.Methods: Twenty-five male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to systemic hypoxia in an hypoxic chamber (at 8-10% O2 for 0, 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. The mRNA relative expression of MnSOD was analyzed using Real Time RT-PCR. MnSOD specific activity was determined using xanthine oxidase inhibition assay.Results: The MnSOD mRNA relative expression in rat blood and heart was decreased during early induced systemic hypoxia (day 1 and increased as hypoxia continued, whereas the mRNA expression in brain was increased since day 1 and reached its maximum level at day 7. The result of MnSOD specific activity during early systemic hypoxia was similar to the mRNA expression. Under very late hypoxic condition (day 21, MnSOD specific activity in blood, heart and brain was significantly decreased. We demonstrate a positive correlation between MnSOD mRNA expression and specific activity in these 3 tissues during day 0-14 of induced systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, mRNA expression and specific activity levels in heart strongly correlate with those in blood.Conclusion: The MnSOD expression at early and late phases of induced systemic hypoxia is distinctly regulated. The MnSOD expression in brain differs from that in blood and heart revealing that brain tissue can  possibly survive better from induced systemic hypoxia than heart and blood. The determination of MnSOD expression in blood can be used to describe its expression in heart under systemic hypoxic condition. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:27-33Keywords: MnSOD, mRNA expression, ROS, specific activity, systemic hypoxia

  6. DNA repair in B. subtilis: an inducible dimer-specific W-reactivation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, P.I.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The W-reactivation system of Bacillus subtilis can repair pyrimidine dimers in bacteriophage DNA. This inducible repair system can be activated by treatment of the bacteria with uv, alkylating agents, cross-linking agents and gamma irradiation. However, bacteriophage treated with agents other than those that cause pyrimidine dimers to be produced was not repaired by this unique form of W-reactivation. In contrast, the W-reactivation system of Escherichia coli can repair a variety of damages placed in the bacteriophage DNA

  7. Reduced GABAergic inhibition in the basolateral amygdala and the development of anxiety-like behaviors after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila P Almeida-Suhett

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major public health concern affecting a large number of athletes and military personnel. Individuals suffering from a TBI risk developing anxiety disorders, yet the pathophysiological alterations that result in the development of anxiety disorders have not yet been identified. One region often damaged by a TBI is the basolateral amygdala (BLA; hyperactivity within the BLA is associated with increased expression of anxiety and fear, yet the functional alterations that lead to BLA hyperexcitability after TBI have not been identified. We assessed the functional alterations in inhibitory synaptic transmission in the BLA and one mechanism that modulates excitatory synaptic transmission, the α7 containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR, after mTBI, to shed light on the mechanisms that contribute to increased anxiety-like behaviors. Seven and 30 days after a mild controlled cortical impact (CCI injury, animals displayed significantly greater anxiety-like behavior. This was associated with a significant loss of GABAergic interneurons and significant reductions in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous and miniature GABAA-receptor mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs. Decreases in the mIPSC amplitude were associated with reduced surface expression of α1, β2, and γ2 GABAA receptor subunits. However, significant increases in the surface expression and current mediated by α7-nAChR, were observed, signifying increases in the excitability of principal neurons within the BLA. These results suggest that mTBI causes not only a significant reduction in inhibition in the BLA, but also an increase in neuronal excitability, which may contribute to hyperexcitability and the development of anxiety disorders.

  8. Morphometric multivariate analysis of GABAergic neurons containing calretinin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, S; Kinukawa, N; Kosaka, T

    2001-05-11

    Several studies reported the morphology of calretinin-positive (CR+) neurons and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) labeled or neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive (nNOS+) neurons in the rodent hippocampus, where these neurons showed similar morphological features. In addition, a previous study reported the frequent colocalization of CR and NADPH-d in the rat hippocampus. In this study, we aimed to examine whether CR+ neurons and nNOS+ neurons belong to a same morphological subpopulation of GABAergic neurons in the mouse hippocampus. Neurons were immunocytochemically classified into three groups, i.e., CR+/nNOS-, CR-/nNOS+ and CR+/nNOS+ groups. The present morphometric analysis was performed in the mouse Ammon's horn, because CR+/nNOS+ neurons were rarely found in the mouse dentate gyrus. We selected three morphometric parameters, i.e., soma area, soma form factor (FF) and number of primary dendrites. Dunnett's post-hoc analysis revealed that soma area, soma FF and number of primary dendrites were significantly larger in CR-/nNOS+ group than in CR+/nNOS- and CR+/nNOS+ groups. The morphometric data of CR+/nNOS+ group were quite similar to those of CR+/nNOS- group. The morphometric multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that these three morphometric parameters were independent significant variables to discriminate between CR+/nNOS- and CR-/nNOS+ groups, and the majority of CR+/nNOS- and CR-/nNOS+ groups were correctly classified from the morphometric features. The present results clearly indicate that CR+/nNOS- neurons and CR-/nNOS+ neurons belong to different morphological subpopulations, and lead us to speculate that they might play different functional roles in the hippocampal circuit. The further application of morphometric multivariate analysis would be valuable to understand the functional roles of chemically defined neurons in the various brain regions.

  9. GABAergic transmission and chloride equilibrium potential are not modulated by pyruvate in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseny S Khakhalin

    Full Text Available In the developing mammalian brain, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is thought to play an excitatory rather than an inhibitory role due to high levels of intracellular Cl(- in immature neurons. This idea, however, has been questioned by recent studies which suggest that glucose-based artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF may be inadequate for experiments on immature and developing brains. These studies suggest that immature neurons may require alternative energy sources, such as lactate or pyruvate. Lack of these other energy sources is thought to result in artificially high intracellular Cl(- concentrations, and therefore a more depolarized GABA receptor (GABAR reversal potential. Since glucose metabolism can vary widely among different species, it is important to test the effects of these alternative energy sources on different experimental preparations. We tested whether pyruvate affects GABAergic transmission in isolated brains of developing wild type Xenopus tadpoles in vitro by recording the responsiveness of tectal neurons to optic nerve stimulation, and by measuring currents evoked by local GABA application in a gramicidin perforated patch configuration. We found that, in contrast with previously reported results, the reversal potential for GABAR-mediated currents does not change significantly between developmental stages 45 and 49. Partial substitution of glucose by pyruvate had only minor effects on both the GABA reversal potential, and the responsiveness of tectal neurons at stages 45 and 49. Total depletion of energy sources from the ACSF did not affect neural responsiveness. We also report a strong spatial gradient in GABA reversal potential, with immature cells adjacent to the lateral and caudal proliferative zones having more positive reversal potentials. We conclude that in this experimental preparation standard glucose-based ACSF is an appropriate extracellular media for in vitro experiments.

  10. Kindling-induced potentiation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to hippocampal dentate granule cells. II. Effects of the NMDA antagonist MK-801.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, G B

    1991-10-18

    The effect of the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist MK-801 on the early development of kindling-induced potentiation was examined in the rabbit hippocampal dentate gyrus. MK-801 (0.5 mg\\/kg) was administered 2 h before each daily kindling stimulation was applied to the perforant path. This treatment continued for the first 10 days of kindling. MK-801 depressed the growth of the afterdischarge duration and suppressed development of behavioral seizures. MK-801 did not block kindling-induced potentiation of either the perforant path-dentate granule cell population spike or excitatory postsynaptic potential. Random impulse train stimulation and non-linear systems analytic techniques were used to examine kindling-induced potentiation of presumed GABAergic recurrent inhibitory circuits. Both the magnitude and duration of kindling-induced response inhibition, to the second of each pair of impulses within the train, were reduced in rabbits pretreated with MK-801. These results suggest that MK-801 differentially affects kindling-induced potentiation of excitatory and inhibitory circuits within the rabbit hippocampal dentate gyrus.

  11. Experimental pathophysiology of systemic alterations induced by Bothrops asper snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, José María; Escalante, Teresa; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2009-12-01

    Moderate and severe envenomations by the snake Bothrops asper provoke systemic alterations, such as systemic bleeding, coagulopathy, hypovolemia, hemodynamic instability and shock, and acute renal failure. Systemic hemorrhage is a typical finding of these envenomations, and is primarily caused by the action of P-III snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). This venom also contains a thrombin-like serine proteinase and a prothrombin-activating P-III SVMP, both of which cause defibrin(ogen)ation. Thrombocytopenia, predominantly induced by a C-type lectin-like protein, and platelet hypoaggregation, caused by the two defibrin(ogen)ating enzymes, also contribute to hemostatic disturbances, which potentiate the systemic bleeding induced by hemorrhagic SVMPs. Cardiovascular disturbances leading to shock are due to the combined effects of hemorrhagic toxins, other venom components that increase vascular permeability, the action of hypotensive agents in the venom and of endogenous mediators, and the potential cardiotoxic effect of some toxins. Renal alterations are likely to be caused by direct cytotoxicity of venom components in the kidney, and by renal ischemia resultant from hypovolemia and hypoperfusion. Lethality induced by B. asper venom is the consequence of several combined effects among which the action of P-III SVMPs is especially relevant.

  12. Laser-induced damage threshold of camera sensors and micro-optoelectromechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Bastian; Ritt, Gunnar; Koerber, Michael; Eberle, Bernd

    2017-03-01

    The continuous development of laser systems toward more compact and efficient devices constitutes an increasing threat to electro-optical imaging sensors, such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices. These types of electronic sensors are used in day-to-day life but also in military or civil security applications. In camera systems dedicated to specific tasks, micro-optoelectromechanical systems, such as a digital micromirror device (DMD), are part of the optical setup. In such systems, the DMD can be located at an intermediate focal plane of the optics and it is also susceptible to laser damage. The goal of our work is to enhance the knowledge of damaging effects on such devices exposed to laser light. The experimental setup for the investigation of laser-induced damage is described in detail. As laser sources, both pulsed lasers and continuous-wave (CW)-lasers are used. The laser-induced damage threshold is determined by the single-shot method by increasing the pulse energy from pulse to pulse or in the case of CW-lasers, by increasing the laser power. Furthermore, we investigate the morphology of laser-induced damage patterns and the dependence of the number of destructive device elements on the laser pulse energy or laser power. In addition to the destruction of single pixels, we observe aftereffects, such as persistent dead columns or rows of pixels in the sensor image.

  13. Laser-induced damage threshold of camera sensors and micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Bastian; Ritt, Gunnar; Körber, Michael; Eberle, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    The continuous development of laser systems towards more compact and efficient devices constitutes an increasing threat to electro-optical imaging sensors such as complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) and charge-coupled devices (CCD). These types of electronic sensors are used in day-to-day life but also in military or civil security applications. In camera systems dedicated to specific tasks, also micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS) like a digital micromirror device (DMD) are part of the optical setup. In such systems, the DMD can be located at an intermediate focal plane of the optics and it is also susceptible to laser damage. The goal of our work is to enhance the knowledge of damaging effects on such devices exposed to laser light. The experimental setup for the investigation of laser-induced damage is described in detail. As laser sources both pulsed lasers and continuous-wave (CW) lasers are used. The laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) is determined by the single-shot method by increasing the pulse energy from pulse to pulse or in the case of CW-lasers, by increasing the laser power. Furthermore, we investigate the morphology of laser-induced damage patterns and the dependence of the number of destructed device elements on the laser pulse energy or laser power. In addition to the destruction of single pixels, we observe aftereffects like persisting dead columns or rows of pixels in the sensor image.

  14. Virgin coconut oil supplementation ameliorates cyclophosphamide-induced systemic toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, S S; Manalil, J J; Ramavarma, S K; Suseela, I M; Thekkepatt, A; Raghavamenon, A C

    2016-02-01

    Virgin coconut oil (VCO) is an unrefined kernal oil, prepared from Cocos nucifera L., having substantial nutritional and medicinal value. Experimental studies have suggested its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulatory and hypolipidemic effects. The present study assesses its effect on formalin-induced chronic inflammation and cyclophosphamide (CTX)-induced systemic toxicity in murine models. Oral administration of VCO effectively reduced formalin-induced paw oedema in mice with more or less similar efficacy as that of diclofenac. The CTX-induced hike in blood urea, creatinine, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and liver marker enzymes in mice was marginally decreased by VCO (8 g/kg body weight) ingestion orally. The liver and kidney catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities, together with cellular glutathione and TBARS levels, were found to be improved in these animals. Overall the study reveals the protective efficacy of VCO against secondary toxicity induced by CTX possibly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Systemic resistance to gray mold induced in tomato by benzothiadiazole and Trichoderma harzianum T39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Yael Meller; Mehari, Zeraye Haile; Rav-David, Dalia; Elad, Yigal

    2014-02-01

    Gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is an important disease of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). This study examined defense-related gene expression involved in the resistance to B. cinerea that is induced in tomato plants by benzothiadiazole and Trichoderma harzianum T39 soil drench. In whole plants, transcriptional changes related to salicylic acid and ethylene were induced by the application of a 0.01% benzothiadiazole solution, whereas changes related to jasmonic acid were induced by the application of a 0.4% T39 suspension. On detached leaves, soil treatment by T39 led to enhanced resistance to B. cinerea infection that was proportional to the concentration of the T39 suspension. By 5 days after pathogen inoculation, the plants that had received the 0.04% T39 drench exhibited 62% less severe disease than the untreated plants. The 0.4% T39 drench led to an 84% reduction in disease severity. Observations of B. cinerea infection in leaves harvested from plants grown in the treated soils revealed that drenching with a T39 suspension induces systemic resistance against B. cinerea and primes salicylic acid- and ethylene-related gene expression in a manner proportional to the concentration of the biocontrol agent. Benzothiadiazole treatment induced resistance to gray mold independently of salicylic acid and led to strong priming of two genes known to be involved in defense against B. cinerea, Pti5 and PI2.

  16. Behavioral training reverses global cortical network dysfunction induced by perinatal antidepressant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Lu, Jordan Y-F; Darling, Ryan D; Simpson, Kimberly L; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Wang, Fang; Yu, Liping; Sun, Xinde; Merzenich, Michael M; Lin, Rick C S

    2015-02-17

    Abnormal cortical circuitry and function as well as distortions in the modulatory neurological processes controlling cortical plasticity have been argued to underlie the origin of autism. Here, we chemically distorted those processes using an antidepressant drug-exposure model to generate developmental neurological distortions like those characteristics expressed in autism, and then intensively trained altered young rodents to evaluate the potential for neuroplasticity-driven renormalization. We found that young rats that were injected s.c. with the antidepressant citalopram from postnatal d 1-10 displayed impaired neuronal repetition-rate following capacity in the primary auditory cortex (A1). With a focus on recovering grossly degraded auditory system processing in this model, we showed that targeted temporal processing deficits induced by early-life antidepressant exposure within the A1 were almost completely reversed through implementation of a simple behavioral training strategy (i.e., a modified go/no-go repetition-rate discrimination task). Degraded parvalbumin inhibitory GABAergic neurons and the fast inhibitory actions that they control were also renormalized by training. Importantly, antidepressant-induced degradation of serotonergic and dopaminergic neuromodulatory systems regulating cortical neuroplasticity was sharply reversed. These findings bear important implications for neuroplasticity-based therapeutics in autistic patients.

  17. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Systemic Bone Loss in Collagen-Induced Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Manasa G; Kour, Supinder; Piprode, Vikrant; Mittal, Monika; Kumar, Anil; Rani, Lekha; Pote, Satish T; Mishra, Gyan C; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammatory synovitis leading to joint destruction and systemic bone loss. The inflammation-induced bone loss is mediated by increased osteoclast formation and function. Current antirheumatic therapies primarily target suppression of inflammatory cascade with limited or no success in controlling progression of bone destruction. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by virtue of their tissue repair and immunomodulatory properties have shown promising results in various autoimmune and degenerative diseases. However, the role of MSCs in prevention of bone destruction in RA is not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) on in vitro formation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and pathological bone loss in the mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model of RA. We observed that ASCs significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in both a contact-dependent and -independent manner. Additionally, ASCs inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-17, and IL-1β. Furthermore, treatment with ASCs at the onset of CIA significantly reduced clinical symptoms and joint pathology. Interestingly, ASCs protected periarticular and systemic bone loss in CIA mice by maintaining trabecular bone structure. We further observed that treatment with ASCs reduced osteoclast precursors in bone marrow, resulting in decreased osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, ASCs suppressed autoimmune T cell responses and increased the percentages of peripheral regulatory T and B cells. Thus, we provide strong evidence that ASCs ameliorate inflammation-induced systemic bone loss in CIA mice by reducing osteoclast precursors and promoting immune tolerance. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Urtica dioica leaves modulates muscarinic cholinergic system in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder and has been associated with cognitive dysfunction. In our earlier study, chronic Urtica dioica (UD) treatment significantly ameliorated diabetes induced associative and spatial memory deficit in mice. The present study was designed to explore the effect of UD leaves extract on muscarinic cholinergic system, which has long been known to be involved in cognition. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p., consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by treatment with UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, oral) for 8 weeks. STZ-induced diabetic mice showed significant reduction in hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1 and choline acetyltransferase expressions. Chronic diabetes significantly up-regulated the protein expression of acetylcholinesterase associated with oxidative stress in hippocampus. Besides, STZ-induced diabetic mice showed hypolocomotion with up-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. Chronic UD treatment significantly attenuated the cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. UD had no effect on locomotor activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. In conclusion, UD leaves extract has potential to reverse diabetes mediated alteration in muscarinic cholinergic system in hippocampus and thereby improve memory functions.

  19. Generation of a Drug-inducible Reporter System to Study Cell Reprogramming in Human Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sergio; Panopoulos, Athanasia D.; Montserrat, Nuria; Multon, Marie-Christine; Daury, Aurélie; Rocher, Corinne; Spanakis, Emmanuel; Batchelder, Erika M.; Orsini, Cécile; Deleuze, Jean-François; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells is achieved by the expression of defined transcription factors. In the last few years, reprogramming strategies on the basis of doxycycline-inducible lentiviruses in mouse cells became highly powerful for screening purposes when the expression of a GFP gene, driven by the reactivation of endogenous stem cell specific promoters, was used as a reprogramming reporter signal. However, similar reporter systems in human cells have not been generated. Here, we describe the derivation of drug-inducible human fibroblast-like cell lines that express different subsets of reprogramming factors containing a GFP gene under the expression of the endogenous OCT4 promoter. These cell lines can be used to screen functional substitutes for reprogramming factors or modifiers of reprogramming efficiency. As a proof of principle of this system, we performed a screening of a library of pluripotent-enriched microRNAs and identified hsa-miR-519a as a novel inducer of reprogramming efficiency. PMID:23019325

  20. Carnosine reverses the aging-induced down regulation of brain regional serotonergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Ghosh, Tushar K; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the role of carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide biomolecule, on brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) serotonergic system during aging. Results showed an aging-induced brain region specific significant (a) increase in Trp (except cerebral cortex) and their 5-HIAA steady state level with an increase in their 5-HIAA accumulation and declination, (b) decrease in their both 5-HT steady state level and 5-HT accumulation (except cerebral cortex). A significant decrease in brain regional 5-HT/Trp ratio (except cerebral cortex) and increase in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio were also observed during aging. Carnosine at lower dosages (0.5-1.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) didn't produce any significant response in any of the brain regions, but higher dosages (2.0-2.5μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) showed a significant response on those aging-induced brain regional serotonergic parameters. The treatment with carnosine (2.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days), attenuated these brain regional aging-induced serotonergic parameters and restored towards their basal levels that observed in 4 months young control rats. These results suggest that carnosine attenuates and restores the aging-induced brain regional down regulation of serotonergic system towards that observed in young rats' brain regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute resistance exercise induces antinociception by activation of the endocannabinoid system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago; Silva, José Felippe Pinho da; Aguiar, Daniele; Paula, Ana Maria de; Cruz, Jader; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea

    2014-09-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is also known as strength training, and it is performed to increase the strength and mass of muscles, bone strength, and metabolism. RE has been increasingly prescribed for pain relief. However, the endogenous mechanisms underlying this antinociceptive effect are still largely unexplored. Thus, we investigated the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in RE-induced antinociception. Male Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by a mechanical nociceptive test (paw pressure) before and after exercise. To investigate the involvement of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoids in RE-induced antinociception, cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists, endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors, and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor were injected before RE. After RE, CB1 cannabinoid receptors were quantified in rat brain tissue by Western blot and immunofluorescence. In addition, endocannabinoid plasma levels were measured by isotope dilution-liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. RE-induced antinociception was prevented by preinjection with CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists. By contrast, preadministration of metabolizing enzyme inhibitors and the anandamide reuptake inhibitor prolonged and enhanced this effect. RE also produced an increase in the expression and activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in rat brain tissue and in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral periaqueductal regions and an increase in endocannabinoid plasma levels. The present study suggests that a single session of RE activates the endocannabinoid system to induce antinociception.

  2. 5-HT1A receptor blockade reverses GABA(A) receptor alpha(3) subunit-mediated anxiolytic effects on stress-induced hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinkers, Christiaan H.; van Oorschot, Ruud; Korte, S. Mechiel; Olivier, Berend; Groenink, Lucianne

    Stress-related disorders are associated with dysfunction of both serotonergic and GABAergic pathways, and clinically effective anxiolytics act via both neurotransmitter systems. As there is evidence that the GABA(A) and the serotonin receptor system interact, a serotonergic component in the

  3. Differentiation and functional incorporation of embryonic stem cell-derived GABAergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus of mice with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisano, Xu; Litvina, Elizabeth; Tagliatela, Stephanie; Aaron, Gloster B; Grabel, Laura B; Naegele, Janice R

    2012-01-04

    Cell therapies for neurological disorders require an extensive knowledge of disease-associated neuropathology and procedures for generating neurons for transplantation. In many patients with severe acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the dentate gyrus exhibits sclerosis and GABAergic interneuron degeneration. Mounting evidence suggests that therapeutic benefits can be obtained by transplanting fetal GABAergic progenitors into the dentate gyrus in rodents with TLE, but the scarcity of human fetal cells limits applicability in patient populations. In contrast, virtually limitless quantities of neural progenitors can be obtained from embryonic stem (ES) cells. ES cell-based therapies for neurological repair in TLE require evidence that the transplanted neurons integrate functionally and replace cell types that degenerate. To address these issues, we transplanted mouse ES cell-derived neural progenitors (ESNPs) with ventral forebrain identities into the hilus of the dentate gyrus of mice with TLE and evaluated graft differentiation, mossy fiber sprouting, cellular morphology, and electrophysiological properties of the transplanted neurons. In addition, we compared electrophysiological properties of the transplanted neurons with endogenous hilar interneurons in mice without TLE. The majority of transplanted ESNPs differentiated into GABAergic interneuron subtypes expressing calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, or calretinin. Global suppression of mossy fiber sprouting was not observed; however, ESNP-derived neurons formed dense axonal arborizations in the inner molecular layer and throughout the hilus. Whole-cell hippocampal slice electrophysiological recordings and morphological analyses of the transplanted neurons identified five basic types; most with strong after-hyperpolarizations and smooth or sparsely spiny dendritic morphologies resembling endogenous hippocampal interneurons. Moreover, intracellular recordings of spontaneous EPSCs indicated that

  4. DNA-methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) binding to CpG rich GABAergic and BDNF promoters is increased in the brain of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, E; Ruzicka, W B; Grayson, D R; Guidotti, A

    2015-09-01

    The down regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase67 (GAD1), reelin (RELN), and BDNF expression in brain of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP) disorder patients is associated with overexpression of DNA methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) and ten-eleven translocase methylcytosine dioxygenase1 (TET1). DNMT1 and TET1 belong to families of enzymes that methylate and hydroxymethylate cytosines located proximal to and within cytosine phosphodiester guanine (CpG) islands of many gene promoters, respectively. Altered promoter methylation may be one mechanism underlying the down-regulation of GABAergic and glutamatergic gene expression. However, recent reports suggest that both DNMT1 and TET1 directly bind to unmethylated CpG rich promoters through their respective Zinc Finger (ZF-CXXC) domains. We report here, that the binding of DNMT1 to GABAergic (GAD1, RELN) and glutamatergic (BDNF-IX) promoters is increased in SZ and BP disorder patients and this increase does not necessarily correlate with enrichment in promoter methylation. The increased DNMT1 binding to these promoter regions is detected in the cortex but not in the cerebellum of SZ and BP disorder patients, suggesting a brain region and neuron specific dependent mechanism. Increased binding of DNMT1 positively correlates with increased expression of DNMT1 and with increased binding of MBD2. In contrast, the binding of TET1 to RELN, GAD1 and BDNF-IX promoters failed to change. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the down-regulation of specific GABAergic and glutamatergic genes in SZ and BP disorder patients may be mediated, at least in part, by a brain region specific and neuronal-activity dependent DNMT1 action that is likely independent of its DNA methylation activity. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Contribution of synchronized GABAergic neurons to dopaminergic neuron firing and bursting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Ekaterina O; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Zakharov, Denis; di Volo, Matteo; Gutkin, Boris; Lapish, Christopher C; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), interactions between dopamine (DA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons are critical for regulating DA neuron activity and thus DA efflux. To provide a mechanistic explanation of how GABA neurons influence DA neuron firing, we developed a circuit model of the VTA. The model is based on feed-forward inhibition and recreates canonical features of the VTA neurons. Simulations revealed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABAR) stimulation can differentially influence the firing pattern of the DA neuron, depending on the level of synchronization among GABA neurons. Asynchronous activity of GABA neurons provides a constant level of inhibition to the DA neuron and, when removed, produces a classical disinhibition burst. In contrast, when GABA neurons are synchronized by common synaptic input, their influence evokes additional spikes in the DA neuron, resulting in increased measures of firing and bursting. Distinct from previous mechanisms, the increases were not based on lowered firing rate of the GABA neurons or weaker hyperpolarization by the GABAR synaptic current. This phenomenon was induced by GABA-mediated hyperpolarization of the DA neuron that leads to decreases in intracellular calcium (Ca 2+ ) concentration, thus reducing the Ca 2+ -dependent potassium (K + ) current. In this way, the GABA-mediated hyperpolarization replaces Ca 2+ -dependent K + current; however, this inhibition is pulsatile, which allows the DA neuron to fire during the rhythmic pauses in inhibition. Our results emphasize the importance of inhibition in the VTA, which has been discussed in many studies, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby computations can occur locally. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Nanoscale Molecular Reorganization of the Inhibitory Postsynaptic Density Is a Determinant of GABAergic Synaptic Potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchietti, Francesca; Vascon, Sebastiano; Nieus, Thierry; Rosillo, Christian; Das, Sabyasachi; Tyagarajan, Shiva K; Diaspro, Alberto; Del Bue, Alessio; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Barberis, Andrea; Cella Zanacchi, Francesca

    2017-02-15

    Gephyrin is a key scaffold protein mediating the anchoring of GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses. Here, we exploited superresolution techniques combined with proximity-based clustering analysis and model simulations to investigate the single-molecule gephyrin reorganization during plasticity of inhibitory synapses in mouse hippocampal cultured neurons. This approach revealed that, during the expression of inhibitory LTP, the increase of gephyrin density at postsynaptic sites is associated with the promoted formation of gephyrin nanodomains. We demonstrate that the gephyrin rearrangement in nanodomains stabilizes the amplitude of postsynaptic currents, indicating that, in addition to the number of synaptic GABAA receptors, the nanoscale distribution of GABAA receptors in the postsynaptic area is a crucial determinant for the expression of inhibitory synaptic plasticity. In addition, the methodology implemented here clears the way to the application of the graph-based theory to single-molecule data for the description and quantification of the spatial organization of the synapse at the single-molecule level. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The mechanisms of inhibitory synaptic plasticity are poorly understood, mainly because the size of the synapse is below the diffraction limit, thus reducing the effectiveness of conventional optical and imaging techniques. Here, we exploited superresolution approaches combined with clustering analysis to study at unprecedented resolution the distribution of the inhibitory scaffold protein gephyrin in response to protocols inducing LTP of inhibitory synaptic responses (iLTP). We found that, during the expression of iLTP, the increase of synaptic gephyrin is associated with the fragmentation of gephyrin in subsynaptic nanodomains. We demonstrate that such synaptic gephyrin nanodomains stabilize the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic responses, thus identifying the nanoscale gephyrin rearrangement as a key determinant for inhibitory

  7. Relationships linking emotional, motor, cognitive and GABAergic dysfunctions in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillend, Cyrille; Chaussenot, Rémi

    2017-03-15

    Alterations in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene have been associated with enhanced stress reactivity in vertebrate species, suggesting a role for brain dystrophin in fear-related behavioral and cognitive processes. Because the loss of dystrophin (Dp427) reduces clustering of central γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, it is suspected that local inhibitory tuning and modulation of neuronal excitability are perturbed in a distributed brain circuit that normally controls such critical behavioral functions. In this study, we undertook a large-scale behavioral study to evaluate fear-related behavioral disturbances in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. We first characterized the behavioral determinants of the enhanced fearfulness displayed by mdx mice following mild acute stress and its association with increased anxiety and altered fear memories. We further demonstrated that this enhanced fearfulness induces long-lasting motor inhibition, suggesting that neurobehavioral dysfunctions significantly influence motor outcome measures in this model. We also found that mdx mice are more sensitive to the sedative and hypnotic effects of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol hydrochlorid (THIP), a selective pharmacological activator of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors involved in central tonic inhibition. Our results highlight that information on the emotional aspects of mdx mice are important to better understand the bases of intellectual and neuropsychiatric defects in DMD and to better define valuable functional readouts for preclinical studies. Our data also support the hypothesis that altered spatial localization of GABAA receptors due to Dp427 loss is a pathological mechanism associated with brain dysfunction in DMD, suggesting that extrasynaptic GABAA receptors might be candidate targets for future therapeutic developments. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Spike timing of distinct types of GABAergic interneuron during hippocampal gamma oscillations in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájos, Norbert; Pálhalmi, János; Mann, Edward O; Németh, Beáta; Paulsen, Ole; Freund, Tamas F

    2004-10-13

    Gamma frequency (30-100 Hz) network oscillations occur in the intact hippocampus during awake, attentive behavior. Here, we explored the underlying cellular mechanisms in an in vitro model of persistent gamma-frequency oscillations, induced by bath application of 20 microm carbachol in submerged hippocampal slices at 30 +/- 1 degrees C. Current-source density analysis of the field oscillation revealed a prominent alternating sink-source pair in the perisomatic and apical dendritic regions of CA3. To elucidate the active events generating these extracellular dipoles, we examined the firing properties of distinct neuron types. Visually guided unit recordings were obtained from individual CA3 neurons followed by intracellular labeling for anatomical identification. Pyramidal cells fired at 2.82 +/- 0.7 Hz, close to the negative peak of the oscillation (0.03 +/- 0.65 msec), and often in conjunction with a negative spike-like component of the field potential. In contrast, all phase-coupled interneurons fired after this negative peak. Perisomatic inhibitory interneurons fired at high frequency (18.1 +/- 2.7 Hz), shortly after the negative peak (1.97 +/- 0.95 msec) and were strongly phase-coupled. Dendritic inhibitory interneurons fired at lower frequency (8.4 +/- 2.4 Hz) and with less fidelity and a longer delay after the negative peak (4.3 +/- 1.1 msec), whereas interneurons with cell body in the stratum radiatum often showed no phase relationship with the field oscillation. The phase and spike time data of individual neurons, together with the current-source density analysis, support a synaptic feedback model of gamma oscillations primarily involving pyramidal cells and inhibitory cells targeting their perisomatic region.

  9. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla contribute to neurogenic hypertension induced by systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kay LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to systemic inflammation, neuroinflammation in the brain, which enhances sympathetic drive, plays a significant role in cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM that augments sympathetic outflow to blood vessels is involved in neural mechanism of hypertension. We investigated whether neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in RVLM contribute to hypertension following chronic systemic inflammation. Methods In normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats, systemic inflammation was induced by infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the peritoneal cavity via an osmotic minipump. Systemic arterial pressure and heart rate were measured under conscious conditions by the non-invasive tail-cuff method. The level of the inflammatory markers in plasma or RVLM was analyzed by ELISA. Protein expression was evaluated by Western blot or immunohistochemistry. Tissue level of superoxide anion (O2·- in RVLM was determined using the oxidation-sensitive fluorescent probe dihydroethidium. Pharmacological agents were delivered either via infusion into the cisterna magna with an osmotic minipump or microinjection bilaterally into RVLM. Results Intraperitoneal infusion of LPS (1.2 mg/kg/day for 14 days promoted sustained hypertension and induced a significant increase in plasma level of C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, or interleukin-1β (IL-1β. This LPS-induced systemic inflammation was accompanied by activation of microglia, augmentation of IL-1β, IL-6, or TNF-α protein expression, and O2·- production in RVLM, all of which were blunted by intracisternal infusion of a cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor, NS398; an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline; or a cytokine synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline. Neuroinflammation in RVLM was also associated with a COX-2-dependent downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and an

  10. Methamphetamine-induced changes in the mice hippocampal neuropeptide Y system: implications for memory impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, J; Baptista, S; Olesen, MV

    2012-01-01

    , being involved in learning and memory processing. It has been demonstrated that METH induces significant alteration in mice striatal NPY, Y(1) and Y(2) receptor mRNA levels. However, the impact of this drug on the hippocampal NPY system and its consequences remain unknown. Thus, in this study, we...... investigated the effect of METH intoxication on mouse hippocampal NPY levels, NPY receptors function, and memory performance. Results show that METH increased NPY, Y(2) and Y(5) receptor mRNA levels, as well as total NPY binding accounted by opposite up- and down-regulation of Y(2) and Y(1) functional binding......, respectively. Moreover, METH-induced impairment in memory performance and AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway were both prevented by the Y(2) receptor antagonist, BIIE0246. These findings demonstrate that METH interferes with the hippocampal NPY system, which seems to be associated with memory failure...

  11. A factor analysis of global GABAergic gene expression in human brain identifies specificity in response to chronic alcohol and cocaine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Baghal, Basel; Yuan, Qiaoping; Goldman, David

    2013-01-01

    Although expression patterns of GABAergic genes in rodent brain have largely been elucidated, no comprehensive studies have been performed in human brain. The purpose of this study was to identify global patterns of GABAergic gene expression in healthy adults, including trans and cis effects in the GABAA gene clusters, before determining the effects of chronic alcohol and cocaine exposure on gene expression in the hippocampus. RNA-Seq data from 'BrainSpan' was obtained across 16 brain regions from postmortem samples from nine adults. A factor analysis was performed on global expression of 21 GABAergic pathway genes. Factor specificity for response to chronic alcohol/cocaine exposure was subsequently determined from the analysis of RNA-Seq data from postmortem hippocampus of eight alcoholics, eight cocaine addicts and eight controls. Six gene expression factors were identified. Most genes loaded (≥0.5) onto one factor; six genes loaded onto two. The largest factor (0.30 variance) included the chromosome 5 gene cluster that encodes the most common GABAA receptor, α1β2γ2, and genes encoding the α3β3γ2 receptor. Genes within this factor were largely unresponsive to chronic alcohol/cocaine exposure. In contrast, the chromosome 4 gene cluster factor (0.14 variance) encoding the α2β1γ1 receptor was influenced by chronic alcohol/cocaine exposure. Two other factors (0.17 and 0.06 variance) showed expression changes in alcoholics/cocaine addicts; these factors included genes involved in GABA synthesis and synaptic transport. Finally there were two factors that included genes with exceptionally low (0.10 variance) and high (0.09 variance) expression in the cerebellum; the former factor was unaffected by alcohol/cocaine exposure. This study has shown that there appears to be specificity of GABAergic gene groups, defined by covariation in expression, for response to chronic alcohol/cocaine exposure. These findings might have implications for combating stress

  12. The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate antiporter, system x (c) (-) : cystine supplier and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Marcus; Sato, Hideyo

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate exchange system, system x (c) (-) , transports one molecule of cystine, the oxidized form of cysteine, into cells and thereby releases one molecule of glutamate into the extracellular space. It consists of two protein components, the 4F2 heavy chain, necessary for membrane location of the heterodimer, and the xCT protein, responsible for transport activity. Previously, system x (c) (-) has been regarded to be a mere supplier of cysteine to cells for the synthesis of proteins and the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). In that sense, oxygen, electrophilic agents, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide trigger xCT expression to accommodate with increased oxidative stress by stimulating GSH biosynthesis. However, emerging evidence established that system x (c) (-) may act on its own as a GSH-independent redox system by sustaining a redox cycle over the plasma membrane. Hallmarks of this cycle are cystine uptake, intracellular reduction to cysteine and secretion of the surplus of cysteine into the extracellular space. Consequently, increased levels of extracellular cysteine provide a reducing microenvironment required for proper cell signaling and communication, e.g. as already shown for the mechanism of T cell activation. By contrast, the enhanced release of glutamate in exchange with cystine may trigger neurodegeneration due to glutamate-induced cytotoxic processes. This review aims to provide a comprehensive picture from the early days of system x (c) (-) research up to now.

  13. Current-induced magnetoresistance oscillations in two-dimensional electron systems

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, X. L.

    2006-01-01

    Electric current-induced magnetoresistance oscillations recently discovered in two-dimensional electron systems are analyzed using a microscopic scheme for nonlinear magnetotransport direct controlled by the current. The magnetoresistance oscillations are shown to result from drift-motion assisted electron scatterings between Landau levels. The theoretical predictions not only reproduce all the main features observed in the experiments but also disclose other details of the phenomenon.

  14. Apparatus and Method for Elimination of Polarization-Induced Fading in Fiber-optic Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Parker, Jr., Allen R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method of eliminating polarization-induced fading in interferometric fiber-optic sensor system having a wavelength-swept laser optical signal. The interferometric return signal from the sensor arms are combined and provided to a multi-optical path detector assembly and ultimately to a data acquisition and processing unit by way of a switch that is time synchronized with the laser scan sweep cycle.

  15. Construction and application of an inducible system for homogenous expression levels in bulk cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yu

    Full Text Available Stringently controlled conditional expressing systems are crucial for the functional characterization of genes. Currently, screening of multiple clones to identify the tightly controlled ones is necessary but time-consuming. Here, we describe a system fusing Tet (tetracycline-inducible elements, BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome and Gateway technology together to allow tight control of gene expression in BAC-transfected eukaryotic bulk cell cultures. Recombinase cloning into the shuttle vector and the BAC facilitates vector construction. An EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein allows FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting and the BAC technology ensures tight control of gene expression that is independent of the integrating site. In the current first application, our gene of interest encodes a beta-catenin-ERalpha fusion protein. Tested by luciferase assay and western blotting, in HTB56 lung cancer cells the final BAC E11-IGR-beta-catenin-ERalpha vector demonstrated sensitive inducibility by Tet or Dox (doxycycline in a dose-dependent manner with low background, and the EGFP was an effective selection marker by FACS in bulk culture HTB56 and myeloblastic 32D cells. This is a highly efficient tool for the rapid generation of stringently controlled Tet-inducible systems in cell lines.

  16. Application of an inducible system to engineer unmarked conditional mutants of essential genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yuji; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Tomida, Junko; Tokuda, Hajime; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2010-09-01

    The Phi CTX-based integration vector pYM101 harboring a tightly controlled modified phage T7 early gene promoter/LacI(q) repressor (T7/LacI) system was constructed for the generation of unmarked conditional mutants in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Promoter activity of the T7/LacI system was demonstrated to be dependent on the presence of the inducer isopropyl -beta-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), as evaluated by measuring beta-galactosidase activity. In the absence of the inducer, the promoter was silent as its activity was lower than those of a promoter-less lacZ control. Unmarked conditional mutants of four predicted essential genes (lolCDE (PA2988-86), lpxC (PA4406), rho (PA5239), and def (PA0019)) were successfully constructed using this recombination system. In the absence of IPTG, the growth of all mutants was repressed; however, the addition of either 0.1 or 1mM IPTG restored growth rates to levels nearly identical to wild-type cells. It was therefore demonstrated that the inducible integration vector pYM101 is suitable for the creation of unmarked conditional mutants of P. aeruginosa, and is particularly useful for examining the function of essential genes. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of the bacterial mismatch repair system in SOS-induced mutagenesis: a theoretical background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.; Kapralov, M.I.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Sweilam, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical study is performed of the possible role of the methyl-directed mismatch repair system in the ultraviolet-induced mutagenesis of Escherichia coli bacterial cells. For this purpose, a mathematical model of the bacterial mismatch repair system is developed. Within this model, the key pathways of this type of repair are simulated on the basis of modern experimental data related to its mechanisms. Here we have modelled in detail five main pathways of DNA misincorporation removal with different DNA exonucleases. Using our calculations, we have tested the hypothesis that the bacterial mismatch repair system is responsible for the removal of the nucleotides misincorporated by DNA polymerase V (the UmuD' 2 C complex) during ultraviolet-induced SOS response. For the theoretical analysis of the mutation frequency, we have combined the proposed mathematical approach with the model of SOS-induced mutagenesis in the E.coli bacterial cell developed earlier. Our calculations support the hypothesis that methyl-directed mismatch repair influences the mutagenic effect of ultraviolet radiation

  18. The endocannabinoid system mediates aerobic exercise-induced antinociception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago R L; Silva, José Felipe P; Aguiar, Daniele C; de Paula, Ana Maria; Cruz, Jader S; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor D; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea C

    2014-02-01

    Exercise-induced antinociception is widely described in the literature, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are poorly understood. Systemic (s.c.) and central (i.t., i.c.v.) pretreatment with CB₁ and CB₂ cannabinoid receptor antagonists (AM251 and AM630) blocked the antinociception induced by an aerobic exercise (AE) protocol in both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests. Western blot analysis revealed an increase and activation of CB₁ receptors in the rat brain, and immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated an increase of activation and expression of CB₁ receptors in neurons of the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) after exercise. Additionally, pretreatment (s.c., i.t. and i.c.v.) with endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors (MAFP and JZL184) and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor (VDM11) prolonged and intensified this antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that exercise could activate the endocannabinoid system, producing antinociception. Supporting this hypothesis, liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry measurements demonstrated that plasma levels of endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and of anandamide-related mediators (palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide) were increased after AE. Therefore, these results suggest that the endocannabinoid system mediates aerobic exercise-induced antinociception at peripheral and central levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Endogenous interleukin (IL)-17A promotes pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity and lupus nephritis induced by pristane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, S A; Odobasic, D; Khouri, M B; Steinmetz, O M; Yang, Y; Holdsworth, S R; Kitching, A R

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is increased both in serum and in kidney biopsies from patients with lupus nephritis, but direct evidence of pathogenicity is less well established. Administration of pristane to genetically intact mice results in the production of autoantibodies and proliferative glomerulonephritis, resembling human lupus nephritis. These studies sought to define the role of IL-17A in experimental lupus induced by pristane administration. Pristane was administered to wild-type (WT) and IL-17A(-/-) mice. Local and systemic immune responses were assessed after 6 days and 8 weeks, and autoimmunity, glomerular inflammation and renal injury were measured at 7 months. IL-17A production increased significantly 6 days after pristane injection, with innate immune cells, neutrophils (Ly6G(+)) and macrophages (F4/80(+)) being the predominant source of IL-17A. After 8 weeks, while systemic IL-17A was still readily detected in WT mice, the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) were diminished in the absence of endogenous IL-17A. Seven months after pristane treatment humoral autoimmunity was diminished in the absence of IL-17A, with decreased levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Renal inflammation and injury was less in the absence of IL-17A. Compared to WT mice, glomerular IgG, complement deposition, glomerular CD4(+) T cells and intrarenal expression of T helper type 1 (Th1)-associated proinflammatory mediators were decreased in IL-17A(-/-) mice. WT mice developed progressive proteinuria, but functional and histological renal injury was attenuated in the absence of IL-17A. Therefore, IL-17A is required for the full development of autoimmunity and lupus nephritis in experimental SLE, and early in the development of autoimmunity, innate immune cells produce IL-17A. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor signalling mechanisms in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, A; O'Connor, J J

    2013-08-01

    In the CNS, neurones are highly sensitive to the availability of oxygen. In conditions where oxygen availability is decreased, neuronal function can be altered, leading to injury and cell death. Hypoxia has been implicated in a number of central nervous system pathologies including stroke, head trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. Cellular responses to oxygen deprivation are complex and result in activation of short- and long-term mechanisms to conserve energy and protect cells. Failure of synaptic transmission can be observed within minutes following this hypoxia. The acute effects of hypoxia on synaptic transmission are primarily mediated by altering ion fluxes across membranes, pre-synaptic effects of adenosine and other actions at glutamatergic receptors. A more long-term feature of the response of neurones to hypoxia is the activation of transcription factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor. The activation of hypoxia-inducible factor is governed by a family of dioxygenases called hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl 4 hydroxylases (PHDs). Under hypoxic conditions, PHD activity is inhibited, thereby allowing hypoxia-inducible factor to accumulate and translocate to the nucleus, where it binds to the hypoxia-responsive element sequences of target gene promoters. Inhibition of PHD activity stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor and other proteins thus acting as a neuroprotective agent. This review will focus on the response of neuronal cells to hypoxia-inducible factor and its targets, including the prolyl hydroxylases. We also present evidence for acute effects of PHD inhibition on synaptic transmission and plasticity in the hippocampus. © 2013 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Dopaminergic receptor agents and the basal ganglia : pharmacological properties and interactions with the GABA-ergic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Wigerline

    1992-01-01

    In the present series of studies, attention was focussed particularly on dopaminergic D2 receptor compounds, with emphasis on the enantiomers of the potent and selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist N-0437. Drugs that display activity at D2 receptors are of great interest as potentially new

  2. Glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific, long-term expression in neocortical neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors containing the phosphate-activated glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter-1, or glutamic acid decarboxylase promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Szabo, Gabor; Curthoys, Norman P; Geller, Alfred I

    2007-05-04

    Many potential uses of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to one of the two major types of forebrain neurons, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop virus vectors that contain either a glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific promoter. The brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the product of the GLS1 gene, produces the majority of the glutamate for release as neurotransmitter, and is a marker for glutamatergic neurons. A PAG promoter was partially characterized using a cultured kidney cell line. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are expressed in distinct populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) produces GABA; the two molecular forms of the enzyme, GAD65 and GAD67, are expressed in distinct, but largely overlapping, groups of neurons, and GAD67 is the predominant form in the neocortex. In transgenic mice, an approximately 9 kb fragment of the GAD67 promoter supports expression in most classes of GABAergic neurons. Here, we constructed plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors that placed the Lac Z gene under the regulation of putative PAG, VGLUT1, or GAD67 promoters. Helper virus-free vector stocks were delivered into postrhinal cortex, and the rats were sacrificed 4 days or 2 months later. The PAG or VGLUT1 promoters supported approximately 90% glutamatergic neuron-specific expression. The GAD67 promoter supported approximately 90% GABAergic neuron-specific expression. Long-term expression was observed using each promoter. Principles for obtaining long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors, based on these and other results, are discussed. Long-term glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific expression may benefit specific experiments on learning or specific gene therapy approaches. Of note, promoter analyses might identify regulatory elements that determine

  3. Modeling the induced mutation process in bacterial cells with defects in excision repair system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugay, A. N.; Vasilyeva, M. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Parkhomenko, A. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    A mathematical model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli cells with defects in the uvrA and polA genes has been developed. The model describes in detail the reaction kinetics for the exci