WorldWideScience

Sample records for future nobel laureate

  1. Nobelitis: a common disease among Nobel laureates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2013-08-01

    Winning a Nobel Prize is a great personal achievement. Some Nobel laureates may consider that their award is a certificate of competence in any field. This may prompt them to undertake projects or accept positions which are beyond their capabilities. Since Nobels are awarded when the laureates have usually passed their prime, caution should be exercised when these individuals are offered highly influential positions in academia and elsewhere.

  2. Econometric Fellows and Nobel Laureates in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Ho Fai Chan; Benno Torgler

    2012-01-01

    An academic award is method by which peers offer recognition of intellectual efforts. In this paper we take a purely descriptive look at the relationship between becoming a Fellow of the Econometric Society and receiving the Nobel Prize in economics. We discover some interesting aspects: of all 69 Nobel Prize Laureates between 1969 and 2011, only 9 of them were not also Fellows. Moreover, the proportion of future Nobel winners among the Fellows has been quite high throughout time and a large ...

  3. Nobels Nobels laureates photographed by Peter Badge

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    A unique photographic record of all living Nobel laureates. In this handsome coffee-table book, photographer Peter Badge captures the likeness of every living Nobel laureate in a lasting black-and-white image -- more than 300 striking portraits in all. Brief biographical sketches accompanying the large-scale photographs pay homage to each laureate's singular contribution to science, literature or world peace. Bringing readers face-to-face with Nelson Mandela, Jimmy Carter, the Dalai Lama, James Watson, Gabriel García Márquez, Toni Morrison, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Linda Buck, and Paul Samuelson among many others, NOBELS offers an intimate and compelling look at well-known honorees as well as lesser-known recipients. A fascinating word/image tableau.

  4. Explaining High Abilities of Nobel Laureates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavinina, Larisa

    2004-01-01

    Although the Nobel Prize is associated with a rare, superior degree of intellectually creative achievement, high abilities of Nobel laureates are far from well explained. This paper argues that Nobel laureates' high abilities are determined in part by their extracognitive abilities, that is, specific feelings, preferences, beliefs and intuitive…

  5. Scientific Productivity and Idea Acceptance in Nobel Laureates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charyton, Christine; DeDios, Samantha Lynn; Nygren, Thomas Eugene

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how new ideas become accepted for Nobel laureates in science. Archival data were collected for 204 Nobel laureates from 1980 to 2009 in physics, chemistry, and medicine or physiology. Acceptance was evaluated for Nobel laureates by Prize area and three key publications in the Nobel laureates' publishing careers: (a) first…

  6. Gender and Science: Women Nobel Laureates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charyton, Christine; Elliott, John O.; Rahman, Mohammed A.; Woodard, Jeness L.; DeDios, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Women and their creativity are underrepresented in science. To date, few women have been awarded the Nobel Prize in science. Eleven female Nobel laureates in physics, chemistry and physiology/medicine between 1901 and 2006 were compared with 37 males who received the Nobel Prize in the same area one year prior and one year after the women. Data…

  7. Gender and Science: Women Nobel Laureates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charyton, Christine; Elliott, John O.; Rahman, Mohammed A.; Woodard, Jeness L.; DeDios, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Women and their creativity are underrepresented in science. To date, few women have been awarded the Nobel Prize in science. Eleven female Nobel laureates in physics, chemistry and physiology/medicine between 1901 and 2006 were compared with 37 males who received the Nobel Prize in the same area one year prior and one year after the women. Data…

  8. A Nobel laureate's formula for the universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A Nobel laureate and a blackboard at CERN is all you need to explain the fundamental physics of the universe. At least, that's what François Englert convinced us of on his visit to CERN on 21 February 2014. Englert shared the 2013 Nobel prize in Physics with Peter Higgs "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles". In the video below, he explains how he and Higgs manipulated equations containing mathematical constructs called scalar fields to predict the existence of the Brout-Englert-Higgs field.   For more information on this topic, click here.

  9. Celebrating Abdus Salam Nobel Laureate

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    Abdus Salam shared with Sheldon Glashow and Steven Weinberg the 1979 Nobel Prize for Physics. A celebration took place in CERN within few days from his nomination. It was at CERN that the heavy liquid chamber Gargamelle first saw the neutral current interaction predicted by the electroweak theory. The photo shows Abdus Salam with Tom Ball and Paul Musset (right). See CERN Courier 19 (1979) 395.

  10. Towards Producing Black Nobel Laureates Affiliated with ``African Universities''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth, Jude

    While Africa has produced a handful Nobel laureate in literature and peace, it has continued to shy away from producing any in the other categories. The reason is not farfetched; our university system is not up to standard. It is saddening that in this century, African countries place emphasis on certificates and not on knowledge. This has made the continent produce students that lack the intellectual capability, experimental ability, fundamental training, creativity, and motivation to excel except they get a foreign training. It is this backdrop that precipitated the research into the methods of teaching and research in universities across Africa. The study is designed to identify the problems and proffer solution to them. Two important questions immediately come to mind. (1) What factors account for the difficulty in producing Nobel laureates affiliated with African universities? (2) What strategies could be adopted to improve teaching and research in African universities? Several factors were investigated which revolve around funding, the competence of the lecturers, quality of students admitted, attitude of the students, parents and government. Nigerian universities were investigated and important deductions were made. During the study an inquiry was made on the method of instruction at various universities, from result obtained, the study therefore concluded that adequate funding, the presence of erudite scholars and brilliant minds will produce future Nobel laureate affiliated with the continent. The study therefore recommended admission and employment of only students and lecturers who have got a thing for academics into the universities and adequate funding of universities and research centres.

  11. Shirin Ebadi: A Muslim Woman Nobel Peace Laureate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2004-01-01

    The Nobel Peace Prize is recognized as one of the most prestigious global awards. Each year the Norwegian Nobel Committee, which is appointed by Norway's parliament to select the winner, receives many nominations from around the world. Shirin Ebadi, who is from Iran, became the eleventh female Nobel Peace laureate in 2003. Ebadi is the third…

  12. Giuseppe Levi: mentor of three Nobel laureates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentivoglio, Marina; Vercelli, Alessandro; Filogamo, Guido

    2006-12-01

    Giuseppe Levi (1872-1965), Professor of Anatomy at the University of Turin, had broad research interests and was a pioneer of in vitro studies on cultured cells. He provided a number of contributions on the nervous system, especially on the plasticity of sensory ganglion cells. An influential and magnetic teacher and mentor, he gathered around him a large group of brilliant students. He has the peculiar primate to count among his students three Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine: Salvador Luria, Renato Dulbecco, and Rita Levi-Montalcini. For all three of them, the internship in Levi's laboratory provided an exceptional initial stimulus. They remained in close contact with each other and with Levi even after the 1940s when they migrated to the United States for political and racial reasons, engaging in different fields of research. Rita Levi-Montalcini, who was awarded the Nobel Prize (1986) for the discovery of Nerve Growth Factor, was stimulated and assisted in her work by Giuseppe Levi during the difficult years of World War II. With Giuseppe Levi, she pursued early studies on the relationships between neural centers and their peripheral target of innervation, and she has witnessed in her writings the enthusiasm of her mentor.

  13. Nobel laureates in the history of the vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souganidis, Ellie

    2012-01-01

    Research on vitamins has advanced considerably over the past 100 years with numerous advancements in the fields of biochemistry, medicine, and nutrition. The purpose of this article is to present the history of vitamins using Nobel Prizes as a framework for each vitamin-related discovery. The Nobel Prize Presentation Speech and Nobel Lecture were reviewed for each Nobel Laureate who received an award for vitamin-related research. The original scientific work of a number of awardees was also utilized as a primary source of the history. Nobel Prizes were awarded primarily for the identification, isolation, and synthesis of vitamins. Additional awards recognized the role of specific vitamins in disease processes. The awarding of over 10 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine in the last century has recognized the seminal work of numerous scientists and physicians and showcased multiple important advancements in vitamins research.

  14. In conversation with Nobel Laureate Jack Steinberger

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Awarded the 1988 Nobel Prize for Physics for his discovery of the muon neutrino, Jack Steinberger has been part of the CERN establishment for almost 50 years. He recently celebrated his 90th birthday and can still be found in his CERN office on an almost daily basis. If you happened to have a coffee with him… this is what he would tell you: his recollections, and thoughts about the present and future of particle physics.   I’ve been at CERN for 45 years, and I’ve seen this organisation go through a lot. Experiments have grown significantly and so have the aspirations of particle physics. When I did my thesis 64 years ago, I could do it alone in just 6 months and I could get worldwide interesting results. Now, experiments at CERN are made up of hundreds, if not thousands of people, working for 20 years to get a result. My thesis advisor was Enrico Fermi, and in 1953 – unless it was 1952, I’d done my thesis a few years before - he was asked to be t...

  15. Why there should be more science Nobel prizes and laureates - And why proportionate credit should be awarded to institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The four science Nobel prizes (physics, chemistry, medicine/physiology and economics) have performed extremely well as a method of recognizing the highest level of achievement. The prizes exist primarily to honour individuals but also have a very important function in science generally. In particular, the institutions and nations which have educated, nurtured or supported many Nobel laureates can be identified as elite in world science. However, the limited range of subjects and a maximum of 12 laureates per year mean that many major scientific achievements remain un-recognized; and relatively few universities can gather sufficient Nobel-credits to enable a precise estimate of their different levels of quality. I advocate that the Nobel committee should expand the number of Nobel laureates and Prize categories as a service to world science. (1) There is a large surplus of high quality prize candidates deserving of recognition. (2) There has been a vast expansion of research with a proliferation of major sub-disciplines in the existing categories. (3) Especially, the massive growth of the bio-medical sciences has created a shortage of Nobel recognition in this area. (4) Whole new fields of major science have emerged. I therefore suggest that the maximum of three laureates per year should always be awarded in the categories of physics, chemistry and economics, even when these prizes are for diverse and un-related achievements; that the number of laureates in the 'biology' category of physiology or medicine should be increased to six or preferably nine per year; and that two new Prize categories should be introduced to recognize achievements in mathematics and computing science. Together, these measures could increase the science laureates from a maximum of 12 to a minimum of 24, and increase the range of scientific coverage. In future, the Nobel committee should also officially allocate proportionate credit to institutions for each laureate, and a historical task

  16. Do Nobel laureates change their patterns of collaboration following prize reception?

    OpenAIRE

    Ho Fai Chan; Ali Sina Önder; Benno Torgler

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether Nobel laureates’ collaborative activities undergo a negative change following prize reception by using publication records of 198 Nobel laureates and analyzing their coauthorship patterns before and after the Nobel Prize. The results overall indicate less collaboration with new coauthors post award than pre award. Nobel laureates are more loyal to collaborations that started before the Prize: looking at coauthorship drop-out rates, we find that these differ significantl...

  17. Nobel laureate in literature visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    Gao Xingjian, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2000, was invited to visit CERN as part of European Researchers’ Night. During his visit to the Laboratory, he took time out to give us a dose of his optimism.   Gao Xingjian in IdeaSquare's bus during his visit to CERN.   “The idea of bringing scientists and artists together is wonderful!” An enthusiastic first-time visitor to the Laboratory, Gao Xingjian regaled his audience with his thoughts on human reality at the conference 'Made of Shadow and Light', in which he took part on 24 September, alongside Sergio Bertolucci, CERN’s Director for Research and Computing. Interested in science since his childhood (his marks in physics and maths at school were excellent, he explains with a smile), he draws an interesting parallel between human consciousness and dark matter: “The concept of dark matter makes complete sense to me,”&nbs...

  18. Nominee and nominator, but never Nobel Laureate: Vincenz Czerny and the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Tuffs, Annette

    2016-12-01

    The Heidelberg surgeon Vincenz Czerny (1842-1916) is remembered as pioneer of innovative operations as well as entrepreneur of interdisciplinary cancer therapy. The purpose of this paper is to describe his role during the early history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. Based on documents from the Nobel Archive, this paper investigates how Czerny contributed, both as nominee and nominator, in shaping the early years of Nobel Prize history. Vincenz Czerny was nominated at least three times for the Nobel Prize, but he was never selected. Czerny's own nomination letters pinpoint important trends in medicine around the turn of the century. At least seven of the candidates he put forward, became Nobel Laureates. Czerny-like many other internationally renowned surgeons during the first decades of the twentieth century-missed out on the Nobel Prize, partly because it is not a lifetime award and his work would have to have been more recent. However, with his nominations, Czerny helped to shape the Nobel Prize to become the most important scientific award worldwide.

  19. Arthur B. McDonald, Physics Nobel Laureate 2015, at CERN colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    Arthur B. McDonald, Physics Nobel Laureate 2015, photographed at CERN colloquium on the "Science of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) and SNOLAB” given in CERN Main Auditorium on Monday 4 Sep 2017

  20. An Introduction to the Work of Elfriede Jelinek, Nobel Laureate in Literature 2004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bandhauer, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    In her paper, "An Introduction to the Work of Elfriede Jelinek, Nobel Laureate in Literature 2004," Andrea Bandhauer explores reactions of the press to the Austrian writer Elfriede Jelinek after she...

  1. The citation wake of publications detects nobel laureates' papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosik, David F; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    For several decades, a leading paradigm of how to quantitatively assess scientific research has been the analysis of the aggregated citation information in a set of scientific publications. Although the representation of this information as a citation network has already been coined in the 1960s, it needed the systematic indexing of scientific literature to allow for impact metrics that actually made use of this network as a whole, improving on the then prevailing metrics that were almost exclusively based on the number of direct citations. However, besides focusing on the assignment of credit, the paper citation network can also be studied in terms of the proliferation of scientific ideas. Here we introduce a simple measure based on the shortest-paths in the paper's in-component or, simply speaking, on the shape and size of the wake of a paper within the citation network. Applied to a citation network containing Physical Review publications from more than a century, our approach is able to detect seminal articles which have introduced concepts of obvious importance to the further development of physics. We observe a large fraction of papers co-authored by Nobel Prize laureates in physics among the top-ranked publications.

  2. Nobel Peace Laureate Muhammad Yunus: A Banker Who Believes Credit is a Human Right

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpara, Michelle Yvonne; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Pederson, Patricia Velde

    2007-01-01

    The article profiles Nobel Peace Laureate Muhammad Yunus, founder of Grameen Bank (an independent financial institution in Bangladesh), as well as an economics professor at the University of Chittagong. In his birthplace of Bangladesh, 49.8 percent of people exist below the poverty line, and 73.2 percent of the women are categorized as…

  3. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine: e0134164

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caroline S Wagner; Edwin Horlings; Travis A Whetsell; Pauline Mattsson; Katarina Nordqvist

    2015-01-01

      Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international...

  4. Nobel Laureate Mohamed ElBaradei: Preventing Nuclear Proliferation Peacefully

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded 60 years after the first atomic bombs fell on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, killing more than 200,000 people; the peace prize raises the hopes of those working to rejuvenate global efforts to prevent the spread and development of nuclear arms. This article profiles the International Atomic…

  5. On the centenary of the Nobel Prize: Russian laureates in physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhin, Konstantin N; Sustavov, Aleksandr F; Tikhonov, Viktor N [Institute of General and Nuclear Physics, Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-05-31

    The history and development of the branches of physics which profited significantly from the work of Russian Nobel laureates (P A Cherenkov, I E Tamm, I M Frank, L D Landau, N G Basov, A M Prokhorov, P L Kapitza, and Zh I Alferov) are reviewed in popular form to mark the recent Nobel Foundation centenary. Apart from the Russian prize winners' achievements, the major contributions of their colleagues - Russian and foreign, predecessors and successors - are briefly discussed. The current state of the branches of physics advanced with the participation of Russian laureates is reviewed, and the practical implications of their work for science, technology, and everyday life are discussed. (from the history of physics)

  6. Reflections on Medical Science Papers Published by 2004 Nobel Prize Laureates in Physiology and Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Zhiguang

    2005-01-01

    Based on the number of publications and citation, studies the scientific papers published by 2004 Nobel Prize Laureates in Physiology and Medicine.Using International Authoritative Database and Technical Metrology, this paper discusses the quantity and quality of papers published by these top scientists, the regulations for the medical research activities, the progressive processes of the research projects and the cooperation between research scientists on these projects. This study tries to shed a light on facilitating outstanding medical scientists and promoting Nobel Prize-level researchers in China.

  7. The contribution of several Nobel Laureates in the development of the Theory of general economic equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Xhelili Krasniqi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nobel Laureates with their contributions to the development of the theory of general equilibrium have enabled this theory to be one of the most important for theoretical and practical analysis of the overall economy and the efficient use of economic resources. Results of the research showing that contributions of Nobel Laureates in the economy belong to two main frameworks of development of the general equilibrium theory: one was the mathematical model of general equilibrium developed by John R. Hicks (1939, Kenneth J.Arrow (1951 and Gerard Debreu (1954 and second frames of general equilibrium belongs to Paul A. Samuelson (1958. To highlight the contributions of these Nobel laureates in the development of the theory of general equilibrium have been selected and are presented in the paper some views, estimates and assumptions that have contributed not only in solving concrete problems, but also to the development of economic science in general. Their works represent a synthesis of theoretical and practical aspects of treatment of general equilibrium which are the starting point for further research in this field.

  8. Nobel laureate T.D. Lee at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    On 30 August, Professor T.D. Lee, who received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1957, gave a seminar at CERN on symmetry and asymmetry in electroweak interactions, 50 years after the discovery of the non-conservation of parity. In 1956, Tsung-Dao Lee postulated with Chen Ning Yang that parity is not conserved in weak interactions, and suggested several experiments to demonstrate this. The following year, an experiment led by Chien-Shiung Wu proved this prediction and, soon after, T.D. Lee and Chen Ning Yang were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics. Still very active at over 80 years of age, T.D. Lee pursues his theory work to this day.

  9. Superconductivity discoveries and discoverers : ten physics Nobel laureates tell their story

    CERN Document Server

    Fossheim, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    This book is about the work of 10 great scientists; who they were and are, their personal background and how they achieved their outstanding results and took their prominent place in science history. We follow one of physics and science history's most enigmatic phenomena, superconductivity, through 100 years, from its discovery in 1911 to the present, not as a history book in the usual sense, but through close ups of the leading characters and their role in that story, the Nobel laureates, who were still among us in the years 2001-2004 when the main round of interviews was carried out. Since then two of them already passed away. For each one of the 10 laureates, the author tells their story by direct quotation from interviews in their own words. Each chapter treats one laureate. The author first gives a brief account of the laureates' scientific background and main contribution. Then each laureate tells his own story in his own words. This book is unique in its approach to science history.

  10. An interview with Nobel laureate Roy Glauber, Physics 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauber, Roy

    2009-06-26

    The field of quantum optics rests on the work of Roy Glauber, who helped elucidate the nature of light as both particles and waves. According to Glauber, quantum optics allowed "all sorts of experiments...that never could have been done before." He suggests that it was not his "small revelation" that the Nobel Committee awarded, but rather the decades of research that followed his own. Nonetheless, Glauber received one-half of the 2005 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his contribution to the quantum theory of optical coherence" while the other half was shared by John Hall and Theodor Hänsch for their work on laser-based precision spectroscopy. Glauber admits that the behavior of light seems strange and unintuitive--yet the phenomena that Einstein called "spooky action at a distance" may have many practical applications. In this candid interview, Glauber shares his thoughts about working at Los Alamos National Laboratory--his shock to learn that he was helping to build The Bomb, and his dismay about how it was used. At Los Alamos, Glauber met two of his major influences: Julian Schwinger, who was Glauber's thesis advisor at Harvard, and Los Alamos scientific director Robert Oppenheimer, who facilitated his early post-doctoral research. Glauber also tells a poignant account of how his marriage fell victim to the social upheaval of the 1960's, and how he was left to raise two children alone. Despite the difficulties of reconciling academia with family, Glauber is amused to find himself revered by women as "someone who has raised children and nonetheless had a successful academic career."

  11. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline S Wagner

    Full Text Available Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index, and year of first of publication, we compare bibliometric statistics and network measures. We find that the Laureates produce fewer papers but with higher average citations. The Laureates also produce more sole-authored papers both before and after winning the Prize. The Laureates have a lower number of coauthors across their entire careers than the matched group, but are equally collaborative on average. Further, we find no differences in international collaboration patterns. The Laureates coauthor network reveals significant differences from the non-Laureate network. Laureates are more likely to build bridges across a network when measuring by average degree, density, modularity, and communities. Both the Laureate and non-Laureate networks have "small world" properties, but the Laureates appear to exploit "structural holes" by reaching across the network in a brokerage style that may add social capital to the network. The dynamic may be making the network itself highly attractive and selective. These findings suggest new insights into the role "star scientists" in social networks and the production of scientific discoveries.

  12. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Caroline S; Horlings, Edwin; Whetsell, Travis A; Mattsson, Pauline; Nordqvist, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index, and year of first of publication, we compare bibliometric statistics and network measures. We find that the Laureates produce fewer papers but with higher average citations. The Laureates also produce more sole-authored papers both before and after winning the Prize. The Laureates have a lower number of coauthors across their entire careers than the matched group, but are equally collaborative on average. Further, we find no differences in international collaboration patterns. The Laureates coauthor network reveals significant differences from the non-Laureate network. Laureates are more likely to build bridges across a network when measuring by average degree, density, modularity, and communities. Both the Laureate and non-Laureate networks have "small world" properties, but the Laureates appear to exploit "structural holes" by reaching across the network in a brokerage style that may add social capital to the network. The dynamic may be making the network itself highly attractive and selective. These findings suggest new insights into the role "star scientists" in social networks and the production of scientific discoveries.

  13. Memorial Meeting for Nobel Laureate Professor Abdus Salam's 90th Birthday

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Abdus Salam was one of the most prolific and exciting scientists of the second half of the last century. From humble beginnings in a village in Pakistan, he rose to become one of the world's most original and influential particle physicists. He shared the 1979 Nobel Prize with Glashow and Weinberg for contributions to electroweak unification, which forms an integral part of the Standard Model. He was the first Pakistani Nobel Laureate and the second only Muslim after Anwar Sadat. After gaining his doctorate in Cambridge, he moved to Imperial College in 1957 where he founded the very successful Theoretical High Energy Physics Group. He remained there as Professor of Physics until his death in 1996.

  14. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate meeting: Martin Chalfie, Chemistry 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfie, Martin

    2010-02-10

    American Biologist Martin Chalfie shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Roger Tsien and Osamu Shimomura for their discovery and development of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Martin Chalfie was born in Chicago in 1947 and grew up in Skokie Illinois. Although he had an interest in science from a young age--learning the names of the planets and reading books about dinosaurs--his journey to a career in biological science was circuitous. In high school, Chalfie enjoyed his AP Chemistry course, but his other science courses did not make much of an impression on him, and he began his undergraduate studies at Harvard uncertain of what he wanted to study. Eventually he did choose to major in Biochemistry, and during the summer between his sophomore and junior years, he joined Klaus Weber's lab and began his first real research project, studying the active site of the enzyme aspartate transcarbamylase. Unfortunately, none of the experiments he performed in Weber's lab worked, and Chalfie came to the conclusion that research was not for him. Following graduation in 1969, he was hired as a teacher Hamden Hall Country Day School in Connecticut where he taught high school chemistry, algebra, and social sciences for 2 years. After his first year of teaching, he decided to give research another try. He took a summer job in Jose Zadunaisky's lab at Yale, studying chloride transport in the frog retina. Chalfie enjoyed this experience a great deal, and having gained confidence in his own scientific abilities, he applied to graduate school at Harvard, where he joined the Physiology department in 1972 and studied norepinephrine synthesis and secretion under Bob Pearlman. His interest in working on C. elegans led him to post doc with Sydney Brenner, at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England. In 1982 he was offered position at Columbia University. When Chalfie first heard about GFP at a research seminar given by Paul Brehm in 1989

  15. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Caroline S.; Horlings, Edwin; Whetsell, Travis A.; Mattson, Pauline; Nordqvist, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index,

  16. The brain on itself: Nobel laureates and the history of fundamental nervous system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmoen, Iver A; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2007-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been given in recognition of work in the neurosciences a number of times. Laureates have been awarded for work on both fundamental and more complex nervous system functions. This review is restricted to contributions by 20th century laureates to the understanding of fundamental nervous system function on the cellular level. In 1906, Camillo Golgi and Ramón y Cajal were awarded for their work on the microscopic structure of the nervous system. Their achievement and those of others within this field, coupled with technological progress, gradually allowed more complex physiological studies. In 1932, the prize was awarded to Charles Sherrington and Edgar Adrian for their discoveries of how neurons function. They were followed in 1944 by Herbert Gasser and Joseph Erlanger who uncovered the highly differentiated functions of single nerve fibers. Alan Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley were awarded for the detection of the ionic mechanism of the action potential and its mathematical explanation in 1963. In 1991, Erwin Neher and Bernd Sakmann were awarded for their work on single ion channels. Although the scientists who proved the hypothesis (Fridjof Nansen, Wilhelm His, and August Forel) were never awarded by the Nobel Committee, their studies gave rise to one of the most fundamental questions in 20th century neuroscience: How is information carried from one neuron to another or to an effector cell? This was first solved in the vegetative nervous system, and, in 1936, Henry Dale and Otto Loewi received the prize for their discoveries relating to chemical transmission of nerve impulses. In 1963, John Eccles was awarded the prize for his work on the physiology of synapses. In 1970, Bernhard Katz received the Nobel Prize for the discovery of quantal release. Katz shared the prize with Julius Axelrod and Ulf von Euler, who were central in finding that transmitters are stored in presynaptic vesicles and that the effect in many synapses is

  17. Nobel laureates at the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn: phenomenology and paths to discovery in neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeben, Christiane; de Sio, Fabio

    2006-12-01

    The practice of science usually involves more than a solitary genius in a solitary room, coping with the problem of her/his life. From the second half of the 19th century onwards, scientific research, especially in the field of the Natural Sciences, has grown into a more and more complex practice, which often entangles very special needs, in terms of research objects, techniques, sources, and perspectives. A few special places, such as the Stazione Zoologica di Napoli, have represented in this period the focal points of an ever growing international scientific network, promoting independent research, exchange and diffusion of novel practices and techniques and unrestricted confrontation. The so-called "Naples experience" has been cited by a large number of renowned scientists of the last two centuries as a key moment in their scientific life. Here we have tried to test it against the experience of three great scientists par excellence, i.e. three Nobel laureates (T. H. Morgan, Otto Warburg, J. D. Watson). The different experiences they have had at Naples represent, in our view, three different moments of the professional life of almost every scientist. Therefore, we have chosen to present them as a phenomenology. The final section is dedicated to a survey of the Zoological Station's contribution to neurosciences, especially to the Naples experience of the Nobel Prize winner Sir Bernard Katz and his assistant Ricardo Miledi, between 1965 and 1970. Their work on the squid at Naples allowed probing and quantitative refinement of results already obtained on different animals and contributed to reinforce the long lasting neurophysiological tradition of the institute.

  18. Written on the Writer's Face: Facial Width-to-Height Ratio among Nominees and Laureates of the Nobel Prize in Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebuda, Izabela; Karwowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR), an established marker of testosterone level and dominance, and eminent writers' achievement. The fWHR of laureates (N = 39) and nominees (N = 247) of the Nobel Prize in Literature 1901-1950 was measured together with historiometric data. It was demonstrated that…

  19. Noble laureate Burton Richter to speak about future of particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Calder, Neil

    2007-01-01

    "As Dickens wrote, it is the best of times and the worst of times, says Nobel laureat Burton Richter, the Paul Pigott Professor in the Physical Sciences, at the Stanford Linera Accelerator Center and a pioneer of the particle colliders that now dominate high-energy physics."

  20. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Sir Harold Kroto, Chemistry 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroto, Harold

    2010-04-07

    English Chemist Harold Kroto shared the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley for their discovery of Fullerenes (C(60;)), molecules composed completely of carbon (C(60;)) that form hollow spheres (also known as Buckyballs), tubes, or ellipsoids. These structures hold the potential for use in future technologies ranging from drug development and antimicrobial agents, to armor and superconductors. Harold Kroto was born in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire in 1939 and grew up in Bolton. Educated at Bolton School, he entered Sheffield University in 1958 to study Chemistry. During his time there he played tennis for the university team, illustrated the university's magazine covers, and played folk music with other students. Enjoying his time at Sheffield very much, he chose to stay on and complete a Ph.D. in Chemistry under Richard Dixon. Following graduation in 1964, Kroto went on to post doc at the National Research Council (NRC) in Ottowa, Canada where microwave spectroscopy became his specialty. After two years of study at the NRC he spent a year at Bell Laboratories. He then accepted a position as a tutorial fellow at the University of Sussex, where he was soon offered a permanent position. There, he applied his expertise in microwave spectroscopy to the field of astronomy and spent several fruitful years detecting long carbon chains in the interstellar medium. Upon hearing of the work of Richard Smalley at Rice, who developed a laser that could vaporize graphite, Kroto thought they could use Smalley's instrument to see carbon chains similar to those they had observed in interstellar matter. He suggested his idea for an experiment to Bob Curl, also at Rice. In 1985 he traveled to Rice to perform the experiment (and also to visit a half-price bookstore he'd heard about in Houston). Although he felt certain that the apparatus would create the carbon chains, the experiment revealed a totally unexpected result: the spontaneous formation of spherical

  1. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Roger Y. Tsien, Chemistry 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    2010-01-01

    American biochemist Roger Tsien shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Martin Chalfie and Osamu Shimomura for their discovery and development of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Tsien, who was born in New York in 1952 and grew up in Livingston New Jersey, began to experiment in the basement of the family home at a young age. From growing silica gardens of colorful crystallized metal salts to attempting to synthesize aspirin, these early experiments fueled what would become Tsien's ...

  2. The fabulous legacy of a Nobel Prize Laureate: Ralph M. Steinman, 1943-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Merad, Miriam; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medecine 2011 was awarded to Ralph M. Steinman, Jules A. Hoffman and Bruce A. Beutler for the discovery of essential elements of innate immunity, in particular dendritic cells (DCs) and toll-like receptors (TLRs). Antigens become immunogenic and capable of triggering an adaptive immune response involving antigen-specific, MHC- restricted effector T cells, only if they are captured and presented by “accessory” cells. In 1972, Ralph M. Steinman and Zanvil Cohn i...

  3. Professor Bernardo Alberto Houssay, MD (1887-1971): Argentine physiologist and Nobel laureate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawgood, Barbara J

    2004-05-01

    Professor Bernardo A Houssay, Director of the Institute of Physiology at the University of Buenos Aires, was an outstanding physiologist who created the first school of medical research in Argentina and brought it to world attention. His research covered a wide range of physiological fields, but particularly concerned the hormonal control of metabolism and arterial hypertension. Houssay was dismissed from the university during the Perón era but was able to found and direct the Institute of Biology and Experimental Medicine in Buenos Aires. He was joint winner of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1947 for his discovery of the role of the anterior pituitary in carbohydrate metabolism.

  4. The 2009 Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Roger Y. Tsien, Chemistry 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsien, Roger Y

    2010-01-13

    American biochemist Roger Tsien shared the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Martin Chalfie and Osamu Shimomura for their discovery and development of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Tsien, who was born in New York in 1952 and grew up in Livingston New Jersey, began to experiment in the basement of the family home at a young age. From growing silica gardens of colorful crystallized metal salts to attempting to synthesize aspirin, these early experiments fueled what would become Tsien's lifelong interest in chemistry and colors. Tsien's first official laboratory experience was an NSF-supported summer research program in which he used infrared spectroscopy to examine how metals bind to thiocyanate, for which he was awarded a $10,000 scholarship in the Westinghouse Science Talent Search. Following graduation from Harvard in 1972, Tsien attended Cambridge University in England under a Marshall Scholarship. There he learned organic chemistry --a subject he'd hated as an undergraduate-- and looked for a way to synthesize dyes for imaging neuronal activity, generating BAPTA based optical calcium indicator dyes. Following the completion of his postdoctoral training at Cambridge in 1982, Tsien accepted a faculty position at the University of California, Berkeley. There he and colleagues developed and improved numerous small molecule indicators, including indicators fura-2 and indo-1. In 1989, Tsien moved his laboratory to the University of California at San Diego, where he and his colleagues developed the enhanced mutant of GFP as a way to devise a cyclic AMP (cAMP) sensor for use in live cells. They initially engineered molecules to take advantage of the conformational change that occurs when cAMP binds to protein kinase A (PKA). By labeling one part of PKA with fluoroscein and another with a rhodamine, they hoped to detect Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), which would occur when the two molecules were in close proximity. The initial experiments

  5. Coordinating world scientific pulsing, escalating China's innovative waving——Contact: Nobel Prize Laureates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Top-level forum on - "Scientific Frontier and China's Opportunities in the 21st Century" was held by NSFC in Beijing to commemorate the 20th birthday of NSFC. The forum was located on the topics of the scientific frontiers in the 21st century science, science foundation to promote fundamental research, and China's opportunities. Their in-depth discussions will influence future fundamental research in China and strengthen Chinese multi-lateral research ties.

  6. Steve Jobs: Nobel Laureate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Jacobs

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable achievements of one of the world's greatest entrepreneurs offer profound insights into the fundamental nature of economy and essential missing links in prevailing economic theory. The career of Steve Jobs dramatically illustrates the central importance of human capital in modern economy and the almost incalculable contribution that a single individual can make to technological advancement, social innovation and wealth creation, while enhancing the lifestyle of hundreds of millions of people. Jobs demonstrated that the real basis of economic value is providing valuable products and services that fulfill human needs and aspirations, not unregulated markets and financial speculation. His apparent failures point to the dual nature of uncertainty that presides over all human activity - both the ever present threat of error and the untold opportunities hidden behind the veil. Widely regarded as a genius for inventing better products, his greatest commercial achievement has been in recognizing the central importance of services in modern society and fashioning integrated social service systems within which products act as an enabling technology.

  7. Steve Jobs: Nobel Laureate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garry Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    .... The career of Steve Jobs dramatically illustrates the central importance of human capital in modern economy and the almost incalculable contribution that a single individual can make to technological...

  8. CAN WE CONSIDER AS BEING „MIRACULOUS” THE SOLUTIONS SUGGESTED BY THE LAUREATES OF NOBEL PRIZE IN ORDER TO STOP THE WORLD ECONOMICAL CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanţa ENEA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Today we are in a global economic crisis. It is not an economic crisis because of scale, for the worst case there was a recession of a few percent of GDP, but rather because it was consistently induced. The best strategies have been proposed so far are essentially neo-Keynesian, as private demand fell, public expenditure can change aggregate demand to provide a stimulus to the economy. At best, this can provide the necessary infrastructure for positive externalities through network effects, at worst, will only serve as a delay tactic, leading to a greater crisis in the near future. Nobel prizes were created by scientist and businessman Alfred Nobel (1833 - 1896, inventor (1867, which, in his will asked that his immense wealth income are offered each year „awards as the which, in the previous year, brought the greatest service of humanity”. Thus, by the will left by Alfred Nobel, Nobel prizes are awarded to institutions: - Swedish Royal Academy of Science: Nobel Prize in Physics, Chemistry Nobel Prize Nobel Prize in Economics; - Carolina Institute in Stockholm: Nobel Prize for Medicine; - Swedish Academy: Nobel Prize for Literature; - Committee composed of five persons of Parliament of Norway: Nobel Peace Prize Nobel prizes are awarded, so in 1901, except for economics, established in 1968 by the Central Bank of Sweden to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the founding of this institution. More specifically, Nobel Prizes have been awarded since December 10, 1901, after their author's death. They consist of: a medal, a diploma and a sum of money, which at first was worth U.S. $ 40,000, then increased to $ 1,000,000. Nobel Prize in cash value increased slightly since 1950, according to the Foundation website. Should mention that The Nobel Foundation has awarded prizes during World War or during World War II. Given these great discoveries of illustrious researchers could find solutions to global economic crisis. If so intense study should find

  9. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergonul, Onder; Yalcin, Can Ege; Erkent, Mahmut Alp; Demirci, Mert; Uysal, Sanem Pinar; Ay, Nur Zeynep; Omeroglu, Asena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR) field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31%) in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (pNobel prizes (53%); however before 1945, German scientists did so (p=0.005). The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage.

  10. The Nobel Prize laureate - father of anaphylaxis Charles-Robert Richet (1850-1935) and his anticancerous serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androutsos, G; Karamanou, M; Stamboulis, E; Liappas, I; Lykouras, E; Papadimitriou, G N

    2011-01-01

    Professor of physiology Charles-Robert Richet, winner of the Nobel Prize in 1913, is best known for his work on anaphylaxis. However, with his collaborator Jules Héricourt studied the effects of antibody treatment and made the very first attempts to fight cancer with serotherapy. Being versatile, Richet contributed in neurology, psychology and was also a poet, playwrighter, pacifist and pioneer in aviation.

  11. Little known ophthalmic interests of Emil von Behring, the first Nobel Prize Laureate in Medicine or Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Wilhelm, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    Although the work for which Emil von Behring (1854-1917) was awarded the first Nobel Prize Winner for Medicine or Physiology in 1901 was on serum therapy, not only was he trained and worked as an ophthalmologist but he also wrote his doctoral dissertation on a practical ophthalmological topic whilst in Berlin under Carl Schweigger (1830-1905). He later worked for 3 years as an assistant and co-worker with the famous Polish ophthalmologist Boleslaw Wicherkiewicz (1847-1915), in Poznan where he described an interesting ophthalmic case in a scientific journal. His life and work in other fields have been well studied, but his interests and relationship to ophthalmology that played an important role in, at least part of, Behring's life have never previously been analysed thoroughly.

  12. Water, from Gilgamesh Epic to Nobel Laureate Richard Feynman: a look into polywater and the memory of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santo, Luca Salvatore; Bisaccia, Carmela; De Santo, Rosa Maria

    2009-01-01

    Water is a complex source of imagination, dreams and rituals, where cultural differences ebb and flow, where a plethora of meanings and interpretations interlink and wash over one another. Water has an ambivalent character as stated in most of the ancient cosmogonies and in the Epic of Gilgamesh. Water's composition was discovered by the London scientist Henry Cavendish in about 1781. Although it is an apparently simple molecule (H2O), it has a highly complex and anomalous character. The anomalous properties of water are those where the behavior of liquid water is quite different from what is found with other liquids. As often stated, life depends indeed on these anomalous properties of water. Notably there are 12 phase, 22 density, 12 material, 11 thermodynamic and 9 physical anomalies. A powerful look into the water molecule was given by Nobel Prize recipient Richard P. Feynman as published in Six easy pieces. A look into the most recent quest for more knowledge about water leads us to the concept of pathological science. The cases of "polywater" and "the memory of water" are indeed paradigmatic episodes of fraudulent research published in journals with high impact factors. In conclusion, men came out of water engineered to handle water, and water greatly affects mythology and philosophy and is a strong presence in the arts and science.

  13. The Golden Age of Nobel Economists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van Dalen (Hendrik)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractNobel laureates in economics make their most important and creative contributions between the ages of 29 and 38. The average creative age of Nobel economists is slightly below that of laureates in physics, and considerably younger than that of laureates in chemistry and medicine/physiolo

  14. Historical Account And Branching To Rarefied Gas Dynamics Of Atomic and Molecular Beams : A Continuing And Fascinating Odyssey Commemorated By Nobel Prizes Awarded To 23 Laureates In Physics And Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campargue, Roger

    2005-05-01

    This Historical Account derived in part from D. R. Herschbach was presented as an opening lecture of the Molecular Beam Session organized at the 24th International Symposium on Rarefied Gas Dynamics held in Bari, Italy, in July 2004. The emphasis is on the impressive results due to the molecular beam techniques in the last century. The first section summarizes the historical beam experiments performed by 14 Nobel Prize laureates having used the thermally effusive sources to establish the basic principles of Modern Physics. The second section is on the branching of Molecular Beams to Rarefied Gas Dynamics having permitted to investigate the physics of supersonic free jets and transform the molecular beam techniques. Finally, the last section relates the spectacular molecular beam experiments in helium free jet ultracooling, molecular spectroscopy, chemical reaction dynamics, clustering and modification of low density matter, and biomolecule mass spectrometry, rewarded by nine Nobel Prizes in Chemistry from 1986 to 2002.

  15. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Laureates Nobel Prizes and Laureates Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Quick Facts Nomination Nomination Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine ...

  16. Nobel laureate Burton Richter to speak about future of particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Particle physics is about to transform our thinking once again. Experiments of the last 15 years suggest new forms of matter, new forces of nature and perhas even new dimensions of space and time. Pinning down the new ideas will require more data from larger and more expensive machines - at a time when funding is more difficult than ever to secure." (1,5 page)

  17. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 35: NOBEL PRIZE LAUREATES IN PHYSICS FOR 1990-1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the distinguished scientific achievements of the world scientists-physicists, awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for period 1990-1994. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information of world level in area physics of elementary particles, physics of high energies, of astrophysics, of modern theoretical and experimental physics. Results. The brief analytical review of the scientific openings and distinguished achievements of scientists-physicists is resulted in area of modern physical and technical problems which were marked the Nobel Prize in physics for period 1990-1994. Originality. Systematization is executed with exposition in the short concentrated form of the known scientific and technical materials, devoted pioneer researches results on dispersion of relativism electrons on protons (neutrons, to opening of likenesses of physics of hard matter and physics of the condensed state of matter, creation of revolutionary detector of elementary particles, to opening of new pulsars and new possibilities in the study of gravitation, to creation of neutron spectroscopy and method of neutron diffraction. Practical value. Popularization and deepening of scientific and technical knowledges for students, engineer and technical specialists and research workers in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics, extending their scientific range of interests and cooperant further development of scientific and technical progress in human society.

  18. AN ANTHOLOGY OF THE DISTINGUISHED ACHIEVEMENTS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNIQUE. PART 36: NOBEL PRIZE LAUREATES IN PHYSICS FOR 1995-1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Implementation of brief analytical review of the distinguished scientific achievements of the world scientists-physicists, awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for period 1995-1999. Methodology. Scientific methods of collection, analysis and analytical treatment of scientific and technical information of world level in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics. Results. The brief analytical review of the scientific openings and distinguished achievements of scientists-physicists is resulted in area of modern physical and technical problems which were marked the Nobel bonuses on physics for period 1995-1999. Originality. Systematization is executed with exposition in the short concentrated form of the known scientific and technical materials, devoted opening of tau-lepton, experimental discovery of electronic neutrino, opening of superfluidity of liquid helium-3, creation of methods of cooling and «capture» of atoms by a laser ray, opening of new form of quantum liquid with excitations of fractional electric charge and clearing up of quantum structure of electroweak interactions of elementary particles scientists-physicists. Practical value. Popularization and deepening of scientific and technical knowledges for students, engineer and technical specialists and research workers in area of modern theoretical and experimental physics, extending their scientific range of interests and further development of scientific and technical progress in human society.

  19. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 141: Qubits for Future Quantum Information Nobel Symposium 141: Qubits for Future Quantum Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeson, Tord; Delsing, Per; Wendin, Göran

    2009-12-01

    correction, have yet to be solved. It has been predicted that quantum computers will be able to perform certain complicated computations or simulations in minutes or hours instead of years as with present computers. So far there exist very few useful quantum algorithms; however there is hope that the development of these will be stimulated once there is a breakthrough in hardware. Remarkable progress has been made in quantum engineering and quantum measurements, but a large scale quantum computer is still far off. Quantum communication and cryptography are much closer to the market than a quantum computer. The development of quantum information has meant a large push in the field of quantum physics, that previously could only be studied in the microscopic world. Artificial atoms, realized by circuit technology and mimicking the properties of 'natural' atoms, are one example of the new possibilities opened up by quantum engineering. Several different types of qubits have been suggested. Some are based upon microscopic entities, like atoms and ions in traps, or nuclear spins in molecules. They can have long coherence times (i.e. a long period allowing many operations, of the order of 10 000, to be performed before the state needs to be refreshed) but they are difficult to integrate into large systems. Other qubits are based upon solid state components that facilitate integration and coupling between qubits, but they suffer from interactions with the environment and their coherent states have a limited lifetime. Advanced experiments have been performed with superconducting Josephson junctions and many breakthroughs have been reported in the last few years. They have an advantage in the inherent coherence of superconducting Cooper pairs over macroscopic distances. We chose to focus the Nobel Symposium on Qubits for Future Quantum Information on superconducting qubits to allow for depth in discussions, but at the same time to allow comparison with other types of qubits that may

  20. Georg von Békésy, Nobel Laureate in Physiology, Experimental Physicist and Art Collector was Born 100 Years Ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, László

    Georg von Békésy was born one hundred years ago, on July 3, 1899 in Budapest, Hungary. He graduated from the University of Bern as a chemist in 1921. He received a Ph.D. in physics in Budapest under the supervision of Charles Tangl in 1923. From 1926 to 1947 he worked in Hungary's best-equipped research laboratory, in the Postal Experimental Institution as a postal engineer. Here he lead basic physical research on ear preparations and on realistic models of the ear, made by himself, to investigate the structure and the working of the ear and, first of all, the inner ear (cochlea). For the results of his research in Hungary, Békésy received the Nobel Prize in Physiology in 1961. The paper also introduces Georg von Békésy as a passionate art collector and expert.

  1. Thomas Huckle Weller MD: Nobel Laureate and research pioneer in poliomyelitis, varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, rubella, and other infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligon, B Lee

    2002-01-01

    In 1954, the Nobel Prize for Medicine was awarded to Drs John Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins for their watershed discovery that growth of poliomyelitis virus occurred in cultures of cells of extraneural origin, first reported in 1949. Their demonstration in 1949 that the Lansing type II strain of poliomyelitis could be grown in cultures of human embryonic tissue set into motion a race to develop a vaccine for the disease that had crippled countless thousands of individuals. The discovery and subsequent recognition were only the beginning of a prolific career for Thomas Huckle Weller, who made numerous contributions to the field of virology, including isolating the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) from cases of chickenpox and zoster, providing suggestive evidence that the same virus is responsible for both diseases; isolating the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) for the first time in tissue culture and suggesting the descriptive name now used for it; establishing Coxsackie viruses as the cause of epidemic pleurodynia: and first isolating rubella virus, the cause of German measles. This article presents a brief biography of Dr Thomas Huckle Weller, one of the field's most important figures, with primary focuses on his work on poliomyelitis, varicella-zoster virus, rubella virus, and cytomegalovirus.

  2. The Nobel Prize Award Ceremony 1984 at the Stockholm Concert Hall, Sweden, 10 December

    CERN Multimedia

    TV1 Fakta, Stockholm

    1984-01-01

    The Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine and Literature as well as the Economics Prize are awarded on 10 December at the Stockholm Concert Hall in Sweden. Organized by the Nobel Foundation, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony is the highlight of the Nobel Week celebrating the Nobel Laureates and their work.

  3. The Nobel Prize Award Ceremony 1992 at the Stockholm Concert Hall, Sweden, 10 December

    CERN Multimedia

    Eurovision / TF1

    1992-01-01

    The Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine and Literature as well as the Economics Prize are awarded on 10 December at the Stockholm Concert Hall in Sweden. Organized by the Nobel Foundation, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony is the highlight of the Nobel Week – celebrating the Nobel Laureates and their work.

  4. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  5. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  6. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  7. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  8. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  9. Nicolae Milescu Spătarul - ancestor of a Nobel Laureate - Ilia I. Mecinikov. Part II. Ilia I. Mecinikov’s life and scientific work; 16th of May 2011 - 166 years since the birth of the European scholar; 15th of July 2011 - 95 years since death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan RIGA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The work showcases the promotion of Romanian lineage - Nicolae Milescu Spătarul (1636-1708 as ancestor of scientist Ilia Ilici Mecinikov (1845-1916, Nobel Laureate (1908.A great figure in world science and bio-medicine, the scientist - creator of two new modernsciences (immunology and gerontology – is claimed and honoured by four nations: Israeli, French,Russian and Ukrainian. Despite his known Romanian descent on his paternal side – biographicallyconsecrated by his wife Olga Mecinikov – Romania has pushed him into oblivion, by not promotingthis historical truth and reality to all.In our country, Prof. Dr. doc. Ilie Th. Riga (1908-1977 publishes in 1930, in the Romanianmagazine, Natura (Nature, Originea românească a lui Metchnikoff (Metchnikoff’s Romanianorigins. In the 2007-2011 period, two of the authors of the work continuously publish, in thecountry and abroad, thus creating Dosarul ascendenţei româneşti al lui Mecinikov (Mecinikov’sfile on his Romanian lineage, for the global informational civilization. They published their worksin printed version: in scientific magazines (2007, 2011, in their own monograph Medicina antiîmbătrânireşi ştiinţele longevităţii (Anti-aging Medicine and Longevity Sciences, (2007, innewspapers Ziua USA (The Day - USA, (2008 and Clipa. Magazinul Actualităţii CulturaleRomâneşti (The Moment. The Romanian Cultural Current Affairs Magazine, (2011, inEnciclopedia medicală Românească (Encyclopaedia of Romanian Medicine, (2009 and also onSorin Riga, Dan Riga, Vasile Man - Nicolae Milescu Spătarul - ancestor of a Nobel Laureate - Ilia I. Mecinikov...250webpages (the online era: www.DacoRomanica.ro (2010, www.revista-studii-uvvg.ro (2011,www.ziuausa.com (2008, www.revistaclipa.com (2011, taken over by other internet websites.

  10. The discovery, development and future of GMR: The Nobel Prize 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Sarah M [Department of Physics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-07

    One hundred and one years after J J Thomson was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the electron, the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to Professors Peter Gruenberg and Albert Fert for the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in which the spin as well as the charge of the electron is manipulated and exploited in nanoscale magnetic materials. The journey to GMR started with Lord Kelvin who 150 years ago in 1857 made the first observations of anisotropic magnetoresistance and includes Sir Neville Mott who in 1936 realized that electric current in metals could be considered as two independent spin channels. Modern technology also has a significant role to play in the award of this Nobel Prize: GMR is only manifest in nanoscale materials, and the development of nanotechnology growth techniques was a necessary pre-requisite; further, the considerable demands of the magnetic data storage industry to drive up the data density stored on a hard disk fuelled an enormous international research effort following the initial discovery with the result that more than 5 billion GMR read heads have been manufactured since 1997, ubiquitous in hard disks today. This technology drive continues to inspire exploration of the spin current in the field now known as spintronics, generating new ideas and applications. This review explores the science underpinning GMR and spintronics, the different routes to its discovery taken by Professors Gruenberg and Fert, the new science, materials and applications that the discovery has triggered and the considerable potential for the future. (topical review)

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: The discovery, development and future of GMR: The Nobel Prize 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sarah M.

    2008-05-01

    One hundred and one years after J J Thomson was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the electron, the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to Professors Peter Grünberg and Albert Fert for the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in which the spin as well as the charge of the electron is manipulated and exploited in nanoscale magnetic materials. The journey to GMR started with Lord Kelvin who 150 years ago in 1857 made the first observations of anisotropic magnetoresistance and includes Sir Neville Mott who in 1936 realized that electric current in metals could be considered as two independent spin channels. Modern technology also has a significant role to play in the award of this Nobel Prize: GMR is only manifest in nanoscale materials, and the development of nanotechnology growth techniques was a necessary pre-requisite; further, the considerable demands of the magnetic data storage industry to drive up the data density stored on a hard disk fuelled an enormous international research effort following the initial discovery with the result that more than 5 billion GMR read heads have been manufactured since 1997, ubiquitous in hard disks today. This technology drive continues to inspire exploration of the spin current in the field now known as spintronics, generating new ideas and applications. This review explores the science underpinning GMR and spintronics, the different routes to its discovery taken by Professors Grünberg and Fert, the new science, materials and applications that the discovery has triggered and the considerable potential for the future.

  12. CERN celebrates discoveries and looks to the future

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Nobel laureates will be among the distinguished guests at a symposium at CERN on 16 September. The symposium will celebrate the double anniversary of major discoveries at CERN that underlie the modern theory of particles and forces. It will also look forward to future challenges and opportunities ... with the construction of the Large Hadron Collider.

  13. Two Nobel Prize winners in two days

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Living legend of physics, Professor Chen Ning Yang, delivered his CERN Colloquium in the Main Auditorium on 12th October (see photo). His numerous contributions to physics include the famous Yang-Mills theory, which underlies the Standard Model of particle physics, and the prediction of parity violation in weak interactions, for which he shared the Nobel prize with T. D. Lee in 1957. The day before, another Nobel laureate, Norman Ramsey, gave a TH Exceptional Seminar in the same auditorium. Ramsey shared the Nobel Prize with Hans G. Dehmelt and Wolfgang Paul in 1989 for developments in atomic precision spectroscopy.

  14. Nobel prizes that changed medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together in one volume fifteen Nobel Prize-winning discoveries that have had the greatest impact upon medical science and the practice of medicine during the 20th century and up to the present time. Its overall aim is to enlighten, entertain and stimulate. This is especially so for those who are involved in or contemplating a career in medical research. Anyone interested in the particulars of a specific award or Laureate can obtain detailed information on the topic by accessing the Nobel Foundation's website. In contrast, this book aims to provide a less formal and more personal view of the science and scientists involved, by having prominent academics write a chapter each about a Nobel Prize-winning discovery in their own areas of interest and expertise.

  15. Powering the future. How we will (eventually) solve the energy crisis and fuel the civilization of tomorrow; Der Letzte macht das Licht aus. Die Zukunft der Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughlin, Robert B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    When it gets dark, we turn on the light. When it gets cold, we heat. When we need energy for the global industry and technology, we make use of the energy. Every time. But soon the earth fuels such as coal, gas, oil and uranium are irrevocably depleted. And then? The Nobel laureate Robert B. Laughlin reports on the future of our energy supply.

  16. 中国诺贝尔奖获得者心理资本与创新绩效关系--屠呦呦个案剖析%Relationship between Psychological Capital and Innovation Performance of Chinese Nobel Laureate---Based on the study of Tu Youyou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐礼平; 李林英

    2016-01-01

    以中国诺贝尔获得者屠呦呦为研究对象,运用扎根理论对官方新闻和专访资料进行深入分析。研究发现,屠呦呦的心理资本包括6个维度:专注、韧性、希望、智慧、责任感、幸福感,这6个维度均与创新绩效呈正相关关系,且其对创新绩效具有积极意义。同时,社会支持系统变量在心理资本与创新绩效的关系中起中介作用。因此应重视个体专注、责任感等积极特征的培养。%Taking Tu Youyou of Nobel Laureate as a case and using the grounded theory to analyze in official news and in‐terview data deeply .We found her psychological capital contains the following six dimensions :concentration ,resilience , hope ,wisdom ,sense of responsibility ,well‐being and six dimensions of psychological capital reflect positive effects on the innovation performance .Besides ,the variables of Social support system had mediating effect on relationship betw een Psy‐chological Capital and Innovation Performance .We suggest that our government should pay more attention to cultivate the positive trait of concentration and sense of responsibility on adolescent students and researchers should combine quantita‐tive with qualitative in the further research .

  17. 诺贝尔奖得主寄语中国未来的科学发展%Nobel Prize laureates suggest on future scientific development in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sidney Altman; 丁肇中; 野依良治; Heinrich Rohrer; Michael Spence; Alan G.Mac Diarmid

    2006-01-01

    5月25-26日,在纪念国家自然科学基金委员会成立20周年的“21世纪科学前沿与中国的机遇”高层论坛上,6位诺贝尔奖得主做了精彩报告.在对中国科学的未来发展寄予殷切期望的同时,他们也对中国的科技政策提出了具有启发性的建议.现摘编如下:

  18. Dylan and the Nobel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Ball

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This article argues for Bob Dylan’s nomination for the Nobel Prize in Literature. Traditional criteria for the award include outstanding idealism and work that benefits mankind, criteria that are easily met in Dylan’s case, given his activism in early 1960s civil rights, antiwar compositions, and beyond. Yet questions have been raised concerning Dylan’s eligibility for such an award. Can a literary prize go to a writer of song? Past Nobels in Literature display a breadth that admits such a lineage, however, and the connections between music and poetry have been noted by Laureates Rabindranath Tagore and W. B. Yeats. The Literature Prize has gone to historians and philosophers as well. Moreover, a close examination of selections from Dylan’s lyrics shows that as texts on the page, they compare favorably with literary masters such as Chekhov, Faulkner, and Rimbaud; that they resist many scholarly attempts at schematization testifies to their power as poetry. In terms of global appreciation, Dylan’s work has not merely survived but triumphed. From whatever standpoint Dylan’s work is viewed, this article argues that it deserves consideration for literature’s highest prize.

  19. NOBEL LAUREATES IN ECONOMICS: STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Нобелевские лауреаты по экономике: статистический анализ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barannikov A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we present the procedure for nomination and approval of the award winners from the Swedish state-owned bank in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (Nobel Prize in economics. As well as the analysis of works by winners of subjects, the patterns for the Nobel Prize, and its components are shown

  20. NOBEL LAUREATES IN ECONOMICS: STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Нобелевские лауреаты по экономике: статистический анализ

    OpenAIRE

    Barannikov A. A.; Sigidov Y. I.

    2012-01-01

    In the article, we present the procedure for nomination and approval of the award winners from the Swedish state-owned bank in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (Nobel Prize in economics). As well as the analysis of works by winners of subjects, the patterns for the Nobel Prize, and its components are shown

  1. Does chocolate consumption really boost Nobel Award chances? The peril of over-interpreting correlations in health studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurage, Pierre; Heeren, Alexandre; Pesenti, Mauro

    2013-06-01

    A correlation observed between chocolate consumption and the number of Nobel laureates has recently led to the suggestion that consuming more chocolate would increase the number of laureates due to the beneficial effects of cocoa-flavanols on cognitive functioning. We demonstrate that this interpretation is disproved when other flavanol-rich nutriment consumption is considered. We also show the peril of over-interpreting correlations in nutrition and health research by reporting high correlations between the number of Nobel laureates and various other measures, whether cogently related or not. We end by discussing statistical alternatives that may overcome correlation shortcomings.

  2. The citation wake of publications detects Nobel laureates' papers

    CERN Document Server

    Klosik, David F

    2013-01-01

    For several decades, a leading paradigm of how to quantitatively assess scientific research has been the analysis of the aggregated citation information in a set of scientific publications. Although the representation of this information as a citation network has already been coined in the 1960s, it needed the systematic indexing of scientific literature to allow for impact metrics that actually made use of this network as a whole improving on the then prevailing metrics that were almost exclusively based on the number of direct citations. However, besides focusing on the assignment of credit, the paper citation network can also be studied in terms of the proliferation of scientific ideas. Here we introduce a simple measure based on the shortest-paths in the paper's in-component or, simply speaking, on the shape and size of the wake of a paper within the citation network. Applied to a citation network containing Physical Review publications from more than a century, our approach is able to detect seminal arti...

  3. The State of Economic Science: Views of Six Nobel Laureates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichel, Werner, Ed.

    In this collection of essays six noted economists question the state of economic science today. Kenneth J. Arrow focuses on the theories of individual and social choice and general economic equilibrium. Arguing that macroeconomics is the key to understanding the modern economic system, Robert M. Solow provides an historical review of the ideas of…

  4. Nobel lectures in physics 2006-2010

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of the Nobel lectures delivered by the prizewinners, together with their biographies and the presentation speeches by Nobel Committee members for the period 2006-2010. The criterion for the Physics award is to the discoverer of a physical phenomenon that changed our views, or to the inventor of a new physical process that gave enormous benefits to either science at large or to the public. The biographies are remarkably interesting to read and the Nobel lectures provide detailed explanations of the phenomena for which the Laureates were awarded the Nobel Prize. Aspiring young scientists as well as more experienced ones, but also the interested public will learn a lot from and appreciate the geniuses of these narrations. List of prizewinners and their discoveries: (2006) to John C Mather and George F Smoot "for their discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation" The very detailed observations that the Laureates have carried out from the ...

  5. Nobel prize in Physics 1988 "for the neutrino beam method and the demonstration of the doublet structure of the leptons through the discovery of the muon neutrino" : Leon M. Lederman, Melwin Schwartz and Jack Steinberger

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    Prof. J. Steinberger, laureate of the Nobel Prize 88, deals with his experiments on neutrino beams as he was in the United States that valueted him the Nobel Prize. Prof. L. M. Lederman presents his next talk in Stockolm on the occasion of the ceremony of the Nobel Prizes. The title is "Two neutrinos to the Standard Model".

  6. Premios Nobel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández Santarén, Juan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Not available

    Todos los años alrededor del 10 de diciembre, aniversario de la muerte de Alfred Nobel, Estocolmo y Oslo se convierten en centro del mayor evento científico y literario: los Premios Nobel, el galardón que recompensa los logros de excelenecia en los campos de la Física, la Química, la Medicina y la Literatura, así como el Premio de la Paz. Se han cumplido ya cien años de su primera concesión y es momento de retrotraernos en el tiempo para recordar algunos rasgos biográficos y personales de Alfred Nobel, su fundador. Y es momento igualmente de evocar la compleja y difícil andadura que hubo que recorrer para dar forma legal a las ideas que Nobel había expresado en su testamento, organizar la Fundación Nobel y a partir de ahí, iniciar la concesión de los premios.

  7. [Commentary on the Nobel Prize that has been granted in Medicine-Physiology, Chemistry and Physics to noteable investigators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo; Apolinar, Leticia Manuel; Saucedo, Renata; Basurto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was established by Alfred Nobel in 1901 to award people who have made outstanding achievements in physics, chemistry and medicine. So far, from 852 laureates, 45 have been female. Marie Curie was the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in 1903 for physics and eight years later also for chemistry It is remarkable that her daughter Irene and her husband also received the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935. Other two married couples, Cori and Moser, have also been awarded the Nobel Prize. The present commentary attempts to show the female participation in the progress of scientific activities.

  8. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-01-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  9. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-01-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  10. The eclipse and rehabilitation of JJR Macleod, Scotland's insulin laureate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, M

    2013-01-01

    John JR Macleod (1876-1935,) an Aberdonian Scot who had emigrated to North America, shared the 1923 Nobel Prize with Frederick Banting for their discovery of insulin at the University of Toronto in 1921-22. Macleod finished his career as Regius Professor of Physiology at the University of Aberdeen from 1928 to 1935. Macleod's posthumous reputation was deeply tarnished by the campaigns against him carried out by his fellow laureate, Banting, and by Banting's student assistant during the insulin research, Charles Best. Banting's denigration of Macleod was based on their almost total personality conflict; Best's was based on a hunger for personal recognition. New research indicates how scarred both men were in their obsessions. The rehabilitation of Macleod's reputation, begun in 1982 with my book, The Discovery of Insulin, has continued in both scholarly and popular circles. By 2012, the ninetieth anniversary of the discovery of insulin, it had become complete both at the University of Toronto and in Canada.

  11. Prêmio Nobel de Química em 1998: Walter Kohn e John A. Pople 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Walter Kohn and John A. Pople

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Gomide Freitas

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A résumé of the evolution of quantum chemistry methodologies is presented. The pioneering contributions of John A. Pople and Water Kohn, the 1998 Nobel Prize Laureates in Chemistry, to the development of quantum chemistry computational methods for studying the properties of molecules and their interaction is discussed.

  12. 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded "for the development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other…

  13. Nobel expectations for new physics at the LHC? : George F. Smoot: "the nature of dark matter"

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Communication Unit

    2008-01-01

    What do leading figures in particle physics expect from the LHC, a few weeks before the machine’s start-up? There couldn’t be a better opportunity to ask them than at the 2008 Lindau meeting of Nobel laureates.

  14. 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded "for the development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other…

  15. Nobel Prize nominees hundred years ago: Abraham Jacobi (1830-1919) and Otto Heubner (1843-1926).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Oommen-Halbach, Anne; Borkhardt, Arndt; Fangerau, Heiner

    2017-08-13

    Pediatrics directly and indirectly played an important role in the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. However, the history of the Nobel Prize and pediatrics goes beyond the actual laureates. Based on original files in the archive of the Nobel committee of physiology or medicine at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden, this overview aims to shed new light on why the international pioneers of pediatrics Abraham Jacobi (1830-1919) and Otto Heubner (1843-1926) were nominated but never received the prize in 1918. Moreover, Clemens von Pirquet (1874-1929), one of the founders of this journal in 1910 (previously known as Zeitschrift für Kinderheilkunde), also appears in the Nobel records during the first decades of the twentieth century, nominated by Heubner and others. We argue that studies of Nobel nominations give new opportunities to study not only the selection process for Nobel laureates, but also to explore which pioneers were seen as the most outstanding at a particular point in time and why. What is known? • Recent historical research suggests that Nobel Prize nominations can help to reconstruct trends in medicine over time. What is new? • This paper takes a new approach on the history of pediatrics and shows why the internationally famous pediatricians Abraham Jacobi, New York, and Otto Heubner, Berlin, were runners-up for the Nobel Prize hundred years ago.

  16. From the PS to the LHC. 50 years of Nobel memories in high-energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Gaume, Luis [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Unit, Physics Dept.; Mangano, Michelangelo; Tsesmelis, Emmanuel (eds.) [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Collects lectures and essays from leading players in the field, among them thirteen Nobel Laureates. Provides unique insights into the history of the field for active researchers. Constitutes a primary source of information for historians of science. This collection of lectures and essays by eminent researchers in the field, many of them nobel laureates, is an outgrow of a special event held at CERN in late 2009, coinciding with the start of LHC operations. Careful transcriptions of the lectures have been worked out, subsequently validated and edited by the lecturers themselves. This unique insight into the history of the field includes also some perspectives on modern developments and will benefit everyone working in the field, as well as historians of science.

  17. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and Nobel Prizes

    CERN Document Server

    Mazloumian, Amin; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo; 10.1371/journal.pone.0018975

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their...

  18. Nobel Prize in 2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐佳梅

    2004-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ The Founder-Alfred Nobel The ManBehind the Prize Alfred Nobel was born in 1833 in Stockholm, Sweden. His family was descended from Olof Rudbeck, the best-known technical genius of Sweden's 17th century era as a great power in northern Europe.

  19. Nobel Prize ceremony 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On 10 December 2013 particle physics took central stage at the Nobel ceremony in Stockholm. Among the invitees were Fabiola Gianotti, former ATLAS spokesperson, Joseph Incandela, CMS Spokesperson, and CERN theorist Luis Alvarez-Gaume. They share their feelings of the memorable day with us.   Overview of the 2013 Nobel Prize Award Ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall. © Nobel Media AB 2013. Photo: Alex Ljungdahl. Fabiola Gianotti and Joe Incandela, at the Nobel Banquet in the Stockholm City Hall.   "It was an honour and a thrill for us to attend such a memorable Nobel prize ceremony and we are very grateful to Peter Higgs for having included us among his invited guests. The ceremony held some special moments for the LHC. In his speech prior to the award of the Nobel prize to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs by King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, Lars Brink (Chair of the Physics Nobel Prize Committee) stressed the importance of the results from the LHC exper...

  20. Words for Nobel prizes

    CERN Document Server

    Moran-Mirabal, J M

    2003-01-01

    We present the statistics of the significant nouns and adjectives of social impact figuring in the nominations of the Nobel prizes in Physics and Chemistry over the period of the awards from 1901 to 2001

  1. Premio Nobel al microcredito

    OpenAIRE

    Reggiani, Tommaso

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes to analyze Grameen Bank operational system and its own evolution, illustrating the reasons for which to Professor Yunus's mission has been conferred an important award as Nobel Peace Prize 2006, evidencing the values that support this economics theory and the innovations that microcredit brings to the understanding of the economics phenomena. [For their efforts to create economic and social development from below, M. Yunus and Grameen Bank - Nobel Peace Prize 2006

  2. ROMANIAN SCIENTISTS IN THE NOMINATION DATABASE FOR THE NOBEL PRIZE IN PHYSIOLOGY OR MEDICINE, 1901-1951.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernescu, Costin

    2014-01-01

    Nobelprize.org site is the most reliable and complete resource of information on the Nobel Prize and the Nobel Laureates. The nomination database for Physiology or Medicine, 1901-1951, offers exciting facts about the Romanian Schools of Medicine from Bucharest, Iaşi and Cluj. Between 1920-1950, four Romanian scientists were nominated for the Nobel Prize: Victor Babeş (1854-1926), Ion Cantacuzino (1863-1934), Thoma Ionescu (1860-1926) and Constantin Levaditi (1874-1953). This paper discusses these nominees, the nominators and the motivations, as well as the specific publications that endorse the candidates' scientific activity. Recommendations made by Romanian professors for foreign researchers to receive the Nobel Prize are also included.

  3. Nobel Prize nominees and the rise of urology in Europe around 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Krischel, Matthis; Halling, Thorsten; Moll, Friedrich; Fangerau, Heiner

    2017-08-01

    Recent historical research has reconstructed the roads leading to the Nobel Prize for the trained urologists Werner Forssmann (1904-1979) in 1956 and Charles Huggins (1901-1997) in 1966. However, the story of urology and the Nobel Prize does not start and end with the laureates. Taking James Israel (1848-1926), Félix Guyon (1831-1920), and Peter J Freyer (1852-1921) as examples, this paper shows that pioneers in urology were in fact runners-up for the award much earlier. The study is based on an analysis of original files in the Nobel Prize archive in Stockholm, scientific publications of the early twentieth century, and secondary literature. We argue that Israel's, Guyon's, and Freyer's candidacies reflect not only scientific trends and controversies in urology at the turn of twentieth century, but that the development of the specialty itself was reflected in nominations of physicians working on problems of the genito-urinary system.

  4. The Nobel Prize Highlights in Immunologic History for a Century%诺贝尔奖与免疫学的百年渊源

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伯宁

    2012-01-01

    2011 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine was shared a-mong Ralph Steinman, Jules Hoffman and Bruce beutler, who dis covered biological function of Dendritic Cells and Toll like receptor respectively. Since 1901 the first-ever Nobel Prize was award to Emil von Behring for the funding of antitoxin, overall 17 Nobel pri zes in physiology and medicine were given for achievements in im munologic fields. In a historical perspective, the Nobel laureates have witnessed the whole development course of immunology as a discipline. After originated from bacteriology, immunology has un dergone major shift from immunochemistry to immunobiology, and become an important frontier discipline of the life sciences eventu ally. The review summarizes all immunologic funding awarded to Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine retrospective, and discusses the contribution of those achievements to immunologic theory de velopment and clinic medicine.

  5. Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes. Fact Sheets on Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedish Inst., Stockholm.

    The life and personality of Alfred Nobel and the Nobel Prizes established by his will are discussed. Nobel was a 19th century Swedish industrialist who was fluent in six languages. He invented dynamite. At his death in 1896, his estate amounted to $9,200,000. His will stipulated that the income from his estate should be divided annually into five…

  6. Maria Goeppert Mayer and the Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen E.

    2013-04-01

    When Maria Goeppert Mayer was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963, she was only the second woman to receive that award and there have been no additional female physics laureates since. Mayer was uniquely prepared to carry out her prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. Furthermore, she worked with some of the most well-known figures in mid-twentieth century physics, and her award came at a time when American science was in ascendance. Why, then, is her name so little known beyond the physics community? There are several possible answers to this question, ranging from the personal (her modest reaction to public acclaim) and the scientific (the mathematically abstract nature of her prize-winning work), to the national (the nature of the issues commanding public attention in the 1960s). In this talk I will present an overview of the circumstances that enabled Mayer to make exceptional contributions to nuclear physics, and then examine some of the possible reasons why her exceptional status is not more widely known.

  7. Wolfgang Pauli at the 6th meeting of the Nobel Prize laureates

    CERN Multimedia

    Franz Thorbecke, Lindau

    1956-01-01

    From left to right : ?, Max Born, Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, Adolf Friedrich Johann Butenandt, ?, Otto Hahn, Wolfgang Pauli, Franca Pauli, Sir Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman, Isidor Isaac Rabi, and Leopold Ruzicka

  8. Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy has awarded the 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Ahmed H. Zewail (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA) "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy". Zewail's work has taken the study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions to the ultimate degree of detail - the time scale of bond making and bond breaking.

  9. Nobel Prize winners for literature as palliative for scientific English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri Kantha, Sachi

    2003-02-01

    Plagiarism causes a serious concern in scientific literature. I distinguish two types of plagiarism. What is routinely highlighted and discussed is the reprehensible type of stealing another author's ideas and words. This type I categorize as "heterotrophic" plagiarism. A more prevalent and less-discussed type of plagiarism is the verbatim use of same sentences repetitively by authors in their publications. This I categorize as "autotrophic" plagiarism. Though harmless per se, autotrophic plagiarism is equally taxing on the readers. The occurrence of autotrophic plagiarism is mainly caused by the lack of proficiency in the current lingua franca of science, ie, English. The writings of 22 Nobel literature laureates who wrote in English, especially their travelogues, essays, and letters to the press can be used for benefit of improving one's own vocabulary and writing skills and style. I suggest the writings of three literati--Bernard Shaw, Bertrand Russell, and Ernest Hemingway--as palliatives for autotrophic plagiarism in scientific publishing.

  10. Pavlov and Cajal: Two different pathways to a Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Jairo A; Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936) and Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) were two contemporary scientists who not only had a great impact on Russian and Spanish science but also on the international stage. Both shared several common features in their life and work, yet they followed fundamentally different paths during their training as scientists. While Pavlov received his laboratory training under the guidance of Ilya Tsion (1843-1912), Cajal did not receive any formal training within a particular laboratory nor did he have a mentor in the traditional sense, rather he was mainly self-taught, although he was supported by key figures like Maestre de San Juan (1828-1890) and Luis Simarro (1851-1921). In this article, we compare the scientific training of these two Nobel Prize laureates and the influences they received during their scientific lives.

  11. Chemistry in the News: 1997 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Chemistry The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the 1997 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with one half to Paul D. Boyer (University of California, Los Angeles, USA) and John E. Walker (Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK) for elucidation of the mechanism of action of ATP synthase, which catalyzes the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); and one half to Jens C. Skou (Aarhus University, Denmark) for the first discovery of an ion-transporting enzyme, Na+,K+-ATPase. The three laureates have performed pioneering work on enzymes that catalyze reactions of the "high-energy" compound adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

  12. Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Development of the Olefin Metathesis Method in Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Charles P.

    2006-02-01

    The 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Yves Chauvin of the Institut Français du Pétrole, Robert H. Grubbs of CalTech, and Richard R. Schrock of MIT "for development of the metathesis method in organic synthesis". The discoveries of the laureates provided a chemical reaction now used daily in the chemical industry for the efficient and more environmentally friendly production of important pharmaceuticals, fuels, synthetic fibers, and many other products. This article tells the story of how olefin metathesis became a truly useful synthetic transformation and a triumph for mechanistic chemistry, and illustrates the importance of fundamental research. See JCE Featured Molecules .

  13. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  14. A lecture by Saul Perlmutter, winner of the 2011 Nobel prize in physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CNRS National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics (IN2P3), Pierre et Marie Curie University and the Laboratory of Nuclear and High-energy Physics (LPNHE) are happy to invite you to a talk by Nobel laureate Saul Perlmutter.   Perlmutter shared the 2011 Nobel prize in physics "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae." He will give a public talk in Paris on 17 December at 5pm: "Supernovae, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Universe" Amphithéâtre Farabeuf des Cordeliers 21, rue de l’école de Médecine 75006 Paris Free entrance (places are limited) and live translation available.

  15. #FakeNobelDelayReasons

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Tuesday’s hour-long delay of the Nobel Prize in Physics announcement was (and still is) quite the cause for speculation. But on the Twittersphere, it was simply the catalyst for some fantastic puns, so-bad-they're-good physics jokes and other shenanigans. Here are some of our favourite #FakeNobelDelayReasons.    

  16. Hubble's Nobel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, D S L

    2001-01-01

    Astronomy is not in the list of natural sciences aimed at by the Nobel awards. In spite of that, there were, throughout the 1930s until the early 1950s, effective moves by important scientists to distinguish Hubble with the Prize. A short report on these attempts is made as well as speculation on what would be the citation for the prize in view of the broad range of Hubble's scientific achievements. Within this context, the opportunity is also taken for publicizing the Crafoord Prize which does consider astronomy.

  17. Polio and Nobel prizes: looking back 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Erling; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2007-05-01

    In 1954, John Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue."5370 This discovery provided for the first time opportunities to produce both inactivated and live polio vaccines. By searching previously sealed Nobel Committee archives, we were able to review the deliberations that led to the award. It appears that Sven Gard, who was Professor of Virus Research at the Karolinska Institute and an adjunct member of the Nobel Committee at the time, played a major role in the events leading to the awarding of the Prize. It appears that Gard persuaded the College of Teachers at the Institute to decide not to follow the recommendation by their Nobel Committee to give the Prize to Vincent du Vigneaud. Another peculiar feature of the 1954 Prize is that Weller and Robbins were included based on only two nominations submitted for the first time that year. In his speech at the Nobel Prize ceremony, Gard mentioned the importance of the discovery for the future production of vaccines, but emphasized the implications of this work for growing many different, medically important viruses. We can only speculate on why later nominations highlighting the contributions of scientists such as Jonas Salk, Hilary Koprowski, and Albert Sabin in the development of poliovirus vaccines have not been recognized by a Nobel Prize.

  18. The Economic Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Gertchev

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper raises the question whether the Economic Nobel Prize is ideologically biased. Based on a review of a significant number of the Prize Committee’s award justifications, the article concludes at a persistent bias against private property and the free market and in favour of collectivism and state interventionism. From a methodological point of view, the Prize has contributed to the widespread use by professional economists of formal mathematics within the positivistic approach. With respect to research findings, the Prize has favoured the doctrine that market processes are faulty, while government policies are an appropriate fix. Additionally, the paper casts doubts on the scientific integrity of the Prize, given the Committee’s acknowledged lack of concern for fundamental revisionism and outright dismissal of possible criticisms.

  19. The inner representation of the external world - from conditioned reflexes to high level mental functions in the light of Nobel Prizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szilágyi T.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the seminal results of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine Laureates are presented. First, a historical review of the development of our knowledge is provided along with the major paradigm shifts, by looking at the Nobel prizes awarded in the field of neuroscience in the last 110 years. We outline the major discoveries that were necessary for humankind to pass through the road leading to the remarkable understanding of high level mental functions, which led to this year’s Nobel Prize award. Next, the ground breaking discoveries of this year Nobel laureates are presented, which provide insights how neural representations of the environment are formed in the association cortices. These cortical areas are many synapses away from sensory receptors and motor outputs, and their activity do not reflect directly the activation patterns of the receptor population, but depends more strongly on intrinsic cortical computations. We also present how ensembles of specialized cells work together to compute complex cognitive functions and behaviour.

  20. Nobel Prize 2012: Haroche & Wineland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Iulia

    2012-11-01

    The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems".

  1. Landau's Nobel Prize in Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Work of Lev Landau had a profound impact on the physics in 20th century. Landau had created the paradigms that had framed the conversations on the outstanding problems in physics for decades. He has laid the foundations for our understanding of quantum matter such as superfluidity, superconductivity and the theory of Fermi Liquid. Here we present sampled Nobel Archive data on the winning nomination that led to the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1962.

  2. Landau's Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, M.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Work of Lev Landau had a profound impact on the physics in 20th century. Landau had created the paradigms that had framed the conversations on the outstanding problems in physics for decades. He had laid foundations for our understanding of quantum matter like superfluidity, superconductivity and the theory of Fermi liquid. Here we present some Nobel Archive data on the winning nomination that led to the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1962.

  3. The Discovery of Anti-Matter The Autobiography of Carl David Anderson, the Youngest Man to Win the Nobel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    In 1936, at age 31, Carl David Anderson became the second youngest Nobel laureate for his discovery of antimatter when he observed positrons in a cloud chamber.He is responsible for developing rocket power weapons that were used in World War II.He was born in New York City in 1905 and was educated in Los Angeles. He served for many years as a physics professor at California Institute of Technology. Prior to Oppenheimer, Anderson was offered the job of heading the Los Alamos atomic bomb program but could not assume the role because of family obligations.He was a pioneer in studying cosmic rays

  4. From the PS to the LHC - Symposium on 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, Michelangelo; Tsesmelis, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    This collection of lectures and essays by eminent researchers in the field, many of them nobel laureates, is an outgrow of a special event held at CERN in late 2009, coinciding with the start of LHC operations. Careful transcriptions of the lectures have been worked out, subsequently validated and edited by the lecturers themselves. This unique insight into the history of the field includes also some perspectives on modern developments and will benefit everyone working in the field, as well as historians of science.

  5. [The 69th Congress-urologists nominated for the Nobel Prize : Not everyone got a prize: four biographical sketches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, F H; Halling, T; Krischel, M; Hansson, N; Fangerau, H

    2017-07-24

    Our research group has reconstructed why the board certified urologists Werner Forssmann (1904-1979) and Charles Huggins (1901-1997) received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine (1956, and 1966, respectively). But the history of "Urology and the Nobel Prize" is in fact more multifaceted than the success stories of these two laureates suggest. James Israel (1848-1926), Berlin, Félix Guyon (1831-1920), Paris, Peter J. Freyer (1852-1921), London and Edwin Beer (1876-1938), New York were nominated for the award during the first three decades of the 20th century. Their candidacies mirror trends among leading urologists during the time when urology became a specialty in its own right.

  6. Learning by Viewing - Nobel Labs 360

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    First of all, my thanks to the Nobel Lindau Foundation for their inspiration and leadership in sharing the excitement of scientific discovery with the public and with future scientists! I have had the pleasure of participating twice in the Lindau meetings, and recently worked with the Nobel Labs 360 project to show how we are building the world's greatest telescope yet, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For the future, I see the greatest challenges for all the sciences in continued public outreach and inspiration. Outreach, so the public knows why we are doing what we are doing, and what difference it makes for them today and in the long-term future. Who knows what our destiny may be? It could be glorious, or not, depending on how we all behave. Inspiration, so that the most creative and inquisitive minds can pursue the scientific and engineering discoveries that are at the heart of so much of human prosperity, health, and progress. And, of course, national and local security depend on those discoveries too; scientists have been working with "the government" throughout recorded history. For the Lindau Nobel experiment, we have a truly abundant supply of knowledge and excitement, through the interactions of young scientists with the Nobelists, and through the lectures and the video recordings we can now share with the whole world across the Internet. But the challenge is always to draw attention! With 7 billion inhabitants on Earth, trying to earn a living and have some fun, there are plenty of competing opportunities and demands on us all. So what will draw attention to our efforts at Lindau? These days, word of mouth has become word of (computer) mouse, and ideas propagate as viruses ( or memes) across the Internet according to the interests of the participants. So our challenge is to find and match those interests, so that the efforts of our scientists, photographers, moviemakers, and writers are rewarded by our public. The world changes every day, so there

  7. Special Issue on "Neutrino Oscillations: Celebrating the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015" in Nuclear Physics B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Tommy

    2016-07-01

    In 2015, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded jointly to Takaaki Kajita from the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration and Arthur B. McDonald from the SNO Collaboration "for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass". Furthermore, the Daya Bay, K2K and T2K, KamLAND, SNO, and Super-Kamiokande Collaborations shared the Fundamental Physics Breakthrough Prize the same year. In order to celebrate this successful and fruitful year for neutrino oscillations, the editors and the publisher of Nuclear Physics B decided to publish a Special Issue on neutrino oscillations. We invited prominent scientists in the area of neutrino physics that relates to neutrino oscillations to write contributions for this Special Issue, which was open to both original research articles as well as review articles. The authors of this Special Issue consist of e.g. the two Nobel Laureates, International Participants of the Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden (August 19-24, 2004), selected active researchers, and members from large experimental collaborations with major results in the last ten years. In total, this Special Issue consists of 28 contributions. Please note that the cover of this Special Issue contains a figure from each of the 26 contributions that have figures included.

  8. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-05-04

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract.

  9. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Mazloumian

    Full Text Available Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract.

  10. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the “boosting effect” of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying “boost factor” is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  11. The end of a noble narrative? European integration narratives after the Nobel Peace Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James; Murray, Philomena

    The award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU) came as a shock and surprise. Not only was the Eurozone economic crisis undermining public support for the EU, but the crisis was also seriously challenging the EU’s image in global politics. Although the Nobel Committee acknowled......The award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU) came as a shock and surprise. Not only was the Eurozone economic crisis undermining public support for the EU, but the crisis was also seriously challenging the EU’s image in global politics. Although the Nobel Committee...... integration both in the past and in the future. We differentiate between scholarly and policy-oriented narratives in the development of our argument. The critical question is whether these narratives have and should – or could - provide legitimation for the EU after the award of the Nobel Peace Prize....

  12. The end of a noble narrative? European integration narratives after the Nobel Peace Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James; Murray, Philomena

    The award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU) came as a shock and surprise. Not only was the Eurozone economic crisis undermining public support for the EU, but the crisis was also seriously challenging the EU’s image in global politics. Although the Nobel Committee acknowled......The award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU) came as a shock and surprise. Not only was the Eurozone economic crisis undermining public support for the EU, but the crisis was also seriously challenging the EU’s image in global politics. Although the Nobel Committee...... integration both in the past and in the future. We differentiate between scholarly and policy-oriented narratives in the development of our argument. The critical question is whether these narratives have and should – or could - provide legitimation for the EU after the award of the Nobel Peace Prize....

  13. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, J.P. [Strasbourg Univ. (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50{sup th} anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  14. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-09-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards.

  15. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards. PMID:25055817

  16. Word from the DG: A Nobel Prize for particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    I don't know about you, but for me that hour between 11:45 and 12:45 on Tuesday seemed to take a very long time to pass. What was going on in that room in Stockholm we'll never know, but whatever it was, it produced a fantastic result for particle physics. There could be no more deserving laureates than François Englert and Peter Higgs, embodying as they do all the hallmarks of great scientists: brilliance, of course, but also humility and a sense of teamwork.   Nobel Prize celebrations in Building 40.   I remember when they met each other at CERN for the first time on 4 July last year: the pleasure in that meeting was evident, and when Peter Higgs was asked for comment by the dozens of journalists who came to CERN that day, he politely declined, saying that this was a day for the experiments. Well, Peter, Tuesday was your day, and everyone at CERN shares the pride and joy that you and François must have felt, wherever you were! And like I&rs...

  17. Physics 1942 - 1962 including presentation speeches and laureates' biographies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Yong

    1964-01-01

    Physics 1942 - 1962 presents Nobel Lectures on physics from 1942 to 1962. This book is 20 chapters that cover various Nobel physics subjects. The opening chapters deal with the topics of molecular ray methods, exclusion principle, quantum mechanics, the ionosphere, development of the Meson theory, interaction between high-speed nucleons and atomic nuclei, and the artificial production of fast particles. Other chapters discuss the principle of nuclear induction, research in nuclear magnetism, the discovery of phase contrast, statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics, the hydrogen atom

  18. Physics 1922 - 1941 including presentation speeches and laureates' biographies

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Yong

    1965-01-01

    Physics presents Nobel Lectures on physics from the period of 1922 to 1941. This book is organized into 18 parts encompassing 36 chapters that cover various Nobel physics subjects. The first parts explore the advances in understanding the atom structure, experimental studies of electrons, X-ray spectra of the atomic structure, kinetic energy of free electrons, and discontinuous structure of matter. These topics are followed by discussions on the laws governing the thermionic phenomena, wave nature of electron, light molecular scattering, the development of quantum mechanics, properties of neut

  19. Nobel Prize Honors Autophagy Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Japanese cell biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi, PhD, was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of autophagy. His groundbreaking studies in yeast cells illuminated how cells break down and recycle damaged material, a process that is critical to the survival of both normal cells and some cancer cells. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Koshiba, Tanaka give Nobel lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Masatoshi Kosiba and Koichi Tanaka presented lectures in English on Sunday, touching on topics ranging from particle physics, to teamwork to commemorate their reception of this year's Nobel Prize for Physics and Chemistry. The two will receive their respective prizes in an awards ceremony scheduled for Tuesday (1 page).

  1. Director of IMCS - National Prize Laureate of Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial board of the "Computer Science Journal of Moldova"

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Director of the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science, Vice Editor-in-Chief of CSJM, and our colleague, D.Hab. Svetlana Cojocaru, in 2011 became the National Prize Laureate of Moldova. In accordance with Government decision, this distinction is given for ``outstanding achievements whose results have substantially enriched science, culture and art, had a considerable contribution to promoting a positive image of the country in the international arena, a significant impact on the development of socio-economic, scientific and technical progress, national and world culture.''

  2. Interview with one of the 2004 Nobel Laureates in Physics, Dr. David J. Gross, January 26, 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2005-01-01

    Dr. David Gross, (Professor of Theoretical Physics, Director of the Kavli Institute For Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara), at CERN for a talk, answered the questions of Paola Catapano

  3. Georg von Bekesy, Nobel Laureate in Physiology, Experimental Physicist and Art Collector Was Born 100 Years Ago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Laszlo

    2001-01-01

    Describes the life and accomplishments of Georg von Bekesy. Discusses his educational background and research career, and describes his extensive work on the ear, particularly the inner ear or cochlea. (SAH)

  4. Autophagy Captures the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooze, Sharon A; Dikic, Ivan

    2016-12-01

    This year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for the discovery of the molecular principles governing autophagy, an intracellular degradation pathway routed via lysosomes or vacuoles. It is a story of a simple yet insightful yeast genetic screen that revealed the inner circuitry of one of the most powerful quality-control pathways in cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fun, Games and a Nobel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成林

    1995-01-01

    Civilization has often been transformed by idle amusements, pastimes and toys. A classic example is gunpowder,the stuff of fireworks displays in ancient China until Europeans brought it home and found a way to kill with it. Another is the airplane, cobbled together from spare parts by a pair of bicycle-mechanic brothers with too much time on their hands.Last week the Nobel Prize in

  6. 百年诺贝尔物理学奖与现代物理学的发展%Nobel prize of physics in the 20th century and the development of modern physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李画眉

    2001-01-01

    According to the prize awarded to Nobel Laureates, modern physics is divided into eight subfields. Molecular and Atomic Physies, Theoretical Physics, Nuclear Physics, Elementary Partical Physics.Condensed Matter Physics, Optics, As trophysics, Radio Physics. According to the time order of the awarded tems and the internal relationship between the achievements awarded, the author introduced the greatest achievements and advances of subfields of Physics in the 20th Century and proposed the trend of physics in 21st century, especially, in the future 20 to 30 years.%根据诺贝尔物理学奖颁奖项目的成就,把现代物理学划分为原子分子物理学、理论物理学、原子核物理学、粒子物理学、凝聚态物理学、光学、天体物理学、无线电学这八大分支学科.以获奖项目研究的时间或获奖成果间的内在联系为主线,介绍这些分支学科在20世纪所取得的重大成就及其发展轨迹,进一步展望物理学在21世纪特别是未来二、三十年的发展趋势.

  7. Ilya Ilich Metchnikoff (1845-1915) and Paul Ehrlich (1854-1915): the centennial of the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalstieg, Frank C; Goldman, Armond S

    2008-05-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich shared the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine - Metchnikoff for discovering the major types and functions of phagocytes and Ehrlich for discovering the types of blood leukocytes, helping to uncover how to generate and use antibodies to protect against bacterial toxins, and formulating the receptor concept of antibodies binding to antigens. In 1908 phagocytic and humoral defences were thought to be unrelated but it was realized much later that they influence one other. Thus, it is fitting that the 1908 Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine remain closely connected in the minds of modern immunologists. Metchnikoff and Ehrlich shared qualities of natural curiosity and tenacity coupled with remarkable inductive-mechanistic thinking and a zest for experimentation. However, their approaches to and methods of research were decidedly different - Metchnikoff's by evolutionary biology and an approach to experimentation via microscopy and Ehrlich's by an imaginative side-chain theory and organic chemistry.

  8. Synthesis and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Jeffrey I.

    2017-10-01

    The question often arises as to who may have deserved a Nobel Prize but was not awarded one. Rarely is this discussion extended to who should have received more than one Nobel Prize, but in the field of organic synthesis there are some compelling candidates.

  9. A Nobel for Non-Keynesians

    OpenAIRE

    David R. Henderson

    2011-01-01

    Commentary On Monday the Nobel Committee announced the winners of the 2011 Nobel Prize in economics: Thomas J. Sargent of New York University and Stanford University's Hoover Institution, and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton University. The award was given for "their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy."

  10. Ginzburg deserved Nobel prize 50 years back

    CERN Multimedia

    Golovchansky, V

    2003-01-01

    "Vitali Ginzburg deserved a Nobel prize fifty years back, Leonid Keldysh, academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, who was Ginzburg's disciple, told Tass. "The Ginzburg-Landau phenomenal theory of superconductivity deserved a Nobel prize right upon being produced. It was a work of intransient importance" (1/2 page).

  11. Science Underlying 2008 Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Bernadette A.

    2009-01-01

    JCE offers a wealth of materials for teaching and learning chemistry that you can explore online. In the list below, Bernadette Caldwell of the Editorial Staff suggests additional resources that are available through JCE for teaching the science behind some of the 2008 Nobel Prizes . Discovering and Applying the Chemistry of GFP The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP to three scientists: Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien. These scientists led the field in discovering and introducing a fluorescing protein from jellyfish into cells and genes under study, which allows researchers to witness biochemistry in action. Now tags are available that emit light in different colors, revealing myriad biological processes and their interactions simultaneously. Identifying HPV and HIV, HIV's Replication Cycle, and HIV Virus-Host Interactions The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to two scientists: Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier; and for his discovery of human papilloma viruses [HPV] causing cervical cancer to one scientist, Harald zur Hausen. Diseases caused by these infectious agents significantly affect global health. While isolating and studying the virus, researchers discovered HIV is an uncommon retrovirus that infects humans and relies on the host to make its viral DNA, infecting and killing the host's white blood cells, ultimately destroying the immune systems of infected humans. Related Resources at JCE Online The Journal has published articles relating to GFP specifically, and more generally to fluorescing compounds applied to biochemistry. The Journal has also published an article and a video on protease inhibition—a strategy to suppress HIV's biological processes. With the video clips, an accompanying guide

  12. Physics Nobel prize 2004: Surprising theory wins physics Nobel

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    From left to right: David Politzer, David Gross and Frank Wilczek. For their understanding of counter-intuitive aspects of the strong force, which governs quarks inside protons and neutrons, on 5 October three American physicists were awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. David J. Gross (Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara), H. David Politzer (California Institute of Technology), and Frank Wilczek (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) made a key theoretical discovery with a surprising result: the closer quarks are together, the weaker the force - opposite to what is seen with electromagnetism and gravity. Rather, the strong force is analogous to a rubber band stretching, where the force increases as the quarks get farther apart. These physicists discovered this property of quarks, known as asymptotic freedom, in 1976. It later became a key part of the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the Standard Model, the current best theory to describe the interac...

  13. Is the Nobel Prize good for science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2013-12-01

    The Nobel Prize is arguably the best known and most prestigious award in science. Here we review the effect of the Nobel Prize and acknowledge that it has had many beneficial effects on science. However, ever since its inaugural year in 1901, the Nobel Prize has also been beset by controversy, mostly involving the selection of certain individuals and the exclusion of others. In this regard, the Nobel Prize epitomizes the winner-takes-all economics of credit allocation and distorts the history of science by personalizing discoveries that are truly made by groups of individuals. The limitation of the prize to only 3 individuals at a time when most scientific discovery is the result of collaborative and cooperative research is arguably the major cause of Nobel Prize controversies. A simple solution to this problem would be to eliminate the restriction on the number of individuals who could be awarded the prize, a measure that would recognize all who contribute, from students to senior investigators. There is precedent for such a change in the Nobel Peace Prize, which has often gone to organizations. Changing the Nobel Prize to more fairly allocate credit would reduce the potential for controversy and directly benefit the scientific enterprise by promoting cooperation and collaboration of scientists within a field to reduce the negative consequences of competition between individual scientists.

  14. Fullerene discoverers win nobel prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D.

    1996-10-16

    Two Rice University (Houston) chemists, Robert F. Curl and Richard E. Smalley, and a scientist at the University of Sussex (Brighton, U.K.), Harold W. Kroto, have won the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the joint discovery of buckminsterfullerenes - soccer ball-shaped carbon molecules. The novel form of carbon, which was initially synthesized by the scientists in 1985 as C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} has led to the development of {open_quotes}an entirely new branch of chemistry... with consequences in such diverse areas as astrochemistry, superconductivity, and material chemistry/physics,{close_quotes} according to the Swedish Academy of Sciences (Stockholm). For chemists, the structure is {open_quotes}uniquely beautiful and satisfying,{close_quotes} the academy says.

  15. The 2009 Physics Nobel Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Bassalo, José Maria Filardo

    2010-01-01

    In this article we will talk about the Nobel P...

  16. Nobel Prize 2011: Perlmutter, Schmidt & Riess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alison

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam Riess, "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae".

  17. Nobel Prize 2014: Akasaki, Amano & Nakamura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, Joerg

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources."

  18. Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Celebrating optical nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrit, Michel

    2014-12-01

    The award of this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry to the pioneers of various optical schemes capable of achieving super-resolution and single-molecule detection is recognition of a revolution in optical imaging.

  19. Quasicrystal discovery bags 2011 chemistry Nobel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for Chemistry has been awarded to Daniel Shechtman from Technion - Israel institute of Technology for his discovery of quasicrystals, which are materials that have ordered but not periodic structures.

  20. Nobel Prize for work on broken symmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize for Physics goes to three physicists who have worked on broken symmetries in particle physics. The announcement of the 2008 Nobel Prize for physics was transmitted to the Globe of Science and Innovation via webcast on the occasion of the preview of the Nobel Accelerator exhibition.On 7 October it was announced that the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences had awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for physics to three particle physicists for their fundamental work on the mechanisms of broken symmetries. Half the prize was awarded to Yoichiro Nambu of Fermilab for "the discovery of the mechanism of spontaneous broken symmetry in subatomic physics". The other half is shared by Makato Kobayashi of Japan’s KEK Institute and Toshihide Maskawa of the Yukawa Institute at the University of Kyoto "for the discovery of the origin of the broken symmetry which predicts the existence of at least three families of quarks in Nature". At th...

  1. 14 Nobel, preocupados por el CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, A

    2003-01-01

    "E l presidente del Consejo del CERN (Laboratorio Europeo de Fisica de Particulas, junto a Ginebra), Maurice Bourquin, ha recibido una carta firmada por un grupo de cientificos muy especiales: 14 premios Nobel de Fisica" (1 page).

  2. A Nobel prize to public science communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Greco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Norwegian Nobel Committee has bestowed the 2007 Nobel Peace Price equally upon the scientists of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC and Al Gore, former vice-President of the United States of America, with the same motivation: «for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change».

  3. The Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, E. N.; Nash, R. L.

    2007-09-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the "First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration." Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, "The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe. These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark. We have organized this lengthy paper into nine, fairly independent sections for ease of reading:1."Michael Jordan or Mia Hamm" - Introduction and Background2."Connecting the Dots Between the Heavens and Earth" - From Newton to Bethe3."From Cosmic Noise to the Big Bang" - The First Nobel

  4. Eugene Paul Wigner's Nobel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S

    2016-01-01

    In 1963, Eugene Paul Wigner was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his contributions to the theory of the atomic nucleus and the elementary particles, particularly through the discovery and application of fundamental symmetry principles. There are no disputes about this statement. On the other hand, there still is a question of why the statement did not mention Wigner's 1939 paper on the Lorentz group, which was regarded by Wigner and many others as his most important contribution in physics. By many physicists, this paper was regarded as a mathematical exposition having nothing to do with physics. However, it has been more than one half century since 1963, and it is of interest to see what progress has been made toward understanding physical implications of this paper and its historical role in physics. Wigner in his 1963 paper defined the subgroups of the Lorentz group whose transformations do not change the four-momentum of a given particle, and he called them the little groups. Thus, Wigner's little g...

  5. Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Edward W.; Nash, Rebecca

    2007-09-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the "First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration." Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, "The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe... These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons (of either gender) are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark. We have organized this paper into nine, fairly independent sections for ease of reading: I. "Michael Jordan or Mia Hamm" - Introduction and Background II. "Connecting the Dots Between the Heavens and Earth" - From Newton to Bethe III. "From Cosmic Noise to the Big Bang" - The

  6. Back to the Future

    CERN Multimedia

    Collins, Graham

    2004-01-01

    "Predictions are hard to make, especially about the future" said Nobel physicist Niels Bohr, many years ago. But two months ago, 150 leading physicists gathered at the University of California to engage in just that daunting task (1 page)

  7. El premio nobel alrededor del ADN

    OpenAIRE

    Delgadillo-Álvarez, Dulce María; Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN)

    2016-01-01

    El Premio Nobel es un galardón internacional otorgado cada año a personas o instituciones que hayan realizado investigaciones, descubrimientos o contribuciones a la humanidad en el año inmediato anterior o en el transcurso de su vida. Los premios se instituyeron en 1895 como última voluntad del químico sueco Alfred Nobel y comenzaron a entregarse en 1901. Dos de las especialidades en las que el Premio es otorgado son en Química y en Fisiología o Medicina. El objetivo de esta breve revisión es...

  8. Eight Nobel prizewinners at CERN in 1962

    CERN Multimedia

    1962-01-01

    In 1962, CERN hosted the 11th International Conference on High Energy Physics. Among the distinguished visitors were eight Nobel prizewinners. Left to right: Cecil F Powell, Isidor I Rabi, Werner Heisenberg, Edwin M McMillan, Emile Segre, Tsung Dao Lee, Chen Ning Yang and Robert Hofstadter.

  9. The Nobel Prize in Physics 1999

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini M

    2000-01-01

    The last Nobel Prize of the Millenium in Physics has been awarded jointly to Professor Gerardus 't Hooft of the University of Utrecht in Holland and his thesis advisor Professor Emeritus Martinus J.G. Veltman of Holland. According to the Academy's citation, the Nobel Prize has been awarded for 'elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interaction in Physics'. It further goes on to say that they have placed particle physics theory on a firmer mathematical foundation. In this short note, we will try to understand both these aspects of the award. The work for which they have been awarded the Nobel Prize was done in 1971. However, the precise predictions of properties of particles that were made possible as a result of their work, were tested to a very high degree of accuracy only in this last decade. This was done in a series of measurements in the experiments in the accelerator laboratories at CERN (Geneva) and Fermilab. To understand the full significance of this Nobel Prize, we will have to summarise ...

  10. Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Among China Chinese Students Undergoing The Laureate English Programme in INTI International University, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghavaani d/o Ampalagan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between foreign language classroom anxiety (communication apprehension, test anxiety and fear of negative evaluation among  Mainland Chinese students undergoing the Laureate English Programme

  11. 10 Ig Nobel Prizes For 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    搞笑诺贝尔奖(the Ig NobelPrizes)是对诺贝尔奖的有趣模仿。其名称来自ignoble(不名誉的)和Nobel Prize(诺贝尔奖)的结合。主办方为科学幽默杂志(Annalsof Improbable Research,AIR),评委中有些是真正的诺贝尔奖得主。其目的是选出那些“乍看之下令人发笑,之后发人深省”的研究。颁奖仪式每年十月,在诺贝尔奖颁奖前一至两周举行,地点为哈佛大学的桑德斯剧场(Sanders Theater)。

  12. The Laureate English Program: Taking a research informed approach to blended learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Marsh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case study is to describe the implementation of the Laureate English Program (LEP, the consequent decision to roll out blended learning across the network, and the Laureate-Cambridge University Press research partnership. Phase 1 of the research was completed in September 2012. The goal of this first phase was to gain a general understanding of student profile, computer literacy and competence, student levels of achievement, and student feedback on their blended learning experience. Six hundred and forty-eight students and 35 teachers responded to a questionnaire, which included multiple choice questions and open ended questions requiring extended comment. The questionnaires revealed that less than 25% of the Laureate student group had ever learned a language online before, which impacted significantly on student perception and use of online learning content. Furthermore, the first phase of research has revealed the impact that a complex interplay of different factors has on the relative effectiveness of these blended programs, and it has acknowledged that research is central to informed decision making in order to provide for effective blended learning. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v3i1.103

  13. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck.

  14. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, His 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and Why He Didn't Get a Second Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Jarlskog, C

    2008-01-01

    "I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist." Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes. In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the "Theory of Everything"?

  15. Norman Ramsey. Nobel Prize Winner in Physics (1989); Norman Ramsey. Premio Nobel de fisica (1989)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Norman Ramsey (Washington 1915) received the Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with con H. G. Dehmelt and W. Paul) for the development of study techniques for Atomic Physics. This tireless researcher participated in the discovery of the Magnetic Resonance Method for Molecular Emission. He invented the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen atomic clock, in addition to being a profile author. (Author)

  16. Cockcroft and Walton. Nobel Prize for Physics (1951); Cockcroft y Walton. Premio Nobel de Fisica (1951)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In 1951, the Nobel Prize for Physics was shared by researchers John Douglas Cockcroft (1897-1969) and Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (1903-1995), for their pioneer work on the transmutation of the atomic nuclei by artificial acceleration of atomic particles. (Author)

  17. Measuring revolutionary biomedical science 1992-2006 using Nobel prizes, Lasker (clinical medicine) awards and Gairdner awards (NLG metric).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The Nobel prize for medicine or physiology, the Lasker award for clinical medicine, and the Gairdner international award are given to individuals for their role in developing theories, technologies and discoveries which have changed the direction of biomedical science. These distinctions have been used to develop an NLG metric to measure research performance and trends in 'revolutionary' biomedical science with the aim of identifying the premier revolutionary science research institutions and nations from 1992-2006. I have previously argued that the number of Nobel laureates in the biomedical field should be expanded to about nine per year and the NLG metric attempts to predict the possible results of such an expansion. One hundred and nineteen NLG prizes and awards were made during the past fifteen years (about eight per year) when overlapping awards had been removed. Eighty-five were won by the USA, revealing a massive domination in revolutionary biomedical science by this nation; the UK was second with sixteen awards; Canada had five, Australia four and Germany three. The USA had twelve elite centres of revolutionary biomedical science, with University of Washington at Seattle and MIT in first position with six awards and prizes each; Rockefeller University and Caltech were jointly second placed with five. Surprisingly, Harvard University--which many people rank as the premier world research centre--failed to reach the threshold of three prizes and awards, and was not included in the elite list. The University of Oxford, UK, was the only institution outside of the USA which featured as a significant centre of revolutionary biomedical science. Long-term success at the highest level of revolutionary biomedical science (and probably other sciences) probably requires a sufficiently large number of individually-successful large institutions in open competition with one another--as in the USA. If this model cannot be replicated within smaller nations, then it implies

  18. 诺贝尔化学奖获奖者的统计分析%A Statistical Analysis of the Laureates of the Chemistry Nobel Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛君; 岳晨

    2004-01-01

    从1901年诺贝尔化学奖首次授予至今,已有137位世界著名化学家因其在化学领域的创造性贡献而获奖.本文对这些获奖者的相关信息进行了全面的信息计量学分析.

  19. Statistical analysis of the laureates of the Nobel Prize in Physics%诺贝尔物理学奖获奖者的统计分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐万超; 袁勤俭

    2004-01-01

    从1901年诺贝尔物理学奖首次授予,截至2001年已有164位世界著名物理学家因其创造性贡献而获奖.对这些获奖者进行统计分析的结果表明:大多数获奖者集中于欧美国家,尤其越来越集中于美国的少数机构,获奖者最早做出与获奖有关成果的年龄和获奖年龄越来越大、获奖成果得到社会认可的时间越来越长,多人分享诺贝尔物理学奖已成为一种趋势等.

  20. Statistical Analysis of the Laureates of the Nobel Prize in Physics%诺贝尔物理学奖获奖者统计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    神干; 殷春浩; 朱姗姗; 侯磊田; 李富强

    2011-01-01

    @@ 诺贝尔物理学奖是根据诺贝尔遗嘱而设立的五个基本奖项之一,旨在奖励那些在物理学领域里做出突出贡献的科学家.该奖项由瑞典皇家自然科学院颁发奖金,每年的奖项候选人由瑞典皇家自然科学院的瑞典或外国院士,诺贝尔物理委员会的委员,曾被授予诺贝尔物理学奖金的科学家,在乌普萨拉、隆德、奥斯陆、哥本哈根、赫尔辛基大学、卡罗琳医学院和皇家技术学院永久或临时任职的物理学教授等科学家推荐.

  1. Endogenous DNA Damage and Repair Enzymes-A short summary of the scientific achievements of Tomas Lindahl, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry 2015

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arne Klungland; Yun-Gui Yang

    2016-01-01

    Tomas Lindahl completed his medical studies at Karolinska Institute in 1970. Yet, his work has always been dedicated to unraveling fundamental mechanisms of DNA decay and DNA repair. His research is characterized with groundbreaking discoveries on the instability of our genome, the identification of novel DNA repair activities, the characterization of DNA repair pathways, and the association to diseases, throughout his 40 years of scientific career.

  2. Akzo Nobel Strengthens Presence in Coatings and Chemicals Businesses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lily Wang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Over the last few years, Akzo Nobel has been very active in China. Akzo Nobel announced a Euro 250 million investment for a new chemicals multisite in Ningbo,and the company has also opened new coatings facilities in Suzhou, Langfang,Tianjin and Jiaxing, bringing the total number ofplants to 22 and the number of employees to almost 5000.

  3. Akzo Nobel Science Award: Svensk upptaeckt botar framtidens cancer

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    'Akzo Nobel Science Award: Svensk upptaeckt botar framtidens cancerStockholm, 27 februari, 2003. Aarets Akzo Nobel Science Award Sweden paa 500 000 kronor gaar till professorn i medicinsk straalningsfysik Anders Brahme. Han prisas foer "sin unika forskargaerning inom straalbehandlingsysiken samt kombinationen av grundforskning, tillaempad forskning och interaktion med industrin"' (1 page).

  4. Is the Nobel Prize in chemistry still relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Rajendrani

    2009-10-01

    No other prize in science matches the iconic stature of the Nobels. But they only recognize individuals in the categories of physics, chemistry, and physiology/medicine. In the modern era of multidisciplinary, multiple-team endeavors, are the Nobel Prizes outdated?

  5. The Ripple Effect: Citation Chain Reactions of a Nobel Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the possible citation chain reactions of a Nobel Prize using the mathematician Robert J. Aumann as a case example. The results show that the award of the Nobel Prize in 2005 affected not only the citations to his work, but also affected the citations to the references in his s...

  6. Autophagy: one more Nobel Prize for yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Andreas; Kainz, Katharina; Andryushkova, Aleksandra; Hofer, Sebastian; Madeo, Frank; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac

    2016-12-05

    The recent announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for the discoveries of mechanisms governing autophagy, underscores the importance of intracellular degradation and recycling. At the same time, it further cements yeast, in which this field decisively developed, as a prolific model organism. Here we provide a quick historical overview that mirrors both the importance of autophagy as a conserved and essential process for cellular life and death as well as the crucial role of yeast in its mechanistic characterization.

  7. Autophagy: one more Nobel Prize for yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Zimmermann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for the discoveries of mechanisms governing autophagy, underscores the importance of intracellular degradation and recycling. At the same time, it further cements yeast, in which this field decisively developed, as a prolific model organism. Here we provide a quick historical overview that mirrors both the importance of autophagy as a conserved and essential process for cellular life and death as well as the crucial role of yeast in its mechanistic characterization.

  8. A Nobel Prize winner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot visited CERN on 2 February with a message for particle physicists and cosmologists alike. After a tour of ATLAS and CMS, Smoot gave a talk to a packed Council Chamber about the connections between particle physics and cosmology, and how the two disciplines can help each other to find answers to their cosmic questions. Smoot's group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is currently working on the development of the Max Planck Surveyor, the next generation of satellite to study cosmic microwave background anisotropy, which will teach us about how our universe was formed.

  9. Daniel Kahneman: premio Nobel de Economia 2002

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Se presenta una retrospección general del perfil del premio Nobel en economía 2002, además se realiza un análisis del llamado “desafío Kahneman-Tversky” y se confrontan los problemas de racionalidad limitada implícitos en el desafío K-T frente a la hipótesis dominante en la teoría económica estándar, acerca de que los agentes formulan expectativas racionales.

  10. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Addison

    2002-05-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded shares of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2001 to three scientists for their development of methods for the efficient catalytic production of just one member of a pair of enantiomers. One-half of the prize was divided equally between William S. Knowles and Ryoji Noyori. The other half of the prize was awarded to K. Barry Sharpless. This paper briefly discusses their discoveries and the significance of the discoveries. It includes an annotated bibliography of their most relevant and easily obtained publications.

  11. Daniel Kahneman: premio Nobel de Economia 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo J. Contreras Sosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta una retrospección general del perfil del premio Nobel en economía 2002, además se realiza un análisis del llamado “desafío Kahneman-Tversky” y se confrontan los problemas de racionalidad limitada implícitos en el desafío K-T frente a la hipótesis dominante en la teoría económica estándar, acerca de que los agentes formulan expectativas racionales.

  12. 诺贝尔自然科学奖与基础研究%Nobel Natural Science Prize and Basic Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈其荣

    2013-01-01

    文章主要提出并探讨了三个具有内在关联的问题:一是基础研究的类型问题。基础研究是一个随着科学研究实践的发展而演进的范畴,通过对现代科学从“学院科学”向“后学院科学”转变的历史考析,得出基础研究的范畴已从只是“纯基础研究”的一种类型拓展为包括“纯基础研究”和“定向基础研究”两种类型的结论,结合诺贝尔自然科学奖获得者从事基础研究的实际案例,对这两种不同类型的基础研究范畴做出了新的阐释。二是诺贝尔自然科学奖获得者从事基础研究的比重究竟有多大。通过对诺贝尔自然科学奖获得者从事基础研究(分为“纯基础研究”与“定向基础研究”)与应用研究获奖工作的人数与比例的统计分析,发现高达90%左右的科学家是由于在基础科学领域取得重大原始性创新成果而被授予诺贝尔自然科学奖的,彰显了权威的诺贝尔自然科学奖对基础研究的“偏爱”,从而显示出基础研究的重要意义。三是诺贝尔自然科学奖获得者是如何从事基础研究的。依据真实、丰富而鲜活的思想资料,运用案例分析法,深入分析和揭示了他们作为科学精英在基础科学领域取得重大原始性创新成果的“奥秘”。%Three interrelated issues are explored in this paper.The first is about the category of basic re-search.The paper points out that the scope of basic research evolves with the progress of the practice of scien-tific research.Based on a close examination of the historical transformation of modern science from "academic science"to the "post-academic science",it argues that the scope of basic research has expanded.Besides "pure basic research",there appears the new category of"oriented basic research".These two categories are explained and interpreted in relation to the actual cases of basic research by Nobel Laureates for natural

  13. Herbert A. Simon: Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, Thomas H

    2003-09-01

    In 1978, Herbert A. Simon won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, the same Nobel won by Daniel Kahneman in 2002. Simon's work in fact paved the way for Kahneman's Nobel. Although trained in political science and economics rather than psychology, Simon applied psychological ideas to economic theorizing. Classical and neoclassical economic theories assume that people are perfectly rational and strive to optimize economic outcomes. Simon argued that human rationality is constrained, not perfect, and that people seek satisfactory rather than ideal outcomes. Despite his Nobel, Simon felt isolated in economics and ultimately moved into psychology. Nevertheless, his ideas percolated through the economic community, so that Kahneman, whose research advanced Simon's broad perspective, could be the psychologist who won the Nobel in economics.

  14. Uni Dufour | Ig Nobel Show with Marc Abrahams | 7 May

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On 7 May, Marc Abrahams, founder of the Ig Nobel Prize, will give an "Ig Nobel show", in English at Uni Dufour. The Ig Nobel Prizes are an American parody of the Nobel Prizes. In early October of each year, they are awarded to ten unusual or trivial achievements in scientific research. The stated aim of the prizes is to "first make people laugh, and then make them think". Marc Abrahams will introduce this funny and dynamic evening with a short presentation before handing over to a selection of recipients. The show is free and open to all. Tuesday 7 May Ig Nobel Show 6:30 p.m. - Room U600 Uni Dufour

  15. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  16. From the Proton Synchrotron to the Large Hadron Collider: 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Directorate Office

    As a new era in particle physics approaches with the start of the LHC, a symposium to commemorate many significant events that have marked high-energy physics in the past 50 years will be held at CERN on 3-4 December 2009. The list of confirmed distinguished speakers reads like the Who’s Who of particle physics of the second half of the 20th Century, including the Nobel Laureates James Cronin, Jerome Friedman, Sheldon Glashow, David Gross, Gerardus ‘t Hooft, Leon Lederman, Burton Richter, Carlo Rubbia, Jack Steinberger, Samuel Ting, Martinus Veltman, Stephen Weinberg and Frank Wilczek. They will share with us memories of several landmark events that, over the past 50 years, have shaped our field of science. These events include the discovery of the J/ψ particle by Richter and Ting in the 1970s; the work of Glashow, Salam and Weinberg on the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interactions; the discovery of fundamental asymmetries in the K-meson sector by Cronin and Fitch...

  17. Rooted in symmetry: Yang reflects on a life of physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "During his latest visit to CERN, Nobel laureate Chen Ning Yang talked to CERN Courier about some of his early work, his impressions of the LHC and his thoughts about the future of physics."; 2006 Nobel laureate George Smoot talked about his quest to explore the early universe; Masayuki Nakahata, who ofundthe signal of a neutrino pulse emitted by SN1987A, looks at the ongoing legacy of this event; (9 pages with photos)

  18. Invited contributions of 2013 geoscience laureates of the French Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtillot, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Each year, the French Academy of Sciences gives out a number of prizes and medals to recognize the contributions and achievements of outstanding colleagues in all fields of Science. In 2013, for the first time, laureates have been invited to make short presentations at the Academy. This resulted in a special session that generated enthusiasm from participants, including many members of the Academy. The editorial team of Comptes rendus Geoscience has felt that it could be of interest to the scientific community to have access to presentations by these scientists in the geoscience series of the Comptes rendus. Six laureates of the 2013 Academy Awards responded positively to the invitation. Because these were invited papers, an Associate Editor and the Chief Editor played the role normally attributed to reviewers, in addition to their normal editorial duties. In some cases, external reviewers were also involved upon invitation by the Editors. We are thankful to the authors and happy to present readers of Comptes rendus Geoscience with this first series that, if successful, could be followed by others in the coming years.

  19. Two Nobel Prizes connected to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Nobel Prizes in Physics and in Physiology or Medicine, announced last week, both have connections with particle physics and CERN. Alexei Abrikosov, Vitaly Ginzburg and Anthony Leggett have received the prize in physics for their "pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids". The most important superconducting materials technically have proved to be those known as type II superconductors, which allow superconductivity and magnetism to exist at the same time and remain superconductive in high magnetic fields. The coils for the superconducting magnets in CERN's Large Hadron Collider are made from niobium-titanium alloy - a type II superconductor. The LHC will operate thanks to magnets made of type II superconductors. Here, superconducting cables for the LHC are on display during a VIP visit.Abrikosov, who is now at the Argonne National Laboratory, was working at the Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems in his native Moscow when he succeeded in formula...

  20. Quark Forces Attract Nobel Prize in Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jenny Hogan; 滕晓燕

    2004-01-01

    @@ The force that holds together the tiniest particles① of matter has pulled in the Nobel Prize in Physics for the three US physicists who unraveled② its workings. David Gross, David Politzer and Frank Wilczek have each been awarded a third of the 2004 prize for explaining how quarks-sub-atomic③particles which make up the protons④ and neutrons⑤ in the nuclei⑥ of atomsstick together. Protons and neutrons consist of three quarks each, and there are six different types of quarks, such as "up" and "down" quarks. The trio⑦ of scientists were awarded the $1.3 million prize for work explaining the so-called "strong" or "color" force prevalent⑧ in the atomic nucleus. The strong force is one of the fundamental forces of nature, and their breakthrough "brought physics one step closer to fulfilling a grand dream... A theory for everything" according to the Royal Swedish.

  1. Nobel Prize for Our Advisor, Gerhard Ertl, Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The 2007 Nobel Prize for chemistry has been awarded on December 10th to the German scientist Gerhard Ertl for "his thorough studies of fundamental molecular processes at the gas-solid interface" as the fundamentals of catalysis.

  2. Nobels attest to emergence of Japan as physics mecca

    CERN Multimedia

    Asaba, M

    2003-01-01

    " The Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry received by two Japanese had the whole nation bubbling with excitement in the face of gloomy news reports that predominated in the second half of last year" (1 page).

  3. Innate immunity's path to the Nobel Prize 2011 and beyond

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine to Ralph Steinmann, Jules Hoffmann, and Bruce Beutler recognized a paradigm shift in our understanding of innate immunity, and its impact on adaptive immunity...

  4. A Nobel prize to public science communication (Italian original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Greco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Norwegian Nobel Committee has bestowed the 2007 Nobel Peace Price equally upon the scientists of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC and Al Gore, former vice-President of the United States of America, with the same motivation: «for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change».

  5. The Nobel Literature Prize Sparks a Mo Yan Craze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    正At 19 o'clock, October 11th, Beijing time, the Swedish Academy awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize for Literature to the Chinese writer Mo Yan. Within several hours, Mo Yan's works were struck by the "Nobel effect", sales shooting up in both bookstores and online marts. Some websites also jumped on the bandwagon and put up a reservation service for the new editions.

  6. Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety among China Chinese Students Undergoing the Laureate English Programme in INTI International University, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampalagan, Meghavaani d/o; Sellupillai, Mogana d/o; Yap, Sze Sze

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between foreign language classroom anxiety (communication apprehension, test anxiety and fear of negative evaluation) among Mainland Chinese students undergoing the Laureate English Programme in INTI International University, Malaysia. The participants of this study consisted of 75…

  7. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau"…

  8. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau" (Barcelona,…

  9. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau"…

  10. Developing Degrees: An Exploratory Analysis of Laureate International Universities' 21st Century Entry into Mexico and Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Beau Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Laureate International Universities (LIU) embodies an emerging international phenomenon in which a multinational corporation (MNC) functions as a holding company that acquires and operates brick-and-mortar higher education institutions in a for-profit model; each individual portfolio institution granting degrees under its own name with any…

  11. The Alfred Nobel rocket camera. An early aerial photography attempt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemar Skoog, A.

    2010-02-01

    Alfred Nobel (1833-1896), mainly known for his invention of dynamite and the creation of the Nobel Prices, was an engineer and inventor active in many fields of science and engineering, e.g. chemistry, medicine, mechanics, metallurgy, optics, armoury and rocketry. Amongst his inventions in rocketry was the smokeless solid propellant ballistite (i.e. cordite) patented for the first time in 1887. As a very wealthy person he actively supported many Swedish inventors in their work. One of them was W.T. Unge, who was devoted to the development of rockets and their applications. Nobel and Unge had several rocket patents together and also jointly worked on various rocket applications. In mid-1896 Nobel applied for patents in England and France for "An Improved Mode of Obtaining Photographic Maps and Earth or Ground Measurements" using a photographic camera carried by a "…balloon, rocket or missile…". During the remaining of 1896 the mechanical design of the camera mechanism was pursued and cameras manufactured. In April 1897 (after the death of Alfred Nobel) the first aerial photos were taken by these cameras. These photos might be the first documented aerial photos taken by a rocket borne camera. Cameras and photos from 1897 have been preserved. Nobel did not only develop the rocket borne camera but also proposed methods on how to use the photographs taken for ground measurements and preparing maps.

  12. Paul Krugman : (presque un Nobel de géographie Paul Krugman: A Nobel Prize in geography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Walther

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paul Krugman a reçu le Prix Nobel d’économie pour son analyse des modèles du commerce mondial et de la localisation de l’activité économique. Voilà une nouvelle qui devrait réjouir certains géographes.Paul Krugman recently won Nobel Economics Prize for his work on trade patterns and location of economic activities. This sounds like good news for (some geographers.

  13. EDITORIAL: Nobel Symposium 148: Graphene and Quantum Matter Nobel Symposium 148: Graphene and Quantum Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Antti; Wilczek, Frank; Ardonne, Eddy; Hansson, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The 2010 Nobel Symposium on Graphene and Quantum Matter, was held at the Grand Hotel in Saltsjöbaden south of Stockholm on 27-31 May. The main theme of the meeting was graphene, and the symposium turned out to be very timely: two of the participants, Andre Geim and Kanstantin Novoselov returned to Stockholm less then six months later to receive the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics. In these proceedings leading experts give up-to-date, historical, experimental, theoretical and technological perspectives on the remarkable material graphene, and several papers also make connections to other states of quantum matter. Saltsjöbaden is beautifully situated in the inner archipelago of Stockholm. It provided a pleasant setting for the talks and the ensuing discussions that took place in an enthusiastic and friendly atmosphere. The social programme included a boat trip in the light summer night and a dinner at the renowned Grand Hotel. These proceedings are ordered thematically, starting with historical overviews, followed by first experimental and then theoretical papers on the physics of graphene. Next are several papers addressing more general topics in quantum matter and finally contributions on the technological applications of graphene. We hope that this volume will serve as a source of knowledge and inspiration for any physicist interested in graphene, and at the same time provide a snapshot of a young field of research that is developing at very high speed. We are grateful to Marja Fahlander for excellent administrative support, and to the Nobel Foundation who funded the symposium.

  14. Eric Kandel: the future of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Erik

    2005-04-01

    Watching ice floes glide by on the Hudson River from Eric Kandel's office, one gets a sense of placid reflection tempered by constant action-an apt analogy for Kandel's ability to calmly manage several ongoing projects and commitments at once. In addition to his well-lauded, ongoing research at Columbia University Medical Center's New York State Psychiatric Institute, Kandel has written several books on neurobiology, behavior, and memory. In addition to being a Nobel Laureate Scientist, he is well-known as an editor of the seminal textbook Principles of Neural Science. He and his colleagues are in the midst of working on a new edition of Principles, and he is working on a scientific autobiography. MI sat down with Dr. Kandel and discussed with him a range of topics including childhood and early career influences, intramural research at the NIH, the HHMI, ethical considerations of altering memory and, of course, Aplysia.

  15. Premios nobel de quimica y filatelia. Parte II: Quimica analitica, quimica organica, productos naturales y bioquimica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez-Reina, Marlon; Amado-Gonzalez, Eliseo

    2013-01-01

    En Premios Nobel de Quimica y Filatelia, Parte II, se hace una revision de los sellos postales emitidos en diferentes paises para conmemorar los Premios Nobel en quimica analitica, quimica organica...

  16. The Energetic Universe: a Nobel Surprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    he history of cosmic expansion can be accurately traced using Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) as standard candles. Over the past 40 years, this effort has improved its precision and extended its reach in redshift. Recently, the distances to SN Ia have been measured to a precision of ~5% using luminosity information that is encoded in the shape of the supernova's rest frame optical light curve. By combining observations of supernova distances as measured from their light curves and redshifts measured from spectra, we can detect changes in the cosmic expansion rate. This empirical approach was successfully exploited by the High-Z Supernova Team and by the Supernova Cosmology Project to detect cosmic expansion and to infer the presence of dark energy. The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess for this discovery. The world's sample of well-observed SN Ia light curves at high redshift and low, approaching 1000 objects, is now large enough to make statistical errors due to sample size a thing of the past. Systematic errors are now the challenge. To learn the properties of dark energy and determine, for example, whether it has an equation-of-state that is different from the cosmological constant demands higher precision and better accuracy. The largest systematic uncertainties come from light curve fitters, photometric calibration errors, and from uncertain knowledge of the scattering properties of dust along the line of sight. Efforts to use SN Ia spectra as luminosity indicators have had some success, but have not yet produced a big step forward. Fortunately, observations of SN Ia in the near infrared (NIR), from 1 to 2 microns, offer a very promising path to better knowledge of the Hubble constant and to improved constraints on dark energy. In the NIR, SN Ia are better standard candles and the effects of dust absorption are smaller. We have begun an HST program dubbed RAISIN (SN IA in the IR) to tighten our grip on dark energy properties

  17. The Transuranium Elements: Early History (Nobel Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, E. M.

    1951-12-12

    In this talk the author tells of the circumstances that led to the discovery of neptunium, the first element beyond uranium, and the partial identification of plutonium, the next one beyond that. The part of the story that lies before 1939 has already been recounted here in the Nobel lectures of Fermi and Hahn. Rather the author starts with the discovery of fission by Hahn and Strassmann. News of this momentous discovery reached Berkeley early in 1939. The staff of the Radiation Laboratory was put into a state of great excitement and several experiments of a nature designed to check and extend the announced results were started, using ionization chambers and pulse amplifiers, cloud chambers, chemical methods, and so forth. The author decided to do an experiment of a very simple kind. When a nucleus of uranium absorbs a neutron and fission takes place, the two resulting fragments fly apart with great violence, sufficient to propel them through air or other matter for some distance. This distance, called the "range", is quantity of some interest, and the author undertook to measure it by observing the depth of penetration of the fission fragments in a stack of thin aluminum foils. The fission fragments came from a thin layer of uranium oxide spread on a sheet of paper, and exposed to neutrons from a beryllium target bombarded by 8 Mev deuterons in the 37-inch cyclotron. The aluminum foils, each with a thickness of about half a milligram per square centimeter, were stacked like the pages of a book in immediate contact with the layer of uranium oxide. After exposure to the neutrons, the sheets of aluminum were separated and examined for radioactivity by means of an ionization chamber. The fission fragments of course are radioactive atoms, and their activity is found where they stop.

  18. Posters of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics available from the Library

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences produces three posters annually, each of which explains the motivation for the award of the Nobel prizes in Physics, Chemistry and Economics.   The files of the posters are available here: http://www.kva.se/en/Prizes/Nobel-prizes/Nobel-Posters/ The good news is that the CERN Library has got a stock of posters of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics. They are available free from the Library (52-1-052).

  19. Romanians and the Nobel Prizes for Science and Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilica Sirbu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There is much to be said about the Nobel Prizes. Numerous pages are written each year to promote, describe, analyze and criticize the prizes, their initiator and their evolution since 1901. The purpose of this study is to bring back to light from the dust of the archives information about those Romanians who were ahead of their times through their outstanding thinking and understanding of the world. Little has been written about those nominated, since it has been considered more relevant to focus on the winners. There were plentiful creative minds who only needed an opportunity to be known to the world. Famous Romanian names show up from the archives and the nomination database provided by the Nobel Institution and enable us to get a broad perspective of the nominators and the nominees. Ironically, as in the case of the Nobel Peace Prize, most of those who genuinely had a chance to win were never nominated.

  20. A Structuralist Perspective to Toni Morrison's Nobel Lecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑞莉

    2009-01-01

    Now most criticisms focus on the factors outside the literary text.In comparison with the criticisms above,this thesis will offer a reading on Toni Morrison's Nobel Lecture from a structuralist perspective.It might provide a different visual angle for understanding the lecture.Structuralism is an approach to analyze the narrative material by examining the underlying invariant structure.In studying literary text,strueturalists concem themselves with the abstract and internal structure rather On the surface phenomena.They emphasize the unity of literary text.By applying the theory of sttucturalism in the analysis of Toni Morrison'Nobel Lecture,this thesis will explore the deep structure and to reveal the deep meaning beneath the Nobel Lecture.

  1. An Archetypal Reading of Toni Morrison's Nobel Lecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蕾蕾

    2008-01-01

    Toni Morrison is widely recognized as American's preeminent novelist.As the Pulitzer Prize and Nobel Prize winning novelist,her stature as a post war American novelist can be no doubt compared to that of great novelists like Hemingway and Faulkner.Historically alert,Toni Morrison magnificently explores the life of the black,especiaiiy that of black women.Her Nobel Prize Lecture.in which she again tells a story of a black wom- an.can be regarded as an epitome of Mortison's works.The dialogue between the blind black old woman and the young people is full of wisdom and profoundness.Like many great works,Morrison's Lecture can also be traced back to some ancient archetypes,this thesis attempts to use archetypal theories to probe into the archetypes in Toni Morrison's Nobel Prize Lecture from characters, and theme.These archetypes denote deeper meaning of the author.

  2. Muller's Nobel Prize Lecture: when ideology prevailed over science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2012-03-01

    This paper extends and confirms the report of Calabrese (Calabrese, E. J. (2011b). Muller's Nobel Lecture on dose-response for ionizing radiation: Ideology or science? Arch. Toxicol. 85, 1495-1498) that Hermann J. Muller knowingly made deceptive comments in his 1946 Nobel Prize Lecture (Muller, H. J. (1946). Nobel Prize Lecture. Stockholm, Sweden. Available at http://www.nobelprize.org/. Accessed December 12) concerning the dose-response. Supporting a linearity perspective, Muller stated there is "no escape from the conclusion that there is no threshold" while knowing the results of a recent study by Ernst Caspari and Curt Stern contradicted these comments. Recently uncovered private correspondence between Muller and Stern reveals Muller's scientific assessment of the Caspari and Stern manuscript in a letter from Muller to Stern 5 weeks (14 January 1947) after his Nobel Prize Lecture of 12 December 1946. Muller indicated that the manuscript was of acceptable scientific quality; he indicated the manuscript should be published, but the findings needed replication because it significantly challenged the linearity hypothesis. These findings complement the previous letter (12 November 1946 letter from Muller to Stern), which revealed that Muller received the Caspari and Stern manuscript, recognized it as significant, and recommended its replication 5 weeks before his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller therefore supported this position immediately before and after his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller's opinions on the Caspari and Stern manuscript therefore had not changed during the time leading up to his Lecture, supporting the premise that his Lecture comments were deceptive. These findings are of historical and practical significance because Muller's comments were a notable contributory factor, changing how risks would be assessed for carcinogens (i.e., changing from a threshold to a linear model) throughout the 20th century to the present.

  3. Pioneers in ozone research receive Nobel Prize in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded its 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry to three AGU members for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone. Only one other Nobel prize has ever been awarded in the realm of atmospheric research. The honorees are professors Paul Crutzen of the Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany; Mario Molina of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and F. Sherwood Rowland of the University of California, Irvine. The Academy credits the three with contributing to “our salvation from a global environmental problem that could have catastrophic consequences.”

  4. Futurism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Jane Loring

    The objectives of this research report are to gain insight into the main problems of the future and to ascertain the attitudes that the general population has toward the treatment of these problems. In the first section of this report the future is explored socially, psychologically, and environmentally. The second section describes the techniques…

  5. The History of Molecular Structure Determination Viewed through the Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William P.; Palenik, Gus J.; Suh, Il-Hwan

    2003-07-01

    For the past 100 years, with only a few exceptions during war times, Nobel Prizes have been awarded annually to men and women who have made exceptionally important discoveries in science. In thirteen of those years, prizes were awarded to individuals whose contributions helped explain the molecular world of matter through interactions of waves or particles with atoms. From William C. Röntgen, who received the very first Nobel Prize in Physics in 1901 for his work with X-rays, to von Laue and the father-and-son Bragg team in the second decade of the century, who used X-rays to understand atomic arrangements, much progress had been made revealing secrets at the molecular level of matter. In the 1930s Debye, Davisson, and Thomson revealed further information using, among other techniques, diffraction of electrons by matter. In the 1960s Crick, Watson, Wilkins, Perutz, Kendrew, and Hodgkin received Nobel Prizes for revealing structures of significantly more complex molecules including the DNA double helix, myoglobin, hemoglobin, and vitamin B12. In the 1970s and 1980s Lipscomb would be recognized for organizing our picture of boron hydrides, Klug would use electron diffraction to determine structures of important nucleic acid protein complexes, Hauptman and Karle would bring us a powerful new way to solve structures, and Deisenhofer, Huber, and Michel would determine the three-dimensional structure of a photosynthetic reaction center. Finally, in 1994 Brockhouse and Shull were recognized for their work with neutrons. Crystallography has been used to answer increasingly complex questions in the past, and will certainly remain an important tool in the future.

  6. Swedish Poet Wins 2011 Nobel Prize for Literature%Swedish Poet Wins 2011 Nobel Prize for Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志伟

    2011-01-01

    Through his condensed( 凝练的), translucent( 透彻的) images he gives us fresh access to reality. --The Swedish Academy The Swedish Academy awarded a Swedish poet, Tomas Transtromer, the 2011 Nobel Prize for Literature, making him the 107th recipient of the Nobel Prize for literature. Transtromer, who has appeared among the list of nominees(被提名者)for the prize for many years, finally won this prize for his famous works Windows and Stones (1966) and The Great En/gma (2004).

  7. Eppur Si Muove! The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Roux, Benoit [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-12-03

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel for their work on developing computational methods to study complex chemical systems. Hence, their work has led to mechanistic critical insights into chemical systems both large and small and has enabled progress in a number of different fields, including structural biology.

  8. Nobel prize awarded to pioneers in ozone research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This article details the achievements of the three individuals who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry - Paul Crutzen, Mario Molina, and F. Sherwood Rowland - for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly the chemical processes that deplete the ozone layer. Background information about the ozone layer is presented as well as highlights of the ozone research done by the prize winners.

  9. [Ralph M. Steinman, 2011 Nobel for his contributions on immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura C

    2012-01-01

    Ralph M. Steinman was the recipient of the 2011 Nobel Prize of Physiology and Medicine due to the discovery of dendritic cells, which have a crucial role on the onset of acquired immunity, a fundamental event in the organism's defense. Today, dendritic cells are used in the development of vaccines and in cancer therapy. Steinman's contributions have been fundamental in the understanding of immunity.

  10. Briton wins Nobel physics prize for work on superfluids

    CERN Multimedia

    Connor, S

    2003-01-01

    A British born scientist, Anthony Leggett, 65, has jointly won this year's Nobel prize in physics for research into the arcane area of superfluids - when matter behaves in its lowest and most ordered state. He shares the 800,000 pounds prize with two Russian physicists who have worked in the field of superconductivity - when electrical conductors lose resistance (1/2 page).

  11. Modular Curriculum: English, American Nobel Prize Winners in Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James A.

    This independent study module treats those Americans who have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. They include Sinclair Lewis, Eugene O'Neill, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Pearl Buck. Selections from the writings of these authors are included. Their works represent many literary genres and also…

  12. Premio Nobel de ciencias Económicas 1998

    OpenAIRE

    Sen Amartya

    1998-01-01

    La Academia Real de Ciencias de Suecia ha decidido otorgar el premio Banco de Suecia 1998 en Ciencias Económicas, en Memoria de Alfred Nobel, al Profesor Amartya Sen, del Trinity College, Reino Unido, y ciudadano indio, por sus contribuciones a la economía del bienestar.

     

     

     

  13. Nobel-Prize Economists Back A Stable RMB Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

      RMB has been put under great pressure of appreciation. But after all, what will be the after effect? In the Forum of the 8th China Beijing International High-tech Expo in May, three Nobel-Prize economists said No simultaneously to the RMB appreciation.……

  14. ATLAS Collaboration Reaction to 2013 Physics Nobel Prize Announcement

    CERN Multimedia

    Abdeslam Hoummada

    2013-01-01

    Physicists from ATLAS took a brief time out from their collaboration week in Marrakech, Morocco to watch the announcement of the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2013. To their delight, it was awarded to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs for their pioneering work on the electroweak-symmetry-breaking mechanism in 1964.

  15. Nobel-Prize Economists Back A Stable RMB Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ RMB has been put under great pressure of appreciation. But after all, what will be the after effect? In the Forum of the 8th China Beijing International High-tech Expo in May, three Nobel-Prize economists said No simultaneously to the RMB appreciation.

  16. Barack Obama: o polêmico Nobel da Paz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgílio Caixeta Arraes

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available O artigo trata do Prêmio Nobel da Paz
    de 2009, destinado ao Presidente Barack Obama.
    A pre miação foi considerada polêmica por ter sido
    concedida no início do seu mandato, o que dificulta
    uma avaliação equilibrada.

  17. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Ben

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus infection and cervical carcinoma.

  18. Six Nobel de physique réunis à Gardanne

    CERN Multimedia

    Crozel, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    It's a single, exceptional event: six Nobel for Physics to inaugurate the new technological center: a school for engineers in the microelectronics field, amphitheaters for conferences, and a researche center; this will give to Gardanne a key role in the development of the french microelectronic industry. (1 page)

  19. Premio Nobel de ciencias Económicas 1998

    OpenAIRE

    Sen Amartya

    1998-01-01

    La Academia Real de Ciencias de Suecia ha decidido otorgar el premio Banco de Suecia 1998 en Ciencias Económicas, en Memoria de Alfred Nobel, al Profesor Amartya Sen, del Trinity College, Reino Unido, y ciudadano indio, por sus contribuciones a la economía del bienestar.

     

     

     

  20. Eppur si muove! The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy C; Roux, Benoît

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel for their work on developing computational methods to study complex chemical systems. Their work has led to mechanistic critical insights into chemical systems both large and small and has enabled progress in a number of different fields, including structural biology.

  1. E pluribus tres: the 2009 nobel prize in chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Charles W

    2009-12-01

    This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology.

  2. E Pluribus Tres: The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Charles W. Carter Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology.

  3. La luce pesante Carlo Rubbia, cronaca di un Nobel

    CERN Document Server

    Bertin, Antonio

    1984-01-01

    In questo libro, attraverso una serie di colloqui con Carlo Rubbia, premio Nobel per la Fisica 1984, gli autori raccontano la storia delle sue scoperte, che hanno permesso all'Europa di effettuare un significativo sorpasso scientifico nei confronti degli Stati Uniti d'America, tradizionalmente all'avanguardia in fisica subnucleare.

  4. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y.; Żuberek, R.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  5. How Robert A. Millikan Got the Physics Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panusch, Martin; Heering, Peter; Singh, Rajinder

    2010-01-01

    In 1923, R.A. Millikan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the elementary charge of electricity and on the photoelectric effect. Recently, historical research had a focus on Millikan's publication practice, as well as on the role of his assistant, Harvey Fletcher. Several studies have raised doubts on whether Millikan can…

  6. The Competition "First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y; Zuberek, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants. (Contains 1 table.)

  7. Contestation des Nobel une tradition aussi ancienne que leur attribution

    CERN Document Server

    Sevestre, G

    2003-01-01

    "La contestation des Nobel, avec cette annee la campagne lancee par un Americain afin de faire reconnaitre son role dans la mise au point de l'imagerie a resonance magnetique (IRM), constitue une tradition, quasiment aussi ancienne que l'attribution de ces distinctions" (1 page).

  8. Spazio ASI, INFN e Nobel Ting a caccia di antimateria

    CERN Multimedia

    Boz,

    2003-01-01

    "Una apparecchiatura per la ricerca dell' antimateria che nell'autunno del 2005 sara' installata sulla Stazione Spaziale e' al centro di un accordo di collaborazione tra l'Agenzia Spaziale Italiana e il Nobel Samuel Ting, del Mit e del Cern di Ginevra, firmato oggi a Roma (1 page).

  9. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded in December 2003 to chemist Paul C. Lauterbur and physicist Peter Mansfield for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a long overdue recognition of the huge impact MRI has had in medical diagnostics and research is mentioned. MRI was derived, and remains an extension of nuclear magnetic resonance…

  10. The ozone hole and the 1995 Nobel prize in chemistry; Trou d`ozone et Prix Nobel 1995 de chimie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, A. [Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Inst. d`Astronomie et de Geophysique G. Lemaitre

    1996-03-01

    To mark to award of the 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry to three world renowned atmospheric chemists, this paper recalls the history of scientific progress in stratospheric ozone chemistry. Then it summarizes current knowledge of ozone-layer depletion and its impact on climate, vegetation and human health. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008

  12. Los cinco escritores lationoamericanos galardonados con el Nobel,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălina Constantinescu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Los discursos de recepción del Premio Nobel, momento decisivo en la vida de un escritor, ofrecen en la mayoría de los casos, la oportunidad de una evaluación de la obra, acaso una confesión, entre ensayo y autobiografía o plantean problemas mundiales o regionales de máximo interés delante de la Academia Sueca de las Letras, para ser escuchadas por el mundo entero, que expresan no solamente los ejes de su personalidad sino también un genero literario sui generis. Intentamos, a continuación, un enfoque de los discursos de aceptación de los cinco Nobel de la literatura hispanoamericana, para poner de relieve los rasgos característicos de la visión de unas destacadas personalidades del mundo literario contemporáneo.

  13. Premio Nobel de ciencias Económicas 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Amartya

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available

    La Academia Real de Ciencias de Suecia ha decidido otorgar el premio Banco de Suecia 1998 en Ciencias Económicas, en Memoria de Alfred Nobel, al Profesor Amartya Sen, del Trinity College, Reino Unido, y ciudadano indio, por sus contribuciones a la economía del bienestar.

     

     

     

  14. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [open quotes]for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.[close quotes] Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  15. [Telomeres: a Nobel Prize at the beginning… of the end].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpar, Shanna; Guittat, Lionel; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2011-10-01

    The 2009 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine was awarded to Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Carol W. Greider and Jack K. Szostak for their work on telomeres and telomerase. This prize acknowledges their pionneering discoveries on chromosomal extremities. Telomeres are the nucleoproteic complexes that may be found at the ends of linear chromosomes. They are essential for genomic stability and are involved in aging and tumorogenesis.

  16. Premio Nobel de Ciencias Económicas 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Academia Real de Ciencias de Suecia

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available La Academia Real de Ciencias de Suecia concedió el Premio Banco de Suecia en Ciencias Económicas en memoria a Alfred Nobel, 1999, al Profesor Robert A. Mundell, Universidad de Culumbia, Nueva York, por su analisis de la politica monetaria y fiscal en diferentes regimenes de la tasa de cambio, y por su analisis de las areas monetarias optimas.

  17. Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer met young scientists on a recent visit to the Laboratory. From left to right: Xavier Gréhant (CERN Openlab), Ewa Stanecka (ATLAS), Magda Kowalska (ISOLDE), Heinrich Rohrer, Stéphanie Beauceron (CMS) and Ana Gago Da Silva (UNOSAT).Heinrich Rohrer, who shared the 1986 Nobel prize for physics with Gerd Binnig for the design of the scanning tunnelling microscope, visited CERN on 25 June. Welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, he visited the ATLAS cavern and control room, the Computer Centre, the Unosat project, the Antimatter Decelerator and ISOLDE. At the end of his visit, he voiced his admiration for CERN and its personnel. As a renowned Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer has the opportunity to pass on his experience and enthusiasm to young scientists. During the evening meal, at which he met five young physicists and computer scientists, who were delighted with the chance to talk to him, he stressed the importance for re...

  18. The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Thomas A. Steitz and the structure of the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Over the past 200 years, there have been countless groundbreaking discoveries in biology and medicine at Yale University. However, one particularly noteworthy discovery with profoundly important and broad consequences happened here in just the past two decades. In 2009, Thomas Steitz, the Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "studies of the structure and function of the ribosome," along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. This article covers the historical context of Steitz's important discovery, the techniques his laboratory used to study the ribosome, and the impact that this research has had, and will have, on the future of biological and medical research.

  19. The 2007 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for surface chemistry: understanding nanoscale phenomena at surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Michael

    2007-11-01

    The 2007 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Gerhard Ertl for his seminal work in the area of surface science, particularly at the gas-solid interface. Although Ertl began his career at a time when the term "nanotechnology" was not yet known, his contributions to the field have paved the way for many future scientists in this area and led to a deeper understanding of catalysis and other surface-specific processes at the nanoscale. Here, we summarize the scientific developments that guided early progress in surface science, and we explore the major advancements in Ertl's career, including his work on adsorption and oxidation of small molecules on metal surfaces. Significant contributions of other key scientists to this rich area are also presented.

  20. The Popular Nobel Prize Award Banquet: Distanced Participation of an Interacting TV-Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Marlene Hugoson

    2012-01-01

    When chemist, inventor, and businessman Alfred Nobel died in 1896 he left a will establishing the Nobel Prize. Over the years, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony, and the following Nobel Prize Award Banquet, developed into a spectacular and well-known event that was sometimes broadcast on radio. Then, in the year 1950, it was shown on Swedish television for the first time. In the decades that followed television became part of almost each and every household, and the viewing audience could now fo...

  1. The roads to Stockholm: On the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ On November 27, 1895, Alfred Nobel signed his last will and testament in Paris that specified details of five prizes to "those who during the past year have done humanity the greatest service". For the past over 100 years, the Nobel Prizes have been forever linked to the supreme achievement of the modern world in science and literature. Winning the Nobel Prizes became dreams of many young and not so young people in science and literature. "How to win a Nobel Prize?" was an innocent question posed to Sydney Brenner recently by a Chinese student.

  2. When a misperception favors a tragedy: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize of 1921.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Couto, Lucélio B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2013-11-20

    Carlos Chagas, the discoverer of Chagas' disease was nominated to the Nobel Prize in 1921, but none did win the prize in that year. As a leader of a young scientist team, he discovered all aspects of the new disease from 1909 to 1920. It is still obscure why he did not win the Nobel Prize in 1921. Chagas was discarded by Gunnar Hedrèn on April 16, 1921. Hedrèn should have made a written report about the details of his evaluation to the Nobel Committee. However, such a document has not been found in the Nobel Committee Archives. No evidence of detractions made by Brazilian scientists on Chagas was found. Since Chagas nomination was consistent with the Nobel Committee requirements, as seen in the presentation letter by until now unknown Cypriano de Freitas, it become clear that Chagas did not win the Nobel Prize exclusively because the Nobel Committee did not perceive the importance of his discovery. Thus, it would be fair a posthumous Nobel Prize of 1921 to Carlos Chagas. A diploma of the Nobel Prize, as precedent with Dogmack in 1947, would recognize the merit of the scientist who made the most complete medical discovery of all times.

  3. 中微子实验的过去、现在与未来--2015年诺贝尔物理学奖解读%PAST,PRESENT AND FUTURE OF NEUTRINO EXPERIMENTS---INTERPRETATION OF THE NOBEL PRIZE IN PHYSICS 2015

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈少敏

    2015-01-01

    Recently ,the topic on neutrinos has become a hot interdisciplinary research direc‐tion among particle physics ,nuclear physics ,geophysics ,astrophysics and cosmology .On Oc‐tober 6 ,2015 ,the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics jointly to Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B .McDonald for the discovery of neutrino oscillations , w hich in turn proved that neutrinos have mass . From the view of development of neutrino physics ,this article introduces neutrino experiments from the past to the present and the fu‐ture outlook .Special focus is given to neutrino oscillation experiments for the interpretation of the prize .The ongoing and proposed neutrino experiments in China are also described .%中微子是目前粒子物理、核物理、地球物理与天体物理及宇宙学研究中的一个交叉热门研究方向.2015年10月6日,瑞典皇家科学院宣布2015年诺贝尔物理学奖授予梶田隆章(Takaaki Kajita)和阿瑟・麦克唐纳(Arthur B .McDonald),以表彰他们在发现中微子振荡也就是中微子有质量上所作出的贡献.本文将从中微子物理发展历史角度介绍中微子实验的过去、当前状况及未来发展,尤其是通过侧重对中微子振荡实验的介绍来解读该奖项.最后,还介绍了国内目前正在开展与拟议建设的中微子实验.

  4. Premios Nobel de Quimica y Filatelia. Parte III: polimeros, coloides, quimica aplicada, quimica inorganica y premios siglo XXI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez-Reina, Marlon; Amado-Gonzalez, Eliseo

    2014-01-01

    En Premios Nobel de Quimica y Filatelia, Parte III, se hace una revision de los sellos postales emitidos en diferentes paises para conmemorar los Premios Nobel en polimeros, coloides, quimica aplicada...

  5. The breakthrough in understanding immune response——introduction of Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2011%揭示免疫应答的关键环节——2011年诺贝尔生理学或医学奖简介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张婷; 王晓民

    2011-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2011 is divided, with one half jointly to Bruce A. Beutler and Jules A. Hoffmann for their discoveries concerning the activation of innate immunity and the other half to Ralph M. Steinman for his discovery of the dendritic cell and its role in adaptive immunity. The detailed understanding of the immune system provided by the new Nobel laureates has given other researchers the ability to improve vaccines and to attempt to stimulate immune reactions to cancer and inflammation.%2011年诺贝尔生理学或医学奖颁发给分别来白法国、美国和加拿大的3位免疫学家Jules Hoffmann、Bruce Beutler和Ralph Steinman,以表彰他们对免疫应答包括先天免疫及获得性免疫中关键环节的揭示.他们的工作为疫苗改进,癌症及炎性反应的防治开辟了新的道路.

  6. Yoshinori Ohsumi's Nobel Prize for mechanisms of autophagy: from basic yeast biology to therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsztein, D C; Frake, R A

    2016-12-01

    On 3 October 2016, Japanese cell biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 'for his discoveries of mechanisms for autophagy'; autophagy being an intracellular degradation pathway that helps maintain cytoplasmic homeostasis. This commentary discusses Ohsumi's Nobel prize-winning work in context, before explaining the clinical relevance of autophagy.

  7. The Nobel Prize in the Physics Class: Science, History, and Glamour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach, Haim

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel strategy for teaching physics: using the Nobel Physics Prize as an organizational theme for high school or even first year university physics, bringing together history, social contexts of science, and central themes in modern physics. The idea underlying the strategy is that the glamour and glitter of the Nobel Prize…

  8. The Popular Nobel Prize Award Banquet: Distanced Participation of an Interacting TV-Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Hugoson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available When chemist, inventor, and businessman Alfred Nobel died in 1896 he left a will establishing the Nobel Prize. Over the years, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony, and the following Nobel Prize Award Banquet, developed into a spectacular and well-known event that was sometimes broadcast on radio. Then, in the year 1950, it was shown on Swedish television for the first time. In the decades that followed television became part of almost each and every household, and the viewing audience could now follow the festivities as they occurred, almost as if they had been invited themselves. A playful attitude towards the event developed, consisting of banter but also of distanced participation in which people dressed up and staged their own Nobel Prize Award “banquets” in front of their television-sets. In later years this phenomenon has developed, simultaneously becoming both more elaborate and more common, and today there is a variety of privately arranged Nobel Prize Award “banquets” to be found throughout Sweden, some even including their own Nobel Prize Award Ceremonies and attending royalty. In my paper, I will present this public parallel to the highly exclusive Nobel Prize Award Banquet and touch on international counterparts to it and the humorous language that surrounds these events.

  9. Postage Stamps and Peace Education: The Nobel Peace Prize. Peace Education Miniprints No. 79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Irwin

    This paper suggests how peace stamps can be used to further understanding of the movement for world peace. In this effort the Nobel Peace Prize, the most prestigious award in the world for peacemaking, is used as a focus. In the prizes from 1901 to the present, the Norwegian Nobel committees have recognized the major paths to peace. This variety…

  10. L’Europe méritait-t-elle le prix Nobel

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Teulon

    2014-01-01

    The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded in 2012 to the European Union. The paper questions the legitimacy of such an award considering that it does not fit in the context defined by Alfred Nobel. It is a perversion: instead of being the reward of merit, the

  11. The end of a noble narrative? European integration narratives after the Nobel Peace Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James; Murray, Philomena

    The award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU) came as a shock and surprise. Not only was the Eurozone economic crisis undermining public support for the EU, but the crisis was also seriously challenging the EU’s image in global politics. Although the Nobel Committee acknowled...

  12. The Nobel Prize in the Physics Class: Science, History, and Glamour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach, Haim

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel strategy for teaching physics: using the Nobel Physics Prize as an organizational theme for high school or even first year university physics, bringing together history, social contexts of science, and central themes in modern physics. The idea underlying the strategy is that the glamour and glitter of the Nobel Prize…

  13. Paul Ehrlich: the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine 1908.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Antonio; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lagonia, Paolo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    We wish to commemorate Paul Ehrlich on the centennial of his being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908. His studies are now considered as milestones in immunology: the morphology of leukocytes; his side-chain theory where he defined the cellular receptor for first time; and his clarification of the difference between serum therapy and chemotherapy. Ehrlich also invented the first chemotherapeutic drug: compound 606, or Salvarsan. We have used some original documents from the Royal Society of London, where Ehrlich was a fellow, and from Leipzig University, where he took a degree in medicine.

  14. A Review of Toni Morrison's Nobel Prize Speech

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冉; 张帆

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with and old story,Toni Morrison uses her unique method to tell us the functions of language and her perspectives of language and literature.From this story,we can understand her writing standpoint and her determination of making contributions to her nation and people.This paper tries to review her speech given in the Nobel Prize in Literature from four aspects.They are the introduction and comprehension of the story,narrative point of view,discourse and power and feminist criticism.

  15. Rencontre avec Georges Charpak, Prix Nobel de Physique

    CERN Multimedia

    UMR Université, Ecole des Mines, IN2P3/CNRS

    1994-01-01

    L'installation au sein de l'Ecole des Mines de Nantes de L'Unité Mixte de Recherche SUBATECH a été marquée par la "leçon inaugurale" du Prix Nobel. Dans un foisonnant exposé où l'humour et la science s'entrelacent sans cesse, Georges Charpak nous raconte l'aventure de la chambre à étincelles, les évolutions les plus récentes de la médecine nucléaire ... et bien d'autres choses encore ....

  16. Cosmic Anger Abdus Salam - The First Muslim Nobel Scientist

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, Gordon Murray

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a biography of Abdus Salam, the first Muslim to win a Nobel Prize for Science (Physics 1979), who was nevertheless excommunicated and branded as a heretic in his own country. His achievements are often overlooked, even besmirched. Realizing that the whole world had to be his stage, he pioneered the International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, a vital focus of Third World science which remains as his monument. A staunch Muslim, he was ashamed of thedecline of science in the heritage of Islam, and struggled doggedly to restore it to its former glory. Undermined by

  17. Los cinco escritores lationoamericanos galardonados con el Nobel,

    OpenAIRE

    Cătălina Constantinescu

    2009-01-01

    Los discursos de recepción del Premio Nobel, momento decisivo en la vida de un escritor, ofrecen en la mayoría de los casos, la oportunidad de una evaluación de la obra, acaso una confesión, entre ensayo y autobiografía o plantean problemas mundiales o regionales de máximo interés delante de la Academia Sueca de las Letras, para ser escuchadas por el mundo entero, que expresan no solamente los ejes de su personalidad sino también un genero literario sui generis. Intentamos, a continuación...

  18. Amartya Sen, premio nobel de economía 1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Amartya Kumar

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Entrevista

    El economista Amartya Sen, de 64 años, fue galardonado el pasado miércoles con el Premio Nobel de Economía por sus trabajos sobre el hambre en el mundo y su relación entre la democracia y la satisfacción de las necesidades básicas de los seres humanos. Casado en terceras nupcias, Sen ha sido profesor en universidades de Asia, América del Norte y Europa. Actualmente enseña en el Trinity College, de la Universidad de Cambridge, en el Reino Unido.

  19. [On the Awarding of the First Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to Emil von Behring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Enke, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    In his will of 1895, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel laid the foundation for prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace to those who had "conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" during the last year. The Nobel Prize is today widely considered as the most prestigious international symbol of scientific excellence, but it still is an exciting research question how it gained such prestige. Drawing on files from the Emil von Behring Archive in Marburg, Germany, and the Archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm this essay aims at shedding light on why the first Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1901 was awarded the German immunologist Emil von Behring, and how this decision was viewed at that time. This study is part of a research project that explores mechanisms leading to scientific recognition by using the example of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.

  20. CERN Library | Tord Ekelöf presents the proceedings of the Nobel Symposium on the Higgs Boson Discovery and Other Recent LHC Results | 12 June

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Thursday, 12 June 2014 at 16:00 in the Library (52-1-052).   The “Nobel Symposium on LHC results” took place at Krusenberg mansion, Uppsala, Sweden on 13-17 May 2013. The aim of the Symposium was to give an overview of the latest experimental and theoretical results pertaining to the LHC programme but also to give an occasion to ponder over the implications of these results in the broader context of the past, present and future evolution of the field of Particle Physics. “Nobel Symposium 154: The Higgs Boson Discovery and Other Recent LHC Results”, ed. by Tord Ekelöf, Physica Scripta T154, IOP, 2013, ISBN 9789789789781. * Coffee will be served from 15:30 * E-proceedings available here.

  1. "Highly qualified loser"? Harvey Cushing and the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Schlich, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Neurosurgery, in particular surgery of the brain, was recognized as one of the most spectacular transgressions of the traditional limits of surgical work. With their audacious, technically demanding, laboratory-based, and highly promising new interventions, prominent neurosurgeons were primary candidates for the Nobel Prize. Accordingly, neurosurgical pioneers such as Victor Horsley and, in particular, Harvey Cushing continued to be nominated for the prize. However, only António Egas Moniz was eventually awarded the prestigious award in 1949 for the introduction of frontal lobotomy, an intervention that would no longer be prize-worthy from today's perspective. Horsley and Cushing, who were arguably the most important proponents of early neurosurgery, remained "highly qualified losers," as such cases have been called. This paper examines the nominations, reviews, and discussions kept in the Nobel Archives to understand the reasons for this remarkable choice. At a more general level, the authors use the example of neurosurgery to explore the mechanisms of scientific recognition and what could be called the enacting of excellence in science and medicine.

  2. A Staged Reading of the Play: No No Nobel

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Staged Reading of the Play: No No Nobel -- In Biology, what discovery is considered the most important breakthrough of the 20th century? In Chemistry, what pattern development enabled chemists and physicists to understand the nature of and ultimately the atomic physics of the elements? In Physics, what experiment and theory in nuclear physics led to the most important journalistic story of the 20th century? In Cosmology, what theory was developed that enabled the understanding of the now named Big Bang theory and the evolution of the universe? In Science Education, what graduate student made a most important observation and ultimately the identification of a remnant of a supernova explosion? Join us for a dramatic staged reading of No No Nobel and find out what unifies all the above questions. The playwright is the science historian David Cassidy and the staged reading is performed by the Baltimore Improv Group www.bigimprov.org . After the performance, the playwright, the director Mike Harris and the actors will be available for a talk-back audience discussion. Produced by Brian Schwartz, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York

  3. Mario Vargas Llosa : Premio Nobel de Literatura 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Valenzuela Garcés

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available La historia del otorgamiento del Premio Nobel de Literatura es bien conocida yen ella podemos advertir, con los estupores del caso, injusticias notables, omisionesimperdonables, olvidos que podrían poner en duda la relevancia de este premio decarácter ecuménico. Felizmente tenemos, y son las más, premiaciones muy justas,reconocimientos que concitaron el acuerdo y el aplauso de todos en su momentoy que no solo confirmaron la notable trayectoria del autor laureado, sino su lanzamientoa nivel universal. Nombres como los de Steinbeck, Camus o García Márqueznos devolvieron la fe en este premio y en lo que no debería dejar de ser nunca: laverdadera consagración de una obra, de notable calidad e importancia, y la de unescritor, ejemplo de conducta moral. Afortunadamente esto es lo que ha sucedido el2010, al recaer el Premio Nobel en un escritor de nuestra casa, comprometido con sutiempo y con su obra como Mario Vargas Llosa, quien es, antes que nada, un hombreconsecuente con sus ideas y creencias.

  4. Biomedical applications of green synthesized Nobel metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zia Ul Haq; Khan, Amjad; Chen, Yongmei; Shah, Noor S; Muhammad, Nawshad; Khan, Arif Ullah; Tahir, Kamran; Khan, Faheem Ullah; Murtaza, Behzad; Hassan, Sadaf Ul; Qaisrani, Saeed Ahmad; Wan, Pingyu

    2017-08-01

    Synthesis of Nobel metal nanoparticles, play a key role in the field of medicine. Plants contain a substantial number of organic constituents, like phenolic compounds and various types of glycosides that help in synthesis of metal nanoparticles. Synthesis of metal nanoparticles by green method is one of the best and environment friendly methods. The major significance of the green synthesis is lack of toxic by-products produced during metal nanoparticle synthesis. The nanoparticles, synthesized by green method show various significant biological activities. Most of the research articles report the synthesized nanoparticles to be active against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Some of these bacteria include Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The synthesized nanoparticles also show significant antifungal activity against Trichophyton simii, Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Trichophyton rubrum as well as different types of cancer cells such as breast cancer cell line. They also exhibit significant antioxidant activity. The activities of these Nobel metal nano-particles mainly depend on the size and shape. The particles of small size with large surface area show good activity in the field of medicine. The synthesized nanoparticles are also active against leishmanial diseases. This research article explores in detail the green synthesis of the nanoparticles and their uses thereof. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. DNA-repair crew won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015%2015年诺贝尔化学奖钟情于基因组DNA“修理工”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 彭斌; 许兴智

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015 was awarded jointly to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for having mapped and explained how the cell repairs its DNA and safeguards the genetic information. In this overview, we briefly introduced research achievements of the laureates and the link between DNA-repair and etiology, development, diagnosis, therapy, and the prevention of human diseases, cancer in particular.%2015年诺贝尔化学奖授予了Tomas Lindahl、Paul Modrich和Aziz Sancar三位科学家,以表彰他们在“绘制细胞修复损伤DNA和捍卫遗传信息(完整性)的机制研究”方面所做出的杰出贡献。简要介绍了三位获奖者的研究工作和成就,以及DNA损伤修复与人类疾病(尤其是癌症)的发生、发展、诊断、治疗及预防的相关性。

  6. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia [Division of Mathematical Physics, LTH, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: cecilia.jarlskog@matfys.lth.se

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008.

  7. An Introduction to 2007 Nobel Laureates of Chemistry:Chemical Processes on Solid Surfaces%固体表面上的化学过程——2007年诺贝尔化学奖简介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑仁垟

    2007-01-01

    2007年10月,瑞典皇家科学院宣布将本年度诺贝尔化学奖授予德国马普学会弗里茨-哈伯研究所的格哈德·埃特尔(Gerhard Ertl)教授,以表彰他在固体表面化学过程研究领域做出的开拓性成就。埃特尔1936年10月10日生于德国斯图加特,大学生涯在慕尼黑技术大学度过,并于1965年获博士学位。

  8. A study on innovation methods of all the Nobel Prize Laureates in chemistry%诺贝尔化学奖得主群体创新方法探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晶

    2014-01-01

    对诺贝尔化学奖得主群体在获奖成就上所采用的研究方法进行了系统考察,分析了创新方法类型的演变与化学研究对象和概念之间的关系,挖掘了创新方法的化学学科特征.结果表明,在思维创新方面,化学奖得主从对传统培根式归纳法的强调,发展到对理论和实验之间关系的多元理解,并持有不同程度的实在论.工具和仪器的革新带来了化学领域概念的变化,以及化学结构本体论状态上的改变.创新方法经历了开始将物理学的模型、仪器、测量与计算方法引入化学研究、追求实验方法的简单性;到仪器革命带来的新工具促进结构测定与机理研究;再至综合多学科研究方法以及多种仪器技术,结合有机合成、检测技术从结构与性能上探讨生命现象的分子基础,以及量子化学计算与模拟成为研究新利器等三个阶段.

  9. A statistical analysis of Nobel Prize laureates in economics 1969-2007%诺贝尔经济学奖获奖者的地理分布及数学化趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹莉

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨诺贝尔经济学奖39年的颁奖趋势及特点,及数学化趋势.方法 对搜集到的诺贝尔经济学奖获奖者资料及数据从地域分布、院校分布、专业分布、年龄分布以及获奖领域分布几个方面进行统计.结果 从数据上证明了诺贝尔经济学奖的"数学化"趋势的存在,以及其代表西方主流经济学发展趋势.结论 诺贝尔经济学奖代表了西方主流经济学的发展趋势,对它的统计分析有助于了解学习现代西方经济学理论,有助于融入世界经济学的研究潮流中.

  10. 1962年诺贝尔生理学和医学奖的三位获奖者%Nobel laureates for the medicine and physiology prize in 1962

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴闻

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1962年诺贝尔生理学和医学奖被授予沃森、克里克和威尔金斯三人,以表彰他们在DNA双螺旋结构研究中所作出的突出贡献.在这篇短文中,我们将简要介绍这三位获奖者的生平.同样在发现DNA双螺旋中作出杰出贡献的女科学家富兰克林(Franklin R),因英年早逝,未能登上诺贝尔领奖台[1].在本期中对她将有另文介绍.

  11. 诺贝尔物理学奖得主知识交流网络结构研究%Research into Structure of Network of Laureates of Nobel Prize in Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈蕾; 陈忠

    2006-01-01

    将诺贝尔物理学奖得主作为结点,在有知识交流的两位得主间添加一条连接,由此得到诺贝尔物理学奖得主知识交流网络.本文对此网络的结构特征进行研究,结果表明该网络的结构具有一般社会网络共有的Scale-free、度协调、负相关特征,而直径较一般社会网络大,聚集系数则明显较小.

  12. Honoring antiparasitics: The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-June Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Protozoa and helminths are the two main groups that cause parasitic diseases with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms. Protozoa are unicellular organisms like the malaria parasite Plasmodium, which is responsible for the majority of deaths associated with parasitic infections. Helminths are alternative parasites that can produce debilitating diseases in hosts, some of which result in chronic infections. The discovery of effective therapeutic drugs is the key to improving health in regions of poverty and poor sanitation where these parasites usually occur. It is very encouraging that the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Youyou Tu as well as William C. Campbell and Satoshi Õmura for their considerable contributions in discovering artemisinin and avermectin, respectively. Both drugs revolutionized therapies for filariasis and malaria, significantly reducing by large percentages their morbidity and mortality.

  13. The noble enigma: Chagas' nominations for the Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Coutinho

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Chagas, a Brazilian physician, discovered the American trypanosomiasis in 1909. Like other remarkable discoveries of those days, his work helped to articulate the insect-vector theory and other theoretical guidelines in tropical medicine. Unlike all other discoveries, all the stages of this work were accomplished in a few months and by a single man. Chagas' discovery was widely recognized at home and abroad. He was twice nominated for the Nobel Prize - in 1913 and in 1921-, but never received the award. Evidence suggests that the reasons for this failure are related to the violent opposition that Chagas faced in Brazil. The contentions towards Chagas were related to a rejection of the meritocratic procedures that gave him prominence, as well as to local petty politics.

  14. Nobel Prize winner visits CERN’s superconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Wednesday 23 April Georg Bednorz, who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1987, visited CERN along with 44 of his colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory. Georg Bednorz (second from right) with colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory in the LHC tunnel. On their arrival, Jos Engelen, the Chief Scientific Officer, gave the IBM group an introduction to CERN. Bednorz came to CERN only recently for the Open Days to give a seminar, but unfortunately did not have time to visit the experiments, so this trip was organised instead. Along with Alex Müller, Bednorz was awarded the Noble Prize for his discovery of superconductivity for the so-called high temperature superconductors, essentially copper-oxide-based compounds showing superconductivity at temperatures much higher than had previously been thought possible. The LHC magnets are built with low-temperature superconductors but many current leads that supply power to the LHC cryostats are made with...

  15. Paul Krugman, premio Nobel de economía 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Sequeiros Tizón, Julio Gaspar

    2010-01-01

    Con motivo de la concesión del Premio Nobel de Economía a Paul Krugman, en este artículo se revisa la evolución reciente de las teorías del comercio internacional, y se analiza cómo el paradigma neoclásico se ha ido reformando a sí mismo para dar cabida y explicación a los nuevos fenómenos que la evidencia empírica iba poniendo de manifiesto. Tras esta revisión se analizan las aportaciones de Paul Krugman que, junto con otros economistas encuadrados en el new neoclassical point of view o en l...

  16. [From apprenticeship to Nobel Prize: Henri Moissan's fabulous destiny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, O

    2008-01-01

    Born in Paris on September 28, 1852, son of an eastern railways' employee and of a dressmaker, Henri Moissan's secondary schooling in Meaux did not allow him to get access to the sesame diploma "baccalauréat" (GCE). In 1869, he did obtain a special certificate of secondary schooling so that he could become an apprentice in watch making. That could have been the end of the story, but dreadful event for France appeared to have beneficial effects for Moissan. Under the threat of the Prussian army, Moissan's family took refuge near Paris. This gave the young Henri the opportunity to register as a student for the second-class pharmacy diploma, which did not need, at the time, the GCE. Moissan became then a trainee in pharmacy in 1871. Meanwhile, he followed the special schooling of "Ecole de chimie" founded by E. Frémy, and then joined the laboratory of Dehérain at the Museum, where he worked in plant physiology. He finally obtained the famous "baccalauréat" (GCE) and could register as a student in first-class pharmacy. He became a pharmacist as well as a doctor in sciences. In 1883, Moissan was named professor at the school of pharmacy in Paris. In 1886, he isolated fluorine by electrolysis of fluorhydric acid, in the presence of potassium fluoride, at a low temperature. He then studied diamond synthesis and gave a start to high temperature chemistry, designing his famous furnace. These findings and many others allowed Moissan to rise to membership in many learned academies around the world. Crowning achievement, Moissan won the Nobel Prize in 1906. A man of culture, collector of autographs and paintings, he died in 1907. Nothing of that would have been possible if there had not been a second-class pharmacist diploma. The history of Henri Moissan is one of a rise from apprenticeship to the Nobel Prize.

  17. INTRODUCTION: Physics of Low-dimensional Systems: Nobel Symposium 73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Stig

    1989-01-01

    The physics of low-dimensional systems has developed in a remarkable way over the last decade and has accelerated over the last few years, in particular because of the discovery of the new high temperature superconductors. The new developments started more than fifteen years ago with the discovery of the unexpected quasi-one-dimensional character of the TTF-TCNQ. Since then the field of conducting quasi-one-dimensional organic systems have been rapidly growing. Parallel to the experimental work there has been an important theoretical development of great conceptual importance, such as charge density waves, soliton-like excitations, fractional charges, new symmetry properties etc. A new field of fundamental importance was the discovery of the Quantum Hall Effect in 1980. This field is still expanding with new experimental and theoretical discoveries. In 1986, then, came the totally unexpected discovery of high temperature superconductivity which started an explosive development. The three areas just mentioned formed the main themes of the Symposium. They do not in any way exhaust the progress in low-dimensional physics. We should mention the recent important development with both two-dimensional and one-dimensional and even zero-dimensional structures (quantum dots). The physics of mesoscopic systems is another important area where the low dimensionality is a key feature. Because of the small format of this Symposium we could unfortunately not cover these areas. A Nobel Symposium provides an excellent opportunity to bring together a group of prominent scientists for a stimulating exchange of new ideas and results. The Nobel Symposia are very small meetings by invitation only and the number of key international participants is typically in the range 25-40. These Symposia are arranged through a special Nobel Symposium Committee after proposal from individuals. This Symposium was sponsored by the Nobel Foundation through its Nobel Symposium Fund with grants from The

  18. G-protein-coupled receptors and their (Bio) chemical significance win 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Hsi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    ... signaling mechanisms of these biological ligands have been slow and hard to define. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2012 acknowledges the importance of GPCRs in these processes, especially for the contribution of Profs Robert J...

  19. Léon Lederman, Mel Schwartz and Jack Steinberger wre awarded the 1988 Nobel Physics Prize.

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    Léon Lederman (left), Mel Schwartz (right) and Jack Steinberger were awarded the 1988 Nobel Physics Prize for their 1962 experiment at Brookhaven which showed that neutrinos come in more than one kind.

  20. Muller's Nobel lecture on dose-response for ionizing radiation: ideology or science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    In his Nobel Prize Lecture of December 12, 1946, Hermann J. Muller argued that the dose-response for radiation-induced germ cell mutations was linear and that there was "no escape from the conclusion that there is no threshold". However, assessment of correspondence between Muller and Curt Stern 1 month prior to his Nobel Prize Lecture reveals that Muller knew the results and implications of a recently completed study at the University of Rochester under the direction of Stern, which directly contradicted his Nobel Prize Lecture. This finding is of historical importance since Muller's Nobel Lecture gained considerable international attention and is a turning point in the acceptance of the linearity model in risk assessment for germ cell mutations and carcinogens.

  1. Colloquium on the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs for their development in 1964 of the mass generation mechanism (the Higgs mechanism) in local gauge theories. This mechanism requires the existence of a massive scalar particle, the Higgs boson, and in 2012 the Higgs boson was finally observed at the Large Hadron Collider after an almost half a century search. In this talk we review the work of these Nobel recipients and discuss its implications.

  2. Scientific Activity Is a Better Predictor of Nobel Award Chances than Dietary Habits and Economic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Hideyuki Doi; Alexandre Heeren; Pierre Maurage

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have described a strong correlation between nutritional or economic data and the number of Nobel awards obtained across a large range of countries. This sheds new light on the intriguing question of the key predictors of Nobel awards chances. However, all these studies have been focused on a single predictor and were only based on simple correlation and/or linear model analysis. The main aim of the present study was thus to clarify this debate by simultaneously explorin...

  3. From stealing fire to cellular reprogramming: a scientific history leading to the 2012 Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensch, M William; Mummery, Christine L

    2013-06-04

    Cellular reprogramming was recently "crowned" with the award of the Nobel Prize to two of its groundbreaking researchers, Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka. The recent link between reprogramming and stem cells makes this appear almost a new field of research, but its historical roots have actually spanned more than a century. Here, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2012 is placed in its historical context.

  4. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now. and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein's biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the univerre, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA's plans for the next great telescope in space, the Jarnes Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where rtars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  5. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now, and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA s Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein s biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the universe, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA s plans for the next great telescope in space, the James Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where stars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  6. Another Nobel Prize linked to synchrotron radiation work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasnain, S.

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien 'for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP'. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry rewards the initial discovery of GFP and a series of important developments which have led to its use as a tagging tool in bioscience. By using DNA technology, researchers can now connect GFP to other interesting, but otherwise invisible, proteins. This glowing marker allows the movements, positions and interactions of the tagged proteins to be monitored. Osamu Shimomura was the first to isolate GFP from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, found off the west coast of North America, and discovered the protein's green glow [Shimomura et al. (1962). J. Cell. Comp. Physiol. 59, 223-240]. Martin Chalfie demonstrated the value of GFP as a luminous genetic tag. In one of his first experiments he coloured six individual cells in the transparent roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans with the aid of GFP. He had obtained the GFP gene (gfp) clone from Prasher [Prasher et al. (1992). Gene, 111, 229-233] and expressed it in E. coli. The GFP protein displayed a bright green fluorescence in this heterologous organism, suggesting that it could indeed serve as a versatile genetic marker in virtually all organisms. Chalfie transformed C. elegans with gfp under the control of a promoter regulating the expression of {beta}-tubulin, abundant in six touch receptor neurons in C. elegans. The organism subsequently expressed GFP from distinct positions in its body and at distinct times in its development [Chalfie et al. (1994). Science, 263, 802-805]. Roger Tsien contributed to the general understanding of how GFP glows by determining the formation of the GFP chromophore, a chemical group that absorbs and emits light. Tsien is best known for extending the colour palette of GFP beyond green, allowing researchers to follow several different biological processes at the same time

  7. Evolution of three Nobel Prize themes and a Nobel snub theme in chemistry: a bibliometric study with focus on international collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Sichao; Ahlgren, Per

    2017-01-01

    In this study, three chemistry research themes closely associated with the Nobel Prize are bibliometrically analyzed-Ribozyme, Ozone and Fullerene-as well as a research theme in chemistry not associated with the Nobel Prize (a Nobel snub theme): Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation. We analyze, based on an algorithmically constructed publication-level classification system, the evolution of the four themes with respect to publication volume and international collaboration, using two datasets, one of them a subset of highly cited publications, for each considered time period. The focus of the study is on international collaboration, where co-occurrence of country names in publications is used as a proxy for international collaboration. For all four themes, especially for Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation, the publication volumes increase considerably from the earliest period to the later periods. The international collaboration rate shows an increasing trend for each theme. For Ozone, Fullerene and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation, the international collaboration rate tend to be higher for the highly cited publications compared to full datasets. With regard to the evolution of number of countries per international publication and per highly cited international publication, a vast majority of the distributions are positively skewed, with a large share of publications with two countries. With respect to the last four periods of the study, the concentration to two countries per publication is more pronounced for the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller equation theme compared to the three Nobel Prize themes.

  8. Nobel Prize Literature; A Selection of the Works of Forty-Four Nobel Prize Winning Authors in the Library of Dutchess Community College, with Biographical and Critical Sketches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Terry E., Comp.

    This bibliography is a compilation of works by 44 Nobel Prize winning authors presently available at the Dutchess Community College library. Each entry describes the piece of literature for which the author received an award, provides a brief sketch of the writer, includes a commentary on the themes of major works, and lists the writer's works. An…

  9. James Chadwick Nobel Prize for Physics 1935. Discovery of the neutron; James Chadwick Premio Nobel de Fisica 1935. Descubrimiento del neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    James Chadwick (1981-1974) was a key figure in the field of nuclear science. Through his studies, he researched the disintegration of atoms by bombarding alpha particles and proved the existence of neutrons. For this discovery, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1935. (Author)

  10. Eugene F. Fama: Nobel prize for 2013: Capital market efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded to the American economists, Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller. The monetarists, Fama and Hansen, from the University of Chicago, and the Neo- Keynesian, Shiller, from the Yale University, according to the Swedish Royal Academy, won this prestigious prize for their research providing mathematical and economic models to determine (irregularities in the stock value trends at the stock exchanges. With his colleagues, in the 1960s Fama established that, in the short term, it is extremely difficult to forecast stock prices, given that new information gets embedded in the prices rather quickly. Shiller, however, determined that, although it is almost impossible to predict the stock prices for a period of few days, this is not true for a period of several years. He discovered that the stock prices fluctuate much more substantially than corporation dividents, and that the relationship between prices and dividends tends to decline when high, and to grow when low. This pattern does not apply only to stocks, but also to bonds and other forms of capital.

  11. Robert J. Shiller: Nobel prize for 2013: Capital market efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded to the American economists, Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller. The monetarists, Fama and Hansen, from the University of Chicago, and the Neo- Keynesian, Shiller, from the Yale University, according to the Swedish Royal Academy, won this prestigious prize for their research providing mathematical and economic models to determine (irregularities in the stock value trends at the stock exchanges. With his colleagues, in the 1960s Fama established that, in the short term, it is extremely difficult to forecast stock prices, given that new information gets embedded in the prices rather quickly. Shiller, however, determined that, although it is almost impossible to predict the stock prices for a period of few days, this is not true for a period of several years. He discovered that the stock prices fluctuate much more substantially than corporation dividents, and that the relationship between prices and dividends tends to decline when high, and to grow when low. This pattern does not apply only to stocks, but also to bonds and other forms of capital.

  12. About the Nobel peace price awarded to the GIEC; Autour du prix Nobel de la paix pour le GIEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourcade, J.Ch

    2008-02-15

    On October 12, 2007, the Nobel peace price was awarded to Al Gore and to the less mediatized IPCC (intergovernmental panel on climate change). This awarding to a group of scientists may look surprising. However, it just reflects the fear that climatic change represents a threat for the international safety. It shows that any mastering action of this global warming involves a very strategical sector, the energy sector, and disturbs our ways of producing, of consuming and of transporting ourselves. It is of prime importance to maintain the dialogue between the supporters of the two opposite visions of the world with contradictory interests, since the climate topic is a strong source of potential conflicts. This is one of the missions of the IPCC, a group of experts elected by their peers to establish a state-of-the-art of the scientific knowledge about climate change. This original scientific institution intercedes here not as a judge but as a warrant of the truthfulness of the informations in domains where the knowledge remains fragile and disputed. This dossier presents the contribution of the IPCC (GIEC in French) to the climate change debate, and the CIRED, a mixed research unit involved in the sustainable development issue. (J.S.)

  13. The Nobel Peace Prize from a Romanian perspective – the interwar period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilica Sirbu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prizes are widely regarded as the ultimate achievement by researchers, writers and politicians. Due to its uniqueness and the values it stands for, the Nobel Peace Prize seems increasingly important in the modern world. To this point, no Romanian citizen was awarded this prize, but how many of them were nominated and how close were those nominated to winning this prize? Based on the archives of the Nobel Institute, this paper presents the Romanian nominees during the interwar period, their image and their activity as it appears in the nomination letters. The documents show that the name of some Romanians appears in the letters of nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize, their works and ideas being of a real interest. Those who nominated them tried to influence the decisions of the Nobel Committee in favor of their candidate. The results were not positive, but Romanians, the nominees as the nominators, were among those keeping pace with the events, the politics and the peace movements in Europe during a troubled time.

  14. Scientific activity is a better predictor of nobel award chances than dietary habits and economic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Doi

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have described a strong correlation between nutritional or economic data and the number of Nobel awards obtained across a large range of countries. This sheds new light on the intriguing question of the key predictors of Nobel awards chances. However, all these studies have been focused on a single predictor and were only based on simple correlation and/or linear model analysis. The main aim of the present study was thus to clarify this debate by simultaneously exploring the influence of food consumption (cacao, milk, and wine, economic variables (gross domestic product and scientific activity (number of publications and research expenditure on Nobel awards. An innovative statistical analysis, hierarchical partitioning, has been used because it enables us to reduce collinearity problems by determining and comparing the independent contribution of each factor. Our results clearly indicate that a country's number of Nobel awards can be mainly predicted by its scientific achievements such as number of publications and research expenditure. Conversely, dietary habits and the global economy variable are only minor predictors; this finding contradicts the conclusions of previous studies. Dedicating a large proportion of the GDP to research and to the publication of a high number of scientific papers would thus create fertile ground for obtaining Nobel awards.

  15. Scientific activity is a better predictor of nobel award chances than dietary habits and economic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideyuki; Heeren, Alexandre; Maurage, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have described a strong correlation between nutritional or economic data and the number of Nobel awards obtained across a large range of countries. This sheds new light on the intriguing question of the key predictors of Nobel awards chances. However, all these studies have been focused on a single predictor and were only based on simple correlation and/or linear model analysis. The main aim of the present study was thus to clarify this debate by simultaneously exploring the influence of food consumption (cacao, milk, and wine), economic variables (gross domestic product) and scientific activity (number of publications and research expenditure) on Nobel awards. An innovative statistical analysis, hierarchical partitioning, has been used because it enables us to reduce collinearity problems by determining and comparing the independent contribution of each factor. Our results clearly indicate that a country's number of Nobel awards can be mainly predicted by its scientific achievements such as number of publications and research expenditure. Conversely, dietary habits and the global economy variable are only minor predictors; this finding contradicts the conclusions of previous studies. Dedicating a large proportion of the GDP to research and to the publication of a high number of scientific papers would thus create fertile ground for obtaining Nobel awards.

  16. The Nobel Prize and otolaryngology: 'Papa Gunnar's' promotion of his peers Gustav Killian and Themistocles Gluck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Halling, Thorsten; Fangerau, Heiner

    2016-09-01

    This study is part of a larger project investigating the enactment of excellence in medicine, with a focus on the Nobel Prize. It takes a closer look at two promising candidates for the Prize in the 1920s and 1930s, Gustav Killian and Themistocles Gluck, and aims at reconstructing their Nobel careers as well as taking Gunnar Holmgren's role as a nominator and evaluator behind the curtains into account. Besides the files collected at the Nobel Archive, the paper is based on a review of scientific publications and ergo-biographical sketches. An analysis of Nobel Prize nominations and evaluations offer a unique perspective to study aspects of the history of otolaryngology. Using original files in the archive of the Nobel committee for physiology or medicine in Sweden, this historical vignette explores judgments of scientific innovation and performance in the history of otolaryngology during the first half of the 20th century. This study shows that Gunnar Holmgren, the founder of Acta Oto-Laryngologica in 1918, repeatedly put forward scholars within the field as prime contenders for the award.

  17. [Tuberculosis 110 years after the Nobel Prize awarded to Koch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritacco, Viviana; Kantor, Isabel N

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1905 to Robert Koch "for his investigations and discoveries in relation to tuberculosis (TB)". He discovered the causal agent of TB, described the four principles that since then have guided research in communicable diseases and also prepared the old tuberculin, a bacillary extract that failed as a healing element but allowed the early diagnosis of TB infection and promoted the understanding of cellular immunity. After his death, the most conspicuous achievements against TB were the BCG vaccine, and the discovery of streptomycin, the antibiotic that launched the era of the effective treatment of TB. Drug-resistance soon appeared. In Argentina, studies on drug resistance began in the 60s. In the 70s, shortened anti-TB drug schemes were introduced consisting in two-month treatment with four drugs, followed by four months with two drugs. The incidence of TB decreased worldwide, but the immune depression associated with awarded together with the misuse of anti-TB drugs allowed the emergence of multidrug resistance and extensive resistance, with the emergence of nosocomial outbreaks worldwide, including Argentina. New rapid diagnostic methods based on molecular biology were developed and also new drugs, but the treatment of multidrug resistant and extensively resistant TB is still difficult and expensive. TB research has marked several milestones in medical sciences, including the monumental Koch postulates, the tuberculin skin test that laid the basis for understanding cell-mediated immunity, the first design of randomized clinical trials and the use of combined multi-drug treatments.

  18. [Avermectin, from winning the Nobel Prize to "innovation in China"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinsong; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-03-04

    The uprise of the superpower nations is always accompanied by the breakthrough and advances of technologies and innovations in the history. Natural products play very important role in human health, such as anticancer molecular taxol, anti-infection drug artemisinin that save a lot of lives, metabolic disease treatment, nutrition and health care. However, more has never been explored. With the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine awarded to William C. Campbell, Satoshi Omura, and Youyou Tu for the discovery of avermectins and artemisinin respectively, the second "Golden age" in the development of natural product is dawning. China is a "world factory" and natural drugs-rich country, but how to upgrade and advance the industry and realize the China dream? Avermectins, produced by Streptomyces avermitilis, are pesticide with high efficiency and low levels of side effects. However, the low producer and expensive development pattern of high consumption, high contamination is not sustainable. Solving the problem, increasing the production and utilization of raw material, reducing the energy consumption and cost of production, decreasing environmental pollution are key to transform China into a power house. In this paper, we case-study avermectins to review the industry development driven by fundamental research. Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy.of Sciences increased the production of avermectin 1000 folds to 9 g/L, which out licensed to new Veyong biochemical Ltd and avermectin Coalitions. As a result, Merck Sharp and Dohme ceased the manufacture of avermectins. The success also shed lights on the improvement of other natural product drugs in China.

  19. [Posthumous nomination for Medicine Nobel Prizes II. The positivism era (1849-1899)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Coke, R

    1997-06-01

    The author proposes the nomination of great physicians of the second half of the XIX century for a posthumous Medicine Nobel Prize. The valorization given by medical historians Garrison, Lavastine, Castiglioni, Lain Entralgo and Guerra, is used to select the better candidates. One to three names are assigned by year from 1849 to 1899. Four categories of Nobel prizes are assigned: a) Basic biological disciplines, b) Clinical and surgical medicine, pathology and specialties, c) Discoverers of transcendental diseases that are eponyms and d) New medical technologies. A total of 84 nominees for the Nobel Prize are presented. These lists are presented as preliminary and tentative to allow an extensive debate about the history of medicine during the nineteenth century.

  20. Chemistry in the News: 1998 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer B.

    1999-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Walter Kohn (University of California at Santa Barbara) for his development of the density-functional theory and to John A. Pople (Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois) for his development of computational methods in quantum chemistry. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Robert F. Fuchgott (State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn), Louis J. Ignarro (University of California at Los Angeles), and Ferid Murad (University of Texas Medical School at Houston) for identifying nitric oxide as a key biological signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system.

  1. El Legado de Johannes Diderik van der Waals y su Conferencia Nobel The Legacy of Johannes Diderik van der Waals and his Nobel Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José O Valderrama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El autor presenta la conferencia que dictó Johannes Diderik van der Waals cuando recibió el premio Nobel de física el año 1910. Este trabajo es una contribución a las celebraciones que se realizan alrededor del mundo para conmemorar los cien años desde que van der Waals recibiera el máximo galardón. La conferencia resume en forma simple pero detallada algunos de sus principales logros; en particular la ecuación de estado, el principio de estados correspondientes y la teoría de mezclas. Estas pioneras ideas de van der Waals han influenciado efectivamente varias áreas de la ciencia, pero en particular estos tres conceptos, y que fueron los que motivaron su merecido premio Nobel. Este artículo concluye que aún después de 100 años del Nobel y más de 125 de la Tesis doctoral, y a pesar de muchos otros extraordinarios logros en la física y en la termodinámica, los conceptos de van der Waals siguen más vigentes que nunca.The author presents the conference that van der Waals delivered when he received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1910. This work is a contribution to the several commemorating activities that are be-ing organized around the world to celébrate the 100 years since van der Waals was awarded the máximum prize. The conference summarizes some of the main achievements and in particular the equation of state, the principie of corresponding states and the theory of mixtures. These pioneering ideas of van der Waals have influenced several áreas of physics and thermodynamics but in particular these three concepts, which motivated his merited Nobel Prize. The paper concludes that even after a hundred years since the Nobel and more than 125 years since the doctoral thesis, and despite of many other extraordinary advances in physics and thermodynamics, the concepts of van der Waals continué more valid than ever.

  2. EDITORIAL: UN NOBEL A LA TENACIDAD EN CONTRA DE LOS DOGMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Armando Cortés

    2005-01-01

    La Asamblea de los premios Nobel en el Instituto Karolinska de Medicina decidió en esta ocasión otorgar el Nobel de Medicina y Fisiología 2005 a los científicos australianos Barry J. Marshall y J. Robin Warren resaltando «la tenacidad» a la hora de cuestionar los dogmas establecidos en torno a la gastritis y la úlcera de estómago o de duodeno. Los dos patólogos demostraron que Helicobacter pylori es la causa de ambos trastornos. En 1982, cuando presentaron sus investigaciones, se consideraba ...

  3. ["A change in medical thinking?" or "over-eager literary activity?" August Bier, homeopathy and the Nobel Prize 1906-1936].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils

    2015-01-01

    This essay explains the nomination and evaluation procedure for the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. Its research is based on original files and on the example of August Karl Gustav Bier (1861-1949). It discusses the minutes of the Nobel Committee for physiology or medicine, which are kept in the Nobel Archives, as well as the unusually high number of nominations of August Bier and the nominations submitted by him; it also describes the reasons why August Bier, in the end, never received the Nobel Prize. The essay focuses mainly on the reception of Bier's homeopathic theses by the Nobel Prize Committee and his nominators.

  4. Nobel 2002: impulso a la teoría económica experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Talavera Aldana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Se registran los procedimientos para otorgar los premios Nobel en ciencias económicas, además de las aportaciones de Vernon Smith y sus posibles aplicaciones en un debate actual de gran importancia para México: la desrregulación de la industria generadora de energía eléctrica.

  5. Introducing Taiwanese undergraduate students to the nature of science through Nobel Prize stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haim Eshach

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a broad agreement among scientists and science educators that students should not only learn science, but also acquire some sense of its nature, it has been reported that undergraduate students possess an inadequate grasp of the nature of science (NOS. The study presented here examined the potential and effectiveness of Nobel Prize stories as a vehicle for teaching NOS. For this purpose, a 36-hour course, “Albert Einstein’s Nobel Prize and the Nature of Science,” was developed and conducted in Taiwan Normal University. Ten undergraduate physics students participated in the course. Analysis of the Views of Nature of Science questionnaires completed by the students before and after the course, as well as the students’ own presentations of Nobel Prize stories (with an emphasis on how NOS characteristics are reflected in the story, showed that the students who participated in the course enriched their views concerning all aspects of NOS. The paper concludes with some suggestions for applying the novel idea of using Nobel Prize stories in physics classrooms.

  6. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorzkowski, W; Zuberek, R [Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Science, Warsaw (Poland); Surya, Y [TOFI, Tangerang-Karawaci (Indonesia)

    2011-07-15

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  7. Trade and Geography : Paul Krugman and the 2008 Nobel Prize for Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, Steven; Garretsen, Harry

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize for economics was awarded to Paul Krugman for three papers-Krugman (1979, 1980, 1991). In this paper we illustrate that, indeed, these three papers are closely connected. We present a summary of the papers using a unified framework. Central in the discussion is the so-called hom

  8. John Bardeen: The Only Person to Win Two Nobel Prizes in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoddeson, L.

    2011-01-01

    John Bardeen worked on the theory of solids throughout his physics career, winning two Nobel Prizes: the first in 1956 for the invention of the transistor with Walter Brattain and William Shockley; and the second in 1972 for the development with Leon Cooper and J Robert Schrieffer of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory of superconductivity.…

  9. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: a large-scale prize for achievements on the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Daniel

    2014-12-17

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of superresolved fluorescence microscopy" can be seen as a combined prize for single-molecule detection and superresolution imaging. Neurons, arguably the most morphologically complex cell type, are the subject of choice for this application, now generically called "nanoscopy."

  10. ["Process of the research and development received Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2002"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tamio

    2004-01-01

    Mr. K. Tanaka engaged in Shimadzu Corporation received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2002 for the development of soft laser desorption ionization method for mass spectrometric analyses of biological macromolecules. In this paper, the process of the research and development of desorption ionization method and the produced laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometer (LDI-TOFMS) are described.

  11. Richard Willstätter and the 1915 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauner, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    One hundred years after his Nobel Prize, Richard Willstätter's achievements and the fascinating role he played in 20th century chemistry are discussed in this Essay. Several of his discoveries, such as the anthocyanidins, cyclooctatetraene, the ortho-quinones, and the structure of cocaine, will forever be associated with his name.

  12. 3 scientists win Nobel for physics electric superconductivity, superfluidity work honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel prize for physics to Russian Vitaly Ginzburg, 87, and Russian-born American Alexei Abrikosov, 75, for their work on electric superconductivity, and to British-born American Anthony Leggett, 65, for describing how liquid helium can become a "superfluid." The three scientists will split $1.3 million in prize money (1 page).

  13. Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. PART I. How to Win the Nobel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Dombey, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Abdus Salam's correspondence during his time as Director of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) is held in the Abdus Salam Archive of the Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics+. I use this correspondence to discuss his contribution to the theory of electromagnetic and weak interactions for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1979.

  14. Climate Change Draws World Attention: The 2007 Nobel Peace Award Goes to Gore and IPCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Beverly Milner; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, the Nobel Committee awarded their Peace Prize to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization and by the United Nations Environment Program) and to former Vice-President Al Gore, Jr. The committee praised the United Nations panel for creating…

  15. Climate Change Draws World Attention: The 2007 Nobel Peace Award Goes to Gore and IPCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Beverly Milner; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, the Nobel Committee awarded their Peace Prize to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (a scientific intergovernmental body set up by the World Meteorological Organization and by the United Nations Environment Program) and to former Vice-President Al Gore, Jr. The committee praised the United Nations panel for creating…

  16. Akzo Nobel Morris Plant Implements a Site-Wide Energy Efficiency Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-01-01

    Akzo Nobel's Surface Chemistry plant in Morris, Illinois, implemented an energy efficiency plan, which included a plant-wide energy efficiency assessment. The assessment revealed opportunities to save an estimated $1.2 million per year in operating and energy costs, reduce environmental impacts, and improve production capacity.

  17. In Sciences, the Reflected Prestige of the Nobel Prize Extends Far Beyond Anything Its Creator Imagined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kim

    1987-01-01

    As the ultimate symbol of excellence, the Nobel Prize has had a tremendous effect on scholars, institutions, and national pride. Topics discussed include: recruitment and fund raising, salaries and other perks, "raids" from other institutions, students seeking out winners, publication declines, etc. (MLW)

  18. Trade and Geography : Paul Krugman and the 2008 Nobel Prize for Economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakman, Steven; Garretsen, Harry

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize for economics was awarded to Paul Krugman for three papers-Krugman (1979, 1980, 1991). In this paper we illustrate that, indeed, these three papers are closely connected. We present a summary of the papers using a unified framework. Central in the discussion is the so-called hom

  19. Play the Tuberculosis Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Laureates Nobel Prizes and Laureates Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Quick Facts Nomination Nomination Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine ...

  20. Play the Mosquito Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Laureates Nobel Prizes and Laureates Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Quick Facts Nomination Nomination Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine ...

  1. Play the Electrocardiogram Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Laureates Nobel Prizes and Laureates Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Quick Facts Nomination Nomination Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine ...

  2. Play the Immune System Defender Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Laureates Nobel Prizes and Laureates Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Quick Facts Nomination Nomination Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine ...

  3. Play the MRI Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Laureates Nobel Prizes and Laureates Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine Prize Literature Prize Peace Prize Prize in Economic Sciences Quick Facts Nomination Nomination Physics Prize Chemistry Prize Medicine ...

  4. Competition to design a new logo for the CERN Staff Association : an award ceremony was held on Friday 1st March in the Main building in the presence of the six laureates.

    CERN Document Server

    Jacques Hervé Fichet

    2013-01-01

    The six laureates received a price offered as follows: 1st prize: an Ezee Suisse electric bike. - 2nd prize (equal second) : a voucher for Go Sport with a value of 200 €. - 4th to 6th prize: a voucher for Go Sport with a value of 50 €

  5. No Silver Medal for Nobel Prize Contenders: Why Anesthesia Pioneers Were Nominated for but Denied the Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Fangerau, Heiner; Tuffs, Annette; Polianski, Igor J

    2016-07-01

    Taking the examples of the pioneers Carl Ludwig Schleich, Carl Koller, and Heinrich Braun, this article provides a first exploratory account of the history of anesthesiology and the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine. Besides the files collected at the Nobel Archive in Sweden, which are presented here for the first time, this article is based on medical literature of the early 20th century. Using Nobel Prize nominations and Nobel committee reports as points of departure, the authors discuss why no anesthesia pioneer has received this coveted trophy. These documents offer a new perspective to explore and to better understand aspects of the history of anesthesiology in the first half of the 20th century.

  6. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Nobel prize winners in physics from 1901 to 1990: simple statistics for physics teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijia; Fuller, Robert G.

    1998-05-01

    A demographic database for the 139 Nobel prize winners in physics from 1901 to 1990 has been created from a variety of sources. The results of our statistical study are discussed in the light of the implications for physics teaching.

  7. Nobel Prize winning physicist to speak at Rensselaer Nov. 20 Leon Lederman to discuss pre college science education

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Leon Lederman, Nobel Prize-winner, will offer some radical ideas for improving pre-college science education when he delivers the annual Robert Resnick Lecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Russell Sage Laboratory (1/2 page).

  8. Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1913: The Highest Honor for the Lowest Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif-Acherman, Simón

    2013-12-01

    One century ago this year the Dutch experimental physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (1853-1926) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in low-temperature physics, in particular for his production of liquid helium. I trace the route to his Nobel Prize within the context of his and his colleagues' research in his laboratory at the University of Leiden, and in light of his nominators and the nominations he received in the five years 1909-1913.

  9. The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics—ground-breaking experiments on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Y.

    2011-11-01

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to Professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for their ground-breaking experiments on graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, and more generally, for their pioneering work in uncovering a new class of materials, namely two-dimensional atomic crystals. This paper gives an accessible account and review of the story of graphene; from its first description in the literature, to the realization and confirmation of its remarkable properties, through to its impressive potential for broad-reaching applications. The story of graphene is written within the context of the enormous impact that Geim and Novoselovs' work has had on this field of research, and recounts their personal pathways of discovery, which ultimately led to their award of the 2010 Nobel Prize.

  10. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  11. Artificial Intelligence to Win the Nobel Prize and Beyond: Creating the Engine for Scientific Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Kitano, Hiroaki; Sony Computer Science Laboratories

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a new grand challenge for AI reasearch: to develop AI system to make major scientific discoveries in biomedical sciences that worth Nobel Prize. There are a series of human cognitive limitations that prevents us from making accerlated scientific discoveries, particularity in biomedical sciences. As a result, scientific discoveries are left behind at the level of cottage industry. AI systems can transform scientific discoveries into highly efficient practice, thereby enab...

  12. Mechanically Interlocked Molecules (MIMs)-Molecular Shuttles, Switches, and Machines (Nobel Lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, J Fraser

    2017-09-04

    Chemistry welcomes a new bond: The mechanical bond has endowed molecules with component parts whose movements can be controlled and monitored. In his Nobel Lecture, J. F. Stoddart describes how being able to template the formation of mechanically interlocked molecules has led to the design and synthesis of shuttles, switches, and machines at the nanoscale. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Scientometric analysis of synchronous references in the Physics Nobel lectures, 1981-1985 : a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhye, Rekha P.; Kalyane, V. L.; Vijai Kumar; Prakasan, E. R.

    2003-01-01

    Scientometric analysis of synchronous references in the nine Physics Nobel lectures by Nicolaas Bloembergen (1981), Arthur L. Schawlow (1981), Kai M. Siegbahn (1981), Kenneth G. Wilson (1982), Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar (1983), William A. Fowler (1983), Carlo Rubbia (1984), Simon van der Meer (1984), and Klaus von Klitzing (1985) indicated high variations: No. of Synchronous References ranged from 24 (Meer) to 283 (Siegbahn); Synchronous Self-References ranged from 5 (Rubbia) to 88 (Siegbahn)...

  14. The milestone of membrane protein research:Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2003

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wenlong; SUI Senfang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2003 was awarded to two biologists, Peter Agre in Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Roderick MacKinnon from Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Rockefeller University, who have made fundamental discoveries concerning channels in cell membranes. Peter Agre discovered and characterized the first water channel protein and Roderick MacKinnon mainly elucidated the structural and mechanistic basis for potassium channels.

  15. Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless Transition and the Haldane Conjecture: Highlights of the Physics Nobel Prize 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Physics Nobel Prize honors a variety of discoveries related to topological phases and phase transitions. Here we sketch two exciting facets: the groundbreaking works by John Kosterlitz and David Thouless on phase transitions of infinite order, and by Duncan Haldane on the energy gaps in quantum spin chains. These insights came as surprises in the 1970s and 1980s, respectively, and they have both initiated new fields of research in theoretical and experimental physics.

  16. Let there be light--with gallium nitride: the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Dollen, Paul; Pimputkar, Siddha; Speck, James S

    2014-12-15

    Significant gains in energy savings now underway can be traced to a single invention--the blue light-emitting diode. GaN-based blue LED technology not only resulted in efficient white light sources, but continues to enable a host of applications and scientific inquiries. The researchers primarily responsible for the development of the blue LED were awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics.

  17. The theory of heat radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Planck, Max

    2003-01-01

    Nobel laureate's classic exposition of the theory of radiant heat in terms of quantum action. Kirchoff's law, black radiation, Maxwell's radiation pressure, entropy, other topics. 1914 edition. Bibliography.

  18. The curious case of the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Arthur M

    2016-03-01

    The 1960 Nobel Prize was awarded to Macfarlane Burnet and Peter Medawar for immunological tolerance. The Nobel Archives reveal that the two were never nominated together by anyone; Burnet had repeatedly been nominated for his virology studies, and the Medawar group (including Rupert Billingham and Leslie Brent) had been nominated independently for their transplantation work. A review of the 1950s literature suggests that tolerance had not yet, by 1960, reached the level of acceptance and acclaim in the immunological community to appear to justify the award. Burnet probably should have received the Prize for his virus work, and perhaps also for his Clonal Selection Theory, whereas Billingham and Brent should have shared in a Prize with Medawar for transplantation. If a Prize were to be given for tolerance, most agree that Ray Owen should have shared in it, for his work on cattle chimerism. It is suggested that the 1960 Nobel Prize to Burnet and Medawar for immunological tolerance may have been given for the wrong reasons and to the wrong associates.

  19. Immediate restoration of NobelActive implants placed into fresh extraction sites in the anterior maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christopher; Bell, Robert E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the success rates of immediately placed and loaded NobelActive implants with the success rate of immediately placed implants that were allowed to osseointigrate prior to loading. The charts of all patients in a private oral surgery office receiving single-unit dental implants in the maxillary anterior region in fresh extraction sites from 2008-2011 were evaluated. All patients receiving NobelActive implants and immediate restorations were included in the study group, while those receiving implants with delayed restorations were included in the control group. Patient records were evaluated for variables such as age, gender, torque values at time of implant placement, smoking habits, use of bisphosphonates, and other significant diseases such as diabetes. The success rate of the study group was 92.9%, whereas the success rate of the control group was 97.6%. This was not statistically significant. Torque values of the failed implants of the study group were similar to those of successful implants in the study group. All implants placed in patients scheduled for immediate loading achieved high torque values and were able to be restored immediately. NobelActive implants were able to obtain high torque values for predictable immediate restoration in fresh extraction sites. Acceptable success rates with excellent soft tissue healing were achieved.

  20. Prof C. N. Yang (Physics Nobel Prize 1957) from Tsinghua University (Beijing) during his CERN Colloquium: "Thematic Melodies of Twentieth Century Theoretical Physics: Quantization, Symmetry and Phase Factor".

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Prof C. N. Yang (Physics Nobel Prize 1957) from Tsinghua University (Beijing) during his CERN Colloquium: "Thematic Melodies of Twentieth Century Theoretical Physics: Quantization, Symmetry and Phase Factor".

  1. Ants, eyelashes, and the 2015 Ig Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, David

    2016-11-01

    The zoo can be a source of recreation and rich scientific investigation. In this lecture, I will give an overview of my recent research with animals at the Atlanta Zoo. We will talk about how to make ant hamburgers, how eyelashes reduce evaporation of your eyes by a factor of two, and why mammals urinate for the same duration of 21 seconds. Although animal-inspired research can sound trendy, it can lead the way toward potential future directions in fluid mechanics, including the dynamics of active materials, flow through hairy surfaces, and the physics of digestion and excretion.

  2. Miraculous material and Nobel Prize in Chemistry%神奇材料与2000年诺贝尔化学奖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸平; 卢樱; 程秀花; 田锐

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between the conducting polymers——“synthetic metals”were discovered and Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2000 is discussed,the applications of conducting polymers and their future's bright are presented.The great discovery is a bear fruit that American scientists,Alan J.Heeger (1936-) and Alan G.MacDiarmid (1927-) cooperated with Japanese scientist Hideki Shirakawa (1936-) to make an all-out effort.The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences had decided to award the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2000 jointly to A.J.Heeger,A.G.MacDiarmid and H.Shirakawa,this shows that the scientists' achievements in the field of conducting polymer are affirmed and approved.“Synthetic metals” will be the most activity-studied field in new material science.%讨论了神奇材料——导电聚合物又称“合成金属”的发现与2000年诺贝尔化学奖的关系,介绍了导电聚合物的广泛应用及其前景,说明了这一伟大发明是科学家通力合作研究的结晶,对美国科学家艾伦*黑格(Alan Jay Heeger,1936-),艾伦*马克迪尔米德(Alan Graham MacDiarmid,1927-)和日本科学家白川英树(Shirakawa Hideki,1936-)授予2000年诺贝尔化学奖,也是对从事导电聚合物研究领域内所有科学家研究成果的肯定与认可,这一领域将是未来十分活跃的新材料研究领域。

  3. Induced pluripotent stem cells: from Nobel Prizes to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, S Tamir; Alexander, Graeme J M

    2013-03-01

    Advances in basic hepatology have been constrained for many years by the inability to culture primary hepatocytes in vitro, until just over five years ago when the scientific playing field was changed beyond recognition with the demonstration that human skin fibroblasts could be reprogrammed to resemble embryonic cells. The reprogrammed cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), were then shown to have the capacity to re-differentiate into almost any human cell type, including hepatocytes. The unlimited number and isogenic nature of the cells that can be generated from tiny fragments of tissue have massive implications for the study of human liver diseases in vitro. Of more immediate clinical importance were recent data demonstrating precision gene therapy on patient specific iPSCs, which opens up the real and exciting possibility of autologous hepatocyte transplantation as a substitute for allogeneic whole liver transplantation, which has been an effective approach to end-stage liver disease, but one that has now been outstripped by demand. In this review, we describe the historical development, current technology and potential clinical applications of induced pluripotency, concluding with a perspective on possible future directions in this dynamic field.

  4. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John

    2007-04-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, proposed in 1974 and launched by NASA in 1989, measured the cosmic microwave and infrared background radiation from the Big Bang and everything that happened later. The COBE team made three key measurements: the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) matches a blackbody within 50 ppm (rms), the CMBR is anisotropic, with 10 ppm variations on a 7^o angular scale, and the cosmic infrared background from previously unknown objects is as bright as all the known classes of galaxies. The first measurement confirmed the Hot Big Bang theory with unprecedented accuracy, the second is interpreted as representing quantum mechanical fluctuations in the primordial soup and the seeds of cosmic structure and the basis for the existence of galaxies, and the third is still not fully understood. I will describe the project history, the team members, the hardware and data processing, the major results, and their implications for science, and end with the outlook for future progress with new background measurements and large telescopes.

  5. The Future of Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Christian; Ossandón, José

    2013-01-01

    Review of Elena Esposito: The Future of Futures. The Time of Money in Financing and Society Cheltenham. Edward Elgar, 2011.......Review of Elena Esposito: The Future of Futures. The Time of Money in Financing and Society Cheltenham. Edward Elgar, 2011....

  6. Reflections on the Cultural Background to China's Reaction to the Nobel Prize Award

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Haaland

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some complex and controversial issues that arose in connection with the 2010 Nobel Prize Peace award to the Chinese dissident Liu Xiao Bo. These issues involve different levels. On one level it is important not to confuse the Nobel committee’s independence of outside interference from political and other organized agencies, with the question of whether the Nobel Prize committee’s decisions can be ideological or politically unbiased in its decisions. Part of the strong Chinese reaction to the award is related to this issue. Another level deals with the Committee’s widening of the criteria to be taken into account in the selection of candidates from the original criterion focused on direct contribution to reduction of armed conflicts, to the wider issues of indirect contributions like alleviation of poverty, ecological sustainability and most crucial the issue of human rights. The last issue is particularly critical since different states have different perspectives of what constitute human rights, and what rights should be given priority on different levels of the country’s development. The main point of the article is to look at historical events and socio-cultural conditions that shape the Chine Government’s (and many citizens’ reaction to the 2010 award. This is placed in the context of the widening income differences emerging in the modern political economy of China and how these may affect the growth of civil society. The critical question is: will the reward contribute to promotion of civil society or will it lead to increased crackdown on dissident voices. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v5i0.6357 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 5, 2011: 81-100

  7. How the 1906 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was shared between Golgi and Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Gunnar

    2007-10-01

    In 1906 the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was shared between Camillo Golgi and Ramón y Cajal in recognition of their work on the structure of the nervous system. Golgi's most impressive contribution was his method, described in 1873. This was applied in studies of the cerebellum, the olfactory bulb, hippocampus and the spinal cord. These studies together with his earlier work were included in his Opera Omnia, published in 1903. His method was highly praised by Cajal. His adherence to the reticular theory was opposed by Cajal, however, who had spelled out the neuron theory already in the late 1800s. Cajal's extraordinary contributions to the structure of the nervous system, based largely on the Golgi method and Ehrlich's methylene blue stain, were published in his Textura del Sistema Nerviosa de Hombre y de los Vertebrados, three volumes published from 1897 to 1904. Documents from the Nobel Archives reveal that Kölliker, Retzius and Fürst were the ones who proposed Golgi and Cajal for a shared prize. Golgi was nominated by Hertwig, as well. Cajal was proposed by Ziehen and Holmgren, and also by Retzius, as an alternative to a shared prize. Holmgren, who was commissioned to write the report to the Nobel Committee, found Cajal far superior to Golgi. Sundberg, asked for another evaluation, was more positive to Golgi's contributions than Holmgren. Gadelius supported Holmgren's views. The final vote gave a majority for a shared prize. The prize ceremony and the lectures were described in detail in Cajal's autobiography.

  8. Gore's Nobel May Bring Even More Attention on Campuses to Environmental Issues: Award for Combating Climate Change Implicitly Honors the Work of Academic Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Richard; Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    When the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced that the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize would be shared by Al Gore, the former U.S. vice president, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the award implicitly celebrated a third party--academic institutions. Much of the research on global warming has come from university scientists, and higher…

  9. Gore's Nobel May Bring Even More Attention on Campuses to Environmental Issues: Award for Combating Climate Change Implicitly Honors the Work of Academic Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Richard; Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    When the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced that the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize would be shared by Al Gore, the former U.S. vice president, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the award implicitly celebrated a third party--academic institutions. Much of the research on global warming has come from university scientists, and higher…

  10. Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry 2014: Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015, commemorating the Old Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu

    2015-01-01

    2015 is the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL), while the physics and chemistry Nobel Prizes 2014 are both about light. The work leading to the two prizes share the same basic theoretical foundation: when an electron jumps from a higher energy level to a lower energy level, the energy difference is transformed into a photon. This basic way of light generation is a key part of the Old Quantum Theory. Interestingly, the date of announcing the 2014 Nobel Prize for physics coincided with the birthdays of Niels Bohr and, especially, of Planck's blackbody radiation formula. In connection with the two 2014 Nobel Prizes, we recall the development of the Old Quantum Theory by Planck, Einstein and Bohr.

  11. Physics Nobel Prize Goes to Tsui, Stormer and Laughlin for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzschild, Bertram

    1998-12-15

    This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is shared by Robert Laughlin (Stanford), Horst Stormer (Columbia University and Bell Laboratories) and Daniel Tsui (Princeton), for their roles in the discovery and explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect. In 1982, when Stormer and Tsui were experimenters at Bell Labs, they and their colleague Arthur Gossard discovered this totally unexpected quantum effect in the transport properties of two‐dimensional electron gases at low temperature in strong magnetic fields.’ (See PHYSICS TODAY, July 1983, page 19.)

  12. Food for thought: Autophagy researcher wins 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Emma Louise

    2017-02-01

    This special edition of the Biomedical Journal honors the awarding of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine to Yoshinori Ohsumi for his pioneering work on elucidating the mechanisms of autophagy. We also highlight a study reporting a new and simple animal model for a widespread surgical technique called interbody spinal fusion. Finally, this issue also includes two articles reporting protocols that could produce specific cell types for cell based therapies. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The exponential growth of autophagy-related research: from the humble yeast to the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Noboru

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy was discovered more than half a century ago. In the early days, autophagy was studied mostly through the use of biochemical methods and electron microscopy. In the 1990s, yeast genetics was introduced to this field and brought about an exponential expansion. The 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was eventually awarded to the scientist who spearheaded the rapid development of the field: Yoshinori Ohsumi. Here, I describe in a Nutshell how the autophagy machinery was discovered and how the autophagy research field has grown following the breakthroughs from yeast studies. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Radiation risk and nuclear medicine: An interview with a Nobel Prize winner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalow, R.S.

    1995-12-01

    In a speech given years ago at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Bronx, NY, Rosalyn S. Yalow, 1977 Nobel Prize recipient for her invention of radioimmunoassay, made several salient points on the perception of fear or hazards from exposure to low-level radiation and low-level radioactive wastes. For the past three years, Yalow has been concerned with the general fear of radiation. In this interview, Newsline solicited Yalow`s views on public perceptions on radiation risk and what the nuclear medicine community can do to emphasize the fact that, if properly managed, the use of isotopes in medicine and other cases is not dangerous.

  15. Mortality and immortality: the Nobel Prize as an experiment into the effect of status upon longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rablen, Matthew D; Oswald, Andrew J

    2008-12-01

    It has been known for centuries that the rich and famous have longer lives than the poor and ordinary. Causality, however, remains trenchantly debated. The ideal experiment would be one in which extra status could somehow be dropped upon a sub-sample of individuals while those in a control group of comparable individuals received none. This paper attempts to formulate a test in that spirit. It collects 19th-century birth data on science Nobel Prize winners. Correcting for potential biases, we estimate that winning the Prize, compared to merely being nominated, is associated with between 1 and 2 years of extra longevity.

  16. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: a spatial model for cognitive neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Neil

    2014-12-17

    Understanding how the cognitive functions of the brain arise from its basic physiological components has been an enticing final frontier in science for thousands of years. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded one half to John O'Keefe, the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser "for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain." This prize recognizes both a paradigm shift in the study of cognitive neuroscience, and some of the amazing insights that have followed from it concerning how the world is represented within the brain.

  17. El burro cuántico de Sancho Panza (Los Nobel en Física 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Galindo Uribarri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available EL premio Nobel en Física 2003 fue compartido por Leggett, Abrikosov y Ginzburg, por sus contribuciones al entendimiento de fenómenos a bajas temperaturas. Este ensayo explica, a un nivel elemental, sus teorías. Además este trabajo presenta una serie de eventos –relacionados con las teorías mencionadas– que forman una historia de tres animales cuánticos: un gato, un calamar y un burro.

  18. The Beatles, the Nobel Prize, and CT scanning of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lawrence R

    2010-01-01

    From its first test scan on a mouse, in 1967, to current medical practice, the CT scanner has become a core imaging tool in thoracic diagnosis. Initially financed by money from Beatles' record sales, the first patient scan was performed in 1971. Only 8 years later, a Nobel Prize in Physics and Medicine was awarded to Hounsfield and Cormack for their discovery. This article traces the history of CT scanner development and how each technical advance expanded chest diagnostic frontiers. Chest imaging now accounts for 30% of all CT scanning.

  19. [Henri Moissn, first French Nobel prize winner in chemistry: the man, the picture collector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, C

    1999-03-01

    Born in Paris in September 1852, Henri Moisson died in February 1907, two months after receiving the Nobel prize for chemistry. After a short schooling at Meaux college, he was destined to be a clock maker. He owes his vocation for chemistry to Jules Plicque, a chemist and friend at the college. Henri Moisson attended Fremy's school of chemistry at the Paris Natural History Museum and undertook pharmaceutical studies. In this presentation, we take a look at Henri Moissan's child-hood and teenage years, his scientific education and offer a glimpse of the man and the picture collector.

  20. AGU Member receives Nobel Prize for “Path-breaking Work”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Shermonta

    Raymond Davis, Jr. was awarded the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physics by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences "for pioneering contributions to astrophysics; in particular, for the detection of cosmic neutrinos." He is the first scientist to have detected solar neutrinos, the signature of nuclear fusion reactions occurring in the core of the Sun.Davis is a retired chemist of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. He has been a member of AGU (SPA) since 1961.

  1. “The Dignity of Man”: Pinter, Politics, and the Nobel Speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Goodspeed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is an examination of Harold Pinter’s Nobel Prize lecture ‘Art, Truth & Politics’ from the political aspect. It argues that Pinter’s speech was widely misreported at the time as being most significant for its political attacks on President George W. Bush and Prime Minister Tony Blair. The paper suggests instead that the lecture given by Pinter is better understood as a message congruent with his long-standing political statements; that it was not an inappropriate eruption of politics into a literary speech; and that these political positions are also relatable to the dramatic work by which he is distinguished.

  2. Nobel Prize Winner in Economics Growth Path’s Enlightenment on Mathematics Education in China%诺贝尔经济学奖获得者成长之路对中国数学教育的启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔希民; 罗俊丽; 李超; 程国

    2014-01-01

    Using statistical research, literature research and comparative analysis, the paper is to make a research on mathematics education in China’s revelation from Nobel laureate in economics. Think: Nobel laureate in economics have great interests in objective things around. They are affected by the families and some other famous people. Thus, there are extensive nature of economic thinking and mathematical thinking in their knowledge structure in which the theory of game, general equilibrium theory, mathematical economics and econometrics and other mathematical background of economic theory system are included. All of these show that they have a good mathematics training and application of mathematical methods of analysis and unique problem solving talent. Some practical problems of China’s Economics Current Theories of Mathematics Education should be paid enough concentration and the way of problem-solving should be found out. The basic principle of“the independent spirit and freed thinking”is the way in which the mathematics educators and researchers should have more space and encouragement to think and explore in depth.%运用统计、文献考证与比较分析的研究方法,探讨诺贝尔经济学奖获得者对中国数学教育的启示性作用。诺贝尔经济学奖获得者不仅具有对客观事物发现的好奇心和浓厚兴趣,而且受家庭文化教育和身边有崇高思想境界的人的影响,同时知识结构的经济思维与数学思维的广博性,构成了博弈论、一般均衡理论、数理经济学和经济计量学等具有数学背景的经济学理论体系,表明他们具有良好的数学修养和应用数学方法分析与解决问题的独特天赋。明确中国经济学理论研究现状与数学教育所存在的实际问题,寻找其原因所在,旨在倡导“独立之精神,自由之思想”,是数学教育研究者有更多思考空间、探索勇气和思考深度的基本原理。

  3. The Essence of Language in Toni Morrison's View through an Analysis of Her Nobel Lecture and Novels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓倩

    2009-01-01

    In 1993.the Nobel Prize of Literature was granted to an American black woman writer,Toni Morrison.She disclosed the features of language in her Nobel Lecture with a story of"the bird-in-hand".Language is both a tool of the ruling class to govern people and a tool for the common people to understand society and express themselves.Morrison has a deep understanding of it and makes good use of the features to express women's liberation and racial liberation in her works,which make her language peculiar and her novels of great social value.

  4. The Limit of a strong Lobby: Why did August Bier and Ferdinand Sauerbruch never receive the Nobel Prize?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Schagen, Udo

    2014-01-01

    August Bier (1861-1949) and Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951) have remained two of the most influential figures during the first half of the 20th century in German and even in international surgery. They were jointly awarded Adolf Hitler's German Science Prize in 1937, but never the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, although no other German surgeons were nominated as often as Bier and Sauerbruch for the prestigeful award from 1901 to 1950. This contribution gives an overview of the reasons why and by whom Bier and Sauerbruch were nominated, and discusses the reasons of the Nobel Prize Committee for not awarding them.

  5. Premios nobel de economía del año 2002: Daniel Kahneman y Vernon L. Smith

    OpenAIRE

    Grijalba Alonso de Porres, Ender

    2015-01-01

    En el siguiente trabajo de Fin de Grado, titulado Premios Nobel de Economía del año 2002: Daniel Kahneman y Vernon L. Smith, se presenta un estudio detallado de las aportaciones de los dos galardonados con dicho premio. Los Premios Nobel son entregados con carácter anual a aquellas personas que han realizado importantes aportaciones en las diferentes ramas de conocimiento. Son un reconocimiento a aquellos individuos que han dedicado parte de su vida aestudiar y profundizar en temas muy concre...

  6. Lecture by the winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Professor Albert Fert, who has just been awarded the Nobel Prize for physics for his work on giant magneto-resistance and spintronics, will give a lecture at the University of Geneva on 16 November on this booming field of science. (c) CNRS Photothèque - C. LebedinskyOn 9 October, the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics was jointly awarded to Albert Fert of the CNRS and Peter Grünberg of the Jülich Research Centre for their simultaneous and independent discovery of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) in 1988. This discovery had a significant impact in the fields of information technology and communications as it was rapidly used to develop extremely sensitive hard disk read-out heads that are capable of reading information stored at very high densities, thereby allowing further progress in the miniaturisation of data-storage devices. Since the first GMR read-out head was launched in 1997, the technology has become the standard in the m...

  7. Super-resolved fluorescence microscopy: Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 for Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möckl, Leonhard; Lamb, Don C; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2014-12-15

    A big honor for small objects: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was jointly awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy". This Highlight describes how the field of super-resolution microscopy developed from the first detection of a single molecule in 1989 to the sophisticated techniques of today.

  8. [The assessment process within science and the nomination of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittella, José Eymard Homem

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest achievements in the history of medicine was the description of Chagas disease by the physician and scientist Carlos Chagas. A hundred years after the discovery of the disease, speculation still remains regarding the two official nominations of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel Prize, the biggest worldwide scientific award, in 1913 and in 1921. It has been accepted that the reason why the prize was not awarded to this brilliant scientist may have been the strong opposition that he faced in Brazil, from some physicians and researchers of that time. They went as far as questioning the existence of Chagas disease, thereby possibly influencing the decision of the Nobel Committee not to award the prize to him. Analysis of the database of the Nobel prize archives, with the revelation of the names of nominators, nominees and prizewinners spanning the years 1901-1951, brought information not only about what was considered to be a scientific achievement at that time, but also about who the important scientists were and what the relationships between them were. The non-recognition of Carlos Chagas' discoveries by the Nobel Committee appears to be more correctly explained by these factors than by the negative impact of the local opposition.

  9. Diagnostic value of NobelGuide to minimize the need for reconstructive surgery of jaws before implant placement: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Roberto; Pellegrino, Gerardo; Marchetti, Claudio; Corinaldesi, Guiseppe; Ciocca, Leonardo

    2010-01-01

    To test if using a CAD/CAM system might reduce the necessity of bone augmentation in patients with atrophic maxillary arches before implant therapy. Twenty male and female patients consecutively scheduled for bone augmentation of the jaw before implant surgery were included in this study, with a total of 29 jaws (maxillary and mandibular) to analyze for the implant-supported fixed prosthesis group and 19 maxillary arches for the implant-supported removable prosthesis group. NobelGuide System (Nobel Biocare), Autocad System (Autodesk), and routine manual CT measurements of available bone were used in this study. The total results of the mean values of the fixed prosthesis group plus the mean values of the removable prosthesis group showed a statistically significant difference between the NobelGuide intervention score and both manual (P = .004) and Autocad (P = .001) measurements. The NobelGuide System represents a viable diagnostic device to reduce the entity or avoid bone reconstructive surgery before implant placements in the atrophic maxilla and mandible.

  10. Nobel gedrag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicke, M.

    2007-01-01

    Nederland heeft een goede naam als het gaat om gedragsonderzoek. Niko Tinbergen deed onderzoek aan de bijenwolf, een sluipwesp die bijen vangt. Hij maakte de gedragsbiologie tot een wetenschap die verder ging dan het beschrijven van gedrag. Waarom gedragen dieren zich zoals ze zich gedragen? Dat waa

  11. Nobel drawings

    CERN Multimedia

    Michel Blanc

    2009-01-01

    1. The Universe in One Drawing (G. Smoot Physics 2006) 2. Superfluid Properties (R. Richardson Physics 1996) 3. The Asymptotic Freedom of the Quark (David Gross, Physics 2004) 4. Understanding Superfluidity (Anthony Legget, Physics 2003) 5. Taming Infinities (G. 't Hooft, Physics 1999) 6. Homo Diagrammaticus (M. Veltman, Physics 1999) 7. A Tale Of Two Liquids (D. Osheroff, Physics 1996) 8. Wire Proliferation (G. Charpak, Physics 1992) 9. High Temperature Superconductivity (G. Bednorz, Physics 1987) 10. Atomic Cuisine (courtesy of C. Rubbia, Physics 1984) 11. Colliding Charm (S. Ting, Physics 1976) 12. The Bubble Chamber ( D. Glaser, Physics 1960) 13. The Narrow Resonance of the J-Psi (B. Richter, Physics 1976) 14. Stochastic Cooling (S. Van der Meer, Physics 1984) 15. The Good Anomaly (J Steinberger, Physics 1988) 16. Quark Somewhere on the White Paper (R. Taylor, Physics 1990) 17. The Tau of Particle Physics (M. Perl, 1995) 18. NMR Spectroscopy (K. Wuethrich, Chemistry 2002) 19. Coherent States (R....

  12. 6th April 2008 - Nobel Prize in Physics 1987 J.G. Bednorz, and Nobel Prize in Physics 2003 A. J. Leggett, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Aymar, on the occasion of CERN LHC 2008 Open day.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    6th April 2008 - Nobel Prize in Physics 1987 J.G. Bednorz, and Nobel Prize in Physics 2003 A. J. Leggett, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Aymar, on the occasion of CERN LHC 2008 Open day.

  13. [Ilya Ilich Metchnikov and Paul Ehrlich: 1908 Nobel Prize winners for their research on immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokaj, J; John, C

    2008-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908 was awarded to Ilya I. Mechnikov and Paul Ehrlich for recognition of their work on immunity. Mechnikov have discovered phagocytes and phagocytosis as the basis of natural cellular immunity. His ,,phagocytic theory" is the principle of immunological concept "self and not self" as the prerequisition of physiological inflammation, and selfmaintaining of organism. Ehrlich developed the methods for standardization of antibody activity in immune sera, described neutralizing and complement-depending effect of antibodies and enunciated the ,"ide-chain" theory of the formation of antibodies. Their concept of the key-stone of immunity was different, but they expressed the basic paradigma of immunology: immunity imply the protection of identity and guarantee the integrity of organism. Both are the founders of immunology as the scientific discipline. Discoveries and conceptions of I. Mechnikov and P. Ehrlich exceedingly influenced development of immunology and are also applicable, instructive and suggestive in contemporary immunology and microbiology.

  14. 40 years of the Nobel prize in physics: then and now

    CERN Document Server

    Broglia, Ricardo A

    2016-01-01

    The findings for which Aage Bohr and Ben R. Mottelson became co-winners of the 1975 Nobel prize in physics provided the basis for a comprehensive and operative answer to the central problem in the study of the nuclear structure, namely the identification of the appropriate concepts and degrees of freedom that are suitable for describing the phenomena encountered. To do so they produced a breathtaking unification of a number of well established concepts, namely liquid drop and shell models, elementary modes of excitation, superconductivity and quantum electrodynamics, resulting eventually in the paradigm of broken symmetry restoration to determine the nuclear collective variables (CV, elementary modes of excitation): violation of translation invariance by the mean field and by scattering states (single-particle motion), of rotational invariance in the variety of spaces, in particular in 3D- and in gauge-space, leading to surface vibrations and to quadrupole rotations, as well as to pairing vibrations and rotat...

  15. Nobel Prize Recipient Eric Betzig Presents Lecture on Efforts to Improve High-Resolution Microscopy | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Betzig, Ph.D., a 2014 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and a scientist at Janelia Research Campus (JRC), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, in Ashburn, Va., visited NCI at Frederick on Sept. 10 to present a Distinguished Scientist lecture and discuss the latest high-resolution microscopy techniques. Betzig co-invented photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) in collaboration with scientists at NIH. PALM achieves 10-fold improvement in spatial resolution of cells, going from the resolution limit of approximately 250 nm in standard optical microscopy down to approximately 20 nm, thus producing a so-called “super-resolution” image. Spatial resolution refers to the clarity of an image or, in other words, the smallest details that can be observed from an image.

  16. How molecular motors work - insights from the molecular machinist's toolbox: the Nobel prize in Chemistry 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astumian, R D

    2017-02-01

    The Nobel prize in Chemistry for 2016 was awarded to Jean Pierre Sauvage, Sir James Fraser Stoddart, and Bernard (Ben) Feringa for their contributions to the design and synthesis of molecular machines. While this field is still in its infancy, and at present there are no commercial applications, many observers have stressed the tremendous potential of molecular machines to revolutionize technology. However, perhaps the most important result so far accruing from the synthesis of molecular machines is the insight provided into the fundamental mechanisms by which molecular motors, including biological motors such as kinesin, myosin, FoF1 ATPase, and the flagellar motor, function. The ability to "tinker" with separate components of molecular motors allows asking, and answering, specific questions about mechanism, particularly with regard to light driven vs. chemistry driven molecular motors.

  17. The Structural Basis of Transcription: 10 Years After the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantsche, Merle; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-12-23

    Transcription is the first step in the expression of genetic information in all living cells. The regulation of transcription underlies cell differentiation, organism development, and the responses of living systems to changes in the environment. During transcription, the enzyme RNA polymerase uses DNA as a template to synthesize a complementary RNA copy from a gene. Herein, we summarize the progress in our understanding of the structural basis of eukaryotic gene transcription that has been made in the ten years since the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was given to Roger Kornberg in 2006. The basis for transcription initiation and RNA chain elongation is emerging, but the intricate mechanisms of transcription regulation remain to be elucidated. The field has also developed hybrid methods for structural biology that combine several techniques to determine the three-dimensional architecture of large and transient macromolecular assemblies. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Academician Yuan Longping was Awarded “the Nobel Prize of Asia”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Academician Yuan Longping, father of hybrid rice, was lately awarded the Magsaysay Prize named after the third Philippine president Ramon F. Magsaysay. The Prize was founded in 1957 which has been known as “the Nobel Prize of Asia”. Prof Yuan received the honor for his great ontributions to hybrid rice research and Asian food security. Hybrid rice yielded about 0.4 billion ton in the past twenty years in Chiha, and has been introduced into 20 countries in Asia, Afica and America and successfully popularized in India and Viemam on a large scale, signifing a great scientific creation in solving the problem of world grain shortage. The awarding ceremony was held on Aug. 31, 2001 in Manila, Phillippines.

  19. NEUTRINOS: Mysterious Particles with Fascinating Features, which led to the Physics Nobel Prize 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant particles in the Universe are photons and neutrinos. Both types of particles are whirling around everywhere, since the early Universe. Hence the neutrinos are all around us, and permanently pass through our planet and our bodies, but we do not notice: they are extremely elusive. They were suggested as a theoretical hypothesis in 1930, and discovered experimentally in 1956. Ever since their properties keep on surprising us; for instance, they are key players in the violation of parity symmetry. In the Standard Model of particle physics they appear in three types, known as "flavors", and since 1998/9 we know that they keep on transmuting among these flavors. This "neutrino oscillation" implies that they are massive, contrary to the previous picture, with far-reaching consequences. This discovery was awarded the Physics Nobel Prize 2015.

  20. Nobel Prize Recipient Eric Betzig Presents Lecture on Efforts to Improve High-Resolution Microscopy | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Betzig, Ph.D., a 2014 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and a scientist at Janelia Research Campus (JRC), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, in Ashburn, Va., visited NCI at Frederick on Sept. 10 to present a Distinguished Scientist lecture and discuss the latest high-resolution microscopy techniques. Betzig co-invented photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) in collaboration with scientists at NIH. PALM achieves 10-fold improvement in spatial resolution of cells, going from the resolution limit of approximately 250 nm in standard optical microscopy down to approximately 20 nm, thus producing a so-called “super-resolution” image. Spatial resolution refers to the clarity of an image or, in other words, the smallest details that can be observed from an image.

  1. Oswald Avery: the professor, DNA, and the Nobel Prize that eluded him.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Tarunendu

    2004-01-01

    In 1944, two Canadians, Oswald Avery and Colin MacLeod, and an American, MacLyn McCarty, published a paper in The Journal of Experimental Medicine that demonstrated genes to be the chemical, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Even though this paper is now regarded as the single mos important publication in biology of the 20th century, Avery was not awarded the Nobel Prize. This raises the question as to why his work did not earn him the Prize. These are several possible reasons: the discovery may have been ahead of tis time; all three authors were physician-scientists ans not recognized chemists or geneticists; and Avery, the principal author, had reached an advanced age and characteristically took an extremely cautious and low-key approach to his work. Discussion of these reasons in turn raises other issues surrounding the recognition of the work of celebrated scientist, from Galileo and Copernicus onwards.

  2. G-protein-coupled receptors and their (Bio) chemical significance win 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane cell surface proteins specialized in cellular communication. These receptors represent a major gateway through which cells convert external cues into intracellular signals and respond with appropriate actions. While the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and drugs on cells, tissues, organs, and even whole organisms are well described, the molecular identity of the direct targets and the diverse signaling mechanisms of these biological ligands have been slow and hard to define. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2012 acknowledges the importance of GPCRs in these processes, especially for the contribution of Profs Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka to the studies of GPCRs. In this brief review, the seminal works accomplished by the two GPCR pioneers are summarized and the (bio) chemical significance of GPCRs in health and disease is discussed.

  3. G-protein-Coupled Receptors and Their (Bio Chemical Significance Win 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Hsien Lin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are seven transmembrane cell surface proteins specialized in cellular communication. These receptors represent a major gateway through which cells convert external cues into intracellular signals and respond with appropriate actions. While the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and drugs on cells, tissues, organs, and even whole organisms are well described, the molecular identity of the direct targets and the diverse signaling mechanisms of these biological ligands have been slow and hard to define. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2012 acknowledges the importance of GPCRs in these processes, especially for the contribution of Profs Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka to the studies of GPCRs. In this brief review, the seminal works accomplished by the two GPCR pioneers are summarized and the (bio chemical significance of GPCRs in health and disease is discussed.

  4. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer.

  5. 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Conferring Molecular Machines as Engines of Creativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Jayaraman

    2017-09-01

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2016 was awardedto three illustrious chemists, Professors Jean-Pierre Sauvage,Sir Fraser Stoddart, and Ben Feringa. Pioneering works ofthese chemists on designing molecules, chemically synthesizingthem, and extracting a work out of such designedmoleculesopen-up a new area of chemistry in a paradigm shifting manner.Beginning with controlling the molecular motions, particularlyinvolving interlocked macrocycles in late 1980s, theadvancement progressed to envelop energy storage and retrieval,and varieties of examples around the concept. Molecularmotion alone can also be a rich source for such a workoutput has also been established. These developments possessthe required momentum to uncover a new area of chemistry,wherein energy input-output can be used beneficially to conducta useful work, in a close analogy to machines such as anelectric motor.

  6. The meaning of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize. Microcredit evangelism, health, and social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The awarding of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize to Muhammad Yunus, founder of the Grameen Bank, provides an opportunity to consider the use and abuse of microfinancing, especially because credit continues to be touted as a poverty-reduction strategy associated with health education and health care financing strategies. Not only is the Grameen diagnosis of poverty dubious, but many structural problems also plague the model, ranging from financial accounting to market failures. In Southern Africa, to illustrate, microcredit schemes for peasants and small farmers have been attempted for more than 70 years, on the basis that modem capitalism and peasant/informal system gaps can be bridged by an expanded financial system. The results have been disappointing. A critical reading of political economy posits an organic linkage between the "developed" and "underdeveloped" economies that is typically not mitigated by capitalist financial markets, but instead is often exacerbated. When applied to health and social policy, microcredit evangelism becomes especially dangerous.

  7. Un Nobel para la física, un orgullo para la telecomunicación

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    El pasado día 6 de octubre se concedieron los Premios Nobel de Física del año 2009, uno de cuyos laureados fue el Dr. Charles Kuen Kao por sus “trascendentales hallazgos relativos a la transmisión de luz en fibras para comunicaciones ópticas”. En este artículo el autor, miembro del equipo que colaboró con el Dr. Kao en sus investigaciones, pretende dar una visión desde el interior del grupo que ayudó a poner a punto una de las revoluciones más importantes que se ha producido en el mundo de l...

  8. Emil Theodor Kocher (1841-1917)--orthopaedic surgeon and the first surgeon Nobel Prize winner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbasirević, Marko Z; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Lesić, Aleksandar R

    2013-01-01

    Theodor Emil Kocher (1841-1917), born in Bern, educated in many universities in Europe. Kocher as many surgeons of that time performed orthopedic surgery, general surgery, neurosurgery and endocrine surgery, but he become famous in orthopaedic surgery and endocrine surgery. He is remember as a surgeon who described the approach to the hip joint, elbow joint, maneuver for the reduction of dislocated shoulder joint. He introduced many instruments and many of them, such as Kocher clamp is still in use. Most important Kocher work was the thyroid gland surgery, and he received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1909, for-in this matter. His nature of meticulous surgeon, scientific and hard working person, dedicated to his patients and students made- found him the place in a history of medicine.

  9. Writing with the eyes. On the Nobel Prize in Literature awarded to Herta Müller

    OpenAIRE

    Siguan, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    Amb Herta Müller, el Premi Nobel de Literatura 2009 va ser atorgat a una escriptora que prové de la minoria de llengua alemanya localitzada a la regió de Banat, a Romania. Müller va començar a escriure en clara oposició a la “identitat alemanya” de la minoria a Banat, que evocava, entre altres coses, el passat nazi del seu pare, però també en oposició a un estil oficial basat en una identitat romanesa monolítica i a un realisme social que no deixava espai per a l'expressió individual. Els ...

  10. Signal transduction and Nobel Prize%信号转导与诺贝尔奖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓强; 王跃民

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction is one of frontiers in life sciences, and many achievements in this field were awarded Nobel Prize. From the initial signal molecular to the subsequent second messenger and reversible phosphorylation, to the G-protein and receptor, and until today signal network system, these researches had greatly expanded the understanding of the phenomenon of life and provided new alternative for a lot of diseases. In this article, the brief history of signal transduction is reviewed according to the research course of classical signaling pathway. It is comprehensively introduced including background, history, significance and utilization of Nobel Prize-related achievements.%信号转导是生命科学前沿领域之一,至今已有多项成果荣获诺贝尔奖。从最初的信号分子,到第二信使和可逆磷酸化,再到G蛋白和G蛋白偶联受体,直到今天的信号网络系统,这些研究极大地拓展了人们对生命现象的理解和认识,从而为多种疾病的治疗提供了新的选择。笔者以经典信号通路研究历程为主线,回顾了信号转导研究的发展简史,全面地介绍了诺贝尔奖相关成果的研究背景、历程、意义和应用。

  11. INTRODUCTION: Many-Body Theory of Atomic Systems: Proceedings of the Nobel Symposium 46

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Lundqvist, Stig

    1980-01-01

    A Nobel Symposium provides an excellent opportunity to bring together a group of prominent scientists for a stimulating meeting. The Nobel Symposia are very small meetings by invitation only and the number of key participants is usually in the range 20-40. These symposia are organized through a special Nobel Symposium Committee after proposals from individuals. They have been made possible through a major grant from the Tri-Centennial Fund of the Bank of Sweden. Our first ideas to arrange a Nobel Symposium on many-body theory of atomic systems came up more than two years ago. It was quite obvious to us that a major break-through was happening in this field. Very accurate schemes have been available for some time for studying the static properties of small closed-shell atomic systems. By "atomic" systems we understand here atoms as well as free molecules, which can be treated by the same formalism, although the technical approaches might be quite different. The conceptual and computational developments in recent years, however, have made it possible to apply the many-body formalism also to heavier systems. Although no rigorous relativistic many-body theory yet exists, there seems to be a general agreement about the way relativistic calculations should be performed on normal atoms and molecules. Schemes based on relativistic perturbation theory as well as on relativistic multi- configurational Hartree-Fock are now in operation and a rapid development is expected in this area. Another field of atomic theory, where significant progress has been made recently, is in the application of many-body formalism to open-shell systems. General schemes, applicable to systems with one or several open shells, are now available, which will make it possible to apply many-body formalism to a much larger group of atomic systems and, in particular, to systems of more physical interest, A number of atomic properties - not only the correlation energy - can then be compared with the

  12. INTRODUCTION: The Physics of Chaos and Related Problems: Proceedings of the 59th Nobel Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Stig

    1985-01-01

    The physics of non-linear phenomena has developed in a remarkable way over the last couple of decades and has accelerated over the last few years, in particular because of the recent progress in the study of chaotic behaviour. In particular the discovery of the universal properties of the transition into chaos for certain classes of systems has stimulated much recent work in different directions both theoretically and experimentally. Chaos theory has become a real challenge to physicists in many different fields and also in many other disciplines such as astronomy, chemistry, medicine, meteorology and economics and social theory. The study of chaos-related phenomena has a truly interdisciplinary character and makes use of important concepts and methods from other disciplines. For the description of chaotic structures one needs a new, recently developed geometry called fractal geometry. For the discussion of the enormous richness of ordered structures which appear, one uses the theory of pattern recognition. In order to study even the simplest theoretical models describing chaos, a computer is essential. It should finally be mentioned that important aspects of computer science are related to the theory of order and chaos. A Nobel Symposium provides an excellent opportunity to bring together a group of prominent scientists for a stimulating exchange of new ideas and results. The Nobel Symposia are very small meetings by invitation only and the number of key participants is typically in the range 20-40. These symposia are organized through a special Nobel Symposium Committee after proposals from individuals. This symposium was sponsored by the Nobel Foundation through its Nobel Symposium Fund with grants from The Tercentenary Fund of the Bank of Sweden and The Knut Alice Wallenberg Foundation. Additional support was obtained from the Royal Academy of Sciences, The Nordic Institute for Theoretical Atomic Physics (NORDITA), Chalmers University of Technology and

  13. LHC INAUGURATION, LHC Fest highlights: exhibition time!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    David Gross, one of the twenty-one Nobel Laureates who have participated in the project.Tuesday 21 October 2008 Accelerating Nobels Colliding Charm, Atomic Cuisine, The Good Anomaly, A Quark Somewhere on the White Paper, Wire Proliferation, A Tale of Two Liquids … these are just some of the titles given to artworks by Physics Nobel Laureates who agreed to make drawings of their prize-winning discoveries (more or less reluctantly) during a special photo session. Science photographer Volker Steger made portraits of Physics Nobel Laureates and before the photo sessions he asked them to make a drawing of their most important discovery. The result is "Accelerating Nobels", an exhibition that combines unusual portraits of and original drawings by twenty-one Nobel laureates in physics whose work is closely related to CERN and the LHC. This exhibition will be one of the highlights of the LHC celebrations on 21 October in the SM18 hall b...

  14. Von Nobel bis Viagra: Die Geschichte eines kleinen Moleküls mit großer Wirkung: Stickstoffmonoxyd (NO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp T

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Es wird kurzgefasst die Geschichte des Nitroglyzerins und von Alfred Nobel dargestellt. Nitroglyzerin war als explosiver Bestandteil von Dynamit der gewaltigste Sprengstoff seiner Zeit und wurde von Alfred Nobel weiterentwickelt und kommerzialisiert, der später den Nobelpreis stiftete. Gleichermaßen ist Nitroglyzerin in öliger Dispersion und in geringsten Mengen seit 100 Jahren als „Koronardilatator“ eingeführt und weiterhin nahezu unersetzlich. Der Mechanismus, mit dem Nitroglyzerin Gefäße erweitert, wurde erst vor 25 Jahren von Furchgott, Ignarro und Murad vollständig aufgeklärt, indem sie die große Bedeutung des Endothels und des gefäßerweiternden Stickstoffmonoxyds beschrieben. Die 3 Forscher erhielten 1998 den Nobelpreis für Medizin zu gleichen Teilen "für die Entdeckung des NOs als Signalmolekül für das kardiovaskuläre System".

  15. Egas Moniz and the origins of psychosurgery: a review commemorating the 50th anniversary of Moniz's Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, A J

    2000-04-01

    Modern psychosurgery began in 1936 with the work of the Portuguese neurologist, Egas Moniz, who attempted to treat the symptoms of mental illness by severing neural tracts in the frontal lobes. This procedure eventually became widespread and applied to thousands of institutionalized, psychotic patients in the United States and other countries. Despite serious side effects associated with psychosurgery, the apparent importance and validity of the treatment was recognized in 1949 when Moniz received the Nobel Prize for his innovation. Psychosurgery was largely replaced by anti-psychotic drugs in the mid-1950s, and the procedure and its practitioners rapidly fell into disrepute. This article reviews Moniz's career, the factors that led up to his first clinical trials of frontal lobe surgery, and the circumstances that allowed psychosurgery to flourish in the 1940s, eventually leading to Moniz's Nobel Prize.

  16. Laureatõ kinopremii "Nika"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Venemaa Kinoakadeemia auhinna "Nike" laureaadid vene filmitegijate seast 2000.a. tööde eest. Auhind "Au ja väärikuse" eest anti Vjatsheslav Tihhonovile. Parima filmi tiitli sai Aleksei Utshiteli "Tema naise päevik" ("Dnevnik jego zhenõ"), parim režissöör oli Bahtijer Hudoinazarov filmi "Kuu isaks" ("Lunnõi papa") eest

  17. Laureatõ kinopremii "Nika"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Venemaa Kinoakadeemia auhinna "Nike" laureaadid vene filmitegijate seast 2000.a. tööde eest. Auhind "Au ja väärikuse" eest anti Vjatsheslav Tihhonovile. Parima filmi tiitli sai Aleksei Utshiteli "Tema naise päevik" ("Dnevnik jego zhenõ"), parim režissöör oli Bahtijer Hudoinazarov filmi "Kuu isaks" ("Lunnõi papa") eest

  18. ¿JUGAMOS EN EL MISMO EQUIPO? LOS NOBEL DE ECONOMÍA Y LA TEORÍA DE JUEGOS

    OpenAIRE

    Francisca Jiménez Jiménez

    2013-01-01

    This work is aimed at offering an overview of the major contributions of Game Theory to the understanding of cooperation and conflict in social dilemmas. In particular, we emphasize some studies carried out by the most outstanding researchers who have been recognized with the Nobel Prize in Economics. For that, we use the well known “tragedy of the commons” as our benchmark strategic setting or game.

  19. Cold (and hot) wars: Superconductivity and society, from Weissberg-Cibulsky 1931 to the 2003 Nobel prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waysand, Georges [Groupe de Physique des Solides, Universites Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6 and Denis Diderot Paris 7, Campus Boucicaut, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France); Laboratoire Souterrain Bas Bruit de Rustrel-Pays d' Apt (Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis), La Grande Combe, 84400 Rustrel (France)

    2005-03-01

    Far from being a continous flow from its discovery down to its explanation, the actual history of superconductivity has been affected by numerous socio-political turbulences all along the XXth century, through hot and Cold wars. From the 30's to the 2003 Nobel prize for physics most of these turbulences are overviewed. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. The Nobel Prize as a Reward Mechanism in the Genomics Era: Anonymous Researchers, Visible Managers and the Ethics of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Hub

    2010-09-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is regarded by many as one of the major scientific achievements in recent science history, a large-scale endeavour that is changing the way in which biomedical research is done and expected, moreover, to yield considerable benefit for society. Thus, since the completion of the human genome sequencing effort, a debate has emerged over the question whether this effort merits to be awarded a Nobel Prize and if so, who should be the one(s) to receive it, as (according to current procedures) no more than three individuals can be selected. In this article, the HGP is taken as a case study to consider the ethical question to what extent it is still possible, in an era of big science, of large-scale consortia and global team work, to acknowledge and reward individual contributions to important breakthroughs in biomedical fields. Is it still viable to single out individuals for their decisive contributions in order to reward them in a fair and convincing way? Whereas the concept of the Nobel prize as such seems to reflect an archetypical view of scientists as solitary researchers who, at a certain point in their careers, make their one decisive discovery, this vision has proven to be problematic from the very outset. Already during the first decade of the Nobel era, Ivan Pavlov was denied the Prize several times before finally receiving it, on the basis of the argument that he had been active as a research manager (a designer and supervisor of research projects) rather than as a researcher himself. The question then is whether, in the case of the HGP, a research effort that involved the contributions of hundreds or even thousands of researchers worldwide, it is still possible to "individualise" the Prize? The "HGP Nobel Prize problem" is regarded as an exemplary issue in current research ethics, highlighting a number of quandaries and trends involved in contemporary life science research practices more broadly.

  1. A Century of Chemical Dynamics Traced through the Nobel Prizes. 1995: Paul Crutzen, Sherwood Rowland, and Mario Molina

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houten, Josh

    2002-10-01

    The 1995 Nobel Prize was awarded to Paul Crutzen, Sherwood Rowland, and Mario Molina "for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone". Collectively, their work established atmospheric chemistry as a major focus at the end of the twentieth century. The results have drawn attention to significant environmental issues in particular, the threat posed to the ozone layer by chlorofluorocarbons.

  2. A Trio of Inference Problems That Could Win You a Nobel Prize in Statistics (If You Help Fund It)

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Xiao-Li

    2014-01-01

    Statistical inference is a field full of problems whose solutions require the same intellectual force needed to win a Nobel Prize in other scientific fields. Multi-resolution inference is the oldest of the trio. But emerging applications such as individualized medicine have challenged us to the limit: Infer estimands with resolution levels that far exceed those of any feasible estimator. Multi-phase inference is another reality because (big) data are almost never collected, processed, and ana...

  3. The Higgs Particle: what is it, and why did it lead to a Nobel Prize in Physics?

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Back in 1964, the theoretical physicists Francois Englert and Robert Brout, as well as Peter Higgs, suggested an explanation for the fact that most elementary particles - such as the electron - have a mass. This scenario predicted a new particle, which has been observed experimentally only just now at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research). This discovery led to the Physics Nobel Prize 2013. Here we sketch in simple terms the concept of the Higgs mechanism, and its importance i...

  4. Improving Army Basic Research: Report of an Expert Panel on the Future of Army Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2004. During the early 1990’s her studies with Dr. Richard Axel led to the discovery of a large gene family...dilute gases of alkali atoms, and for early fundamental studies of the properties of the condensates. 2004 Medicine : Linda Buck—odorant receptors...Research: An Uncertain Future for the Bell Legacy,” Prometheus , Vol. 21, No. 2, June 2003. Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for

  5. 观察人的经济行为何以可能? --2002年诺贝尔经济学奖得主思想评述%Why is the Observation of Man's Economic Behaviour Possible? --Review of Nobel Prize Laureates of 2002

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易宪容; 黄瑜琴; 蒋涛

    2002-01-01

    @@ 一、导言 2002年诺贝尔经济学奖授予了美国普林斯顿大学的以色列籍心理学家卡尼曼教授(Daniel Kahneman)和美国乔治梅森大学经济学家史密斯教授(Vernon L.Smith),分别表彰他们"把心理学研究和经济学研究有效的结合,从而解释了在不确定条件下如何判断与决策"和"发展了一整套实验研究方法,尤其是在实验室里研究市场机制的选择性方面"对现代经济学所作的贡献.这次授奖,从学科的类别来看,两者对经济学的贡献迥然不同,一为行为经济学,一为实验经济学.但诺奖授奖委员会为什么会把他们放在一年获奖呢?最大的共同点可能就在于以不同的方式回答了本文提出的问题,即观察人的经济行为何以可能?在于以心理学的认知方法和实验的方法揭开了人类经济行为的非理性之谜,从而为现代经济学的研究开启了一片新天地.

  6. A brief history of macromolecular crystallography, illustrated by a family tree and its Nobel fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskolski, Mariusz; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    As a contribution to the celebration of the year 2014, declared by the United Nations to be 'The International Year of Crystallography', the FEBS Journal is dedicating this issue to papers showcasing the intimate union between macromolecular crystallography and structural biology, both in historical perspective and in current research. Instead of a formal editorial piece, by way of introduction, this review discusses the most important, often iconic, achievements of crystallographers that led to major advances in our understanding of the structure and function of biological macromolecules. We identified at least 42 scientists who received Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry or Medicine for their contributions that included the use of X-rays or neutrons and crystallography, including 24 who made seminal discoveries in macromolecular sciences. Our spotlight is mostly, but not only, on the recipients of this most prestigious scientific honor, presented in approximately chronological order. As a summary of the review, we attempt to construct a genealogy tree of the principal lineages of protein crystallography, leading from the founding members to the present generation. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. The Nobel Prize for understanding autophagy, a cellular mechanism of waste disposal that keeps us healthy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MEGHA BANSAL; GHANSHYAM SWARUP

    2016-12-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2016, was awarded to Prof Yoshinori Ohsumi from TokyoInstitute of Technology, Yokohoma, Japan, for his work that helped in understanding the molecularmechanisms of autophagy, a process used by most eukaryotic cells to degrade a portion of cytoplasmincluding damaged organelles, large protein complexes and aggregated proteins in lysosomes. This processof autophagy (self-eating) maintains cellular homeostasis and helps the cell and the organism to surviveduring periods of stress, such as starvation, by recycling the cellular components to generate amino acidsand nutrients needed for producing energy. Autophagy and ubiquitin-proteasome system are the two majorprotein degradation systems in the cell.The lysosome was identified by Christian de Duve in the 1950s as a membrane bound organelle in thecell that contains degradative enzymes such as proteases, lipases, acid phosphatases, etc. (de Duve, 2005).The term autophagy was coined by Christian de Duve in 1963. Autophagy generally occurs at low level, butit increases under conditions such as stress and differentiation/remodelling of tissues. Autophagy wasprimarily studied by electron microscopy for decades because no molecular markers were available for itsmolecular analysis.

  8. Antimalarial qinghaosu/artemisinin: The therapy worthy of a Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerapan Krungkrai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality in the tropical endemic countries worldwide. This is largely due to the emergence and spread of resistance to most antimalarial drugs currently available. Based on the World Health Organization recommendation, artemisinin-based combination therapies are now used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Artemisinin or qinghaosu (Chinese name and its derivatives are highly potent, rapidly acting antimalarial drugs. Artemisinin was discovered in 1971 by a Chinese medical scientist Youyou Tu, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2015 on her discovering the antimalarial properties of qinghaosu from the traditional Chinese qinghao plant. Nevertheless, artemisinin resistance in falciparum malaria patients has first emerged on the Thai-Cambodian border in 2009, which is now prevalent across mainland Southeast Asia from Vietnam to Myanmar. Here, we reviewed malaria disease severity, history of artemisinin discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of drug action, artemisinin-based combination therapies, emergence and spread of drug resistance, including the recent findings on mechanism of resistance in the falciparum malaria parasite. This poses a serious threat to global malaria control and prompts renewed efforts for the urgent development of new antimalarial drugs.

  9. Antimalarial qinghaosu/artemisinin: The therapy worthy of a Nobel Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerapan Krungkrai; Sudaratana Rochanakij Krungkrai

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality in the tropical endemic countries worldwide. This is largely due to the emergence and spread of resistance to most antimalarial drugs currently available. Based on the World Health Organization recommendation, artemisinin-based combination therapies are now used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Artemisinin or qinghaosu(Chinese name) and its derivatives are highly potent, rapidly acting antimalarial drugs. Artemisinin was discovered in 1971 by a Chinese medical scientist Youyou Tu, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2015 on her discovering the antimalarial properties of qinghaosu from the traditional Chinese qinghao plant. Nevertheless, artemisinin resistance in falciparum malaria patients has first emerged on the Thai-Cambodian border in 2009, which is now prevalent across mainland Southeast Asia from Vietnam to Myanmar. Here, we reviewed malaria disease severity, history of artemisinin discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of drug action, artemisinin-based combination therapies, emergence and spread of drug resistance, including the recent findings on mechanism of resistance in the falciparum malaria parasite. This poses a serious threat to global malaria control and prompts renewed efforts for the urgent development of new antimalarial drugs.

  10. Antimalarial qinghaosu/artemisinin:The therapy worthy of a Nobel Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jerapan Krungkrai

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality in the tropical endemic countries worldwide. This is largely due to the emergence and spread of resistance to most antimalarial drugs currently available. Based on the World Health Organization recommendation, artemisinin-based combination therapies are now used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Artemisinin or qinghaosu (Chinese name) and its derivatives are highly potent, rapidly acting antimalarial drugs. Artemisinin was discovered in 1971 by a Chinese medical scientist Youyou Tu, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2015 on her discovering the antimalarial properties of qinghaosu from the traditional Chinese qinghao plant. Nevertheless, artemisinin resistance in falciparum malaria patients has first emerged on the Thai-Cambodian border in 2009, which is now prevalent across mainland Southeast Asia from Vietnam to Myanmar. Here, we reviewed malaria disease severity, history of artemisinin discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of drug action, artemisinin-based combination therapies, emergence and spread of drug resistance, including the recent findings on mechanism of resistance in the falciparum malaria parasite. This poses a serious threat to global malaria control and prompts renewed efforts for the urgent development of new antimalarial drugs.

  11. Turbulence theory and infrared images falsify the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl

    2012-11-01

    Turbulence defined by the inertial vortex force explains Planck scale big bang processes as temporary, rendering a permanent Einstein cosmological constant Λ and a positive expansion rate of the universe driven by anti-gravitational dark energy forces unnecessary. Large kinematic viscosity stresses during the plasma epoch from 1011 s to 1013 s cause fragmentation by proto-super-cluster-voids at 1012 s and proto-galaxies at the 1013 s transition to gas. Fragmentation of gas proto-galaxies is at Earth-mass planet viscous scales in Jeans mass clumps of a trillion planets. These Proto-Globular-star-Clusters (PGCs) freeze to form the dark matter of galaxies according to the Gibson (1996) Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics (HGD) theory, and as observed by Schild (1996) by quasar microlensing. White dwarf carbon stars explode as Supernovae Ia events (SNeIa) when their mass increases to 1.44 solar, providing the standard candles used to justify the Nobel Prize claim of a positive expansion rate. However, if all stars form from primordial planet mergers in PGC clumps as claimed by HGD cosmology, the SNeIa become subject to a systematic dimming error depending on the line of sight to the event. New space telescope infrared images strongly support HGD cosmology.

  12. The structure of Lippmann heliochromes: Cajal and the 1908 Nobel Prize in Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triarhou, Lazaros C; del Cerro, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    The 1908 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Luxembourgeois Gabriel Lippmann (1848-1921), Professor of Mathematical and Experimental Physics at la Sorbonne, for his method of reproducing colors photographically based on the theory of wave interference. In the preceding several years, the eminent neurohistologist - and avid photographer - Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) had been experimenting with Lippmann heliochromes, studying under the microscope the structure of the laminae of Zenker that produce mixed colors, and especially white. Those studies led to a series of technical papers by Cajal, the culmination being an article published 100 years ago in the Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC. A few years later, Cajal published Photography in Colors, his classic monograph on the physicochemical principles of the 'art of Daguerre,' bearing further testimony to his exuberant productivity, far-reaching interests, and scientific genius. The present article reflects on the workings of the mind of Cajal and his fundamental knowledge that was a precondition for his success in neurohistology. It highlights the links between the early photographic studies of Cajal and Lippmann, masters of the biological and physical sciences, respectively. Special emphasis is placed on Lippmann's discovery of heliochromes and the microscopic analyses performed on them by Cajal, including elements from relevant contemporary studies and discoveries.

  13. Les Nobel juifs de chimie le partage du savoir au XX siècle

    CERN Document Server

    Benguigui, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    L'un des traits marquants et remarquables des Juifs tout au long de leur histoire, plusieurs fois millénaire, a été leur créativité dans tous les domaines, en particulier dans le domaine scientifique. Ils ont participé de façon impressionnante à la remise en cause des valeurs, au démantèlement des dogmes et à l'irruption des forces cachées. On peut d'emblée souligner que la contribution des Juifs à la science a été sans commune mesure avec le pourcentage de la population qu'ils représentent. Cela reste vrai pour la chimie du XXe siècle. A travers la vie et l'oeuvre de 23 prix Nobel de chimie, l'auteur nous livre une histoire passionnante de ces hommes, biens souvent des exilés et d'origine modeste. dont la science fut leur vocation et le partage du savoir leur crédo.

  14. PRINCIPALES CONTRIBUCIONES DE LOS PREMIOS NOBEL DE ECONOMÍA DEL AÑO 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Briceño

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available En el 2000 la Academia Real Sueca de Ciencias otorgó un premio Nobel compartido entre dos economistas cuyos aportes en los campos de la microeconometría, permitieron el descubrimiento de métodos ampliamente aplicados en el análisis estadístico de la conducta individual y familiar en el área económica así como el de otras ciencias sociales. Particularmente, según el dictamen de la Academia el premio para James Heckman se basa en su descubrimiento de la teoría y métodos para el análisis de muestras selectivas y a Daniel McFadden por el descubrimiento de la teoría y los métodos para el análisis de la elección discreta. En este artículo se expondrán las teorías de cada uno de estos autores, con el fin de conocer un poco más acerca de los aportes teóricos de los economistas galardonados con esta distinción.

  15. CHAIRMAN'S PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 79: The Birth and Early Evolution of Our Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Bengt; Nilsson, Jan S.; Skagerstam, Bo-Sture

    1991-01-01

    It was in 1986 that we submitted a proposal to organize a Nobel Symposium on the topic "The Birth and Early Evolution of Our Universe", a subject not previously discussed at such a meeting. Our feeling at the time was that it would be appropriate to gather together international expertise on the deep and exciting connections between elementary physics and astrophysics/cosmology. In both these scientific disciplines there are wellknown "standard models"—the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model of electroweak interactions and the Big-Bang cosmological model. The former model has now been tested to a very high accuracy. Progress in observational cosmology and astrophysics has on the other hand given strong support to the standard Big-Bang model as a realistic framework of cosmological evolution. The interesting fact, of course, is that the two standard models are not independent, and their predictions become interlinked when one considers the early, hot universe. It is now a wonderfully accepted piece of history that the constraint on the number of light neutrinos as obtained from the Big-Bang primordial nucleosynthesis agree very well with recent high-energy laboratory experiments. When our proposal was approved in 1989 we were very happy and honoured to invite a large number of internationally outstanding contributors to take part in the Symposium, almost all of whom were able to participate. It was, however, with deep regret and shock that their sudden deaths prevented us from inviting A Sakharov and Y Zeldovich. Their presence and wisdom was sadly missed. By choosing the beautiful village of Gräftåvallen, outside the town of Östesund, as the location of the Symposium, we hoped to provide a relaxing and stimulating atmosphere and also, possibly, almost twenty hours of sunlight a day for a week. The hosts of Gräftåvallen, Annika and Tommy Hagström, have to be thanked for making our stay both extremely successful and to a memorable experience. Our thanks also go to

  16. [Maria Skłodowska-Curie--her chemistry at the centenary of the second Nobel Prize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagórski, Zbigniew Paweł; Kornacka, Ewa Maria

    2012-01-01

    The article presents from the perspective of one hundred years the work of Maria Curie-Skłodowska, which in many cases was ahead of the state of knowledge of the time. It opened new horizons and for this reason we made many digressions. The fact of awarding her the Nobel Prize twice is a sensation enough to present the values of careful activity of the Nobel Prize Committee that emphasizes the importance of Maria's achievements. A significant element of Maria Skłodowska-Curie's achievements was still mysterious character of the radiation in her time, and only chemical approach made it possible to organise the phenomena and explain the origin of the radiation. The essence of the research was an arduous separation of components following the track of growing radiation of successive fractions of preparations. This research was a start of the technology of educement of dispersed elements in great mass of materials. We underline the paramount role of the chemical research Maria Skłodowska conducted while still in Warsaw in the laboratories of the Museum of Industry and Agriculture under the guidance of an excellent chemist Józef Jerzy Boguski. Her research in Paris was the origin of the semi-commercial scale in chemistry and setting aside a special shed outside the university building was the beginning of the institutes that now function beyond universities and are key element of scientific and technical progress. Technology of splitting developed by Maria Skłodowska-Curie was applied also by other radiochemists, e.g. By Otto Hahn. Lively movement in radiochemistry of her lifetime resulted in Maria's disputes with e.g. German chemist Marckwald, who questioned the originality of polonium. The scientific disputes like this one Maria won triumphantly although in several others she had to accept opponents' argument, as in the case of radon. Her experiments were planned with utmost rationality as it was with the rejection of the hypothesis saying that radioactivity was

  17. In vitro fertilization – from concept to first child Commemorating the 2010 Nobel Prize in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Janežič

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the birth of the world’s first test-tube baby in 1978, more than 4 million babies have been born worldwide with the help of in vitro fertilization (IVF. In Slovenia, the first babies were born in 1984. In 2005, the percentage of babies born with biomedically assisted reproduction was 3.9 % and was the highest in Europe. IVF is nowadays a widely available and accepted method for helping infertile couples. However, the path to success was long and difficult. In this article, we present the development of IVF from the first ideas about fertilizing eggs outside the body from the end of the 19th century, followed by experiments on different animal species, the first human pregnancy and finally the birth of the first child in the United Kingdom. Many pioneers from other countries, particularly Australia and the United States of America, were instrumental in developing IVF as we know it today. Unfortunately, covering the history of IVF would greatly exceed the purpose of this article. During its history, the method was modified with innovative improvements. In its beginnings, there was a great deal of scepticism and opposition from certain public as well as scientific circles, an attitude that changed radically. The fact that the pioneer Robert Edwards received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2010 is proof of the growing acceptance of the method. Surely, IVF is a complex medical field, which raised and still raises ethical and legal questions. But from a merely human perspective, it is simply a method which gave infertile couples the opportunity to fulfill their lifetime dream.

  18. [An illustrious unknown. Giuseppe Levi among science, anti-fascism and Nobel Prizes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignolio, Andrea; De Sio, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    The anatomist Giuseppe Levi (1872-1965) is unanimously considered one of the major figures of Italian biomedical sciences in the 20th century. His fame, however, is mainly derived from having nurtured three Nobel Prize winners, namely Salvador E. Luria, Rita Levi Montalcini and Renato Dulbecco. In reappraising Levi's role in the development of Italian science and culture in general, this article aims at questioning both the narrowness of earlier accounts and a certain kind of genealogical approach to the history of scientific disciplines and academic schools. We will here consider Giuseppe Levi as an instance of two major cultural phenomena: the development of experimental biology in Italy and continental Europe and the anti-fascist socialist culture expressed by a part of the Italian intellectuals. In so doing, we will reassess the historical specificity of the scientific maturation of Levi's three famous students, on the one hand, while on the other we will consider in some depth the cultural and moral environment in which Levi thrived and his role as a moral example for his students. Such revision, we will argue, have a direct bearing on more general historiographical issues, namely, the need for a stronger contextualization of the birth and consolidation of research traditions, implying a rejection of simplistic genealogical reconstructions, and the role of academic schools and institutional settings in the definition of novel, multidisciplinary scientific approaches. Finally, the following will highlight the importance of a more careful outlook on the master-pupil relationship in academic context, addressing issues of both continuity and rupture. The article is subdivided in two main sections, the first devoted to Levi as a scientist, the second to his Anti-fascism.

  19. ВИТОКИ НОБЕЛІВСЬКОГО РУХУ В УКРАЇНІ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Н. І. Паламарчук

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Herein the analysis of the historical preconditions of the Nobel Movement development in Ukraine is given and the significance of studying and promoting the heritage of Nobel laureates is considered. The major science branches of the world’s most prestigious award are reviewed. The political component of the decisions taken to nominees for the Nobel Prize is shown.

  20. Marie and Irene Curie. The first female Nobel Prize winners; Marie en IreneCurie. De eerste vrouwelijke Nobelprijswinnaars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordenbos, G. [Joke Smit Instituut voor Vrouwenstudies, Universiteit Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2003-07-01

    Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1903 and in 1911. Also her daughter, Irene Joliot-Curie, received a Nobel Prize for science in 1935. In this book an overview is given of the academic world at that time: limited access to universities for women, the carriers of both women in physics and their pioneering research and discoveries, the refusal of Marie Curie by the French Academy of Sciences, the awarding of the Nobel Prize and the assignment of Irene Joliot-Curie as the first female minister in France, the impact of the two World Wars, their married and private lives and the constant smear campaign of the press against both women. The lives and works of both women are hold against the light of the present position of women in physical sciences. [Dutch] In 1903, precies honderd jaar geleden, ontving Marie Curie als eerste vrouw de Nobelprijs voor de Wetenschap, gevolgd door een tweede Nobelprijs in 1911. Ook haar dochter Irene Joliot-Curie kreeg de Nobelprijs voor de wetenschap in 1935. Marie and Irene Curie schetst een breed beeld van de academische wereld waarin beide vrouwen zich bewogen: de beperkte toegang van vrouwen tot de universiteit, hun carrisres in de natuurkunde en baanbrekende ontdekkingen, de afwijzing van Marie door de Franse Academie des Sciences, de toekenning van de Nobelprijs en de benoeming van Irene als eerste vrouwelijke minister in Frankrijk, de invloed van de twee Wereldoorlogen, hun huwelijks- en priveleven en de niet aflatende hetze van de pers tegen beiden. In de door mannen gedomineerde wereld van de natuurwetenschappen liep de uitzonderingspositie van beide vrouwen als rode draad door hun curieuze levens. Het leven en werk van de Curies wordt geactualiseerd door deze tegen het licht te houden van de huidige positie van vrouwen in de natuurwetenschappen. Het bereiken van de top van de wetenschap door vrouwen blijkt nog steeds uitzonderlijk.

  1. Justice where justice is due: A posthumous Nobel Prize to Carlos Chagas (1879-1934), the discoverer of American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Martins, Cláudia A; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2009-05-01

    Working in the Brazilian backland, Chagas described a new disease. He discovered the etiologic agent, the vector, the reservoir, the acute stage, the several clinical aspects of the chronic stage (particularly the heart disease), role of autoimmunity in its pathogenesis, and anticipated the social impact of the disease. Chagas was nominated to Nobel Prize twice: in 1913, and in 1921. In 1913, Richet won the prize because his work on anaphylaxis. In 1921, no one received the Nobel Prize. It is believed that detraction of Chagas' work at the National Academy of Medicine, made by jealousy, mediocrity, and political rivalries can be maculated the image of the scientist. Furthermore, misperception of Chagas' work may also have led the Nobel Committee not to award him. One-hundred years after the discovery, we can appreciate the greatness of the discovery of Carlos Chagas, never seem in the realm of biological research. Time to make justice, therefore, has finally come.

  2. [George H. Whipple. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1934. Whipple's disease, pernicious anemia, and other contributions to medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    George Hoyot Whipple (1878-1976) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine in 1934, along with Minot and Murphy for their studies in pernicious anemia. Whipple's name has been given to the bacterial disease which he describes in 1907 that we know today as Whipple's disease or intestinal lipodystrophy. He gave the name of thalasemia to the Mediterranean anemia of Cooley, and made diverse contributions to hematology and general pathology. He worked with William Welch in the Department of Pathology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and later became director of the University of Rochester. He died in 1976 at the age of 98.

  3. MAPEAMENTO DAS COMPETÊNCIAS E DESCRIÇÃO DE CARGOS DA LIVRARIA NOBEL DE PIRACICABA.

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Andreza Fernanda de; Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Brasil; Cremonezi, Graziela Oste Graziano; Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Brasil; Rocha, Maria Josilene Fontinele; Faculdade de Ensino Superior da Amazônia Reunida (FESAR), Brasil; Aguiar, Verônica Marinho; Faculdade de Ensino Superior da Amazônia Reunida (FESAR), Brasil; Franco, Ana Cristina Souza; Faculdade de Ensino Superior da Amazônia Reunida (FESAR), Brasil

    2014-01-01

    Este trabalho tem por objetivo mapear as competências e desenvolver a descrição de cargos da livraria Nobel de Piracicaba. Tendo num primeiro momento descritas as teorias referenciais sobre competências, descrição de cargo e as competências técnicas e comportamentais necessárias para o exercício da função/cargo. A pesquisa foi caracterizada quanto à abordagem do problema como qualitativa; A técnica escolhida para coleta de dados baseou-se na observação direta da pesquisadora, bem como nas inf...

  4. Sexo, divorcio y machismo: En torno a Gary Becker, Premio Nobel de Economía 1992

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Baca, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Gary Becker ha dedicado su vida a extender el campo de aplicación de la teoría económica a todas las actividades del ser humano. En su Tratado sobre la Familia, Becker estudia los problemas de la discriminación sexual, la poligamia y la monogamia, la elección de parejas, la demanda de hijos y el divorcio, desde el punto de vista de la inversión en capital humano. Este es posiblemente el trabajo que lo ha llevado a merecer el Premio Nobel de Economía y del cual se ofrece aquí un breve comentar...

  5. Looking at the future with Rita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentivoglio, M

    2013-11-12

    This paper on Rita Levi-Montalcini (1909-2012), who received in 1986 the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery of nerve growth factor, focuses on aspects of her advocacy and her commitment to education in which she has been especially active in the last part of her long life. With passionate confidence on the capabilities of the aging brain (together with severe admonition against the pursuit of immortality), she encouraged contributions of senior citizens to the society. Always projected into the future, with enduring faith in the potential of young individuals, in education as a key to development, in the capabilities of women, in the importance of gender equality, Rita established in 2001 the Rita Levi-Montalcini Foundation for the education of African women. Her legacy on engagement for a better 'global village' should not be forgotten by the neuroscience community.

  6. The contributions of Paul Ehrlich to pharmacology: a tribute on the occasion of the centenary of his Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Fèlix; Rosich, Laia

    2008-01-01

    On the centenary of Paul Ehrlich's Nobel Prize, this German researcher deserves to be remembered as a pioneer in a large number of scientific disciplines. As a result of his enthusiasm and scientific abilities, dedication, and contacts with other scientists of his time, he was able to make countless contributions in fields as diverse as histology, haematology, immunology, oncology, microbiology and pharmacology, among others. Although the Swedish award was meant to recognize the standardization of the manufacture of antidiphtheria serum, it was the discovery of arsphenamine (Salvarsan) for the treatment of syphilis which won him wider international acclaim. From a pharmacological perspective, Ehrlich's outstanding contributions include dissemination of the 'magic bullet' concept for the synthesis of antibacterials, introduction of concepts such as chemoreceptor and chemotherapy, and linking the chemical structure of compounds to their pharmacological activity. These achievements took place within the framework he established for the transition from experimental pharmacology to therapeutic pharmacology. He introduced a modern research system based on the synthesis of multiple chemical structures for pharmacological screening in animal models of disease states. These contributions were undoubtedly decisive in propitiating the wider development of antibiotics decades later. For these reasons, it is fitting to mark the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize awarded to this great scientist by commemorating the importance of his contributions to the advance of pharmacology. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Horning cell self-digestion: Autophagy wins the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Po-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process by which eukaryotic cells eliminate intracellular components via the lysosomal degradation process. This cell self-digestion process was first discovered and morphologically characterized in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The genetic screen studies in baker's yeast in the 1990s further identified the essential genes functioning in the autophagic process. In the past two decades, the detailed molecular process involved in the completion of autophagy was delineated. Additionally, autophagy has been implied to function in many aspects of biological processes, including maintenance of organelle integrity, protein quality control, regulation of the stress response, and immunity. In addition to maintain cell homeostasis, autophagy has recently been shown to be modulated and to participate in the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as pathogen infections, neurodegenerative diseases, and tumor development. Overall, the breakthrough in autophagy research relies on the discovery of autophagy-related genes (ATGs) using a genetic screening approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which was established by Yoshinori Ohsumi. This year the Nobel Committee has awarded Yoshinori Ohsumi the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his remarkable contribution to autophagy research. Copyright © 2017 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Horning cell self-digestion: Autophagy wins the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yuan Ke

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process by which eukaryotic cells eliminate intracellular components via the lysosomal degradation process. This cell self-digestion process was first discovered and morphologically characterized in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The genetic screen studies in baker's yeast in the 1990s further identified the essential genes functioning in the autophagic process. In the past two decades, the detailed molecular process involved in the completion of autophagy was delineated. Additionally, autophagy has been implied to function in many aspects of biological processes, including maintenance of organelle integrity, protein quality control, regulation of the stress response, and immunity. In addition to maintain cell homeostasis, autophagy has recently been shown to be modulated and to participate in the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as pathogen infections, neurodegenerative diseases, and tumor development. Overall, the breakthrough in autophagy research relies on the discovery of autophagy-related genes (ATGs using a genetic screening approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which was established by Yoshinori Ohsumi. This year the Nobel Committee has awarded Yoshinori Ohsumi the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his remarkable contribution to autophagy research.

  9. Autophagy wins the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: Breakthroughs in baker's yeast fuel advances in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Beth; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2017-01-10

    Autophagy is an ancient pathway in which parts of eukaryotic cells are self-digested within the lysosome or vacuole. This process has been studied for the past seven decades; however, we are only beginning to gain a molecular understanding of the key steps required for autophagy. Originally characterized as a hormonal and starvation response, we now know that autophagy has a much broader role in biology, including organellar remodeling, protein and organelle quality control, prevention of genotoxic stress, tumor suppression, pathogen elimination, regulation of immunity and inflammation, maternal DNA inheritance, metabolism, and cellular survival. Although autophagy is usually a degradative pathway, it also participates in biosynthetic and secretory processes. Given that autophagy has a fundamental role in many essential cellular functions, it is not surprising that autophagic dysfunction is associated with a wide range of human diseases. Genetic studies in various fungi, particularly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, provided the key initial breakthrough that led to an explosion of research on the basic mechanisms and the physiological connections of autophagy to health and disease. The Nobel Committee has recognized this breakthrough by the awarding of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for research in autophagy.

  10. Influence of Translator's Religious Ideology on Translation: A Case Study of English Translations of the Nobel Quran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibeh Khosravi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aimed to investigate the role of translator's religious ideology on his/her translation of the Nobel Quran by focusing on English translations of four verses from Surah An-Nisa (Women, Surah Al-Ahzab (The Confederates and Surah An-Nur (Light which are mostly referred to with the aim of imagining Islam as a religion that oppresses women and abuses their rights. To this end, four English translations of the Nobel Quran by four translators from Muslim, Christian and Jewish backgrounds, with different ideologies, were selected as the corpus of this study. The research applied Farahzad's model of translation criticism (Based on Fairclough's approach to CDA as the theoretical framework of this paper. Based on this framework, English translations of selected verses were compared with their original versions at the textual level and paratextual level. The result of this study demonstrated that it is difficult to conclude that there is relationship between translator's religious ideology and his/her translation of Quran.

  11. EDITORIAL: UN NOBEL A LA TENACIDAD EN CONTRA DE LOS DOGMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Cortés

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available La Asamblea de los premios Nobel en el Instituto Karolinska de Medicina decidió en esta ocasión otorgar el Nobel de Medicina y Fisiología 2005 a los científicos australianos Barry J. Marshall y J. Robin Warren resaltando «la tenacidad» a la hora de cuestionar los dogmas establecidos en torno a la gastritis y la úlcera de estómago o de duodeno. Los dos patólogos demostraron que Helicobacter pylori es la causa de ambos trastornos. En 1982, cuando presentaron sus investigaciones, se consideraba que el estrés y el estilo de vida eran las causas de la úlcera péptica. El hallazgo provocó uno de los mayores cismas médicos. La comunidad médica criticó fuertemente el hallazgo y Barry J. Marshall llegó a inocularse la bacteria para demostrar su teoría. Sólo hasta 1991, estos hallazgos fueron realmente reconocidos por los gastroenterólogos. Actualmente se considera que la bacteria descubierta por los investigadores australianos es la responsable de más de 90% de las úlceras duodenales y hasta de 80% de las gástricas. Los trabajos de los científicos demostraron que la dolencia, considerada hasta entonces un trastorno crónico, se puede tratar con éxito si se elimina H. pylori del organismo. El compromiso de este germen en la gastritis crónica activa, su asociación con la úlcera gastroduodenal y su inclusión por parte de la IARC en 1994 (grupo de estudio del cáncer, perteneciente a la Organización Mundial de la Salud entre los agentes carcinógenos tipo 1, lo ha convertido en uno de los microorganismos de mayor interés en patología humana. Cerca de la mitad de la población mundial está infectada por esta bacteria. Warren (nacido en 1937 en Adelaida, ejerció la patología hasta 1999 en el Royal Hospital, de Perth, observó la presencia de bacterias en el «antro» asociada con inflamación de la mucosa gástrica en 50% de los pacientes a los cuales se había hecho una biopsia. Barry Marshall (nacido en 1951 en Kargoorlie

  12. 奉献与创新:南丁格尔奖获得者的教育教学价值取向%Dedication and creation: the education value orientation of the Nightingale Prize laureates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段志光

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Florence Nightingale and the Nightingale Prize laureates in China were selected as the subjects. The initial data were collected from databases in the world by the national science library, Chinese academy of sciences and national science and technology library. By a qualitative and quantitative method, the relationship between dedication and innovation was studied. It is discovered that nursing is obviously located to service profession in our country and dedication character of Nightingale Prize laureates in our country is par excellence. It is thought that the value measurement standard for nurs-ing social contribution should not be limited to innovation, equal attention should be paid to dedication and innovation if nursing goes from occupation to specialty. Nightingale spirit should be looked as the value and destination of nursing education teaching forever, and its essence should be to lead the emphasis on dedica-tion to on dedication and innovation simultaneously. Value judgment of nursing education teaching should be improved from simple dedication to both of dedication and innovation. Results show that dedication and innovation are the essence of Nightingale spirit, the value orientation of Nightingale Prize laureates and probably a new thinking of nursing specialty.%本文以南丁格尔和我国南丁格尔奖获得者为研究对象,委托中国科学院文献情报中心和国家图书馆科技查询中心,自国内外相关数据库采集有关原始数据,运用定性与定量相结合方法,主要探讨奉献与创新的关系.研究发现,我国将护理定位于奉献为主的服务性行业的痕迹仍很明显,我国南丁格尔奖获得者的奉献特征十分突出.研究认为,护理学对社会贡献的价值衡量标准不宜再局限于奉献;护理学要从职业走向专业,只能走奉献与创新并重之路.南丁格尔精神作为护理教育教学的价值目标不能改变,但其实质应当由主要侧重奉献向

  13. Can Members of the Communist Party Win the Nobel Prize for Literature?%共产党员能否获诺贝尔文学奖?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡毅

    2013-01-01

    Mo Yan won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2012 and he was the sixth Nobel Prize winner from the Com-munist Party in the history of Nobel Prize for Literature .But due to the influence of history ,culture and ideology ,it is rarely known and some even misunderstood the winner of the prize .This paper is aimed at helping people correct their misunderstanding and weakening the influence of politics and ideology to let people pay more attention to Nobel Prize for Literature as a prize of literature rather than a prize of politics .%莫言于2012年荣获诺贝尔文学奖,是诺贝尔文学奖历史上第六位获得该奖的共产党员。但过去由于历史、文化和意识形态等方面的阻隔,许多人并不知道此事,对他的获奖还存在不少误解。现对这一情况作了专门疏理,提出要正确认识诺贝尔文学奖,要淡化政治和意识形态色彩,更多地关注它是一个文学奖而不是政治奖。

  14. Simon van der Meer and Carlo Rubbia celebrate their awarding of the Nobel Prize in 1984 with a toast at CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1984-01-01

    CERN's 1984 Nobel prizewinners Carlo Rubbia (left) and Simon van der Meer, who were awarded the prize for their roles in discovering the W+, W- and Z0 particles, the carriers of Nature's weak force. Carlo Rubbia's work allowed CERN's Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) to collide protons and antiprotons, while Simon van der Meer's technical virtuosity made the project possible.

  15. Visit of the ATLAS cavern by Prof. Murray Gell-Mann, Physics Nobel 1969. With Dr Peter Jenni and Dr Alison Lister

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Murray Gell-Mann, well known for proposing the quark model and as a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1969, came to CERN on 23 January. During his visit he gave a theoretical physics seminar on decoherent histories in quantum mechanics.

  16. Nobel Chemistry in the Laboratory: Synthesis of a Ruthenium Catalyst for Ring-Closing Olefin Metathesis--An Experiment for the Advanced Inorganic or Organic Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, George E.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment for the upper-level undergraduate laboratory is described in which students synthesize a ruthenium olefin metathesis catalyst, then use the catalyst to carry out the ring-closing metathesis of diethyl diallylmalonate. The olefin metathesis reaction was the subject of the 2005 Nobel Prize in chemistry. The catalyst chosen for this…

  17. [G-protein coupled receptors. Nobel Prize 2012 for chemistry to Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockaert, Joël

    2012-12-01

    The 2012 Nobel Prize for chemistry has been won by Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian Kobilka for their work on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Those receptors (3% of human genome) evolutionary are derived from one 1 or 2 ancestors and are able to recognize external message as different as light, odorants, gustative molecules and intercellular messages such as hormones and neurotransmitters. They are targets of 30-40% of therapeutic drugs. Robert J. Lefkowitz has been one of the leaders of the field from more than 40 years and has built several key concepts of the domain. Brian Kobilka was successful, in 2007, in producing a crystal structure of the β2-adrenergic receptor. This paved the way for the production of a series of almost 50 GPCR crystal structures both in inactive and active forms.

  18. Charles J. Pedersen: innovator in macrocyclic chemistry and co-recipient of the 1987 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izatt, Reed M

    2007-02-01

    Charles J. Pedersen began life in Korea where his father was employed as an engineer at a gold mine in a remote region of that country. He received his primary and secondary school education in Japan and university training in the United States. He was employed as an organic research chemist at DuPont for 42 years. The signal accomplishment of this unusual individual was his serendipitous discovery of macrocyclic polyethers and of their selective complexation of alkali metal cations. This discovery sparked the development of a new field of chemistry and led to his sharing the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1987. An attempt is made to understand Pedersen as a person in this article.

  19. Tidal interactions and principle of corresponding states: from micro to macro cosmos. A century after van der Waals' Nobel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Caimmi, R

    2012-01-01

    The current attempt is aimed to honor the first centennial of Johannes Diderik van der Waals (VDW) awarding Nobel Prize in Physics. The VDW theory of ordinary fluids is reviewed in the first part of the paper, where special effort is devoted to the equation of state and the law of corresponding states. In addition, a few mathematical features involving properties of cubic equations are discussed, for appreciating the intrinsic beauty of the VDW theory. A theory of astrophysical fluids is shortly reviewed in the second part of the paper, grounding on the tensor virial theorem for two-component systems, and an equation of state is formulated with a convenient choice of reduced variables. Additional effort is devoted to particular choices of density profiles, namely a simple guidance case and two cases of astrophysical interest. The related macroisothermal curves are found to be qualitatively similar to VDW isothermal curves below the critical threshold and, for sufficiently steep density profiles, a critical ma...

  20. The first Nobel Peace Prize, Henry Dunant (founder of the International Red Cross) and his "Mémoirs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Raimonda; Vanni, Paolo; Baccolo, Grazia M; Guerin, Elizabeth; Vanni, Duccio

    2003-06-01

    To celebrate the memory and work of Henry Dunant, on the centenary of the presentation of the first Nobel Peace Prize, rightly awarded to Dunant for his having founded the institution of the International Red Cross, this paper presents the reader with some insights into his activities and sufferings, his trials and tribulations, and the hope and strength of his character. The ceaseless efforts made by Dunant to bring about the Institution which today represents Hope for so many suffering people who are silent victims of wars and atrocities, are fleetingly presented. The authors' intention is to give due recognition to Dunant for his work, and to highlight the humanity and the moral and social worth of the face behind the International Red Cross.

  1. Nobel prize and biomedical engineering%诺贝尔奖与生物医学工程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董秀珍

    2008-01-01

    @@ 众所周知,诺贝尔奖创立于1901年,它是根据瑞典著名化学家、硝化甘油炸药发明人阿尔弗雷德·贝恩哈德·诺贝尔(Alfred Bernhard Nobel)的遗嘱以其部分遗产作为基金创立的,共设立物理、化学、生理学和医学、文学及和平5种奖项,授予世界各国在这些领域对人类做出重大贡献的人.因此,可以说获得诺贝尔奖的项目代表了当时相关学科的最高水平.

  2. HiEnergy Technologies announces scientific advisory board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    HiEnergy has named the physicists on their independent scientific advisory board. They include Nobel laureate Dr. Melvin Schwartz and Dr. Giovanni Fazio, Senior Physicist at the Harvard Smithsonian Centre (1/2 page).

  3. Premier Wen hails sci-tech cooperation with CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Premier Wen Jiabao met CERN's director general Dr Robert Aymar and physicist and Nobel laureate Dr Samuel Chao Chung Ting. Premier Wen emphasied the importance for China to collaborate on fundamental science (0.5 page)

  4. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  5. Future Contingents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Hasle., Per F. V.

    2015-01-01

    will be a sea-battle tomorrow” could serve as standard examples. What could be called the problem of future contingents concerns how to ascribe truth-values to such statements. If there are several possible decisions out of which one is going to be made freely tomorrow, can there be a truth now about which one......, ‘future contingents’ could also refer to future contingent objects. A statement like “The first astronaut to go to Mars will have a unique experience” could be analyzed as referring to an object not yet existing, supposing that one day in the distant future some person will indeed travel to Mars......, but that person has not yet been born. The notion of ‘future contingent objects’ involves important philosophical questions, for instance the issue of ethical obligations towards future generations, quantification over ‘future contingent objects’ etc. However, this entry is confined to the study of future...

  6. Future Contingents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Hasle., Per F. V.

    2011-01-01

    will be a sea-battle tomorrow” could serve as standard examples. What could be called the problem of future contingents concerns how to ascribe truth-values to such statements. If there are several possible decisions out of which one is going to be made freely tomorrow, can there be a truth now about which one......, ‘future contingents’ could also refer to future contingent objects. A statement like “The first astronaut to go to Mars will have a unique experience” could be analyzed as referring to an object not yet existing, supposing that one day in the distant future some person will indeed travel to Mars......, but that person has not yet been born. The notion of ‘future contingent objects’ involves important philosophical questions, for instance the issue of ethical obligations towards future generations, quantification over ‘future contingent objects’ etc. However, this entry is confined to the study of future...

  7. Future accelerators (?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  8. 23rd April 2008 - Nobel Prize in Physics 1987 J. G. Bednorz visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with IBM Zurich Research Laboratory colleagues guided by L. Bottura, N. Catalan Lasheras and Y. Papaphilippou.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien brice

    2008-01-01

    23rd April 2008 - Nobel Prize in Physics 1987 J. G. Bednorz visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with IBM Zurich Research Laboratory colleagues guided by L. Bottura, N. Catalan Lasheras and Y. Papaphilippou.

  9. Telegramme sent on June 14 1956 from physicists Fred Reines and Clyde Cowan to Wolfgang Pauli announcing the detection, for the first time, of neutrinos. The Physics Nobel Prize in 1995 was awarded to Reines for this discovery.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximiliem Brice

    2006-01-01

    Telegramme sent on June 14 1956 from physicists Fred Reines and Clyde Cowan to Wolfgang Pauli announcing the detection, for the first time, of neutrinos. The Physics Nobel Prize in 1995 was awarded to Reines for this discovery.

  10. The web cast of the Nobel Prize of Physics of 2008, transmitted direct from Stockholm to the Globe of Science at CERN. Followed by a discussion among CERN theorists, with the participation of Jack Steinberger and John Ellis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    The web cast of the Nobel Prize of Physics of 2008, transmitted direct from Stockholm to the Globe of Science at CERN. Followed by a discussion among CERN theorists, with the participation of Jack Steinberger and John Ellis.

  11. A Century of Ideas Perspectives from Leading Scientists of the 20th Century

    CERN Document Server

    Sidharth, B. G

    2008-01-01

    Shortly after its inauguration in 1985 the Birla Science Centre, Hyderabad, India, started a series of lectures by Nobel Laureates and other scientists of international renown, usually in Physics and Astronomy, sometimes in Life Sciences and Chemistry. The present collection mostly consists of lectures on frontier topics. The transcript of each lecture is preceded by a short biography of the Nobel Laureate/Scientist in question. The lectures are aimed at, and accessible to a wide non-specialist but higher educated audience.

  12. THE 2000 NOBEL PRIZE FOR PHYSICS%半导体异质结及其在光电子学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈良惠

    2001-01-01

    瑞典皇家科学院2000年10月10日宣布,将2000年度诺贝尔物理奖授予三位科学家,他们是俄罗斯科学院圣彼得堡约飞技术物理研究所的Zh.I.Alferov、美国加利福尼亚大学的HerbertKroemer和美国德克萨斯仪器公司的JackS.Kilby,以表彰他们为现代信息技术,特别是他们发明的高速晶体管、激光二极管和集成电路(芯片)所作出的奠基性贡献.Kilby由于发明并发展了集成电路技术而获奖,通过这项发明,微电子学成为所有现代技术的基础.Kilby的获奖成果已有另文(见2001年第3期《物理》)评述.Alferov和Kroemer则是由于他们在半导体异质结及其在电子和光电子学中的应用方面的突出贡献而获奖.该文仅就这两位诺贝尔物理奖得主在异质结及其在光电子中的应用方面的贡献进行评述.%The Nobel Prize in Physics 2000 was awarded by the Royal SwedishAcademy of Sciences with one half jointly to Zhores I. Alferov, A.F.Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia and Herbert Kroemer, University of California at Santa Barbara, California, USA, and the other half to Jack S. Kilby of Texas Instruments, Dallas,Texas, USA. The researchers' work laid the foundation of modern information technology, in particular through their invention of rapid transistors, laser diodes, and integrated circuits. Kilby was awarded for the invention and development of the integrated circuits by which microelectronics has become the basis of modern science and technology, this has been reviewed in another paper. Alferov and Kroemer were awarded for their distinguished work in the field of semiconductor heterostructures and their applications in electronics and optoelectronics. The history, applications and future development of semiconductor heterostructures will be discussed briefly.

  13. The chemical bond structure and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1992-01-01

    This inspired book by some of the most influential scientists of our time--including six Nobel laureates--chronicles our emerging understanding of the chemical bond through the last nine decades and into the future. From Pauling's early structural work using x-ray and electron diffraction to Zewail's femtosecond lasers that probe molecular dynamics in real time; from Crick's molecular biology to Rich's molecular recognition, this book explores a rich tradition of scientific heritage and accomplishment. The perspectives given by Pauling, Perutz, Rich, Crick, Porter, Polanyi, Herschbach, Zewail,

  14. Research Methods of Takaaki Kajita,the Nobel Prize Winners in Physics 2015%2015年诺贝尔物理学奖获得者梶田隆章研究方法初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈培; 张洪雷

    2016-01-01

    日本科学家梶田隆章与加拿大科学家阿瑟·麦克唐纳因中微子振荡研究,共同分享了2015年度诺贝尔物理学奖。梶田隆章和麦克唐纳利用两国的大型仪器对中微子做出了重要的测量,二人的研究证明了中微子存在质量,这一发现改变了人类对宇宙的历史、结构和未来的一些认识。本文简单介绍了两位科学家的研究历程,初探其科学研究方法。%The Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 was jointly to Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B .MacDonald for the discovery of neutrino oscillations .The research in turn proved that neutrinos have mass by the im‐portant neutrino measurements of large‐scale instruments .This discovery changed the universe’s his‐tory ,structure and some ideas for the future .In this paper ,the two scientists’ research history will be introduced and the scientific research method will be discussed .

  15. Obama's Remarks About Winning the Nobel Peace Prize(PART 2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新

    2010-01-01

    @@ We can't accept a world in which more people are denied opportunity and dignity① that all people yearn for-the ability to get an education and make a decent living; the security that yon won't have to live in fear of disease or violence without hope for the future.

  16. A great honor and a huge challenge for China: You-you TU getting the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Da; Yang, Xue; Guo, Jun-Chao

    2016-05-01

    Public excitement over the award of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to the Chinese medical scientist You-you TU for the discovery of a herbal anti-malarial, may mislead the Chinese people into believing that traditional Chinese herbal medi-cine can be used to cure all disease without any ad-verse effects. The aim of this paper is to explain the advantages and disadvantages of herbal traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) objectively.

  17. Revisiting the 1981 Nobel Prize to Roger Sperry, David Hubel, and Torsten Wiesel on the occasion of the centennial of the Prize to Golgi and Cajal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlucchi, Giovanni

    2006-12-01

    In 1981 the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology was awarded to Roger Sperry for his work on the functional specialization of the cerebral hemispheres, and to David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel for their work on information processing in the visual system. The present paper points to some important links between the work of Sperry and that of Hubel and Wiesel and to their influences on neuroscience in the best tradition going back to Cajal.

  18. The failed attribution of the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology to Viktor Hamburger for the discovery of Nerve Growth Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    The announcement in October 1986 that the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was to awarded to Rita Levi Montalcini and Stanley Cohen for the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor, respectively, caused many to wonder why Viktor Hamburger in whose laboratory the initial work was done had not been included in the award. This article try to reconstruct the history of the discovery of NGF with the aim to re-establish a correct dynamic of the events.

  19. Water channel proteins: from their discovery in 1985 in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, to the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benga, Gh

    2006-10-30

    small indeed, of The New Land was Columbus; later, others, including Amerigo Vespucci (from whom the name derived), have better "seen" and in the subsequent years many explorers discovered the complexity of the Americas. Consequently, the initial discovery of the first water channel by Benga's group must be properly credited; the omission of Gheorghe Benga from the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (half of which was awarded to Peter Agre "for the discovery of the water channels") was a new mistake in the award of Nobel Prizes. Benga's claim is presented on the web site of the Ad Astra Association (www.ad-astra.ro/benga). As can be seen on this site his recognition as a discoverer of the first water channel protein from the human RBC membrane is growing. Thousands of science-related professionals from hundreds of academic and research units, as well as participants in several international scientific events, have signed as supporters of Benga; his priority is also mentioned in several comments on the 2003 Nobel Prize as presented on the site.

  20. 莫言获诺奖引起的现象述评%A Review of Some Phenomena Caused by Mo Yan’ s Nobel Prize Award

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨彬

    2013-01-01

    Mo Yan’ s Nobel Prize Award has led to numerous social phenomena and exhibited many social is-sues. This paper attempts to review these social phenomena in five aspects such as the“disappearance of anxiety o-ver the Nobel Prize”, the upsurge of Mo Yan worship, the public opinions for or against Mo Yan, an analysis of causes for Mo Yan’ s Nobel Prize Award, and the relationship between Mo Yan’ s award and contemporary Chinese literature.%莫言获得诺贝尔文学奖后,引起很多社会现象,折射出很多社会问题。论文主要从“诺奖焦虑症”的消失、莫言热、支持还是质疑莫言、莫言获奖原因探究、莫言获奖与中国当代文学五个方面对这些社会现象进行评述。

  1. Future Textiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Louise Degn; Jensen, Hanne Troels Fusvad; Hansen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Magasinet Future Textiles samler resultaterne fra projektet Future Textiles, der markedsfører området intelligente tekstiler. I magasinet kan man læse om trends, drivkræfter, udfordringer samt få ideer til nye produkter inden for intelligente tekstiler. Områder som bæredygtighed og kundetilpasning...

  2. From fission to fusion: a perspective on the research that won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Krishanu

    2014-03-01

    Secretion is widespread in all eukaryotic cells: all of us experience this in the course of daily life--saliva, mucus, sweat, tears, bile juice, adrenalin, etc.--the list is extremely long. How does a cell manage to repeatedly spit out some stuff without losing the rest? The answer is: through regulated vesicle trafficking within the cell. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013 was awarded to Drs Randy Schekman, James E Rothman and Thomas C Südhof for their 'discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells'. Dr Randy Schekman and his colleagues discovered a number of genes required for vesicle trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi; the James E Rothman group unravelled the protein machinery that allows vesicles to bud off from the membrane and fuse to their targets; and Dr Thomas C Südhof along with his colleagues revealed how calcium ions could instruct vesicles to fuse and discharge their contents with precision. These enabled the biotechnology industry to produce a variety of pharmaceutical and industrial products like insulin and hepatitis B vaccines, in a cost-efficient manner, using yeast and tissue cultured cells.

  3. From fission to fusion: A perspective on the research that won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishanu Ray

    2014-03-01

    Secretion is widespread in all eukaryotic cells: all of us experience this in the course of daily life – saliva, mucus, sweat, tears, bile juice, adrenalin, etc. – the list is extremely long. How does a cell manage to repeatedly spit out some stuff without losing the rest? The answer is: through regulated vesicle trafficking within the cell. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013 was awarded to Drs Randy Schekman, James E Rothman and Thomas C Südhof for their ‘discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells’. Dr Randy Schekman and his colleagues discovered a number of genes required for vesicle trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi; the James E Rothman group unravelled the protein machinery that allows vesicles to bud off from the membrane and fuse to their targets; and Dr Thomas C Südhof along with his colleagues revealed how calcium ions could instruct vesicles to fuse and discharge their contents with precision. These enabled the biotechnology industry to produce a variety of pharmaceutical and industrial products like insulin and hepatitis B vaccines, in a cost-efficient manner, using yeast and tissue cultured cells.

  4. Santiago Ramón y Cajal and Ivan Petrovic Pavlov: their parallel scientific lives, Schools and Nobel Prizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Alonso Rozo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Santiago Ramón y Cajal was not only a great scientist but he was also a dedicated teacher who managed to create his own School in Spain. Cajal was active at the end of the XIX and the beginning of the XX century, a period in which Ivan Petrovich Pavlov, another great contemporary scientist, also established a strong School in Russia. While these two acclaimed scientists shared a similar vision on science, a view they also conveyed to their disciples, they applied quite distinct criteria in the way they dealt with their followers. Interestingly, despite the geographic and idiomatic barriers that had to be overcome, the paths of these two great figures of XX century science crossed at least three times. First when they competed for the City of Moscow Prize, second when they both attended the Congreso Internacional de Medicina de Madrid (Medicine International Congress in Madrid in 1903 and finally, they competed on four consecutive occasions for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Here we discuss their scientific vision, their different attitudes in the interaction with disciples and the distinct circumstances in which their paths crossed.

  5. Santiago Ramón y Cajal and Ivan Petrovic Pavlov: their parallel scientific lives, schools and nobel prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Jairo A; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Santiago Ramón y Cajal was not only a great scientist but he was also a dedicated teacher who managed to create his own School in Spain. Cajal was active at the end of the XIX and the beginning of the XX century, a period in which Ivan Petrovich Pavlov, another great contemporary scientist, also established a strong School in Russia. While these two acclaimed scientists shared a similar vision on science, a view they also conveyed to their disciples, they applied quite distinct criteria in the way they dealt with their followers. Interestingly, despite the geographic and idiomatic barriers that had to be overcome, the paths of these two great figures of XX century science crossed at least three times. First when they competed for the City of Moscow Prize, second when they both attended the "Congreso Internacional de Medicina de Madrid" (Medicine International Congress in Madrid) in 1903 and finally, they competed on four consecutive occasions for the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Here we discuss their scientific vision, their different attitudes in the interaction with disciples and the distinct circumstances in which their paths crossed.

  6. Análisis de la comunicación persuasiva: la entrega del Nobel a Vargas Llosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Desde los tiempos de su candidatura a la presidencia de Perú, el Premio Nobel de Literatura Mario Vargas Llosa nunca renunció a su faceta política así como tampoco a la de observador de la sociedad. Algo que le ha procura- do numerosos detractores pero que no ha mermado sus dotes narrativas. Esta controversia provocó interpretaciones frontalmente encontradas a su discurso en la ceremonia de entrega de los galardones, celebrada en diciembre de 2010. Cuando observamos la interpretación que de aquel acontecimiento realizaron dos medios de comunicación escritos, queda reflejada, al aplicar en el más amplio sentido del término, el uso de las técnicas de comunicación periodística persuasiva. Se realiza así en este trabajo un análisis de diversos aspectos que influyen en esta forma de comunicación, desde la elección de la persona que ha de redactar la información o el comentario de fondo, hasta la selección de los textos originales, completos o fragmentados, que apoyan las opiniones vertidas en la información, pasando por el análisis formal, incluso, del tipo de imágenes elegidas para ilustrar la información y su apoyo en forma de texto de pie de foto.

  7. [The 2004 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for research into smell receptors and the organization of the olfactory system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbach, J P H

    2004-12-25

    The 2004 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to Richard Axel and Linda B. Buck, for their discovery of smell receptors and the organisation of the olfactory system. Their original discovery concerned the identification of some 1000 genes that code for smell receptors in the olfactory epithelium of the rat. They also demonstrated that each receptor can only be activated by a limited number of odourants and that there is some overlap in specificity with other smell receptors. Odourants in inhaled air are specifically recognized and bound by the smell receptors on the olfactory neurones in the nasal epithelium. The activated neurones send an electrical signal to the mitral cells, the dendrites of which lie in the glomeruli of the olfactory bulb. In each olfactory neuron only one smell receptor gene is expressed. Neurones with the same type of receptor are spread throughout the epithelium but converge in the same glomerulus. An olfactory map is formed by means of mitral-cell projections which run to the cerebral cortex as well as to other parts of the brain. Possibly the information gained about odourants will be applied in the areas of physiology and pathophysiology; in the field of pharmacology for example where odourants may be used in the treatment of disorders of fertility, behaviour or mood.

  8. Future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B; Tallarida, Ronald J

    2010-01-01

    The chapters of this book summarize much of what has been done and reported regarding cancer chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment. In this chapter, we point out some future directions for investigation.

  9. Sustainable Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable Futures is a voluntary program that encourages industry to use predictive models to screen new chemicals early in the development process and offers incentives to companies subject to TSCA section 5.

  10. Robot Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Anja; Grindsted Nielsen, Sally; Jochum, Elizabeth Ann;

    Robots are increasingly used in health care settings, e.g., as homecare assistants and personal companions. One challenge for personal robots in the home is acceptance. We describe an innovative approach to influencing the acceptance of care robots using theatrical performance. Live performance i...... perceive social robots interacting with humans in a future care scenario through a scripted performance. We discuss our methods and initial findings, and outline future work....

  11. Santiago Ramón y Cajal: Cien años de un premio Nobel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Chuaire

    2006-09-01

    consistió en aportar pruebas que demostraban que en la génesis de las complejas interacciones entre las neuronas, el azar no tenía cabida alguna. El elevado grado de estructuración y de especificidad entre ellas así lo indicaba, y aunque nunca formuló explicaciones definitivas al respecto, sus observaciones no fueron y no podrán ser pasadas por alto5. El descubrimiento de las neurofibrillas (1903, efectuado mediante la utilización de una nueva técnica por él ideada, nitrato de plata reducido, le permitió por una parte defender de los ataques a su teoría de la neurona y por otra, dar inicio a estudios más profundos en la fisiología de las células nerviosas1,2. Entre 1899 y 1904 publicó “Textura del sistema nervioso del hombre y de los vertebrados”, reconocida en la actualidad como la obra más importante de la neurobiología5. En 1905 acometió la investigación sobre la degeneración y la regeneración del sistema nervioso, donde demostró que la regeneración de la fibra nerviosa ocurre a expensas del cabo proximal del axón de la neurona lesionada, lo que contribuyó a fortalecer aún más la teoría neuronal. Los resultados de dicho trabajo se recopilaron en los dos volúmenes del libro “Estudios sobre la degeneración y regeneración del sistema nervioso” (1913-19141-4. Más de 30 artículos que reseñan sus hallazgos y teorías, aparecieron en revistas y magazines2, una verdadera proeza para la época. Aunque recibió varias distinciones, como el premio Moscú (1900 y la medalla de oro Helmholtz de la Academia de Ciencias de Berlín (1905, el momento cumbre de su carrera fue en el mes de octubre de 1906, cuando el Real Instituto Carolino de Estocolmo le otorgó, junto con su colega Camillo Golgi, el premio Nobel de Fisiología y Medicina1-4. Fue en ese entonces objeto de toda clase de reconocimientos y homenajes, con los que confesaba, se sentía en extremo mortificado2. En el marco de las múltiples celebraciones del centenario de su premiaci

  12. Energy Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Selin, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    foresight and public and stakeholder engagement are used to reflect on?and direct?the impacts of new technology. In this essay we draw on our experience of anticipatory governance, in the shape of the ?NanoFutures? project on energy futures, to present a reflexive analysis of engagement and deliberation. We...... draw out five tensions of the practice of deliberation on energy technologies. Through tracing the lineages of these dilemmas, we discuss some of the implications of these tensions for the practice of civic engagement and deliberation in a set of questions for this community of practitioner-scholars....

  13. Energy Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Selin, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    foresight and public and stakeholder engagement are used to reflect on?and direct?the impacts of new technology. In this essay we draw on our experience of anticipatory governance, in the shape of the ?NanoFutures? project on energy futures, to present a reflexive analysis of engagement and deliberation. We...... draw out five tensions of the practice of deliberation on energy technologies. Through tracing the lineages of these dilemmas, we discuss some of the implications of these tensions for the practice of civic engagement and deliberation in a set of questions for this community of practitioner-scholars....

  14. Future Contingents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Peter; Hasle., Per F. V.

    2011-01-01

    will be a sea-battle tomorrow” could serve as standard examples. What could be called the problem of future contingents concerns how to ascribe truth-values to such statements. If there are several possible decisions out of which one is going to be made freely tomorrow, can there be a truth now about which one...... about the future. Finally, it should be mentioned that temporal logic has found a remarkable application in computer science and applied mathematics. In the late 1970s the first computer scientists realised the relevance of temporal logic for the purposes of computer science (see Hasle and Øhrstrøm 2004)....

  15. O processo de avaliação em ciência e a indicação de Carlos Chagas ao prêmio Nobel de Fisiologia ou Medicina The assessment process within science and the nomination of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel prize for Physiology or Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eymard Homem Pittella

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Uma das maiores realizações na história da medicina foi a descrição da doença de Chagas pelo médico e cientista Carlos Chagas. Ao completar 100 anos da descoberta da doença de Chagas, permanecem ainda especulações a respeito das duas indicações oficiais de Carlos Chagas à maior premiação mundial em ciência, o Nobel, em 1913 e 1921. Admite-se que a não premiação do genial cientista possa ter ocorrido em razão da forte oposição que enfrentou no Brasil por parte de alguns médicos e pesquisadores da época, que chegaram mesmo a questionar a existência da doença de Chagas, influenciando a decisão do Comitê Nobel para não premiá-lo. A análise do banco de dados dos arquivos do Prêmio Nobel, com a revelação dos nomes de indicadores, indicados e ganhadores do prêmio, cobrindo o período 1901-1951, trouxe informações não apenas sobre o que era considerada realização científica na época, mas também sobre quem eram os cientistas importantes e quais eram as relações entre eles. O não reconhecimento das descobertas de Carlos Chagas pelo Comitê Nobel parece ser mais corretamente explicado por esses fatores do que pelo impacto negativo da oposição local.One of the greatest achievements in the history of medicine was the description of Chagas disease by the physician and scientist Carlos Chagas. A hundred years after the discovery of the disease, speculation still remains regarding the two official nominations of Carlos Chagas for the Nobel Prize, the biggest worldwide scientific award, in 1913 and in 1921. It has been accepted that the reason why the prize was not awarded to this brilliant scientist may have been the strong opposition that he faced in Brazil, from some physicians and researchers of that time. They went as far as questioning the existence of Chagas disease, thereby possibly influencing the decision of the Nobel Committee not to award the prize to him. Analysis of the database of the Nobel prize

  16. 基于履历信息的国际科技人才特征分析——以近十年诺贝尔物理、化学、生理或医学奖得主为例%Analysis of Characteristics of International Qualified Scientists and Technicians Based on Personal Curriculum Vitaes——Taking Nobel Laureates in Physics, Chemistry and Physiology or Medicine During Last Decade for Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍雪莹; 陈贡; 刘木林

    2014-01-01

    本文通过公开信息源获取2004-2013年诺贝尔物理学、化学、生理学或医学奖得主的个人履历信息,对这72位获奖者的特征进行分析,包括性别结构、国家分布、年龄结构,挖掘对获奖产生重要影响的科研社会关系.结果发现,获奖者以男性居多,女性获奖者多属于生理学或医学领域;获奖者多为美国人,高水平的机构对科技人才的成长有着重要影响;获奖者整体年龄偏大,其中高龄化学奖得主人数最多;科研社会关系对于年轻学者的成长有着非常积极的影响.文章最后为我国培养国际科技人才提出若干建议.

  17. New Mexico Fiber-Optic Link Marks Giant Leap Toward Future of Radio Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    . 15. Nobel Laureate Robert Wilson is in the background. The added antennas are part of a comprehensive plan that the NRAO has developed for upgrading the VLA. The existing array of antennas was authorized by Congress in 1972 and built from 1974 to 1980. The upgrade plan also includes replacing the original electronic and digital equipment from the 1970s with modern technology. Such refurbishment will improve the VLA's scientific capabilities from tenfold to a hundredfold in all research areas, and for a modest investment would provide an enhanced facility many times more powerful than the original VLA. "Though the VLA today is hundreds of times more capable than its original design, some of the technologies of the 1970s that still are in use threaten the instrument with premature obsolescence," said Miller Goss, NRAO's director of VLA/VLBA operations. "Replacing those with today's technology will assure the VLA's continued role as one of the world's premier astronomical research facilities. The success of the Pie Town-VLA link shows one way this can happen." "We are enthusiastic and excited about this development, not only because of the scientific value of the Pie Town link itself, but more importantly because it proves the concept of expanding the VLA," said Robert Dickman, of the NSF's Division of Astronomical Sciences. "The AUI Board of Trustees, in providing 30 percent of the support for the optical fiber link from its corporate reserves, recognizes the scientific importance of making this connection between the VLA and the VLBA," said Martha P. Haynes, AUI's Interim President. Referring to the scientific phenomenon of forming images using the arrays to produce "interferometric fringes," Haynes, a radio astronomer herself, remarked that "We view the provision of corporate matching funds for this project as a 'fringe benefit' for NRAO." Work on the Pie Town-VLA link began in late 1997. Project engineer Ron Beresford, who came from the Australia Telescope National

  18. Futur "simple" et futur "proche" ("Simple" Future and "Immediate" Future).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franckel, Jean-Jacques

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the use of simple and immediate future tenses in French shows that the expression of time is controlled more by context and modals than by specifically temporal cues. The role of negation in this situation is discussed. (MSE)

  19. Creative Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Rosemary

    2003-01-01

    In 1999 the National Committee for Creativity and Culture in Education (NACCCE) produced a report called "All our futures." In many respects it was and still is a seminal report; it raises issues about creativity in education and offers serious messages for Government, schools and the inspection process. The author's research into teacher…

  20. 诺贝尔自然科学奖与科学精英的造就%Nobel Prize in Science and the Creation of the Scientific Elites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈其荣

    2012-01-01

    Nobel prize in science and the scientific elites are intrinsically related. Nobel Science Prize winners are all outstanding scientific elites. From the scientific, technological and social perspective, the thesis devotes to explain the fascinating subject of the creation of scientific elites as the natural science Nobel prize winners, so to give an example for the training of the top-notch talents in our country, and to arouse the people to think about the idea, model and mechanism for the training of such excellent person.%诺贝尔自然科学奖与科学精英之间有着内在的关联;诺贝尔自然科学奖获得者是科学界的杰出精英;以科学、技术与社会的视角,紧密联系和结合诺贝尔自然科学奖所提供的翔实而鲜活的思想资料,阐释了作为科学精英的诺贝尔自然科学奖获得者是如何造就出来的这一极具魅力的主题;旨在为我国培养和造就拔尖创新人才提供一个可资借鉴与比较的范例,唤起国人对培养和造就此类人才的理念、模式与机制的思考。