WorldWideScience

Sample records for future power infrastructure

  1. Next generation information communication infrastructure and case studies for future power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bin

    As power industry enters the new century, powerful driving forces, uncertainties and new functions are compelling electric utilities to make dramatic changes in their information communication infrastructure. Expanding network services such as real time measurement and monitoring are also driving the need for more bandwidth in the communication network. These needs will grow further as new remote real-time protection and control applications become more feasible and pervasive. This dissertation addresses two main issues for the future power system information infrastructure: communication network infrastructure and associated power system applications. Optical networks no doubt will become the predominant data transmission media for next generation power system communication. The rapid development of fiber optic network technology poses new challenges in the areas of topology design, network management and real time applications. Based on advanced fiber optic technologies, an all-fiber network is investigated and proposed. The study will cover the system architecture and data exchange protocol aspects. High bandwidth, robust optical networks could provide great opportunities to the power system for better service and efficient operation. In the dissertation, different applications are investigated. One of the typical applications is the SCADA information accessing system. An Internet-based application for the substation automation system will be presented. VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) technology is also used for one-line diagrams auto-generation. High transition rate and low latency optical network is especially suitable for power system real time control. In the dissertation, a new local area network based Load Shedding Controller (LSC) for isolated power system will be presented. By using PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) and fiber optic network, an AGE (Area Generation Error) based accurate wide area load shedding scheme will also be proposed. The objective

  2. Transition of Future Energy System Infrastructure; through Power-to-Gas Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Maroufmashat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Power-to-gas is a promising option for storing interment renewables, nuclear baseload power, and distributed energy and it is a novel concept for the transition to increased renewable content of current fuels with an ultimate goal of transition to a sustainable low-carbon future energy system that interconnects power, transportation sectors and thermal energy demand all together. The aim of this paper is to introduce different Power-to-gas “pathways”, including Power to Hydrogen, Power to Natural Gas End-users, Power to Renewable Content in Petroleum Fuel, Power to Power, Seasonal Energy Storage to Electricity, Power to Zero Emission Transportation, Power to Seasonal Storage for Transportation, Power to Micro grid, Power to Renewable Natural Gas (RNG to Pipeline (“Methanation”, and Power to Renewable Natural Gas (RNG to Seasonal Storage. In order to compare the different pathways, the review of key technologies of Power-to-gas systems are studied and the qualitative efficiency and benefits of each pathway is investigated from the technical points of view. Moreover, different Power-to-gas pathways are discussed as an energy policy option that can be implemented to transition towards a lower carbon economy for Ontario’s energy systems.

  3. Energy strategy 2025. Perspectives towards 2025 and introductory action plan for the future power infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Danish Government's long-term energy strategy follows up on the political agreement of 29 March 2004. The energy strategy is a coherent formulation of the Government's long-term energy policy. The pivotal point for the energy strategy is liberalized energy markets and market based tools for obtaining goals such as efficiency, security of supply and environment. The focus is increasingly on the substantial business potential within development of new and more efficient energy technology, in which Denmark takes up several globally strong positions. Furthermore, transportation energy consumption has been included directly in an energy strategy for the first time. At the same time as the energy strategy is presented, a summarizing background report from the Danish Energy Agency with facts, analyses and evaluations is published, as well as a report from energinet.dk that summarizes the system responsibilities' input to that part of the energy strategy that deals with power infrastructure. (BA)

  4. The future of infrastructure security :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Pablo; Turnley, Jessica Glicken; Parrott, Lori K.

    2013-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop on the future of infrastructure security on February 27-28, 2013, in Albuquerque, NM. The 17 participants came from backgrounds as diverse as federal policy, the insurance industry, infrastructure management, and technology development. The purpose of the workshop was to surface key issues, identify directions forward, and lay groundwork for cross-sectoral and cross-disciplinary collaborations. The workshop addressed issues such as the problem space (what is included in infrastructure problems?), the general types of threats to infrastructure (such as acute or chronic, system-inherent or exogenously imposed) and definitions of secure and resilient infrastructures. The workshop concluded with a consideration of stakeholders and players in the infrastructure world, and identification of specific activities that could be undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other players.

  5. Nuclear power infrastructure and planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    There are several stages in the process of introducing nuclear power in a country. These include feasibility studies; technology evaluation; request for proposals and proposal evaluation; project and contracts development and financing; supply, construction, and commissioning; and finally operation. The IAEA is developing guidance directed to provide criteria for assessing the minimum infrastructure necessary for: a) a host country to consider when engaging in the implementation of nuclear power, or b) a supplier country to consider when assessing that the recipient country would be in an acceptable condition to begin the implementation of nuclear power. There are Member States that may be denied the benefits of nuclear energy if the infrastructure requirements are too large or onerous for the national economy. However if co-operation could be achieved, the infrastructure burden could be shared and economic benefits gained by several countries acting jointly. The IAEA is developing guidance on the potential for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure among countries adopting or extending nuclear power programme

  6. Future Architectures for NREN infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessing, Henrik; Bozorgebrahimi, Kurosh; Belter, Bartosz

    This study identifies key requirements for NRENs towards future network architectures that become apparent as users become moremobile and have increased expectations in terms of availability of data. In addition, cost saving requirements call for federated use of, inparticular, the optical spectral...

  7. IFC and infrastructure - investing in power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, Vijay

    1992-01-01

    Adequate infrastructure is essential to a country's growth. It provides a foundation which enables the economy to function. Until recently, most governments provided the physical infrastructure of industry: transport, communications, and power systems. Today, the trend is for governments to regulate monopolies while taking maximum advantage of private sector investment, decision-making and management. The private sector is increasingly being recognized as having the capacity to operate infrastructure projects more efficiently. (author)

  8. Basic infrastructure for a nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    There are several stages in the process of introducing nuclear power in a country. These include development of nuclear policies and regulations, feasibility studies, public consultations, technology evaluation, requests for proposals and evaluations, contracts and financing, supply, construction, commissioning, operation and finally decommissioning. This publication addresses the 'basic' infrastructure needs, which are adequate until the issue of the construction license. It is obvious that a fully developed nuclear infrastructure will be required for the further implementation stages of a nuclear power reactor. The officials and experts in each country will undertake the transition from a basic infrastructure to a fully developed infrastructure that covers the stages of construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning. The publication is directed to provide guidance for assessing the basic infrastructure necessary for: - A host country to consider when engaging in the implementation of nuclear power, and - A supplier country to consider when assessing whether the recipient country is in an acceptable condition to begin the implementation of a nuclear power project. The target users are decision makers, advisers and senior managers in the governmental organizations, utilities, industrial organizations and regulatory bodies in the countries adopting nuclear power programmes or exporting supplies for these programmes. The governmental organizations that may find this publication useful include: Ministries of Economy, Energy, Foreign Affairs, Finance, Mining, Internal Affairs, Academic Institutions, Nuclear Energy Agencies and Environmental Agencies. This publication was produced within the IAEA programme directed to increase the capability of Member States to plan and implement nuclear power programmes and to establish and enhance national nuclear infrastructure. This publication should be used in conjunction with the IAEA Safety Standards Series and other

  9. Nuclear power infrastructure - issues, strategy and possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Y.A.

    2009-01-01

    specific assistance and review services in the areas of infrastructure readiness, feasibility studies, draft nuclear law, regulatory frameworks and organization, siting issues, human resource development and planning, bid evaluation and technology assessment, innovations in nuclear technology are necessary to achieve an increase in nuclear energy's long term contribution to sustainable development. There are a number of international initiatives to ensure and strengthen the sustainability of nuclear power in the future such as the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) and the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The expansion of nuclear power will increase the nuclear material in use and may increase the risk of proliferation or terrorism. The need to consider the challenges associated with the expansion of nuclear power has led to a number of international initiatives based on the idea of strengthening multinational control over, and assurance of, the supply of nuclear technology and materials. The former IAEA Director General Dr. El Baradei has proposed as the first step establishment of a mechanism to assure the supply of nuclear fuel. This back-up mechanism in which the IAEA becomes a guarantor for the supply of fissile materials to civilian nuclear users could add further confidence by helping to protect against political disruptions. He established the group of experts to review multilateral arrangements, relevant to the front-end and back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle and the policy, legal, security, economic and technological elements of cooperation. Two factors dominate all assessments made by this group: assurance of non-proliferation and assurance of supply.The general support of timeliness of this initiative and need to continue the efforts were expressed on NPT Conference in NY where about 45 States expressed the support of some elements of MNA and on the IAEA GC in September of this year. Several networks (Asian

  10. Power beaming providing a space power infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Coomes, E.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper, based on two levels of technology maturity, applied the power beaming concept to four panned satellite constellations. The analysis shows that with currently available technology, power beaming can provide mass savings to constellations in orbits ranging from low-Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit. Two constellations, space surveillance and tracking system and space-based radar, can be supported with current technology. The other two constellations, space-based laser array and boost surveillance and tracking system, will require power and transmission system improvements before their breakeven specific mass is achieved. A doubling of SP-100 conversion efficiency from 10 to 20% would meet or exceed breakeven for these constellations

  11. Building infrastructure for new nuclear power programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starz, A.; Aoki, M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, more than sixty countries have indicated that they are considering or launching nuclear power programmes. It has been more than a decade since a country commissioned its first nuclear power plant. In meantime, the global nuclear community has faced greater concerns about safety, security and non-proliferation, resulting in increased international obligations and a greater expectation for transparency and openness regarding nuclear power programmes. Many of these 'nuclear newcomers' are turning to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to understand the implications of the nuclear power option and to receive advice about how to proceed with implementing a national programme. In response to growing demand for assistance, the IAEA developed a comprehensive, phased approach to establishing the infrastructure necessary to support a national nuclear power programme. This 'Milestones' approach is described in Nuclear Energy Series Guide NG-G-3.1 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' (2007). From establishing the national position and legal framework to nuclear safety, security and safeguards, the Milestones covers 19 issues that need to be addressed. This approach also places special emphasis on the need for involvement of the Government, utility, industry, academic, and other stakeholders in a national decision-making process. The IAEA is also helping 'newcomers' to better understand its Safety Standards, which were written from the perspective of operating nuclear power programmes. A new safety guide is in development which provides a Road-map to the safety standards and identifies the standards that are relevant for each phase consistent with the Milestones. Several countries in the Europe region are working with the IAEA to understand the issues associated with a nuclear power programme in preparation for making a knowledgeable commitment. The starting points and approaches vary widely: some are European

  12. Securing the United States' power infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happenny, Sean F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The United States’ power infrastructure is aging, underfunded, and vulnerable to cyber attack. Emerging smart grid technologies may take some of the burden off of existing systems and make the grid as a whole more efficient, reliable, and secure. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is funding research into several aspects of smart grid technology and grid security, creating a software simulation tool that will allow researchers to test power distribution networks utilizing different smart grid technologies to determine how the grid and these technologies react under different circumstances. Demonstrating security in embedded systems is another research area PNNL is tackling. Many of the systems controlling the U.S. critical infrastructure, such as the power grid, lack integrated security and the networks protecting them are becoming easier to breach. Providing a virtual power substation network to each student team at the National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition, thereby supporting the education of future cyber security professionals, is another way PNNL is helping to strengthen the security of the nation’s power infrastructure.

  13. Current and future flood risk to railway infrastructure in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubeck, Philip; Kellermann, Patric; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Feyen, Luc; Dillenardt, Lisa; Thieken, Annegret H.

    2017-04-01

    CORINE, due to their line shapes. To assess current and future damage and risk to railway infrastructure in Europe, we apply the damage model RAIL -' RAilway Infrastructure Loss' that was specifically developed for railway infrastructure using empirical damage data. To adequately and comprehensively capture the line-shaped features of railway infrastructure, the assessment makes use of the open-access data set of openrailway.org. Current and future flood hazard in Europe is obtained with the LISFLOOD-based pan-European flood hazard mapping procedure combined with ensemble projections of extreme streamflow for the current century based on EURO-CORDEX RCP 8.5 climate scenarios. The presentation shows first results of the combination of the hazard data and the model RAIL for Europe.

  14. Future Investment in Drinking Water and Wastewater Infrastructure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beider, Perry

    2002-01-01

    ... in maintaining and replacing their pipes, treatment plants, and other infrastructure. But there is neither consensus on the size and timing of future investment costs nor agreement on the impact of those costs on households and other water ratepayers...

  15. Developing Infrastructure for New Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    Many countries are interested in introducing or expanding nuclear energy programmes because they regard nuclear power as a clean and stable source of electricity that can help to mitigate the impact of climate change. However, the March 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan - caused by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented proportions - demonstrated that there is a constant need to improve global nuclear safety, despite the great progress made in the previous 25 years. A 'safety first' approach needs to become fully entrenched among nuclear power plant operators, governments and regulators everywhere. Safety first must also be the watchword for Member States considering the introduction of nuclear power. I believe that all IAEA Member States should have access to nuclear power if they wish to add it their energy mix. While it is up to each country to decide whether or not to opt for nuclear power, the IAEA has a key role to play in ensuring that the development of nuclear power programmes takes place in a safe, efficient, responsible and sustainable manner. The IAEA has developed guidelines and milestones to help countries work in a systematic way towards the introduction of nuclear power. Use of the 'Milestones' approach can increase transparency both within a country introducing nuclear power, and between it and other States. This brochure summarizes the services which the IAEA offers to Member States considering introducing nuclear power. These include advice on proper planning, building the required human resources and infrastructure, establishing legal and regulatory frameworks, and ensuring the highest standards of safety and security, without increasing proliferation risks. The IAEA offers independent know-how on the construction, commissioning, startup and operation of nuclear reactors. Through the Technical Cooperation programme, we provide targeted support to 'newcomer' countries in response to national development needs

  16. Future nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, D.S.; Nasreddine, M.

    2006-01-01

    The book includes an introduction then it speaks about the options to secure sources of energy, nuclear power option, nuclear plants to generate energy including light-water reactors (LWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR), fast breeder reactors (FBR), development in the manufacture of reactors, fuel, uranium in the world, current status of nuclear power generation, economics of nuclear power, nuclear power and the environment and nuclear power in the Arab world. A conclusion at the end of the book suggests the increasing demand for energy in the industrialized countries and in a number of countries that enjoy special and economic growth such as China and India pushes the world to search for different energy sources to insure the urgent need for current and anticipated demand in the near and long-term future in light of pessimistic and optimistic outlook for energy in the future. This means that states do a scientific and objective analysis of the currently available data for the springboard to future plans to secure the energy required to support economy and welfare insurance.

  17. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maichel, G.

    2001-01-01

    The market and competition, political boundary conditions, ecological boundary conditions, science and technology as well as international aspects are factors decisive in the future use of nuclear power. The agreement reached between the federal government and the power utilities in June 2000 represents a workable compromise - without winners or losers - in a situation in which action was urgently required. Once the agreement has been put into effect by legislators and the executive, operation of the nuclear power plants still on stream can be continued on a long term basis under safe boundary conditions. This requires an amendment to the Atomic Energy Act reflecting the sense of the agreement reached, the constructive inclusion of the federal states, and the immediate, legally assured execution of necessary transports of spent fuel and the construction of on-site stores for spent fuel. In the common interest, the question of final storage should not suffer from politically motivated delays. Factors favoring the further use of nuclear power continue to be mainly ecological and economic ones. The economic performance of plants is being documented very clearly, especially in the course of the deregulation of the electricity market, and the objective of finding a power supply system which protects the climate seems to be attainable only by nuclear power also in countries other than Germany. In the course of globalization, and in the light of thoughts about building new nuclear power plants also in European countries, it must also be in the public interest to preserve competence in nuclear technology, together with a capable infrastructure, in Germany. In addition, strengthening research and development is important in securing the future technical performance capability of Germany. (orig.) [de

  18. The future of gas infrastructures in Eurasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaassen, Ger; McDonald, Alan; Jimin Zhao

    2001-01-01

    The IIASA-WEC study global energy perspectives emphasized trends toward cleaner, more flexible, and more convenient final energy forms, delivered chiefly by energy grids, and noted potential energy infrastructure deficiencies in Eurasia. We compare planned interregional gas pipelines and LNG terminals in Eurasia with the study's projected trade flows for 2020. We focus on the study's three high-growth scenarios and single middle course scenario. The comparison indicates that high gas consumption in a scenario need not imply high gas trade. For the former Soviet Union, a robust strategy across all six scenarios is to implement existing plans and proposals for expanding gas export capacity. For Eastern Europe, significant import capacity expansions beyond current plans and proposals are needed in all but the middle course scenario. Western European plans and proposals need to be increased only in two high gas consumption scenarios. Planned and proposed capacities for the Middle East (exports) and centrally planned Asia (imports) most closely match a high gas trade scenario, but are otherwise excessive. Paradoxically, for the Pacific OECD, more short-term import capacity is needed in scenarios with low gas consumption than in high-consumption scenarios. For Southeast Asia, proposed import capacities are significantly higher than scenario trade projections. (Author)

  19. Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development Program: Korean Education Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Yeol; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Si Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Many countries have decided nuclear power for next energy resources as one of the long-term energy supply options. IAEA projected nuclear power expansion up to 2030 reaching between 447 GWe and 691 GWe compared to 370 GWe and 2660 TWh at the end of 2006. Both low and high projection is accompanied with new nuclear power plant constructions respectively 178 and 357, about 11 units per year, and most new construction is in North America, the Far East, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. During the last forty years, thirty three countries have established commercial nuclear power programs but only some of them have developed comprehensive and large scale peaceful nuclear power infrastructure. Although various cooperation and guidance program of nuclear power infrastructure, developing appropriate environment and infrastructure of nuclear power plant is still challenging problems for developing countries launching nuclear power program. With increasing the demand of safety and safeguard from international society, creating appropriate infrastructure becomes essential requirements in national nuclear power program. In the viewpoint of developing countries, without sufficient explanation and proper guidance, infrastructure could be seen only as another barrier in its nuclear power program. The importance of infrastructure development would be obscured by ostensible business and infrastructure program can result in increasing entering barriers to peaceful nuclear power application field without benefits to developing countries and international community. To avoid this situation by providing enough explanation and realistic case example and cooperate with the countries wanting to establish comprehensive nuclear power infrastructure in the peaceful applications, we are creating the education program of infrastructure development with basic guidelines of the IAEA infrastructure series and Korean experiences from least developed country to advanced country

  20. Potential for sharing nuclear power infrastructure between countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    The introduction or expansion of a nuclear power programme in a country and its successful execution is largely dependent on the network of national infrastructure, covering a wide range of activities and capabilities. The infrastructure areas include legal framework, safety and environmental regulatory bodies, international agreements, physical facilities, finance, education, training, human resources and public information and acceptance. The wide extent of infrastructure needs require an investment that can be too large or onerous for the national economy. The burden of infrastructure can be reduced significantly if a country forms a sharing partnership with other countries. The sharing can be at regional or at multinational level. It can include physical facilities, common programmes and knowledge, which will reflect in economic benefits. The sharing can also contribute in a significant manner to harmonization of codes and standards in general and regulatory framework in particular. The opportunities and potential of sharing nuclear power infrastructure is determined by the objectives, strategy and scenario of the national nuclear power programme. A review of individual infrastructure items shows that there are several opportunities for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure between countries if they cooperate with each other. International cooperation and sharing of nuclear power infrastructure are not new. This publication provides criteria and guidance for analyzing and identifying the potential for sharing of nuclear power infrastructure during the stages of nuclear power project life cycle. The target users are decision makers, advisers and senior managers in utilities, industrial organizations, regulatory bodies and governmental organizations in countries adopting or extending nuclear power programmes. This publication was produced within the IAEA programme directed to increase the capability of Member States to plan and implement nuclear power

  1. Future spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste infrastructure in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerlie, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    In Norway a Governmental Committee was appointed in 1991 to make an evaluation of the future steps that need to be taken in Norway to find a final solution for the spent nuclear fuel and for some other radioactive waste for which a disposal option does not exist today. The report from the Committee is now undergoing a formal hearing process. Based on the Committees recommendation and comments during the hearing the responsible Ministry will take a decision on future infrastructure in Norway for the spent nuclear fuel. This will be decisive for the future management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in Norway. (author)

  2. Modeling green infrastructure land use changes on future air ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green infrastructure can be a cost-effective approach for reducing stormwater runoff and improving water quality as a result, but it could also bring co-benefits for air quality: less impervious surfaces and more vegetation can decrease the urban heat island effect, and also result in more removal of air pollutants via dry deposition with increased vegetative surfaces. Cooler surface temperatures can also decrease ozone formation through the increases of NOx titration; however, cooler surface temperatures also lower the height of the boundary layer resulting in more concentrated pollutants within the same volume of air, especially for primary emitted pollutants (e.g. NOx, CO, primary particulate matter). To better understand how green infrastructure impacts air quality, the interactions between all of these processes must be considered collectively. In this study, we use a comprehensive coupled meteorology-air quality model (WRF-CMAQ) to simulate the influence of planned land use changes that include green infrastructure in Kansas City (KC) on regional meteorology and air quality. Current and future land use data was provided by the Mid-America Regional Council for 2012 and 2040 (projected land use due to population growth, city planning and green infrastructure implementation). These land use datasets were incorporated into the WRF-CMAQ modeling system allowing the modeling system to propagate the changes in vegetation and impervious surface coverage on meteoro

  3. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeile, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Present conditions and future prospects for the nuclear power industry in the United States are discussed. The presentation includes a review of trends in electrical production, the safety of coal as compared to nuclear generating plants, the dangers of radiation, the economics of nuclear power, the high cost of nuclear power in the United States, and the public fear of nuclear power. 20 refs

  4. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Document Server

    A.Gaddi

    2011-01-01

    Between the end of March to June 2011, there has been no detector downtime during proton fills due to CMS Infrastructures failures. This exceptional performance is a clear sign of the high quality work done by the CMS Infrastructures unit and its supporting teams. Powering infrastructure At the end of March, the EN/EL group observed a problem with the CMS 48 V system. The problem was a lack of isolation between the negative (return) terminal and earth. Although at that moment we were not seeing any loss of functionality, in the long term it would have led to severe disruption to the CMS power system. The 48 V system is critical to the operation of CMS: in addition to feeding the anti-panic lights, essential for the safety of the underground areas, it powers all the PLCs (Twidos) that control AC power to the racks and front-end electronics of CMS. A failure of the 48 V system would bring down the whole detector and lead to evacuation of the cavern. EN/EL technicians have made an accurate search of the fault, ...

  5. Proliferation risks from nuclear power infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squassoni, Sharon

    2017-11-01

    Certain elements of nuclear energy infrastructure are inherently dual-use, which makes the promotion of nuclear energy fraught with uncertainty. Are current restraints on the materials, equipment, and technology that can be used either to produce fuel for nuclear electricity generation or material for nuclear explosive devices adequate? Technology controls, supply side restrictions, and fuel market assurances have been used to dissuade countries from developing sensitive technologies but the lack of legal restrictions is a continued barrier to permanent reduction of nuclear proliferation risks.

  6. Architecture for Cognitive Networking within NASAs Future Space Communications Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gilbert J., III; Eddy, Wesley M.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Barnes, James; Brooks, David

    2016-01-01

    Future space mission concepts and designs pose many networking challenges for command, telemetry, and science data applications with diverse end-to-end data delivery needs. For future end-to-end architecture designs, a key challenge is meeting expected application quality of service requirements for multiple simultaneous mission data flows with options to use diverse onboard local data buses, commercial ground networks, and multiple satellite relay constellations in LEO, MEO, GEO, or even deep space relay links. Effectively utilizing a complex network topology requires orchestration and direction that spans the many discrete, individually addressable computer systems, which cause them to act in concert to achieve the overall network goals. The system must be intelligent enough to not only function under nominal conditions, but also adapt to unexpected situations, and reorganize or adapt to perform roles not originally intended for the system or explicitly programmed. This paper describes architecture features of cognitive networking within the future NASA space communications infrastructure, and interacting with the legacy systems and infrastructure in the meantime. The paper begins by discussing the need for increased automation, including inter-system collaboration. This discussion motivates the features of an architecture including cognitive networking for future missions and relays, interoperating with both existing endpoint-based networking models and emerging information-centric models. From this basis, we discuss progress on a proof-of-concept implementation of this architecture as a cognitive networking on-orbit application on the SCaN Testbed attached to the International Space Station.

  7. Microwave Power Beaming Infrastructure for Manned Lightcraft Operations: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrabo, Leik N.

    2008-01-01

    In the past ∼7 years, microwave gyrotron technology has rapidly evolved to a critical threshold wherein ultra-energetic space launch missions based on beamed energy propulsion (BEP) now appear eminently feasible. Over the next 20 years, hundred megawatt-class microwave power-beaming stations could be prototyped on high deserts and 3- to 4 km mountain peaks before migrating into low Earth orbit, along with their passive microwave relay satellites. Described herein is a 20 GW rechargeable nuclear power satellite and microwave power-beaming infrastructure designed for manned space launch operations in the year 2025. The technological readiness of 2500 GJ superconducting magnetic energy storage 'batteries', 433-m ultralight space structures, 100 MW liquid droplet radiators, 1-6+ MW gyrotron sources, and mega-scale arrays (e.g., 3000 phase-locked units) is addressed. Microwave BEP is 'breakthrough' technology with the very real potential to radically reduce space access costs by factors of 100 to 1000 in the forseeable future

  8. Low-Power Wireless Sensor Network Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Tranberg

    Advancements in wireless communication and electronics improving form factor and hardware capabilities has expanded the applicability of wireless sensor networks. Despite these advancements, devices are still limited in terms of energy which creates the need for duty-cycling and low-power protocols...... peripherals need to by duty-cycled and the low-power wireless radios are severely influenced by the environmental effects causing bursty and unreliable wireless channels. This dissertation presents a communication stack providing services for low-power communication, secure communication, data collection......, and network management which enables construction of low-power wireless sensor network applications. More specifically, these services are designed with the extreme low-power scenarios of the SensoByg project in mind and are implemented as follows. First, low-power communication is implemented with Auto...

  9. Nuclear power - the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hann, J.

    1991-01-01

    It is asserted by the author that nuclear power is the only available resource - indeed the only solution to an ever-increasing demand for energy in the United Kingdom over the next 50-100 years. It must be the cornerstone of a practical integrated energy policy, covering that sort of time-scale. In fact, it is going to be a strategic necessity. In this paper the background to establishing a policy is sketched. An explanation is given of what the nuclear industry is doing so as to ensure that the nuclear option is very definitely retained as a result of the 1994 Review of nuclear power in the UK. (author)

  10. Nuclear power's burdened future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, C.

    1987-01-01

    Although governments of the world's leading nations are reiterating their faith in nuclear power, Chernobyl has brought into focus the public's overwhelming feeling that the current generation of nuclear technology is simple not working. Despite the drastic slowdown, however, the global nuclear enterprise is large. As of mid-1986, the world had 366 nuclear power plants in operation, with a generating capacity of 255,670 MW. These facilities generate about 15% of the world's electricity, ranging from 65% in France to 31% in West Germany, 23% in Japan, 16% in the United States, 10% in the Soviet Union, and non in most developing nations. Nuclear development is clearly dominated by the most economically powerful and technologically advanced nations. The United States, France, the Soviet Union, Japan, and West Germany has 72% of the world's generating capacity and set the international nuclear pace. The reasons for scaling back nuclear programs are almost as diverse as the countries themselves. High costs, slowing electricity demand growth, technical problems, mismanagement, and political opposition have all had an effect. Yet these various factors actually form a complex web of inter-related problems. For example, rising costs usually represent some combination of technical problems and mismanagement, and political opposition often occurs because of safety concerns or rising costs. 13 references

  11. Advanced Wireless Power Transfer Vehicle and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Burton, E.; Wang, J.; Konan, A.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL on advanced wireless power transfer vehicle and infrastructure analysis. The potential benefits of E-roadway include more electrified driving miles from battery electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, or even properly equipped hybrid electric vehicles (i.e., more electrified miles could be obtained from a given battery size, or electrified driving miles could be maintained while using smaller and less expensive batteries, thereby increasing cost competitiveness and potential market penetration). The system optimization aspect is key given the potential impact of this technology on the vehicles, the power grid and the road infrastructure.

  12. IAEA Reviews Niger’s Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) team of experts has concluded an eight-day mission to Niger to review its infrastructure development for a nuclear power programme. The Integrated Nuclear Infrastructure Review (INIR) was carried out at the invitation of the Government of the Republic of Niger. Niger, whose economic development is hampered by a lack of consistent electricity supply, is considering a potential role for nuclear power in its energy mix. A country of about 21 million people in Western Africa, Niger is currently ranked as the world’s fourth largest producer of uranium ore. The INIR team observed a strong Government commitment to developing the infrastructure for a nuclear power programme. The Government has established a Strategic Orientation Committee for the Nuclear Power Programme chaired by the Prime Minister, and a National Technical Committee for the Nuclear Power Programme chaired by the President of the Nigerien High Authority for Atomic Energy (HANEA). Those two committees form the Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization (NEPIO). Niger has already completed or initiated several studies related to nuclear infrastructure development, and prepared a comprehensive report summarizing the results.

  13. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2011-01-01

    Most of the work relating to Infrastructure has been concentrated in the new CSC and RPC manufactory at building 904, on the Prevessin site. Brand new gas distribution, powering and HVAC infrastructures are being deployed and the production of the first CSC chambers has started. Other activities at the CMS site concern the installation of a new small crane bridge in the Cooling technical room in USC55, in order to facilitate the intervention of the maintenance team in case of major failures of the chilled water pumping units. The laser barrack in USC55 has been also the object of a study, requested by the ECAL community, for the new laser system that shall be delivered in few months. In addition, ordinary maintenance works have been performed during the short machine stops on all the main infrastructures at Point 5 and in preparation to the Year-End Technical Stop (YETS), when most of the systems will be carefully inspected in order to ensure a smooth running through the crucial year 2012. After the incide...

  14. Architecture for Cognitive Networking within NASA's Future Space Communications Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gilbert; Eddy, Wesley M.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Barnes, James; Brooks, David

    2016-01-01

    Future space mission concepts and designs pose many networking challenges for command, telemetry, and science data applications with diverse end-to-end data delivery needs. For future end-to-end architecture designs, a key challenge is meeting expected application quality of service requirements for multiple simultaneous mission data flows with options to use diverse onboard local data buses, commercial ground networks, and multiple satellite relay constellations in LEO, GEO, MEO, or even deep space relay links. Effectively utilizing a complex network topology requires orchestration and direction that spans the many discrete, individually addressable computer systems, which cause them to act in concert to achieve the overall network goals. The system must be intelligent enough to not only function under nominal conditions, but also adapt to unexpected situations, and reorganize or adapt to perform roles not originally intended for the system or explicitly programmed. This paper describes an architecture enabling the development and deployment of cognitive networking capabilities into the envisioned future NASA space communications infrastructure. We begin by discussing the need for increased automation, including inter-system discovery and collaboration. This discussion frames the requirements for an architecture supporting cognitive networking for future missions and relays, including both existing endpoint-based networking models and emerging information-centric models. From this basis, we discuss progress on a proof-of-concept implementation of this architecture, and results of implementation and initial testing of a cognitive networking on-orbit application on the SCaN Testbed attached to the International Space Station.

  15. Future with fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschfeld, F.

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews several current approaches to the development of nuclear fusion power sources by the year 2000. First mentioned is the only project to develop a nonpolluting, radiation-free source by using only natural and nonradioactive isotopes (nuclei of deuterium, helium 3 and boron) as ''advanced'' fuels. This system will also be capable of direct conversion of the released energy into electricity. Next described is the PACER concept, in which thermonuclear burning of deuterium occurs in fusion explosion taking place underground (e.g., in a salt dome). The released energy is absorbed in high-pressure steam which is then piped to a surface heat exchanger to provide steam for a turbogenerator. After filtration, the steam is returned. The PACER system also produces fissionable fuel. The balance of the article reviews three ''magnetic fusion'' approaches. Tokamak, mirror and theta pinch systems utilize magnetic fields to confine a plasma for either pulsed or steady-state operation. The tokamak and theta pinch are toroidal in shape, while the mirror can be thought of as a magnetic field configuration of roughly tubular shape that confines the plasma by means of higher fields at the ends than at its center. The tokamak approach accounts for about 65 percent of the magnetic fusion research and development, while theta pinches and mirrors represent about 15 percent each. Refs

  16. Electric power: essential infrastructure for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munasinghe, Mohan

    1990-01-01

    Although the recent sharp decline in world oil prices has provided much needed relief to the hard pressed economies of most oil-importing nations, energy-related problems still preoccupy the minds of decision makers in most developing countries. The availability of adequate energy resources at a reasonable cost is still a vital precondition for continued economic progress, and the power sector in particular is acknowledged as an engine for growth. At the same time, most of the key energy issues identified during the past decade have not disappeared. For example, developing country energy investments still account for about 25 per cent of total public investments; oil importers are spending an average of 15-20 per cent of export earnings on petroleum imports; and serious fuelwood shortages and deforestation problems continue, especially in Africa and Asia. (author). 3 refs

  17. Senagal National Presentation on Nuclear Power Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutapha, S.T

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory Body (RB) implementation is in progress: decree defining Role, Responsibility and Mission of RB signed after IAEA Advisory Mission received 7-11 December 2009. Self-assessment on some topics of the Milestones will be done by Working Group (WG). The political statement from government Declaration of indentation to consider nuclear energy generation was read at IAEA General Conference). Decree 2008-1433 (December -12- 2008d) creates under the authority of the President de la République a Work Group for the Management and the realization of the Senegalese Nuclear Power Project in the horizon 2016. The Draft Law in preparation and the laws on Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety (law 2004-17 and law 2009-14) provide for a Regulatory Body but ASRN is not yet fully established by decrees although the decree 2010-893 July 30 2010 defining the role and missions of ASRN has been signed by President

  18. Global patterns of current and future road infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Johan R.; Huijbregts, Mark A. J.; Schotten, Kees C. G. J.; Schipper, Aafke M.

    2018-06-01

    Georeferenced information on road infrastructure is essential for spatial planning, socio-economic assessments and environmental impact analyses. Yet current global road maps are typically outdated or characterized by spatial bias in coverage. In the Global Roads Inventory Project we gathered, harmonized and integrated nearly 60 geospatial datasets on road infrastructure into a global roads dataset. The resulting dataset covers 222 countries and includes over 21 million km of roads, which is two to three times the total length in the currently best available country-based global roads datasets. We then related total road length per country to country area, population density, GDP and OECD membership, resulting in a regression model with adjusted R 2 of 0.90, and found that that the highest road densities are associated with densely populated and wealthier countries. Applying our regression model to future population densities and GDP estimates from the Shared Socioeconomic Pathway (SSP) scenarios, we obtained a tentative estimate of 3.0–4.7 million km additional road length for the year 2050. Large increases in road length were projected for developing nations in some of the world’s last remaining wilderness areas, such as the Amazon, the Congo basin and New Guinea. This highlights the need for accurate spatial road datasets to underpin strategic spatial planning in order to reduce the impacts of roads in remaining pristine ecosystems.

  19. Infrastructure needs and organizational aspect of nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    I. Introduction. II. Infrastructure development for nuclear power program: a) pre-requisites and requirements for a nuclear power program; b) long-term national policy for a nuclear power (long-term policy reason; national commitment); c) manpower development (role of academic institutions; practical manpower training); d) laws and regulations (regulatory framework; main national laws and regulations); e) nuclear research and development implementation (researches in the university; long term nuclear R and D program; research reactors); f) functions of government organizations (Atomic Energy Commission (PNRI); Department of Science and Technology; Department of Energy; Department of Education and Culture); g) industrial infrastructure; h) technology transfer (recipients's preparedness); i) safeguards obligations; j) public acceptance activities. III. Stages of nuclear power development (stage 1: planning; stage 2: detailed study and procurement; stage 3: construction; stage 4: operation) IV. Conclusion/Recommendation. (author)

  20. Highways of the future : a strategic plan for highway infrastructure research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This Highways of the FutureA Strategic Plan for Highway Infrastructure Research and Development was developed in response to a need expressed by the staff of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Office of Infrastructure Research and Developme...

  1. Personalized Infrastructure: Leveraging Behavioral Strategies for Future Mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvall, Andrew L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-23

    For decades, the transportation system has been built to position the personal automobile at the pinnacle of mobility options. This prominence is strongly reflected in individual and population behaviors, and supported by coevolved transportation policy, social norms, funding, and physical structures. Such has been the status quo for the living memory of the U.S. population. However, with the advent of emergent, technologically driven mobility options, the transportation system is in an era of rapid and disruptive change. No longer is transportation infrastructure an externality predominantly composed of physical elements; it is also now a personalized interface carried in the pockets of the majority of the population. Perceptions of personal mobility are evolving, in large part because of the proliferation of smartphone technology and the related Internet of Things (IoT), which will become increasingly essential within future transportation systems. With the emergence of personalized mobility infrastructure, many intervention approaches to influence transportation behavior do not adequately acknowledge the complexity of the social/digital environment within which transportation decisions are made. Transportation decisions are influenced by multiple facets, including costs and benefits in time and money, but also by sociocultural elements shaped by social norms and diffusion of ideas. Understanding of factors that lead to transportation behaviors can help to identify incentives and leverage points whereby alternative choices may be most accepted by individuals, and which, if well coordinated, may lead to improved transportation energy outcomes. How can change be initiated to shift away from the transportation status quo? Is it possible to use technologically delivered incentives to produce meaningful changes in transportation behavior? What types of incentives and at what perceived value is necessary to induce changes in behavior? As transportation agencies look

  2. Infrastructure development assistance modeling for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Hwang, K.; Park, K. M.; Kim, S. W.; Lee, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model, a general frame to be utilized in assisting newcomer countries to start a nuclear power program. A nuclear power plant project involves technical complexity and high level of investment with long duration. Considering newcomers are mostly developing countries that lack the national infrastructure, key infrastructure issues may constitute the principal constraints to the development of a nuclear power program. In this regard, it is important to provide guidance and support to set up an appropriate infrastructure when we help them with the first launch of nuclear power plant project. To date, as a sole nuclear power generation company, KHNP has been invited many times to mentor or assist newcomer countries for their successful start of a nuclear power program since Republic of Korea is an exemplary case of a developing country which began nuclear power program from scratch and became a major world nuclear energy country in a short period of time. Through hosting events organized to aid newcomer countries' initiation of nuclear power projects, difficulties have been recognized. Each event had different contents according to circumstances because they were held as an unstructured and one-off thing. By developing a general model, we can give more adequate and effective aid in an efficient way. In this paper, we created a model to identify necessary infrastructures at the right stage, which was mainly based on a case of Korea. Taking into account the assistance we received from foreign companies and our own efforts for technological self-reliance, we have developed a general time table and specified activities required to do at each stage. From a donor's perspective, we explored various ways to help nuclear infrastructure development including technical support programs, training courses, and participating in IAEA technical cooperation programs on a regular basis. If we further develop the model, the next task would be to

  3. Infrastructure development assistance modeling for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Hwang, K.; Park, K. M.; Kim, S. W.; Lee, S. M. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD, 23, 106 gil, Yeongdong-daero, Gangnam-gu, 153-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a model, a general frame to be utilized in assisting newcomer countries to start a nuclear power program. A nuclear power plant project involves technical complexity and high level of investment with long duration. Considering newcomers are mostly developing countries that lack the national infrastructure, key infrastructure issues may constitute the principal constraints to the development of a nuclear power program. In this regard, it is important to provide guidance and support to set up an appropriate infrastructure when we help them with the first launch of nuclear power plant project. To date, as a sole nuclear power generation company, KHNP has been invited many times to mentor or assist newcomer countries for their successful start of a nuclear power program since Republic of Korea is an exemplary case of a developing country which began nuclear power program from scratch and became a major world nuclear energy country in a short period of time. Through hosting events organized to aid newcomer countries' initiation of nuclear power projects, difficulties have been recognized. Each event had different contents according to circumstances because they were held as an unstructured and one-off thing. By developing a general model, we can give more adequate and effective aid in an efficient way. In this paper, we created a model to identify necessary infrastructures at the right stage, which was mainly based on a case of Korea. Taking into account the assistance we received from foreign companies and our own efforts for technological self-reliance, we have developed a general time table and specified activities required to do at each stage. From a donor's perspective, we explored various ways to help nuclear infrastructure development including technical support programs, training courses, and participating in IAEA technical cooperation programs on a regular basis. If we further develop the model, the next task

  4. Attractive Mobile Corridors - The Power of Light Rail Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mette; Lassen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Light rail is a popular tool in urban development strategies in many European cities. One argument for choosing a rail-based solution is that it signals stability to investors and will attract development and investments in the corridor. The choice of corridor in the various light rail cities...... and redistributes urban space. Furthermore light rail is not only a physical infrastructure but also an infrastructure of power that is carefully planned and designed creating both mental and physical patterns of mobilities and immobilities. Hence it is important to underline that mobility systems, such as light...

  5. The European power plant infrastructure-Presentation of the Chalmers energy infrastructure database with applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjaerstad, Jan; Johnsson, Filip

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a newly established database of the European power plant infrastructure (power plants, fuel infrastructure, fuel resources and CO 2 storage options) for the EU25 member states (MS) and applies the database in a general discussion of the European power plant and natural gas infrastructure as well as in a simple simulation analysis of British and German power generation up to the year 2050 with respect to phase-out of existing generation capacity, fuel mix and fuel dependency. The results are discussed with respect to age structure of the current production plants, CO 2 emissions, natural gas dependency and CO 2 capture and storage (CCS) under stringent CO 2 emission constraints. The analysis of the information from the power plant database, which includes planned projects, shows large variations in power plant infrastructure between the MS and a clear shift to natural gas-fuelled power plants during the last decade. The data indicates that this shift may continue in the short-term up to 2010 since the majority of planned plants are natural gas fired. The gas plants are, however, geographically concentrated to southern and northwest Europe. The data also shows large activities in the upstream gas sector to accommodate the ongoing shift to gas with pipelines, liquefaction plants and regasification terminals being built and gas fields being prepared for production. At the same time, utilities are integrating upwards in the fuel chain in order to secure supply while oil and gas companies are moving downwards the fuel chain to secure access to markets. However, it is not yet possible to state whether the ongoing shift to natural gas will continue in the medium term, i.e. after 2010, since this will depend on a number of factors as specified below. Recently there have also been announcements for construction of a number of new coal plants. The results of the simulations for the German and British power sector show that combination of a relatively low

  6. Future CO2 Emissions and Climate Change from Existing Energy Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K.; Matthews, D.

    2010-12-01

    If current greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations remain constant, the world would be committed to several centuries of increasing global mean temperatures and sea level rise. By contrast, near elimination of anthropogenic CO2 emissions would be required to produce diminishing GHG concentrations consistent with stabilization of mean temperatures. Yet long-lived energy and transportation infrastructure now operating can be expected to contribute substantial CO2 emissions over the next 50 years. Barring widespread retrofitting of existing power plants with carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies or the early decommissioning of serviceable infrastructure, these “committed emissions” represent infrastructural inertia which may be the primary contributor to total future warming commitment. With respect to GHG emissions, infrastructural inertia may be thought of as having two important and overlapping components: (i) infrastructure that directly releases GHGs to the atmosphere, and (ii) infrastructure that contributes to the continued production of devices that emit GHGs to the atmosphere. For example, the interstate highway and refueling infrastructure in the United States facilitates continued production of gasoline-powered automobiles. Here, we focus only on the warming commitment from infrastructure that directly releases CO2 to the atmosphere. Essentially, we answer the question: What if no additional CO2-emitting devices (e.g., power plants, motor vehicles) were built, but all the existing CO2-emitting devices were allowed to live out their normal lifetimes? What CO2 levels and global mean temperatures would we attain? Of course, the actual lifetime of devices may be strongly influenced by economic and policy constraints. For instance, a ban on new CO2-emitting devices would create tremendous incentive to prolong the lifetime of existing devices. Thus, our scenarios are not realistic, but offer a means of gauging the threat of climate change from existing

  7. The JET Intershot Analysis: Current infrastructure and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layne, R.; Cook, N.; Harting, D.; McDonald, D.C.; Tidy, C.

    2010-01-01

    The JET Intershot Analysis (Chain1) generates processed data following a pulse. Maintaining the pulse repetition rate is one of JET's key success factors, so performance of Chain1 is crucial. This paper will describe JET's experience of managing Chain1, including a description of the control system used to ensure the analysis chain runs as quickly as possible, and a discussion of JET's experience of integrating externally developed codes into a standard analysis framework. The current Chain1 infrastructure was developed in 1999 and although reliable and efficient is starting to prove costly in terms of flexibility and extensibility to meet JET's current and future needs. For this reason JET is planning to re-implement the Chain1 system. The paper will outline the work done towards this aim, and present a model of the proposed new system. Finally, possible future steps towards an integrated data production chain for JET will be discussed, and the potential applicability to next generation fusion devices will be outlined.

  8. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Infrastructures teams are constantly ensuring the smooth operation of the different services during this critical period when the detector is taking data at full speed. A single failure would spoil hours of high luminosity beam and everything is put in place to avoid such an eventuality. In the meantime however, the fast approaching LS1 requires that we take a look at the various activities to take place from the end of the year onwards. The list of infrastructures consolidation and upgrade tasks is already long and will touch all the services (cooling, gas, inertion, powering, etc.). The definitive list will be available just before the LS1 start. One activity performed by the CMS cooling team that is worth mentioning is the maintenance of the cooling circuits at the CMS Electronics Integration Centre (EIC) at building 904. The old chiller has been replaced by a three-units cooling plant that also serves the HVAC system for the new CSC and RPC factories. The commissioning of this new plant has tak...

  9. Thailand: Infrastructure Development and Challenges to Launch Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinmeesuke, Sirichai

    2011-01-01

    In June 2007, the cabinet passed a resolution for Thailand's Power Development Plan (PDP 2007). It was mentioned in the plan that Thailand will have 2 x 1,000 MWe nuclear power plants in 2020 and another 2 x 1,000 MWe in 2021. The PDP 2007 was revised in March 2009 and it was agreed to change the nuclear power generation to only 1 x 1,000 MWe in 2020 and 2021 respectively due to the large excess capacity at present. Many activities related to development of infrastructures in order to support electricity generation using nuclear power are being executed. Milestones for nuclear power program implementation has been developed using the IAEA document 'Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power' with some amendment/additions to suit the country situation. According to the schedule, a lot of activities related to infrastructure establishment, feasibility study, utility preparation and public education and participation are being performed. Within the year 2011, various issues such as legal and regulatory systems and international commitment, industrial and commercial infrastructure, technology transfer and human resource development, safety and environmental protection, public information and public acceptance, preparation of the nuclear power utility establishment, etc. must be solved out and undertaken to assure the cabinet to make final decision to go nuclear. There are many challenges for Thailand embarking of the nuclear power programme. It is essential to plan for the establishment of a regulatory body at the national level to support and regulate the nuclear power plant industry. Currently, the application for a license and the monitoring of a power plant are administered by the authorities of various agencies under different ministries; hence the process is very time-consuming and overlaps with one another. The approach that the regulatory body and the authorities to issue licenses relevant to the nuclear power plant operation

  10. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Gaddi.

    The various water-cooling circuits ran smoothly over the summer. The overall performance of the cooling system is satisfactory, even if some improvements are possible, concerning the endcap water-cooling and the C6F14 circuits. In particular for the endcap cooling circuit, we aim to lower the water temperature, to provide more margin for RPC detectors. An expert-on-call piquet has been established during the summer global run, assuring the continuous supervision of the installations. An effort has been made to collect and harmonize the existing documentation on the cooling infrastructures at P5. The last six months have seen minor modifications to the electrical power network at P5. Among these, the racks in USC55 for the Tracker and Sniffer systems, which are backed up by the diesel generator in case of power outage, have been equipped with new control boxes to allow a remote restart. Other interventions have concerned the supply of assured power to those installations that are essential for CMS to run eff...

  11. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    The long winter shut-down allows for modifications that will improve the reliability of the detector infrastructures at P5. The annual maintenance of detector services is taking place as well. This means a full stop of water-cooling circuits from November 24th with a gradual restart from mid January 09. The annual maintenance service includes the cleaning of the two SF5 cooling towers, service of the chiller plants on the surface, and the cryogenic plant serving the CMS Magnet. In addition, the overall site power is reduced from 8MW to 2MW, compatible with the switchover to the Swiss power network in winter. Full power will be available again from end of January. Among the modification works planned, the Low Voltage cabinets are being refurbished; doubling the cable sections and replacing the 40A circuit breakers with 60A types. This will reduce the overheating that has been experienced. Moreover, two new LV transformers will be bought and pre-cabled in order to assure a quick swap in case of failure of any...

  12. Powering the Future Data Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    of the characteristics of these two power sources: long warm-up stage and low dynamics for fuel cell, and variable terminal voltage for supercapacitors. The motivation for this project was to find ways which can overcome those limitations to integrate fuel cells and supercapcitors to the system with high efficiency......The extended run Uninterruptible Power Supply system (UPSs) which powered by fuel cells and supercapcitors, is a promising solution for future data centre to obtain environmentfriendly energy efficient and cost effective. There are many challenges in power electronic interface circuits, because......: • Optimized design method for dual active bridge (DAB) converter and its derived circuits; • A novel hybrid dc-dc converter and its corresponding optimal design method are proposed; • An improved dual input current-fed DC-DC converter with bidirectional power conversion ability is investigated; • Extend...

  13. Technical Meeting/Workshop on Topical Issues on Infrastructure Development: Managing the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of the TM/Workshop is to provide an opportunity for exchange of specific information on the management of the development of a sustainable national infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants as it is recommended in the Agency's Milestones approach. Taking into account the actual status of new nuclear power programmes in Member States, this Agency event shall focus on the moving beyond the consideration of the nuclear power and advancing to the next phase, when future partners (Consultants, NPP Vendors, EPC Contractors, etc.) shall be selected and contracted for the first Nuclear Power Plant. The objectives of the Technical Meeting/Workshop are the following: 1. To exchange specific information and to facilitate the management and coordination of the development and implementation of a national infrastructure for nuclear power; 2. To present and discuss case studies, good practices and lessons learned about recent experiences in implementing an appropriate infrastructure for nuclear power, including management methods and self-evaluation processes; 3. To allow participants to improve their knowledge of various aspects of nuclear infrastructure development; and 4. To provide a forum in which participants can discuss common challenges, opportunities for cooperation, concerns and issues their countries face in the infrastructure implementation process.

  14. Ontario-U.S. power outages : impacts on critical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This paper described the power outage and resulting blackout that occurred on August 14, 2003 and identified how critical infrastructure was directly and interdependently impacted in Canada. The aim of the paper was to assist critical infrastructure protection and emergency management professionals in assessing the potential impacts of large-scale critical infrastructure disruptions. Information for the study was acquired from Canadian and American media reports and cross-sectoral information sharing with provincial and federal governments and the private sector. The blackout impacted most of the sources and means of generating, transmitting and distributing power within the area, which in turn impacted all critical infrastructure sectors. Landline and cellular companies experienced operational difficulties, which meant that emergency responders were impacted. Newspapers and the electronic media struggled to release information to the public. The banking and finance industry experienced an immediate degradation of services. The power outage caused shipping and storage difficulties for commercial retailers and dairy producers. A number of incidents were reported where only partially treated waste water was released into neighbouring waterways. The timing of the blackout coincided with the closures of workplaces and created additional difficulties on transportation networks. Many gas station pumps were inoperable. Police, fire departments and ambulance services experienced a dramatic increase in the volume of calls received, and all branches of the emergency services sector encountered transportation delays and difficulties with communications equipment. Nuclear reactors were also impacted. An estimated 150,000 Government of Canada employees were unable to report to work. Estimates have indicated that the power outage cost Ontario's economy between $1 and $2 billion. The outage negatively impacted 82 per cent of small businesses in Ontario. 170 refs., 3 figs

  15. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtak, F.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear power in Germany at present is confronting two challenges: On the one hand, technical innovations are required in order to meet the expectations of nuclear proponents while, on the other hand, a public stand must be taken vis-a-vis the demand to opt out of nuclear power. This means that nuclear engineers not only must perform their technical functions, but increasingly also engage themselves socially. Neglecting just one of these two challenges is likely to impair severely the future of nuclear power in Germany. In the absence of a swing in public opinion it will not be possible to build a new nuclear plant, and nuclear power will be doomed to extinction, at least in a number of countries, within a matter of decades. In the absence of technical innovation, today's LWR technology will cause the fissile uranium available naturally to be consumed, thus killing nuclear power for lack of future fissile material. In responding to the two challenges, nuclear technology must safeguard its future by not retreating into an ivory tower of pure technology; on the other hand, technical innovation is a prerequisite for its continued existence. (orig.) [de

  16. The update of competence and infrastructure to the near future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Marcio Soares; Mattos, Joao Roberto Loureiro de

    2009-01-01

    Currently, the Brazilian nuclear organizations are conducting joint efforts toward the management of existing personnel and infrastructure in order to update their competence to study and develop the nuclear fuel elements for high performance and extended burnup. As contribution to this effort, the Nuclear Technology Development Centre is promoting the update of the fuel rod design codes to ensure they are fit and appropriate to design purposes and to evaluations of the fuel rod performance in accordance with current and near future insertion conditions. Comprehensive models of thermal properties and in-pile behavior of the fuel are in development by the CDTN's expert staff, insertion into performance codes and validation against a representative database as the International Fuel Performance Experiments. The thermal properties of UO 2 and (U,Gd)O 2 have been reviewed and reduced into the analytical models based on a topological view of the matter and its properties. The current status of this project is presented in this paper. (author)

  17. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Gaddi

    With all the technical services running, the attention has moved toward the next shutdown that will be spent to perform those modifications needed to enhance the reliability of CMS Infrastructures. Just to give an example for the cooling circuit, a set of re-circulating bypasses will be installed into the TS/CV area to limit the pressure surge when a circuit is partially shut-off. This problem has affected especially the Endcap Muon cooling circuit in the past. Also the ventilation of the UXC55 has to be revisited, allowing the automatic switching to full extraction in case of magnet quench. (Normally 90% of the cavern air is re-circulated by the ventilation system.) Minor modifications will concern the gas distribution, while the DSS action-matrix has to be refined according to the experience gained with operating the detector for a while. On the powering side, some LV power lines have been doubled and the final schematics of the UPS coverage for the counting rooms have been released. The most relevant inte...

  18. The future of nuclear power

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James

    2012-01-01

    Newly conceived, safer reactor designs are being built in the United States (and around the world) to replace the 104 obsolete operating nuclear power reactors in this country alone. The designs--which once seemed exotic and futuristic--are now 40 years old, and one by one these vintage Generation II plants will reach the end of productive service in the next 30 years. The Future of Nuclear Power examines the advanced designs, practical concepts, and fully developed systems that have yet to be used. This book introduces readers to the traditional, American system of units, with some archaic te

  19. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2013-01-01

      Most of the CMS infrastructures at P5 will go through a heavy consolidation-work period during LS1. All systems, from the cryogenic plant of the superconducting magnet to the rack powering in the USC55 counting rooms, from the cooling circuits to the gas distribution, will undergo consolidation work. As announced in the last issue of the CMS Bulletin, we present here one of the consolidation projects of LS1: the installation of a new dry-gas plant for inner detectors inertion. So far the oxygen and humidity suppression inside the CMS Tracker and Pixel volumes were assured by flushing dry nitrogen gas evaporated from a large liquid nitrogen tank. For technical reasons, the maximum flow is limited to less than 100 m3/h and the cost of refilling the tank every two weeks with liquid nitrogen is quite substantial. The new dry-gas plant will supply up to 400 m3/h of dry nitrogen (or the same flow of dry air, during shut-downs) with a comparatively minimal operation cost. It has been evaluated that the...

  20. Inductive power transfer: Powering our future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covic, Grant A

    2013-01-01

    The ability to provide power without wires was imagined over a century ago, but assumed commercially impractical and impossible to realise. However for more than two decades the University of Auckland has been at the forefront of developing and commercialising this technology alongside its industrial partners. This research has proven that significant wireless power can be transferred over relatively large air-gaps efficiently and robustly. Early solutions were applied in industrial applications to power moving vehicles in clean room systems, industrial plants, and in theme parks, but more recently this research has helped develop technology that has the ability to impact us directly at home. The seminar will describe some of the early motivations behind this research, and introduce some of the solutions which have been developed by the team of researchers at Auckland over two decades, many of which have found their way into the market. It will also describe how the technology has recently been re-developed to enable battery charging of electric vehicles without the need to plug in, and alongside this how it has the potential to change the way we drive in the future

  1. Developing industrial infrastructures to support a programme of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Guidebook is intended to offer assistance in the many considerations and decisions involved in preparing the national industry for participation in a nuclear power programme. The heavy financial investment, the setting up of certain infrastructures many years ahead of plant construction, plus the high level of technology involved require early and systematic planning. A further purpose of this Guidebook is to serve particularly those decision makers and planners in the various governmental authorities, the technological institutions and in the industries likely to be involved in a nuclear project. These industries include the services of the national engineering resources, the domestic design and manufacturing groups as well as the civil construction companies. These will be responsible for plant erection, testing and commissioning and most of all for the establishment of a framework for quality assurance. All of these are the components of an essential infrastructure necessary to raise the standards of the national industry and to displace increasingly foreign suppliers to the extent possible. In addition, this Guidebook should help to show some of the implications, consequences and options involved in a nuclear power programme. It does not consider the basic decisions for going nuclear, nor does it review the choice of the technology or nuclear process selected for the programme. Instead, it limits itself to a consideration of the nuclear power plant and its essential cycle activities. Figs and tabs

  2. Industrial infrastructure for the Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    For the inception of the Indian nuclear power programme, great emphasis has been laid on development of comprehensive indigenous capability in design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. The choice of the pressurised heavy water reactor as the mainline for India's first generation nuclear power stations fitted into this perspective. Apart from the inherent advantages of high neutron economy, low fuelling costs and high capacity factors, this system offered significant opportunities for manufacture and design of all the components within the country. The development of indigenous capability has not been without its problems, namely cost overruns and delays. The main causes for these delays have been the developmental nature of the jobs involving learning process and continued tightening of the quality control requirements. The strategy of development to be pursued by any country is naturally dependent upon the size of the programme it wishes to embark upon and the state of industrial infrastructure in the country. The Indian experience has demonstrated that for development of a comprehensive capability, it is necessary to have a well formulated reactor policy, a good inter-disciplinary R and D base, a good base of conventional industrial infrastructure, a comprehensive manpower development programme and an innovative management. It is hoped that this experience will be of benefit to other developing countries embarking on their own nuclear programme

  3. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corak, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Energy production and use will contribute to global warming through greenhouse gas emissions in the next 50 years. Although nuclear power is faced with a lot of problems to be accepted by the public, it is still a significant option for the world to meet future needs without emitting carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and other atmospheric pollutants. In 2002, nuclear power provided approximately 17% of world energy consumption. There is belief that worldwide electricity consumption will increase in the next few years, especially in the developing countries followed by economic growth and social progress. Official forecasts shows that there will be a mere increase of 5% in nuclear electricity worldwide by 2020. There are also predictions that electricity use may increase at 75%. These predictions require a necessity for construction of new nuclear power plants. There are only a few realistic options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation: Increase efficiency in electricity generation and use; Expand use of renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, biomass and geothermal; Capture carbon dioxide emissions at fossil-fuelled electric generating plants and permanently sequester the carbon; Increase use of nuclear power. In spite of the advantages that nuclear power has, it is faced with stagnation and decline today. Nuclear power is faced with four critical problems that must be successfully defeat for the large expansion of nuclear power to succeed. Those problems are cost, safety, waste and proliferation. Disapproval of nuclear power is strengthened by accidents that occurred at Three Mile Island in 1979, at Chernobyl in 1986 and by accidents at fuel cycle facilities in Japan, Russia and in the United States of America. There is also great concern about the safety and security of transportation of nuclear materials and the security of nuclear facilities from terrorist attack. The paper will provide summarized review regarding cost, safety, waste and

  4. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Irrespective of the nuclear controversy which continues undiminished in the Federal Republic of Germany, the future of nuclear power is going to be determined by facts also in this country. Of course, the attitude of people plays an important role in this process, all the more so as it is highly emotionally biased in this matter. However, this attitude may change. Factors which could influence such a swing stem from the growing tendency to weigh the risks of all sources of energy, but also from the attitudes of the partner countries within and outside the European Community. Undoubtedly, also the growing energy requirement of the developing countries will be one of the factors determining the fate of nuclear power in this country. However, a key factor is politics which, after having weighed all possibilities, is required to always create optimal boundary conditions to ensure the long-term prosperity of the population. (orig.) [de

  5. Future developments in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.J.

    1978-12-01

    To date, the peaceful application of nuclear energy has been largely restricted to the generation of electricity. Even with such an application there is potential for wider use of the nuclear energy generated in providing heat for dwellings, control of climate for the production of vegetables and providing warm water for fish and lobster farming. It is possible to envisage specific applications of nuclear power reactors to process industries requiring large blocks of energy. These and other future developments are reviewed in this report. (author)

  6. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    Canadians are heavily dependent upon reliable and affordable sources of energy to sustain their lifestyle. In a world threatened by diminishing energy resources, Canadians need to plan for the future. Canadian electrical utilities must respond to rapidly changing circumstances and uncertainties to ensure that the public's demand for electricity is met with a high quality product. There is a need to strike a proper balance between demand management alternatives and new supply options. Nuclear power will remain as an alternative supply option. The place of CANDU will depend upon its continued high performance, public acceptance and the leadership given to the program

  7. Testing Situation Awareness Network for the Electrical Power Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Leszczyna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary electrical power infrastructure is exposed to new types of threats. The cause of such threats is related to the large number of new vulnerabilities and architectural weaknesses introduced by the extensive use of Information and communication Technologies (ICT in such complex critical systems. The power grid interconnection with the Internet exposes the grid to new types of attacks, such as Advanced Persistent Threats (APT or Distributed-Denial-ofService (DDoS attacks. When addressing this situation the usual cyber security technologies are prerequisite, but not sufficient. To counter evolved and highly sophisticated threats such as the APT or DDoS, state-of-the-art technologies including Security Incident and Event Management (SIEM systems, extended Intrusion Detection/Prevention Systems (IDS/IPS and Trusted Platform Modules (TPM are required. Developing and deploying extensive ICT infrastructure that supports wide situational awareness and allows precise command and control is also necessary. In this paper the results of testing the Situational Awareness Network (SAN designed for the energy sector are presented. The purpose of the tests was to validate the selection of SAN components and check their operational capability in a complex test environment. During the tests’ execution appropriate interaction between the components was verified.

  8. Electric Power Infrastructure Reliability And Security Research And Development Initiative. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, S.; Meeker, R.; Steurer, M.; Li, H.; Pamidi, S.; Rodrigo, H.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Cartes, D.; Ordonez, J.; Domijan, A.; Liu, W.; Cox, D.; McLaren, P.; Hovsapian, R.; Edwards, D.; Simmons, S.; Wilde, N.; Woodruff, S.; Kopriva, D.; Hussaini, Y.; Mohammed, O.; Zheng, J.; Baldwin, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    This is the final scientific/technical report for the Electric Power Infrastructure Reliability and Security R and D Initiative sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, under award number DE-FG02-05CH11292. This report covers results from the FSU-led, multi-institution effort conducted over the period 8/15/05 to 10/14/2007. Building upon existing infrastructure for power systems research, modeling, and simulation, the Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS) at Florida State University (FSU) is developing world-class programs in electric power systems research and education to support future electric power system needs and challenges. With U.S. Department of Energy Support, FSU CAPS has engaged in a multi-faceted effort to conduct basic and applied research towards understanding, developing, and deploying technologies and approaches that can lead to improved reliability and security of the North American electric power generation and delivery infrastructure. This wide-reaching project, through a number of carefully selected thrusts cutting across several research disciplines, set out to address key terrestrial electric utility power system issues and challenges. The challenges and the thrusts to address them were arrived at through analysis of a number of national reports and recommendations combined with input from an experienced multi-disciplined team of power systems research staff and faculty at FSU CAPS. The resulting project effort can be grouped into four major areas: - Power Systems and New Technology Insertion - Controls, Protection, and Security - Simulation Development - High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS)

  9. Nuclear power has a future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, O.

    2000-01-01

    Consensus is possible. This is the message of the President of the Deutsches Atomforum, Dr. Otto Majewski, at the opening of the Forum's Winter Meeting in Berlin. Majewski emphasized that the operators of nuclear power plants urgently needed security in planning, given the rapid change in the European electricity market. It was time to get away from the onesided discussion about running times and opt-out, and focus again on the entire spectrum of a long term, calculable, reliable energy policy. Besides a sustainable clarification of the transport issue, the retroactive taxation of the reserves accumulated for waste management constituted an unacceptable burden on operators. Companies would take legal action against these measures, should it turn out to be necessary. Dr. Majewski expressed himself unequivocally in favour of the EPR as a reactor line for the future. (orig.) [de

  10. Increased costs to US pavement infrastructure from future temperature rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, B. Shane; Guido, Zack; Gudipudi, Padmini; Feinberg, Yarden

    2017-10-01

    Roadway design aims to maximize functionality, safety, and longevity. The materials used for construction, however, are often selected on the assumption of a stationary climate. Anthropogenic climate change may therefore result in rapid infrastructure failure and, consequently, increased maintenance costs, particularly for paved roads where temperature is a key determinant for material selection. Here, we examine the economic costs of projected temperature changes on asphalt roads across the contiguous United States using an ensemble of 19 global climate models forced with RCP 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. Over the past 20 years, stationary assumptions have resulted in incorrect material selection for 35% of 799 observed locations. With warming temperatures, maintaining the standard practice for material selection is estimated to add approximately US$13.6, US$19.0 and US$21.8 billion to pavement costs by 2010, 2040 and 2070 under RCP4.5, respectively, increasing to US$14.5, US$26.3 and US$35.8 for RCP8.5. These costs will disproportionately affect local municipalities that have fewer resources to mitigate impacts. Failing to update engineering standards of practice in light of climate change therefore significantly threatens pavement infrastructure in the United States.

  11. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Infrastructures teams are preparing for the LS1 activities. A long list of maintenance, consolidation and upgrade projects for CMS Infrastructures is on the table and is being discussed among Technical Coordination and sub-detector representatives. Apart from the activities concerning the cooling infrastructures (see below), two main projects have started: the refurbishment of the SX5 building, from storage area to RP storage and Muon stations laboratory; and the procurement of a new dry-gas (nitrogen and dry air) plant for inner detector flushing. We briefly present here the work done on the first item, leaving the second one for the next CMS Bulletin issue. The SX5 building is entering its third era, from main assembly building for CMS from 2000 to 2007, to storage building from 2008 to 2012, to RP storage and Muon laboratory during LS1 and beyond. A wall of concrete blocks has been erected to limit the RP zone, while the rest of the surface has been split between the ME1/1 and the CSC/DT laborat...

  12. The Future of Economic Power

    OpenAIRE

    Malanciuc Bogdan Simion

    2014-01-01

    The importance of power in the development of society is undeniable. The power relations between national economies are more and more important and should be considered in every international economics analysis. Economic power has become the bedrock of both the military and the political power. Today the balance of economic power is shifting. The emerging states (China in the first place) are now demanding a greater role in global politics, challenging the existing international order dominat...

  13. The ATLAS High Level Trigger Infrastructure, Performance and Future Developments

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS High Level Trigger (HLT) is a distributed real-time software system that performs the final online selection of events produced during proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It is designed as a two-stage event filter running on a farm of commodity PC hardware. Currently the system consists of about 850 multi-core processing nodes that will be extended incrementally following the increasing luminosity of the LHC to about 2000 nodes depending on the evolution of the processor technology. Due to the complexity and similarity of the algorithms a large fraction of the software is shared between the online and offline event reconstruction. The HLT Infrastructure serves as the interface between the two domains and provides common services for the trigger algorithms. The consequences of this design choice will be discussed and experiences from the operation of the ATLAS HLT during cosmic ray data taking and first beam in 2008 will be presented. Since the event processing time at the HL...

  14. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrea Gaddi

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the intense campaign of replacement of the leaky bushing on the Endcap circuits, other important activities have also been completed, with the aim of enhancing the overall reliability of the cooling infrastructures at CMS. Remaining with the Endcap circuit, the regulating valve that supplies cold water to the primary side of the circuit heat-exchanger, is not well adapted in flow capability and a new part has been ordered, to be installed during a stop of LHC. The instrumentation monitoring of the refilling rate of the circuits has been enhanced and we can now detect leaks as small as 0.5 cc/sec, on circuits that have nominal flow rates of some 20 litres/sec. Another activity starting now that the technical stop is over is the collection of spare parts that are difficult to find on the market. These will be stored at P5 with the aim of reducing down-time in case of component failure. Concerning the ventilation infrastructures, it has been noticed that in winter time the relative humidity leve...

  15. Advanced simulation for analysis of critical infrastructure : abstract cascades, the electric power grid, and Fedwire.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Beyeler, Walter Eugene

    2004-08-01

    Critical Infrastructures are formed by a large number of components that interact within complex networks. As a rule, infrastructures contain strong feedbacks either explicitly through the action of hardware/software control, or implicitly through the action/reaction of people. Individual infrastructures influence others and grow, adapt, and thus evolve in response to their multifaceted physical, economic, cultural, and political environments. Simply put, critical infrastructures are complex adaptive systems. In the Advanced Modeling and Techniques Investigations (AMTI) subgroup of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC), we are studying infrastructures as complex adaptive systems. In one of AMTI's efforts, we are focusing on cascading failure as can occur with devastating results within and between infrastructures. Over the past year we have synthesized and extended the large variety of abstract cascade models developed in the field of complexity science and have started to apply them to specific infrastructures that might experience cascading failure. In this report we introduce our comprehensive model, Polynet, which simulates cascading failure over a wide range of network topologies, interaction rules, and adaptive responses as well as multiple interacting and growing networks. We first demonstrate Polynet for the classical Bac, Tang, and Wiesenfeld or BTW sand-pile in several network topologies. We then apply Polynet to two very different critical infrastructures: the high voltage electric power transmission system which relays electricity from generators to groups of distribution-level consumers, and Fedwire which is a Federal Reserve service for sending large-value payments between banks and other large financial institutions. For these two applications, we tailor interaction rules to represent appropriate unit behavior and consider the influence of random transactions within two stylized networks: a regular homogeneous array

  16. Perspectives on the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernoff, H.; Friedman, D.

    1990-01-01

    The US outlook on the future of nuclear power can be divided into three perspectives, here termed the macroeconomic perspective, the technological perspective, and the utility perspective (including independent power producers, or IPPs). A brief review of the macroeconomic and technological perspectives shows how differently the public, the media, politicians, and many nonutility advocates of nuclear power view the future of nuclear power (and, especially, the requirements for new orders) compared with the utilities and prospective IPPs

  17. Cost recovery of congested infrastructure under market power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, Erik T.

    2017-01-01

    The Mohring–Harwitz (1962) theorem states that the degree of self-financing of congested infrastructure is equal to the elasticity of the capacity cost function in the optimum, so that under neutral scale economies exact self-financing applies. The theorem breaks down when the infrastructure is used

  18. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Document Server

    Andrea Gaddi

    2010-01-01

    During the last six months, the main activity on the cooling circuit has essentially been preventive maintenance. At each short machine technical stop, a water sample is extracted out of every cooling circuit to measure the induced radioactivity. Soon after, a visual check of the whole detector cooling network is done, looking for water leaks in sensitive locations. Depending on sub-system availability, the main water filters are replaced; the old ones are inspected and sent to the CERN metallurgical lab in case of suspicious sediments. For the coming winter technical stop, a number of corrective maintenance activities and infrastructure consolidation work-packages are foreseen. A few faulty valves, found on the muon system cooling circuit, will be replaced; the cooling gauges for TOTEM and CASTOR, in the CMS Forward region, will be either changed or shielded against the magnetic stray field. The demineralizer cartridges will be replaced as well. New instrumentation will also be installed in the SCX5 PC farm ...

  19. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Document Server

    A. Gaddi

    2011-01-01

    During the last winter technical stop, a number of corrective maintenance activities and infrastructure consolidation work-packages were completed. On the surface, the site cooling facility has passed the annual maintenance process that includes the cleaning of the two evaporative cooling towers, the maintenance of the chiller units and the safety checks on the software controls. In parallel, CMS teams, reinforced by PH-DT group personnel, have worked to shield the cooling gauges for TOTEM and CASTOR against the magnetic stray field in the CMS Forward region, to add labels to almost all the valves underground and to clean all the filters in UXC55, USC55 and SCX5. Following the insertion of TOTEM T1 detector, the cooling circuit has been branched off and commissioned. The demineraliser cartridges have been replaced as well, as they were shown to be almost saturated. New instrumentation has been installed in the SCX5 PC farm cooling and ventilation network, in order to monitor the performance of the HVAC system...

  20. INFRASTRUCTURES

    CERN Document Server

    Andrea Gaddi

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important tasks for LS1 was achieved this autumn when all the electronics racks in the USC55 counting rooms were switched from the standard powering network to the CMS low-voltage UPS. This long-sought move will prevent fastidious power cuts of the CMS electronics in case of short power glitches on the main powering network, as already assured to the detector front-end electronics in UXC55. In the same time, a study to update the dedicated UPS units for some crucial detector sub-systems, as the Magnet Control System (MCS), the Detector Safety System (DSS) and the IT Network Star-points, has been lunched. A new architecture, with fully redundant UPS units, able to assure power supply in case of long network outage (up to a maximum of five hours, in the case of the Magnet) has been recently presented by the EN-EL group and is currently under evaluation. The dry-gas plant recently commissioned in SH5 has passed a first test in order to understand the time needed to switch from dry-air to dry-n...

  1. Renewable and nuclear power: A common future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbruggen, Aviel

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power and renewable energy are the main options to bring down the carbon intensity of commercial energy supply. What technology is unlimited backstop supply depends on its performance on the sustainability criteria: democratic decided, globally accessible, environmental benign, low risk, affordable. Renewable power meets all criteria, with affordability under debate. Maximizing energy efficiency as prerequisite, the affordable sustainable option in fact is the twin efficiency/renewable power. Nuclear power falls short on the sustainability criteria and its public acceptance is low. Nuclear proponents now propose nuclear and renewable energy as a suitable couple to address the climate change challenge. The two antagonists however are mutually exclusive on the five major directions of future power systems. First, nuclear power has been architect of the expansive 'business-as-usual' energy economy since the 1950s. Second, add-on by fossil-fuelled power plants is bulky and expansive for nuclear power, but is distributed, flexible and contracting over time for renewable power. Third, power grids for spreading bulky nuclear outputs are other than the interconnection between millions of distributed power sources requires. Fourth, risks and externalities and the proper technology itself of nuclear power limit its development perspectives, while efficiency/renewable power are still in their infancy. Fifth, their stalemate for R and D resources and for production capacities will intensify. Nuclear power and renewable power have no common future in safeguarding 'Our Common Future'

  2. Climate Vulnerability of Hydro-power infrastructure in the Eastern African Power Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Vignesh

    2017-04-01

    At present there is around 6000 MW of installed hydropower capacity in the Eastern African power pool (EAPP)[1]. With countries aggressively planning to achieve the Sustainable development goal (SDG) of ensuring access to affordable electricity for all, a three-fold increase in hydropower capacity is expected by 2040 [1]. Most of the existing and planned infrastructure lie inside the Nile River Basin. The latest assessment report (AR 5) from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) indicates a high level of climatic uncertainty in the Nile Basin. The Climate Moisture index (CMI) for the Eastern Nile region and the Nile Equatorial lakes varies significantly across the different General Circulation Models (GCM)[2]. Such high uncertainty casts a shadow on the plans to expand hydropower capacity, doubting whether hydropower expansion can contribute to the goal of improving access to electricity or end up as sunk investments. In this assessment, we analyze adaptation strategies for national energy systems in the Eastern African Power Pool (EAPP), which minimize the regret that could potentially arise from impacts of a changed climate. An energy systems model of the EAPP is developed representing national electricity supply infrastructure. Cross border transmission and hydropower infrastructure is defined at individual project level. The energy systems model is coupled with a water systems management model of the Nile River Basin that calculates the water availability at different hydropower infrastructures under a range of climate scenarios. The results suggest that a robust adaptation strategy consisting of investments in cross border electricity transmission infrastructure and diversifying sources of electricity supply will require additional investments of USD 4.2 billion by 2050. However, this leads to fuel and operational cost savings of up to USD 22.6 billion, depending on the climate scenario. [1] "Platts, 2016. World Electric Power Plants Database

  3. The future of nuclear power in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    The future of nuclear power in Mexico shows interesting aspects: the nuclear power is the source of energy that can supply large proportions of energy, that the country needs; the Kw/h of nuclear power is the most economic energy; the installation of 20 nucleoelectric plants will grant future jobs, the associated nuclear industry can be nationally integrated in the natural uranium cycle. (author)

  4. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi

    The annual maintenance of detector services took place from mid November to mid January as planned. This involved a full stoppage of water-cooling circuits on November 24th with a gradual restarting from mid-January 09. The annual maintenance service included the cleaning of the two SF5 cooling towers and the service of the chiller plants on surface. The cryogenic plant serving the CMS Magnet was shut-down as well to perform the annual maintenance. In addition to that, the overall site power has been reduced from 8 to 2 MW, in order to cope with the switching to the Swiss power network in winter. Full power was reinstated at the end of January. The cooling network has seen the installation of a bypass for the endcap circuit, in order to limit pressure surges when one endcap is shut-off. In addition, filters have been added on most of the cooling loops in UXC55 to better protect the muon chambers. At the same time a global cleaning campaign of all the filters (more than 500 pieces) has been completed. As expe...

  5. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, G.

    1988-01-01

    The desire for safe and plentiful forms of energy led to the rapid development of the nuclear power industry in the years following the Second World War. Although initially embraced as the answer to the dwindling supply of non-renewable fuel resources, plans to expand nuclear power generation have met with growing public resistance as investigations point to the possible harmful effects of radiation, an unavoidable by-product of the process. This book presents the case for nuclear power in the light of the increasing amount of controversy surrounding the issue. Diverse and often contradicting nuclear policies in different countries are examined with reference to the political, historical and economic factors which account for these wide variations in public sentiment. A detailed analysis is given of the growth of world energy demand, energy vs economic growth and alternative energies, and particular emphasis is given to aspects of the environment, pollution, safety, health hazards and the measurement and control of radiation. The role of public attitudes and awareness also receives special attention: a fuller and less emotional public understanding of nuclear power is necessary to assess the various benefits and risks which accompany this important source of energy

  6. Risoe energy report 8. The intelligent energy system infrastructure for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Soenderberg Petersen, L. (eds.)

    2009-09-15

    This report is volume 8 in a series started in 2002, and will take its point of reference in the need for the development of a highly flexible and intelligent energy system infrastructure which facilitates substantial higher amounts of renewable energy than today's energy systems. This intelligent and flexible infrastructure is a prerequisite in achieving the goals set up by IPCC in 2007 on CO{sub 2} reductions as well as ensuring the future security of energy supply in all regions of the world. The report presents a generic approach for future infrastructure issues on local, regional and global scale with focus on the energy system. The report is based on chapters and updates from Risoe Energy Report 1 - 7, as well as input from contributors to the DTU Climate Change Technology workshops and available international literature and reports. (author)

  7. Nuclear power - a reliable future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, Serban

    2002-01-01

    The Ministry of Education and Research - Department of Research has implemented a national Research and Development program taking into consideration the following: - the requirements of the European Union on research as a factor of development of the knowledge-based society; - the commitments to the assimilation and enforcement of the recommendations of the European Union on nuclear power prompted by the negotiations of the sections 'Science and Research' and ' Energy' of the aquis communautaire; - the major lines of interest in Romania in the nuclear power field established by National Framework Program of Cooperation with IAEA, signed on April 2001; - the short and medium term nuclear options of the Romanian Government; - the objectives of the National Nuclear Plan. The major elements of the nuclear research and development program MENER (Environment, Energy, Resources) supported by the Department of Research of the Ministry of Education and Research are the following: - reactor physics and nuclear fuel management; - operation safety of the Power Unit 1 of Cernavoda Nuclear Electric Power Station; - improved nuclear technological solutions at the Cernavoda NPP; - development of technologies for nuclear fuel cycle; - operation safety of the other nuclear plants in Romania; - assessment of nuclear risks and estimation of the radiological impact on the environment; - behavior of materials under the reactor service conditions and environmental conditions; - design of nuclear systems and equipment for the nuclear power stations and nuclear facilities; - radiological safety; - application of nuclear techniques and technologies in industry, agriculture, medicine and other fields of social life. Research to develop high performance methods and equipment for monitoring nuclear impact on environment are conducted to endorse the measures for radiation protection. Also mentioned are the research on implementing a new type of nuclear fuel cycle in CANDU reactors as well as

  8. The future for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall of Goring, Lord.

    1989-01-01

    Lord Marshall explains how the situation for nuclear power in late 1989 in the United Kingdom had come about. Despite warnings that for a successful nuclear programme a large generator which has the obligation to supply in a defined geographical area should operate, this is not what will happen under the plans to privatise the electricity supply industry in the UK. Under these no body will have the obligation to supply electricity and the distribution Company will not have the obligation to supply after the first few years. Other problems with the privatisation plans are discussed. The implications of the government's decisions on nuclear power, first to maintain the Magnox stations in the government sector, second to abandon the full PWR construction programme and thirdly not to transfer the AGRs to the private sector, are discussed. (UK)

  9. Efficient integration of renewable energy into future energy systems. Development of European energy infrastructures in the period 2030 to 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, Carolin; Uhlig, Jeanette; Zoch, Immo (eds.)

    2011-10-15

    In consideration of strategic climate mitigation, energy security and economic competitiveness goals, the EU passed the Directive 2009/28/EC, including a binding target of 20 per cent renewable energy consumption in the EU by 2020. This target is comprehensive and includes energy generation, transport, heating and cooling sectors. In 2008, renewable energy consumption in the EU was about 10 per cent. So meeting the 20 per cent renewable energy objective will require massive changes in energy production, transmission and consumption in the EU. Furthermore, it is obvious that the development of the energy system will not stop in 2020, but that it will continue towards 2050 and beyond. Over the past century, the European electricity system was developed in line with a national utilit y perspective which heavily emphasised large, centralised conventional power production. Investment decisions for new energy infrastructure and technology were typically made at the national level. In the future, much more energy production will be based on local or regional renewable energy sources (RES). Many consumers may also become energy producers feeding into the infrastructures. Transnational energy transfers will gain in importance. These changes will require very different electricity and gas infrastructures and decision-making processes from today. Lack of infrastructure capacity is already a barrier for the further deployment of RES-based energy production in some regions in Europe. (orig.)

  10. Challenges for future space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandhorst, H.W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Forecasts of space power needs are presented. The needs fall into three broad categories: survival, self-sufficiency, and industrialization. The cost of delivering payloads to orbital locations and from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Mars are determined. Future launch cost reductions are predicted. From these projections the performances necessary for future solar and nuclear space power options are identified. The availability of plentiful cost effective electric power and of low cost access to space are identified as crucial factors in the future extension of human presence in space

  11. Transportation infrastructure resiliency : a review of transportation infrastructure resiliency in light of future impacts of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    The threat of global climate change and its impact on our worlds infrastructure is a rapidly growing reality. Particularly, as seen in recent storm events such as Hurricane Katrina and Sandy in the United States, transportation infrastructure is o...

  12. Nuclear power: the future reassessed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, L [East Anglia Univ., Norwich (UK). Environmental Risk Assessment Unit (ERAU)

    1991-02-01

    In recommending that consent be given for the construction of a further Pressurized Water Reactor at Hinkley Point in Somerset, UK, the Inspector at the Public Inquiry underlined two major benefits: (i) the contribution an additional large nuclear plant would make to the strategic objective of diversity of supply, and (ii) the environmental benefits of nuclear power compared to many alternative forms of electricity generation. The major environmental advantages of nuclear power over fossil fuel combustion arise both because of the small amounts of fuel required - 1/18,000 compared to coal - thus minimizing transport needs and land use, and because of the virtual absence of atmospheric emissions from nuclear stations. Nuclear reactors emit no acid gases and the nuclear fuel cycle gives rise to only small amounts of carbon dioxide. An expansion of the nuclear option is often opposed on three grounds; the need to dispose of radioactive waste; the danger of the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the risk of a large scale accident. However all these doubts can be answered and the arguments supporting nuclear safety are summarized. It is argued that the contribution to primary energy demand in Europe could be doubled or trebled by 2020 with considerable benefits in overall safety environmental impacts at no extra cost. (author).

  13. Nuclear power: the future reassessed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    In recommending that consent be given for the construction of a further Pressurized Water Reactor at Hinkley Point in Somerset, UK, the Inspector at the Public Inquiry underlined two major benefits: (i) the contribution an additional large nuclear plant would make to the strategic objective of diversity of supply, and (ii) the environmental benefits of nuclear power compared to many alternative forms of electricity generation. The major environmental advantages of nuclear power over fossil fuel combustion arise both because of the small amounts of fuel required - 1/18,000 compared to coal - thus minimizing transport needs and land use, and because of the virtual absence of atmospheric emissions from nuclear stations. Nuclear reactors emit no acid gases and the nuclear fuel cycle gives rise to only small amounts of carbon dioxide. An expansion of the nuclear option is often opposed on three grounds; the need to dispose of radioactive waste; the danger of the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the risk of a large scale accident. However all these doubts can be answered and the arguments supporting nuclear safety are summarized. It is argued that the contribution to primary energy demand in Europe could be doubled or trebled by 2020 with considerable benefits in overall safety environmental impacts at no extra cost. (author)

  14. INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Gaddi and P. Tropea

    2012-01-01

      During the Year-End Technical Stop all the systems have been carefully inspected in order to assure a smooth running through the crucial year 2012. Regarding the electrical distribution, the annual General Emergency Stop test (AUG, in CERN language) has shown a discrepancy in the action matrix, as some racks were not cut off by the AUG action as they should have been. The subsequent investigation quickly indicated that a missing connection at the main UPS switchboard was the source of the problem. The problem has been addressed to the EN/EL group responsible for the equipment and a new test is planned in the beginning of March. Some consolidation work has been carried out as well, namely the doubling of the line powering the rack that houses the DCS servers in USC55. During the last months of the technical stop, the cooling systems of CMS have undergone the usual preventive maintenance, a few corrective interventions and a huge programme of performance tests. The preventive maintenance programm...

  15. Power and the future generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rummery, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    In this keynote address, the author, who was acting president of AECL at the time of the conference, emphasizes the importance of nuclear energy to Canada, and its future importance to the developing countries. In 1992, nuclear energy supplied 15% of Canada's electricity, employed 30,000 people in Canada, created at least 10,000 jobs in other sectors, generated federal tax revenues of C$700 million, and by supplanting coal and gas imports saved about C$1 billion. Export sales prospects in China, Korea, Turkey, the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand are indicated. AECL is presently undergoing reorganization for greater efficiency. A public opinion poll indicated about 70% Canadian public support for nuclear energy

  16. Market Power in Bilateral Oligopoly Markets with Nonexpendable Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funaki, Y.; Houba, H.E.D.; Motchenkova, E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: We consider price-fee competition in bilateral oligopolies with perfectly-divisible goods, non-expandable infrastructures, concentrated agents on both sides, and constant marginal costs. We define and characterize stable market outcomes. Buyers exclusively trade with the supplier with whom

  17. Increasing the resilience and security of the United States' power infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happenny, Sean F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The United States' power infrastructure is aging, underfunded, and vulnerable to cyber attack. Emerging smart grid technologies may take some of the burden off of existing systems and make the grid as a whole more efficient, reliable, and secure. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is funding research into several aspects of smart grid technology and grid security, creating a software simulation tool that will allow researchers to test power infrastructure control and distribution paradigms by utilizing different smart grid technologies to determine how the grid and these technologies react under different circumstances. Understanding how these systems behave in real-world conditions will lead to new ways to make our power infrastructure more resilient and secure. Demonstrating security in embedded systems is another research area PNNL is tackling. Many of the systems controlling the U.S. critical infrastructure, such as the power grid, lack integrated security and the aging networks protecting them are becoming easier to attack.

  18. Electric Power Infrastructure Reliability and Security (EPIRS) Reseach and Development Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Meeker; L. Baldwin; Steinar Dale; Alexander Domijan; Davild Larbalestier; Hui Li; Peter McLaren; Sastry Pamidi; Horatio Rodrigo; Michael Steurer

    2010-03-31

    Power systems have become increasingly complex and face unprecedented challenges posed by population growth, climate change, national security issues, foreign energy dependence and an aging power infrastructure. Increased demand combined with increased economic and environmental constraints is forcing state, regional and national power grids to expand supply without the large safety and stability margins in generation and transmission capacity that have been the rule in the past. Deregulation, distributed generation, natural and man-made catastrophes and other causes serve to further challenge and complicate management of the electric power grid. To meet the challenges of the 21st century while also maintaining system reliability, the electric power grid must effectively integrate new and advanced technologies both in the actual equipment for energy conversion, transfer and use, and in the command, control, and communication systems by which effective and efficient operation of the system is orchestrated - in essence, the 'smart grid'. This evolution calls for advances in development, integration, analysis, and deployment approaches that ultimately seek to take into account, every step of the way, the dynamic behavior of the system, capturing critical effects due to interdependencies and interaction. This approach is necessary to better mitigate the risk of blackouts and other disruptions and to improve the flexibility and capacity of the grid. Building on prior Navy and Department of Energy investments in infrastructure and resources for electric power systems research, testing, modeling, and simulation at the Florida State University (FSU) Center for Advanced Power Systems (CAPS), this project has continued an initiative aimed at assuring reliable and secure grid operation through a more complete understanding and characterization of some of the key technologies that will be important in a modern electric system, while also fulfilling an education and

  19. The future of nuclear power in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, D.

    1996-01-01

    The current and future prospects of the nuclear power industry in Europe are assessed in this Financial Times Energy Publishing report. Key issues relating to the development of the industry in both Eastern and Western Europe are addressed. Changing governmental and popular attitudes to nuclear power are described and nuclear energy's likely future contribution to Europe's energy needs is discussed. Detailed production and consumption statistics make the document useful reading for those in nuclear generating companies, electric utilities, major power consumers, waste management companies, governments, regulatory bodies, investors and environmental groups amongst others. (UK)

  20. Challenges for future space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandhorst, H.W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The future appears rich in missions that will extend the frontiers of knowledge, human presence in space, and opportunities for profitable commerce. The key to success of these ventures is the availability of plentiful, cost effective electric power and assured, low cost access to space. While forecasts of space power needs are problematic, an assessment of future needs based on terrestrial experience was made. These needs fall into three broad categories-survival, self sufficiency and industrialization. The cost of delivering payloads to orbital locations from low earth orbit (LEO) to Mars was determined and future launch cost reductions projected. From these factors, then, projections of the performance necessary for future solar and nuclear space power options were made. These goals are largely dependent upon orbital location and energy storage needs

  1. Nuclear power a viable energy choice for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Global energy use will most likely increase to more than double by 2050, which is e.g. the medium value of the projection in the Intergovernmentals Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES). How to reconcile the projections with the current nuclear status? In its first fifty years, nuclear power has grown from 5 MWe of power production to an installed worldwide capacity of 360 GWe in 30 countries. Nuclear power provides about 16% of the total electricity in the world and is contributing to the reduction of the emission of greenhouse gases from the power sector. The SRES scenarios identify a gap between the current electricity generation capacity and the capacity requirements in 2050 of 360 GWe and 1 500 GWe. Three key factors will determine the future contribution of nuclear power: - improved economics, - national energy choice and supporting infrastructure as well as institutional arrangement, and - the degree to which advances are implemented in evolutionary and innovative reactor and fuel cycle technologies, to address safety, waste and proliferation concerns, as well as economic competitiveness. The economics of nuclear power are one main topic in industrial countries. A Japanese case study on energy security credit shows that nuclear power will eventually be a winner in the long term perspective due to amortisation and stable fuel prices. Nuclear power is also a part of nuclear technologies to address daunting challenges in the developing countries - hunger, disease, poverty, and shortage of drinking water and electricity. (orig.)

  2. Thermal-hydraulic R and D infrastructure for water cooled reactors of the Indian nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, P.K.; Jain, V.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    R and D has been the critical ingredient of Indian Nuclear Power Program from the very inception. Approach to R and D infrastructure has been closely associated with the three-stage nuclear power program that was crafted on the basis of available resources and technology in the short-term and energy security in the long-term. Early R and D efforts were directed at technologies relevant to Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) which are currently the mainstay of Indian nuclear power program. Lately, the R and D program has been steered towards the design and development of advanced and innovative reactors with the twin objective of utilization of abundant thorium and to meet the future challenges to nuclear power such as enhanced safety and reliability, better economy, proliferation resistance etc. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is an Indian innovative reactor currently being developed to realize the above objectives. Extensive R and D infrastructure has been created to validate the system design and various passive concepts being incorporated in the AHWR. This paper provides a brief review of R and D infrastructure that has been developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre for thermal-hydraulic investigations for water-cooled reactors of Indian nuclear power program. (author)

  3. Solar power role in the future power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebkov, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    One studied the most essential factors, materials and processes governing the role of the solar power in the future power generation. Paper describes new principles to convert solar energy, to produce solar silicon and solar elements, to encapsulate solar modules, to make use of stationary solar concentrators [ru

  4. The IDC’s role in stimulating and supporting infrastructure innovation : Past, Present & Future

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matshekga, L

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available and will achieve this through focus on the following sectors: Energy:  Conventional: coal, gas, nuclear.  Renewables: solar, wind, hydro, biomass, biogas.  Non-conventional: co-generation, waste-to-energy, geothermal, wave, hydrogen/fuel cells....  Infrastructure: power transmission & distribution lines, energy storage (excl. batteries & petroleum  Efficiency: on-grid, off-grid, demand-side management (installation & monitoring) – load limiting & shifting. Logistics (mainly PPP):  Land: road, rail...

  5. Kenya National Presentation on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyanjui, B

    2010-01-01

    Kenya will factored 1200MW of nuclear energy in the period 2022-2023 of the national Least Cost Power Development Plan and 4200MW by 2030. A national nuclear power programme is now at inception. The National Economic and Social Council endorsed adoption of the nuclear programme in April 2010. Electricity demand is expected to rise from the current 1200 MW to over 15000 MW by 2030. The achievement of the Vision 2030 requires affordable and stable electricity tariffs. Formation of a Nuclear Power Committee to study and initially promote the development of the nuclear power program will be established e.g. Nuclear Power Committee - Kenyan version of Nuclear Energy Programme Implementing Organization formed. The Nuclear Power Committee is expected to precede formation of the NEPIO. There was proposal to review of current laws –e.g. Energy Act, Radiation Protection Act, Environmental Management and Control Act, Penal Code, etc. Potential sites proposed along the Indian Ocean Coastal areas, near Lake Victoria and the central region near the main national hydropower plants, based on power grid layout and water bodies. Kenya is in Phase 1 of milestones- Consideration before a decision is taken to start a NPP. Capacity Building towards Development of a Nuclear Power Programme (NPP) in Kenya is underway. To implement the national least cost power development plan so as to increase the capacity from current 1,300MW to 18,000MW by 2030 to support achievement of the ‘Vision 2030’

  6. Hydroelectric power in Romania. Past - present - future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogan, V.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the past and present situation in hydroelectric power (achievements, rates of commissioning and so on) and the future strategies for the hydroelectric power resource development in the conditions of a free market economy. At present the contribution of hydroelectric power in the Romania's total power balance is about 16,500 GW h/year which represents nearly 28 %. The theoretical hydroelectric power potential of Romania is 75,000 GW h/year while the technical potential, which could actually be developed, is only 40,000 GW h/year. Finally, there are presented the main directions in the hydroelectric power development up to the year 2020. (author) 3 tabs

  7. Control Architecture for Future Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai

    for assessment of control architecture of electric power systems with a means-ends perspective. Given this purpose-oriented understanding of a power system, the increasingly stochastic nature of this problem shall be addressed and approaches for robust, distributed control will be proposed and analyzed....... The introduction of close-to-real-time markets is envisioned to enable fast distributed resource allocation while guaranteeing system stability. Electric vehicles will be studied as a means of distributed reversible energy storage and a flexible power electronic interface, with application to the case......This project looks at control of future electric power grids with a high proportion of wind power and a large number of decentralized power generation, consumption and storage units participating to form a reliable supply of electrical energy. The first objective is developing a method...

  8. The future of fission-electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morowski, J.V.

    1983-06-01

    Future worldwide electricity supply needs dictate the necessity of maintaining a sound capability for electricity and electric power generating facilities, including nuclear, as viable export commodities. A survey of fission-power plant types and the status of worldwide nuclear electric power illustrates the primary emphasis on LWR's and HWR's as two leading types in the export market. This survey examines the factors affecting the market prospects for the next five to fifteen years and provides a discussion on some possible improvements to current market circumstances. A comparative description is provided for some of the types of LWR and CANDU characteristics such as quantities, schedules, constructability factors, and equipment and system. Important factors in the selection process for future nuclear power plants are discussed. Some factors included are seismic design requirements; plant design description and possible site layout; plant protection, control and instrumentation; thermal cycle design and arrangement; and special construction and rigging requirements

  9. Coarse-Grained Online Monitoring of BTI Aging by Reusing Power-Gating Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Tenentes, V.; Rossi, D.; Sheng Yang,; Khursheed, S.; Al-Hashimi, B.M.; Gunn, S.R.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel coarse-grained technique for monitoring online the Bias Temperature Instability (BTI) aging of circuits by exploiting their power gating infrastructure. The proposed technique relies on monitoring the discharge time of the virtual-power-network during stand-by operations, the value of which depends on the threshold voltage of the CMOS devices in the power-gated design (PGD). It does not require any distributed sensors, because the virtual-power network is alr...

  10. Electric power infrastructure in Asia and the Pacific: economics and investment opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarsono, B.S.; Saha, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the status and potential of the Asia Pacific electric power infrastructure, including the transmission and distribution system, to highlight some of the most relevant issues in the sector and to look at the prospect of investment opportunity for the private sector in the power industry

  11. A Statistical Approach to Planning Reserved Electric Power for Railway Infrastructure Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Brabec, M. (Marek); Pelikán, E. (Emil); Konár, O. (Ondřej); Kasanický, I. (Ivan); Juruš, P. (Pavel); Sadil, J.; Blažek, P.

    2013-01-01

    One of the requirements on railway infrastructure administration is to provide electricity for day-to-day operation of railways. We propose a statistically based approach for the estimation of maximum 15-minute power within a calendar month for a given region. This quantity serves as a basis of contracts between railway infrastructure administration and electricity distribution system operator. We show that optimization of the prediction is possible, based on underlying loss function deriv...

  12. The future for distributed power in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanwarpal, Vishvjeet

    2000-01-01

    The substantial potential market opportunities for on-site tailor-made cogeneration units in Asia generally is discussed. The article also looks at India, Australia, Japan and Indonesia in particular. The article is presented under the sub-headings of (i) Asian power and IPP developments; (ii) captive capacity and rationale; (iii) Asian captive capacity; (iv) captive power plants; (v) key drivers of CPPs in Asia; (vi) cogeneration plants; (vii) cogeneration application industries; (viii) biomass power for Asia (ix) key hurdles in cogeneration development; (x) future potential of cogeneration and (xi) country snapshots

  13. Applicability of the proposed evaluation method for social infrastructures to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimura, Tomiyasu

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an evaluation method for social infrastructures, and verifies the applicability of the proposed evaluation method to social infrastructures by applying it to nuclear power plants, which belong to social infrastructures. In the proposed evaluation method for social infrastructures, the authors chose four evaluation viewpoints and proposed common evaluation standards for the evaluation indexes obtained from each viewpoint. By applying this system to the evaluation of nuclear power plants, the evaluation index examples were obtained from the evaluation viewpoints. Furthermore, when the level of the common evaluation standards of the proposed evaluation method was applied to the evaluation of the activities of nuclear power plants based on the regulations, it was confirmed that these activities are at the highest level. Through this application validation, it was clarified that the proposed evaluation method for social infrastructures had certain effectiveness. The four evaluation viewpoints are 'service,' 'environment,' 'action factor,' and 'operation and management.' Part of the application examples to a nuclear power plant are as follows: (1) in the viewpoint of service: the operation rate of the power plant, and operation costs, and (2) in the viewpoint of environment: external influence related to nuclear waste and radioactivity, and external effect related to cooling water. (A.O.)

  14. Site infrastructure as required during the construction and erection of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.F.; Wagner, H.

    1978-01-01

    In general, in an exchange of experience on constructing nuclear power plants priority is given to design and lay-out, financing, quality assurance etc., but in this paper an attempt has been made to describe range and type of site infrastructure required during construction and erection. Site infrastructure will make considerable demands on the planning, supply of material and maintenance that may result from the frequently very isolated location of power plant sites. Examples for specific values and experiences are given for a nuclear power plant with two units on the 1300-MW type at present under construction of the Persian Gulf in Iran. Data concerning the site infrastructure, including examples, are given and explained on the basis of graphs. The site is split up into a technical and a social infrastructure. The main concern of the technical site infrastructure is the timely provision and continuous availability of electric energy, water, communication grids, workshops, warehouses, offices, transport and handling facilities, as well as the provision of heavy load roads, harbour facilities, etc. The social site infrastructure in general comprises accommodation, food supplies and the care and welfare of all site personnel, which includes a hospital, school, self-service shop, and sport and recreation facilities. (author)

  15. Nuclear power. What policies for what future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiriet, Lucien.

    1976-01-01

    A long- and very long-dated estimation of the world uranium resources are given comparatively to that of fissile energies, and the short- and mean-dated distributions of these resources and uranium economy are discussed in the light of foresights concerning the energy consumption provided for France and the most important industrial countries in 1985. The competitive character and the economic future of nuclear power are discussed. The incidence that the evolution in the nuclear policies of the principal industrial countries had, in the past, on the formation and growth of the market of nuclear power production is shown. The future possibilities of nuclear reactors and nuclear hydrogen are evaluated with the role of nuclear power in an economic policy in national independence [fr

  16. The future of distributed power in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobenic, J.

    2002-01-01

    Maxim Power Corporation is a provider of distributed energy and environmental solutions with a total of 55 MW of installed generating capacity in Canada, Europe and Asia, with 35 MW in Alberta. The 8 MW Taber facility in southern Alberta was described. Maxim operates 25 other small scale power generation stations (1 MW units) across 4 sites in southern Alberta. All the sites are interconnected at 25 kV and are eligible for distribution credits. The 3 MW EVI facility which utilizes solution gas was also described in the PowerPoint presentation. Maxim operates an additional 3 projects totaling 10 MW. The paper made reference to issues regarding market attributes for distributed power, policy framework and the transition to a competitive power market in Alberta. The chronology of events in Alberta's power market from August 2000 to June 2001 was outlined. The impacts of deregulation on distributed power include: (1) artificially low price environment from market intervention, (2) high efficiency cogeneration opportunities have been eliminated, (3) business failures and reduced investment, and (4) private investment not afforded the same alternative cost recovery mechanisms as the Alberta balancing pool. The presentation concluded with a report card for Alberta's deregulation, giving a grade F for both present and future opportunities for distributed power in Alberta. 2 figs

  17. The future of nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, J.

    1993-01-01

    The future of nuclear power in Germany is not only a matter of technology, economy and ecology but, above all, a matter of political leadership, the quality of interaction of all groups of society, the need to take ideology out of politico-economico-technical matters, and of firmly standing up for a style of democracy in which majorities, not minorities, decide. The power economy is agreed that nuclear power is indispensable in a powerful electricity supply scheme. These should be the criteria to be met by an energy consensus: No nuclear plants should be sacrificed by being shut down before the end of their technical and economic service life; spent fuel and waste management in Germany should be secured with sufficient interim storage and repository storage capacities. (orig.) [de

  18. Future energy mix - also without nuclear power?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, C.

    2005-01-01

    The considerable rises in the price of oil in the months of October and November 2004 assigned topical importance to the 'Future Energy Mix - also without Nuclear Power?' meeting of young nuclear engineers and students with experts from politics, industry, and research at the YOUNG GENERATION event organized at the Biblis nuclear power station on November 4-6, 2004. Specialized presentations were made about these topics: The Biblis Nuclear Power Plant Site. The Effects of Deregulation on the Electricity Market Emission Trading - a Combination of Economy and Ecology? Energy Mix for the 21 st Century. The event was completed by a round-table discussion among leading experts, and a presentation of perspectives in university education in areas encompassing power technology. (orig.)

  19. Indian power sector: past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, C.V.J.; Lal, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    In India population and economic growth is expected to create serious power shortages triggering the need for new power generation capacity. The situation is worsened on account of stagnant conditions prevailing in the country during the past few years. The opening of economy to the global market is expected to usher in an increased economic growth bringing in its wake greater demand for power. It will, thus, be seen that to cater these requirements the power sector industry in the country will have to grow at a much faster rate in the near future. However, to have a correct perspective of the emerging scenario, it might be worthwhile to have a look at the past patterns of development. (author). 9 refs., 5 tabs

  20. Enhancing future resilience in urban drainage system: Green versus grey infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xin; Guo, Hao; Zeng, Siyu

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, the concept transition from fail-safe to safe-to-fail makes the application of resilience analysis popular in urban drainage systems (UDSs) with various implications and quantifications. However, most existing definitions of UDSs resilience are confined to the severity of flooding, while uncertainties from climate change and urbanization are not considered. In this research, we take into account the functional variety, topological complexity, and disturbance randomness of UDSs and define a new formula of resilience based on three parts of system severity, i.e. social severity affected by urban flooding, environmental severity caused by sewer overflow, and technological severity considering the safe operation of downstream facilities. A case study in Kunming, China is designed to compare the effect of green and grey infrastructure strategies on the enhancement of system resilience together with their costs. Different system configurations with green roofs, permeable pavement and storage tanks are compared by scenario analysis with full consideration of future uncertainties induced by urbanization and climate change. The research contributes to the development of sustainability assessment of urban drainage system with consideration of the resilience of green and grey infrastructure under future change. Finding the response measures with high adaptation across a variety of future scenarios is crucial to establish sustainable urban drainage system in a long term. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Understanding and enhancing future infrastructure resiliency: a socio-ecological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Daniel; Sircar, Indraneel; Dainty, Andrew; Fussey, Pete; Goodier, Chris

    2015-07-01

    The resilience of any system, human or natural, centres on its capacity to adapt its structure, but not necessarily its function, to a new configuration in response to long-term socio-ecological change. In the long term, therefore, enhancing resilience involves more than simply improving a system's ability to resist an immediate threat or to recover to a stable past state. However, despite the prevalence of adaptive notions of resilience in academic discourse, it is apparent that infrastructure planners and policies largely continue to struggle to comprehend longer-term system adaptation in their understanding of resilience. Instead, a short-term, stable system (STSS) perspective on resilience is prevalent. This paper seeks to identify and problematise this perspective, presenting research based on the development of a heuristic 'scenario-episode' tool to address, and challenge, it in the context of United Kingdom infrastructure resilience. The aim is to help resilience practitioners to understand better the capacities of future infrastructure systems to respond to natural, malicious threats. © 2015 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2015.

  2. Future demand scenarios of Bangladesh power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Md. Alam Hossain; Boie, Wulf; Denich, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    Data on the future electricity demand is an essential requirement for planning the expansion of a power system. The purpose of this study is to provide a general overview of electricity consumption in Bangladesh, forecast sector-wise electricity demand up to 2035 considering the base year 2005, and compare the results with official projections. The Long-range Energy Alternative Planning (LEAP) model with three scenarios, namely low gross domestic product (GDP) growth, average GDP growth and high GDP growth, is applied in this study. In the low to high GDP growth scenarios, the extent of industrial restructuring and technical advancement is gradually increased. The findings have significant implications with respect to energy conservation and economic development. The study also compares the projected per capita electricity consumption in Bangladesh with the historical growth in several other developing countries. Such an evaluation can create awareness among the planners of power system expansion in Bangladesh to meet the high future demand.

  3. Republic of Uganda National Presentation on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbit, B.; Tungotyo, T.D

    2010-01-01

    The total installed electricity capacity is 595.8 MW mainly hydropower, cogeneration from biomass and thermal power. The Installed Capacity is expected to rise to about 802 MW in 2011 with commissioning of Bujagali hydropower Plant currently under construction, and other mini hydropower plants. Current contribution to the Energy Supply Pattern: Electricity 1.1%, Oil products 9.5% and Biomass 89.4%. (Uganda Energy balance, 2009). The need to drift from use of Biomass as source of energy prompted the consideration of energy supply options which are environmentally friendly. This includes the energy efficiency campaigns, renewable energy technologies and NPP. Uganda government intends to substantially increase power generation capacity in the next 20 years of which nuclear will have significant contribution. Legal framework has been put in place and currently building of capacity through training of young scientists. Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development is the home of all the energy Sector programmes including the nuclear Energy Programme. The Atomic Energy Act 2008 has been promulgated and the Atomic Energy Council was established to regulate the peaceful application of Atomic energy. The Council is mandated to provide protection and safety of individuals, society and the environment from the dangers resulting from ionizing radiation

  4. RF Wireless Power Transfer: Regreening Future Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Ha-Vu; Kaddoum, Georges

    2017-01-01

    Green radio communication is an emerging topic since the overall footprint of information and communication technology (ICT) services is predicted to triple between 2007 and 2020. Given this research line, energy harvesting (EH) and wireless power transfer (WPT) networks can be evaluated as promising approaches. In this paper, an overview of recent trends for future green networks on the platforms of EH and WPT is provided. By rethinking the application of radio frequency (RF)-WPT, a new conc...

  5. Power supply in future: ecological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hustedt, M.

    2000-01-01

    The most important prerequisites for an ecological supply of energy in the future is the opting out of nuclear energy and the completion of the second and third phase of the socio-ecological tax reform. As a part of our energy will continue to be generated on the basis of fossil fuels in the foreseeable future, it is essential that a radical change takes place in the efficiency of fossil energy engineering. In addition to this, any possible energy-saving potential must be exploited; this includes the new energy-saving law, promoting the modernisation of old buildings and modern energy management (heat insulation, heating engineering, warm water heating etc.). For an ecological power supply the share of renewable energies must be increased to form a major pillar of our power supply. The '100,000-roof' programme of the German federal government and the development programme for near-market renewable energy sources form part of this approach. Energy research should shift its orientation and accelerate the conversion of our power supply: priority should be given to developing energy-saving technologies and renewable energy. Supporting municipalities and public utilities is especially important. This means revising the basic conditions of energy laws so that they assist public utilities to face competition as power utilities. (orig.) [de

  6. Nuclear power now and in the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, J G [Nuclear Electric (United Kingdom)

    1991-08-01

    The future of the nuclear industry in the United Kingdom is considered from the perspective of the new public sector utility, Nuclear Electric, set up to retain control of nuclear power stations on the privatization of the rest of the electricity supply industry. Two major objectives are the increased nuclear generation of electricity and the cutting of costs. These are discussed in terms of life extension programmes for the magnox reactors, improved performance of AGR reactors and expectations for the Sizewell B PWR station now under construction; waste management, reactor decommissioning and fuel-cycle costs are also considered. Economic, environmental and political criteria are outlined which need to be addressed in relation to the government's review of nuclear power in 1991. Because of the marginal economic advantages of nuclear power in the United Kingdom, it will be important to quantify the environmental and diversity benefits of this source. (UK).

  7. Spatio-temporal model based optimization framework to design future hydrogen infrastructure networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konda, N.V.S.; Shah, N.; Brandon, N.P.

    2009-01-01

    A mixed integer programming (MIP) spatio-temporal model was used to design hydrogen infrastructure networks for the Netherlands. The detailed economic analysis was conducted using a multi-echelon model of the entire hydrogen supply chain, including feed, production, storage, and transmission-distribution systems. The study considered various near-future and commercially available technologies. A multi-period model was used to design evolutionary hydrogen supply networks in coherence with growing demand. A scenario-based analysis was conducted in order to account for uncertainties in future demand. The study showed that competitive hydrogen networks can be designed for any conceivable scenario. It was concluded that the multi-period model presented significant advantages in relation to decision-making over long time-horizons

  8. Power infrastructure quality and manufacturing productivity in Africa: A firm level analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyo, Busani

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to examine the impact of the quality of power infrastructure on productivity in African manufacturing firms using data from the World Bank enterprise surveys. We measured power infrastructure quality using the number of hours per day without electricity and the percentage of output lost due to outages and found these indicators to be negative and significant determinants of productivity. These variables seem to be significant determinants in Uganda, Tanzania and Zambia as well as in the food and agriculture sector. To improve economic growth and encourage employment creation, governments in Africa have to come up with measures to improve the reliability of electricity infrastructure. - Highlights: • Power infrastructure quality indicators are found to have a negative and significant effect. • The power quality indicators have varied effects both at country and sector level. • Owning a generator minimises the negative impact of outages in Uganda, Tanzania and Mauritius. • Other controls like labour, capital, foreign ownership etc. have a positive and significant effect. • The firm age variable is insignificant suggesting that accumulated knowledge does not matter

  9. Cost Optimization of Water Resources in Pernambuco, Brazil: Valuing Future Infrastructure and Climate Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ipsita; Josset, Laureline; Lall, Upmanu; Cavalcanti e Silva, Erik; Cordeiro Possas, José Marcelo; Cauás Asfora, Marcelo

    2017-04-01

    Optimal management of water resources is paramount in semi-arid regions to limit strains on the society and economy due to limited water availability. This problem is likely to become even more recurrent as droughts are projected to intensify in the coming years, causing increasing stresses to the water supply in the concerned areas. The state of Pernambuco, in the Northeast Brazil is one such case, where one of the largest reservoir, Jucazinho, has been at approximately 1% capacity throughout 2016, making infrastructural challenges in the region very real. To ease some of the infrastructural stresses and reduce vulnerabilities of the water system, a new source of water from Rio São Francisco is currently under development. Till its development, water trucks have been regularly mandated to cover water deficits, but at a much higher cost, thus endangering the financial sustainability of the region. In this paper, we propose to evaluate the sustainability of the considered water system by formulating an optimization problem and determine the optimal operations to be conducted. We start with a comparative study of the current and future infrastructures capabilities to face various climate. We show that while the Rio Sao Francisco project mitigates the problems, both implementations do not prevent failure and require the reliance on water trucks during prolonged droughts. We also study the cost associated with the provision of water to the municipalities for several streamflow forecasts. In particular, we investigate the value of climate predictions to adapt operational decisions by comparing the results with a fixed policy derived from historical data. We show that the use of climate information permits the reduction of the water deficit and reduces overall operational costs. We conclude with a discussion on the potential of the approach to evaluate future infrastructure developments. This study is funded by the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB), and in

  10. Future of nuclear power after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asselstine, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    If nuclear power plants are to have a future in the US, existing plants must demonstrate a safe and accident-free operation, the public must perceive that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is independent and objective, safety corrections must make operating plants more reliable, and the US must develop an acceptable way to dispose of high-level radioactive wastes. Focusing on safe operation and public confidence in the NRC, the author examines the consequences of the Chernobyl accident and compares public opinion reactions with those following the Three Mile Island accident. He notes the recent NRC decisions have been counterproductive to the nuclear industry, but that other countries have demonstrated that the goal of safe nuclear power is achievable. The NRC will have to increase the level of public participation in the regulatory process if it hopes to restore its former level of credibility

  11. Control Architecture Modeling for Future Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai

    electricity exchange. However, at the same time, it seems that the overall system design cannot keep up by simply adapting in response to changes, but that also new strategies have to be designed in anticipation. Changes to the electricity markets have been suggested to adapt to the limited predictability...... of wind power, and several new control strategies have been proposed, in particular to enable the control of distributed energy resources, including for example, distributed generation or electric vehicles. Market designs addressing the procurement of balancing resources are highly dependent...... on the operation strategies specifying the resource requirements. How should one decide which control strategy and market configuration is best for a future power system? Most research up to this point has addressed single isolated aspects of this design problem. Those of the ideas that fit with current markets...

  12. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations

  13. Anticipatory ethics for a future Internet: analyzing values during the design of an Internet infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilton, Katie

    2015-02-01

    The technical details of Internet architecture affect social debates about privacy and autonomy, intellectual property, cybersecurity, and the basic performance and reliability of Internet services. This paper explores one method for practicing anticipatory ethics in order to understand how a new infrastructure for the Internet might impact these social debates. This paper systematically examines values expressed by an Internet architecture engineering team-the Named Data Networking project-based on data gathered from publications and internal documents. Networking engineers making technical choices also weigh non-technical values when working on Internet infrastructure. Analysis of the team's documents reveals both values invoked in response to technical constraints and possibilities, such as efficiency and dynamism, as well as values, including privacy, security and anonymity, which stem from a concern for personal liberties. More peripheral communitarian values espoused by the engineers include democratization and trust. The paper considers the contextual and social origins of these values, and then uses them as a method of practicing anticipatory ethics: considering the impact such priorities may have on a future Internet.

  14. Integration of Utilities Infrastructures in a Future Internet Enabled Smart City Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Sánchez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Improving efficiency of city services and facilitating a more sustainable development of cities are the main drivers of the smart city concept. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT play a crucial role in making cities smarter, more accessible and more open. In this paper we present a novel architecture exploiting major concepts from the Future Internet (FI paradigm addressing the challenges that need to be overcome when creating smarter cities. This architecture takes advantage of both the critical communications infrastructures already in place and owned by the utilities as well as of the infrastructure belonging to the city municipalities to accelerate efficient provision of existing and new city services. The paper highlights how FI technologies create the necessary glue and logic that allows the integration of current vertical and isolated city services into a holistic solution, which enables a huge forward leap for the efficiency and sustainability of our cities. Moreover, the paper describes a real-world prototype, that instantiates the aforementioned architecture, deployed in one of the parks of the city of Santander providing an autonomous public street lighting adaptation service. This prototype is a showcase on how added-value services can be seamlessly created on top of the proposed architecture.

  15. Integration of utilities infrastructures in a future internet enabled smart city framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Luis; Elicegui, Ignacio; Cuesta, Javier; Muñoz, Luis; Lanza, Jorge

    2013-10-25

    Improving efficiency of city services and facilitating a more sustainable development of cities are the main drivers of the smart city concept. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) play a crucial role in making cities smarter, more accessible and more open. In this paper we present a novel architecture exploiting major concepts from the Future Internet (FI) paradigm addressing the challenges that need to be overcome when creating smarter cities. This architecture takes advantage of both the critical communications infrastructures already in place and owned by the utilities as well as of the infrastructure belonging to the city municipalities to accelerate efficient provision of existing and new city services. The paper highlights how FI technologies create the necessary glue and logic that allows the integration of current vertical and isolated city services into a holistic solution, which enables a huge forward leap for the efficiency and sustainability of our cities. Moreover, the paper describes a real-world prototype, that instantiates the aforementioned architecture, deployed in one of the parks of the city of Santander providing an autonomous public street lighting adaptation service. This prototype is a showcase on how added-value services can be seamlessly created on top of the proposed architecture.

  16. Integration of Utilities Infrastructures in a Future Internet Enabled Smart City Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Luis; Elicegui, Ignacio; Cuesta, Javier; Muñoz, Luis; Lanza, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Improving efficiency of city services and facilitating a more sustainable development of cities are the main drivers of the smart city concept. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) play a crucial role in making cities smarter, more accessible and more open. In this paper we present a novel architecture exploiting major concepts from the Future Internet (FI) paradigm addressing the challenges that need to be overcome when creating smarter cities. This architecture takes advantage of both the critical communications infrastructures already in place and owned by the utilities as well as of the infrastructure belonging to the city municipalities to accelerate efficient provision of existing and new city services. The paper highlights how FI technologies create the necessary glue and logic that allows the integration of current vertical and isolated city services into a holistic solution, which enables a huge forward leap for the efficiency and sustainability of our cities. Moreover, the paper describes a real-world prototype, that instantiates the aforementioned architecture, deployed in one of the parks of the city of Santander providing an autonomous public street lighting adaptation service. This prototype is a showcase on how added-value services can be seamlessly created on top of the proposed architecture. PMID:24233072

  17. The SAMGrid database server component: its upgraded infrastructure and future development path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loebel-Carpenter, L.; White, S.; Baranovski, A.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; Burgon-Lyon, M.; St Denis, R.; Belforte, S.; Kerzel, U.; Bartsch, V.; Leslie, M.

    2004-01-01

    The SAMGrid Database Server encapsulates several important services, such as accessing file metadata and replica catalog, keeping track of the processing information, as well as providing the runtime support for SAMGrid station services. Recent deployment of the SAMGrid system for CDF has resulted in unification of the database schema used by CDF and D0, and the complexity of changes required for the unified metadata catalog has warranted a complete redesign of the DB Server. We describe here the architecture and features of the new server. In particular, we discuss the new CORBA infrastructure that utilizes python wrapper classes around IDL structs and exceptions. Such infrastructure allows us to use the same code on both server and client sides, which in turn results in significantly improved code maintainability and easier development. We also discuss future integration of the new server with an SBIR II project which is directed toward allowing the DB Server to access distributed databases, implemented in different DB systems and possibly using different schema

  18. Future Expectation for China's Nuclear Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ China:the future of nuclear power Wang Yonggan:In terms of the highlighted issue of energy security,oil is of paramount importance,coal is the foundation and electricity is the pivot according to China's energy strategy.The national total installed power capacity will hit a record high of 900 GW in 2010,and will probably approach 1 500 GW in 2020 when coal-fired power will continue to dominate,and alternative energy such as nuclear energy,hydroenergy,wind energy,and others will take up only 30% at most.Therefore,China remains in dire need to create more room for alternative energy.To solve this problem,solutions should be found in the diversification of energy,especially large-scale development of alternative energy,by which a lowered-and ultimately zeroed-growth of coal-fired generating units could be realized,and the target of low,even zero carbon emission could come true.

  19. Planning for a space infrastructure for disposal of nuclear space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J. Jr.; Albert, T.E.; Lee, J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of safe, reliable, and compact power systems is vital to humanity's exploration, development, and, ultimately, civilization of space. Nuclear power systems appear to present to offer the only practical option of compact high-power systems. From the very beginning of US space nuclear power activities, safety has been a paramount requirement. Assurance of nuclear safety has included prelaunch ground handling operations, launch, and space operations of nuclear power sources, and more recently serious attention has been given to postoperational disposal of spent or errant nuclear reactor systems. The purpose of this paper is to describe the progress of a project to utilize the capabilities of an evolving space infrastructure for planning for disposal of space nuclear systems. Project SIREN (Search, Intercept, Retrieve, Expulsion - Nuclear) is a project that has been initiated to consider post-operational disposal options for nuclear space power systems. The key finding of Project SIREN was that although no system currently exists to affect the disposal of a nuclear space power system, the requisite technologies for such a system either exist or are planned for part of the evolving space infrastructure

  20. Technology Needs of Future Space Infrastructures Supporting Human Exploration and Development of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Connie; Howell, Joe

    2001-01-01

    The path to human presence beyond near-Earth will be paved by the development of infrastructure. A fundamental technology in this infrastructure is energy, which enables not only the basic function of providing shelter for man and machine, but also enables transportation, scientific endeavors, and exploration. This paper discusses the near-term needs in technology that develop the infrastructure for HEDS.

  1. The role of minimum supply and social vulnerability assessment for governing critical infrastructure failure: current gaps and future agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garschagen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased attention has lately been given to the resilience of critical infrastructure in the context of natural hazards and disasters. The major focus therein is on the sensitivity of critical infrastructure technologies and their management contingencies. However, strikingly little attention has been given to assessing and mitigating social vulnerabilities towards the failure of critical infrastructure and to the development, design and implementation of minimum supply standards in situations of major infrastructure failure. Addressing this gap and contributing to a more integrative perspective on critical infrastructure resilience is the objective of this paper. It asks which role social vulnerability assessments and minimum supply considerations can, should and do – or do not – play for the management and governance of critical infrastructure failure. In its first part, the paper provides a structured review on achievements and remaining gaps in the management of critical infrastructure and the understanding of social vulnerabilities towards disaster-related infrastructure failures. Special attention is given to the current state of minimum supply concepts with a regional focus on policies in Germany and the EU. In its second part, the paper then responds to the identified gaps by developing a heuristic model on the linkages of critical infrastructure management, social vulnerability and minimum supply. This framework helps to inform a vision of a future research agenda, which is presented in the paper's third part. Overall, the analysis suggests that the assessment of socially differentiated vulnerabilities towards critical infrastructure failure needs to be undertaken more stringently to inform the scientifically and politically difficult debate about minimum supply standards and the shared responsibilities for securing them.

  2. The role of minimum supply and social vulnerability assessment for governing critical infrastructure failure: current gaps and future agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garschagen, Matthias; Sandholz, Simone

    2018-04-01

    Increased attention has lately been given to the resilience of critical infrastructure in the context of natural hazards and disasters. The major focus therein is on the sensitivity of critical infrastructure technologies and their management contingencies. However, strikingly little attention has been given to assessing and mitigating social vulnerabilities towards the failure of critical infrastructure and to the development, design and implementation of minimum supply standards in situations of major infrastructure failure. Addressing this gap and contributing to a more integrative perspective on critical infrastructure resilience is the objective of this paper. It asks which role social vulnerability assessments and minimum supply considerations can, should and do - or do not - play for the management and governance of critical infrastructure failure. In its first part, the paper provides a structured review on achievements and remaining gaps in the management of critical infrastructure and the understanding of social vulnerabilities towards disaster-related infrastructure failures. Special attention is given to the current state of minimum supply concepts with a regional focus on policies in Germany and the EU. In its second part, the paper then responds to the identified gaps by developing a heuristic model on the linkages of critical infrastructure management, social vulnerability and minimum supply. This framework helps to inform a vision of a future research agenda, which is presented in the paper's third part. Overall, the analysis suggests that the assessment of socially differentiated vulnerabilities towards critical infrastructure failure needs to be undertaken more stringently to inform the scientifically and politically difficult debate about minimum supply standards and the shared responsibilities for securing them.

  3. Power cables now and in the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanser, G

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of the problems to be faced with the underground supply of electric power to large, urban areas and of the contributions that improvements in power cable technology will make to solving these problems. It is concluded that the increase in population densities and the rising demand for energy on the part of individual consumers bring up problems for electricity supply and thus have a direct influence on development trends in cable engineering. During the last few years the increasing capacities required in power transmission have led to the use of higher voltages and to the application of special methods of cooling for the oil-filled cable. When the technical and economic possibilities with present-day cable techniques have been exhausted, we must anticipate the introduction of new types of cable, i.e., gas-insulated cables and superconducting cables. The problems involved in power distribution are being solved successfully by resorting to larger conductor cross-sectional areas and by raising the voltage levels. The advantages of plastic cables are also being utilized on a wide scale. The requirement that there be freedom from partial discharges in plastic cables operating at medium and higher voltages is becoming increasingly more widely adopted as a new quality criterion in cable engineering. New materials from the polymer range are permitting the introduction of fittings which are easier to install and which reduce costs. Cable engineering has already, to a considerable extent, adapted itself to face future problems. Even so, there are still a large number of problems in cable engineering requiring research, development and operation.

  4. Infrastructure for thulium-170 isotope power systems for autonomous underwater vehicle fleets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.

    1991-07-01

    The radioisotope thulium-170 is a safe and environmentally benign heat source for providing the high endurance and energy densities needed by advanced power systems for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV). Thulium Isotope Power (TIP) systems have an endurance of ∼3000 h, and gravimetric and volumetric energy densities of 3 x 10 4 Wh/kg and 3 x 10 8 Wh/m 3 , respectively. These energy densities are more than 200 times higher than those currently provided by Ag-Zn battery technology. In order to capitalize on these performance levels with about one hundred AUVs in continuous use, it will be necessary to establish an infrastructure for isotope production and heat-source refurbishment. The infrastructure cost is not trivial, and studies are needed to determine its optimum configuration. The major component of the projected infrastructure is the nuclear reactor used to produce Tm- 170 by neutron absorption in Tm-169. The reactor design should ideally be optimized for TM-170 production. Using the byproduct ''waste'' heat beneficially would help defray the cost of isotope production. However, generating electric power with the reactor would compromise both the cost of electricity and the isotope production capacity. A coastal location for the reactor would be most convenient from end-use considerations, and the ''waste'' heat could be used to desalinate seawater in water-thirsty states. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Nuclear power: Status report and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the current status and future prospects of commercial nuclear electric power, with emphasis on issues of safety, physical security, proliferation, and economics. Discussions of these issues are presented separately for the current operating fleet, for new reactor designs similar in size to the current fleet, and for prospective new reactors of substantially smaller size. This article also discusses the issue of expansion of commercial nuclear power into new countries. The article concludes with recommendations, related both to technical issues and policy considerations. The major implications for policy are that although the level of safety and security achieved in today's operating reactor fleet worldwide is considered broadly acceptable, some advanced designs now under development potentially offer demonstrably safer performance, and may offer improved financial performance also. Management and safety culture are vital attributes for achieving adequate safety and security, as are a strong political culture that includes an absence of corruption, an independent regulatory authority, and a separation of nuclear operation from day-to-day politics. In some countries that are now considering a nuclear-power program for the first time, careful attention to these attributes will be essential for success. - Highlights: •Current status of nuclear reactor safety and security is judged to be adequate. •Strong management and safety culture are vital to achieve adequate nuclear safety. •Advanced reactor designs offer important safety advantages. •Maintaining and strengthening international nuclear institutions is important. •Achieving nuclear safety in “newcomer” countries requires a strong political culture.

  6. Cyber security in nuclear power plants and its portability to other industrial infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champigny, Sebastien; Gupta, Deeksha; Watson, Venesa; Waedt, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Power generation increasingly relies on decentralised and interconnected computerised systems. Concepts like ''Industrial Internet of Things'' of the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), and ''Industry 4.0'' find their way in this strategic industry. Risk of targeted exploits of errors and vulnerabilities increases with complexity, interconnectivity and decentralization. Inherently stringent security requirements and features make nuclear computerised applications and systems a benchmark for industrial counterparts seeking to hedge against those risks. Consequently, this contribution presents usual cyber security regulations and practices for nuclear power plants. It shows how nuclear cyber security can be ported and used in an industrial context to protect critical infrastructures against cyber-attacks and industrial espionage.

  7. Telecommunications, power supply, computer systems: the infrastructures of the soccer world cup; Telecommunications, electricite, informatique: les infrastructures de la Coupe du Monde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1998-06-01

    The 1998 edition of the soccer world cup took place in ten different stadiums in France and several related sites. This short paper gives a general overview of the infrastructures developed for this occasion in the domains of telecommunications, power supply (substations, protection systems, computerized control systems..), and computer systems. (J.S.)

  8. SimWIND: A geospatial infrastructure model for optimizing wind power generation and transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Benjamin R.; Middleton, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Wind is a clean, enduring energy resource with the capacity to satisfy 20% or more of U.S. electricity demand. Presently, wind potential is limited by a paucity of electrical transmission lines and/or capacity between promising wind resources and primary load centers. We present the model SimWIND to address this shortfall. SimWIND is an integrated optimization model for the geospatial arrangement and cost minimization of wind-power generation–transmission–delivery infrastructure. Given a set of possible wind-farm sites, the model simultaneously determines (1) where and how much power to generate and (2) where to build new transmission infrastructure and with what capacity in order to minimize the cost for delivering a targeted amount of power to load. Costs and routing of transmission lines consider geographic and social constraints as well as electricity losses. We apply our model to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) Interconnection, considering scenarios that deliver up to 20 GW of new wind power. We show that SimWIND could potentially reduce ERCOT's projected ∼$5B transmission network upgrade line length and associated costs by 50%. These results suggest that SimWIND's coupled generation–transmission–delivery modeling approach could play a critical role in enhancing planning efforts and reducing costs for wind energy integration. - Highlights: ► Wind power is limited by transmission capacity between resources and demands. ► SimWIND is a coupled generation-transmission-delivery model for wind infrastructure. ► The model minimizes costs considering realistic transmission routing and networking. ► We show that SimWIND could save 50% of $5B costs for expanding the Texas grid. ► Results suggest SimWIND may play a critical role in enhancings wind planning efforts.

  9. IRIS guidelines. 2014 ed. Integrated Review of Infrastructure for Safety (IRIS) for self-assessment when establishing the safety infrastructure for a nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA safety standards reflect an international consensus on what constitutes a high level of safety for protecting people and the environment, and therefore represent what all Member States should achieve, whilst recognizing the ultimate responsibility of each State to ensure safety when implementing a nuclear power programme. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-16, entitled Establishing the Safety Infrastructure for a Nuclear Power Programme was published in order to provide recommendations, presented in the form of sequential actions, on meeting safety requirements progressively during the initial three phases of the development of safety, as described in INSAG-22, Nuclear Safety Infrastructure for a National Nuclear Power Programme Supported by the IAEA Fundamental Safety Principles. To that end, the 200 safety related actions, which are proposed by SSG-16, constitute a roadmap to establish a foundation for promoting a high level of safety over the entire lifetime of the nuclear power plant. These actions reflect international consensus on good practice in order to achieve full implementation of IAEA safety standards. The IAEA has developed a methodology and tool, the Integrated Review of Infrastructure for Safety (IRIS), to assist States in undertaking self-assessment with respect to SSG-16 recommendations when establishing the safety infrastructure for a nuclear power programme, and to develop an action plan for improvement. The IRIS methodology and the associated tool are fully compatible with the IAEA safety standards and are also used, when appropriate, in the preparation of review missions, such as the Integrated Regulatory Review Service and advisory missions. The present guidelines describe the IRIS methodology for self-assessment against SSG-16 recommendations. Through IRIS implementation, every organization concerned with nuclear safety may gain proper awareness and engage in a continuous progressive process to develop the effective national

  10. Electric vehicle charging infrastructure assignment and power grid impacts assessment in Beijing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    This paper estimates the charging demand of an early electric vehicle (EV) market in Beijing and proposes an assignment model to distribute charging infrastructure. It finds that each type of charging infrastructure has its limitation, and integration is needed to offer a reliable charging service. It also reveals that the service radius of fast charging stations directly influences the final distribution pattern and an infrastructure deployment strategy with short service radius for fast charging stations has relatively fewer disturbances on the power grid. Additionally, although the adoption of electric vehicles will cause an additional electrical load on the Beijing's power grid, this additional load can be accommodated by the current grid's capacity via the charging time management and the battery swap strategy. - Highlight: ► Charging posts, fast charging stations, and battery swap stations should be integrated. ► Charging posts at home parking places will take a major role in a charging network. ► A service radius of 2 km is proposed for fast charging stations deployment. ► The additional charging load from EVs can be accommodated by charging time management.

  11. Advancing vector biology research: a community survey for future directions, research applications and infrastructure requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Alain; Pondeville, Emilie; Schnettler, Esther; Crisanti, Andrea; Supparo, Clelia; Christophides, George K.; Kersey, Paul J.; Maslen, Gareth L.; Takken, Willem; Koenraadt, Constantianus J. M.; Oliva, Clelia F.; Busquets, Núria; Abad, F. Xavier; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Levashina, Elena A.; Wilson, Anthony J.; Veronesi, Eva; Pichard, Maëlle; Arnaud Marsh, Sarah; Simard, Frédéric; Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Vector-borne pathogens impact public health, animal production, and animal welfare. Research on arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges which transmit pathogens to humans and economically important animals is crucial for development of new control measures that target transmission by the vector. While insecticides are an important part of this arsenal, appearance of resistance mechanisms is increasingly common. Novel tools for genetic manipulation of vectors, use of Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria, and other biological control mechanisms to prevent pathogen transmission have led to promising new intervention strategies, adding to strong interest in vector biology and genetics as well as vector–pathogen interactions. Vector research is therefore at a crucial juncture, and strategic decisions on future research directions and research infrastructure investment should be informed by the research community. A survey initiated by the European Horizon 2020 INFRAVEC-2 consortium set out to canvass priorities in the vector biology research community and to determine key activities that are needed for researchers to efficiently study vectors, vector-pathogen interactions, as well as access the structures and services that allow such activities to be carried out. We summarize the most important findings of the survey which in particular reflect the priorities of researchers in European countries, and which will be of use to stakeholders that include researchers, government, and research organizations. PMID:27677378

  12. Future of nuclear power in the Northeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailor, V.L.; Shore, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    As of July 1975, there were 15 operable nuclear power plants in the Northeast, representing approximately 11 percent of the regional electric generating capability. Construction plans for the next two decades show a strong preference for nuclear units, there being 18 new units under construction and 33 additional units announced. Three projections (scenarios) covering the period from 1976 to 2000 are presented. The Base Case Nuclear Scenario assumes that the construction schedules as of August 31, 1975 are implemented. A Nuclear Moratorium Scenario assumes that no new plants are undertaken after January 1, 1977. Finally, a Maximum Nuclear Growth Scenario postulates a concerted effort to add additional nuclear capacity beginning in 1982, but constrained by the ability of industry to expand the capabilities needed to supply the components and fuel. Appreciable differences in the three scenarios do not appear until about 1985, a consequence of the long lead time in making plans and completing construction. The cumulative incremental costs of the Nuclear Moratorium Scenario postulated in this study exceed $160 billion by the year 2000. Despite the present favorable economics and performance of the nuclear units, and despite the strong preference of the planners for nuclear capacity to meet future demands, there are many factors which cast doubt on whether these plans will be executed. Cost escalation, combined with difficulties in raising capital funds, have forced many units to be deferred or canceled

  13. The future of integrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, R.; Termuehlen, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the future of integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants as affected by various technical, economical and environmental trends in power generation. The topics of the paper include a description of natural gas-fired combined cycle power plants, IGCC plants, coal gasifier concepts, integration of gasifiers into combined cycle power plants, efficiency, environmental impacts, co-products of IGCC power plants, economics of IGCC power plants, and a review of IGCC power plant projects

  14. Energy storage in future power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Claus Nygaard; Østergaard, Jacob; Divya, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Most sources of renewable power are characterised by uncontrollable and chaotic variations in power output. We here look at how energy storage may benefit renewable power generation by making it available in periods with little or no intermittent generation and thereby prevent additional conventi......Most sources of renewable power are characterised by uncontrollable and chaotic variations in power output. We here look at how energy storage may benefit renewable power generation by making it available in periods with little or no intermittent generation and thereby prevent additional...... conventional generation form being used. In addition to this, one of the strongest concerns in relation to renewable power is the instability in the electric power system that it may introduce as a result of large and relatively fast power fluctuations. An additional benefit of energy storage is therefore its...

  15. Reliability assessment of power pole infrastructure incorporating deterioration and network maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Paraic C.; Stewart, Mark G.; Spencer, Nathan; Li, Yue

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable investment in timber utility poles worldwide, and there is a need to examine the structural reliability and probability based management optimisation of these power distribution infrastructure elements. The work presented in this paper builds on the existing studies in this area through assessment of both treated and untreated timber power poles, with the effects of deterioration and network maintenance incorporated in the analysis. This more realistic assessment approach, with deterioration and maintenance considered, was achieved using event-based Monte Carlo simulation. The output from the probabilistic model is used to illustrate the importance of considering network maintenance in the time-dependent structural reliability assessment of timber power poles. Under wind load, treated and untreated poles designed and maintained in accordance with existing Australian standards were found to have similar failure rates. However, untreated pole networks required approximately twice as many maintenance based pole replacements to sustain the same level of reliability. The effect of four different network maintenance strategies on infrastructure performance was also investigated herein. This assessment highlighted the fact that slight alterations to network maintenance practices can lead to significant changes in performance of timber power pole networks. - Highlights: • A time-dependent structural reliability model was developed for timber power poles. • Deterioration and network maintenance were incorporated into this event based model. • Network maintenance had a significant impact on power pole wind vulnerability. • Treated and untreated poles designed to Australian standards had similar reliability. • Minor alterations to maintenance strategies had large effects on network performance

  16. Wind farm - A power source in future power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2009-01-01

    wind turbines and wind farms, and then introduces the wind power development and wind farms. An optimization platform for designing electrical systems of offshore wind farms is briefed. The major issues related to the grid connection requirements and the operation of wind turbines/farms in power......The paper describes modern wind power systems, introduces the issues of large penetration of wind power into power systems, and discusses the possible methods of making wind turbines/farms act as a power source, like conventional power plants in power systems. Firstly, the paper describes modern...... systems are illustrated....

  17. Future prospects for nuclear power in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maïzi, Nadia; Assoumou, Edi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Applies a bottom-up energy system optimization model to define future energy choices. • Derive scenarios to explore different combination of nuclear policy and emission target up to 2050. • Underline the resulting challenges in term of power capacity renewal rate and flexibility. - Abstract: Taking different nuclear policy options from a French perspective, we look at the issues that we were able to pinpoint thanks to the TIMES-FR model. The technico-economic analysis supported by the TIMES-FR model brings robust lessons, whichever technological options are selected: • The cliff effect puts the French system “up against the wall”: sustained investments must be made to renew electricity production facilities coming to the end of their lives. • This situation opens up opportunities to all industrial channels, with the main challenge being to sustain an ambitious pace of constructing new capacities and answering specific questions for each of them, such as acceptability and reliability. • In parallel, the current paradigm of increasing electricity consumption is likely to be challenged over the coming decades if environmental issues are still part of public policy. • These factors make it possible to consider that the question of political options in terms of long-term energy cannot be restricted to a technological choice and must go beyond pro- or anti-nuclear lobbying. This contribution, which is mainly based on a technical thought process, should fit into the wider framework of a debate on society and behavior choices. The issue of the electricity user will be unavoidable

  18. Multilevel Control System of Regional Power Consumption: Analysis of Infrastructure Elements Interconnections, Efficiency Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Nikolaevna Myznikova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental strategic programs in the spheres of power and economics adopted at various levels of management, are not always capable to solve the problem of power efficiency. The changes of systemic connections of economy and power elements are one of the basic problems of management at the regional level. The development of market relations has caused the growth of uncertainty factors at all levels of power consumption management. An insufficient estimation of system infrastructural interrelations and an individualization of organizational-economic relations of economic subjects and their localization, have generated the intersystem conflictness in distribution of power resources and have aggravated the problem of estimating power consumption efficiency at a systemic level. The restriction of application of the traditional management methods based on the principles of technological efficiency of the processes of energy manufacture and consumption, is connected with the information ruptures caused by the growth of factors of uncertainty and inconsistency of efficiency criteria. Application of modern methods of power consumption forecasting has a number of essential restrictions. At the present stage the management of power consumption in multilevel systems is aimed at realisation of system integrity and economic coordination of manufacture elements, transfer and consumption at regional level and demands working out of the new effective management methods based on the analysis of system interrelations. Allocation of system interrelations depends on features of development of electropower sector, active and passive elements of the structure of consumption, power balance. The analysis and estimation of interrelations of power and economic sphere allow to improve methodology of management of power consumption at the regional level in the conditions of uncertainty.

  19. Future opportunities and future trends for e-infrastructures and life sciences: going beyond grid to enable life science data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotis ePsomopoulos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increasingly rapid growth of data in Life Sciences we are witnessing a major transition in the way research is conducted, from hypothesis-driven studies to data-driven simulations of whole systems. In the context of the European Grid Infrastructure Community Forum 2014 (Helsinki, 19–23 May 2014, a workshop was held aimed at understanding the state of the art of Grid/Cloud computing in EU research as viewed from within the field of Life Sciences. The workshop brought together Life Science researchers and infrastructure providers from around Europe and facilitated networking between them within the context of EGI. The first part of the workshop included talks from key infrastructures and projects within the Life Sciences community. This was complemented by technical talks that established the key aspects present in major research approaches. Finally, the discussion phase provided significant insights into the road ahead with proposals for possible collaborations and suggestions for future actions.

  20. The future of power transmission and distribution in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parakh, S.C.

    1995-01-01

    India's growing economy requires considerable investment in the power sector. Though rapid strides have been made, the power sector has been unable to supply quality power and demand is continuously outstripping supply. The future of power transmission and distribution in India is discussed. 2 tabs

  1. Airborne biological hazards and urban transport infrastructure: current challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Zaheer Ahmad; Campos, Luiza Cintra; Christie, Nicola; Colbeck, Ian

    2016-08-01

    Exposure to airborne biological hazards in an ever expanding urban transport infrastructure and highly diverse mobile population is of growing concern, in terms of both public health and biosecurity. The existing policies and practices on design, construction and operation of these infrastructures may have severe implications for airborne disease transmission, particularly, in the event of a pandemic or intentional release of biological of agents. This paper reviews existing knowledge on airborne disease transmission in different modes of transport, highlights the factors enhancing the vulnerability of transport infrastructures to airborne disease transmission, discusses the potential protection measures and identifies the research gaps in order to build a bioresilient transport infrastructure. The unification of security and public health research, inclusion of public health security concepts at the design and planning phase, and a holistic system approach involving all the stakeholders over the life cycle of transport infrastructure hold the key to mitigate the challenges posed by biological hazards in the twenty-first century transport infrastructure.

  2. Electric power: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnetzer, H.

    1994-01-01

    When, at the turn of the century, public electric power supply facilities were created and in 1908, the electric power stations of the Swiss canton of Zurich (EKZ) were built, only a third of the communities in the Zurich area could boast about being the consumers of this new energy. But what did the first electrically powered devices and machines look like? This, and more, is presented in the ''electric power house'' in Burenwisen Glattfelden in the canton of Zurich. Besides a Kaplan turbine and a sample of the most interesting devices from the past and the present, the focus of the exhibition is on the presentation of the new and old sources of light. The EKZ are pleased to be able to present their ''electric power house'' to the public, providing a broad range of information on energy-related questions and the development of electric power supply. (orig.) [de

  3. Business Models for Solar Powered Charging Stations to Develop Infrastructure for Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Robinson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Electric power must become less dependent on fossil fuels and transportation must become more electric to decrease carbon emissions and mitigate climate change. Increasing availability and accessibility of charging stations is predicted to increase purchases of electric vehicles. In order to address the current inadequate charging infrastructure for electric vehicles, major entities must adopt business models for solar powered charging stations (SPCS. These SPCS should be located in parking lots to produce electricity for the grid and provide an integrated infrastructure for charging electric vehicles. Due to the lack of information related to SPCS business models, this manuscript designs several models for major entities including industry, the federal and state government, utilities, universities, and public parking. A literature review of the available relevant business models and case studies of constructed charging stations was completed to support the proposals. In addition, a survey of a university’s students, staff, and faculty was conducted to provide consumer research on people’s opinion of SPCS construction and preference of business model aspects. Results showed that 69% of respondents would be more willing to invest in an electric vehicle if there was sufficient charging station infrastructure at the university. Among many recommendations, the business models suggest installing level 1 charging for the majority of entities, and to match entities’ current pricing structures for station use. The manuscript discusses the impacts of fossil fuel use, and the benefits of electric car and SPCS use, accommodates for the present gap in available literature on SPCS business models, and provides current consumer data for SPCS and the models proposed.

  4. Nuclear power. A technology for the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neles, Julia Mareike; Pistner, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    What exactly is nuclear power? How do nuclear power plants function? What do they contribute to power supply, and at what risk? The authors of this compact and clearly written book provide answers to these and more questions. They present the physical and technical fundamentals as well as safety, nuclear aste management and non-proliferation. The book enables its readers to understand the political consequences of the Fukushima reactor accident.

  5. The future of gas power in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trong, Maj Dang

    2001-01-01

    The growth of gas power capacity in Western Europe in 2001 is estimated at 6.5 per cent. The extent of plants under construction in 2001 and ambitious plans for further development demonstrates the general belief that investing in gas power is soon becoming profitable. Expected slump in the world economy may curb the willingness to invest, at least in the short run. In Norway, the greatest barrier to the development of gas power production is political. Great Britain is the major gas power producing country in Western Europe, contributing 30 per cent of the total production

  6. Problem-Oriented Simulation Packages and Computational Infrastructure for Numerical Studies of Powerful Gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damyanova, M; Sabchevski, S; Vasileva, E; Balabanova, E; Zhelyazkov, I; Dankov, P; Malinov, P

    2016-01-01

    Powerful gyrotrons are necessary as sources of strong microwaves for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) of magnetically confined plasmas in various reactors (most notably ITER) for controlled thermonuclear fusion. Adequate physical models and efficient problem-oriented software packages are essential tools for numerical studies, analysis, optimization and computer-aided design (CAD) of such high-performance gyrotrons operating in a CW mode and delivering output power of the order of 1-2 MW. In this report we present the current status of our simulation tools (physical models, numerical codes, pre- and post-processing programs, etc.) as well as the computational infrastructure on which they are being developed, maintained and executed. (paper)

  7. Cyber security in nuclear power plants and its portability to other industrial infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champigny, Sebastien; Gupta, Deeksha; Watson, Venesa; Waedt, Karl [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Power generation increasingly relies on decentralised and interconnected computerised systems. Concepts like ''Industrial Internet of Things'' of the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), and ''Industry 4.0'' find their way in this strategic industry. Risk of targeted exploits of errors and vulnerabilities increases with complexity, interconnectivity and decentralization. Inherently stringent security requirements and features make nuclear computerised applications and systems a benchmark for industrial counterparts seeking to hedge against those risks. Consequently, this contribution presents usual cyber security regulations and practices for nuclear power plants. It shows how nuclear cyber security can be ported and used in an industrial context to protect critical infrastructures against cyber-attacks and industrial espionage.

  8. Tasks of a power engineer in future thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freymeyer, P.; Scherschmidt, F.

    1982-01-01

    Today already the power plants provide plenty of tasks and problems to the electrical engineer in the fields of power and conductive engineering. A completely new orientation of power engineering leads to larger, more complex system and even to systems unknown so far. In conductive engineering entirely new solutions have come in view. There are a lot of interesting topics for the electrical engineer in the rearrangement and advance into virgin territory of thermal power plants. (orig.) [de

  9. Improved Power System of the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Rabinowitz, Mario

    2003-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide an insight into physics and engineering that can modernize electric power systems. Topics covered are Flexible ac transmission systems (FACTS), Custom Power, Greatly improved Capacitors, Electrical Insulation, Distribution Cables, Improved Polymeric Insulation, Underground Vault Explosions, Fault Location, Smart Cables, Neutral and Ground, Corrosion and Protection, Conventional Transformers, Compact Transformers, Ferroresonance, and Solid State Transformers.

  10. Nuclear Power: Africa and the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Y.M.; Hussein, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Africa is a home to around 800 million people. The total population is expected to reach 1.3 billion by 2020. Efficient, clean energy forms are vital to Africa's sustainable development and fight against poverty. Nuclear power is a sustainable, clean, safe and economic way to met the African countries demand for electrical energy and water desalination As of 29 January 2007, there were 435 nuclear power plants in operation around the world. They total about 369 G We of generating capacity and supply about 16% of the world electricity. Of the 435 nuclear power plants in operation, just two are in Africa: Koeberg-1 and Koeberg-2 in South Africa. Both are 900 M We PWRs.There are also 28 new nuclear power plants under construction none in Africa. In this paper, varies factors , which support the attractiveness of nuclear power for African countries are identified and discussed

  11. The North American power delivery system: Balancing market restructuring and environmental economics with infrastructure security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoud Amin, S.; Gellings, Clark W.

    2006-01-01

    The North American electric power system was developed over the last 100 years without a conscious awareness and analysis of the system-wide implications of its current evolution under the forces of deregulation, system complexity, power-market impacts, terrorism, and human error. The possibility of power delivery beyond neighboring areas was a distant secondary consideration. Today, the North American power network may realistically be considered to be the largest machine in the world. With the advent of deregulation and competition in the electric power industry, new ways are being sought to improve the efficiency of that network without seriously diminishing its reliability and security. Controlling a heterogeneous, widely dispersed, yet globally interconnected system is a serious technological problem in any case. It is even more complex and difficult to control it for optimal efficiency and maximum benefit to the ultimate consumers while still allowing all its business components to compete fairly and freely. In this paper we present an overview of key issues and the context in which the electricity infrastructure is being operated under the above forces along with a strategic vision extending to a decade, or longer, that would enable more secure and robust systems operation, security monitoring, and efficient energy markets. (author)

  12. The future of electric power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    In this interview with a prominent expert of the electric power industry, problems of assuring electricity supply, the economics of nuclear electricity generation, the supply structure, and cogeneration are discussed. (UA) [de

  13. ESRDC - Designing and Powering the Future Fleet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    Carolina, as part of the Electric Ship Research and Development Consortium, has advanced technologies and methods applicable to electric ships in...We studied the application of advanced two-stage cooling technologies to the cooling of electronic power converters for ship electrical systems... technologies , • Used high speed generators for power generation, • Used an alternative electrical system topology. A master’s student used S3D to design a

  14. Future independent power generation and implications for instruments and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the independent power producers market is comprised of cogeneration, small power generation, and independent power production (IPP) segments. Shortfalls in future electric supply are expected to lead to significant growth in this market. The opportunities for instruments and controls will shift from traditional electric utility applications to the independent power market with a more diverse set of needs. Importance will be placed on system reliability, quality of power and increased demand for clean kWh

  15. Future standard and fast charging infrastructure planning: An analysis of electric vehicle charging behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, Patrick; Weldon, Peter; O’Mahony, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    There has been a concentrated effort by European countries to increase the share of electric vehicles (EVs) and an important factor in the rollout of the associated infrastructure is an understanding of the charging behaviours of existing EV users in terms of location of charging, the quantity of energy they require, charge duration, and their preferred mode of charging. Data were available on the usage of charging infrastructure for the entire island of Ireland since the rollout of infrastructure began. This study provides an extensive analysis of this charge event data for public charging infrastructure, including data from fast charging infrastructure, and additionally a limited quantity of household data. For the household data available, it was found that EV users prefer to carry out the majority of their charging at home in the evening during the period of highest demand on the electrical grid indicating that incentivisation may be required to shift charging away from this peak grid demand period. Car park locations were the most popular location for public charging amongst EV users, and fast chargers recorded the highest usage frequencies, indicating that public fast charging infrastructure is most likely to become commercially viable in the short- to medium-term. - Highlights: • Electric vehicle users prefer to charge at home in the evening at peak demand times. • Incentivisation will be necessary to encourage home charging at other times. • Fast charging most likely to become commercially viable in short to medium term. • Priority should be given to strategic network location of fast chargers. • Of public charge point locations, car park locations were favoured by EV users.

  16. Futur d'une infrastructure de correction automatisée : CodeGradX

    OpenAIRE

    Queinnec , Christian; Pons , Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cet article évoque quelques expériences et nouvelles idées au-tour d'une infrastructure de correction automatisée de programmes. CodeGradX est une infrastructure de correction automatisée de programmes. Elle est en service depuis 2008 (initialement sous le nom de FW4EX) et a depuis corrigé plus de 150 000 soumissions d'étudiants à des exercices principalement en Scheme, utilitaires d'Unix, JavaScript mais aussi en C, Octave, O'Caml, Python sans oublier les compétitions annuelles des Journées ...

  17. Reliability and vulnerability analyses of critical infrastructures: Comparing two approaches in the context of power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Jonas; Hassel, Henrik; Zio, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Society depends on services provided by critical infrastructures, and hence it is important that they are reliable and robust. Two main approaches for gaining knowledge required for designing and improving critical infrastructures are reliability analysis and vulnerability analysis. The former analyses the ability of the system to perform its intended function; the latter analyses its inability to withstand strains and the effects of the consequent failures. The two approaches have similarities but also some differences with respect to what type of information they generate about the system. In this view, the main purpose of this paper is to discuss and contrast these approaches. To strengthen the discussion and exemplify its findings, a Monte Carlo-based reliability analysis and a vulnerability analysis are considered in their application to a relatively simple, but representative, system the IEEE RTS96 electric power test system. The exemplification reveals that reliability analysis provides a good picture of the system likely behaviour, but fails to capture a large portion of the high consequence scenarios, which are instead captured in the vulnerability analysis. Although these scenarios might be estimated to have small probabilities of occurrence, they should be identified, considered and treated cautiously, as probabilistic analyses should not be the only input to decision-making for the design and protection of critical infrastructures. The general conclusion that can be drawn from the findings of the example is that vulnerability analysis should be used to complement reliability studies, as well as other forms of probabilistic risk analysis. Measures should be sought for reducing both the vulnerability, i.e. improving the system ability to withstand strains and stresses, and the reliability, i.e. improving the likely behaviour

  18. Wireless Infrastructure M2M Network For Distributed Power Grid Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavi, Hamid; Hu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    With the massive integration of distributed renewable energy sources (RESs) into the power system, the demand for timely and reliable network quality monitoring, control, and fault analysis is rapidly growing. Following the successful deployment of Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) in transmission systems for power monitoring, a new opportunity to utilize PMU measurement data for power quality assessment in distribution grid systems is emerging. The main problem however, is that a distribution grid system does not normally have the support of an infrastructure network. Therefore, the main objective in this paper is to develop a Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communication network that can support wide ranging sensory data, including high rate synchrophasor data for real-time communication. In particular, we evaluate the suitability of the emerging IEEE 802.11ah standard by exploiting its important features, such as classifying the power grid sensory data into different categories according to their traffic characteristics. For performance evaluation we use our hardware in the loop grid communication network testbed to access the performance of the network.

  19. Cote D’voire National Presentation on Nuclear Power Infrastructure Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Limited production capacity to meet energy demand is 1316 MW in 2010 with impossibility to satisfy the demand in the high scenario of 41 000 GWh in 2020. There is necessity of using other sources of production that include nuclear power plant for a mass production. NEPIO not formally established, its establishment is underway to implement the entire infrastructure necessary to achieve the nuclear power plant in Côte d’Ivoire. Projects of nuclear law and decree were drawn up with the legal assistance of the IAEA. Universities and engineers schools do not offer courses adapted to the development of a nuclear industry. Therefore the Government is taking measures for implementation of the NEPIO and ratifying all the international agreement connected to nuclear power plant. Face to the constantly increasing energy demand, Côte d’Ivoire showed its intention to develop an nuclear power programme for the satisfaction of needs by 2025. To implement this programme, a national strategic plan has been established

  20. Present and future of Korean nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, K-H

    2014-01-01

    'Full text:' The Korean nuclear power industry has devoted itself to technological development and self-reliance over the last 30 years since Kori unit 1, the first nuclear power plant commenced its commercial operation in 1978. As a result of such efforts and accumulated experiences, the Korean nuclear power industry has developed the OPR 1000 and APR 1400 units and is almost completing the development of the APR+ as a 1,500MW class reactor with its own technologies of design and manufacturing. Also, the Korean nuclear power industry has been able to build a strong supply chain from engineering, manufacturing, construction, and fuel supply, to operation and maintenance. At present, Korea is operating 23 commercial power reactors with a total installed capacity of 20,716 MW, accounting for 25 percent of the installed capacity and one third of the nation's total electricity generation. Also, the share of nuclear power generation capacity will be 29 percent by 2035 in the Long Term Energy Development Plan and 43 GW of nuclear energy capacity will be needed. Thanks to nuclear power generation as an essential driving force, Korea has been able to supply cheap and stable electricity. However, amid the growing public concerns about nuclear safety after the Fukushima accident, the Korean government and related organizations are exerting its utmost effort in all areas, for example, enhancing nuclear safety and safety culture, carrying out management innovation, and communicating with the public in order to enhance transparency. Also, the Korean government launched the Public Engagement Commission on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in 2013, which is tasked to initiate public consultation & discussion and submit recommendation to government after in-depth review and analysis on SNF management options by the end of 2014. Nuclear power has become very essential part of national economy in Korea because Korea has virtually no indigenous energy resources and

  1. Present and future of Korean nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, K-H [Korea Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    'Full text:' The Korean nuclear power industry has devoted itself to technological development and self-reliance over the last 30 years since Kori unit 1, the first nuclear power plant commenced its commercial operation in 1978. As a result of such efforts and accumulated experiences, the Korean nuclear power industry has developed the OPR 1000 and APR 1400 units and is almost completing the development of the APR+ as a 1,500MW class reactor with its own technologies of design and manufacturing. Also, the Korean nuclear power industry has been able to build a strong supply chain from engineering, manufacturing, construction, and fuel supply, to operation and maintenance. At present, Korea is operating 23 commercial power reactors with a total installed capacity of 20,716 MW, accounting for 25 percent of the installed capacity and one third of the nation's total electricity generation. Also, the share of nuclear power generation capacity will be 29 percent by 2035 in the Long Term Energy Development Plan and 43 GW of nuclear energy capacity will be needed. Thanks to nuclear power generation as an essential driving force, Korea has been able to supply cheap and stable electricity. However, amid the growing public concerns about nuclear safety after the Fukushima accident, the Korean government and related organizations are exerting its utmost effort in all areas, for example, enhancing nuclear safety and safety culture, carrying out management innovation, and communicating with the public in order to enhance transparency. Also, the Korean government launched the Public Engagement Commission on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in 2013, which is tasked to initiate public consultation & discussion and submit recommendation to government after in-depth review and analysis on SNF management options by the end of 2014. Nuclear power has become very essential part of national economy in Korea because Korea has virtually no indigenous energy resources and

  2. Future of Nuclear Power: NRC emergency preparedness licensing activities agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, T.H.

    1995-01-01

    This talk summary addresses the issue of how future policies of the NRC will affect nuclear power in areas such as construction, emergency preparedness, and licensing. Specific topics covered include the following: Emergent EP licensing issues for operating nuclear Power Plants; 10CFR Part 52 and the process for licensing of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs); and potential revisions to emergency preparedness programs for future nuclear power plants

  3. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  4. Nuclear power: benefits for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vultur, G.; Vultur, C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper explains how nuclear power was implemented in Romania, why Romania chose nuclear energy, and what the impact of building a power plant is on the industry and environment of Romania. In the 1960's, Romania started discussions with different partners to cooperate in the development and application of atomic energy for a peaceful purpose. In 1977, the Romanian Government decided that the Candu-600 would be the basic unit for its nuclear program. The contract between Romania and Canada was for 5 units. In 1979, the construction of the first Candu unit started in Cernavoda, on the Danube 160 km east of Bucharest. (authors)

  5. Infrastructural relations: Water, political power and the rise of a new 'despotic regime'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Strang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is 60 years since Karl Wittfogel highlighted a key relationship between political power and the ownership and control of water. Subsequent studies have suggested, commensurately, that exclusion from the ownership of essential resources represents a fundamental form of disenfranchisement – a loss of democratic involvement in societal direction. Several areas of theoretical development have illuminated these issues. Anthropologists have explored the recursive relationship between political arrangements and cosmological belief systems. Narrow legal definitions of property have been challenged through the consideration of more diverse ways of owning and controlling resources. Analyses of material culture have shown how it extends human agency, as well as having agentive capacities itself; and explorations of infrastructures have highlighted their role in composing socio-technical and political relations. Such approaches are readily applied to water and the material culture through which it is controlled and used. Drawing on historical and ethnographic research on water in Australia and the UK, this paper traces changing relationships between cosmological beliefs, infrastructure and political arrangements over time. It suggests that a current trend towards privatised, transnational water ownership potentially opens the door to the emergence of new 'despotic regimes'.

  6. Modeling green infrastructure land use changes on future air quality in Kansas City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green infrastructure can be a cost-effective approach for reducing stormwater runoff and improving water quality as a result, but it could also bring co-benefits for air quality: less impervious surfaces and more vegetation can decrease the urban heat island effect, and also resu...

  7. The Philippine nuclear power project, its past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovellanos, J.U.

    1993-01-01

    The article discussed the historical background of the nuclear power plants; how it operates; the government opinion on the operation of the nuclear power plant; the application of power resources to industry; the implementation of PNPP-1 particularly the economic aspects of energy in the near future. (IMA)

  8. Present and future nuclear power financing schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diel, R.

    1977-01-01

    The financial requirement for nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany for the period up until 1985 was estimated to run up to some DM 100 billion already in the Nuclear Energy Study published by the Dresdner Bank in 1974. This figure is not changed in any way by the reduction the nuclear power program has suffered in the meantime, because the lower requirement for investment capital is more than offset by the price increases that have occurred meanwhile. A capital requirement in the order of DM 100 billion raises major problems for the power producing industry and the banks which, however, are not going to hamper the further expansion of nuclear power, because new financing schemes have been specially developed for the nuclear field. They include financing by leasing, the use of funds from real estate credit institutions for long term financing, borrowing of long term funds in the Euro market, and financing through subsidiaries of the utilities. The new financing schemes also apply to the large financial requirement associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, waste management in particular. In this sector the utilities agree to bear the economic risk of the companies implementing the respective projects. Accordingly, financing will not entail any major difficulties. Another area of great importance is export financing. The German-Brazilian nuclear agreement is a model of this instrument. (orig.) [de

  9. Nuclear Power and Ghana's Future Electricity Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennison, I.; Dzobo, M.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing Ghana in her developmental efforts is the generation of adequate and affordable electricity to meet increasing demand. Problems with the dependency on hydro power has brought insecurity in electricity supply due to periodic droughts. Thermal power systems have been introduced into the electricity generation mix to complement the hydro power supply but there are problems associated with their use. The high price of crude oil on the international market has made them expensive to run and the supply of less expensive gas from Steps are being taken to run the thermal plants on less expensive gas from Nigeria has delayed due to conflicts in the Niger Delta region and other factors. The existing situation has therefore called for the diversification of the electricity generation mix so as to ensure energy security and affordable power supply. This paper presents the nuclear option as a suitable alternative energy source which can be used to address the energy supply problems facing the nation as well the steps being taken towards its introduction in the national energy mix. In addition, electricity demand projections using the MAED model as well as other studies are presented. The expected electricity demand of 350000 GWh (4000MWyr) in 2030, exceeds the total electricity supply capability of the existing hydropower system, untapped hydro resources and the maximum amount of gas that can be imported from Nigeria through the West Africa pipeline. Also presented is a technological assessment on the type of nuclear reactor to be used. The technological assessment which was done based on economics, grid size, technological maturity, passive safety and standardization of reactor design, indicate that a medium sized pressurized water reactor (i.e. a PWR with capacity 300MW to 700MW) is the most favourable type of reactor. In addition the challenges facing the implementation of the nuclear power programme in Ghana are presented. (author)

  10. Regional power marketing opportunities : current challenges and future outlooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiers, M.

    1998-01-01

    The North American demand for electric power and natural gas by sector was described and a comparison was made between the number of FERC certified electric power marketers versus natural gas marketing companies between 1986 and 1997 to illustrate the extent of changes that occurred during the decade. Regional opportunities for energy marketers were reviewed. By way of current challenges, the author identified (1) regulatory impediments, (2) divestiture of assets, (3) creation of an effective ISO, (4) establishment of effective pricing mechanisms, (5) customer systems and infrastructure, (6) forcing legislative reform, and (7) stranded cost recovery, as the most important. figs

  11. Key issues in space nuclear power challenges for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The future appears rich in missions that will extend the frontiers of knowledge, human presence in space, and opportunities for profitable commerce. Key to the success of these ventures is the availability of plentiful, cost effective electric power and assured, low cost access to space. While forecasts of space power needs are problematic, an assessment of future needs based on terrestrial experience has been made. These needs fall into three broad categories: survival, self sufficiency, and industrialization. The cost of delivering payloads to orbital locations from LEO to Mars has been determined and future launch cost reductions projected. From these factors, then, projections of the performance necessary for future solar and nuclear space power options has been made. These goals are largely dependent upon orbital location and energy storage needs. Finally the cost of present space power systems has been determined and projections made for future systems.

  12. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper

  13. Assessment of infrastructure development requirements for embarking on nuclear power program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.; Ilijovski, I.; Popovski, V.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades nuclear energy has been proven as reliable and economical energy supply that is capable of meeting demanding energy market requirements. Many countries around the world consider entering into new nuclear energy programs and building new power reactors for satisfying their increasing electrical energy needs. A nuclear power program is a major undertaking requiring careful planning, preparation and investment, and human resources for building adequate nuclear infrastructure. Preparations for making a decision to enter into a new nuclear energy program requires a significant amount of financial and human resources, time, and assistance from already developed countries and international nuclear organizations. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from Vienna provides technical help, financial assistance, and documented knowledge that are important for countries facing the challenge of entering nuclear programs for the first time. The IAEA organizes technical courses and information exchange meetings for new countries at which experiences and lessons learned are provided to new countries. This paper describes the key activities in the process for making a decision to enter a new nuclear energy program. It describes the efforts currently being conducted in the Republic of Macedonia in the direction of collecting information, performing various feasibility studies, and engaging in regional cooperation for utilizing experiences of the regional countries in performing such activities, and in developing their nuclear power programs. This paper also provides an overview of the IAEA documents and recommendations that are relevant for this topic

  14. The future Jules Horowitz material testing reactor: An opportunity for developing international collaborations on a major European irradiation infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrat, D.; Bignan, G.; Maugard, B.; Gonnier, C.; Blandin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Development process of a fuel product or a nuclear material before using at an industrial scale in a power reactor ranges from characterization of the material itself under neutronic flux up to its qualification in accidental conditions. Irradiations in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs) are in practice the basis of the whole process, in complement of prediction capabilities gained by modelling. Dedicated experimental reactors play also an important complementary role for some specific integral tests (e.g. RIA tests). Irradiations of precursors in power reactors are often limited to products which present a slight design evolution compare to the standard product or are implemented for further tests when a statistical approach is useful for defining a safety criterion. However European MTR park status is characterized by ageing infrastructures, which could cause operational issues in coming years, either on technological or on safety point of views. Moreover some specific supplies related to the public demand could be strongly affected (e.g. radiopharmaceutical targets). To avoid a lack in irradiation capacity offer at European level, CEA launched the Jules Horowitz Material Testing Reactor (JHR) international program, in the frame of a Consortium gathering also EDF (FR), AREVA (FR), European Commission (EU), SCK.CEN (BE), VTT (FI), CIEMAT (SP), STUDSVIK (SE), UJV (CZ), NNL (UK), IAEC (IL), DAE (IN) and as associated partnership: JAEA (JP). Some institutions in this list are themselves the flagship of a national Consortium. Discussions for enlarging participation are on-going with other countries, as JHR Consortium is open to new member entrance until JHR completion. The Jules Horowitz Material Testing Reactor (JHR MTR) is under construction at CEA Cadarache in southern France and will be an important international User Facility for R&D in support to the nuclear industry, research centres, regulatory bodies and TSO, and academic institutions. It represents a unique

  15. Hydro-power: a long history, a bright future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deudney, D

    1981-07-01

    A brief history of the spread of hydro-power in the world was given. Tables showing hydro-power potential and use, and the % electricity from hydro-power for 13 countries were included along with a graph showing % hydro-power operating, planned and under construction by region. The need for committed and farsighted political leadership for future development and the possibility of hydro production reaching 4 to 6 times its present level were discussed.

  16. Managing Sustainable Demand-side Infrastructure for Power System Ancillary Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Simon Christopher

    Widespread access to renewable electricity is seen as a viable method to mitigate carbon emissions, although problematic are the issues associated with the integration of the generation systems within current power system configurations. Wind power plants are the primary large-scale renewable generation technology applied globally, but display considerable short-term supply variability that is difficult to predict. Power systems are currently not designed to operate under these conditions, and results in the need to increase operating reserve in order to guarantee stability. Often, operating conventional generation as reserve is both technically and economically inefficient, which can overshadow positive benefits associated with renewable energy exploitation. The purpose of this thesis is to introduce and assess an alternative method of enhancing power system operations through the control of electric loads. In particular, this thesis focuses on managing highly-distributed sustainable demand-side infrastructure, in the form of heat pumps, electric vehicles, and electrolyzers, as dispatchable short-term energy balancing resources. The main contribution of the thesis is an optimal control strategy capable of simultaneously balancing grid- and demand-side objectives. The viability of the load control strategy is assessed through model-based simulations that explicitly track end-use functionality of responsive devices within a power systems analysis typically implemented to observe the effects of integrated wind energy systems. Results indicate that there is great potential for the proposed method to displace the need for increased reserve capacity in systems considering a high penetration of wind energy, thereby allowing conventional generation to operate more efficiently and avoid the need for possible capacity expansions.

  17. Advanced Power Converter for Universal and Flexible Power Management in Future Electricity Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Bassett, R.

    2007-01-01

    converters for grid connection of renewable sources will be needed. These power converters must be able to provide intelligent power management as well as ancillary services. This paper presents the overall structure and the control aspects of an advanced power converter for universal and flexible power......More "green" power provided by Distributed Generation will enter into the European electricity network in the near future. In order to control the power flow and to ensure proper and secure operation of this future grid, with an increased level of the renewable power, new power electronic...

  18. The future role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, J. B.

    1981-11-01

    In some regions of the United States and Europe nuclear power supplies over 30 percent of the total electricity demand. It supplies 11 percent in developed western nations and about 2.4 percent of total world primary energy demand. The installed nuclear capacity in OECD countries, which accounts for 94 percent of world nuclear capacity, is currently expected to increase from the 113 GWin 1980 to 220 GW by 1985 and 330 GW by 1990. In addition to impediments to nuclear programmes that have arisen from a lack of public acceptance, procedural problems have arisen through uncertainties in the regulatory processes, particularly in the USA and West Germany

  19. The Effect of Infrastructure Sharing in Estimating Operations Cost of Future Space Transportation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Meenakshi

    2005-01-01

    NASA and the aerospace industry are extremely serious about reducing the cost and improving the performance of launch vehicles both manned or unmanned. In the aerospace industry, sharing infrastructure for manufacturing more than one type spacecraft is becoming a trend to achieve economy of scale. An example is the Boeing Decatur facility where both Delta II and Delta IV launch vehicles are made. The author is not sure how Boeing estimates the costs of each spacecraft made in the same facility. Regardless of how a contractor estimates the cost, NASA in its popular cost estimating tool, NASA Air force Cost Modeling (NAFCOM) has to have a method built in to account for the effect of infrastructure sharing. Since there is no provision in the most recent version of NAFCOM2002 to take care of this, it has been found by the Engineering Cost Community at MSFC that the tool overestimates the manufacturing cost by as much as 30%. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a methodology to assess the impact of infrastructure sharing so that better operations cost estimates may be made.

  20. Nuclear power in future energy scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    It is explained that even when the renewable energy sources like solar, biogas and biomass are developed to the maximum feasible extent, they will only be able to sustain a marginal level of economic activity. In India demand for coal is expected to rise at some 6% per annum and that for oil at about 4% per annum. It is doubtful whether the coal production can be raised to meet the demand of 2000 million tonnes of coal by the turn of century. Steadily increasing cost of oil will make it difficult to procure the necessary quota of oil. The only way, therefore, for large-scale increase in electricity generation is to use nuclear energy. At present, it accounts for only 3% of the electricity produced in the country. It is shown that with implementation of a proper nuclear programme, 10,000 MW of nuclear power representing 15% of electricity produced by the year 2000 can be produced. Safety aspect of nuclear power is discussed and it is mentioned that scare on these grounds is not justifiable. Need for a national consensus on this issue is emphasised. (M.G.B.)

  1. Nuclear-powered rocket of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunqiao, B

    1979-06-01

    A possible manned mission to Mars with a crew of 7 in an 80-meter-long nuclear-powered rocket will take 180 days to reach its destination, will spend 10 to 14 days on the surface, and will take 200 days to return. A nuclear-powered engine (using U-235 or U-239) is the most likely means of propulsion. Four designs are described. The superheated exhaust engine will use a reactor to heat liquid hydrogen to over 4000/sup 0/C, after which it will be ejected from the exhaust. A plasma compression engine will use electric current produced by a reactor to heat hydrogen to plasma temperature (70,000/sup 0/C), after which it will be ejected through the exhaust by a magnetic field. In a gaseous-core reactor engine, gaseous fuel will heat liquid hydrogen to over 9,000/sup 0/C and use it as the propellant. The boldest solution is a proposal to use small nuclear explosions as the propulsive force. The first alternative will probably not produce enough thrust, while there will be a difficulty producing sufficient electricity in the second alternative. The other two alternatives seem promising.

  2. The future of Croatian power sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelcic, A.; Slipac, G.; Zeljko, M.

    2000-01-01

    The article gives two among many possible scenarios of the power sector development in Croatia for the period between 2001 and 2030. This article observes the long period until 2030. It is understandable that the reliability of the results of the analysis for the entire period is not consistent. For the first ten years of the planning period the results can be taken with great reliability, while for the period until 2010 and onward there are only outlines of the problems rather than proposals for final solutions. The expected technological development will also contribute especially in the light of the general apprehension about consequences of pollution and the obligations overtaken at the Kyoto Conference on Environment. One of the most important issues is the safety of power sector. With the increased use of gas for electricity generation as well as in the other consumption sectors, it is essential to ensure several supply lines and enlarge storage facilities. Of course, there is also a question of diversification of sources after 2010. The study uses the coal plants for working design only, but other sources can serve the same purpose. (e.g., nuclear plants). In the next 4-5 years many presumptions of development in that period will become more transparent, so it is not necessary to bring final conclusions in this moment

  3. Systems and methods for tracking a device in zero-infrastructure and zero-power conditions, and a tracking device therefor

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif; Bilal, Rana Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    and systems that enhance location determination in zero-infrastructure and zero-power conditions. In one example, a device, system and/or method includes an infrastructure-based localization module, an infrastructure-less localization module and a passive

  4. Safety goals for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    This talk presents technology goals developed for Generation IV nuclear energy systems that can be made available to the market by 2030 or earlier. These goals are defined in the broad areas of sustainability, safety and reliability, and economics. Sustainability goals focus on fuel utilization, waste management, and proliferation resistance. Safety and reliability goals focus on safe and reliable operation, investment protection, and essentially eliminating the need for emergency response. Economics goals focus on competitive life cycle and energy production costs and financial risk. Future reactors fall in three categories - those which are: Certified or derivatives; Designed to a reasonable extent and based on available technology; In conceptual form only with potential to most fully satisfy the GENIV goals

  5. Future transport power sources. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautavirta, M.; Jaaskelainen, S.

    2013-09-15

    On 17 January 2012 Minister of Transport Merja Kyllonen appointed a working group to explore alternative propulsion systems for the transport of the future. The task of the group was to examine .. on the basis of the current modes of transport and their expected renewal rate .. what forms of propulsion would be possible in Finland in the future, to what extent they could be used, and on what timetable they could be adopted. In addition, the working group was to issue recommendations on what measures should be taken. The group's vision is that passenger car traffic, rail transport and boating will be almost entirely independent of oil in 2050. Liquid and gaseous biofuels should cover at least 70 per cent of the fuels used in heavy-goods transport by 2050, and electricity should have an equally large share in bus and delivery transport in urban areas. In aviation, biokerosine would replace 40 per cent of the current fuels and in shipping, the use of sustainable alternative fuels would contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 40-50 per cent. Transport in airport and port terminals would be nearly emission-free as early as 2030. To achieve the goal for private motoring, the working group proposes that an interim target be set whereby all new private cars registered in 2030 should be capable of using alternative fuels. In addition, energy-efficiency needs to improve by nearly 50 per cent from the 2013 level. As far as maritime transport is concerned, the LNG Action Plan must be implemented by as early as 2020. On the basis of its study, the working group puts forward recommendations for measures to be implemented by 2020 and indicators for monitoring the implementation. (orig.)

  6. The status and future of geothermal power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, Charles F. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Geothermal electricity production in the United States began in 1960. Today there are over 20 plants in the western United States providing a total of about 2,200 MW of clean and reliable electricity. Currently identified resources could provide over 20,000 MW of power in the U.S., and undiscovered resources might provide 5 times that amount. In the 1990s industry growth slowed due to the loss of market incentives and competition from natural gas. However, increased interest in clean energy sources, ongoing technological improvements, and renewed opportunities abroad hold promise for a resurgence in the industry. This review paper covers the status of the technology, the issues faced, and the latest research. While the focus is on geothermal in the U.S., a brief description of the large international market is included.

  7. Nuclear power - assures the energy future. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference surveyed the present status of nuclear projects and future nuclear power plans, the export of electricity and technology, Canada's nuclear industry, and innovative nuclear opportunities

  8. Market system infrastructure: a major issue for the power system reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passelergue, J.Ch.

    2005-01-01

    The restructuring and opening of the electricity market made more complex the power system operation. While the system operator does not own anymore the generation assets, a perfect coordination with the market players is critical to guarantee the power system operation reliability. The market platforms, which are the main links between the system operator and the market players, must include communication means guaranteeing an uninterrupted service. The data-processing infrastructure must thus be designed to ensure the market system accessibility, as well as the effective exchange of data. Moreover, the market systems must facilitate the market operation and monitoring. They must allow the definition of a business process that, on the one hand, allows sequencing the users' actions, and that, on the other hand, provides the errors detected during the data-processing. Lastly, the market systems must facilitate the putting in place and follow-up by the market operator of operational procedures covering all the situations the operator can have to face. (author)

  9. Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid (TCIPG) Final Technical Report - November 20, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, William H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Sauer, Peter W. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Valdes, Alfonso [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Scaglione, Anna [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Smith, Sean W [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Hauser, Carl [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2015-11-20

    The Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid project (TCIPG) was funded by DOE and DHS for a period of performance that ran from October 1, 2009 to August 31 2015. The partnership included the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (lead institution) and partner institutions Arizona State University (replacing original partner UC Davis when faculty moved), Dartmouth College, and Washington State University. TCIPG was a unique public-private partnership of government, academia, and industry that was formed to meet the challenge of keeping our power grid secure. TCIPG followed from the earlier NSF-funded TCIP project, which kicked off in 2005. At that time, awareness of cyber security and resiliency in grid systems (and in control systems in general) was low, and the term “smart grid” was not in wide use. The original partnership was formed from a team of academic researchers with a shared vision for the importance of research in this area, and a commitment to producing more impactful results through early involvement of industry. From the TCIPG standpoint, “industry” meant both utilities (investor-owned as well as cooperatives and municipals) and system vendors (who sell technology to the utility sector). Although TCIPG was a university-led initiative, we have from the start stressed real-world impact and partnership with industry. That has led to real-world adoption of TCIPG technologies within the industry, achieving practical benefits. This report summarizes the achievements of TCIPG over its period of performance.

  10. Can renewable energy power the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriarty, Patrick; Honnery, Damon

    2016-01-01

    Fossil fuels face resource depletion, supply security, and climate change problems; renewable energy (RE) may offer the best prospects for their long-term replacement. However, RE sources differ in many important ways from fossil fuels, particularly in that they are energy flows rather than stocks. The most important RE sources, wind and solar energy, are also intermittent, necessitating major energy storage as these sources increase their share of total energy supply. We show that estimates for the technical potential of RE vary by two orders of magnitude, and argue that values at the lower end of the range must be seriously considered, both because their energy return on energy invested falls, and environmental costs rise, with cumulative output. Finally, most future RE output will be electric, necessitating radical reconfiguration of existing grids to function with intermittent RE. - Highlights: •Published estimates for renewable energy (RE) technical potential vary 100-fold. •Intermittent wind and solar energy dominate total RE potential. •We argue it is unlikely that RE can meet existing global energy use. •The need to maintain ecosystem services will reduce global RE potential. •The need for storage of intermittent RE will further reduce net RE potential.

  11. The future of nuclear power in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarsono, B.

    1984-01-01

    The current economic development strategy of Indonesia envisages rapid expansion of the small industrial and manufacturing sector. Recently, hydrocarbons have provided 70% of government revenues, 80% of foreign earnings, and 90% of commercial domestic energy consumption. Finite resources, plus limitations on hydropower and geothermal development by the year 2000 indicate that nuclear power will be necessary. Year 2000 projected requirements for Java are 80 TWh, corresponding to 17 to 22 GWe. Year 2000 coal availability of 12 to 18 x 10 6 annual tons then indicate a residual nuclear requirement of 1 to 4 GWe, assuming reasonable geothermal and hydropower development and no new oil-burning plants. A nuclear research center will be built near Jakarta with a 30-MW multipurpose research reactor and other facilities. The next steps in the program are: (1) set up a nuclear regulatory branch of BATAN (the National Atomic Energy Agency); (2) establish a state-owned nuclear construction and operation organization; (3) establish a design engineering and management organization; and (4) decide on the type of plant and build two to four units by 2000. (author)

  12. Power Systems of the Future: A 21st Century Power Partnership Thought Leadership Report (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Powerful trends in technology, policy environments, financing, and business models are driving change in power sectors globally. In light of these trends, the question is no longer whether power systems will be transformed, but rather how these transformations will occur. Power Systems of the Future, a thought leadership report from the 21st Century Power Partnership, explores these pathways explores actions that policymakers and regulators can take to encourage desired power system outcomes.

  13. Roads and associated structures: infrastructure impacts, vulnerabilities and design considerations for future climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tighe, S.L.; Lapp, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the findings from the literature scan, directed at identifying engineering literature that relates to road and associated infrastructure vulnerabilities in light of climate change. The scan was carried out over the course of several weeks in late 2007/early 2008. Although many Canadian transportation agencies are thinking about the potential vulnerabilities and associated engineering impacts, very few agencies have completed any formal analysis at this time. A few agencies currently have some on-going activities that are expected to be completed in 2008, but the majority have not started to examine the engineering aspects of how the change will need to be addressed in design, construction and maintenance. Although climate change and it's impact on transportation and specifically roads and associated structures is appearing in various reports and documents across Canada, available detailed information on engineering impacts was limited to nonexistent. This paper includes a brief introduction and background on climate change in general and the related predicted impacts on road infrastructure and associated structures, with primary focus on bridges. These sections are followed by project scope and objectives and methodology of assessment. The summary of findings provides some more specific details and has been prepared using available public agency documents that were located during the aforementioned search. Finally a few closing comments are provided. (author)

  14. Power Nuclear Reactors: technology and innovation for development in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2009-01-01

    The conference is about some historicals task of the fission technology as well as many types of Nuclear Reactors. Enrichment of fuel, wastes, research reactors and power reactors, a brief advertisment about Uruguay electric siystem and power generation, energetic worldwide, proliferation, safety reactors, incidents, accidents, Three-Mile Island accident, Chernobil accident, damages, risks, classification and description of Power reactors steam generation, nuclear reactor cooling systems, future view

  15. Present situation and future prospects for French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.

    1984-01-01

    The author depicts the present situation and future of the French nuclear power programme which has now become a major industrial reality after successful acceptance of a twofold challenge: the technical problem and that of training the personnel responsible for operating the power stations. The large number of nuclear plants now in operation and planned for the next few years makes electricity generated from nuclear power a ''new industrial reality'', which we must still learn to utilize to the best effect [fr

  16. A study on joint exhibition and establishment of the future knowledge infrastructure system between the IAEA and Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K. W.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, H. Y.

    2003-12-01

    The objectives of the project are to suggest a proposal for future cooperation of establishment of nuclear knowledge infrastructure system to the IAEA and to have a joint technical exhibition on nuclear knowledge management and future nuclear education training with the Agency on the occasion of the 47th General Conference of the Agency in 2003. In order to suggest a proposal for future cooperation of establishment of nuclear knowledge infrastructure system to the IAEA, firstly, Korea will seek to make a coordinator role in the establishment of Asian Network for Higher Education in Nuclear Technology(ANENT) which is sponsored by the Agency, secondly, Korea will participate in the project on the establishment of World Nuclear University sponsored by the Agency and World Nuclear Association, thirdly, Korea will host the IAEA training events on nuclear knowledge management to provide its technical capability for the IAEA member states. For the implementation of a joint technical exhibition which contain the above contexts, Korea will identify the exhibition topics and methods and will produce a video film in English, and will show several new education models such as cyber education system, simulator training using virtual reality technology, and education using network methodology. Futhermore, NTC/KAERI has conducted successfully a joint technical exhibition on nuclear knowledge management and future nuclear education training at the 47th IAEA General Conference in Vienna. Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed Elbaradei, commented that Korea's effort for preservation knowledge in the field of the nuclear field is a worthy endeavor which have the full support of the IAEA

  17. Report on the seminar on supporting industrial infrastructure requirements and development for nuclear power, Vienna, 14-18 April, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The Seminar on Supporting Industrial Infrastructure Requirements and Development for Nuclear Power reviewed the following problem areas: establishing the programmatic objectives of a realistic national participation and the technology transfer which would be necessary to qualify such a participation; promoting the level of industrialization which would be necessary to attain the targeted national participation; assuring quality in industry by enforcing comprehensive QA programme; setting-up a national R and D infrastructure to assist the transfer of technology and act as a permanent asset to solve problems as they arise in industry

  18. Future travel demand and its implications for transportation infrastructure investments in the Texas Triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    This study takes a megaregion approach to project future travel demand and choice of transport : modes in the Texas Triangle, which is encompassed by four major metropolitan areas, Dallas-Fort : Worth, Houston, San Antonio, and Austin. The model was ...

  19. Location, duration, and power; How Americans' driving habits and charging infrastructure inform vehicle-grid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearre, Nathaniel S.

    The substitution of electrical energy for gasoline as a transportation fuel is an initiative both with a long history, and one made both pressing and important in today's policy discussion by renewed interest in plug-in vehicles. The research presented in this dissertation attempts to inform the policy discussion for governments, for electric utilities, for the makers of electric cars, and for the industries developing and planning charging infrastructure. To that end, the impacts of variations to several possible system design parameters, on several metrics of evaluation, are assessed. The analysis is based on a dataset of vehicle trips collected by Georgia Institute of Technology, tracking almost 500 vehicles that commute to, from or within the Atlanta city center, comprising Atlanta `commuter-shed'. By assuming that this dataset of trips defines the desired travel behavior of urban and suburban American populations, the effects of travel electrification in personal vehicles can be assessed. Several significant and novel findings have emerged from this research. These include the conclusion that at-work charging is not necessarily the logical next step beyond home-charging, as it will in general add little to the substitutability of electric vehicles. In contrast, high power en-route charging, combined with modest power home charging is shown to be surprisingly effective, potentially requiring of EV drivers a total time spent at en-route recharging stations similar to that for liquid fueled cars. From the vehicle marketing perspective, a quantification of the hybrid household effect, wherein multi-vehicle households own one EV, showed that about a quarter of all households could adopt a vehicle with 80 miles of range with no changes to travel patterns. Of interest to grid management, this research showed an apparent maximum fleet-wide load from unregulated charging of about 1 kW per vehicle, regardless of EVSE power or EV battery size. This contrasts with a

  20. Future CO2 emissions and electricity generation from proposed coal-fired power plants in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Christine; Fofrich, Robert; Davis, Steven J.

    2017-04-01

    With its growing population, industrializing economy, and large coal reserves, India represents a critical unknown in global projections of future CO2 emissions. Here, we assess proposed construction of coal-fired power plants in India and evaluate their implications for future emissions and energy production in the country. As of mid-2016, 243 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired generating capacity are under development in India, including 65 GW under construction and an additional 178 GW proposed. These under-development plants would increase the coal capacity of India's power sector by 123% and, when combined with the country's goal to produce at least 40% of its power from non-fossil sources by 2030, exceed the country's projected future electricity demand. The current proposals for new coal-fired plants could therefore either "strand" fossil energy assets (i.e., force them to retire early or else operate at very low capacity factors) and/or ensure that the goal is not met by "locking-out" new, low-carbon energy infrastructure. Similarly, future emissions from the proposed coal plants would also exceed the country's climate commitment to reduce its 2005 emissions intensity 33% to 35% by 2030, which—when combined with the commitments of all other countries—is itself not yet ambitious enough to meet the international goal of holding warming well below 2°C relative to the pre-industrial era.

  1. California Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Projections: 2017-2025 - Future Infrastructure Needs for Reaching the State's Zero Emission-Vehicle Deployment Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Eric W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rames, Clement L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bedir, Abdulkadir [California Energy Commission; Crisostomo, Noel [California Energy Commission; Allen, Jennifer [California Energy Commission

    2018-03-27

    This report analyzes plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) infrastructure needs in California from 2017 to 2025 in a scenario where the State's zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) deployment goals are achieved by household vehicles. The statewide infrastructure needs are evaluated by using the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Projection tool, which incorporates representative statewide travel data from the 2012 California Household Travel Survey. The infrastructure solution presented in this assessment addresses two primary objectives: (1) enabling travel for battery electric vehicles and (2) maximizing the electric vehicle-miles traveled for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The analysis is performed at the county-level for each year between 2017 and 2025 while considering potential technology improvements. The results from this study present an infrastructure solution that can facilitate market growth for PEVs to reach the State's ZEV goals by 2025. The overall results show a need for 99k-130k destination chargers, including workplaces and public locations, and 9k-25k fast chargers. The results also show a need for dedicated or shared residential charging solutions at multi-family dwellings, which are expected to host about 120k PEVs by 2025. An improvement to the scientific literature, this analysis presents the significance of infrastructure reliability and accessibility on the quantification of charger demand.

  2. Providing all global energy with wind, water, and solar power, Part I: Technologies, energy resources, quantities and areas of infrastructure, and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, Mark Z., E-mail: jacobson@stanford.ed [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4020 (United States); Delucchi, Mark A., E-mail: madelucchi@ucdavis.ed [Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Climate change, pollution, and energy insecurity are among the greatest problems of our time. Addressing them requires major changes in our energy infrastructure. Here, we analyze the feasibility of providing worldwide energy for all purposes (electric power, transportation, heating/cooling, etc.) from wind, water, and sunlight (WWS). In Part I, we discuss WWS energy system characteristics, current and future energy demand, availability of WWS resources, numbers of WWS devices, and area and material requirements. In Part II, we address variability, economics, and policy of WWS energy. We estimate that {approx}3,800,000 5 MW wind turbines, {approx}49,000 300 MW concentrated solar plants, {approx}40,000 300 MW solar PV power plants, {approx}1.7 billion 3 kW rooftop PV systems, {approx}5350 100 MW geothermal power plants, {approx}270 new 1300 MW hydroelectric power plants, {approx}720,000 0.75 MW wave devices, and {approx}490,000 1 MW tidal turbines can power a 2030 WWS world that uses electricity and electrolytic hydrogen for all purposes. Such a WWS infrastructure reduces world power demand by 30% and requires only {approx}0.41% and {approx}0.59% more of the world's land for footprint and spacing, respectively. We suggest producing all new energy with WWS by 2030 and replacing the pre-existing energy by 2050. Barriers to the plan are primarily social and political, not technological or economic. The energy cost in a WWS world should be similar to that today. - Research highlights: {yields} Replacing world energy with wind, water, and sun (WWS) reduces world power demand 30%. {yields} WWS for world requires only 0.41% and 0.51% more world land for footprint and spacing, respectively. {yields} Practical to provide 100% new energy with WWS by 2030 and replace existing energy by 2050.

  3. Operational flexibility and economics of power plants in future low-carbon power systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne Sjoerd; van den Broek, Machteld; Seebregts, Ad; Faaij, André

    2015-01-01

    Future power systems will require large shares of low-carbon generators such as renewables and power plants with Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) to keep global warming below 2. °C. Intermittent renewables increase the system-wide demand for flexibility and affect the operation of thermal power

  4. Geophysical Survey of McMurdo Ice Shelf to Determine Infrastructure Stability and for Future Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    further encouraged research to deter- mine if other englacial features exist that may contribute to future MIS in- stability. The National Science...surrounding topography by roughly 5 m. The structure is capped by a hyperbolic reflection at a 10 m depth, lacks any fine firn stratigraphy within, and

  5. The SEA of the Future: Building the Productivity Infrastructure. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Betheny, Ed.; Jochim, Ashley, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    "The SEA of the Future" is an education publication series examining how state education agencies can shift from a compliance to a performance-oriented organization through strategic planning and performance management tools to meet growing demands to support education reform while improving productivity. This volume, the third in the…

  6. The safety of future nuclear power plants in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queniart, D.

    1988-10-01

    The present paper concerns certain personal thoughts on the safety of future French power plants, which will come into operation at the beginning of the next century. These reflections, which are made on the author's own behalf and, under no circumstances, implicate at this stage the official views of the French safety authorities, are aimed at defining some directions for the improvement of safety in these future plants as compared with that of plants presently in operation or under construction

  7. Analysis of the efficiency of the Iberian power futures market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitan Herraiz, Alvaro; Rodriguez Monroy, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Market efficiency is analysed for the Iberian Power Futures Market and other European Power Markets, as well as other fuel markets through evaluation of ex-post Forward Risk Premium. The equilibrium price from compulsory call auctions for distribution companies within the framework of the Iberian Power Futures Market is not optimal for remuneration purposes as it seems to be slightly upward biased. In the period considered (August 2006-July 2008), monthly futures contracts behave similarly to quarterly contracts. Average risk premia have been positive in power and natural gas markets but negative in oil and coal markets. Different hypotheses are tested regarding increasing volatility with maturity and regarding Forward Risk Premium variations (decreasing with variance of spot prices during delivery period and increasing with skewness of spot prices during delivery period). Enlarged data sets are recommended for stronger test results. Energy markets tend to show limited levels of market efficiency. Regarding the emerging Iberian Power Futures Market, price efficiency is improved with market development of all the coexistent forward contracting mechanisms and with further integration of European Regional Electricity Markets. (author)

  8. The effect of costs on the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walske, C.

    1984-01-01

    The author discusses the future of the nuclear power industry from an economics and cost-factor point of view, from the point of view of plant management, as it affects and requires personnel training, as R and D cost and competition is involved, as end-user cost is involved, and as efficiency and cost effectiveness of nuclear power fare in comparison with other sources of electrical energy

  9. Nuclear power plants - a solution for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinn, D.

    1978-01-01

    This book is not written for experts, but for interested laymen. The arguments in favour of nuclear power plants are presented in an intelligible and critical manner. The problem of nuclear power is reviewed at a moment where the nuclear controversy has even led to lawsuits. Still, there is hope for a secure energy supply - and fear of the risks that the future might bring and which may even endanger our lives. (GL) [de

  10. Developing the necessary infrastructure. Chapter 1; IAEA activities in support of countries considering embarking on Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira, O.

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA supports in a variety of ways in establishing an appropriate infra-structure necessary to secure safe and reliable operation and still maintaining the international safeguards regime, especially in developing countries which are considering introduction of nuclear power programme. The TC projects to support introduction of nuclear power has been formulated and its number increased significantly recently. Various guidance documents have been published by the IAEA recently to enable progressive development of national infrastructure. The IAEA guidance documents constitute a basis of advises to newcomer countries. The recently formulated important mission is INIR mission to review the status of national infrastructure in the context of measuring the distance to the expected milestone. Finally, it is expected that the newcomers would make informed decision-making on going to nuclear power by fully understanding the necessary obligations and national long-term commitment, by confirming viability of nuclear power options in the country's energy plan through Energy Planning and long-term strategic assessment using IAEA guidance and tools

  11. Plug-in vehicles and the future of road infrastructure funding in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumortier, Jerome; Kent, Matthew W.; Payton, Seth B.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, road infrastructure funding is declining due to an increase in fuel efficiency and the non-adjustment of fuel taxes to inflation. Legislation to tax plug-in vehicles has been proposed or implemented in several states. Those propositions are contrary to policies to promote fuel efficient vehicles. This paper assesses (1) the magnitude of the decline in federal fuel tax revenue caused by plug-in vehicles and (2) quantifies the revenue that could be generated from a federal plug-in vehicle registration fee. We find that the contribution of plug-in vehicles to the decline of the federal fuel tax revenue is at most 1.6% and the majority of the shortfall can be attributed to the non-adjustment of the fuel tax rate and the increase in vehicle fuel efficiency by 2040. An additional tax of $50–$200 per plug-in vehicle per year in the reference case would generate $188–$745 million in 2040 which represents an increase of 1.69–6.71% in federal fuel tax revenue compared to no tax. The lesson for policy makers is that plug-in vehicles do not contribute significantly to the funding shortfall in the short- and medium-run and a supplemental tax would generate a small percentage of additional revenue. - Highlights: •Fees on plug-in cars are proposed or implemented to collect foregone fuel taxes. •Plug-in cars are responsible for a very small percentage of declining tax revenue. •An additional tax on plug-in cars does not stop the decline in fuel tax revenue. •Adjusting fuel taxes to inflation is a more effective tool to increase tax revenue.

  12. Systems and methods for tracking a device in zero-infrastructure and zero-power conditions, and a tracking device therefor

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif

    2017-03-23

    Disclosed are embodiments for a tracking device having multiple layers of localization and communication capabilities, and particularly having the ability to operate in zero-infrastructure or zero-power conditions. Also disclosed are methods and systems that enhance location determination in zero-infrastructure and zero-power conditions. In one example, a device, system and/or method includes an infrastructure-based localization module, an infrastructure-less localization module and a passive module that can utilize at least two of the modules to determine a location of the tracking device.

  13. Synergistic Use of Nighttime Satellite Data, Electric Utility Infrastructure, and Ambient Population to Improve Power Outage Detections in Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony A. Cole

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural and anthropogenic hazards are frequently responsible for disaster events, leading to damaged physical infrastructure, which can result in loss of electrical power for affected locations. Remotely-sensed, nighttime satellite imagery from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS Day/Night Band (DNB can monitor power outages in disaster-affected areas through the identification of missing city lights. When combined with locally-relevant geospatial information, these observations can be used to estimate power outages, defined as geographic locations requiring manual intervention to restore power. In this study, we produced a power outage product based on Suomi-NPP VIIRS DNB observations to estimate power outages following Hurricane Sandy in 2012. This product, combined with known power outage data and ambient population estimates, was then used to predict power outages in a layered, feedforward neural network model. We believe this is the first attempt to synergistically combine such data sources to quantitatively estimate power outages. The VIIRS DNB power outage product was able to identify initial loss of light following Hurricane Sandy, as well as the gradual restoration of electrical power. The neural network model predicted power outages with reasonable spatial accuracy, achieving Pearson coefficients (r between 0.48 and 0.58 across all folds. Our results show promise for producing a continental United States (CONUS- or global-scale power outage monitoring network using satellite imagery and locally-relevant geospatial data.

  14. CERI says lower power rates still in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    The impact that consumers will encounter with the convergence of Alberta's natural gas and electric utility industry were discussed. It will take a few years of infrastructure improvements before lower rates and improved efficiencies will be realized. Electricity prices in Alberta are expected to increase until the next generating capacity is connected to the provincial power grid. In addition, consumer prices are increasing because of the province's reliance on imports from British Columbia to meet peak demand. In August 2000 the province held a controversial auction of its generating capacity. The auction raised little more than $1 billion to the balancing pool, well short of the $4 billion target. Two major power facilities, the Genesee and Sheerness, failed to attract any bids at all. Despite this, the government accepted the results of the auction and will move forward with its retail restructuring program which calls for the competitive power market to be in place on January 1, 2001. The five major bidders who acquired the right to market about 4,249 megawatts of generating capacity from eight generating units in Alberta are EPCOR Utilities Inc., ENMAX Energy Corp., Enron Canada Power Corp., TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., and Engage Energy. The Alberta government is in the process of finalizing details of how the raised funds will be used to offset the impact of electricity rates

  15. Adequacy of operating reserves for power systems in future european wind power scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Kaushik; Litong-Palima, Marisciel; Maule, Petr

    2015-01-01

    operating reserves. To study the effects of these imbalances, anticipated wind scenarios for European power systems are modelled for 2020 and 2030. Wind power forecasts for different time scales and real-time available wind power are modelled. Based on these studies, this paper qualitatively analyzes......Wind power generation is expected to increase in Europe by large extent in future. This will increase variability and uncertainty in power systems. Imbalances caused due to uncertainty in wind power forecast can trigger frequency instability in the system. These imbalances are handled using...... the adequacy of primary and secondary reserves requirements for future European power systems. This paper also discusses the challenges due to the uncertainty in wind power forecasts and their possible solutions for wind installation scenarios for 2020 and 2030....

  16. Technological and social change and the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, H.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past decade and a half, the nuclear power industry has experienced growing public opposition. Underlying the nuclear industry's problems is a very fundamental anti-technology outlook by the public - visibly apparent in the environmental movement - that not only affects nuclear power but business in general. Is this anti-technology attitude of the public and media writers a passing phase, or will it wane and yield to a positive attitude toward technology? This paper discusses historical, sociological and technological change in the Western industrial world, and how changing attitudes might affect nuclear power in the future. (author)

  17. Qualitative Description of Electric Power System Future States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Trevor D.; Corbin, Charles D.

    2018-03-06

    The simulation and evaluation of transactive systems depends to a large extent on the context in which those efforts are performed. Assumptions regarding the composition of the electric power system, the regulatory and policy environment, the distribution of renewable and other distributed energy resources (DERs), technological advances, and consumer engagement all contribute to, and affect, the evaluation of any given transactive system, regardless of its design. It is our position that the assumptions made about the state of the future power grid will determine, to some extent, the systems ultimately deployed, and that the transactive system itself may play an important role in the evolution of the power system.

  18. Supporting Control Room Operators in Highly Automated Future Power Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Minjiang; Catterson, Victoria; Syed, Mazheruddin

    2017-01-01

    Operating power systems is an extremely challenging task, not least because power systems have become highly interconnected, as well as the range of network issues that can occur. It is therefore a necessity to develop decision support systems and visualisation that can effectively support the hu...... the human operators for decisionmaking in the complex and dynamic environment of future highly automated power system. This paper aims to investigate the decision support functions associated with frequency deviation events for the proposed Web of Cells concept....

  19. Future perspective of cost for nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Ichiro

    1988-01-01

    The report presents and discussed results of evaluation of the cost for power generation in this and forthcoming years on the basis of an analysis of the current fuel prices and the economics of various power sources. Calculations show that nuclear power generation at present is inferior to coal-firing power generation in terms of required costs, but can become superior in the future due to an increased burn-up and reduced construction cost. Investigations are made of possible contributions of future technical improvements to reduction in the overall cost. Results suggest that nuclear power generation will be the most efficient among the various electric sources because of its technology-intensive feature. Development of improved light water reactors is of special importance to achieve a high burn-up and reduced construction costs. In general, the fixed cost accounts for a large part of the overall nuclear power generation cost, indicating that a reduction in construction cost can greatly increase the economic efficiency. Changes in the yen's exchange rate seem to have little effect on the economics of nuclear power generation, which represents another favorable aspect of this type of energy. (Nogami, K.)

  20. Computing and cognition in future power-plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.; Sheridan, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to speculate on the nature of future interactions between people and computers in the operation of power plants. In particular, the authors offer a taxonomy for examining the differing functions of operators in interacting with the plant and its computers, and the differing functions of the computers in interacting with the plant and its operators

  1. Computing and cognition in future power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.; Sheridan, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to speculate on the nature of future interactions between people and computers in the operation of power plants. In particular, the authors offer a taxonomy for examining the differing functions of operators in interacting with the plant and its computers, and the differing functions of the computers in interacting with the plant and its operators

  2. Key regulatory challenges for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, Neil E.

    2001-01-01

    Key regulatory challenges for future nuclear power plants are concerned with fuel and cladding materials taken to higher burnup and operated at higher temperatures. Particular challenges are related to reduction in waste toxicity, understanding and control of coolant corrosion, qualification of fuel particles, new maintenance practices

  3. Nuclear power and Imatran Voima in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numminen, K.

    1995-01-01

    As the owner of the Loviisa NPS with two VVER-440 units, Imatran Voima (IVO) has worked with nuclear power for more than twenty years. After the negative decision of the Finnish Parliament in 1993 there are no possibilities to build nuclear power in Finland in the near future. However, the preparation work for increasing the produced power of all four operating NPP's of Finland is going on. The emphasis in the work with new nuclear energy is on the supporting programs in Eastern Europe and the preparation of a building contract of a new NPS to China together with the Russians. With a new decision of the Finnish Parliament, the nuclear option could still be an important part of the future energy strategy of Finland. (orig.)

  4. Software Infrastructure for exploratory visualization and data analysis: past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C T; Freire, J

    2008-01-01

    Future advances in science depend on our ability to comprehend the vast amounts of data being produced and acquired, and scientific visualization is a key enabling technology in this endeavor. We posit that visualization should be better integrated with the data exploration process instead of being done after the fact - when all the science is done - simply to generate presentations of the findings. An important barrier to a wider adoption of visualization is complexity: the design of effective visualizations is a complex, multistage process that requires deep understanding of existing techniques, and how they relate to human cognition. We envision visualization software tools evolving into 'scientific discovery' environments that support the creative tasks in the discovery pipeline, from data acquisition and simulation to hypothesis testing and evaluation, and that enable the publication of results that can be reproduced and verified

  5. Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Test Bed and Data Infrastructure Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Van Dam, Kerstin Kleese [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shipman, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-04

    The collaborative Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project started in July 2011 with the goal of accelerating the development of climate model components (i.e., atmosphere, ocean and sea ice, and land surface) and enhancing their predictive capabilities while incorporating uncertainty quantification (UQ). This effort required accessing and converting observational data sets into specialized model testing and verification data sets and building a model development test bed, where model components and sub-models can be rapidly evaluated. CSSEF’s prototype test bed demonstrated, how an integrated testbed could eliminate tedious activities associated with model development and evaluation, by providing the capability to constantly compare model output—where scientists store, acquire, reformat, regrid, and analyze data sets one-by-one—to observational measurements in a controlled test bed.

  6. A Revolution in the Making: Advances in Materials That May Transform Future Exploration Infrastructures and Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles E.; Dicus, Dennis L.; Shuart, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Strategic Plan identifies the long-term goal to provide safe and affordable space access, orbital transfer, and interplanetary transportation capabilities to enable research, human exploration, and the commercial development of space; and to conduct human and robotic missions to planets and other bodies in our solar system. Numerous scientific and engineering breakthroughs will be required to develop the technology necessary to achieve this goal. Critical technologies include advanced vehicle primary and secondary structure, radiation protection, propulsion and power systems, fuel storage, electronics and devices, sensors and science instruments, and medical diagnostics and treatment. Advanced materials with revolutionary new capabilities are an essential element of each of these technologies. This paper discusses those materials best suited for aerospace vehicle structure and highlights the enormous potential of one revolutionary new material, carbon nanotubes.

  7. On the spatial hedging effectiveness of German wind power futures for wind power generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Troels Sønderby; Pircalabu, Anca

    2018-01-01

    The wind power futures recently introduced on the German market fill the gap of a standardized product that addresses directly the volume risk in wind power trading. While the German wind power futures entail risk-reducing benefits for wind power generators generally speaking, it remains unclear...... the extent of these benefits across wind farms with different geographical locations. In this paper, we consider the wind utilization at 31 different locations in Germany, and for each site, we propose a copula model for the joint behavior of the site-specific wind index and the overall German wind index....... Our results indicate that static mixture copulas are preferred to the stand-alone copula models usually employed in the economic literature. Further, we find evidence of asymmetric dependence and upper tail dependence. To quantify the benefits of wind power futures at each wind site, we perform...

  8. The regulatory and waste safety infrastructure of Bangladesh: Present status and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazi, O.A.

    2001-01-01

    Although nuclear energy and ionizing radiation exist as this planet earth exists, the history of human use of these energies is only a little over hundred years old. Nuclear and radiological practices are of immense benefit to society. But, like all other practices, nuclear and radiological practices also involve risks of a special type and nature. People and media are particularly sensitive to the use as well as to any accident or emergency involving the practices. Necessary laws and regulatory bodies have existed in many countries for a long time to control and keep the risks within acceptable limits. Nonetheless, accidents do occur and emergencies arise, which leads to the questioning of such regulatory systems' effectiveness. International interaction and co-operation are essential to addressing societal concerns appropriately. Bangladesh, though late, has also enacted laws and established a regulatory system to control the practices. This paper focuses on the country's regulatory status, hurdles being faced in implementing the legal requirements, and future thinking to increase effectiveness and efficiency. (author)

  9. The safety of nuclear power: Strategy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The conference took place in Vienna from 2 to 6 September 1991. It was attended by approximately 350 participants from about fifty countries and 12 international organizations. The conference was directed to decision makers on nuclear safety and energy policy at the technical policy level. Its objective was to review the nuclear power safety issues on which international consensus would be desirable, to address the concerns on nuclear safety expressed by the WCED, and to formulate recommendations for future actions by national and international authorities to advance nuclear safety to the highest level, including proposals for the IAEA's future activities for consideration by its governing bodies. Background Papers were prepared in advance of the conference by Expert Groups on the following five issues: Fundamental principles for the safe use of nuclear power; Ensuring and enhancing safety of operating plants; Treatment of nuclear power plants built to earlier safety standards; The next generation of nuclear power plants; Final disposal of radioactive waste. On the basis of comments received on these papers from IAEA Member States, significant topics for discussion were identified. These topics and the papers formed the basis of the discussions from which the conference arrived at recommendations for future action by national and international authorities. A separate abstract was prepared for the opening speeches, background papers, major findings of the conference and the President's closing statement. 2 figs, 1 tab

  10. Power supply and pulsing strategies for the future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogna, A S; Weber, M; Göttlicher, P

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the power delivery systems of the future linear colliders exploits the pulsed bunch structure of the beam in order to minimize the average current in the cables and the electronics and thus to reduce the material budget and heat dissipation. Although modern integrated circuit technologies are already available to design a low-power system, the concepts on how to pulse the front-end electronics and further reduce the power are not yet well understood. We propose a possible implementation of a power pulsing system based on a DC/DC converter and we choose the Analog Hadron Calorimeter as a specific example. The model features large switching currents of electronic modules in short time intervals to stimulate the inductive components along the cables and interconnections.

  11. Voltage control in the future power transmission systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Nan

    Wind energy in Denmark covers 42% of the total power consumption in 2015, and will share up to 50% by 2020. Consequently, the conventional power plants are decommissioning. Under the progress of the green transition, the national decision leads to underground many overhead lines in the future...... stages. The voltage uncertainty caused by the wind power forecasting errors is estimated, which is applied as a voltage security margin to further constrain the voltage magnitude in the optimization problem. The problem under the uncertainty is therefore converted to a deterministic problem, which...... to ensure a highly reliable transmission, e.g. balancing the generation and the consumption in large geographic regions, the exchange capacities will be enlarged by upgrading the interconnections. The Danish power system, the electricity transportation hub between the Nordic and continental European systems...

  12. Powering the future: Blueprint for a sustainable electricity industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, C.; Lenssen, N.

    1997-01-01

    Long known for its vast scale and fierce resistance to change, the US power industry is poised for a sweeping transformation. Although driven by many of the same forces propelling the telecommunications revolution, the electricity industry has received only a fraction as much attention. Yet the electric industry is far larger, with a current investment per customer of $6,000--double that of the phone and cable industries combined. Moreover, unlike telecommunications, the future of the power industry will have an enormous impact on the global environment. The glimmerings of a more efficient, decentralized, and less-polluting power system are beginning to capture the interest--and even the investment dollars--of some. In this paper, the authors describe the route to a more environmentally sustainable electric industry to power the twenty-first century

  13. The future of nuclear power worldwide and the role of the global nuclear energy partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurgeon, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation is entitled, 'The Future of Nuclear Power Worldwide and the Role of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership', and the core message in one sentence is: When we look at the challenges of meeting our growing energy demands, providing for energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, we must conclude that nuclear power has to play a significant and growing role in meeting these challenges. Similarly, the mission of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership is to foster the safe and secure worldwide expansion of nuclear energy. GNEP comes at a crucial time in the burgeoning expansion of nuclear power. It is the only comprehensive proposal to close the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States, and engage the international community to minimize proliferation risks as well as provide and benefit from cooperation in policy formation, technical support, and technology and infrastructure development. Nuclear power's poised renaissance is encouraging, but it will require public support, expanded R and D activities and facilities, and increases in human capital needed for wide-scale construction and operation of new nuclear plants. Despite recent political currents, Germany can, too, become a part of this renaissance and become a full partner in the global partnership that shares a common vision for nuclear power's expansion. (orig.)

  14. Future prospects for nuclear power at home and overseas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear power will provide energy throughout the next century and beyond, not 'too cheap to meter,' but cleanly, safely and economically, nonetheless. However the drivers behind its continued development will not be those of the century now drawing to its close - defence needs and the quest to explore new technology. They will be the growing needs of future generations of consumers and the ever increasing concern for the environment. Before attempting to peer into the future it is always worth reviewing the past to see what lessons have been learnt. (Author)

  15. Power Testing in Basketball: Current Practice and Future Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Neal; Dalbo, Vincent J; Burgos, Bill; Pyne, David B; Scanlan, Aaron T

    2018-02-01

    Numerous foundational movements performed during basketball are predicated on underlying power-related attributes, including speed, change-of-direction, and jumping. Accordingly, fitness testing batteries for basketball have incorporated an assortment of linear speed tests, change-of-direction tests, and jump tests. However, due to the wide variety of testing options it is difficult for basketball practitioners to select appropriate testing protocols for the assessment of power-related attributes. As a result, there is a need to review the relevant literature to identify game-specific, power-related attributes important in basketball and the most appropriate tests available to assess power-related attributes for basketball practitioners. Therefore, the aims of this review were to: (1) identify essential power-related attributes important in basketball; (2) discuss the suitability of common and novel power-related tests; and (3) provide recommendations for future research and best practice approaches for basketball coaching staff. In this review, we propose a series of novel tests that are more targeted and specific to basketball movements including: (1) 5-m and 10-m linear sprints, (2) Modified Agility T-Test, (3) Change-of-Direction Deficit, (4) lateral bound, (5) Sargent jump, (6) one-step jump, and (7) isometric midthigh pull test. Improved testing of power-related attributes should enable basketball practitioners to develop targeted training plans for enhancing player performance.

  16. High efficiency USC power plant - present status and future potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, R. [Faelleskemikerne I/S Fynsvaerket (Denmark); Hald, J. [Elsam/Elkraft/TU Denmark (Denmark)

    1998-12-31

    Increasing demand for energy production with low impact on the environment and minimised fuel consumption can be met with high efficient coal fired power plants with advanced steam parameters. An important key to this improvement is the development of high temperature materials with optimised mechanical strength. Based on the results of more than ten years of development a coal fired power plant with an efficiency above 50 % can now be realised. Future developments focus on materials which enable an efficiency of 52-55 %. (orig.) 25 refs.

  17. High efficiency USC power plant - present status and future potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, R [Faelleskemikerne I/S Fynsvaerket (Denmark); Hald, J [Elsam/Elkraft/TU Denmark (Denmark)

    1999-12-31

    Increasing demand for energy production with low impact on the environment and minimised fuel consumption can be met with high efficient coal fired power plants with advanced steam parameters. An important key to this improvement is the development of high temperature materials with optimised mechanical strength. Based on the results of more than ten years of development a coal fired power plant with an efficiency above 50 % can now be realised. Future developments focus on materials which enable an efficiency of 52-55 %. (orig.) 25 refs.

  18. Future NASA Power Technologies for Space and Aero Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeder, James F.

    2015-01-01

    To achieve the ambitious goals that NASA has outlined for the next decades considerable development of power technology will be necessary. This presentation outlines the development objectives for both space and aero applications. It further looks at the various power technologies that support these objectives and examines drivers that will be a driving force for future development. Finally, the presentation examines what type of non-traditional learning areas should be emphasized in student curriculum so that the engineering needs of the third decade of the 21st Century are met.

  19. HTS technology - Generating the future of offshore wind power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Jens

    2010-09-15

    Superconductive generator design is going to become a real competitive alternative in the future. In general, superconductor design is the most competitive out of Direct Drive Systems and best fulfils the needs of the upcoming market - especially in the offshore market, where WECs with higher nominal power up to 10MW are required. Low weight, high reliability and the very good grid behaviour are the main advantages of the superconductor generator design and will lead to lower costs. The other systems are restricted to a smaller energy output range and / or onshore wind power production business.

  20. SmartGrid: Future networks for New Zealand power systems incorporating distributed generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Nirmal-Kumar C.; Zhang Lixi

    2009-01-01

    The concept of intelligent electricity grids, which primarily involves the integration of new information and communication technologies with power transmission lines and distribution cables, is being actively explored in the European Union and the United States. Both developments share common technological developmental goals but also differ distinctly towards the role of distributed generation for their future electrical energy security. This paper looks at options that could find relevance to New Zealand (NZ), in the context of its aspiration of achieving 90% renewable energy electricity generation portfolio by 2025. It also identifies developments in technical standardization and industry investments that facilitate a pathway towards an intelligent or smart grid development for NZ. Some areas where policy can support research in NZ being a 'fast adapter' to future grid development are also listed. This paper will help policy makers quickly review developments surrounding SmartGrid and also identify its potential to support NZ Energy Strategy in the electricity infrastructure. This paper will also help researchers and power system stakeholders for identifying international standardization, projects and potential partners in the area of future grid technologies.

  1. The future of nuclear power in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibenschutz, J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the future prospects of nuclear power in Latin America. As part of the developing world, Latin America has a great potential for energy growth. Although there are substantial differences among the different countries of the area, one common denominator is the relatively low per-capita energy consumption. As in many other regions of the world, nuclear power makes sense to complement hydro and fossil-fueled power generation. One of the main restrictions to the growth of nuclear power has been the relatively small size of some electric system. As in most developing countries, the damage to the environment due to the energy-producing systems is very important. In countries like Cuba, nuclear power is clearly the most economical source, since the country lacks indigenous energy resources and the need to import primary energy sources favors nuclear power. The problem of the Latin American region is a severe shortage of financial resources. Standardization has been recognized as one of the better mechanisms to lower nuclear power costs. Argentina has been proposing the construction of CANDU-type reactors as the basis for their standard program, and some years ago Mexico took steps to launch a program for the installation of ∼20 identical units. As in the whole world, the general public is reluctant to accept nuclear power. So far, nuclear power plants have been important to Latin America, with varying levels of local participation, but with imported technology. Unless a major scientific breakthrough takes place, nuclear power will constitute an important component of the energy system in Latin America

  2. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume II. Infrastructure and community-services requirements, Island of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, G.A.; Buevens, W.R.

    1982-06-01

    The requirements of infrastructure and community services necessary to accommodate the development of geothermal energy on the Island of Hawaii for electricity production are identified. The following aspects are covered: Puna District-1981, labor resources, geothermal development scenarios, geothermal land use, the impact of geothermal development on Puna, labor resource requirments, and the requirements for government activity.

  3. Potential future exposure of European land transport infrastructure to rainfall-induced landslides throughout the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlögl, Matthias; Matulla, Christoph

    2018-04-01

    In the face of climate change, the assessment of land transport infrastructure exposure towards adverse climate events is of major importance for Europe's economic prosperity and social wellbeing. In this study, a climate index estimating rainfall patterns which trigger landslides in central Europe is analysed until the end of this century and compared to present-day conditions. The analysis of the potential future development of landslide risk is based on an ensemble of dynamically downscaled climate projections which are driven by the SRES A1B socio-economic scenario. Resulting regional-scale climate change projections across central Europe are concatenated with Europe's road and railway network. Results indicate overall increases of landslide occurrence. While flat terrain at low altitudes exhibits an increase of about 1 more potentially landslide-inducing rainfall period per year until the end of this century, higher elevated regions are more affected and show increases of up to 14 additional periods. This general spatial distribution emerges in the near future (2021-2050) but becomes more pronounced in the remote future (2071-2100). Since largest increases are to be found in Alsace, potential impacts of an increasing amount of landslides are discussed using the example of a case study covering the Black Forest mountain range in Baden-Württemberg by further enriching the climate information with additional geodata. The findings derived are suitable to support political decision makers and European authorities in transport, freight and logistics by offering detailed information on which parts of Europe's ground transport network are at particularly high risk concerning landslide activity.

  4. Analysis of future nuclear power plants competitiveness with stochastic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.; Tomsic, Z.

    2004-01-01

    To satisfy the increased demand it is necessary to build new electrical power plants, which could in an optimal way meet, the imposed acceptability criteria. The main criteria are potential to supply the required energy, to supply this energy with minimal (or at least acceptable) costs, to satisfy licensing requirements and be acceptable to public. The main competitors for unlimited electricity production in next few decades are fossil power plants (coal and gas) and nuclear power plants. New renewable power plants (solar, wind, biomass) are also important but due to limited energy supply potential and high costs can be only supplement to the main generating units. Large hydropower plans would be competitive under condition of existence of suitable sites for construction of such plants. The paper describes the application of a stochastic method for comparing economic parameters of future electrical power generating systems including conventional and nuclear power plants. The method is applied to establish competitive specific investment costs of future nuclear power plants when compared with combined cycle gas fired units combined with wind electricity generators using best estimated and optimistic input data. The bases for economic comparison of potential options are plant life time levelized electricity generating costs. The purpose is to assess the uncertainty of several key performance and cost of electricity produced in coal fired power plant, gas fired power plant and nuclear power plant developing probability distribution of levelized price of electricity from different Power Plants, cumulative probability of levelized price of electricity for each technology and probability distribution of cost difference between the technologies. The key parameters evaluated include: levelized electrical energy cost USD/kWh,, discount rate, interest rate for credit repayment, rate of expected increase of fuel cost, plant investment cost , fuel cost , constant annual

  5. Can nuclear power be enough for future technology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Akimi

    2017-01-01

    This paper focused on the report 'Can nuclear power be future technology?' published on September 28, 2008 by the Leading R and D Committee of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. It took up part of the discussions at the general discussion session, and those of two working groups mainly by young committee members, and summarized and compiled them. Regarding 'maturity of nuclear technology as future technology,' this paper summarized and discussed from the technical viewpoint the current situation and problems of nuclear power in consideration of the future. Major topics include (1) nuclear safety and disaster prevention, (2) decommissioning of rectors (normal reactors, and accident reactors), (3) back end, (4) effects of low-level radiation, (5) technology trends, (6) economic efficiency, and (7) human resource development. Regarding 'social acceptability of nuclear energy,' the following were discussed: (1) basic human rights such as 'moral rights' and nuclear technologies, (2) risk communication and its problems, and (3) measures to improve the reliability of stakeholders involved in nuclear power. Regarding 'nuclear accident responding team,' this paper covered the nuclear accident responding unit founded in France after the nuclear accident in Japan, and nuclear accident responding unit founded in Japan. (A.O.)

  6. Local Power -- Global Connections: linking the world to a sustainable future through decentralized energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, Richard; Sweet, David

    2007-07-01

    Various international dynamics are converging to increase the attractiveness of decentralized energy as a complement to existing centralized energy infrastructures. Decentralized energy (DE) technologies, including onsite renewables, high efficiency cogeneration and industrial energy recycling, offer considerable benefits to those seeking working alternatives to emerging challenges in the energy sector. DE is ideally suited to provide clean affordable energy to areas where modern energy services are currently lacking. Having smaller generators close to where energy is required ensures a safe, reliable and secure energy supply when the energy is required. Furthermore, because DE is a much cleaner alternative than conventional central power plants and the energy provided comes at a much smaller price tag DE is an increasingly acceptable alternative both in the developed and developing world. DE is sure to play a key role in any plan to build a sustainable energy future. (auth)

  7. On the present situation and future role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The engaged public debate about the need for, and responsibility of, the continued use of nuclear power goes on unabated between the political parties and other groups of social relevance in the Federal Republic of Germany. And yet, some tentative changes seem to appear in the spectrum of opinions. In this situation, the German public utility companies operating nuclear power plants felt it necessary to express once more in a position paper their attitude with respect to nuclear power for the benefit of those bearing political responsibility at Federal and State Government level and the political parties. Their statements are guided by the responsibility the public utilities have for a reliable, sufficient, environmentally clean, and economic provision of electricity. They are convinced that nuclear power should remain a major constituent part of a comprehensive supply concept also in the future. This supply concept, which is based on the efficient use of power, relies on nuclear energy, run-of-river power, and lignite for the base load and on domestic hard coal for the medium load range; renewable energy sources are included. It underscores the social responsibility of the public utilities in ensuring electricity supply in a way which helps to conserve resources and is compatible with the environment. (orig.) [de

  8. The Future of Solar Power in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Reid

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We used detailed industry data to analyse the impacts of expected further cost reductions on the competitiveness of solar power in Britain, and assess whether the solar market can survive without support in the near future. We investigated three solar power markets: large-scale, ground-mounted “solar farms” (defined in our analysis as larger than a 5000 kilowatt system; commercial roof-top (250 kW; and residential rooftop (3 kW. We found that all three would be economic without support in the next decade. Such an outcome assumes progressively falling support under a stable policy regime. We found that unsubsidised residential solar power may be cheaper with battery storage within the next five to 10 years. Unsupported domestic solar battery packs achieve payback periods of less than 10 years by 2025. That could create an inflexion point driving adoption of domestic solar systems. The variability of solar power will involve some grid integration costs at higher penetration levels, such as more frequent power market scheduling; more interconnector capacity; storage; and backup power. These costs and responses could be weighed against non-market benefits including the potential for grid balancing; lower carbon and particulate emissions; and energy security.

  9. Future view of electric power supply techniques. Distribution techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Toshio

    1988-06-20

    Present situations surrounding the power distribution are described, and the problems and future trend of the power distribution are reviewed. It is described for the situations that the gravity of a power demand is transfering from industrial use to home use and the dependence on electrical energy is increasing. It is pointed out for the features that the distribution system exists on not only supply side but also customer side, the system is complicated and two-dimentional, and there is a tremendous amount of facility. High voltage, high frequency and automatic distribution, and the distributed power sources such as fuel cells are described in terms of the problems to ensure the power supply. The protection and decreasing of service interruptions, the protection of harmonic wave, and long-life equipments are described in terms of the problems to ensure the power quality. As for the problems to ensure a comfortable life and space, the communication system using the distribution system for a customer service or automatic operation in a house, and the enviromental harmony by a small facility or underground distribution are described. (1 tab)

  10. Nuclear power's changing future - Fastest growth in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-two of the last 31 nuclear power plants (NPPs) connected to the world's energy grid have been built in Asia, driven by the pressures of economic growth, natural resource scarcity and increasing populations. Of the new NPPs presently under construction, 18 of the 27 are located in Asia, while construction has virtually halted in Western European and North American countries with long-standing nuclear power programmes, says the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The IAEA reports that although four Western European countries have decided to shut down their nuclear energy plants, the future of nuclear energy in Europe and North America is still far from clear, during a period when energy needs and concerns over global warming are both rising. Only one new NPP is beginning construction in Western Europe. No new NPPs are planned in North America, although that could change very soon. The Conference examines the status and future of nuclear power 50 years after the first nuclear energy producing plant came o n-line , at a plant near Moscow in the then Soviet Union on June 26, 1954. It covers the following topics: Nuclear Prospects in Near and Long-Term; Nuclear Power Today: Shifting to the East; Climate Change and Economics: Factors for Growth (NPPs Avoid Carbon Emissions, Costs are Low at Operating Plants; New Plants are Expensive); the Key Issues are Safety and Waste management; Uranium resources are abundant; sustainable development

  11. Is there a future for nuclear power in developing countries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    While the future for nuclear power remains uncertain in many developing countries, India, along with China and South Korea, will require nuclear power to grow significantly in the coming decades. India will find its dependence on imported fuels increasing substantially. It will be prudent, therefore, to pursue the nuclear power programme in an efficient and cost effective manner aiming for substantially increased growth rate. We have to look at novel ways of bringing in additional investments from governmental sources (central and state) and the public through bonding. There may also be prospects of private sector participation and overseas investments. Those options remain to be explored, and now is the time to mount an effort for new methods of resource mobilization

  12. IEC fusion: The future power and propulsion system for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Coventry, Matt; Miley, George H.; Nadler, Jon; Hanson, John; Hrbud, Ivana

    2000-01-01

    Rapid access to any point in the solar system requires advanced propulsion concepts that will provide extremely high specific impulse, low specific power, and a high thrust-to-power ratio. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion is one of many exciting concepts emerging through propulsion and power research in laboratories across the nation which will determine the future direction of space exploration. This is part of a series of papers that discuss different applications of the Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion concept for both in-space and terrestrial use. IEC will enable tremendous advances in faster travel times within the solar system. The technology is currently under investigation for proof of concept and transitioning into the first prototype units for commercial applications. In addition to use in propulsion for space applications, terrestrial applications include desalinization plants, high energy neutron sources for radioisotope generation, high flux sources for medical applications, proton sources for specialized medical applications, and tritium production

  13. Electric power industry in Korea: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hoesung.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical power is an indispensable tool in the industrialization of a developing country. An efficient, reliable source of electricity is a key factor in the establishment of a wide range of industries, and the supply of energy must keep pace with the increasing demand which economic growth creates in order for that growth to be sustained. As one of the most successful of all developing countries, Korea has registered impressive economic growth over the last decade, and it could be said that the rapid growth of the Korean economy would not have been possible without corresponding growth in the supply of electric power. Power producers in Korea, and elsewhere in Asia, are to be commended for successfully meeting the challenge of providing the necessary power to spur what some call an economic miracle. The future continues to hold great potential for participants in the electrical power industry, but a number of important challenges must be met in order for that potential to be fully realized. Demand for electricity continues to grow at a staggering rate, while concerns over the environmental impact of power generating facilities must not be ignored. As it becomes increasingly difficult to finance the rapid, and increasingly larger-scale expansion of the power industry through internal sources, the government must find resources to meet the growing demand at least cost. This will lead to important opportunities for the private sector. It is important, therefore, for those interested in participating in the power production industry and taking advantage of the newly emerging opportunities that lie in the Korean market, and elsewhere in Asia, to discuss the relevant issues and become informed of the specific conditions of each market

  14. Feasibility study for linking railway network and power transmission infrastructure; Machbarkeitsstudie zur Verknuepfung von Bahn- und Energieleitungsinfrastrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Lutz; Rathke, Christian [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energieversorgung und Hochspannungstechnik; Stephan, Arnd; Albrecht, Andreas [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Bahnfahrzeuge und Bahntechnik; Weyer, Hartmut; Lismann, Christian (comps.) [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Deutsches und Internationales Berg- und Energierecht

    2013-03-15

    At times of growing emergencies of electricity transport, the extension of transmission becomes a necessary and compulsory component of the energy concept of the Federal Government. The extension of the capacities of the network transportation from North to South and from east to West is inevitable. Under this aspect, the contribution under consideration analyzes whether and to what extent the utilization of the existing railways potentials of the 16.7 Hz traction power supply system of the DB Energie GmbH (Frankfurt (Main), Federal Republic of Germany) is possible for the establishment of new power transmission lines of the general 50 Hz power supply. Furthermore, it is investigated to what extent possibilities of infrastructure connections exist in the shape of combined transmission routes between traction supply and public energy supply.

  15. A Smart City Lighting Case Study on an OpenStack-Powered Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, Giovanni; Bruneo, Dario; Distefano, Salvatore; Longo, Francesco; Puliafito, Antonio; Al-Anbuky, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of embedded systems, mobile devices and other smart devices keeps rising globally, and the scope of their involvement broadens, for instance, in smart city-like scenarios. In light of this, a pressing need emerges to tame such complexity and reuse as much tooling as possible without resorting to vertical ad hoc solutions, while at the same time taking into account valid options with regard to infrastructure management and other more advanced functionalities. Existing solutions mainly focus on core mechanisms and do not allow one to scale by leveraging infrastructure or adapt to a variety of scenarios, especially if actuators are involved in the loop. A new, more flexible, cloud-based approach, able to provide device-focused workflows, is required. In this sense, a widely-used and competitive framework for infrastructure as a service, such as OpenStack, with its breadth in terms of feature coverage and expanded scope, looks to fit the bill, replacing current application-specific approaches with an innovative application-agnostic one. This work thus describes the rationale, efforts and results so far achieved for an integration of IoT paradigms and resource ecosystems with such a kind of cloud-oriented device-centric environment, by focusing on a smart city scenario, namely a park smart lighting example, and featuring data collection, data visualization, event detection and coordinated reaction, as example use cases of such integration. PMID:26153775

  16. A Smart City Lighting Case Study on an OpenStack-Powered Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Merlino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of embedded systems, mobile devices and other smart devices keeps rising globally, and the scope of their involvement broadens, for instance, in smart city-like scenarios. In light of this, a pressing need emerges to tame such complexity and reuse as much tooling as possible without resorting to vertical ad hoc solutions, while at the same time taking into account valid options with regard to infrastructure management and other more advanced functionalities. Existing solutions mainly focus on core mechanisms and do not allow one to scale by leveraging infrastructure or adapt to a variety of scenarios, especially if actuators are involved in the loop. A new, more flexible, cloud-based approach, able to provide device-focused workflows, is required. In this sense, a widely-used and competitive framework for infrastructure as a service, such as OpenStack, with its breadth in terms of feature coverage and expanded scope, looks to fit the bill, replacing current application-specific approaches with an innovative application-agnostic one. This work thus describes the rationale, efforts and results so far achieved for an integration of IoT paradigms and resource ecosystems with such a kind of cloud-oriented device-centric environment, by focusing on a smart city scenario, namely a park smart lighting example, and featuring data collection, data visualization, event detection and coordinated reaction, as example use cases of such integration.

  17. A Smart City Lighting Case Study on an OpenStack-Powered Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, Giovanni; Bruneo, Dario; Distefano, Salvatore; Longo, Francesco; Puliafito, Antonio; Al-Anbuky, Adnan

    2015-07-06

    The adoption of embedded systems, mobile devices and other smart devices keeps rising globally, and the scope of their involvement broadens, for instance, in smart city-like scenarios. In light of this, a pressing need emerges to tame such complexity and reuse as much tooling as possible without resorting to vertical ad hoc solutions, while at the same time taking into account valid options with regard to infrastructure management and other more advanced functionalities. Existing solutions mainly focus on core mechanisms and do not allow one to scale by leveraging infrastructure or adapt to a variety of scenarios, especially if actuators are involved in the loop. A new, more flexible, cloud-based approach, able to provide device-focused workflows, is required. In this sense, a widely-used and competitive framework for infrastructure as a service, such as OpenStack, with its breadth in terms of feature coverage and expanded scope, looks to fit the bill, replacing current application-specific approaches with an innovative application-agnostic one. This work thus describes the rationale, efforts and results so far achieved for an integration of IoT paradigms and resource ecosystems with such a kind of cloud-oriented device-centric environment, by focusing on a smart city scenario, namely a park smart lighting example, and featuring data collection, data visualization, event detection and coordinated reaction, as example use cases of such integration.

  18. Nuclear power for sustainable development. Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamantiades, A.; Kessides, I.

    2009-01-01

    Interest in nuclear power has been revived as a result of volatile fossil fuel prices, concerns about the security of energy supplies, and global climate change. This paper describes the current status and future plans for expansion of nuclear power, the advances in nuclear reactor technology, and their impacts on the associated risks and performance of nuclear power. Advanced nuclear reactors have been designed to be simpler and safer, and to have lower costs than currently operating reactors. By addressing many of the public health and safety risks that plagued the industry since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, these reactors may help break the current deadlock over nuclear power. In that case, nuclear power could make a significant contribution towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, significant issues persist, fueling reservations among the public and many decision makers. Nuclear safety, disposal of radioactive wastes, and proliferation of nuclear explosives need to be addressed in an effective and credible way if the necessary public support is to be obtained. (author)

  19. Biomass energy technologies for rural infrastructure and village power - opportunities and challenges in the context of global climate change concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, V.V.N.; Bhandari, P.M.; Gupta, P.

    2004-01-01

    The potential and role of biomass resources in developing countries for addressing global climate change concerns are highlighted using India as a case study. Promotion of technologies, which use biomass more efficiently, is seen as a key strategy to integrate the concerns of both developing countries and developed countries. The role of various biomass technologies for improving rural infrastructure and village power is discussed in detail. A vision of establishing and running a chain of rural energy service companies, operating with a basket of devices and technologies, under the general provisions of CDM, is examined for commercialization and mainstreaming of biomass technologies which have achieved reasonable levels of maturity. (author)

  20. Future steps toward a Danish power system with 50% wind power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jacob; Ackermann, Thomas; Bach, Poul-Frederik

    .dk. The objective of EcoGrid work package 5 is to suggest future research and development activities in EcoGrid.dk. The future activities will consist of related activities of which some should be directed within an EU framework (EcoGridEU). The delivery of phase 1 work package 5 is a packet of proposals to be used......This report is part of the EcoGrid.dk project phase 1 initiated by Energinet.dk and the result of work package 5 dealing with proposals for future steps toward a Danish power system with 50% wind power. The EcoGrid.dk project has the objective to develop new long term technologies and market...... power system with increased volumes of RE. - Phase 2: Specific projects, analyses and recommendations to Energinet.dk with main focus on research activities - Phase 3: Technologies are implemented in real environment and demonstrated with subsequent adoption and implementation in Energinet...

  1. Personnel Safety for Future Magnetic Fusion Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2009-07-01

    The safety of personnel at existing fusion experiments is an important concern that requires diligence. Looking to the future, fusion experiments will continue to increase in power and operating time until steady state power plants are achieved; this causes increased concern for personnel safety. This paper addresses four important aspects of personnel safety in the present and extrapolates these aspects to future power plants. The four aspects are personnel exposure to ionizing radiation, chemicals, magnetic fields, and radiofrequency (RF) energy. Ionizing radiation safety is treated well for present and near-term experiments by the use of proven techniques from other nuclear endeavors. There is documentation that suggests decreasing the annual ionizing radiation exposure limits that have remained constant for several decades. Many chemicals are used in fusion research, for parts cleaning, as use as coolants, cooling water cleanliness control, lubrication, and other needs. In present fusion experiments, a typical chemical laboratory safety program, such as those instituted in most industrialized countries, is effective in protecting personnel from chemical exposures. As fusion facilities grow in complexity, the chemical safety program must transition from a laboratory scale to an industrial scale program that addresses chemical use in larger quantity. It is also noted that allowable chemical exposure concentrations for workers have decreased over time and, in some cases, now pose more stringent exposure limits than those for ionizing radiation. Allowable chemical exposure concentrations have been the fastest changing occupational exposure values in the last thirty years. The trend of more restrictive chemical exposure regulations is expected to continue into the future. Other issues of safety importance are magnetic field exposure and RF energy exposure. Magnetic field exposure limits are consensus values adopted as best practices for worker safety; a typical

  2. Personnel Safety for Future Magnetic Fusion Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwallader, Lee

    2009-01-01

    The safety of personnel at existing fusion experiments is an important concern that requires diligence. Looking to the future, fusion experiments will continue to increase in power and operating time until steady state power plants are achieved; this causes increased concern for personnel safety. This paper addresses four important aspects of personnel safety in the present and extrapolates these aspects to future power plants. The four aspects are personnel exposure to ionizing radiation, chemicals, magnetic fields, and radiofrequency (RF) energy. Ionizing radiation safety is treated well for present and near-term experiments by the use of proven techniques from other nuclear endeavors. There is documentation that suggests decreasing the annual ionizing radiation exposure limits that have remained constant for several decades. Many chemicals are used in fusion research, for parts cleaning, as use as coolants, cooling water cleanliness control, lubrication, and other needs. In present fusion experiments, a typical chemical laboratory safety program, such as those instituted in most industrialized countries, is effective in protecting personnel from chemical exposures. As fusion facilities grow in complexity, the chemical safety program must transition from a laboratory scale to an industrial scale program that addresses chemical use in larger quantity. It is also noted that allowable chemical exposure concentrations for workers have decreased over time and, in some cases, now pose more stringent exposure limits than those for ionizing radiation. Allowable chemical exposure concentrations have been the fastest changing occupational exposure values in the last thirty years. The trend of more restrictive chemical exposure regulations is expected to continue into the future. Other issues of safety importance are magnetic field exposure and RF energy exposure. Magnetic field exposure limits are consensus values adopted as best practices for worker safety; a typical

  3. The future of nuclear power and fourth-generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Renault, C.

    2006-01-01

    Faced with the exhaustion of fossil fuel resources, the output of existing nuclear power must quadruple between now and 2050, and the Commissariat a l'Energie atomique (CEA) and its industrial partners are cooperating in a programme of R and D on future nuclear power. France strategy puts rapid neutron reactors (RNR) at the forefront, in view of their possible introduction by 2040. These reactors allow a more efficient use of uranium resources and minimise the production of long-life nuclear waste. Two technologies which use respectively, sodium and gas as their coolant are being studied. For the sodium RNR, which benefits from significant existing experience, the key is to first improve its economic performance. For the gas RNR, which draws on the principles and the generic assets of the RNR, for those using helium as the coolant, and those with applications at high temperature, it is important firstly to demonstrate the key technologies such as the fuel. The decision of President Chirac to launch the study of a prototype, fourth-generation reactor for 2020 is stimulating the research effort into France future nuclear power. (author)

  4. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poullikkas, Andreas [Electricity Authority of Cyprus, P.O. Box 24506, 1399 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In contrast, generation III reactors, which are an evolution of generation II reactors, incorporate passive or inherent safety features that require no active controls or operational intervention to avoid accidents in the event of malfunction, and may rely on gravity, natural convection or resistance to high temperatures. Today, partly due to the high capital cost of large power reactors generating electricity and partly due to the consideration of public perception, there is a shift towards the development of smaller units. These may be built independently or as modules in a larger complex, with capacity added incrementally as required. Small reactors most importantly benefit from reduced capital costs, simpler units and the ability to produce power away from main grid systems. These factors combined with the ability of a nuclear power plant to use process heat for co-generation, make the small reactors an attractive option. Generally, modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production and reduced installation costs. Many are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction. Generation III+ designs are generally extensions of the generation III concept, which include advanced passive safety features. These designs can maintain the safe state without the use of any active control components. Generation IV reactors, which are future designs that are currently under research and development, will tend to have closed

  5. Electric vehicles to support large wind power penetration in future danish power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Thøgersen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Electric Vehicles (EVs) could play major role in the future intelligent grids to support a large penetration of renewable energy in Denmark, especially electricity production from wind turbines. The future power systems aims to phase-out big conventional fossil-fueled generators with large number...... on low voltage residential networks. Significant amount of EVs could be integrated in local distribution grids with the support of intelligent grid and smart charging strategies....

  6. Business case uncertainty of power plants in future energy systems with wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, Anne Sjoerd; Broek, Machteld van den; Özdemir, Özge; Koutstaal, Paul; Faaij, André

    2016-01-01

    The European power sector is transforming due to climate policies and an increased deployment of intermittent RES. The sector will require thermal power plants for the decades to come, but their business cases are (negatively) affected by this transformation. This study presents a novel tool to quantify the effect of policy, price and project-related uncertainties on power plant business cases. This tool can support policymakers in stimulating necessary investments in new thermal generation capacity. We find that these investments are currently unsound (power plants recoup on average –12% to 59% of their initial investment). Future climate policy, i.e. the CO_2 price, has a very strong impact on business cases (affects the profitability by 5–40%-points). The impact of the deployment of wind power is average (2–8%-point difference between 10% and 21% wind penetration). Variations in annual wind power production barely affect the profitability (variation of ±1%-point). To stimulate new investments, policymakers should first decrease the uncertainty in business cases caused by policy. Durable climate policy is especially important. Also, policies to increase the profits of thermal power plants should be carefully considered and implemented. This combined approach will reduce the revenue gap that needs to be bridged by supportive policies. - Highlights: • The operation of thermal power plants is affected by CO_2 prices and wind power. • A new tool quantifies the effect of their uncertainty on power plant profitability. • New power plants are unprofitable and show a large spread in expected profits. • Uncertain future climate policy is a key factor in all business cases (±56% change). • Increasing wind power penetration (10–21%) decreases profitability by 14%.

  7. How prepared were the Puerto Rico Seismic Network sites for the arrival of Hurricane Maria? Lessons learned on communications, power and infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacore, E. A.; Lopez, A. M.; Huerfano, V.; Lugo, J.; Baez-Sanchez, G.

    2017-12-01

    For exactly 85 years the island of Puerto Rico in the northeastern Caribbean was spared from catastrophic category 4 hurricane winds. Then Hurricane Maria arrived on September 20, 2017 with maximum sustained winds of up to 155 mph. The eye of the hurricane crossed the island from southeast to northwest in eight hours leaving almost a meter of rainfall on its path. Sustained winds, gusts and precipitation were most certainly going to affect the seismic and geodetic equipment the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN) use for locating earthquakes in the region. PRSN relies on 35 seismic stations (velocity and strong-motion) to characterize the seismic behavior of the island and 15 geodetic (GNSS) stations to determine crustal deformation of the Puerto Rico - Virgin Islands microplate. PRSN stations have been designed to withstand earthquakes. However, the equipment suffered considerable damage due to the strong winds especially station communication towers. This coupled with catastrophic damage to the telecommunication and power grids of the island had severe effects on the network. Additionally, the level of devastation was such that it hampered the ability of PRSN staff to visit the sites for assessment and repair. Here we present the effects of category 4 hurricane had on our seismic and geodetic sites, examine the susceptibility of the PRSN stations' power and communications, and discuss future plans to recuperate and improve station resiliency for future catastrophic events. These lessons learned hopefully will help harden sites of networks, agencies and/or institutions that rely on similar infrastructure.

  8. Thermal power plant operating regimes in future British power systems with increasing variable renewable penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmunds, Ray; Davies, Lloyd; Deane, Paul; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work investigates thermal power operating regimes in future power systems. • Gas plants have low utilisation in the scenarios considered. • Ramping intensity increases for gas plants and pumped storage. • Coal plants frequently operate at minimum stable levels and start-ups increase. • Grid emission intensity and total emission production remains substantial. - Abstract: This work investigates the operational requirements of thermal power plants in a number of potential future British power systems with increasing variable renewable penetration. The PLEXOS Integrated Energy Model has been used to develop the market models, with PLEXOS employing mixed integer programming to solve the unit commitment and economic dispatch problem, subject to a number of constraints. Initially, a model of the British power system was developed and validated. Subsequently, a 2020 test model was developed to analyse a number of future system structures with differing fuel and carbon prices and generation mixes. The study has found that in three of the four scenarios considered, the utilisation of gas power plants will be relatively low, but remains fundamental to the security of supply. Also, gas plants will be subject to more intense ramping. The findings have consequent implications for energy policy as expensive government interventions may be required to prevent early decommissioning of gas capacity, should the prevailing market conditions not guarantee revenue adequacy.

  9. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high-temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  10. Investigation of Insulation Materials for Future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Peggy A.; Hurwitz, Frances I.; Ellis, David L.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power System (RPS) Technology Advancement Project is developing next generation high temperature insulation materials that directly benefit thermal management and improve performance of RPS for future science missions. Preliminary studies on the use of multilayer insulation (MLI) for Stirling convertors used on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) have shown the potential benefits of MLI for space vacuum applications in reducing generator size and increasing specific power (W/kg) as compared to the baseline Microtherm HT (Microtherm, Inc.) insulation. Further studies are currently being conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) on candidate MLI foils and aerogel composite spacers. This paper presents the method of testing of foils and spacers and experimental results to date.

  11. Future Computing Platforms for Science in a Power Constrained Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdurachmanov, David; Eulisse, Giulio; Elmer, Peter; Knight, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Power consumption will be a key constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics (HEP). This makes performance-per-watt a crucial metric for selecting cost-efficient computing solutions. For this paper, we have done a wide survey of current and emerging architectures becoming available on the market including x86-64 variants, ARMv7 32-bit, ARMv8 64-bit, Many-Core and GPU solutions, as well as newer System-on-Chip (SoC) solutions. We compare performance and energy efficiency using an evolving set of standardized HEP-related benchmarks and power measurement techniques we have been developing. We evaluate the potential for use of such computing solutions in the context of DHTC systems, such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). (paper)

  12. Thoughts about the future of nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, M.

    2008-01-01

    On November 6, 2007, the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft conferred its 30 th honorary membership upon Professor Dr. Manfred Popp. The new Honorary Member has a record of outstanding achievements in the interest of nuclear power in Germany. This commitment is also apparent from his professional career, which was devoted to this high technology with impressive scientific and technical knowledge and political acumen, perseverance and stamina. The KTG is most grateful to Professor Popp for accepting its honorary membership. The article includes a revised version of the lecture given by Professor Manfred Popp at the ceremony conferring honorary membership. The author discusses some thoughts about the future of nuclear power in Germany in the light of societal, political, technical and environmental aspects. The status and perspectives of this technology are considered also within the framework of international developments. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear power: is it the future's economic and environmental alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Liz.

    1989-01-01

    The future for uranium mining and nuclear power in the Asian Pacific region and in particular in Australia, is discussed. Given the depressed uranium market, where there is ample capacity (both worldwide and within Australia) to meet uncommitted demand, there does not seem to be any overwhelming economic imperative for new production centres in Australia. However, in the context of growing environmental concerns of the Greenhouse Effect, if the coal-fired stations are to compete with the cleanliness of nuclear stations it is suggested that governments will have to rethink their energy policies. 2 tabs

  14. Development and future perspective of nuclear power plants. Current status and future prospect of world nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi NPS accidents occurred on 11 March 2011 brought about great effects on nuclear development not only in Japan but also in the world. In Japan restart of operation of periodically inspected nuclear power plants (NPPs) could not be allowed except Oi NPPs two units and most parties except Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) pledged to possibly phasing out nuclear power at House of Councillors election in July and public opinion was mostly against nuclear power after the accident. LDP clearly stated that, with the inauguration of new government last December, Japan would not pursuing the policy of the prior government of possibly phasing out nuclear power by the 2030s, but would instead make a 'zero-base' review of energy policy. Germany decided to close eight reactors immediately and remaining nine by the end of 2022. For many countries, nuclear power would play an important role in achieving energy security and sustainable development goals. In 2011 NPPs 6 units started operation with 2 units under construction, and in 2012 NPPs 3 units started operation with 7 units under construction. At present there are now over 400 NPPs operating in 31 countries and world trend seemed nuclear development was continued and number of countries newly deploying NPPs was increasing as much as eighteen. This article presented current status and future prospect of world NPPs in details. Japan would like to share its experiences and information obtained from the accident with the world and also promote NPPs overseas to meet the world's expectations. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations.

  16. Electric and hybrid vehicles: power sources, models, sustainability, infrastructure and the market

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pistoia, G

    2010-01-01

    ... for simulation studies Velocity scheduling using traffic preview Hybrid vehicles with telematics Optimal management of hybrid vehicles with telematics Conclusions and future opportunities 1. 2. 3...

  17. About the Need of Combining Power Market and Power Grid Model Results for Future Energy System Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Denis; Böttger, Diana; Löwer, Lothar; Becker, Holger; Akbulut, Alev; Stock, Sebastian

    2018-02-01

    The European power grid infrastructure faces various challenges due to the expansion of renewable energy sources (RES). To conduct investigations on interactions between power generation and the power grid, models for the power market as well as for the power grid are necessary. This paper describes the basic functionalities and working principles of both types of models as well as steps to couple power market results and the power grid model. The combination of these models is beneficial in terms of gaining realistic power flow scenarios in the grid model and of being able to pass back results of the power flow and restrictions to the market model. Focus is laid on the power grid model and possible application examples like algorithms in grid analysis, operation and dynamic equipment modelling.

  18. Advancing the competitive future of nuclear power through partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryor, Charles W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The emergence of competitive markets, coupled with significant environmental benefits, will create a period of tremendous opportunity and enhanced value for commercial nuclear power plants, both existing plants and those on the immediate horizon. The challenge for nuclear plant owners and operators is to reduce costs and improve performance in order to improve the plants net earnings stream and remain competitive with other forms of generation. In his remarks, Dr. Pryor will examine the excellent performance of nuclear plants worldwide and look at the significant value yet to be captured from existing plants. Continued capacity factor improvement driven primarily by shorter outages will help, but new business practices will be needed in the future to achieve competitive production costs of around 1cent/kwh at the bus bar. Dr. Pryor will explore innovative approaches to resource sharing and integration that already are paying dividends worldwide. Beyond this immediate need for greater cooperative efforts is the necessity of longer-range strategies implementing advanced technologies in new plant designs. Although energy demand and environmental benefits are driving renewed interest in nuclear power, the cost challenge for new plants remains significant. Dr. Pryor will discuss the cost challenge, new designs that are available to meet market demand, and the role of utility/supplier partnerships in current and future new plant projects. (author)

  19. Sustaining the future: the role of nuclear power in meeting future world energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, R.; Sun, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A description is given of recently informed analyses showing the potential that nuclear power has in meeting global energy demands. For both the electricity and transportation sectors, we can quantify the beneficial effects on the environment, and we show how nuclear power deserves credit for its role in assisting future world energy, environmental and economic sustainability. The continuing expansion of the world's and Asia's energy needs, coupled with the need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) and other emissions, will require new approaches for large scale energy production and use. This is particularly important for China and Asia with respect to meeting both the energy demand and sustainability challenges. We show and explore the role of nuclear power for large-scale energy applications, including electricity production and hydrogen for transportation. Advanced nuclear technologies, such as those like CANDU's next generation ACR, can meet future global energy market needs, avoid emissions, and mitigate the potential for global climate change. We use the latest IPCC Scenarios out to the year 2100 as a base case, but correct them to examine the sensitivity to large scale nuclear and hydrogen fuel penetration. We show a significant impact of nuclear energy on energy market penetration, and in reducing GHGs and other emissions in the coming century, particularly in the industrial developing world and in Asia. This is achieved without needing emissions credits, as are used or needed as economic support for other sources, or for subsidies via emissions trading schemes. Nuclear power offers the relatively emissions-free means, both to provide electricity for traditional applications and, by electrolytic production of hydrogen, to extend its use deep into the transportation sector. For the published IPCC Marker Scenarios for Asia we show the reduction in GHG emissions when electrolysis using electricity from nuclear power assists the introduction of hydrogen as a fuel

  20. Private participation in infrastructure: A risk analysis of long-term contracts in power sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceran, Nisangul

    The objective of this dissertation is to assess whether the private participation in energy sector through long term contracting, such as Build-Operate-Transfer (BOT) type investments, is an efficient way of promoting efficiency in the economy. To this end; the theoretical literature on the issue is discussed, the experience of several developing countries are examined, and a BOT project, which is undertaken by the Enron company in Turkey, has been studied in depth as a case study. Different risk analysis techniques, including sensitivity and probabilistic risk analysis with the Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) method have been applied to assess the financial feasibility and risks of the case study project, and to shed light on the level of rent-seeking in the BOT agreements. Although data on rent seeking and corruption is difficult to obtain, the analysis of case study investment using the sensitivity and MCS method provided some information that can be used in assessing the level of rent-seeking in BOT projects. The risk analysis enabled to test the sustainability of the long-term BOT contracts through the analysis of projects financial feasibility with and without the government guarantees in the project. The approach of testing the sustainability of the project under different scenarios is helpful to understand the potential costs and contingent liabilities for the government and project's impact on a country's overall economy. The results of the risk analysis made by the MCS method for the BOT project used as the case study strongly suggest that, the BOT projects does not serve to the interest of the society and transfers substantial amount of public money to the private companies, implying severe governance problems. It is found that not only government but also private sector may be reluctant about full privatization of infrastructure due to several factors such as involvement of large sunk costs, very long time period for returns to be received, political and

  1. Support infrastructure available to Canadian residents completing post-graduate global health electives: current state and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lojan Sivakumaran

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Canadian universities are encouraged to continue to send their trainees on global health electives. To address the gaps in infrastructure reported in this study, the authors suggest the development of comprehensive standardized guidelines by post-graduate regulatory/advocacy bodies to better ensure patient and participant safety. We also encourage the centralization of infrastructure management to the universities’ global health departments to aid in resource management.

  2. Adaptive Environmentally Contained Power and Cooling IT Infrastructure for the Data Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Ron; Chavez, Miguel, E.

    2012-06-27

    The objectives of this program were to research and develop a fully enclosed Information Technology (IT) rack system for 100 kilowatts (KW) of IT load that provides its own internal power and cooling with High Voltage Alternating Current (HVAC defined as 480 volt) and chilled water as the primary inputs into the system and accepts alternative energy power sources such as wind and solar. For maximum efficiency, internal power to the IT equipment uses distributed High Voltage Direct Current power (HVDC defined as 360-380 volt) from the power source to the IT loads. The management scheme aggressively controls energy use to insure the best utilization of available power and cooling resources. The solution incorporates internal active management controls that not only optimizes the system environment for the given dynamic IT loads and changing system conditions, but also interfaces with data center Building Management Systems (BMS) to provide a complete end-to-end view of power and cooling chain. This technology achieves the goal of a Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) of 1.25, resulting in a 38% reduction in the total amount of energy needed to support a 100KW IT load compared to current data center designs.

  3. Vegetation clearance distances to prevent wildland fire caused damage to telecommunication and power transmission infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. W. Butler; J. Webb; J. Hogge; T. Wallace

    2015-01-01

    Towers and poles supporting power transmission and telecommunication lines have collapsed due to heating from wildland fires. Such occurrences have led to interruptions in power or communication in large municipal areas with associated social and political implications as well as increased immediate danger to humans. Unfortunately, no studies address the question of...

  4. Vegetation clearance distances to prevent wildland fire caused damage to telecommunication and power transmission infrastructure (2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. W. Butler; T. Wallace; J. Hogge

    2015-01-01

    Towers and poles supporting power transmission and telecommunication lines have collapsed due to heating from wildland fires. Such occurrences have led to interruptions in power or communication in large municipal areas with associated social and political implications as well as increased immediate danger to humans. Vegetation clearance standards for overhead...

  5. Efficient strategies for the integration of renewable energy into future energy infrastructures in Europe – An analysis based on transnational modeling and case studies for nine European regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boie, Inga; Fernandes, Camila; Frías, Pablo; Klobasa, Marian

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the current international climate change strategy, the European Commission has agreed on ambitious targets to reduce CO 2 emissions by more than 80% until 2050 as compared to 1990 levels and to increase the share of renewable energy and improve energy efficiency by 20% until 2020. Under this framework, renewable energy generation has increased considerably in the EU and it is expected to keep growing in the future years. This paper presents long-term strategies for transmission infrastructure development to integrate increasing amounts of renewable generation in the time horizon of 2030–2050. These are part of the outcomes of the SUSPLAN project, which focuses on four possible future renewable deployment scenarios in different European regions taking into account the corresponding infrastructure needs, especially electricity and gas grids, both on regional and transnational level. The main objective of the project is the development of guidelines for the integration of renewable energy into future energy infrastructures while taking account of national and regional characteristics. Therefore, the analysis is based on a two-track approach: A transnational modeling exercise (“top-down”) and in-depth case studies for nine representative European regions (“bottom-up”). - Highlights: • We present the main outcomes of the SUSPLAN EU project. • It assesses long-term energy infrastructure needs to integrate RES in Europe. • Regional and transnational analyses are performed for 4 RES scenarios until 2050. • Major barriers to the integration of RES into energy infrastructure are identified. • Efficient strategies to mitigate these barriers are proposed

  6. Which Future for Nuclear Power Beyond the Year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, Remy

    1990-01-01

    In today's world, and most certainly in the future, a growing number of people seek a better life - with continuing progress. To achieve this, they need more and more energy and electricity. There is, of course, a limit to this increase; the world population will stabilize and advances in energy consumption practices will limit waste. I do not intend to speculate on figures for the future; I prefer to restrict myself to present-day facts and figures: eight billion metric tons of oil equivalent are consumed each year, a quarter of which is in the form of electricity. And of this electricity, nuclear power supplies 20%. Forecasting the future is a tricky business, especially when six years of construction lie ahead, followed by forty years of industrial 'life'. I am prepared to make such forecasts, though, as my convictions are based on three extremely solid reasons. These may not seem very original and some of you have perhaps heard me give them before; however, they are sound and will remain so for many years to come. Nuclear energy guarantees security in three major areas: energy policies, the environment and the economy

  7. Transformation of Agricultural Land for Urbanisation, Infrastructural Development and Question of Future Food Security: Cases from Parts of Hugli District, West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giyasuddin Siddique

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Developing countries of the world encounter urbanisation and infrastructural development in or around the fertile tracts and the absence of any landuse plan for desired land use change has led to conversion of farmlands, which is detrimental to future food security and environmental quality. Hugli district is traditionally well known as one of the most prosperous agricultural regions of West Bengal but the district is experiencing rapid urban extension and infrastructural development towards productive agricultural land since 1991. This has caused decline in the amount of agricultural production which may be treated as an indicator of increasing threat to the long run sustainable livelihood security of the people of the whole of West Bengal. This article critically explores the transformation of agricultural (farm land because of growing rate of urbanisation and infrastructural development, which in turn poses the question of threat to food (in security. Although, this is a growing problem across the universe, this article probes the future food security questions of Hugli district, West Bengal by examining the impact of the highly intertwined indicators of urbanisation and infrastructural development on agricultural (farm land use and its effect on food security. Regression analysis, Spearman’s Ranking Correlation Coefficient, Remote Sensing technologies, Markov Chain Model, Projection of future population growth and yield rate are employed to understand the depth of the problem. The result not only shows a direct negative correlation between urban extension and agricultural areal contraction but also the supervised classification of satellite imageries shows that there is rapid change of rural land use from 1996-2016. There is no match between future population growth and future yield rate of crops and the Markov Chain Model further predicts that the cropland will decrease from 62.77% to 42.90% and the built up area will increase from 31

  8. Shippingport Atomic Power Station Operating Experience, Developments and Future Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.; Oldham, G.M.; Stiefel, J.T.

    1963-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates five years of operation and test of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station and discusses the current technical developments and future plans of the Shippingport programme. This programme is directed towards development of the basic technology of light-water reactors to provide the basis for potential reduction in the costs of nuclear power. The Shippingport reactor plant has operated for over five years and has been found to integrate readily into a utility system either as a base load or peak load unit. Plant component performance has been reliable. There have been no problems in contamination or waste disposal. Access to primary coolant components for maintenance has been good, demonstrating the integrity of fuel elements. Each of the three refuelling operations performed since start-up of Shippingport has required successively less time to accomplish. Recently, the third seed was refuelled in 32 working days, about one quarter the time required for the first refuelling. The formal requirements of personnel training, written administrative procedures, power plant manuals, etc., which have been a vital factor in the successful implementation of the Shippingport programme, are described. The results obtained from the comprehensive test programme carried out at Shippingport are compared with calculations, and good agreement has been obtained. Reactor core performance, plant stability, and response to load changes, fuel element and control rod performance, long-term effects such as corrosion and radiation level build-up, component performance, etc., are discussed in this paper. The principal objective of the current and future programmes of the Shippingport Project in advancing the basic technology of water-cooled reactors is discussed. This programme includes the continued operation of the Shippingport plant, and the development, design, manufacture and test operation of a long-life, highpower density second core - Core 2. At its

  9. Nuclear Power for Future Electricity Generation in Ghana: Issues and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyarko, B.J.B.; Akaho, E.H.K.; Ennison, I.

    2011-01-01

    Ghana's electricity demand has been estimated to be growing at a high rate of about 7% per annum over the last ten years. This is due to the relatively high population growth, economic aspiration of the country and the extension of electricity to rural areas. Electricity supply, on the contrary, has been unable to meet the demand due to high dependency on rain-fed hydropower plants, which started operating in 1965 and currently account for about 68% of the total installed capacity. Within the last 28 years, climatic changes and draughts have caused the nation to experience three major power crises. These climate changes resulted in low inflows and thus reduced power generation from hydropower systems. To complement the hydropower systems, the Government in 1997 installed thermal plants based on light crude oil. However, due to the high crude oil prices on the international market in recent times have made the operation of these plants very expensive. Ghana's crude oil find can boost its energy supply when the oil exploration begins somewhere in 2010. For rural cooking, domestic biomass is employed. Ghana has no domestic coal resources. The Government of Ghana is concerned with: limited further growth potential of domestic hydro; high cost of imported oil and gas and environmental issues associated with use of imported coal. Small Solar and wind generation exist in some sectors, but potential large-scale development is not envisioned for the near future. With these in mind, the President of Ghana set up a Committee involving Stakeholder Institutions to formulate the Nuclear Power Policy and develop the basic elements of Nuclear Infrastructure and to assess the viability of introducing the nuclear power option in Ghana's energy mix. Cabinet took a decision to include the nuclear power for electricity generation after the Committee submitted his report to the President in 2008. (author)

  10. Limitation of fusion power plant installation on future power grids under the effect of renewable and nuclear power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Shutaro, E-mail: takeda.shutarou.55r@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto (Japan); Sakurai, Shigeki [Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto (Japan); Yamamoto, Yasushi [Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kasada, Ryuta; Konishi, Satoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Future power grids would be unstable due to renewable and nuclear power sources. • Output interruptions of fusion plant would cause disturbances to future grids. • Simulation results suggested they would create limitations in fusion installation. • A novel diagram was presented to illustrate this suggested limitation. - Abstract: Future power grids would be unstable because of the larger share of renewable and nuclear power sources. This instability might bring some additional difficulties to fusion plant installation. Therefore, the authors carried out a quantitative feasibility study from the aspect of grid stability through simulation. Results showed that the more renewable and nuclear sources are linked to a grid, the greater disturbance the grid experiences upon a sudden output interruption of a fusion power plant, e.g. plasma disruption. The frequency deviations surpassed 0.2 Hz on some grids, suggesting potential limitations of fusion plant installation on future grids. To clearly show the suggested limitations of fusion plant installations, a novel diagram was presented.

  11. Perception of risk and the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovic, P.

    1990-01-01

    Scientists and policy makers were slow to recognize the importance of public attitudes and perceptions in shaping the fate of nuclear power. In 1976, Alvin Weinberg observed: 'As I compare the issues we perceived during the infancy of nuclear energy with those that have emerged during its maturity, the public perception and acceptance of nuclear energy appears to be the question that we missed rather badly.... This issue has emerged as the most critical question concerning the future of nuclear energy.' Today, fourteen years later, the problem of public acceptance is even more critical. Either the problem is damn tough or we have not been working hard enough to solve it (I suspect that both of these assertions are true). Public support for nuclear power has declined steadily for a decade and a half, driven by a number of powerful forces and events. In mid-March of 1979, the movie The China Syndrome had its premier, dramatizing the worst-case predictions of the earliest risk assessment studies. Two weeks later, events at Three Mile Island made the movie appear prophetic. Succeeding years have brought us Chernobyl and other major technological disasters, most notably Bhopal and the Challenger accident. The public has drawn a common message from these accidents - that nuclear (and other) complex technology is unsafe, that expertise is inadequate, and that government and industry cannot be trusted to manage nuclear power safely. These dramatic accidents and the distrust they have spawned have been reinforced by numerous chronic problems involving radiation, such as the discovery of significant radon concentrations in many homes, the continuing battles over the siting of facilities to store or dispose of nuclear wastes, and the disclosures of serious environmental contamination emanating from nuclear weapons facilities (at Hanford, Fernald, Rocky Flats and Savannah River)

  12. Low Power Design for Future Wearable and Implantable Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Lundager

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the fast progress in miniaturization of sensors and advances in micromachinery systems, a gate has been opened to the researchers to develop extremely small wearable/implantable microsystems for different applications. However, these devices are reaching not to a physical limit but a power limit, which is a critical limit for further miniaturization to develop smaller and smarter wearable/implantable devices (WIDs, especially for multi-task continuous computing purposes. Developing smaller and smarter devices with more functionality requires larger batteries, which are currently the main power provider for such devices. However, batteries have a fixed energy density, limited lifetime and chemical side effect plus the fact that the total size of the WID is dominated by the battery size. These issues make the design very challenging or even impossible. A promising solution is to design batteryless WIDs scavenging energy from human or environment including but not limited to temperature variations through thermoelectric generator (TEG devices, body movement through Piezoelectric devices, solar energy through miniature solar cells, radio-frequency (RF harvesting through antenna etc. However, the energy provided by each of these harvesting mechanisms is very limited and thus cannot be used for complex tasks. Therefore, a more comprehensive solution is the use of different harvesting mechanisms on a single platform providing enough energy for more complex tasks without the need of batteries. In addition to this, complex tasks can be done by designing Integrated Circuits (ICs, as the main core and the most power consuming component of any WID, in an extremely low power mode by lowering the supply voltage utilizing low-voltage design techniques. Having the ICs operational at very low voltages, will enable designing battery-less WIDs for complex tasks, which will be discussed in details throughout this paper. In this paper, a path towards battery

  13. Perception of risk and the future of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovic, P [University of Oregon and Decision Research, Eugene, OR (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Scientists and policy makers were slow to recognize the importance of public attitudes and perceptions in shaping the fate of nuclear power. In 1976, Alvin Weinberg observed: 'As I compare the issues we perceived during the infancy of nuclear energy with those that have emerged during its maturity, the public perception and acceptance of nuclear energy appears to be the question that we missed rather badly.... This issue has emerged as the most critical question concerning the future of nuclear energy.' Today, fourteen years later, the problem of public acceptance is even more critical. Either the problem is damn tough or we have not been working hard enough to solve it (I suspect that both of these assertions are true). Public support for nuclear power has declined steadily for a decade and a half, driven by a number of powerful forces and events. In mid-March of 1979, the movie The China Syndrome had its premier, dramatizing the worst-case predictions of the earliest risk assessment studies. Two weeks later, events at Three Mile Island made the movie appear prophetic. Succeeding years have brought us Chernobyl and other major technological disasters, most notably Bhopal and the Challenger accident. The public has drawn a common message from these accidents - that nuclear (and other) complex technology is unsafe, that expertise is inadequate, and that government and industry cannot be trusted to manage nuclear power safely. These dramatic accidents and the distrust they have spawned have been reinforced by numerous chronic problems involving radiation, such as the discovery of significant radon concentrations in many homes, the continuing battles over the siting of facilities to store or dispose of nuclear wastes, and the disclosures of serious environmental contamination emanating from nuclear weapons facilities (at Hanford, Fernald, Rocky Flats and Savannah River)

  14. Brayton Power Conversion Unit Tested: Provides a Path to Future High-Power Electric Propulsion Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2003-01-01

    Closed-Brayton-cycle conversion technology has been identified as an excellent candidate for nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) power conversion systems. Advantages include high efficiency, long life, and high power density for power levels from about 10 kWe to 1 MWe, and beyond. An additional benefit for Brayton is the potential for the alternator to deliver very high voltage as required by the electric thrusters, minimizing the mass and power losses associated with the power management and distribution (PMAD). To accelerate Brayton technology development for NEP, the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a low-power NEP power systems testbed that utilizes an existing 2- kWe Brayton power conversion unit (PCU) from previous solar dynamic technology efforts. The PCU includes a turboalternator, a recuperator, and a gas cooler connected by gas ducts. The rotating assembly is supported by gas foil bearings and consists of a turbine, a compressor, a thrust rotor, and an alternator on a single shaft. The alternator produces alternating-current power that is rectified to 120-V direct-current power by the PMAD unit. The NEP power systems testbed will be utilized to conduct future investigations of operational control methods, high-voltage PMAD, electric thruster interactions, and advanced heat rejection techniques. The PCU was tested in Glenn s Vacuum Facility 6. The Brayton PCU was modified from its original solar dynamic configuration by the removal of the heat receiver and retrofitting of the electrical resistance gas heater to simulate the thermal input of a steady-state nuclear source. Then, the Brayton PCU was installed in the 3-m test port of Vacuum Facility 6, as shown. A series of tests were performed between June and August of 2002 that resulted in a total PCU operational time of about 24 hr. An initial test sequence on June 17 determined that the reconfigured unit was fully operational. Ensuing tests provided the operational data needed to characterize PCU

  15. Power supply in future: ecological aspects; Kuenftige Stromversorgung: Oekologische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hustedt, M.

    2000-06-01

    The most important prerequisites for an ecological supply of energy in the future is the opting out of nuclear energy and the completion of the second and third phase of the socio-ecological tax reform. As a part of our energy will continue to be generated on the basis of fossil fuels in the foreseeable future, it is essential that a radical change takes place in the efficiency of fossil energy engineering. In addition to this, any possible energy-saving potential must be exploited; this includes the new energy-saving law, promoting the modernisation of old buildings and modern energy management (heat insulation, heating engineering, warm water heating etc.). For an ecological power supply the share of renewable energies must be increased to form a major pillar of our power supply. The '100,000-roof' programme of the German federal government and the development programme for near-market renewable energy sources form part of this approach. Energy research should shift its orientation and accelerate the conversion of our power supply: priority should be given to developing energy-saving technologies and renewable energy. Supporting municipalities and public utilities is especially important. This means revising the basic conditions of energy laws so that they assist public utilities to face competition as power utilities. (orig.) [German] Wichtigste Voraussetzung fuer eine kuenftige oekologische Stromversorgung sind der Ausstieg aus der Atomenergie sowie die Vollendung der zweiten und dritten Stufe der oekologisch-sozialen Steuerreform. Da in absehbarer Zeit ein Teil der Energieerzeugung weiterhin auf Basis fossiler Energietraeger erfolgen wird, ist eine Effizienzrevolution bei den fossilen Energietechnologien notwendig. Darueber hinaus muessen die erschliessbaren Energieeinsparpotentiale genutzt werden; dazu gehoeren die neue Energiesparverordnung, die Foerderung der Altbausanierung sowie ein modernes Energiemanagement (Waermedaemmung

  16. A Study Examining Photovoltaic (PV) Solar Power as an Alternative for the Rebuilding of the Iraqi Electrical Power Generation Infrastructure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Austin, Curtis; Borja, Ralph; Phillips, Jeffery

    2005-01-01

    .... engineers' actions upon entering Iraq, the increased need for electrical power in Iraq, the costs of insurgent attacks on the electrical system, and security issues that need to be dealt with for the...

  17. A Power-Efficient Access Point Operation for Infrastructure Basic Service Set in IEEE 802.11 MAC Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Ye Ming

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrastructure-based wireless LAN technology has been widely used in today's personal communication environment. Power efficiency and battery management have been the center of attention in the design of handheld devices with wireless LAN capability. In this paper, a hybrid protocol named improved PCF operation is proposed, which intelligently chooses the access point- (AP- assisted DCF (distributed coordinator function and enhanced PCF (point coordinator function transmission mechanism of IEEE 802.11 protocol in an infrastructure-based wireless LAN environment. Received signal strength indicator (RSSI is used to determine the tradeoff between direct mobile-to-mobile transmission and transmission routed by AP. Based on the estimation, mobile stations can efficiently communicate directly instead of being routed through AP if they are in the vicinity of each other. Furthermore, a smart AP protocol is proposed as extension to the improved PCF operation by utilizing the historical end-to-end delay information to decide the waking up time of mobile stations. Simulation results show that using the proposed protocol, energy consumption of mobile devices can be reduced at the cost of slightly longer end-to-end packet delay compared to traditional IEEE 802.11 PCF protocol. However, in a non-time-critical environment, this option can significantly prolong the operation time of mobile devices.

  18. Rural electric power infrastructure and infantile work; Infraestrutura energetica rural e incidencia de trabalho infantil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Aloisio Leoni [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Arquitetura]. E-mail: alschmid@uol.com.br

    2000-07-01

    Based both on the data available at the IBGE (Brazilian Geographic and Statistical Institute) Worldwide Web site from the Censo Agropecuario de 1996 and on the premise, that human energy is one of the most important energy sources in rural areas, the existence of a correlation of infant work and electric energy infrastructure in Brazilian rural properties was investigated. The verification was conducted first by Municipality, and second by product. Analysis covered agriculture, poultry and extractive practices. As a result, first part led to no correlation at all. However, the second part suggested a correlation to exist between share of rural workers under 14 and share of rural properties not having access to electric energy services. This correlation refers to the share of workers being both under 14 and belonging to the owner's family, corroborating the indication, in the literature, of infant work being a familiar tradition in the Brazilian countryside. Finally, the advance of the investigations with an approach more specific to region and character of economic activity is recommended. (author)

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sandor, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Steward, Darlene [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Vimmerstedt, Laura [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Webster, Karen W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum-based transportation fuel system is complex and highly developed, in contrast to the nascent low-petroleum, low-carbon alternative fuel system. This report examines how expansion of the low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure could contribute to deep reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the U.S. transportation sector. Three low-carbon scenarios, each using a different combination of low-carbon fuels, were developed to explore infrastructure expansion trends consistent with a study goal of reducing transportation sector GHG emissions to 80% less than 2005 levels by 2050.These scenarios were compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and were evaluated with respect to four criteria: fuel cost estimates, resource availability, fuel production capacity expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion.

  20. Safety related requirements on future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehaus, F.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power has the potential to significantly contribute to the future energy supply. However, this requires continuous improvements in nuclear safety. Technological advancements and implementation of safety culture will achieve a safety level for future reactors of the present generation of a probability of core-melt of less than 10 -5 per year, and less than 10 -6 per year for large releases of radioactive materials. There are older reactors which do not comply with present safety thinking. The paper reviews findings of a recent design review of WWER 440/230 plants. Advanced evolutionary designs might be capable of reducing the probability of significant off-site releases to less than 10 -7 per year. For such reactors there are inherent limitations to increase safety further due to the human element, complexity of design and capability of the containment function. Therefore, revolutionary designs are being explored with the aim of eliminating the potential for off-site releases. In this context it seems to be advisable to explore concepts where the ultimate safety barrier is the fuel itself. (orig.) [de

  1. The role of fusion as a future power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kintner, E.E.; Hirsch, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    potentials of fusion power in relation to nuclear fission, solar and other future energy sources can be assessed in general terms. The probability of success in fusion development, while not susceptible to measurement, continues to improve. Fusion can be expected to play an increasingly important role in energy supply world-wide in the early decades of the 21st century. If a commercial scale demonstration reactor (greater than or equal to 500 MWe) operates successfully by 2000, it is reasonable to anticipate as many as 20 to 100 large (1000 MWe) plants by 2020 and an increasing percentage of fusion electrical generating stations thereafter

  2. Future efforts on safety security at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Shunsuke

    2003-01-01

    As operation management of nuclear power generation in Japan was at the highest level in the world at beginning of 1990s, Japan has gradually been left behind by foreign countries at indices such as its operation ratio, its employees' exposure, and so on, and is at a general level. In special, as PWR showed 89% in its operation ratio corresponding to international level on PWR at last year, BWR was concentrated to countermeasure of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) caused by storage on consideration of stress relaxation at machining of parts made of SUS-316LC at a number of nuclear reactors, and all of units in the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd. had an accident on feasibility to cease them by finding out incorrect deeds at past periodical and self inspections. The minor Committee on Nuclear Regulation Rule Investigation of the Nuclear Security Party of the Advisory Committee for Energy judged this accident formed by neglecting tense feelings on inspection based on shortage of recognition on necessity to do administrative explanation obligation for natives and preparation of quality assurance system expressible on validity of safety management for local society of customers by management center in electric business companies, to propose a countermeasure to be done by government and private companies. Here was expressed future important subjects under their outlines. (G.K.)

  3. Factors affecting the future of nuclear power in OECD Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of nuclear power in OECD Europe and addresses the prospects for its future over, say, the next quarter century. Most of the data and findings are drawn from studies published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The NEA is a small agency with a rather modest budget whose 27 members are industrialized countries from North America, Asia and Europe. The Agency works to pool the expertise of our member countries to produce technical, economic and legal work of considerable depth and quality addressing issues of common interest to those countries. Our work covers such fields as nuclear science, nuclear power economics, nuclear safety, radiation protection, waste management and nuclear liability. The studies carried out in the framework of the Agency require fewer resources than would be needed by our member countries if they were to pursue them individually, which is especially important at a time of cut-backs in national programmes in such critical areas as nuclear safety research. (author)

  4. Space Weather Effects on Current and Future Electric Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, D.; Dutta, O.; Tandoi, C.; Brandauer, W.; Mohamed, A.; Damas, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    This work addresses the effects of Geomagnetic Disturbances (GMDs) on the present bulk power system as well as the future smart grid, and discusses the mitigation of these geomagnetic impacts, so as to reduce the vulnerabilities of the electric power network to large space weather events. Solar storm characterized by electromagnetic radiation generates geo-electric fields that result in the flow of Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GICs) through the transmission lines, followed by transformers and the ground. As the ground conductivity and the power network topology significantly vary with the region, it becomes imperative to estimate of the magnitude of GICs for different places. In this paper, the magnitude of GIC has been calculated for New York State (NYS) with the help of extensive modelling of the whole NYS electricity transmission network using real data. Although GIC affects only high voltage levels, e.g. above 300 kV, the presence of coastline in NYS makes the low voltage transmission lines also susceptible to GIC. Besides this, the encroachment of technologies pertaining to smart grid implementation, such as Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs), Microgrids, Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS), and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) have been analyzed for GMD impacts. Inaccurate PMU results due to scintillation of GPS signals that are affected by electromagnetic interference of solar storm, presence of renewable energy resources in coastal areas that are more vulnerable to GMD, the ability of FACTS devices to either block or pave new path for GICs and so on, shed some light on impacts of GMD on smart grid technologies.

  5. The future profile of power generation in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eynon, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation addressed North American power generation issues with particular reference to energy markets, electricity projections, coal supply and natural gas supply. Energy demand is expected to grow due to an increase in population and economic activity. Growth will be tempered by improvements in energy efficiency of equipment and buildings. Production of domestic energy is projected to grow, but not enough to meet energy demands in the United States, thereby increasing levels of imports, primarily natural gas from Canada. One of the key factors in energy markets is the price of natural gas which rose to record levels in 2001 due to strong demand in the winter and tight supplies stemming from low drilling rates in the late 1990s. In the long term, technology improvements will offset price increases. Improvements in gas finding and development technology will continue. Electricity use is projected to grow at slightly slower than historical rates due to improvements in equipment efficiency and investments in demand-side management programs. The growth in electricity sales is led by the commercial sector followed by the industrial sector. The paper emphasized the need for new generating capacity to replace aging generating plants. Coal-fired steam plants have the largest share of power generation in the United States, representing about one-half of total generation, followed by nuclear, natural gas and renewable energy sources. The use of petroleum for generation is small and is expected to decline in the future with the advent of new efficient generating technologies. The use of natural gas for power generation is expected grow significantly due to new technologies for efficient combustion turbines and combined-cycle generators fueled by natural gas. These technologies have low capital costs compared to other technologies and have short lead times for construction. tabs., figs

  6. The future of nuclear power: The role of the IFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.

    1995-01-01

    The author is in favor of nuclear energy for three major reasons: (1) a nuclear power station emits no particulates or sulfur; (2) a nuclear power station emits no carbon dioxide and therefore does not contribute (appreciably) to the possibility of global warming which is a major environmental issue of this century; (3) nuclear energy offers the opportunity to have an energy supply sustainable for the next hundred thousands years, and is the only supply presently known to be able to do so at a reasonable cost. He notes that at Rio de Janeiro, the USA joined other countries in calling for an approach to an indefinitely sustainable future. Alas, they were not bold or honest enough to state that using nuclear power, combined with considerable increase in energy efficiency and prudent use of renewables, is the only known way of achieving one other than massive population reduction or poverty. It is unlikely that improved energy efficiency can do the job alone. If the first two were the only issues, ordinary light water reactors would be adequate. One would not need the breeder reactor. But unless huge quantities of high quality uranium are found, or a cheap way of extracting it from seawater, one will need to have a way of using the uranium 238 or thorium. This is the role of this meeting. The author arrives at a set of criteria for a breeder reactor system: (1) it must be safe (secure against major accidents); (2) the system must be proliferation resistant; (3) the cost of the produced electricity must be competitive with other sources of energy--with perhaps a small margin for environmental advantage; (4) it must be capable of rapid expansion if and when needed

  7. Nuclear power generation alternative for a clean energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simionov, V; Ibadula, R.; Popescu, Ion.; Bobric, Elena

    2001-01-01

    World Energy Council stated that to raise the efficiency in which energy is provided is a huge challenge for power engineering. Over 60% of primary energy is in effect, wasted. At present 63% of the world's electricity comes from thermal power (coal, oil and gas), 19% from hydro, 17% from nuclear, 0.5% from geothermal and 0.1% from solar, wind and biomass. Nuclear power almost completely avoids all the problems associated within fossil fuels: no greenhouse effect, no acid rain, no air pollution with sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, no oil spills, etc. Its impact on health and environment is related to radiation and is relatively minor. Without pretending a high accuracy of numbers, if the first Romanian nuclear power reactor will be replaced by a coal plant of equivalent capacity, about 5 millions tons of CO 2 and large quantities of associated sulfur and nitrous oxides, would be discharged to the atmosphere each year. However, the acceptance of nuclear power is largely an emotional issue. Based on the environmental monitoring program this paper tries to demonstrate that the routine radioactive emissions of Cernavoda NPP, which are limited by competent national authority, constitutes an insignificant risk increase. The concept of sustainable development was elaborated in the late 1980s and defined as a development that fulfil the needs of the present, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Sustainable development incorporates equity within and across countries as well as across generations, and integrates economic growth, environmental protection and social welfare. To analyze nuclear energy from a sustainable development perspective it is necessary to consider its economic, environmental and social impacts characteristics, both positive and negative. It is obvious that the development of nuclear energy broadens the natural resource base usable for energy production, and increases human and man-made capital. There are also

  8. Towards a Wireless and Low-Power Infrastructure for Representing Information Based on E-Paper Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Sánchez-de-Rivera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been much interest in replacing traditional information supports with more technological solutions in recent years. New technologies which allow paper-like perception with minimal power needs have emerged as low-power wireless scenarios. A priority for these new supports is to create the architecture for a scalable solution which maintains minimal power requirements. The retail industry demands a new information infrastructure that improves customer and employee satisfaction. In this work, authors propose an information provision architecture based on E-Paper and carry out an experiment where different smart labeling architectures based on Paper, E-Paper, LED liquid crystal display (LCD and Dot-matrix LCD were tested in order to determine which is best suited for a real labeling environment. Enclosed in a research project called SMARKET, the authors pilot-tested the work in a real supermarket, having the opportunity to survey employees and customers about satisfaction and frustration with the use of the architectures proposed in this research work.

  9. Buyer's participation and well developed domestic infrastructure. Keys to successful introduction of nuclear power in a small country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numminen, K.; Laine, P.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power is advantageous for a small country such as Finland which does not possess indigenous fossil fuel. For instance, the cost of imports required by nuclear fuel is essentially smaller than the cost of production of electric energy based on coal or fuel oil. In Finland the advantageousness of nuclear power was already proved in the 1950s but before starting the first power plant project it took 15 years to develop step by step the required infrastructure: building the research institutes and training their staff, creating connections to the international organizations and elsewhere abroad, training Finnish design staff, developing the domestic industry to the high quality required by nuclear power, and establishing the necessary authorities and public administration. Thanks to thorough preparation the implementation of the plant projects progressed at a good pace in the 1970s. The lesson learned from operation of the plants is that in a small country - located far from its main supplier - the staff at the plant and the supporting staff in the power company have to be able to analyse the problems occurring, usually in the conventional equipment, and carry out quick repairs without aid from the main supplier. This requires a high level of educational attainment from the staff and the best way to achieve this is for the staff to participate in the design and construction as much as possible already in the implementation phase. In order to maintain high availability, the capability of the domestic industry must also be good - especially in the fields of mechanical industry and electronics. In Finland over 30% of electric energy was produced in 1981 by four nuclear units. Two of these were built as manifold east-west adjustment work with the Soviet supplier and the other two are of Swedish origin

  10. Historical variation in the capital costs of natural gas, carbon dioxide and hydrogen pipelines and implications for future infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoots, K.; Rivera-Tinoco, R.; Verbong, G.P.J.; Zwaan, van der B.C.C.

    2011-01-01

    The construction of large pipeline infrastructures for CH4, CO2and H2transportation usually constitutes a major and time-consuming undertaking, because of safety and environmental issues, legal and (geo)political siting arguments, technically un-trivial installation processes, and/or high investment

  11. The Past and the Future of Holocaust Research : From Disparate Sources to an Integrated European Holocaust Research Infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanke, Tobias; Daelen, Veerle Vanden; Frankl, Michal; Kristel, Conny; Rodriguez, Kepa; Speck, Reto; Rapp, Andrea; Lossau, Norbert; Neurot, Heike

    2014-01-01

    The European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) has been set up by the European Union to create a sustainable complex of services for researchers. EHRI will bring together information about dispersed collections, based on currently more than 20 partner organisations in 13 countries and many

  12. Do the Powerful Discount the Future Less? The Effects of Power on Temporal Discounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jinyun; Wu, Sherry J; Sun, Luying

    2017-01-01

    Individuals have the tendency to discount rewards in the future, known as temporal discounting, and we find that sense of power (the felt capacity to influence the thinking and behavior of others) reduces such tendency. In Studies 1 and 2, we used both an experiment and a survey with organizational employees to demonstrate that power reduced temporal discounting. In Study 3, we replicated study 1 while exploring a unique cultural trait of Danbo , or indifference to fame and wealth, across two ethnic groups (Han and Tibetan groups) in China. While power reduces temporal discounting, the relationship between the two may be leveraged by individual differences of optimism, frustration, and Danbo . The results imply a more nuanced interpretation of how individual and situational factors can affect intertemporal choice.

  13. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

    1979-09-01

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected

  14. Divertor development for a future fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norajitra, Prachai

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is considered as a future source of sustainable energy supply. In the first chapter, the physical principle of magnetic plasma confinement, and the function of a tokamak are described. Since the discovery of the H-mode in ASDEX experiment ''Divertor I'' in 1982, the divertor has been an integral part of all modern tokamaks and stellarators, not least the ITER machine. The goal of this work is to develop a feasible divertor design for a fusion power plant to be built after ITER. This task is particularly challenging because a fusion power plant formulates much greater demands on the structural material and the design than ITER in terms of neutron wall load and radiation. First several divertor concepts proposed in the literature e.g. the Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) using different coolants are reviewed and analyzed with respect to their performance. As a result helium cooled divertor concept exhibited the best potential to come up to the highest safety requirements and therefore has been chosen for the design process. From the third chapter the necessary steps towards this goal are described. First, the boundary conditions for the arrangement of a divertor with respect to the fusion plasma are discussed, as this determines the main thermal and neutronic load parameters. Based on the loads material selection criteria are inherently formulated. In the next step, the reference design is defined in accordance with the established functional design specifications. The developed concept is of modular nature and consists of cooling fingers of tungsten using an impingement cooling in order to achieve a heat dissipation of 10 MW/m 2 . In the next step, the design was subjected to the thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical calculations in order to analyze and improve the performance and the manufacturing technologies. Based on these results, a prototype was produced and experimentally tested on their cooling capacity, their thermo-cyclic loading

  15. An infrastructure for telecommunications power in a new era in public networking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osifchin, N. [International Power Strategies (United States)

    2000-07-01

    A new era in networking is on the horizon as we enter the 21{sup st} century. It is based on a seamless circuit and packet public network (PN) with the potential to transport and process voice, video, data and Internet traffic at higher speeds and lower costs than today's PSTN. Worldwide divestitures and subsequent deregulation and the dramatic growth of the Internet have given rise to a growing number of competitive carriers and service providers. This has accelerated the deployment of packet networks and inspired government mandates that let competitors co-locate their equipment in incumbents COs and POPs. Customer's perceived the cost of co-location in incumbent's space to be expensive and restricting. This gave rise to a new industry that rents equipment space in buildings refurbished to replicate CO environments termed carrier hotels or telehousing. These events have impacted network power in two ways. It increased the demand for higher capacity CO power plants to support growth in Internet, DSLs and second lines and energized the debate over AC verses DC as the preferred power for telecommunications. Quality of service, which is a looming issue as the PSTN transitions to the PN, can be translated to mean dependable and reliable non-stop power. The trend to outsourcing equipment space needs presents ILECs a timely opportunity to consolidate their huge inventories of COs and POPs into business units that would lease equipment space to incumbents and competitors and convert a cost center into a profit center. (orig.)

  16. Infrastructures Development Strategy in Energy Engineering Education and Research: a Bonus to Introduce a Safe and Secure Nuclear Power Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhelal, Oum Keltoum [National School of Mineral Industry, ENIM, BP 753, Agdal, 10000 Rabat (Morocco)

    2008-07-01

    In the area of Energy Engineering, high education programs including nuclear activities are currently running in collaboration with the employment sector to provide skills oriented profiles; the available packages are thus characterized by a limited size and a low impact in enhancing power technology teaching and industrial partnerships. However, ongoing nuclear applications activities are undertaken through strong legal and institutional infrastructures as Morocco has joined a large number of international conventions and agreements trusted by the IAEA. The introduction of nuclear power is subject to a close attention today to investigate if it is an alternative solution to meet the increasing energy needs. For a country not much industrialized and characterized by a medium electricity grid, the decision on the recourse to nuclear power needs to carry up early a training, R and D federative program on behalf of the engineering sector and the international cooperation. As the challenges associated to develop a successful nuclear power program requires an important effort directed toward increasing capacity, new education and training programs in the field of Energy Sciences and Engineering are presently targeted in several high education institutions prior to the goals of the education and research national reform. The preparation of a new master and engineer diploma at ENIM 'Power Systems Engineering and Management' is in process: the curricula introduces innovative concepts bringing together academic teachers, researchers and stakeholders to establish new discipline-based teaching and learning tools: what is mainly focused is to increase competency profile in consultation with the industry sector and to attract high quality students to ensure availability of human resources at the right time in the field of power technology utilization including nuclear power. A coordinated approach joining national and international partnership to implement oriented R

  17. Infrastructures Development Strategy in Energy Engineering Education and Research: a Bonus to Introduce a Safe and Secure Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouhelal, Oum Keltoum

    2008-01-01

    In the area of Energy Engineering, high education programs including nuclear activities are currently running in collaboration with the employment sector to provide skills oriented profiles; the available packages are thus characterized by a limited size and a low impact in enhancing power technology teaching and industrial partnerships. However, ongoing nuclear applications activities are undertaken through strong legal and institutional infrastructures as Morocco has joined a large number of international conventions and agreements trusted by the IAEA. The introduction of nuclear power is subject to a close attention today to investigate if it is an alternative solution to meet the increasing energy needs. For a country not much industrialized and characterized by a medium electricity grid, the decision on the recourse to nuclear power needs to carry up early a training, R and D federative program on behalf of the engineering sector and the international cooperation. As the challenges associated to develop a successful nuclear power program requires an important effort directed toward increasing capacity, new education and training programs in the field of Energy Sciences and Engineering are presently targeted in several high education institutions prior to the goals of the education and research national reform. The preparation of a new master and engineer diploma at ENIM 'Power Systems Engineering and Management' is in process: the curricula introduces innovative concepts bringing together academic teachers, researchers and stakeholders to establish new discipline-based teaching and learning tools: what is mainly focused is to increase competency profile in consultation with the industry sector and to attract high quality students to ensure availability of human resources at the right time in the field of power technology utilization including nuclear power. A coordinated approach joining national and international partnership to implement oriented R and D

  18. Power Supply and Integration in Future Combat Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khalil, Gus; Barshaw, Edward; Danielson, Eugene; Chait, Michael

    2004-01-01

    ...). To meet these requirements, hybrid electric power system has been identified as the best alternative to support the demand for propulsion, continuous axillary power demand and pulsed power demand for weapons and armor...

  19. Development of a Flexible Computerized Management Infrastructure for a Commercial Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Hajek, Brian K.; Usman, Shoaib

    2006-01-01

    The report emphasizes smooth transition from paper-based procedure systems (PBPSs) to computer-based procedure systems (CBPSs) for the existing commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. The expected advantages and of the transition are mentioned including continued, safe and efficient operation of the plants under their recently acquired or desired extended licenses. The report proposes a three-stage survey to aid in developing a national strategic plan for the transition from PBPSs to CBPSs. It also includes a comprehensive questionnaire that can be readily used for the first stage of the suggested survey

  20. Development of a Flexible Computerized Management Infrastructure for a Commercial Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Hajek, Brian K.; Usman, Shoaib

    2006-05-01

    The report emphasizes smooth transition from paper-based procedure systems (PBPSs) to computer-based procedure systems (CBPSs) for the existing commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. The expected advantages and of the transition are mentioned including continued, safe and efficient operation of the plants under their recently acquired or desired extended licenses. The report proposes a three-stage survey to aid in developing a national strategic plan for the transition from PBPSs to CBPSs. It also includes a comprehensive questionnaire that can be readily used for the first stage of the suggested survey.

  1. Future view of electric power information processing techniques. Architecture techniques for power supply communication network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Keisuke

    1988-06-20

    Present situations of a power supply communication are described, and the future trend of a power supply information network is reviewed. For the improvement of a transmission efficiency and quality and a cost benefit for the power supply communication, the introduction of digital networks has been promoted. As for a protection information network, since there is the difference between a required communication quality of system protection information and that of power supply operation information, the individual digital network configuration is expected, in addition, the increasing of image information transmission for monitoring is also estimated. As for a business information network, the construction of a broad-band switched network is expected with increasing of image transmission needs such as a television meeting. Furthermore, the expansion to a power supply ISDN which is possible to connect between a telephone, facsimile and data terminal, to exchange various media and to connect between networks is expected with higher communication services in the protection and business network. However, for its practical use, the standardization of various interfaces will become essential. (3 figs, 1 tab)

  2. The future of nuclear power: A world-wide perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktar, Ismail

    This study analyzes the future of commercial nuclear electric generation worldwide using the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) concept. The Tobit panel data estimation technique is applied to analyze the data between 1980 and 1998 for 105 countries. EKC assumes that low-income countries increase their nuclear reliance in total electric production whereas high-income countries decrease their nuclear reliance. Hence, we expect that high-income countries should shut down existing nuclear reactors and/or not build any new ones. We encounter two reasons for shutdowns: economic or political/environmental concerns. To distinguish these two effects, reasons for shut down are also investigated by using the Hazard Model technique. Hence, the load factor of a reactor is used as an approximation for economic reason to shut down the reactor. If a shut downed reactor had high load factor, this could be attributable to political/environmental concern or else economic concern. The only countries with nuclear power are considered in this model. The two data sets are created. In the first data set, the single entry for each reactor is created as of 1998 whereas in the second data set, the multiple entries are created for each reactor beginning from 1980 to 1998. The dependent variable takes 1 if operational or zero if shut downed. The empirical findings provide strong evidence for EKC relationship for commercial nuclear electric generation. Furthermore, higher natural resources suggest alternative electric generation methods rather than nuclear power. Economic index as an institutional variable suggests higher the economic freedom, lower the nuclear electric generation as expected. This model does not support the idea to cut the carbon dioxide emission via increasing nuclear share. The Hazard Model findings suggest that higher the load factor is, less likely the reactor will shut down. However, if it is still permanently closed downed, then this could be attributable to political

  3. Transportation infrastructure between nuclear power plant gates and nearest line-haul networks: Plan and procedure for data development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saricks, C.L.; Singh, M.K.; Stammer, R.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    This study is concerned with the segments of the transportation system that include possible routings over public roads and private (or public) rail links, and waterway access (within 25 miles) from the gates of typical reactor sites to proximate links of what can be termed the national through-route system. These routings are by no means uniform throughout the United States. Local roads and rail links near reactor sites may be subject to a wide variety of jurisdictions for maintenance, repair, and inspection; may or may not (at present) qualify for federal assistance under the Federal-Aid Highway and related funding programs; may or may not meet accepted construction standards for facilities expected to bear heavy loads; and, perhaps most importantly for the spent-fuel transportation program, may be subject to occasional and currently unavoidable disruptions that could seriously impair shipment schedules. The overall objectives of the study are to describe a framework for identifying the characteristics of the near-site transportation networks of all existing nuclear power plants that could give rise to important shipment scheduling and programming constraints. These characteristics cover both transportation infrastructure and existing structural and environmental limitation, and define a scope and schedule for constructing a data base for the transportation networks surrounding all nuclear power plants. 6 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Future CANDU nuclear power plant design requirements document executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Duk Su; Chang, Woo Hyun; Lee, Nam Young; S. A. Usmani

    1996-03-01

    The future CANDU Requirements Document (FCRED) describes a clear and complete statement of utility requirements for the next generation of CANDU nuclear power plants including those in Korea. The requirements are based on proven technology of PHWR experience and are intended to be consistent with those specified in the current international requirement documents. Furthermore, these integrated set of design requirements, incorporate utility input to the extent currently available and assure a simple, robust and more forgiving design that enhances the performance and safety. The FCRED addresses the entire plant, including the nuclear steam supply system and the balance of the plant, up to the interface with the utility grid at the distribution side of the circuit breakers which connect the switchyard to the transmission lines. Requirements for processing of low level radioactive waste at the plant site and spent fuel storage requirements are included in the FCRED. Off-site waste disposal is beyond the scope of the FCRED. 2 tabs., 1 fig. (Author) .new

  5. Oil and nuclear power: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, Ferenc L.; Rogner, Hans-Holger

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between oil and nuclear energy in the global energy scene over the past 50 years is analysed. The former nuclear-oil product competition in power generation and various end-use markets is found to have transformed into a complementary relationship. Current concerns associated with both energy sources and related technologies, including price volatility, supply security, geopolitical sensitivity, depletion alarms, and environmental pollution issues for oil, economic performance, operational safety, proliferation, terrorism, radioactive waste disposal, and the resulting public acceptance for nuclear are examined as determinants of their future roles in the world energy balance. An assessment of the long-term prospects for oil and nuclear energy is presented at the scale of a century to support further economic and energy policy analyses. It is the first in-depth study of global energy projections based on a comparative examination of long-term socio-economic scenarios and their coordinated quantifications by a set of integrated energy-economy models

  6. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  7. Combined Heat and Power: Effective Energy Solutions for a Sustainable Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, Ms. Anna [Sentech, Inc.; Hampson, Anne [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Hedman, Mr. Bruce [Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc., an ICF Company; Garland, Patricia W [ORNL; Bautista, Paul [Sentech, Inc.

    2008-12-01

    Combined Heat and Power (CHP) solutions represent a proven and effective near-term energy option to help the United States enhance energy efficiency, ensure environmental quality, promote economic growth, and foster a robust energy infrastructure. Using CHP today, the United States already avoids more than 1.9 Quadrillion British thermal units (Quads) of fuel consumption and 248 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions annually compared to traditional separate production of electricity and thermal energy. This CO{sub 2} reduction is the equivalent of removing more than 45 million cars from the road. In addition, CHP is one of the few options in the portfolio of energy alternatives that combines environmental effectiveness with economic viability and improved competitiveness. This report describes in detail the four key areas where CHP has proven its effectiveness and holds promise for the future as an: (1) Environmental Solution: Significantly reducing CO{sub 2} emissions through greater energy efficiency; (2) Competitive Business Solution: Increasing efficiency, reducing business costs, and creating green-collar jobs; (3) Local Energy Solution: Deployable throughout the US; and (4) Infrastructure Modernization Solution: Relieving grid congestion and improving energy security. CHP should be one of the first technologies deployed for near-term carbon reductions. The cost-effectiveness and near-term viability of widespread CHP deployment place the technology at the forefront of practical alternative energy solutions such as wind, solar, clean coal, biofuels, and nuclear power. Clear synergies exist between CHP and most other technologies that dominate the energy and environmental policy dialogue in the country today. As the Nation transforms how it produces, transports, and uses the many forms of energy, it must seize the clear opportunity afforded by CHP in terms of climate change, economic competitiveness, energy security, and infrastructure

  8. The central government power generating capacity- reforms and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rajendra

    1995-01-01

    The alarming resource gap that the states were facing in 1970's has prompted the Central Government to augment the resources for power generation by creating two new entities in November 1975 viz the National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) and National Hydro Power Corporation (NHPC). Few other organisations also exist in central sector which are engaged in power generation like Nuclear Power Corporation (NPC). NTPC being the leading player in the power sector, it can neither be indifferent nor dissociate itself from the reforms sweeping the sector today. The article describes the Central Government's role in power generation, reforms and NTPC and further prospects of NTPC

  9. Future on Power Electronics for Wind Turbine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Ma, Ke

    2013-01-01

    networks and more and more wind power stations, acting as power plants, are connected directly to the transmission networks. As the grid penetration and power level of the wind turbines increase steadily, the wind power starts to have significant impacts to the power grid system. Therefore, more advanced...... generators, power electronic systems, and control solutions have to be introduced to improve the characteristics of the wind power plant and make it more suitable to be integrated into the power grid. Meanwhile, there are also some emerging technology challenges, which need to be further clarified......Wind power is still the most promising renewable energy in the year of 2013. The wind turbine system (WTS) started with a few tens of kilowatt power in the 1980s. Now, multimegawatt wind turbines are widely installed even up to 6-8 MW. There is a widespread use of wind turbines in the distribution...

  10. Uranium in phosphate rocks and future nuclear power fleets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, S.; Baschwitz, A.; Mathonniere, G.

    2014-01-01

    According to almost all forward-looking studies, the world’s energy consumption will increase in the future decades, mostly because of the growing world population and the long-term development of emerging countries. The effort to contain global warming makes it hard to exclude nuclear energy from the global energy mix. Current light water reactors (LWR) burn fissile uranium (a natural, finite resource), whereas some future Generation IV reactors, as Sodium fast reactors (SFR), starting with an initial fissile load, will be capable of recycling their own plutonium and already-extracted depleted uranium. This makes them a feasible solution for the sustainable development of nuclear energy. Nonetheless, a sufficient quantity of plutonium is needed to start up an SFR, with the plutonium already being produced in LWR. The availability of natural uranium therefore has a direct impact on the capacity of the reactors (both LWR and SFR) that we can build. This paper discusses the correspondence between the resources and the nuclear power demand as estimated by various international organisations. Uranium is currently produced from conventional sources. The estimated quantities of uranium evolve over time in relation to their rate of extraction and the discovery of new deposits. Contrary to conventional resources, unconventional resources – because they are hardly used – also exist. These resources are more uncertain both in terms of their quantities and the feasibility of recovering them. Recovering uranium from seawater would guarantee a virtually infinite resource of nuclear fuel, but its technical and economic feasibility has yet to be demonstrated, and huge advances need to be achieved in this direction. According to different publications on phosphate reserves, the potential amount of uranium recoverable from phosphates can be estimated at around 4 MtU. Furthermore, the production of uranium as a by-product of phosphate is determined by the world production of

  11. Distance relay performance in future converter dominated power systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Moumita; Jia, Jundi; Yang, Guangya

    2017-01-01

    Increasing penetration of converter-based generations in power system has led to new system challenges. Short circuit power response from converter-based generations is different from that of traditional synchronous generators. Power electronic converters can be designed for over-current only up to 1.1-1.25 times of its nominal value. Low availability of short circuit power can cause many challenges such as misoperation of distance relays. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of...

  12. Smart Power Management of DC Microgrids in Future Milligrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyghami, Saeed; Mokhtari, Hossein; Davari, Pooya

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a novel droop approach for power management in low voltage dc MicroGrids (MGs) based on a master-slave concept is presented. A virtual frequency is injected by a master unit, which is proportional to its output power. Other slave units determine their output power according to the c...

  13. Danish wind power in Brazil. Part 1. The future of wind power in Brazil - market analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husted Rich, N

    1996-04-01

    More than 95% of total energy produced in Brazil comes from highly efficient hydroelectric power plants but, faced with a serious shortage of energy after the year 2000, the country is now considering wind energy as one of the basic alternatives for energy supply. It is suggested that biomass, wind energy and biogas may be included in a future supply policy for the north-east region of the land. The structure of, the privatisation, legislation and the tariff system within the Brazilian power sector are described in addition to the present situation regarding wind energy in the country, including current and coming projects in this field, the excellent wind conditions in Northeastern Brazil and investment possibilities. The political activities in this field of the Danish Folkecenter for Renewable Energy are noted and future developments in Brazil are discussed. It is concluded that there are good prospects for Danish windmill technology on the Brazilian market. Wind measurement programs are presently being carried out in various areas of the country, though a number of impediments to the development of wind energy in Brazil remain. (AB)

  14. The future of electronic power processing and conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Consoli, A.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    . - A large penetration of power electronics into power systems will happen within the next 25-30 years. The main transmission grid will not be affected. The power electronics development will be in distributed generation and in the loads. - The success of the integrated starter/generator, hybrid or electric...... cars depends on political decisions more than on technological advances. However, the success of a recent Japanese hybrid car and the cost of oil could trigger the critical momentum for large-scale use of power electronics in automotive applications. - We are moving toward standardized power supply...

  15. Current Status and Future Prospects for Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    In the past 50 years, nuclear power has grown from a new scientific development to become a major part of the energy mix in over 30 countries. In 1998, 434 power reactors worldwide produced 2294 billion kWh of electricity, slightly up on 1997 output. Sixteen countries relied on nuclear power for 25 percent or more of their electricity. Accumulated operating experience for nuclear power plants reached over 9,000 reactor-years. In 1998, 36 nuclear power plants were under construction: 14 in Eastern Europe, 12 in the Fat East; 7 in the Middle East and South Asia, 2 in Latin America, 1 in stern Europe (France)

  16. Role of nuclear power in securing future energy supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kuster, J.

    1982-01-01

    Status of nuclear power engineering development in the FRG is considered. The problems of NPP waste and spent fuel reprocessing and problems of fast and high-temperature reactor design are discussed. It is noted that in 1980 the NPP registered power in the FRG amounted to about 9300 MW, that corresponds to approximately 14% of power production in the country. NPPs with power of 30000 MW (el.) are under construction or prepared for it at present. It is concluded that the prospects of nuclear power engineering development in the FRG are good now though in the past it developed too slowly

  17. Telecom infrastructure leasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, R.

    1995-01-01

    Slides to accompany a discussion about leasing telecommunications infrastructure, including radio/microwave tower space, radio control buildings, paging systems and communications circuits, were presented. The structure of Alberta Power Limited was described within the ATCO group of companies. Corporate goals and management practices and priorities were summarized. Lessons and experiences in the infrastructure leasing business were reviewed

  18. Multiport power router and its impact on future smart grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Yuichi; Shichijo, Daiki; Wada, Keiji; Iwatsuki, Katsumi

    2016-07-01

    We propose a Y configuration power router as a unit cell to easily construct a power delivery system that can meet many types of user requirements. The Y configuration power router controls the direction and magnitude of power flows between three ports regardless of DC or AC. We constructed a prototype three-way isolated DC/DC converter that is the core unit of the Y configuration power router. The electrical insulation between three ports assures safety and reliability for power network systems. We then tested the operation of power flow control. The experimental results revealed that our methodology based on a governing equation was appropriate to control the power flow of the three-way DC/DC converter. In addition, a distribution network composed of power routers had the ability to easily enable interchanges of electrical power between autonomous microgrid cells. We also explored the requirements for communication between energy routers to achieve dynamic adjustments of energy flows in a coordinated manner and their impact on resilient power grid systems.

  19. The Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute (GNEII) Four Years On

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, Robert J.; Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Solodov, Alexander; Beeley, Philip A.; Boyle, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: What is GNEII? • Regionally based Institution → human resource capability → Future decision makers → managers & regulators. • Education & Development → Nuclear energy infrastructure → Integrated safeguards, safety, and security (3S) → Nuclear power fundamentals. • Strategic effort → Coordinated partnership → Responsible national nuclear energy program → Regional context. Why GNEII? • Build indigenous human resources → Education, Research, Technical capacity → Integrated 3S Systems Approach - coupled with - Nuclear Energy Infrastructure. • GNEII Addresses a Need → Increased nuclear power demand → Regional Nuclear Infrastructure → GNEII is a sustainable mechanism for developing a responsible nuclear energy program

  20. Power plants 2020+. Power plant options for the future and the related demand for research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This short overview already demonstrates that in the foreseeable future all generation options - nuclear power, fossil-fired power plants and renewable sources of energy - will continue to be applied. If, however, due to climate protection targets, energy conversion processes are to be to switched to CO 2 -free or -low carbon energy sources, comprehensive research endeavours will be required in order to advance existing technology options and to adjust them to changing conditions. This paper is bound to recommend individual fields of research from the viewpoint of the VGB Scientific Advisory Board for the period 2020 and beyond. Firstly, the generation structure in the European high-voltage grid and its development until 2020 will be considered, then the research demand for - Hard coal- and lignite-fired power plants, - Renewables-based electricity generation (wind, solar energy) and - Nuclear-based electricity generation will be outlined briefly, listing the main technology issues to be answered by researchers in order to increase efficiency and to settle any ''loose ends''. Apart from generation technologies, the options for storing electrical energy will also be dealt with. These options can contribute to make the feed-in of renewables-based electricity more permanent and sustainable. (orig.)

  1. Inventory of future power and heat production technologies; Inventering av framtidens el- och vaermeproduktionstekniker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekstroem, Clas (Vattenfall Research and Development AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    's Water Framework Directive. Combined heat and power with a steam cycle is currently the most cost-effective alternative for biofuel based power production, and it also provides optimal utilization of fuel. The potential here is restricted mainly by the amount of available district heating demands. Gasification with gas turbines or gas engines ensures higher electricity efficiency for plants up to 50 MW, although costs are currently high. Wind power has become competitive owing to fast international expansion, although only on the strength of effective climate-related control measures and measures favouring renewable energy production. Its potential is restricted by the quantities that can be integrated into the electricity network, given that production is reliant on wind conditions. The possibility of storing electricity/energy could increase its usability. Wave power is a promising future alternative, although currently at an early stage of development. Its potential is restricted by the quantities that can be integrated into the electricity network, given that production is entirely reliant on waves. Combined plants with combined heat and power or district heating improve the overall utilization of fuel. Upgrading solid biofuels to pellets is currently a competitive option, and torrefication could prove an interesting option should there be a demand for prolonged storing ability and improved grindability. Pyrolysis oil can be burned in simple plants, and would also enable a cost-effective use of 'problematic' biofuels. Infrastructure and handling must however be adapted to the fact that pyrolysis oil is corrosive and unstable for storing. The competitiveness of all biofuel based automotive fuel alternatives studied pre-supposes that future control measures within the transport sector are equally effective as those currently in place. Under current conditions biogas is a competitive alternative to petrol, but its potential is curbed by the restricted

  2. Commercial nuclear power: Assuring safety for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, C.B.; Modarres, M.

    1998-03-01

    This timely book offers insights into the benefits of nuclear power as well as the technological and environmental challenges facing the nuclear industry. Containing the results of worldwide scientific studies and industrial site visits, the book represents a timely focus on the applications of commercial nuclear power, the potential benefits to be gained from contained nuclear use, the environmental risks of nuclear power, and the prevention of nuclear accidents.This timely book offers insights into the benefits of nuclear power as well as the technological and environmental challenges facing the nuclear industry. Containing the results of worldwide scientific studies and industrial site visits, the book represents a timely focus on the applications of commercial nuclear power, the potential benefits to be gained from contained nuclear use, the environmental risks of nuclear power, and the prevention of nuclear accidents

  3. Future NASA mission applications of space nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.; Mankins, J.; McConnell, D.G.; Reck, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies sponsored by NASA show a continuing need for space nuclear power. A recently completed study considered missions such as a Jovian grand tour, a Uranus or Neptune orbiter and probe, and a Pluto flyby that can only be done with nuclear power. There are studies for missions beyond the outer boundaries of the solar system at distances of 100 to 1000 astronomical units. The NASA 90-day study on the space exploration initiative identified a need for nuclear reactors to power lunar surface bases and radioisotope power sources for use in lunar or Martian rovers, as well as considering options for advanced, nuclear propulsion systems for human missions to Mars

  4. Future Roles of Air and Space Power in Combatting Terrorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McAlpine, Mark

    1997-01-01

    .... The political, economic, and informational instruments of power play primary roles in addressing and eliminating the root causes behind terrorism attacks, but the military instrument will prevent...

  5. Nuclear power- the inevitable option for future energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Y.S.R.

    1995-01-01

    In the ensuring era development and deployment of electrical power sources will be governed by environmental changes, energy security and economical competitiveness. In the energy-mix scenario nuclear power has the potential and will make significant contributions in the coming decades. It is certain that nuclear power will continue to play a vital role in bridging the widening gap of demand and availability of energy in the years to come. In sum and substance, with the limited energy options available with India, nuclear power must assume greater share to meet the rapidly growing energy demands. Fortunately, country has a sound base for achieving the goal. 14 tabs., 3 figs

  6. Requirements on future energy supply. Analysis on the demand of future power plant capacity and strategy for a sustainable power utilization in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This strategy paper was drawn up with a view to maximum ecological compatibility of pwer plant modernization and sustainable power generation and use. The first part of the paper analyzes the power plants to be decommissioned on a medium-term basis and - against the background of several different scenarios for future power demand - an estimate of power plant capacities required by 2020. The second part describes the goals and concrete requirements of sustainable energy use. In the final part, the available instruments are presented, and those instruments are recommended that will be best suited for making power demand and supply efficient, sustainable and environment-friend.y [de

  7. Case Studies in Low-Energy District Heating Systems: Determination of Dimensioning Methods for Planning the Future Heating Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tol, Hakan; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Svendsen, Svend

    suggests a plan for an energy efficient District Heating (DH) system with low operating temperatures, such as 55°C supply and 25°C return; connected to low-energy buildings. Different case studies referring to typical DH planning situations could show the rational basis for the integrated planning...... of the future’s sustainable and energy efficient heating infrastructure. In this paper, a case study which focuses on dimensioning method of piping network of low-energy DH system in a new settlement, located in Roskilde Municipality, Denmark, is presented. In addition to the developed dimensioning method......, results about the optimal network layout and substation type for low-energy DH systems are also pointed out regarding to this case study. A second case study, included in this paper, focuses on technical and economical aspects of replacing natural gas heating system to low-energy DH system in an existing...

  8. The role of nuclear power in meeting future energy demands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, K.

    1977-01-01

    Future energy demands and possibilities of meeting them are outlined. The current status and future developments of nuclear energetics all over the world and in the CMEA member states are discussed considering reactor safety, fission product releases, and thermal pollution of the environment

  9. Nuclear Power Programme in India—Past, Present and Future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    India is poised for multifold growth in nuclear power generation to match the needs of sustained economic growth and improving the standard of living for masses. Nuclear power is currently the fourth-largest source of electricity in India after thermal, hydroelectric and renew- able sources of electricity. Thorium utilization for ...

  10. Present status and future development of Qinshan nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Yu

    1987-01-01

    Qinshan 300 MWe Nuclear power Project is the first domestically designed and constructed nuclear power plant in China. Here is a brief description of its progress in design work, equipment manufacture and site construction since the first structural concrete in March 1985. In Qinshan area four units of 600 MWe each are planned to be built with collaboration of proper foreign partners. (author)

  11. Perception of risk and the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovic, P.

    1993-01-01

    Public support for nuclear power has declined greatly, driven by a number of powerful forces and events. Numerous studies have demonstrated the public's extreme perceptions of risk and negative attitudes regarding nuclear power. This negativity is remarkable in light of the confidence most technical analysts have regarding the safety of this technology. Public fears and opposition to nuclear power can be seen as a crisis in confidence, a profound breakdown in trust in the scientific, governmental, and industrial managers of nuclear technologies. The problem is not due to public ignorance or irrationality, but is deeply rooted in individual psychology and the adversarial nature of our social, institutional, legal, and political systems of risk management. In the absence of revolutionary changes in the ways that risks are managed in our society, it is unlikely that public trust, confidence, and acceptance of nuclear power can be regained

  12. Constructing a sustainable power sector in China: current and future emissions of coal-fired power plants from 2010 to 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, D.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    As the largest energy infrastructure in China, power sector consumed more coal than any other sector and threatened air quality and greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement target. In this work, we assessed the evolution of coal-fired power plants in China during 2010-2030 and the evolution of associated emissions for the same period by using a unit-based emission projection model which integrated the historical power plants information, turnover of the future power plant fleet, and the evolution of end-of-pipe control technologies. We found that, driven by the stringent environmental legislation, SO2, NOx, and PM2.5 emissions from China's coal-fired power plants decreased by 49%, 45%, and 24% respectively during 2010-2015, comparing to 14% increase of coal consumption and 15% increase in CO2 emissions. We estimated that under current national energy development planning, coal consumption and CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants will continue to increase until 2030, in which against the China's Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) targets. Early retirement of old and low-efficient power plants will cumulatively reduce 2.2 Pg CO2 emissions from the baseline scenario during 2016-2030, but still could not curb CO2 emissions from the peak before 2030. Owing to the implementation of "near zero" emission control policy, we projected that emissions of air pollutants will significantly decrease during the same period under all scenarios, indicating the decoupling trends of air pollutants and CO2 emissions. Although with limited direct emission reduction benefits, increasing operating hours of power plants could avoid 236 GW of new power plants construction, which could indirectly reduce emissions embodied in the construction activity. Our results identified a more sustainable pathway for China's coal-fired power plants, which could reduce air pollutant emissions, improve the energy efficiency, and slow down the construction of new units. However, continuous

  13. Current and Future Opportunities for Wind Power in the Southeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinnesand, Heidi; Roberts, Owen; Lantz, Eric

    2016-10-05

    This presentation discusses future wind opportunities in the Southeast including factors such as changes in wind turbine technology, historical innovation trends, and forecast demand growth among regions. The presentation covers the current status of wind in the United States at 80-m hub height and the near-future outlook with a hub height at 110 to 140 meters. Future cost reductions in 2030 and beyond are also explored. Heidi Tinnesand presented this information to a utility advisory group meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina, on October 5, 2016.

  14. Future radioisotope power needs for missions to the solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondt, J.F.; Underwood, M.L.; Nesmith, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    NASA and DOE plan a cooperative team effort with industry, government laboratories and universities to develop a near term, low cost, low power (100 watt electric class), low mass (<10 kg), advanced radioisotope space power source (ARPS) and in the process reduce the plutonium-related costs as well. The near term is focused on developing an advanced energy converter to use with the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS). The GPHS was developed and used for the current radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Advanced energy converter technologies are needed as a more efficient replacement for the existing thermoelectric converters so that the space radioisotope power source mass and cost can be reduced. a more advanced technology space radioisotope power system program is also planned that addresses a longer-term need. Twenty first century robotic scientific information missions to the outer planets and beyond are planned to be accomplished with microspacecraft which may demand safe, even more compact, lower-power, lower-mass radioisotope power sources than those which can be achieved as a result of the near term efforts. The longer-term program focuses not only on converter technology but also on lower power, more compact radioisotope heat source technology and smaller, lower mass radioisotope heater units for second generation microspacecraft. This more ambitious, longer time-horizon focus necessarily occurs at this time on the technology R and D level rather than at the system technology level

  15. Distributed computer control systems in future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, G.; L'Archeveque, J.V.R.; Watkins, L.M.

    1978-09-01

    Good operating experience with computer control in CANDU reactors over the last decade justifies a broadening of the role of digital electronic and computer related technologies in future plants. Functions of electronic systems in the total plant context are reappraised to help evolve an appropriate match between technology and future applications. The systems research, development and demonstration program at CRNL is described, focusing on the projects pertinent to the real-time data acquisition and process control requirements. (author)

  16. A study of the status and future of superconducting magnetic energy storage in power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, X D; Cheng, K W E; Sutanto, D

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems offering flexible, reliable, and fast acting power compensation are applicable to power systems to improve power system stabilities and to advance power qualities. The authors have summarized researches on SMES applications to power systems. Furthermore, various SMES applications to power systems have been described briefly and some crucial schematic diagrams and equations are given. In addition, this study presents valuable suggestions for future studies of SMES applications to power systems. Hence, this paper is helpful for co-researchers who want to know about the status of SMES applications to power systems. (topical review)

  17. Future directions in radiation protection in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, L.

    1987-01-01

    Our visions of the future are often very optimistic and hopeful, representing the best imaginings of the human mind. The authors are inclined to think of the future as filled with new and better things. Some people even visualize the future as a science fiction perfection, but, in reality, it will also contain elements of the past and the present, both good and bad. With respect to radiation protection, a guess would tell us that the future holds the implementation of some version of ICRP-26 in one revision or another of the NRC 10 CFR20 regulations. But many of the technical problems of today may likely be ''solved'' by the public, the politicians, the sociologists and the bureaucrats of the future. For example, two such ''solutions'' may possibly appear in such grotesque forms as drastically lowered allowable annual doses or as engineered facilities for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste above ground on seismic stilts. All of these aspects - the good, the bad, the new, the old, and the indifferent - are all touched upon in this vision of the future

  18. Greening infrastructure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The development and maintenance of infrastructure is crucial to improving economic growth and quality of life (WEF 2013). Urban infrastructure typically includes bulk services such as water, sanitation and energy (typically electricity and gas...

  19. Research and development for the future nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Hideo [Japan International Cooperation Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    This paper consists of nuclear power technologies in Japan, its states of other countries, the today's objects, investment, change of the research and development paradigm, new type of reactor, public research and target research and resource. The new types of reactor investigated in Japan are FBR, 4S, aqueous homogenous reactor, gas reactor and molten-salt reactor. On the basis of correspondence to environment of market and materialization of business model, nuclear power has to cooperate with electric power side. The international joint research should be investigated, because the investment is limited. There are three references such as Report of nuclear power section in the total source energy investigation (2001): http://www.meti.go.jp/report/data/g10627aj.html, OECD/NEA (2002): http://www.neafr/html/ndd/reports/2002/nea3969.html and public research: http://www.iae.or.jp/koubo/koubo.html. (S.Y.)

  20. Research and development for the future nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    This paper consists of nuclear power technologies in Japan, its states of other countries, the today's objects, investment, change of the research and development paradigm, new type of reactor, public research and target research and resource. The new types of reactor investigated in Japan are FBR, 4S, aqueous homogenous reactor, gas reactor and molten-salt reactor. On the basis of correspondence to environment of market and materialization of business model, nuclear power has to cooperate with electric power side. The international joint research should be investigated, because the investment is limited. There are three references such as Report of nuclear power section in the total source energy investigation (2001): http://www.meti.go.jp/report/data/g10627aj.html, OECD/NEA (2002): http://www.neafr/html/ndd/reports/2002/nea3969.html and public research: http://www.iae.or.jp/koubo/koubo.html. (S.Y.)

  1. The future of nuclear power in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The arguments that have been put forward in the United Kingdom to justify the contention by its opponents that nuclear power should not be seen as a safe, economic, strategically desirable and environmentally attractive energy source are examined. Counter arguments are presented to support the belief that these are wholly wrong. In the short to medium term, however, economic and political considerations suggest that the prospects for nuclear power in the United Kingdom are not optimistic. The long term evolution of nuclear power is uncertain but it is possible that the security of energy supply, comparative economics and environmental attractions associated with nuclear power will become more apparent and work in its favour eventually. The conviction is expressed that, by the middle of the next century, the United Kingdom will be reaping the benefits of the fast reactor on a significant scale. (UK)

  2. Opening up the future in space with nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Man's extraterrestrial development is dependent on abundant power. For example, space-based manufacturing facilities are projected to have a power demand of 300 kWe by the end of this Century, and several megawatts in the early part of next millennium. The development of the lunar resource base will result in power needs ranging from an initial 100 kW(e) to many megawatts. Human visits to Mars could be achieved using a multimegawatt nuclear electric propulsion system or high thrust nuclear rockets. Detailed exploration of the solar system will also be greatly enhanced by the availability of large nuclear electric propulsion systems. All of these activities will require substantial increases in space power - hundreds of kilowatts to many megawatts. The challenge is clear: how to effectively use nuclear energy to support humanity's expansion into space

  3. Financing future exports of Canada's electrical power equipment industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, K.A.J.; Saravanamuttoo, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    The economic impact on the Canadian power sector of continued constraints on the availability of concessionary export financing is examined. An overview of the structure of the Canadian electrical power equipment industry is provided, followed by a discussion of its competitiveness and performance. Export prospects are outlined and separate reviews are presented of hydroelectric and thermal expansion. A global market of US $17 billion for hydroelectric power in the 1990s is forecast, and a market of US $300 billion for all forms of power generation in developing Asia. The export strategies of international competitive bidding, forming a consortium within an international multinational enterprise, co-financing with Japanese aid agencies, and direct negotiation are discussed. The costs and benefits of concessional financing are assessed and shown to bring net fiscal benefits. 12 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Medical aspects of power generation, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemann, R E

    1979-01-01

    It can be seen that the radiation emissions of nuclear power plants are small indeed, compared to natural background radiation and other man-made sources of radiation. For example, the poulation is exposed to 100 times more radiation from television sets than from nuclear power reactors. The assumed risks to the people in this country from nuclear power reactors are also small compared to the normal risks which are tolerated in this society. The complete elimination of all hazards is a most difficult if not impossible task. If we need and desire a certain level of electrical energy, if we must choose between alternative sourves of the energy, then it is apparent that the total impact on our health from nuclear power generation of electricity, under normal operations and in consideration of catastrophic accident probabilities, is significantly less than that of continuing or increasing use of fossil fuels to generate electricity.

  5. IP Connected Low Power Wireless Personal Area Networks in the Future Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rune Hylsberg; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg; Kjærgaard, Jens Kristian

    2012-01-01

    The Internet of Things is a key concept of the Future Internet. The Internet of Things potentially interconnects billions of small devices in a large ubiquitous infrastructure based on the Internet Protocol (IP). Typically, these devices will be limited in computational capacity, memory......WPANs). The authors address the key mechanisms from network aspects down to device design aspects and discuss how technologies interplay to make real application deployment practical for the Internet of Things....

  6. The 'electric power' experience: Between nostalgia and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moergeli, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    The ''Muehleberg'' is a concept which is mostly used in connection with the nuclear power station. But there is more to the ''Muehleberg'' than at first sight. A hydroelectric station, a waste dump gas plant and the brandnew works management centre of the Bernische Kraftwerke AG (BKW) constitute the framework for a host of other attractions in the field of electric power; among others, examples of technological culture in the BKW museum, which are worth seeing. (orig.) [de

  7. Indian power industry: role of private sector in future progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, T.R.

    1997-01-01

    This document discusses about the current scenario of power sectors in the country. It deals with the present power policy to encourage the private sector investment. Recommendations of the long-term pricing policy are laid down to meet the financial resources and energy demands. In general the reforms should be guided by the objective of introducing competition wherever possible, so as to minimise the cost to the consumer and improve the quality and services

  8. Distance relay performance in future converter dominated power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkar, Moumita; Jia, Jundi; Yang, Guangya

    2017-01-01

    Increasing penetration of converter-based generations in power system has led to new system challenges. Short circuit power response from converter-based generations is different from that of traditional synchronous generators. Power electronic converters can be designed for over-current only up ...... of converter controls on fault current response of converter-based generations is also investigated. Index Terms—Converter control, distance relays, power system protection, system modelling....... to 1.1-1.25 times of its nominal value. Low availability of short circuit power can cause many challenges such as misoperation of distance relays. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of converter dominated systems on performance of distance relays. Backup functionality of the distance...... relay is major concern as miscoordination of backup relays in case of cascading faults can lead to severe stress in system, which can develop into blackout. In this paper, response of relays in traditional system is compared with response of relays in low short-circuit-current power systems. Impact...

  9. Opening Address [Technical Meeting/Workshop on Topical Issues on Infrastructure Development: Managing the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants, Vienna (Austria), 24-27 January 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. I would like to express my cordial welcome to the participants of the 6th annual workshop on nuclear power infrastructure since 2006. Looking back at the development of nuclear power programmes for embarking countries since 2006, I am glad to see that many embarking countries apply the IAEA Milestones approach and have made much progress, since several countries already have entered or entering into phase 3, the construction of the first nuclear power plant. Since the last annual workshop, the most shocking event was the accident in Fukushima Daiichi in March 2011, which was caused by an earthquake and tsunami of unprecedented severity. Looking at the impact of this accident on the nuclear power, there were speculations that the expansion in interest in nuclear power, which we had experienced in recent years, could come to an end. However, it is clear now that there will be continuous and significant growth in the use of nuclear power in the next two decades, although at a slower rate than in our previous projections. Most of the growth will occur in countries that already have operating nuclear power plants, such as China, India and Russia. In countries which are considering introducing nuclear power, interest remains strong, despite Fukushima Daiichi. Most of these countries are proceeding with plans to add nuclear power to their energy mix, with the Agency's assistance. Only a few countries cancelled or revised their plans, while others have taken a ''wait and see'' approach. However, the factors that contributed to increasing interest in nuclear power before the Fukushima Daiichi accident have not changed: these include increasing global demand for energy, as well as concerns about climate change, volatile fossil fuel prices and security of energy supply. The countries strongly committed to nuclear power such as the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, Belarus, Vietnam, Jordan, Bangladesh and Poland, keep the same position even

  10. Bike Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Victor; Harder, Henrik; Jensen, Ole B.

    Bike Infrastructures aims to identify bicycle infrastructure typologies and design elements that can help promote cycling significantly. It is structured as a case study based research where three cycling infrastructures with distinct typologies were analyzed and compared. The three cases......, the findings of this research project can also support bike friendly design and planning, and cyclist advocacy....

  11. Physics for future Presidents - nuclear power, terrorism, global warming; La physique expliquee a notre futur president - Nucleaire, terrorisme, rechauffement climatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Richard A.

    2011-04-26

    This book explains the science behind the concerns that our nation faces in the immediate future. It outlines the tools of terrorists, the dangers of nuclear power, and the reality of global warming. As citizens who will elect future presidents of the most powerful and influential countries in the world, we need to know-truly understand if Iran's nascent nuclear capability is a genuine threat to the West, if biochemical weapons are likely to be developed by terrorists, if there are viable alternatives to fossil fuels that should be nurtured and supported by the government, if nuclear power should be encouraged, and if global warming is actually happening. This book is written in everyday, nontechnical language on the science behind the concerns that our nations faces in the immediate future. This book is translated from 'Physics for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlines', published by W. W. Norton and Company in August 2008. Contents: 1 - Terrorism: Nine-eleven, Terrorist nukes, The next terrorist attack, Biological terrorism; 2 - Energy: Key energy surprises, Solar Power, The end of oil; 3 - Nukes: Radioactivity and death, Radioactive decay, Nuclear weapons, Nuclear madness, Nuclear power, Nuclear waste, Controlled fusion; 4 - Space: Space and satellites, Gravity applications, Humans in space, Spying with invisible light; 5 - Global Warming: A brief history of climate, The greenhouse effect, A very likely cause, Evidence, Non-solutions, The fruit on the ground, New technologies

  12. Potential of light water reactors for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueldner, R.

    2003-01-01

    Energy consumption worldwide is going to increase further in the next few decades. Reliable supplies of electricity can be achieved only by centralized power plant structures. In this scenario, nuclear power plants are going to play a leading role as reliable and competitive plants, also under deregulated market conditions. Today, light water reactors have achieved a leading position, both technically and economically, contributing 85% to worldwide electricity generation in nuclear plants. They will continue to be a proven technology in power generation. In many countries, activities therefore are concentrated on extending the service life of plants beyond a period of forty years. New nuclear generating capacities are expected to be created and added from the end of this decade onward. Most of this capacity will be in light water reactors. The concepts of third-generation reactors will meet all economic and technical safety requirements of the 21st century and will offer considerable potential for further development. Probably some thirty years from now, fourth-generation nuclear power plants will be ready for commercial application. These plants will penetrate especially new sectors of the energy markets. Public acceptance of new nuclear power plants is not a matter of reactor lines, provided that safety requirements are met. The important issue is the management of radioactive waste. The construction of new nuclear power plants in Western Europe and North America mainly hinges on the ability to explain to the public that there is a need for new plants and that nuclear power is fundamental to assuring sustainable development. (orig.)

  13. Designing for Wide-Area Situation Awareness in Future Power Grid Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Fiona F.

    Power grid operation uncertainty and complexity continue to increase with the rise of electricity market deregulation, renewable generation, and interconnectedness between multiple jurisdictions. Human operators need appropriate wide-area visualizations to help them monitor system status to ensure reliable operation of the interconnected power grid. We observed transmission operations at a control centre, conducted critical incident interviews, and led focus group sessions with operators. The results informed a Work Domain Analysis of power grid operations, which in turn informed an Ecological Interface Design concept for wide-area monitoring. I validated design concepts through tabletop discussions and a usability evaluation with operators, earning a mean System Usability Scale score of 77 out of 90. The design concepts aim to support an operator's complete and accurate understanding of the power grid state, which operators increasingly require due to the critical nature of power grid infrastructure and growing sources of system uncertainty.

  14. Living with nuclear power and planning for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, R.

    2000-01-01

    Obrigheim, Germany has become well-known throughout the world for its nuclear power plant. The people living in Obrigheim and the surrounding villages support the existence of the nuclear power plant in its present state. The owners of the plant have informed the public quite openly and underlined the great importance of safety during both construction and operation of the plant. The cooperation with the local authorities and the public has been is still is very good. The employees of the plant are fully integrated into the life of the community. Additionally, Obrigheim is the only nuclear power plant in Germany that will offer a location of an intermediate spent fuel storage facility, avoiding thus the problem of radioactive materials transport, fulfilling thus the crucial requirements of a long-term operating time, i.e. there would be no reason for shutdown

  15. Indonesia - nuclear power as option for the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesegart, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Republic of Indonesia consists of 13.600 islands, about 6.000 of them are populated. More than half of the ca. 182 mio. inhabitants (1991) live on the main island Java which only has a share of 7% of the total area of the East Asian country. The developing country Indonesia is characterized by economic stability - according to the World Bank its chances to reach the circle of industrialized countries till the year 2000 are good. But electricity supply of the country lags behind overall economic development. Here about 20% of the demand can not be covered. There are high losses in energy production, transmission and distribution. The Indonesian government plans extensions in the power supply area, a doubling of 1991 capacities are strived for till 2000. Financially this is to be attained with the instruments denationalization and deregulation. Apart from coal, water power and geothermal energy now also nuclear power will be used. (orig.) [de

  16. The status and future development of nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoda, A.Y.

    1987-01-01

    As a result of its high dependence on imports in the energy supply sector, Japan has embarked on an extensive nuclear power program, which covers the whole nuclear fuel cycle and the construction of nuclear power plants. In 1985, 32 nuclear generating units with an aggregate power of 24.500 MW were in operation; this amounts to well over a quarter of the total generating capacity installed in Japan. Another ten units with an aggregate approx. 10,000 MW are under construction and six units with 6300 MW are being prepared for construction. After the completion of this phase of the program in 1995, the nuclear generating capacity is to be stepped up year by year by an aggregate 1500 to 2500 MW, for the time being. (orig.) [de

  17. Advanced Metering Infrastructure based on Smart Meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi

    By specifically designating penetrations rates of advanced meters and communication technologies, devices and systems, this paper introduces that the penetration of advanced metering is important for the future development of electric power system infrastructure. It examines the state of the technology and the economical benefits of advanced metering. One result of the survey is that advanced metering currently has a penetration of about six percent of total installed electric meters in the United States. Applications to the infrastructure differ by type of organization. Being integrated with emerging communication technologies, smart meters enable several kinds of features such as, not only automatic meter reading but also distribution management control, outage management, remote switching, etc.

  18. Is There Any Future For Coal Power Plants In Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zimakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the policies of EU countries towards coal power plants as well as practical steps taken by their governments. Coal power plants are widely considered to be environmentally harmful which confronts with environmental policies of the EU suggesting Europe-wide cuts of greenhouse gas emissions. Based on that assumption a number of EU countries such asBelgium,Austria,Portugal,Dania,Finland,SwedenandUKare striving to phase out coal power plants and achieved significant progress on this path replacing coal with other generation sources. On the other hand, other EU members are lagging behind as coal phase-out is not an urgent item of their political agenda. This situation is typical forIreland,Netherlands,Italy,Croatia,SloveniaandSlovakia. Domestic coal extracting industry can pose a significant hindering factor for a coal power plants phase-out and can effectively block the process. This is the case inBulgaria,Romania,Hungary,CzechRepublic,GreeceandPoland. ButGermany, which also has a well-developed coal industry, transforms its energy sector towards a green one cutting the share of coal in the generation mix. If this effort of the German government proves successful it will deliver a positive transformation model for other EU countries with a large share of coal in generation-mix due to domestic coal extraction industry. The analysis of the political and economic (both macro and micro processes leads to conclusion that there is no unity among EU member states in their approach towards coal fired power plants phase-out. This will allow for coal power plants to retain their market share in a short to medium term. But in the longer run one can expect a significant decrease of coal fired generation inEurope, even in the countries traditionally dependent on coal.

  19. The future Jules Horowitz material test reactor: A major European research infrastructure for sustaining the international irradiation capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrat, D.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J.; Gonnier, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multipurpose experimental reactors are now key infrastructures, in complement of prediction capabilities gained thanks to progresses in the modelling, for supporting nuclear energy in terms of safety, ageing management, innovation capacity, economical performances and training. However the European situation in this field is characterized by ageing large infrastructures, which could face to operational issues in the coming years and could jeopardize the knowledge acquisition and the nuclear product qualification. Moreover some specific supplies related to the public demand could be strongly affected (e.g. radiopharmaceutical targets). To avoid a lack in the experimental capacity offer at the European level, the CEA has launched the Jules Horowitz material test reactor (JHR) international program, in the frame of a Consortium gathering EDF (FR), AREVA (FR), the European Commission (EU), SCK.CEN (BE), VTT (FI), CIEMAT (SP), VATTENFALL (SE), UJV (CZ), JAEA (JP) and the DAE (IN). The JHR will be a 100 MW tank pool reactor and will have several experimental locations either inside the reactor core or outside the reactor tank in a reflector constituted by beryllium blocks. Excavation works started mid-2007 on the CEA Cadarache site in the southeast of France. After the construction permit delivery gained in September 2007, building construction began at the beginning of 2009. Reactor start-up is scheduled in 2016. The JHR is designed to offer up-to-date irradiation experimental capabilities for studying nuclear material and fuel behaviour under irradiation in a modern safety frame, mainly due to: 1) High values of fast and thermal neutron fluxes in the core and high thermal neutron flux in the reflector (producing typically twice more material damages per year than available today in European MTRs); 2) A large variety of experimental devices capable to reproduce environment conditions of mainly light water reactors (LWRs) and sodium fast reactors; 3) Several equipment

  20. Nuclear power: benefits for the future in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vultur, C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper explains how nuclear power was implemented in Romania, why Romania chose nuclear energy and what the impact of building a power plant is on the industry and environment of Romania. In the 1960's, Romania started discussions with different partners to cooperate in the development and application of atomic energy for peaceful purpose. In 1977 Romanian Government decided that the Candu-600 to be the basic unit for its nuclear program. The contract between Romania and Canada was for 5 units. In 1979, the construction of the first Candu - 600 unit started in Cernavoda, on the right side of Danube River, about 160 km east of Bucharest. (author)

  1. New situation and future of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castejon, F.

    2008-01-01

    The situation of the nuclear power plants in the World is commented, making emphasis on the Spanish case. It is also pointed the difficulty of the nuclear industry to overcome the main caveats of this energy source: To guarantee the safety of the reactors, the management of the high radioactive level waste, and high investments necessary to build a nuclear power plant. These caveats have made that the public opinion is against the nuclear energy in Europe, and especially in Spain. It is difficult that a re launching of nuclear energy without the economical support of the governments, which guarantees the return of the investments. (Author) 7 refs

  2. Future of nuclear power in meeting the Nation's energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    After reviewing the progress and problems of nuclear power, Commissioner Mason discusses briefly three challenges, which together cause great public concern: (1) continued assurance of reactor safety; (2) escalating capital costs; and (3) fuel supply and utilization. He feels that the ultimate role of nuclear power depends on both technology and the public attitude; that the technology is at hand, but public confidence may not be; and to this extent, as in other vital societal issues, an informed public will be the critical determinant

  3. Innovation avenues for coal derived power essential for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkley, Mark; Cruz, Elizabet; Vatanakul, Maytinee; Hynes, Rory; Stickler, Alexander

    2010-09-15

    Current political climates are culminating in the conflict between economic development and environmental regulation -- Climate Change. Developed nations are driven by and dependent upon the cheap, abundant power of coal. Today, developing nations wish to duplicate this historical pathway, yet are subject to global scrutiny. The politico-economic conflict between nations may be alleviated by innovative technologies delivering power and improved environmental considerations. The long-term economic trend has been upward and thus targeting expanding and converting existing economies to utilize innovative technologies is fundamental to addressing the balance between socio-economic and environmental interests.

  4. Fusion power in a future low carbon global electricity system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabal, H.; Lechón, Y.; Bustreo, C.

    2017-01-01

    Fusion is one of the technologies that may contribute to a future, low carbon, global energy supply system. In this article we investigate the role that it may play under different scenarios. The global energy model ETM (originally EFDA TIMES Model) has been used to analyse the participation...

  5. MHR fuel cycle options for future sustainability of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, Alan; Venneri, Francesco; Rodriguez, Carmelo; Fikani, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The future sustainability of the nuclear option is not significantly tied to the level of resources. For example, current high quality uranium reserves (∼3.34x10 6 tons) are enough for more than 55 years at present consumption rates (IAEA estimate). Doubling of the present uranium ore price (∼$26/kg) could create about a tenfold increase in resources, providing more than 550 years of supply at present rates (World Nuclear Association estimate). There are also thorium reserves which are estimated to be about three times those of uranium, and would allow for a significant increase in annual consumption levels. The key to a sustainable nuclear future is really tied to the political and technical problems of long term waste disposal, and the perceived risks of nuclear weapons proliferation. Thus fuel cycle options for a sustainable nuclear future must address and solve these issues. High temperature, Gas-Cooled, Graphite Moderated, reactors (MHRs) have nuclear and operational characteristics to provide multiple fuel cycle options to solve these issues. Three fuel cycles for the MHD are described in this paper, and their capabilities for meeting a sustainable nuclear future in terms of nuclear waste minimization and destruction, and reduction of proliferation risk, are discussed. (author)

  6. Electric Vehicle Based Battery Storages for Future Power System Regulation Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    supplying the reserve power requirements. This limited regulation services from conventional generators in the future power system calls for other new reserve power solutions like Electric Vehicle (EV) based battery storages. A generic aggregated EV based battery storage for long-term dynamic load frequency...

  7. Prediction of future dispute concerning nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    This investigation is the third research on the public acceptance of nuclear power generation by the National Congress on Social Economics. In this study, how the energy dispute including that concerning nuclear power generation will develop in 1980s and 1990s, how the form of dispute and the point of controversy will change, were predicted. Though the maintenance of the concord of groups strongly regulates the behavior of people, recently they have become to exercise individual rights frequently. The transition to the society of dispute is the natural result of the modernization of society and the increase of richness. The proper prediction of social problems and the planning and execution of proper countermeasures are very important. The background, objective, basic viewpoint, range and procedure of this investigation, the change of social dispute, the history of the dispute concerning nuclear power generation, the basic viewpoint in the prediction of the dispute concerning nuclear power generation, the social situation in 1980s, the prediction and avoidance of the dispute in view of social and energy situations, and the fundamental strategy for seeking a clue to the solution in 1980s and 1990s are described. The establishment of neutral mediation organs and the flexible technologies of nuclear reactors are necessary. (Kako, I.)

  8. Taming the atom: facing the future with nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, I.M.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: the mythology of the atom; what is nuclear power (the atom and its nucleus; radioactivity; nuclear fission; breeding nuclear fuel; how a reactor works; the natural reactor at Oklo; the fast reactor; nuclear fusion); the nuclear industry in profile (uranium mining; isotope enrichment; reactor fuel fabrication; types of reactor; decommissioning redundant stations; transport of spent nuclear fuel; reprocessing the spent fuel; management of waste products); nuclear power in the energy scene (energy in man's development; the impending crisis; the need for energy conservation; the role of nuclear power; status of the fast reactor programme; atoms by wire; other possible sources; the question of economics; the next few decades); matters of public concern (biological effects of radiation; probability and consequences of accidents; worries about waste disposal; no free lunches; the technological imperative; the centralisation of power; fears about terrorism; threats to civil liberties; proliferation of nuclear weapons); the great nuclear debate (depth of public concern; lack of public knowledge; differing national techniques; put it somewhere else; a question of credibility). (U.K.)

  9. On the future of nuclear power in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lameiras, Fernando Soares

    2002-01-01

    The recent optimism related to the resumption of nuclear energy for the generation of electricity in Brazil has been based on investments by the actual government to finish Angra II, the expansion of INB's facilities, the electricity supply crisis, and, on the external plan, the announcement of the Energy Plan of the George W. Bush government. However, for this resumption to take hold, it is necessary that the nuclear enterprises decrease their dependence on State resources and enter the nuclear power international market. With these measures, it was sought to demonstrate that the interest of the private capital could appear, making feasible the construction of new nuclear power plants. In fact, the major hurdle to the increase of the use of nuclear power is in the economic area. The State does not have resources available to afford the investments necessary to build new nuclear power plants. In contrast, the private sector prefers other alternatives which require less investment and afford faster capital return rates. (author)

  10. Microgrids, virtual power plants and our distributed energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmus, Peter

    2010-12-15

    Opportunities for VPPs and microgrids will only increase dramatically with time, as the traditional system of building larger and larger centralized and polluting power plants by utilities charging a regulated rate of return fades. The key questions are: how soon will these new business models thrive - and who will be in the driver's seat? (author)

  11. Indian nuclear power programme – Past, present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and processing of uranium, construction of plants to produce heavy water and ... In May 1956, a decision was taken to set-up a pilot plant at AEET for ... The development of most of these reactor systems is an integrated result of detailed under- .... NPCIL has engineered the methodology and strategies for Nuclear Power ...

  12. Nuclear Power Programme in India—Past, Present and Future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is important due to its security in terms of fuel reserves; since India has one of the largest ... of advanced nuclear power systems for utilization of thorium. ... operating water cooled reactors, the country plans to build innovative nuclear ...

  13. Classification of reserve capacity in future power systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frunt, J.; Kling, W.L.; Myrzik, J.M.A.

    2009-01-01

    In electrical power systems must always be a balance between supply and demand. Any imbalance will result in a frequency deviation. To reduce the imbalance to zero, ancillary services for balancing are in use. Ancillary services are characterised by their deployment time and their capacity. By using

  14. Nuclear Power as a Basis for Future Electricity Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioro, Igor; Buruchenko, Sergey

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that electrical-power generation is the key factor for advances in industry, agriculture, technology and the level of living. Also, strong power industry with diverse energy sources is very important for country independence. In general, electrical energy can be generated from: 1) burning mined and refined energy sources such as coal, natural gas, oil, and nuclear; and 2) harnessing energy sources such as hydro, biomass, wind, geothermal, solar, and wave power. Today, the main sources for electrical-energy generation are: 1) thermal power - primarily using coal and secondarily - natural gas; 2) “large” hydro power from dams and rivers and 3) nuclear power from various reactor designs. The balance of the energy sources is from using oil, biomass, wind, geothermal and solar, and have visible impact just in some countries. In spite of significant emphasis in the world on using renewables sources of energy, in particular, wind and solar, they have quite significant disadvantages compared to “traditional” sources for electricity generation such as thermal, hydro, and nuclear. These disadvantages include low density of energy, which requires large areas to be covered with wind turbines or photovoltaic panels or heliostats, and dependence of these sources on Mother Nature, i.e., to be unreliable ones and to have low (20 - 40%) or very low (5 - 15%) capacity factors. Fossil-fueled power plants represent concentrated and reliable source of energy. Also, they operate usually as “fast-response” plants to follow rapidly changing electrical-energy consumption during a day. However, due to combustion process they emit a lot of carbon dioxide, which contribute to the climate change in the world. Moreover, coal-fired power plants, as the most popular ones, create huge amount of slag and ash, and, eventually, emit other dangerous and harmful gases. Therefore, Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), which are also concentrated and reliable source of energy

  15. Solar power from space: the worldwide grid of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Recent interest in the feasibility and prospects for generating large amounts of electricity from space-based solar power systems is reviewed. The interest is generated by reports which suggest that sun-surfacing solar arrays in stationary earth orbit at an altitude 22,300 miles would not only be unaffected by the Earth's day-night cycle, cloud cover and atmospheric dust, but would also receive some eight times as much sunlight as solar collectors at the Earth's surface. The prediction is that relevant technology will be perfected to the point where by the middle of the 21. century a large share of the world's demand for electricity will be met by a series of very large space-based solar photovoltaic arrays. Several billion watts of power could be beamed to the Earth at microwave radio frequencies for collection by wide area rectifying ground antennas for conversion to electricity via transmitters connected to the photovoltaic arrays. A chronological account of development of this concept of beaming solar power from space shows that the idea has been around since the 1880s, gaining more and more credibility with each advance in space science . The moon, too, has been suggested as an ideal site for developing large-scale solar power systems that beam microwave energy to Earth. The lunar soil could supply silicon to build solar arrays, and metals such as iron and aluminum, for support structures and electric wiring. NASA is actively pursuing this line of inquiry, especially since all the problems involved with solar energy generation on earth, are absent on the moon.While a breakthrough is not imminent, the significant progress achieved to date in demonstrating the feasibility of wireless power transmission from space provides good reason for continuing to pursue this line of investigation

  16. The future technologies for decentralized power generation. Prospective aspects; Les techniques futures de production d`electricite decentralisee. Elements prospectifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquet, A [Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Meyer, J L [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1997-07-01

    Due to a favorable context (fuel costs, environmental concerns, deregulation...), decentralized power production, and more especially cogeneration, is presently developing in many countries, notably in France. An overlook on the main decentralized power generation technologies that may shows a likely commercial development in the near future, and their performance enhancement programs, are presented: combustion turbines, advanced gas turbines, micro gas turbines, regenerative gas turbines, cogeneration fuel cells, Stirling engines and solar dish Stirling systems, natural gas driven alternative engines, and wind turbines. Their development for on site power production in large commercial and small industrial sites, for collective or insular power networks, or for cogeneration in interconnected or large industrial sites, are discussed, and issues related to network management due to the abundance of power injection points in the low-voltage network are outlined

  17. Possible sites for future nuclear power plants in Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaar, Ilan, E-mail: ilany@energy.gov.il [Ministry of National Infrastructure, Energy and Water Resources, Chief Scientist Office, 14 Hartum St., POB 36148, Jerusalem 9136002 (Israel); Walter, Ayelet [Ministry of National Infrastructure, Energy and Water Resources, Chief Scientist Office, 14 Hartum St., POB 36148, Jerusalem 9136002 (Israel); Sanders, Yovav [Sysnet Group, Habarzel St. 32, Tel Aviv 69710 (Israel); Felus, Yaron [Survey of Israel, 1 Lincoln St., POB 14171, Tel-Aviv 61141 (Israel); Calvo, Ran; Hamiel, Yariv [Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkhe Israel St., Jerusalem 95501 (Israel)

    2016-03-15

    A preliminary work aimed at allocating suitable new sites for possible NPPs in Israel is presented. The work is based on Israel's present NPP siting criteria, supported by selected procedure performed by various countries that conducted similar process. The site selection process was conducted in two stages: first, a selection procedure using demographic analysis was conducted; second, a seismological and geological analysis process was performed in the remaining area. From the combined two screening processes results, an overall new area of 569 km{sup 2} was located as a possible area for future construction of NPPs in Israel. Further and more comprehensive work, based on the IAEAs site selection guidelines, has to be performed in the future, in order to verify the preliminary findings presented in this work.

  18. Comparative analysis of coolants for FBR of future nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Grigoryev, O.G.; Pylchenkov, E.H.; Skorikov, D.E.; Komkova, O.I.

    2001-01-01

    Selection of a fast reactor (FR) coolant for future nuclear reactors is a complex task that has not a single solution. Safety requirements are expected to grow in the future. The requirements to FR are reconsidered. Gradual transition from the FR as a builder up of plutonium to the FR as an economically effective energy source, is taking place. Among all types of coolants viable for FR, LMC (light molten salt coolants) cover the most complete range of requirements to advanced reactors and have a complete database. Sodium and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) are selected because there is a complete package of technologies for their handling. Heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC), being at a disadvantage of heat transfer rate in relation to sodium, make it possible to give the inherent safety properties to the reactor and, as a result, to simplify essentially the reactor design and its safety systems. This results in capital and costs reduction. Neutronic characteristics of HLMC cooled reactors make possible to transmute their own minor actinides (MA) safely, and LBC cooled reactors are able to transmute LWR'MA with high safety characteristics. Basing on the comparison carried out, it can be concluded, that both LBC and sodium are perspective coolants for future FR

  19. Comparative analysis of coolants for FBR of future nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Grigoryev, O.G.; Pylchenkov, E.H.; Skorikov, D.E.; Komkova, O.I. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation, Institute for Physics and Power Engineering named after Academician A.I. Leipusky, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    Selection of a fast reactor (FR) coolant for future nuclear reactors is a complex task that has not a single solution. Safety requirements are expected to grow in the future. The requirements to FR are reconsidered. Gradual transition from the FR as a builder up of plutonium to the FR as an economically effective energy source, is taking place. Among all types of coolants viable for FR, LMC (light molten salt coolants) cover the most complete range of requirements to advanced reactors and have a complete database. Sodium and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) are selected because there is a complete package of technologies for their handling. Heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC), being at a disadvantage of heat transfer rate in relation to sodium, make it possible to give the inherent safety properties to the reactor and, as a result, to simplify essentially the reactor design and its safety systems. This results in capital and costs reduction. Neutronic characteristics of HLMC cooled reactors make possible to transmute their own minor actinides (MA) safely, and LBC cooled reactors are able to transmute LWR'MA with high safety characteristics. Basing on the comparison carried out, it can be concluded, that both LBC and sodium are perspective coolants for future FR.

  20. STRUCTURAL AND HIDDEN BARRIERS TO A LOCAL PRIMARY HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE: AUTONOMY, DECISIONS ABOUT PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, AND THE CENTRALITY AND SIGNIFICANCE OF POWER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Christopher R; Hansberry, Shantisha T; Arrieta, Martha I

    2013-09-01

    To examine a local primary health care infrastructure and the reality of primary health care from the perspective of residents of a small, urban community in the southern United States. Data derive from 13 semi-structured focus groups, plus three semi-structured interviews, and were analyzed inductively consistent with a grounded theory approach. Structural barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure include transportation, clinic and appointment wait time, and co-payments and health insurance. Hidden barriers consist of knowledge about local health care services, non-physician gatekeepers, and fear of medical care. Community residents have used home remedies and the emergency department at the local academic medical center to manage these structural and hidden barriers. Findings might not generalize to primary health care infrastructures in other communities, respondent perspectives can be biased, and the data are subject to various interpretations and conceptual and thematic frameworks. Nevertheless, the structural and hidden barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure have considerably diminished the autonomy community residents have been able to exercise over their decisions about primary health care, ultimately suggesting that efforts concerned with increasing the access of medically underserved groups to primary health care in local communities should recognize the centrality and significance of power. This study addresses a gap in the sociological literature regarding the impact of specific barriers to primary health care among medically underserved groups.

  1. Possibilities and future of wind power production in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holttinen, E.; Tammelin, B.

    1997-01-01

    The article was prepared for two presentations for Finnish MPs late autumn 1996 in connection of the handling of new energy taxation in Finland. The governmental proposal was going to favour the use of coal and unfavour the use of renewable energy sources. The total amount of installed wind power in Finland (7 MW) was compared to some other European countries. Anyhow it is well known that the wind potential in Finland due to its long coast line, large archipelago and great number of arctic mountains, all with very good wind climate, offers a great opportunity for effective exploitation of wind energy. The price of wind energy in Finland is 30 p/kWh (about 0,05 ECU) and it is estimated that with bigger power plan units it could be 20 p/kWh. Different ways to support wind energy production was presented with examples from Germany, Denmark and Sweden. (orig.) (8 refs.)

  2. Small and medium power reactors: the past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The history of small and medium power reactors (SMPRs) is reviewed. Although the power range goes up to plants with an electricity output of 600MWe, the focus is on plants of 250-300 MWe. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in promoting their use for electrical energy production for developing countries is examined. It can be shown that there is a considerable potential market for SMPRs which will increase later this century and into the next. There are, however, a number of problems to be overcome. These are not in the technical aspects but problems of costs and financing. Thus efforts should be made to reduce capital costs, shorten construction time and find potential customers who are acceptable borrowers to the international banking world. Various types of reactor are examined. (U.K.)

  3. Flamanville 3. A new power plant to prepare the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This brochure presents the Flamanville-3 nuclear power plant project (Flamanville, Manche, France). This new power generation unit is based on the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR) concept. The construction started in 2007 and the plant will be put into service in 2012. The Flamanville-3 reactor will be the forehead of an eventual series of a new generation of reactors devoted to replace the actual French reactors that are close to the end of their service life. The reactor is a 1650 MWe PWR which complements the two existing units already in operation since 1985 and 1986. The safety characteristics of this new generation of reactor and the socio-economical fallouts of its construction are briefly presented. (J.S.)

  4. Point Lepreau nuclear project unlocks power future of New Brunswick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, E J [New Brunswick Electric Power Commission, Fredericton (Canada)

    1976-08-01

    Projects under development will increase the generating capacity of New Brunswick Electric Power Commission from 1.47 to 3.14 GW. Of these projects, the most significant is the 0.63 GW Point Lepreau CANDU reactor. Progress in the construction of the power reactor is summarized. The concrete reactor building was slipformed in April 1976. A second nuclear unit at Point Lepreau is being considered. Information is also provided on the new oil-fired station at Coleson Cove, a new oil- or coal-fired unit at Dalhousie and further hydro units at Mactaquac. A 0.16 GW pumped storage hydro unit at Green River is being considered. Information on transmission (Including the HVDC system), substations, and connection with Hydro Quebec is included.

  5. Distributed control and instrumentation systems for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, G.; L'Archeveque, J.V.R.

    1976-01-01

    The centralized dual computer system philosophy has evolved as the key concept underlying the highly successful application of direct digital control in CANDU power reactors. After more than a decade, this basis philosophy bears re-examination in the light of advances in system concepts--notably distributed architectures. A number of related experimental programs, all aimed at exploring the prospects of applying distributed systems in Canadian nuclear power plants are discussed. It was realized from the outset that the successful application of distributed systems depends on the availability of a highly reliable, high capacity, low cost communications medium. Accordingly, an experimental facility has been established and experiments have been defined to address such problem areas as interprocess communications, distributed data base design and man/machine interfaces. The design of a first application to be installed at the NRU/NRX research reactors is progressing well

  6. On-site power generation for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarroll, R.L.; Partanen, W.E. [Power Generating, Inc., Fort Worth, TX (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Power Generating, Inc. is developing a direct-fired gas turbine power system designed to operate on solid fuel. This presentation will summarize the results of the development work performed to date and will outline the program currently underway to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a gas turbine fired on white wood and subsequently on coal. The presentation will describe testing already completed on a pressurized cyclonic burner which forms the external combustion stage for the solid fuel fired gas turbine and the testing that has been done on various fuels categorized as acceptable {open_quotes}fuels of choice{close_quotes} for the demonstration project. Also to be covered will be a discussion of the equipment to be used in the demonstration project, the reasons why specific pieces of equipment have been selected, and how they might be modified for the gas turbine application.

  7. Is Power Production Flexibility a Substitute for Storability? Evidence from Electricity Futures Prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, M.; Huisman, R. [Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-07-15

    Electricity is not storable. As a consequence, electricity demand and supply need to be in balance at any moment in time as a shortage in production volume cannot be compensated with supply from inventories. However, if the installed power supply capacity is very flexible, variation in demand can be counterbalanced with flexible adjustment of production volumes. Therefore, supply flexibility can replace the role of inventory. In this paper, we question whether power production flexibility is a substitute for storability. To do so, we examine power futures prices from countries that differ in their power supply and test whether power futures prices contain information about expected future spot prices and risk premiums and examine whether futures prices from a market in which power supply is more flexible would lead to futures prices that are more in line with the theory of storage. We find the opposite; futures prices from markets with flexible power supply behave according to the expectations theory. The implicit view from futures prices is that flexibility is not a substitute for storability.

  8. Is Power Production Flexibility a Substitute for Storability? Evidence from Electricity Futures Prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, M.; Huisman, R.

    2010-07-01

    Electricity is not storable. As a consequence, electricity demand and supply need to be in balance at any moment in time as a shortage in production volume cannot be compensated with supply from inventories. However, if the installed power supply capacity is very flexible, variation in demand can be counterbalanced with flexible adjustment of production volumes. Therefore, supply flexibility can replace the role of inventory. In this paper, we question whether power production flexibility is a substitute for storability. To do so, we examine power futures prices from countries that differ in their power supply and test whether power futures prices contain information about expected future spot prices and risk premiums and examine whether futures prices from a market in which power supply is more flexible would lead to futures prices that are more in line with the theory of storage. We find the opposite; futures prices from markets with flexible power supply behave according to the expectations theory. The implicit view from futures prices is that flexibility is not a substitute for storability.

  9. Development of distributed computer systems for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, G.; L'Archeveque, J.V.R.

    1978-01-01

    Dual computers have been used for direct digital control in CANDU power reactors since 1963. However, as reactor plants have grown in size and complexity, some drawbacks to centralized control appear such as, for example, the surprisingly large amount of cabling required for information transmission. Dramatic changes in costs of components and a desire to improve system performance have stimulated a broad-based research and development effort in distribution systems. This paper outlines work in this area

  10. Future of structural reliability methodology in nuclear power plant technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueeller, G I [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany, F.R.); Kafka, P [Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit m.b.H. (GRS), Garching (Germany, F.R.)

    1978-10-01

    This paper presents the authors' personal view as to which areas of structural reliability in nuclear power plant design need most urgently to be advanced. Aspects of simulation modeling, design rules, codification and specification of reliability, system analysis, probabilistic structural dynamics, rare events and particularly the interaction of systems and structural reliability are discussed. As an example, some considerations of the interaction effects between the protective systems and the pressure vessel are stated. The paper concludes with recommendation for further research.

  11. The power supply of the future - sustainable or nuclear?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenthal, G.

    2008-01-01

    In the available contribution the author directs the view of the complexity as a neglected peculiarity of the large technology. Many elements of the energy conflicts and dangers of the energy supply are explainable only by the uncritical attitudes in relation to the associated and not sufficiently solvable complexity problems. The criticism to it is directed not alone against the atomic energy, but more generally against the heedless technique philosophy of the power suppliers

  12. Nuclear power in USSR. Present status and future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemskoff, Pierre.

    1980-05-01

    This study on nuclear electricity in the USSR deals with the main aspects of the development motivations of this form of energy in the country. The various systems developed are recalled, with their complex of power stations in operations or under construction, as well as the various other Soviet achievements: processs heat reactors, prefabricated reactors, etc. The nuclear industry in the USSR, profitability of the base facilities and cooperation with foreign countries are briefly reviewed [fr

  13. CCGT + LWR = the power plant of the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiklauri, G.

    1997-01-01

    The thermal efficiency of LWR type reactors can be increased making use of the Tsikl-Durst cycle, where the gas turbine is combined with the nuclear reactor using a steam mixer. The principle of this combined cycle is outlined. It is envisaged that the overall thermal efficiency of the power plant can be increased to 41 - 44%. The total output would be two to three times higher. With advanced light-water reactors (ABWR, AP-600) and advanced gas turbines in combination with the one-way steam generator as developed by Solar Turbines Inc., producing steam at 650 degC to 750 degC, it is feasible to attain a total thermal efficiency of 55%. The combination of two kinds of fuel (nuclear fuel and natural gas) improves operating flexibility of the cycle in various regimes so as to respond to natural gas prices and electricity demands. The gas turbine adds to the nuclear power plant an independent source of power, so that standby dieselgenerators are no more necessary. (P.A.). 1 tab., 2 figs

  14. The future of utility-scale wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hock, S.; Thresher, R.; Williams, T.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that by 2030, wind power could potentially displace between 3 and 4 quadrillion (10 15 ) Btus (quads) of primary energy, with an installed electrical generation capacity of 120,000 to 160,000 MW. This forecast is based upon economic analyses indicating that the costs of wind-generated electricity could be cost competitive with conventional fossil-fuel-based generation by early next century. The key to realizing this objective is overcoming technical challenges to the development of a next-generation of advanced wind turbines. These challenges include the detailed characterization of wind inflow to turbines at wind-power-plant sites, an understanding of unsteady aerodynamics, the development of sophisticated computer models of all aspects of turbine operation, and the application of a better understanding of component and system fatigue to new designs. Advanced wind systems will include such new technologies as blade designs incorporating advanced airfoils and new materials, variable-speed operation, advanced power electronics, rotor-hub enhancements, tall towers, aerodynamic controls, advanced drive trains, and expert control systems. A larger market share for wind energy will also require the resolution of issues surrounding transmission, storage, and the integration of an intermittent energy source into the utility grid

  15. Challenges related to the management of energy and transportation infrastructures within the context of future eco cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Laurent; Culver, Keith; Gaudin, Etienne; Sun, David

    2010-09-15

    The 100 years from 1950 to 2050 will be remembered for the greatest social, cultural, economic and environmental transformation in history - the urbanization of humanity. With half of us now occupying urban space, the future of the human species is tied to the city - Anna Tibaijuka, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations and Executive Director UN-HABITAT, in remarks at the third session of the World Urban Forum in Vancouver, Canada, in 2006. The urbanization of humanity is both a fact and a challenge. 3.5 billion people live in cities now, and 6 billion people will live in cities by 2050.

  16. Impacts of Renewable Energy Quota System on China's Future Power Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Weiming; Zhang, Da; Mischke, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    As the biggest carbon emitting sector which produces 44% of current national carbon emission in China, the coal-dominated power sector has a tremendous potential for CO2 mitigation in the next two decades. Renewable energy quota system is currently discussed as a potential future policy instrument...... for the power sector, which requires certain fraction of renewable energy in total power generation for each province and grid zone. The quantitative studies on renewable energy quota for China are still very limited. Based on a least-cost and technology-rich power generation and transmission expansion model...... for China, this study examines the impacts of renewable energy quota system and carbon cap policy instruments on the future Chinese power sector. Various scenarios are examined toward 2030 and their future power generation mix, capacity installations and carbon emission are discussed. This study concludes...

  17. Decentral power stores. Key components of future power supply concepts; Dezentrale Energiespeicher. Schluesselkomponenten fuer die Stromversorgung der Zukunft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huschke, Reinhard

    2011-07-01

    The book presents the most relevant power storage technologies, i.e. their advantages, shortcomings and possible applications. The focus is on decentral power stores that can be used wherever electric power must be stored, independent of local conditions. Although this concept does not play much of a role today, it will become more relevant in the context of increasingly decentral power supply. For 2020, a minimum share of 30 percent renewable energy in German power supply is required by law, while other scenarios assume an even bigger share. The present storage reserve capacity will not be sufficient for this. The book also goes into the applications of power storage systems in the fields of electromobility and in future, more decentral power grids. (orig.)

  18. Future trends in power plant process computer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dettloff, K.

    1975-01-01

    The development of new concepts of the process computer technique has advanced in great steps. The steps are in the three sections: hardware, software, application concept. New computers with a new periphery such as, e.g., colour layer equipment, have been developed in hardware. In software, a decisive step in the sector 'automation software' has been made. Through these components, a step forwards has also been made in the question of incorporating the process computer in the structure of the whole power plant control technique. (orig./LH) [de

  19. Modeling future power plant location patterns. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagles, T.W.; Cohon, J.L.; ReVelle, C.

    1979-04-01

    The locations of future energy facilities must be specified to assess the potential environmental impact of those facilities. A computer model was developed to generate probable locations for the energy facilities needed to meet postulated future energy requirements. The model is designed to cover a very large geographical region. The regional demand for baseload electric generating capacity associated with a postulated demand growth rate over any desired time horizon is specified by the user as an input to the model. The model uses linear programming to select the most probable locations within the region, based on physical and political factors. The linear program is multi-objective, with four objective functions based on transmission, coal supply, population proximity, and water supply considerations. Minimizing each objective function leads to a distinct set of locations. The user can select the objective function or weighted combination of objective functions most appropriate to his interest. Users with disparate interests can use the model to see the locational changes which result from varying weighting of the objective functions. The model has been implemented in a six-state mid-Atlantic region. The year 2000 was chosen as the study year, and a test scenario postulating 2.25% growth in baseload generating capacity between 1977 and 2000 was chosen. The scenario stipulatedthat this capacity be 50% nuclear and 50% coal-fired. Initial utility reaction indicates the objective based on transmission costs is most important for such a large-scale analysis

  20. Impact of Three Mile Island on the nuclear community and the future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, S.

    1980-01-01

    The Three Mile Island incident has already impacted on the future of nuclear power specifically and on the energy crisis generally. The resultant NRC's de facto moratorium on the licensing of commercial nuclear power plants will increase the use of oil, raise the cost of electric power, and may create power shortages. On the positive side, TMI may have been beneficial in that it has precipitated a searching reassessment and improvement of nuclear power safety and practices-TMI not withstanding, the rate of nuclear power expansion must increase; otherwise the energy crisis will deepen in the years to come

  1. Towards risk-based management of critical infrastructures : enabling insights and analysis methodologies from a focused study of the bulk power grid.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Bryan T.; LaViolette, Randall A.; Cook, Benjamin Koger

    2008-02-01

    This report summarizes research on a holistic analysis framework to assess and manage risks in complex infrastructures, with a specific focus on the bulk electric power grid (grid). A comprehensive model of the grid is described that can approximate the coupled dynamics of its physical, control, and market components. New realism is achieved in a power simulator extended to include relevant control features such as relays. The simulator was applied to understand failure mechanisms in the grid. Results suggest that the implementation of simple controls might significantly alter the distribution of cascade failures in power systems. The absence of cascade failures in our results raises questions about the underlying failure mechanisms responsible for widespread outages, and specifically whether these outages are due to a system effect or large-scale component degradation. Finally, a new agent-based market model for bilateral trades in the short-term bulk power market is presented and compared against industry observations.

  2. Improving the safety of future nuclear fission power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, W.; Gros, G.

    2001-01-01

    The main objectives and principles in nuclear fission reactor safety are presented, e.g. the defence in depth strategy and technical principles such as redundancy, diversity and physical separation. After a brief historical review of the continuous development of safety improvement, the most recent international discussion is presented. This includes mainly the international activities within IAEA and its International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG). The safety improvement, presented in recommendations of IAEA and INSAG is expressed as an improvement of all elements and all levels of the defence in depth concept. Special emphasis is put on improvement of the highest level, which requires the implementation of means to mitigate consequences of accidents with severe core damage. The different future concepts are briefly characterised. Some examples from the French-German safety approach are taken to demonstrate how requirements for safety improvement by means of an enhancement of the defence in depth principle are developed

  3. The Status and Future of Geothermal Electric Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.

    2000-08-14

    Geothermal electricity production in the US began in 1960. Today there are over 20 plants in the western US providing a total of about 2,200 MW of clean and reliable electricity. Currently identified resources could provide over 20,000 MW of power in the US, and undiscovered resources might provide 5 times that amount. In the 1990s industry growth slowed due to the loss of market incentives and competition from natural gas. However, increased interest in clean energy sources, ongoing technological improvements, and renewed opportunities abroad hold promise for a resurgence in the industry. This review paper covers the status of the technology, the issues faced, and the latest research. While the focus is on geothermal in the US, a brief description of the large international market is included.

  4. Social Media, Power, and the Future of VBAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Amy M; Gerber, Hilary; Andrews, Desirre

    2010-01-01

    The Internet has been called a disruptive technology because it has shifted power and altered the economics of doing business, whether that business is selling books or providing health care. Social media have accelerated the pace of disruption by enabling interactive information sharing and blurring the lines between the "producers" and "consumers" of knowledge, goods, and services. In the wake of the National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Vaginal Birth After Cesarean (VBAC) and major national recommendations for maternity care reform, activated, engaged consumers face an unprecedented opportunity to drive meaningful changes in VBAC access and safety. This article examines the role of social networks in informing women about VBAC, producing low-cost, accessible decision aids, and enabling multi-stakeholder collaborations toward workable solutions that remove barriers women face in accessing VBAC.

  5. Blanket handling concepts for future fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, E.; Gottfried, R.; Maisonnier, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the frame of the power plant conceptual studies (PPCS) launched by the European Commission, two main blanket handling concepts have been investigated with respect to engineering feasibility and the impact on the plant availability and on cost: the large module handling concept (LMHC) and the large sector handling concept (LSHC). The LMHC has been considered as the reference handling concept while the LSHC has been considered as an attractive alternative to the LMHC due to its potential of smaller replacement times and hence increasing the plant availability. Although no principle feasibility issue has been identified, a number of engineering issues have been highlighted for the LSHC that would require considerable efforts for their resolution. Since its availability of about 77% based on a replacement time for all the internals of about 4.2 months is slightly lower than for the LMHC, the LMHC remains the reference blanket replacement concept for a conceptual reactor

  6. Coal, an alternative to nuclear power in Europe's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paillard, Christophe-Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    The impending demise of nuclear power in several European countries and the projected strong increase in world energy requirements are placing coal in the forefront again. From being the primary energy source in the 19. century, coal is making a quite remarkable come-back in the 21. century with the advent of 'clean coal' and with its dominance in the energy mix of rapidly emerging countries such as China. New mines should open in Europe. In France, the last mine closed in 2004, but there is potential for new ones in the centre of France in areas such as Auvergne and Bourgogne, as well as Midi Pyrenees. These could create new jobs and reduce France's energy dependency. Far from the topical scenes of the past described in books such as Germinal, with its tips and misery, coal is again a promising energy source, with potential to satisfy a rising share of Europe's energy demand. (author)

  7. Power from the seas - Wave energy has a big future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenler, W.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how the energy of the oceans' waves can become an important source of energy. The generation of the energy contained in waves as an indirect form of solar energy is described. The energy potential offered is quoted as being high in the Atlantic near England and Scotland. The article goes on the discuss the technical potential of this form of renewable energy and provides a map showing this. Financial aspects and economic potentials are discussed. Effects on the environment are also discussed. The on-shore and off-shore technologies that can be used to capture wave energy are described and discussed, as is the combination of power production from wind and waves

  8. Power from Perspective: Potential future United States energy portfolios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonn, Bruce; Healy, K.C.; Gibson, Amy; Ashish, Ashutosh; Cody, Preston; Beres, Drew; Lulla, Sam; Mazur, Jim; Ritter, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents United States energy portfolios for the year 2030, developed from seven different Perspectives. The Perspectives are characterized by different weights placed on fourteen defining values (e.g., cost, social acceptance). The portfolios were constructed to achieve three primary goals, energy independence, energy security, and greenhouse gas reductions. The portfolios are also evaluated over a comprehensive set of secondary criteria (e.g., economic growth, technical feasibility). It is found that very different portfolios based on very different defining values can achieve the three primary goals. Commonalities among the portfolios include reliance upon cellulosic ethanol, nuclear power, and energy efficiency to meet year 2030 energy demands. It is concluded that the US energy portfolio must be diverse and to achieve national energy goals will require an explicit statement of goals, a strong role for government, and coordinated action across society

  9. Report for the Prime Minister. Making the future French electric power organization a success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report from the French Deputy of the Meuse region aims at taking stock of four main questions raised by the future organization of the French electric power industry in the context of the opening of the European power market: the public utility of electric power, the future missions of Electricite de france (EdF) company, the questions in relation with the personnel status in the electric power industry, and the status of the regulating authority. In order to give some elements of answer to these questions, the report has been divided into 2 parts: part 1 presents the power production, transport and distribution in the future electric power regulation (the renewal of nuclear facilities, the building of non-nuclear units, the exploitation of the power distribution network, the accounting dissociation and the transparency of accountancy, the organization of network access, the eligible clients, the direct power lines, the obligations of purchase, the distribution and the role of local authorities). Part 2 presents the four main stakes of the modernization of the French electric power sector: the electric power public utility (public concern and rights, government policy, sustain of innovation, environment protection and energy mastery, the transportation and distribution networks, the role of operators and the financing), the future evolution of EdF (missions and organization, future of the public company), the social modernization of the electric power sector (present day status, adaptation, evolution, pensions), the organization and role of the future regulation authority. The propositions of the author are reported in the appendix. (J.S.)

  10. Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Discovering Sustainable Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    Sustainability is fundamental to the Department of Energy’s research mission and operations as reflected in the Department’s Strategic Plan. Our overarching mission is to discover the solutions to power and secure America’s future.

  11. Transweb - real time transportation threat assessment analysis tool: look what the future may bring for energy related infrastructure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilger, F.; Ballard, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Transweb is envisioned as a transportation threat assessment program and this real time GIS based web assessment too (a.k.a., GTA for GIS threat assessment) can be used to plan railroad or highway shipments of hazardous waste (e.g., toxic industrial chemicals - TIC's) and high-level nuclear waste materials (e.g., like those destined for Yucca Mountain - HLW) that may be used in energy production facilities. Transweb will become a vulnerability mapping and analysis tool that can be used by transportation planners, emergency response personnel, security/safety managers, and law enforcement to route such shipments, make contingency plans in the event of altered road or rail conditions, and/or to assist in the response to an accident or human initiated event like terrorism. The initial phase of the project will seek to establish the protocol on highway shipments and follow up phases will focus on rail GTA's. This paper will report on the initial development of this analytical technique, define the problems associated with such analysis, and offer examples of its analytical possibilities for threat assessment relative to energy related facilities like nuclear power generation stations. (author)

  12. Building safeguards infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Rebecca S.; McClelland-Kerr, John

    2009-01-01

    Much has been written in recent years about the nuclear renaissance - the rebirth of nuclear power as a clean and safe source of electricity around the world. Those who question the nuclear renaissance often cite the risk of proliferation, accidents or an attack on a facility as concerns, all of which merit serious consideration. The integration of these three areas - sometimes referred to as 3S, for safety, security and safeguards - is essential to supporting the growth of nuclear power, and the infrastructure that supports them should be strengthened. The focus of this paper will be on the role safeguards plays in the 3S concept and how to support the development of the infrastructure necessary to support safeguards. The objective of this paper has been to provide a working definition of safeguards infrastructure, and to discuss xamples of how building safeguards infrastructure is presented in several models. The guidelines outlined in the milestones document provide a clear path for establishing both the safeguards and the related infrastructures needed to support the development of nuclear power. The model employed by the INSEP program of engaging with partner states on safeguards-related topics that are of current interest to the level of nuclear development in that state provides another way of approaching the concept of building safeguards infrastructure. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative is yet another approach that underscored five principal areas for growth, and the United States commitment to working with partners to promote this growth both at home and abroad.

  13. A seasonal copula mixture for hedging the clean spark spread with wind power futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Troels Sønderby; Pircalabu, Anca; Høg, Esben

    2018-01-01

    The recently introduced German wind power futures have brought the opportunity to address the problem of volume risk in wind power generation directly. In this paper we study the hedging benefits of these instruments in the context of gas-fired power plants by employing a strategy that allows...... and the dependence structure, while being straightforward and easy to implement. Based on Monte Carlo simulations from the proposed model, the results indicate that significant benefits can be achieved by using wind power futures to hedge the spot clean spark spread. Moreover, a comparison study shows...... trading in the spot clean spark spread and wind power futures. To facilitate hedging decisions, we propose a time-varying copula mixture for the joint behavior of the spot clean spark spread and the daily wind index. The model describes the data surprisingly well, both in terms of the marginals...

  14. Infrastructure Joint Venture Projects in Malaysia: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeli, Norsyakilah; Muhamad Halil, Faridah; Ismail, Faridah; Sufian Hasim, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    As many developed country practise, the function of the infrastructure is to connect the each region of Malaysia holistically and infrastructure is an investment network projects such as transportation water and sewerage, power, communication and irrigations system. Hence, a billions allocations of government income reserved for the sake of the infrastructure development. Towards a successful infrastructure development, a joint venture approach has been promotes by 2016 in one of the government thrust in Construction Industry Transformation Plan which encourage the internationalisation among contractors. However, there is depletion in information on the actual practise of the infrastructure joint venture projects in Malaysia. Therefore, this study attempt to explore the real application of the joint venture in Malaysian infrastructure projects. Using the questionnaire survey, a set of survey question distributed to the targeted respondents. The survey contained three section which the sections are respondent details, organizations background and project capital in infrastructure joint venture project. The results recorded and analyse using SPSS software. The contractors stated that they have implemented the joint venture practice with mostly the client with the usual construction period of the infrastructure project are more than 5 years. Other than that, the study indicates that there are problems in the joint venture project in the perspective of the project capital and the railway infrastructure should be given a highlights in future study due to its high significant in term of cost and technical issues.

  15. Infrastructure Joint Venture Projects in Malaysia: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeli Norsyakilah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As many developed country practise, the function of the infrastructure is to connect the each region of Malaysia holistically and infrastructure is an investment network projects such as transportation water and sewerage, power, communication and irrigations system. Hence, a billions allocations of government income reserved for the sake of the infrastructure development. Towards a successful infrastructure development, a joint venture approach has been promotes by 2016 in one of the government thrust in Construction Industry Transformation Plan which encourage the internationalisation among contractors. However, there is depletion in information on the actual practise of the infrastructure joint venture projects in Malaysia. Therefore, this study attempt to explore the real application of the joint venture in Malaysian infrastructure projects. Using the questionnaire survey, a set of survey question distributed to the targeted respondents. The survey contained three section which the sections are respondent details, organizations background and project capital in infrastructure joint venture project. The results recorded and analyse using SPSS software. The contractors stated that they have implemented the joint venture practice with mostly the client with the usual construction period of the infrastructure project are more than 5 years. Other than that, the study indicates that there are problems in the joint venture project in the perspective of the project capital and the railway infrastructure should be given a highlights in future study due to its high significant in term of cost and technical issues.

  16. India's nuclear energy programme and future power need

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Critics of the recently negotiated 123 Nuclear Agreement between India and the United States of America often cite its retrograde effects on India's longstanding policy of non-alignment in foreign relations. The major part of this article will, therefore, is devoted to various aspects of DAE's performance, areas and problems that need more attention, their future plan on stepping up the production of nuclear energy by a big factor beyond their indigenous reach, and the consequent imperative and compulsion of opening the doors to the international market for bulk purchases. India's access to the international market for nuclear energy was barred because of our refusal to sign the nuclear non-proliferation treaty (NPT). Hence, when George Bush, ex-President of U.S.A., offered to sign a bilateral treaty with India, opening the door for nuclear and other strategic co-operation, the offer was welcome by the DAE and the Government of India with open arms. However, obligations under the rules of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), of which India is a member, still required applying to the Body for their approval so that India could approach the Consortium of nuclear supplier countries for their agreement to do business with India without raising any hindrance arising from NPT and Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)

  17. The Future Potential of Waver Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirko Previsic; Jeff Epler; Maureen Hand; Donna Heimiller; Walter Short; Kelly Eurek

    2012-09-20

    The theoretical ocean wave energy resource potential exceeds 50% of the annual domestic energy demand of the United States, is located close to coastal population centers, and, although variable in nature, may be more consistent and predictable than some other renewable generation technologies. As a renewable electricity generation technology, ocean wave energy offers a low air pollutant option for diversifying the U.S. electricity generation portfolio. Furthermore, the output characteristics of these technologies may complement other renewable technologies. This study addresses the following: (1) The theoretical, technical and practical potential for electricity generation from wave energy (2) The present lifecycle cost profile (Capex, Opex, and Cost of Electricity) of wave energy conversion technology at a reference site in Northern California at different plant scales (3) Cost of electricity variations as a function of deployment site, considering technical, geo-spatial and and electric grid constraints (4) Technology cost reduction pathways (5) Cost reduction targets at which the technology will see significant deployment within US markets, explored through a series of deployment scenarios RE Vision Consulting, LLC (RE Vision), engaged in various analyses to establish current and future cost profiles for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, quantified the theoretical, technical and practical resource potential, performed electricity market assessments and developed deployment scenarios. RE Vision was supported in this effort by NREL analysts, who compiled resource information, performed analysis using the ReEDSa model to develop deployment scenarios, and developed a simplified assessment of the Alaska and Hawaii electricity markets.

  18. Cyberwarfare on the Electricity Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murarka, N.; Ramesh, V.C.

    2000-03-20

    The report analyzes the possibility of cyberwarfare on the electricity infrastructure. The ongoing deregulation of the electricity industry makes the power grid all the more vulnerable to cyber attacks. The report models the power system information system components, models potential threats and protective measures. It therefore offers a framework for infrastructure protection.

  19. Power Systems of the Future: A 21st Century Power Partnership Thought Leadership Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinaman, Owen; Miller, Mackay; Adil, Ali; Arent, Douglas; Cochran, Jaquelin; Vora, Ravi; Aggarwal, Sonia; Bipath, Minnesh; Linvill, Carl; David, Ari; Kauffman, Richard; Futch, Matt; Arcos, Efrain Villanueva; Valenzuela, Jose Maria; Martinot, Eric; Bazilian, Morgan; Pillai, Reji Kumar

    2015-02-01

    This report summarizes key forces driving transformation in the power sector around the world, presents a framework for evaluating decisions regarding extent and pace of change, and defines pathways for transformation. Powerful trends in technology, policy environments, financing, and business models are driving change in power sectors globally. In light of these trends, the question is no longer whether power systems will be transformed, but rather how these transformations will occur. Three approaches to policy and technology decision-making can guide these transformations: adaptive, reconstructive, and evolutionary. Within these approaches, we explore the five pathways that have emerged as viable models for power system transformation.

  20. Future Power Production by LENR with Thin-Film Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz; Lipson, Andrei; Luo, Nie; Shrestha, P. Joshi

    2007-03-01

    PdD cluster reaction theory was recently proposed to explain a wide range of Low energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR) experiments. If understood and optimized, cluster reactions could lead to a revolutionary new power source of nuclear energy. The route is two-fold. First, the excess heat must be obtained reproducibly and over extended run times. Second, the percentage of excess must be significantly (order of magnitude or more) higher than the 20-50% typically today. The thin film methods described here have proven to be quite reproducible, e.g. providing excess heat of 20-30% in nine consecutive runs of several weeks each. However, mechanical separation of the films occurs over long runs due to the severe mechanical stresses created.. Techniques to overcome these problems are possible using graded bonding techniques similar to that used in high temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Thus the remaining key issue is to increase the excess heat. The cluster model provides import insight into this. G. H. Miley, H. Hora, et al., 233rd Amer Chem Soc Meeting, Chicago, IL, March 25-29, 2007.

  1. Age differences in the understanding of wealth and power: the mediating role of future time perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyuan; Tsang, Vivian Hiu-Ling

    2016-12-01

    Individuals' understanding of wealth and power largely determines their use of resources. Moreover, the age range of wealth and power holders is increasing in modern societies. Thus, the current study examines how people of different ages understand wealth and power. As varying future time perspective is related to changes in prioritised life goals, it was tested as a potential mediator of the age differences. A total of 133 participants aged 18-78 years were asked 8 open-ended questions regarding their understanding of the possible use and desired use of wealth and power, after which they reported their future time perspective. Compared with possible use, the participants mentioned relatively more prosocial elements when they talked about their desired use of the resources, especially power. The older adults expressed more prosocial understanding in regard to the desired use of wealth and the possible use of power compared to their younger counterparts. The age differences were fully mediated by future time perspective. The results suggest that age is a critical factor that influences individuals' conceptualisation of wealth and power. Life-span developmental stage and future time perspective are important factors to consider for explaining individual differences in the exercise of wealth and power and for promoting their prosocial usage.

  2. Voltage and Frequency Control for Future Power Systems: the ELECTRA IRP Proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D’hulst, R.; Merino Fernandez, J.; Rikos, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a high level functional architecture for frequency and voltage control for the future (2030+) power system is presented. The proposal suggests a decomposition of the present organization of power system operation into a ”web of cells”. Each cell in this web is managed by a single...

  3. Future of Nuclear. Sweden's power struggle comes to a head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatermann, R.; Forbes, A.

    2009-03-15

    The section 'Future of nuclear' in this magazine this time only holds one brief article on the position of Sweden with regard to nuclear power and a column ('View from London') on the opportunity for nuclear power in the United Kingdom.

  4. The Future of Electronic Power Processing and Conversion: Highlights from FEPPCON IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enslin, Johan H.; Blaabjerg, Frede; Tan, Don F.D.

    2017-01-01

    Since 1991, every second year the IEEE Power Electronics Society (PELS) has organized the technical long-range planning meeting "Future of Electronic Power Processing and Conversion" (FEPPCON). FEPPCON IX was held 12-16 June 2017 in beautiful Kruger Park in South Africa (Figure 1). The overall go...

  5. The future of nuclear energy. A perspective on nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power has made a huge contribution to the quality of life for millions, providing electrical power without emitting green house gasses to the environment. Its safety record is sterling when compared to any major industrial undertaking by any measure. Yet the much of the public and many policy makers remain skeptical of nuclear power, if not down right frightened of it or opposed to it. 'The Future of Nuclear Power' examines what must be achieved by nuclear power itself to attain public support. Dr. John Sackett, a world leader in nuclear reactor safety, examines the four areas which must be addressed as this technology moves into the future proliferation of weapons material; waste management; safety; and, economics and concludes that the key to success in each of these areas is United States leadership in determining how nuclear power is developed and applied

  6. Present status and future outlook of nuclear power generation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunikazu Aisaka

    1987-01-01

    The structure of energy consumption in Japan is heavily dependent on imported oil, therefore Japan has been making its greatest effort in developing nuclear power among other alternatives of oil. The capacity factor of the nuclear power plants in Japan marked 76% in FY 1986, exceeding 70% level for the past several years. The share of nuclear power is expected to increase steadily in the future. Future scale of the nuclear power generation is projected as 62,000 MW in year 2000 and as 137,000 MW in 2030. Nuclear power is expected to produce 58% of the nation's total power generation in 2030. Under the present circumstances, Janpan is executing a nuclear energy policy based on the following guidelines: 1. Promoting the safety advancement program; 2. Improving LWR technologies; 3. Program on use of plutonium in thermal reactors; 4. Advanced thermal reactors (ATRs); 5. Promotion of FBR development; 6. Nuclear fuel cycle. (Liu)

  7. Italian nuclear power industry after nuclear power moratorium: Current state and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, R.; Previti, G.

    1992-01-01

    Following Italy's nuclear power referendum results and their interpretation, all construction and operation activities in the field of nuclear power were suspended by a political decision with consequent heavy impacts on Italian industry. Nevertheless, a 'nuclear presidium' has been maintained, thanks to the fundamental contribution of activities abroad, succeeding in retaining national know-how and developing the new technologies called for the new generation of nuclear power plants equipped with intrinsic and/or passive reactor safety systems

  8. Impacts of Renewable Energy Quota System on China's Future Power Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Weiming; Zhang, Da; Mischke, Peggy; Zhang, Xiliang

    2014-01-01

    As the biggest carbon emitting sector which produces 44% of current national carbon emission in China, the coal-dominated power sector has a tremendous potential for CO2 mitigation in the next two decades. Renewable energy quota system is currently discussed as a potential future policy instrument for the power sector, which requires certain fraction of renewable energy in total power generation for each province and grid zone. The quantitative studies on renewable energy quota for China are ...

  9. Nuclear power in the Asia-Pacific region. Current status and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Jia; Otsuki, Takashi; Irie, Kazutomo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the current status and future perspective of nuclear power in the APEC region. We design three scenarios, including Low-nuclear Scenario, Business-as-Usual Scenario (BAU) as well as High-nuclear Scenario, in order to quantitatively evaluate contribution of nuclear power to the low-carbon energy system. Preliminary results from the modeling are presented in the paper, and the drivers and challenges for nuclear power development in the APEC region are discussed. (author)

  10. Site development and demands on infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieke, K.F.

    1976-01-01

    All sub-fields are examined which form the infrastructure, the infrastructure being indispensable for the site development of a nuclear power plant. The main emphasis is put on the technical infrastructure, but the social infrastructure is dealt with, too. The most important sub-fields are: traffic connections, energy supply, external communications, foundation, building mearures. (UA) [de

  11. Seasonal optimal mix of wind and solar power in a future, highly renewable Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heide, Dominik [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS) and Frankfurt International Graduate School for Science, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); von Bremen, Lueder [ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, University of Oldenburg, Marie-Curie-Str. 1, D-26129 Oldenburg (Germany); Greiner, Martin [Corporate Research and Technology, Siemens AG, D-81730 Muenchen (Germany); Aarhus School of Engineering and Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 118, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hoffmann, Clemens [Corporate Research and Technology, Siemens AG, D-81730 Muenchen (Germany); Speckmann, Markus; Bofinger, Stefan [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Windenergie und Energiesystemtechnik (IWES), Koenigstor 59, D-34119 Kassel (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    The renewable power generation aggregated across Europe exhibits strong seasonal behaviors. Wind power generation is much stronger in winter than in summer. The opposite is true for solar power generation. In a future Europe with a very high share of renewable power generation those two opposite behaviors are able to counterbalance each other to a certain extent to follow the seasonal load curve. The best point of counterbalancing represents the seasonal optimal mix between wind and solar power generation. It leads to a pronounced minimum in required stored energy. For a 100% renewable Europe the seasonal optimal mix becomes 55% wind and 45% solar power generation. For less than 100% renewable scenarios the fraction of wind power generation increases and that of solar power generation decreases. (author)

  12. Concentrating solar power. Its potential contribution to a sustainable energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    This report summarises the findings and recommendations of a study of concentrating solar power (CSP). The study has examined the potential contribution of CSP in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa (the MENA region) over the period to 2050, and the scientific and technical developments that will be required to realise that potential. This study critically reviews existing work and describes the scientific consensus on the status and prospects of this technology. It also identifies key outstanding issues and where knowledge gaps need to be filled for CSP to fulfil its potential contribution in Europe and the MENA region. Based on these findings, the study makes recommendations on how to improve national and European support programmes for CSP development and deployment. Specific aims of the study have been the following: (1) to review the current status of CSP technologies and identify the technological developments and research and development (R and D) needed to achieve reliable operation and cost competitiveness with fossil fuelled electricity generation; (2) to consider how issues associated with the intermittent nature of CSP for electricity generation due to the daily pattern of insolation and the potential for cloudy days can best be addressed; (3) to identify the environmental impacts and infrastructure requirements of CSP, and comment on the significance of these in relation to other options for electricity supply; and, consequently, (4) to develop a view of the potential contribution that CSP located in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa could make to the energy mix in those regions by 2020 and 2050. This report focuses primarily on the generation of electricity from CSP, but it is recognised that there are other potentially significant 'products' from CSP such as process steam for industry, water desalination, alternative energy carriers such as hydrogen and syngas, and decontamination of water supplies. Although not discussed in

  13. EV Charging Infrastructure Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karner, Donald [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Garetson, Thomas [Electric Transportation Inc., Rogers, AR (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    As highlighted in the U.S. Department of Energy’s EV Everywhere Grand Challenge, vehicle technology is advancing toward an objective to “… produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today’s gasoline-powered vehicles …” [1] by developing more efficient drivetrains, greater battery energy storage per dollar, and lighter-weight vehicle components and construction. With this technology advancement and improved vehicle performance, the objective for charging infrastructure is to promote vehicle adoption and maximize the number of electric miles driven. The EV Everywhere Charging Infrastructure Roadmap (hereafter referred to as Roadmap) looks forward and assumes that the technical challenges and vehicle performance improvements set forth in the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge will be met. The Roadmap identifies and prioritizes deployment of charging infrastructure in support of this charging infrastructure objective for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge

  14. EV Charging Infrastructure Roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karner, Donald; Garetson, Thomas; Francfort, Jim

    2016-01-01

    As highlighted in the U.S. Department of Energy's EV Everywhere Grand Challenge, vehicle technology is advancing toward an objective to ''... produce plug-in electric vehicles that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles ...'' [1] by developing more efficient drivetrains, greater battery energy storage per dollar, and lighter-weight vehicle components and construction. With this technology advancement and improved vehicle performance, the objective for charging infrastructure is to promote vehicle adoption and maximize the number of electric miles driven. The EV Everywhere Charging Infrastructure Roadmap (hereafter referred to as Roadmap) looks forward and assumes that the technical challenges and vehicle performance improvements set forth in the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge will be met. The Roadmap identifies and prioritizes deployment of charging infrastructure in support of this charging infrastructure objective for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge

  15. Future wind power forecast errors, need for regulating power, and costs in the Swedish system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, Fredrik [Vattenfall Research and Development AB, Stockholm (Sweden). Power Technology

    2011-07-01

    Wind power is one of the renewable energy sources in the electricity system that grows most rapid in Sweden. There are however two market challenges that need to be addressed with a higher proportion of wind power - that is variability and predictability. Predictability is important since the spot market Nord Pool Spot requires forecasts of production 12 - 36 hours ahead. The forecast errors must be regulated with regulating power, which is expensive for the actors causing the forecast errors. This paper has investigated a number of scenarios with 10 - 55 TWh of wind power installed in the Swedish system. The focus has been on a base scenario with 10 TWh new wind power consisting of 3,5 GW new wind power and 1,5 GW already installed power, which gives 5 GW. The results show that the costs for the forecast errors will increase as more intermittent production is installed. However, the increase can be limited by for instance trading on intraday market or increase quality of forecasts. (orig.)

  16. Energy consumption in communication infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittmann, L.

    2012-11-15

    Despite communication infrastructures (excluding computer and storage center) are ''only'' consuming 2-4% of the global power usage, the concern arise from the growth rate of around 40%. Unless action is taken the power provided to operate the Internet, the cellular mobile network, the WiFi hotspots will be so significant that usage restrictions might be applied - and economic growth limited. The evolutionary and the disruptive approach is not a choice as the implementation of the disruptive approach has a timeline of at least 10 years and the evolutionary approach is unlikely to cope with demand growth in a longer perspective. A more intensive use of optical technology is currently the best solution for the long term future but requires a complete restructuring of the way networks are researched and implemented as optics are unlikely to provide the same flexibility as the electronic/software solution used in current networks. (Author)

  17. Situation and future developments in the power station engineering of the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effenberger, H.; Weidlich, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    Starting with the present state of power stations in the GDR and their evaluation in respect of energy and ecology, the authors have developed a concept for the future objectives and possibilities of the power stations. With regard to the modification of the power station engineering, considered as urgently required due to reasons of energy and environment, there was suggestions for modern plant conceptions, such as fluidized bed combustors, combined and gas/steam power plants, besides the retrofitting and the new building of proven conventional plants. It includes also the extension of combined heat and power systems, of nuclear energy, and the use of regenerative energy sources as parts of this concept. The power station modifications intended are shown in tables for the various power station locations. (orig.) [de

  18. Empirical evaluation of the efficiency of the Iberian power futures market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Capitán Herráiz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Market efficiency is analysed for the Iberian Power Futures Market and other European Power Markets, as well as other fuel markets through evaluation of ex-post Forward Risk Premium. The equilibrium price from compulsory call auctions for distribution companies within the framework of the Iberian Power Futures Market is not optimal for remuneration purposes as it seems to be slightly upward biased, though such a premium is not significant (only around 2% above the average of Settlement Prices. In the period considered (August 2006 to September 2008, monthly futures contracts behave similarly to quarterly contracts. Average risk premia have been positive in power and natural gas markets but negative in oil and coal markets. Different hypotheses are tested regarding increasing volatility with maturity and regarding Forward Risk Premium correlations (negative with variance of spot prices during delivery period and positive with skewness of spot prices during delivery period. Enlarged data sets are recommended for stronger test results. Energy markets tend to show limited levels of market efficiency. Regarding the emerging Iberian Power Futures Market, price efficiency is improved with market development and with further integration of European Regional Power Markets.

  19. Opening Remarks [Technical Meeting/Workshop on Topical Issues on Infrastructure Development: Managing the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power Plants, Vienna (Austria), 24-27 January 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flory, D.

    2012-01-01

    Good morning ladies and gentlemen, distinguished delegates, my dear colleagues. I would like also to welcome you to the 6th annual workshop on nuclear power infrastructure. My introductory remarks will mainly address the activities of the Agency in response to the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan and the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. In the early 2011, we were looking at the significant improvement in the safety performance of the nuclear industry since the Chernobyl disaster 25 years earlier. The accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was a wakeup call: it reminded all of us that nuclear accidents CAN happen, and indeed WILL happen. It has badly shaken public confidence in the capacity of nuclear industry and of governments to protect people and the environment against ionising radiations and to ensure nuclear safety. Our common goal is to make such accidents a much more remote possibility, and to make sure that all tools to minimize their consequences, to respond effectively and timely, and to inform the global community in the most transparent manner, are available, are ready, are tested. I have been told that in Chinese there are two characters to cover the concept of crisis: one means danger, the other means opportunity. We all know that challenges help in bringing the best in human and organizations. On March 11, less than an hour after the earthquake struck off the east coast of Japan, and following notification from our International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC), the Agency's Incident and Emergency System (IES) was activated. Within the next hour, the Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) had established initial communication with Japan's official contact point and later published its first status summary report on the Emergency Notification and Assistance Convention (ENAC) website. From then on, these status reports on plant and radiological conditions at Fukushima Daiichi site were distributed twice daily to Member

  20. Flood vulnerability of critical infrastructure in Cork, Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bruijn Karin M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent flood events in Ireland and particularly in County Cork have caused significant disruption to health service provisions, interruption of water and power supplies, and damage to roads and other transportation infrastructure, affecting the lives of hundreds of thousands of people over a prolonged period of weeks. These events clearly reveal- the vulnerability of the critical infrastructure to flooding and the dependence of society on critical infrastructure. In order to reduce the flood vulnerability and increase the resilience of the critical infrastructure networks in the future, detailed evidence-based analysis and assessment is essential. To this end a case study has been carried out on Cork City which analyses this vulnerability as it was in 2009, and as it is currently, and identifies adaptation options to reduce the future vulnerability of critical infrastructure to flooding and to build a more resilient society. This paper describes the storyline approach and CIrcle tool and their application to Cork City which focused on the analysis of the flood vulnerability of critical infrastructure and the impacts of failure of the infrastructure for other critical functions and on society.

  1. Power generation from bio methane. Requirements of the EEG 2012 and balancing in gas infrastructure; Verstromung von Biomethan. Anforderungen des EEG 2012 und gaswirtschaftliche Bilanzierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herz, Steffen; Bredow, Hartwig von [von Bredow Valentin Rechtsanwaelte, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Six years ago, the first biogas infeed plant was connected to the natural gas distribution system. The infeed of biogas progressed beyond the nursery stage. The infeed of bio methane significantly is promoted by the renewable energy law. One fundamental requirement for the promotion with respect to the Renewable Energy Law is the generation of the power to be remunerated by means of the exclusive use of biomass. The Renewable Energy Law EEG 2012 contains the new requirement, that furthermore the transport of biogas from its production until removal has to be documented by means of a mass balance. Under this aspect, the authors of the contribution under consideration report on the requirements of the EEG 2012 and the balancing in gas infrastructure with respect to the power generation from biomass.

  2. Reliability of IGBT-based power devices in the viewpoint of applications in future power supply systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, J.

    2011-01-01

    IGBT-based high-voltage power devices will be key components for future renewable energy base of the society. Windmills in the range up to 10 MW use converters with IGBTs. HVDC systems with IGBT-based voltage source converters have the advantage of a lower level of harmonics, less efforts for filters and more possibilities for control. The power devices need a lifetime expectation of several ten years. The lifetime is determined by the reliability of the packaging technology. IGBTs are offered packaged in presspacks and modules. The presentation will have the focus on IGBT high power modules. Accelerated power cycling tests for to determine the end-of-life at given conditions and their results are shown. models to calculate the lifetime, and actual work in research for systems with increased reliability.

  3. Building safeguards infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland-Kerr, J.; Stevens, J.

    2010-01-01

    Much has been written in recent years about the nuclear renaissance - the rebirth of nuclear power as a clean and safe source of electricity around the world. Those who question the nuclear renaissance often cite the risk of proliferation, accidents or an attack on a facility as concerns, all of which merit serious consideration. The integration of three areas - sometimes referred to as 3S, for safety, security and safeguards - is essential to supporting the clean and safe growth of nuclear power, and the infrastructure that supports these three areas should be robust. The focus of this paper will be on the development of the infrastructure necessary to support safeguards, and the integration of safeguards infrastructure with other elements critical to ensuring nuclear energy security

  4. Approaches to the safety of future nuclear power plants. Report of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Approaches to Safety of Future Nuclear Power Plants in Different Countries, held from 29 May to 2 June 1995, contributed to this process. Experts from 14 different countries and two international organizations participated in the meeting, which provided the opportunity to exchange information and to review the answers developed to date to these issues (primarily form the IAEA's technical document ''Development of Safety Principles for the Design of Future Nuclear Power Plants'' IAEA-TECDOC-801) and the report of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group ''Basic Safety Principles for Nuclear Power Plants'' (INSAG-3). These references were then used as a starting point for answering the question ''to what degree does general agreement (or harmonization) exist on these desired safety approaches for future reactors, and what opportunities remain for further harmonization? 11 refs, 1 tab

  5. Nuclear power at present and in the future. Sweden and the rest of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    The report provides by no means a complete picture of nuclear power. There are a number of issues not covered, such as environmental impacts caused by the nuclear plants used (with the exception of the greenhouse gases that highlights some of report), the link with nuclear weapons and waste disposal. The share of nuclear power in Sweden in 2010 is higher than the average for the world The global net installed power of nuclear power in early 2010 was just over 370 GW e distributed over 436 nuclear power plants. In 2007, global electricity generation from nuclear power was about 14 percent of total electricity generation, compared with 44 percent in Sweden. The average availability for nuclear power plants was about 82 percent between 2005 and 2007. During the same period the availability in Swedish plants was lose to 84 percent. The Swedish availability has fallen, in 2004 the availability was comparable to that in Finland, which amounted to just over 94 percent between 2005 and 2007. The expansion of nuclear power may be limited by technical challenges in manufacturing infrastructure and a shortage of skilled labor. There is only a few reactor suppliers in the market and the quality demand of the material is much higher than for other major projects. Whether nuclear power is competitive with alternative investments or not is uncertain. The investment costs for building new reactors is high but the operational and maintenance costs are low compared to many other types of power sources. In an Emission Trading System nuclear power competitivity with fossil options increases. Nuclear power is a power source with low greenhouse gas emissions over its life cycle. Uranium is a limited resource and like other natural resources limited to a number of countries. Most nuclear reactors are also dependent on enrichment of the natural uranium. If an open or closed nuclear fuel cycle is used is crucial for how long the uranium reserves will last and how nuclear energy can grow

  6. Design Criteria for Future Fuels and Related Power Systems Addressing the Impacts of Non-CO2 Pollutants on Human Health and Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, James Jay

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the economics, supply chain, and emissions of greenhouse gases associated with the wide use of fossil fuels have led to increasing interest in developing alternative and renewable fuels for stationary power generation and transportation systems. Although there is considerable uncertainty regarding the economic and environmental impacts of alternative and renewable fuels, there is a great need for assessment of potential and emerging fuels to guide research priorities and infrastructure investment. Likewise, there is a great need to identify potential unintended adverse impacts of new fuels and related power systems before they are widely adopted. Historically, the environmental impacts of emerging fuels and power systems have largely focused on carbon dioxide emissions, often called the carbon footprint, which is used to assess impacts on climate change. Such assessments largely ignore the large impacts of emissions of other air pollutants. Given the potential changes in emissions of air pollutants associated with the large-scale use of new and emerging fuels and power systems, there is a great need to better guide efforts to develop new fuels and power systems that can avoid unexpected adverse impacts on the environment and human health. This review covers the nature of emissions, including the key components and impacts from the use of fuels, and the design criteria for future fuels and associated power systems to assure that the non-CO2 adverse impacts of stationary power generation and transportation are minimized.

  7. Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Haldrup

    2017-01-01

    Currently both design thinking and critical social science experience an increased interest in speculating in alternative future scenarios. This interest is not least related to the challenges issues of global sustainability present for politics, ethics and design. This paper explores the potenti......Currently both design thinking and critical social science experience an increased interest in speculating in alternative future scenarios. This interest is not least related to the challenges issues of global sustainability present for politics, ethics and design. This paper explores...... the potentials of speculative thinking in relation to design and social and cultural studies, arguing that both offer valuable insights for creating a speculative space for new emergent criticalities challenging current assumptions of the relations between power and design. It does so by tracing out discussions...... of ‘futurity’ and ‘futuring’ in design as well as social and cultural studies. Firstly, by discussing futurist and speculative approaches in design thinking; secondly by engaging with ideas of scenario thinking and utopianism in current social and cultural studies; and thirdly by showing how the articulation...

  8. MFC Communications Infrastructure Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Cannon; Terry Barney; Gary Cook; George Danklefsen, Jr.; Paul Fairbourn; Susan Gihring; Lisa Stearns

    2012-01-01

    Unprecedented growth of required telecommunications services and telecommunications applications change the way the INL does business today. High speed connectivity compiled with a high demand for telephony and network services requires a robust communications infrastructure.   The current state of the MFC communication infrastructure limits growth opportunities of current and future communication infrastructure services. This limitation is largely due to equipment capacity issues, aging cabling infrastructure (external/internal fiber and copper cable) and inadequate space for telecommunication equipment. While some communication infrastructure improvements have been implemented over time projects, it has been completed without a clear overall plan and technology standard.   This document identifies critical deficiencies with the current state of the communication infrastructure in operation at the MFC facilities and provides an analysis to identify needs and deficiencies to be addressed in order to achieve target architectural standards as defined in STD-170. The intent of STD-170 is to provide a robust, flexible, long-term solution to make communications capabilities align with the INL mission and fit the various programmatic growth and expansion needs.

  9. Future scenarios for the development of nuclear power. How will nuclear power develop over the next twenty to forty years?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, Susan E.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear power technology has developed significantly over the past 60 years to the point that today it supplies the world with 15% of its electricity; and there are plans for continued development. However, the continued growth of nuclear power is not without challenges. The nuclear industry must remain competitive in the face of challenges ranging from environmental considerations and proliferation concerns to ensuring safe and often transparent operations. Understanding these and other issues, as well as their underlying causes, can help the industry leaders create more robust strategies and effectively implement nuclear fuel cycle decisions. Robust strategies are ones that can be effective even when circumstances change, due to events such as opposition, new scientific information, changes in resource availability, or introduction of competing technologies. Scenario planning is tool which can help planners and decision makers create a strategic conversation about the future and how to manage and plan in a time of accelerated change and complexity. In this paper, scenario planning is introduced and the development of nuclear power is examined against the back drop of four future scenarios, specifically looking at how variations in environmental quality, resource availability, security and proliferation, and safety may affect the development of nuclear power. The scenarios discussed provide a starting point to improve the understanding of issues and opportunities facing the global nuclear power industry and ultimately, to improve strategies for technology development. Such scenarios may be employed as a basis for collaboration and communication amongst the stakeholders involved in the development of nuclear technology. (author)

  10. Enhanced Situational Awareness and Decision Support for Operators of Future Distributed Power Network Architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaher, Ammar S. A. E.; Catterson, V. M.; Syed, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes scenarios proposed for a control room decision support system aimed at future power network operators. The purpose is to consider the requirements of the future control room from the perspective of the operator under the conditions of a significant frequency excursion incident....... The control room visualisation and decision support functionality for aiding the operator in restoring the frequency to its target value will be considered. The analysis takes place within the Web-ofCells framework, adopted to deal with power system control through a web of subsystems, called cells, which...

  11. Electric Vehicles Integration in the Electric Power System with Intermittent Energy Sources - The Charge/Discharge infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marra, Francesco

    The replacement of conventional fuelled vehicles with electric vehicles (EVs) is going to increase in the coming years, following the trend seen for renewable energy sources (RES), as photovoltaic (PV) and wind power. In this scenario, the electric power systems in Europe are going to accommodate...... increased levels of non-dispatchable and fluctuating energy sources, as well as additional power demand due to EV charging. If the charging of EVs can be intelligently managed, several advantages can be offered to the power system. How useful coordinated EV charging can be, in combination with RES...... and the power levels needed. Furthermore, during EV coordination, a number of nonlinearities and battery ageing issues should be taken into account, to ensure a correct EV coordination and to preserve the EV battery lifetime. The third part of this research exploits the use of EV load coordination as an energy...

  12. The importance of fossil-fired power plants for the future energy supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czychon, K.H.

    2013-01-01

    In response to the nuclear disaster in Fukushima and the phasing out of nuclear energy in Germany which is planned up to the year 2022, in addition to the already decommissioned nuclear power plants, a further outage capacity of approximately 13 MW will result. Against the background of the unresolved storage problem, regardless of further expansion of the use of renewable energy sources, the need arises for additional fossil-fueled power plants, i.e. gas and coal power plants. The development of gas prices shows that a further expansion of the gas turbine power plants is limited for economic reasons. This leads to the consequence that the future coal-fired power plants are needed to produce electricity. To meet the requirements for a reduction of CO 2 emissions laws, new power plants must be built with increased efficiency compared to previous systems. In order to meet the challenges of future fossil fuel power plant generations, the Grosskraftwerk Mannheim (Large-scale Power Plant Mannheim) is involved in numerous research projects to increase efficiency, reduce harmful emissions and economic implementation of ambitious technologies.

  13. Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Michael S.; Hix, W. Raphael; Bardayan, Daniel W.; Blackmon, Jeffery C.; Lingerfelt, Eric J.; Scott, Jason P.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Chae, Kyungyuk; Guidry, Michael W.; Koura, Hiroyuki; Meyer, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    A Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics has been developed to streamline the inclusion of the latest nuclear physics data in astrophysics simulations. The infrastructure consists of a platform-independent suite of computer codes that is freely available online at nucastrodata.org. Features of, and future plans for, this software suite are given

  14. Future CO2 emissions and electricity generation from proposed coal-fired power plants in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fofrich, R.; Shearer, C.; Davis, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    India represents a critical unknown in global projections of future CO2 emissions due to its growing population, industrializing economy, and large coal reserves. In this study, we assess existing and proposed construction of coal-fired power plants in India and evaluate their implications for future energy production and emissions in the country. In 2016, India had 369 coal-fired power plants under development totaling 243 gigawatts (GW) of generating capacity. These coal-fired power plants would increase India's coal-fired generating capacity by 123% and would exceed India's projected electricity demand. Therefore, India's current proposals for new coal-fired power plants would be forced to retire early or operate at very low capacity factors and/or would prevent India from meeting its goal of producing at least 40% of its power from renewable sources by 2030. In addition, future emissions from proposed coal-fired power plants would exceed India's climate commitment to reduce its 2005 emissions intensity 33% - 35% by 2030.

  15. Feasibility study on the interconnection of traction and other power line infrastructures; Machbarkeitsstudie zur Verknuepfung von Bahn- und Energieleitungsinfrastrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Lutz [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energieversorgung und Hochspannungstechnik; Stephan, Arnd [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professur Elektrische Bahnen; Weyer, Hartmut [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Deutsches und Internationales Berg- und Energierecht

    2013-06-15

    It was the purpose of the feasibility study to find out if and to what extent the existing transmission route potentials of the 16.7 Hz traction power network (DB Energie GmbH) can be used for the installation of new transmission lines of the standard 50 Hz power supply system. Of importance is here the question if and in which way the integration of new three-phase or DC overhead lines or cable systems in existing traction power routes is technically feasible, and to what extent such interconnection offers a potential for the acceleration of the planning and approval processes. (orig.)

  16. Infrastructure becomes a energy source. Tunnel projects for power generation; Infrastruktur wird zur Energiequelle. Tunnelprojekte zur Energiegewinnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterling, Ralf [Rehau AG + Co, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. Traffic Route Engineering

    2012-07-15

    Tunnel structures offer a great potential for power generation from the surrounding soil as well as from the tunnel itself due to the tunnel operation. Some tunnel projects already are being used for the purpose of power generation for above-ground applications. Therefore, in recent years various technologies have been developed. Firstly, energy can be produced from underground water. On the other hand, primarily absorber systems offer great potential for power generation with tubbing. This is just given to city tunnels where underground water can be utilized restrictedly.

  17. Making Energy Infrastructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schick, Lea; Winthereik, Brit Ross

    2016-01-01

    in a pragmatic present and in an unprecedented future; between being tied to the specific site of the competition and belonging to no place in particular; and not least between being predominantly an art project and primarily an infrastructure project. Remarkable differences between cosmopolitics and smooth...... politics appear here, especially compared to the literature analysing the roles played by art and design when imagining new ways of living with energy. Oscillation between smooth politics and cosmopolitics may provide a generative way forward for actors wishing to engage in the infrastructuring...

  18. Role of hydrogen in future North European power system in 2060

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meibom, Peter; Karlsson, Kenneth Bernard

    2010-01-01

    the heat production in heat pumps and electric heat boilers, and by varying the production of hydrogen in electrolysis plants in combination with hydrogen storage. Investment in hydrogen storage capacity corresponded to 1.2% of annual wind power production in the scenarios without a hydrogen demand from...... the future success of fuel cell technologies have been investigated as well as different electricity and heat demand assumptions. The variability of wind power production was handled by varying the hydropower production and the production on CHP plants using biomass, by power transmission, by varying...

  19. The MIT report 'The future of nuclear power' and its implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tatsujiro; Nagano, Koji

    2004-01-01

    An interdisciplinary MIT study : 'The Future of Nuclear Power' was published on 29 July, 2003. Its important points and meaning of this report are described. The object of the report is to make clear what should be played a part of nuclear power. From the growth scenario of nuclear power in the world, it concluded nuclear power had to generate 100 million kW, 19% total power generation, in 2050. Three choices for future of nuclear power are expected as followings, 1) once-through operation of the existing thermal neutron reactors and direct processing of spent fuel, 2) closed cycle operation of thermal neutron reactors and recycle burnup of MOX fuel of separated Pu (PUREX/MOX) and 3) introduction of fast reactors for closed cycle operation of both fast and thermal neutron reactors in order of material balance of the latter reactors. It is the most important part of the report that these choices were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively on the view points of economical efficiency, waste disposal (short and long term), non-proliferation and safety (reactor and fuel cycle). Some new politics such as support of nuclear power introduction, waste disposal and development of researches are suggested. (S.Y.)

  20. Future of nuclear power in Japan - Development of next Generation LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Eiji; Yamamoto, T.; Kurosaki, K.; Ohga, Y.; Tsuzuki, K.; Kasai, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2010-09-15

    Japan's energy policies have been to decrease the oil portion and dependence on the Middle East for energy security, as well as satisfy environmental requirement. The report of 2008 targeted reducing GHG emission by 60-80% before 2050, and highlighted ''Cool Earth-Innovative Energy Technology Program'' featuring 21 innovative technologies. In this context nuclear power is expected as a core power source. In April 2008, ''Next Generation Light Water Power Reactor Development Program'' was launched with the IAE as the core organization in alliance with Japan's major vendors and in collaboration with METI and power utilities for the future of nuclear power.