WorldWideScience

Sample records for future experimental plan

  1. Future planning - utopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boernke, F.

    1978-01-01

    Our life develops as the anticipation of future. Everything we wish, hope, plan and carry out and think is or should be related to future and will have its effects in future. The certainty may spread that it is a necessary obligation to learn to find out our actual being more clearly to be able to develop a thinking and acting that is directed to future that has also a total of responsability as its essence. We will later atone for the failed outlooks into future or for only moderate or uncompleted starts of planning. For this reason we should consider that future does not come for its own, not without our demands, not without our acting. Only if our reflection and aspiration, thinking and acting is done with moderate and circumspect sense in the right way it will be a good fundamental for the future. (orig.) [de

  2. Animal experimentation in Spacelab - Present and future U.S. plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, W. E.; Dant, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    Current development of life-sciences hardware and experiments for the fourth Spacelab mission in the Life Sciences Flight Experiments Program at NASA Ames is reviewed. The research-animal holding facility, the general-purpose work station, and the life sciences laboratory equipment are characterized, and the 14 Ames projects accepted for the mission are listed and discussed. Several hardware systems and experimental procedures will be verified on the Spacelab-3 mission scheduled for late 1984.

  3. Particle Engulfment and Pushing (PEP): Past Micro-Gravity Experiments and Future Experimental Plan on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhayu; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Catalina, A. V.; Juretzko, F.; Dhindaw, B. K.; Curreri, P. A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of an insoluble particle with a growing solid-liquid interface (SLI) has been a subject of investigation for the four decades. For a metallurgist or a material scientist understanding the fundamental physics of such an interaction is relevant for applications that include distribution of reinforcement particles in metal matrix composites, inclusion management in castings, and distribution of Y2Ba1Cu1O5 (211) precipitates (flux pinning sites) in Y1Ba2Cu3O7 (123) superconducting crystals. The same physics is also applicable to other areas including geological applications (frost heaving in soils) and preservation of biological cells. Experimentally this interaction can be quantified in terms of a critical growth velocity, Vcr, of the SLI below which particles are pushed ahead of the advancing interface, and above which the particles are engulfed. Past experimental evidence suggests that this Vcr is an inverse function of the particle radius, R. In order to isolate the fundamental physics that governs such a relationship it is necessary to minimize natural convection at the SLI that is inherent in ground based experiments. Hence for the purpose of producing benchmark data (Vcr vs. R) PEP is a natural candidate for micro-gravity experimentation. Accordingly, experiments with pure Al containing a dispersion of ZrO2 particles and an organic analogue, succinonitrile (SCN) containing polystyrene particles have been performed on the LMS and USMP-4 mission respectively. In this paper we will summarize the experimental data that was obtained during these two micro-gravity missions and show that the results differ compared to terrestrial experiments. We will also discuss the basic elements of our analytical and numerical model and present a comparison of the predictions of these models against micro-gravity experimental data. Finally. we will discuss our future experimental plan that includes the ISS glovebox and MSRRl.

  4. Future land use plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ''Future Land Use'' initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities' interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory's view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts

  5. Future land use plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  6. Executive Summary - Future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Our Institute has sufficient scientific potential to play a key role in the field of particle physics, nuclear physics and in several aspects of solid state and applied physics, at least in our part of Europe. We believe the Institute should continue its present mode of operation, where basic research, closely coordinated through our collaboration with leading laboratories all over the world, stimulates our interdisciplinary research and technology transfer to the industry. If our present scientific potential is matched by suitably modernized infrastructure, we should be able to acquire the critical mass necessary for further effective development. In order to maintain our present world-level research, we have to continue and further extend our participation in large international collaborations, in the construction of large detectors and to seek further financial support from EU and international organizations. For experimental particle physics, our priorities remain in collaborating with major European and world laboratories such as CERN, DESY, Gran Sasso, Fermilab, KEK, SLAC and with laboratories developing astrophysics experiments, such as the PIERRE AUGER experiment. Collaboration in the field of nuclear physics, physics of condensed matter, theoretical physics and interdisciplinary research should be continued with leading European laboratories offering access to large accelerator facilities (such as GANIL or GSI), to synchrotron radiation or to unique polarized neutron beams, such as those available at ILL Grenoble. An exiting new frontier in research for our research teams will be opened by the X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) in DESY and the future International Linear Collider. We will be able to further invest towards upgrading our small-scale facilities, such as the infrastructure around the Van de Graaff accelerator, in order to perform single-ion beam experiments, or around the AIC-144 cyclotron, to treat ocular melanoma, in close collaboration with

  7. Ice condenser experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannberg, L.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Owczarski, P.C.; Liebetrau, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental plan is being developed to validate the computer code ICEDF. The code was developed to estimate the extent of aerosol retention in the ice compartments of pressurized water reactor ice condenser containment systems during severe accidents. The development of the experimental plan began with review of available information on the conditions under which the code will be applied. Computer-generated estimates of thermohydraulic and aerosol conditions entering the ice condenser were evaluated and along with other information, used to generate design criteria. The design criteria have been used for preliminary test assembly design and for generation of statistical test designs. Consideration of the phenomena to be evaluated in the testing program, as well as equipment and measurement limitations, have led to changes in the design criteria and to subsequent changes in the test assembly design and statistical test design. The overall strategy in developing the experimental plan includes iterative generation and evaluation of candidate test designs using computer codes for statistical test design and ICEDF for estimation of experimental results. Estimates of experimental variability made prior to actual testing will be verified by replicate testing at preselected design points

  8. Planning for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiewing, Janis

    2002-01-01

    Revising the strategic plan was the beginning of a multiyear initiative that will determine the path of the JRCERT. The key word in the preceding statement is beginning. The strategic plan is an ever-changing document. Although some components, such as the values statements, will stand over time, other components will change as accreditation and educational arenas change. That is the paradox of strategic planning: Remaining true to the vision, values and mission statements requires knowing when to change to keep the JRCERT aligned with the responsive to its communities of interest.

  9. Strategic Planning: Shaping Future Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    fielding, the PM may also be planning for future increments , sustainment and other long-term ef- forts. Strategic planning can help the PM position these...introduced the Planning, Programming, and Budgeting System (PPBS) to the DoD. Prior to that, the DoD’s budget - ing focused on areas such as overhead

  10. Future plan of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsunezaki, Akio

    1998-01-01

    In cooperation of four countries, Japan, USA, EU and Russia, ITER plan has been proceeding as ''the conceptual design activities'' from 1988 to 1990 and ''the industrial design activities'' since 1992. To construct ITER, the legal and work side of ITER operation has been investigated by four countries. However, their economic conditions have been changed to be wrong. So that, construction of ITER can not begin after end of industrial design activities in 1998. Accordingly, they determined to continue the industrial design activities more three years in order to study low cost options and to test the superconductive model·coil. (S.Y.)

  11. Planning for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, B. [Ohio Automation (USA)

    2004-02-01

    The paper examines the potential of integrated computer-aided mine planning software, ICAMPS. This is Ohio Automation's complete mining software package that runs inside AutoCAD and covers the entire mining process - from geologic modelling of deposit to laying out of the mine, and scheduling and calculating royalty payments. The article describes the various modules of the system: MineSurf for geological modelling, MineSimU-Simulated mining for Underground; MineSimS-Simulated Mining for Surface and MineVent-Ventilation systems analysis. 2 figs.

  12. 810 Future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Kruk, J.W.; Miettinen, H.E.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Roberts, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    It is believed that a good bet for finding the Quark-Gluon Plasma at AGS energies is with the heaviest projectiles on the heaviest target, i.e. Au on Au. One of the likely signatures of the plasma is strangeness enhancement. Al Saulys has shown what it's like to find Δ and K degree with Si projectiles. Our Monte Carlo simulations show track densities 4 times higher for Au projectiles. In addition, the Au beam itself produces 30 times more ionization. Thus the present TPC's will be limited to only a few hundred ions per sec. This paper discusses plans for these experiments and modification to TPC. 9 figs

  13. Future plans at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, M

    2003-01-01

    The CERN ISOLDE facility has operated for over 30 years delivering beams of exotic ions to an ever-growing user community. The facility went through a major up-grade in the early 1990s with the move from the 600 MeV synchrocyclotron to the 1 GeV PS-Booster proton synchrotron. This was followed by a primary proton beam energy up grade to 1.4 GeV in 1999. Lately, an important step forward was taken with the start of the REX-ISOLDE experiment for charge breeding and post acceleration of exotic ions. CERN has recently decided on a consolidation project for the facility to assure that the required number of shifts can be delivered in the future. An overview will be given of the on-going consolidation and development programme and its implications on the physics programme, in particular the REX-ISOLDE post accelerator experiment. An important parameter for a better yield of very exotic elements is the primary proton beam intensity, beam energy and time structure. The possible short-term improvements of, in particul...

  14. Plan Merging : Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Weerdt, M.M.; Van der Krogt, R.P.J.; Zutt, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of a plan merging algorithm. This algorithm coordinates the plans of multiple, autonomous agents, each able to independently find a plan. This algorithm is evaluated using realistic data from a taxi company. We show that when we allow passengers to be a few

  15. Future plans at ISOLDE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindroos, Mats

    2003-01-01

    The CERN ISOLDE facility has operated for over 30 years delivering beams of exotic ions to an ever-growing user community. The facility went through a major up-grade in the early 1990s with the move from the 600 MeV synchrocyclotron to the 1 GeV PS-Booster proton synchrotron. This was followed by a primary proton beam energy up grade to 1.4 GeV in 1999. Lately, an important step forward was taken with the start of the REX-ISOLDE experiment for charge breeding and post-acceleration of exotic ions. CERN has recently decided on a consolidation project for the facility to assure that the required number of shifts can be delivered in the future. An overview will be given of the on-going consolidation and development programme and its implications on the physics programme, in particular the REX-ISOLDE post-accelerator experiment. An important parameter for a better yield of very exotic elements is the primary proton beam intensity, beam energy and time structure. The possible short-term improvements of, in particular, beam intensity will be discussed in some detail. While the main effort at CERN today goes towards the completion of the LHC, some resources have been found for accelerator R and D. A possible project is a new high intensity proton source at CERN, the superconducting proton linac, which could open the door to the construction of a next generation radioactive beam facility. The possible primary beam characteristics and some design considerations and their implications for such a facility will be discussed. Some ideas for the facility itself, such as the use of antiprotons and muons as new probes, production of a neutrino beam from stored radioactive ions and a preliminary design for a low energy storage ring, will be presented

  16. Future planning in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Lillie; Moll, Henrike; FitzGibbon, Lily

    2018-05-01

    The capacity to plan ahead and provide the means for future ends is an important part of human practical reasoning. When this capacity develops in ontogeny is the matter of an ongoing debate. In this study, 4- and 5-year-olds performed a future planning task in which they had to create the means (a picture of a particular object, e.g., a banana) that was necessary to address a future end (of completing a game in which such a picture was missing). Children of both ages drew more targets than children in a control condition in which there was no future end to be pursued. Along with prior findings, the results suggest a major progression in children's future thinking between 3 and 5 years. Our findings expand on prior knowledge by showing that young children cannot only identify the probate means to future ends but determine such ends and create the means to achieve them, thus offering compelling evidence for future planning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Sea materials experimental plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This Seal Materials Performance Test Plan describes the plan for testing materials that will be used to seal a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. The need for sealing and backfilling the repository and the use of various sealing materials are described. The seal materials include mined salt backfills, cementitious bulkheads and plugs, and earthen backfills. The laboratory testing program for characterizing the behavior and performance of these materials is described. This report includes plans for screening materials, evaluating candidate materials to be tested, and testing a representative set of materials

  18. Physics Teachers' Future Teaching Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    There are two sides of the physics teacher turnover equation: teachers leaving and teachers entering. This month we will focus on teachers' future teaching plans. As seen in the figure, about 5% of the 27,000 teachers who taught physics in U.S. high schools in 2008-09 were in their first year of teaching physics (but not necessarily their first…

  19. The FELIX experimental program and future upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.; Lari, R.J.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the DOE First Wall/Blanket/Shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program, Argonne National Laboratory FELIX (Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction EXperiment to study electromagnetic effects. T.he earliest test will select and verify appropriate eddy current simulation computer program (codes), followed by component concept tests, component model tests, and finally tests with prototypes. This paper describes the experimental and computer code plans and future upgrades for the FELIX facility

  20. Scenario planning and nanotechnological futures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farber, Darryl; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2009-01-01

    Scenario planning may assist us in harnessing the benefits of nanotechnology and managing the associated risks for the good of the society. Scenario planning is a way to describe the present state of the world and develop several hypotheses about the future of the world, thereby enabling discussions about how the world ought to be. Scenario planning thus is not only a tool for learning and foresight, but also for leadership. Informed decision making by experts and political leaders becomes possible, while simultaneously allaying the public's perception of the risks of new and emerging technologies such as nanotechnology. Two scenarios of the societal impact of nanotechnology are the mixed-signals scenario and the confluence scenario. Technoscientists have major roles to play in both scenarios.

  1. Nonisothermal hydrologic transport experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D.

    1992-09-01

    A field heater experimental plan is presented for investigating hydrologic transport processes in unsaturated fractured rock related to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in an underground repository. The experimental plan provides a methodology for obtaining data required for evaluating conceptual and computer models related to HLW isolation in an environment where significant heat energy is produced. Coupled-process models are currently limited by the lack of validation data appropriate for field scales that incorporate relevant transport processes. Presented in this document is a discussion of previous nonisothermal experiments. Processes expected to dominate heat-driven liquid, vapor, gas, and solute flow during the experiment are explained, and the conceptual model for nonisothermal flow and transport in unsaturated, fractured rock is described. Of particular concern is the ability to confirm the hypothesized conceptual model specifically, the establishment of higher water saturation zones within the host rock around the heat source, and the establishment of countercurrent flow conditions within the host rock near the heat source. Field experimental plans are presented using the Apache Leap Tuff Site to illustrate the implementation of the proposed methodology. Both small-scale preliminary experiments and a long-term experiment are described

  2. Saudi Arabia plans future strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, John.

    1996-01-01

    The future strategy of Saudi Arabia with respect to its oil production capacity is discussed. A major uncertainty affecting planning is the prospect of an Iraqi return to the market as and when Saddam Hussein falls or he manages to comply fully with all the UN resolutions and sanctions are lifted. It is believed that Iraq could at very short notice be capable of exporting 2mb/d of crude rising to 2.5 mb/d within a few months. This is 10% of OPEC's physically traded crude. Also taken seriously are Baghdad's assertions that Iraq will have a production capacity of about 6mb/d by the year 2000. Saudi officials are concerned that OPEC is not ready to tackle the impact of an Iraqi return to the market at a time when some OPEC members are producing above quota anyway. The most likely outcome is thought to be that OPEC would simply raise their nominal production ceiling. Against this background, Saudi Arabia has embarked on the exploitation of the gigantic oil reserves of the Shaybah field. This development offers the kingdom an ability, on the one hand, to increase its earnings while remaining within its OPEC quota and, on the other hand, to increase output substantially should it ever appear that its best interests are served by not adhering to quotas. (UK)

  3. Disposal phase experimental program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility comprises surface and subsurface facilities, including a repository mined in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2,150 feet. It has been developed to safely and permanently isolate transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes in a deep geological disposal site. On April 12, 1996, the DOE submitted a revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The DOE anticipates receiving an operating permit from the NMED; this permit is required prior to the start of disposal operations. On October 29, 1996, the DOE submitted a Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the WIPP land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-579) as amended, and the requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Parts 191 and 194. The DOE plans to begin disposal operations at the WIPP in November 1997 following receipt of certification by the EPA. The disposal phase is expected to last for 35 years, and will include recertification activities no less than once every five years. This Disposal Phase Experimental Program (DPEP) Plan outlines the experimental program to be conducted during the first 5-year recertification period. It also forms the basis for longer-term activities to be carried out throughout the 35-year disposal phase. Once the WIPP has been shown to be in compliance with regulatory requirements, the disposal phase gives an opportunity to affirm the compliance status of the WIPP, enhance the operations of the WIPP and the national TRU system, and contribute to the resolution of national and international nuclear waste management technical needs. The WIPP is the first facility of its kind in the world. As such, it provides a unique opportunity to advance the technical state of the art for permanent disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes

  4. The Future of Electricity Resource Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahrl, Fredrich [Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Mills, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lavin, Luke [Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Ryan, Nancy [Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Olsen, Arne [Energy and Environmental Economics, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Schwartz, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Electricity resource planning is the process of identifying longer-term investments to meet electricity reliability requirements and public policy goals at a reasonable cost. Resource planning processes provide a forum for regulators, electric utilities, and electricity industry stakeholders to evaluate the economic, environmental, and social benefits and costs of different investment options. By facilitating a discussion on future goals, challenges and strategies, resource planning processes often play an important role in shaping utility business decisions. Resource planning emerged more than three decades ago in an era of transition, where declining electricity demand and rising costs spurred fundamental changes in electricity industry regulation and structure. Despite significant changes in the industry, resource planning continues to play an important role in supporting investment decision making. Over the next two decades, the electricity industry will again undergo a period of transition, driven by technological change, shifting customer preferences and public policy goals. This transition will bring about a gradual paradigm shift in resource planning, requiring changes in scope, approaches and methods. Even as it changes, resource planning will continue to be a central feature of the electricity industry. Its functions — ensuring the reliability of high voltage (“bulk”) power systems, enabling oversight of regulated utilities and facilitating low-cost compliance with public policy goals — are likely to grow in importance as the electricity industry enters a new period of technological, economic and regulatory change. This report examines the future of electricity resource planning in the context of a changing electricity industry. The report examines emerging issues and evolving practices in five key areas that will shape the future of resource planning: (1) central-scale generation, (2) distributed generation, (3) demand-side resources, (4

  5. Future Plans for the ACORNE Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Lee F

    2007-01-01

    A summary of the future plans for ACORNE collaboration are presented. Of particular note is the intended development of an acoustic calibrator to be deployed in the deep sea above the Rona hydrophone array. Crucial to this goal is work recently completed on the understanding of hydrophone response and the generation of bipolar acoustic signals; this work is presented in detail

  6. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  7. The future of hydropower planning modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, J.; Zuñiga, D.; Nowak, W.; Olivares, M. A.; Castelletti, A.; Thilmant, A.

    2017-12-01

    Planning the investment and operation of hydropower plants with optimization tools dates back to the 1970s. The focus used to be solely on the provision of energy. However, advances in computational capacity and solving algorithms, dynamic markets, expansion of renewable sources, and a better understanding of hydropower environmental impacts have recently led to the development of novel planning approaches. In this work, we provide a review, systematization, and trend analysis of these approaches. Further, through interviews with experts, we outline the future of hydropower planning modeling and identify the gaps towards it. We classified the found models along environmental, economic, multipurpose and technical criteria. Environmental interactions include hydropeaking mitigation, water quality protection and limiting greenhouse gas emissions from reservoirs. Economic and regulatory criteria consider uncertainties of fossil fuel prices and relicensing of water rights and power purchase agreements. Multipurpose considerations account for irrigation, tourism, flood protection and drinking water. Recently included technical details account for sedimentation in reservoirs and variable efficiencies of turbines. Additional operational considerations relate to hydrological aspects such as dynamic reservoir inflows, water losses, and climate change. Although many of the above criteria have been addressed in detail on a project-to-project basis, models remain overly simplistic for planning large power fleets. Future hydropower planning tools are expected to improve the representation of the water-energy nexus, including environmental and multipurpose criteria. Further, they will concentrate on identifying new sources of operational flexibility (e.g. through installing additional turbines and pumps) for integrating renewable energy. The operational detail will increase, potentially emphasizing variable efficiencies, storage capacity losses due to sedimentation, and the

  8. Doublet III: status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.

    1980-04-01

    A synopsis is presented of the experimental results from the ohmic heating phase of Doublet III, with emphasis on the production of good target plasmas for the upcoming neutral beam injection phase. The program plan for the device over the life of the US-Japan cooperative program is discussed, as is the status of the preliminary investigation into replacing the present vacuum vessel by one better suited for ETF simulation

  9. Space station evolution: Planning for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Alphonso V.; Askins, Barbara S.

    1987-06-01

    The need for permanently manned presence in space has been recognized by the United States and its international partners for many years. The development of this capability was delayed due to the concurrent recognition that reusable earth-to-orbit transportation was also needed and should be developed first. While the decision to go ahead with a permanently manned Space Station was on hold, requirements for the use of the Station were accumulating as ground-based research and the data from unmanned spacecraft sparked the imagination of both scientists and entrepreneurs. Thus, by the time of the Space Station implementation decision in the early 1980's, a variety of disciplines, with a variety of requirements, needed to be accommodated on one Space Station. Additional future requirements could be forecast for advanced missions that were still in the early planning stages. The logical response was the development of a multi-purpose Space Station with the ability to evolve on-orbit to new capabilities as required by user needs and national or international decisions, i.e., to build an evolutionary Space Station. Planning for evolution is conducted in parallel with the design and development of the baseline Space Station. Evolution planning is a strategic management process to facilitate change and protect future decisions. The objective is not to forecast the future, but to understand the future options and the implications of these on today's decisions. The major actions required now are: (1) the incorporation of evolution provisions (hooks and scars) in the baseline Space Station; and (2) the initiation of an evolution advanced development program.

  10. Space station evolution: Planning for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Alphonso V.; Askins, Barbara S.

    1987-01-01

    The need for permanently manned presence in space has been recognized by the United States and its international partners for many years. The development of this capability was delayed due to the concurrent recognition that reusable earth-to-orbit transportation was also needed and should be developed first. While the decision to go ahead with a permanently manned Space Station was on hold, requirements for the use of the Station were accumulating as ground-based research and the data from unmanned spacecraft sparked the imagination of both scientists and entrepreneurs. Thus, by the time of the Space Station implementation decision in the early 1980's, a variety of disciplines, with a variety of requirements, needed to be accommodated on one Space Station. Additional future requirements could be forecast for advanced missions that were still in the early planning stages. The logical response was the development of a multi-purpose Space Station with the ability to evolve on-orbit to new capabilities as required by user needs and national or international decisions, i.e., to build an evolutionary Space Station. Planning for evolution is conducted in parallel with the design and development of the baseline Space Station. Evolution planning is a strategic management process to facilitate change and protect future decisions. The objective is not to forecast the future, but to understand the future options and the implications of these on today's decisions. The major actions required now are: (1) the incorporation of evolution provisions (hooks and scars) in the baseline Space Station; and (2) the initiation of an evolution advanced development program.

  11. FutureTDM Communication and Exploitation Plan

    OpenAIRE

    Frew, Helen

    2016-01-01

    This report is designed to meet the overall objective of FutureTDM – to identify and remove TDM uptake barriers in the EU through an effective and sustainable communications strategy. It sets out a strategy to engage, to inform (showing our expertise), to be accessible and to be relevant now and post project end date. The plan explains how we are going to communicate the project, offering options both on‐line and in person, with user friendly language and a recognisable slogan...

  12. Physics and planning for future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Physics opportunities at future (not presently under construction) colliders are examined, particularly with reference to the motivations for building them. First a number of considerations involved in planning and choosing beams, energies, and luminosities are discussed. Higgs physics, which currently seems to be the central problem of particle physics, is emphasized, with detailed study of how to do WW scattering and how to detect effects of heavy Higgs bosons. Some new results are included. High energy hadron colliders dominate the discussion, but alternatives are examined for comparison and when they have unique capabilities

  13. WIN Chapters: Milestones and Future Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, P.; Pelegrí, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper the WIN Chapters: milestones and future plans are presented. WIN-IAEA has rewarded-in the three last years - to Australia-2014, South-Africa-2013 and Sweden-2012. WIN-Global -specially WiN IAEA- can collaborate a lot with the CTBTO presenting the content of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons actually increasing the signatory members in 2015. Historical decisions on NTP are already affecting WiN IAEA. The research reactors or high flux reactors are important in the field of medical applications and other future applications. In Australia women-scientist of OPAL, can become WiN. Between the OPAL applications there is a production of silicon plates to be used in laptops/mobiles. WIN-Europe activities related with the climatic change and with the academic promotion. 2015 is also a very important year due the celebration of 20th Anniversary of WIN-Spain; plans of this Chapter and Conferences of WIN-Global are presented. In addition there are women working in ITER, in some activities in the EU, China, India, Japan, South Korea, USA and Russia both in the academic (R+D) field and into the Industry. (Author)

  14. Plan of ITER remote experimentation center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozeki, T., E-mail: ozeki.takahisa@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi Rokkasho, Kitakami-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Clement, S.L. [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral, B3, 13/03, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Nakajima, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science and Project Leader of IFERC, 2-166 Obuchi, Rokkasho, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    Plan of ITER remote experimentation center (REC) based on the broader approach (BA) activity of the joint program of Japan and Europe (EU) is described. Objectives of REC activity are (1) to identify the functions and solve the technical issues for the construction of the REC for ITER at Rokkasho, (2) to develop the remote experiment system and verify the functions required for the remote experiment by using the Satellite Tokamak (JT-60SA) facilities in order to make the future experiments of ITER and JT-60SA effectively and efficiently implemented, and (3) to test the functions of REC and demonstrate the total system by using JT-60SA and existing other facilities in EU. Preliminary identified items to be developed are (1) Functions of the remote experiment system, such as setting of experiment parameters, shot scheduling, real time data streaming, communication by video-conference between the remote-site and on-site, (2) Effective data transfer system that is capable of fast transfer of the huge amount of data between on-site and off-site and the network connecting the REC system, (3) Storage system that can store/access the huge amount of data, including database management, (4) Data analysis software for the data viewing of the diagnostic data on the storage system, (5) Numerical simulation for preparation and estimation of the shot performance and the analysis of the plasma shot. Detailed specifications of the above items will be discussed and the system will be made in these four years in collaboration with tokamak facilities of JT-60SA and EU tokamak, experts of informatics, activities of plasma simulation and ITER. Finally, the function of REC will be tested and the total system will be demonstrated by the middle of 2017.

  15. MAD-X progress and future plans

    CERN Document Server

    Deniau, L

    2012-01-01

    The design efforts for the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will require significant extensions of the MAD-X code widely used for designing and simulating particles accelerators. These changes are framed into a global redesign of the MADX architecture meant to consolidate its structure, increase its robustness and flexibility, and improve its performance. Some examples of recent extensions to MAD-X like the RF-Multipole element will be presented. Improvement for models and algorithms selection providing better consistency of the results and a wider range of use will be discussed. The computation efficiency will also be addressed to profit better of modern technologies. In this paper, we will describe the last improvements and the future plans of the project.

  16. Experimental Breeder Reactor I Preservation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Braun

    2006-10-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR I) is a National Historic Landmark located at the Idaho National Laboratory, a Department of Energy laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The facility is significant for its association and contributions to the development of nuclear reactor testing and development. This Plan includes a structural assessment of the interior and exterior of the EBR I Reactor Building from a preservation, rather than an engineering stand point and recommendations for maintenance to ensure its continued protection.

  17. Air quality and future energy system planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral Mourao, Zenaida; Konadu, Dennis; Lupton, Rick

    2016-04-01

    energy system planning. Some example applications of this work are: (1) to discover conflicts and synergies between air quality regulations and future developments in the energy system and land use change; (2) to show the drivers of air quality in a given spatial context; (3) to explore effective ways to visualize impacts of different energy, land use and emissions control policies on air quality. An initial test case for the Bay Area in California will be presented, extending the scope of the existing California ForeseerTM tool to identify impacts of different policies within the water-energy-land nexus on local air quality.

  18. Using Human Capital Planning to Predict Future Talent Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, Donald; Jansen, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Human capital planning is an important tool in predicting future talent needs and sustaining organizational excellence over the long term. This article examines the concept of human capital planning and outlines how institutions can use HCP to identify the type and number of talent needed both now and in the future, recognize and prioritize talent…

  19. Status of muon collider research and development and future plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The status of the research on muon colliders is discussed and plans are outlined for future theoretical and experimental studies. Besides work on the parameters of a 3–4 and 0.5 TeV center-of-mass (COM energy collider, many studies are now concentrating on a machine near 0.1 TeV (COM that could be a factory for the s-channel production of Higgs particles. We discuss the research on the various components in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate pions from a heavy-Z target and proceeding through the phase rotation and decay (π→μν_{μ} channel, muon cooling, acceleration, storage in a collider ring, and the collider detector. We also present theoretical and experimental R&D plans for the next several years that should lead to a better understanding of the design and feasibility issues for all of the components. This report is an update of the progress on the research and development since the feasibility study of muon colliders presented at the Snowmass '96 Workshop [R. B. Palmer, A. Sessler, and A. Tollestrup, Proceedings of the 1996 DPF/DPB Summer Study on High-Energy Physics (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA, 1997].

  20. The first ep collider run and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desy, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    After successful machine commissioning in 1991, the new electron-proton collider HERA was ready to start the experimental program in spring last year. Data taking at the ZEUS and H1 experiments began on June 26. The energy of the colliding beams was E e =26.7 GeV and E p = 820 GeV, in accord with the design. The peak luminosity obtained so far was 2.2x10 29 cm -2 s -1 . Until the end of the experimental run in November 1992 an integrated luminosity of 33 nb -1 was delivered to the experiments. Future plans concerning ep operation focus on increasing the number of colliding bunches in order to approach the design goal for the luminosity of 1.5x10 31 cm -2 s -1 . In the electron ring, up to 60% transverse spin polarization have been achieved. It is planned to install a polarized gas target experiment (Hermes, approved as the 3rd HERA experiment) which will require an electron beam with about 50% longitudinal polarization. The machine modifications required for HERMES are scheduled for the 93/94 winter shut down. Furthermore, the possibilities of installing a fixed target experiment for b-quark physics in the proton ring are being studied

  1. Using VE to Strategically Plan Our Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margie Jeffs; Lori Braase; Alison Conner; Darcie Martinson; Jodi Grgich

    2009-06-01

    The Value Engineering (VE) Methodology is an effective tool for business or project strategic planning. In conjunction with the “Balanced Scorecard Approach” (Drs. Robert Kaplan, PhD, and David Norton, PhD, from the Balanced Scorecard Collaborative/Palladium Group), function analysis can be used to develop strategy maps and scorecards. The FAST diagram provides an integrated approach to strategy map development by formulating a cause and effect relationship and establishing the “how” and “why” behind the strategy map. By utilizing the VE Job Plan, one is able to move from strategic thinking all the way through to execution of the strategy.

  2. Network topology of an experimental futures exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. C.; Tseng, J. J.; Tai, C. C.; Lai, K. H.; Wu, W. S.; Chen, S. H.; Li, S. P.

    2008-03-01

    Many systems of different nature exhibit scale free behaviors. Economic systems with power law distribution in the wealth are one of the examples. To better understand the working behind the complexity, we undertook an experiment recording the interactions between market participants. A Web server was setup to administer the exchange of futures contracts whose liquidation prices were coupled to event outcomes. After free registration, participants started trading to compete for the money prizes upon maturity of the futures contracts at the end of the experiment. The evolving `cash' flow network was reconstructed from the transactions between players. We show that the network topology is hierarchical, disassortative and small-world with a power law exponent of 1.02±0.09 in the degree distribution after an exponential decay correction. The small-world property emerged early in the experiment while the number of participants was still small. We also show power law-like distributions of the net incomes and inter-transaction time intervals. Big winners and losers are associated with high degree, high betweenness centrality, low clustering coefficient and low degree-correlation. We identify communities in the network as groups of the like-minded. The distribution of the community sizes is shown to be power-law distributed with an exponent of 1.19±0.16.

  3. Hibernia's environmental planning: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grattan, L.

    1991-01-01

    The Hibernia oil project on the Grand Banks was assessed by the Federal Environmental Assessment and Review (FEARO) process, and the FEARO recommendations were used by the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board to specify conditions of approval to proceed with the project. The construction site for the Hibernia offshore platform also underwent an environmental evaluation under the FEARO process. The Hibernia project partners are committed to implementing environmental protection plans for all phases of the project, and enforcement of the plans is the responsibility of the two major site contractors. An environmental effects monitoring program is in place at the construction site and the Hibernia partners are consulting closely with fishermen in the site area to develop an operational code of practice and a compensation policy

  4. SLC status and SLAC future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1990-01-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high-energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of higher-energy linear colliders. SLAC has a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. (author) 8 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Neutrino Oscillations Present Status and Future Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This book reviews the status of a very exciting field - neutrino oscillations - at a very important time. The fact that neutrinos have mass has only been proved in the last few years and the acceptance of that fact has opened up a whole new area of study to understand the fundamental parameters of the mixing matrix. The book summarizes the results from all the experiments which have played a role in the measurement of neutrino oscillations and briefly describes the scope of some new planned experiments. Contributions include a theoretical introduction by Stephen Parke from FNAL, as well as art

  6. Effective Planning of the Future of the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentsov, A.; Bolsunovskaya, Yu; Bolsunovskaya, L.

    2014-08-01

    The problems of the Arctic region have become the most important ones in the world. Political risks hinder the industrial development of the region. This paper addresses the problem of planning and modeling the future of this region. It presents the problems of developing a model of the future due to the ideologies and strategies of two main actors in the Arctic, the United States and the Russian Federation. The effects of a bipolar perception of the future of the region and of the whole world are shown. A model of the effective planning of the future of the Arctic region is proposed.

  7. Artificial Intelligence Research Branch future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Helen (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains information on the activities of the Artificial Intelligence Research Branch (FIA) at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) in 1992, as well as planned work in 1993. These activities span a range from basic scientific research through engineering development to fielded NASA applications, particularly those applications that are enabled by basic research carried out in FIA. Work is conducted in-house and through collaborative partners in academia and industry. All of our work has research themes with a dual commitment to technical excellence and applicability to NASA short, medium, and long-term problems. FIA acts as the Agency's lead organization for research aspects of artificial intelligence, working closely with a second research laboratory at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and AI applications groups throughout all NASA centers. This report is organized along three major research themes: (1) Planning and Scheduling: deciding on a sequence of actions to achieve a set of complex goals and determining when to execute those actions and how to allocate resources to carry them out; (2) Machine Learning: techniques for forming theories about natural and man-made phenomena; and for improving the problem-solving performance of computational systems over time; and (3) Research on the acquisition, representation, and utilization of knowledge in support of diagnosis design of engineered systems and analysis of actual systems.

  8. Toward a Holistic Federated Future Internet Experimentation Environment: The Experience of NOVI Research and Experimentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglaris, V.; Papagianni, C.; Androulidakis, G.; Grammatikou, M.; Grosso, P.; van der Ham, J.; de Laat, C.; Pietrzak, B.; Belter, B.; Steger, J.; Laki, S.; Campanella, M.; Sallent, S.

    This article presents the design and pilot implementation of a suite of intelligent methods, algorithms, and tools for federating heterogeneous experimental platforms (domains) toward a holistic Future Internet experimentation ecosystem. The proposed framework developed within the NOVI research and

  9. The 1990 progress report and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Peter; Zweben, Monte; Compton, Michael

    1990-01-01

    This document describes the progress and plans of the Artificial Intelligence Research Branch (RIA) at ARC in 1990. Activities span a range from basic scientific research to engineering development and to fielded NASA applications, particularly those applications that are enabled by basic research carried out at RIA. Work is conducted in-house and through collaborative partners in academia and industry. Our major focus is on a limited number of research themes with a dual commitment to technical excellence and proven applicability to NASA short, medium, and long-term problems. RIA acts as the Agency's lead organization for research aspects of artificial intelligence, working closely with a second research laboratory at JPL and AI applications groups at all NASA centers.

  10. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO-BWR system on a

  11. SCORPIO-BWR: status and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porsmyr, Jan; Bodal, Terje; Beere, William H. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: During the years from 2000 to 2003 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and TEPCO Systems Corporation, Japan, to develop a core monitoring system for BWRs based on the their existing core monitoring system TiARA and the SCORPIO framework. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general framework (SCORPIO Framework) has been used which facilitates easy software modifications as well as adding/ replacing physics modules. The software modules is integrated in the SCORPIO framework using the Software Bus as the communication tool and with the Picasso UIMS tool for MMI. The SCORPIO-BWR version is developed on a Windows-PC platform. The SCORPIO-BWR version provides all functions, which are necessary for all analyses and operations performed on a BWR plant and comprises functions for on-line core monitoring, predictive analysis and core management with interfaces to plant instrumentation and physics codes. Functions for system initialisation and maintenance are also included. A SCORPIO-BWR version adapted for ABWR was installed in TEPSYS facilities in Tokyo in January 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. The ABWR version of the system is now in the verification and validation phase. In the period from April 2003 until March 2004 a project for realizing an offline-version of SCORPIO-BWR system, which supports the offline tasks of BWR in-core fuel management for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors, was developed. The offline-version of the SCORPIO-BWR system for ABWR and BWR-5 type of reactors was installed at TEPSYS in March 2003, where the final acceptance tests were carried out and accepted. Plans for the next version of this system is to study the possibility of adapting SCORPIO-BWR to work with 'mobile technology'. This means that it should be possible to access and display information from the SCORPIO

  12. GERDA: Recent results and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Björn

    2014-04-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) is an experiment designed to investigate the neutrinoless double beta decay (0 νββ) in 76Ge. An array of high purity germanium detectors isotopically enriched to 87% of 76Ge is operated within 64 m3 of liquid argon (LAr) at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS). The experiment aims to explore the 0 νββ half-life up to 1.4×1026 yr with a collected exposure of 100 kg yr separated into two physics phases. The data taking of Phase I started in November 2011 and finished in May 2013 with 21.6 kg yr of exposure and a background index (BI) of 2×10-2cts/(kg yr keV) around the Q-value of 2039 keV before pulse shape cuts. Phase II of the experiment is being prepared with additional 30 Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors and an instrumentation of the LAr, aiming at a BI reduction by a factor of 10 w.r. to Phase I. This paper will present the GERDA setup and the latest results of the experiment including a new measurement of the 2 νββ spectrum of 76Ge and the decomposition of the background spectrum. The 0 νββ analysis, finished in the meanwhile, will be briefly mentioned. Furthermore, the major improvements planned for Phase II will be discussed.

  13. GERDA: Recent results and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Björn, E-mail: bjoernlehnert@gmail.com

    2014-04-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) is an experiment designed to investigate the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in {sup 76}Ge. An array of high purity germanium detectors isotopically enriched to 87% of {sup 76}Ge is operated within 64 m{sup 3} of liquid argon (LAr) at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS). The experiment aims to explore the 0νββ half-life up to 1.4×10{sup 26} yr with a collected exposure of 100 kg yr separated into two physics phases. The data taking of Phase I started in November 2011 and finished in May 2013 with 21.6 kg yr of exposure and a background index (BI) of 2×10{sup −2}cts/(kg yr keV) around the Q-value of 2039 keV before pulse shape cuts. Phase II of the experiment is being prepared with additional 30 Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) detectors and an instrumentation of the LAr, aiming at a BI reduction by a factor of 10 w.r. to Phase I. This paper will present the GERDA setup and the latest results of the experiment including a new measurement of the 2νββ spectrum of {sup 76}Ge and the decomposition of the background spectrum. The 0νββ analysis, finished in the meanwhile, will be briefly mentioned. Furthermore, the major improvements planned for Phase II will be discussed.

  14. Planning Schools for the Future. Publication No. BM-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, JoAnn

    In a three-year study, Research for Better Schools (RBS) was asked by the National Institute of Education to identify, analyze, and verify definitive social changes forecast for the decades ahead, and to project their implications for schools of the future. RBS reviewed the literature to extract future planning needs relevant to educational…

  15. Demographic Analysis and Planning for the Future. No. 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Cathy M.

    The basic sources and types of demographic data available for future planning for the developmentally disabled are reviewed and a frame work for data organization is suggested. It is explained that future forecasts may be undertaken by the following principles: trend forecasting or extrapolation; scenario construction; models, games, and…

  16. IVS: Current Status and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrend, D.; Nothnagel, A.; Petrachenko, W. T.; Tuccari, G.

    2016-12-01

    The International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) is a globally operating service that coordinates and performs Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) activities through its constituent components. The VLBI activities are associated with the creation, provision, dissemination, and archiving of relevant VLBI data and products. The products mostly pertain to the determination of the celestial and terrestrial reference frames, the Earth orientation parameters (EOP), atmospheric parameters as well as other ancillary parameters. The IVS observational network currently consists of about 40 radio telescopes worldwide. Subsets of these telescopes (8-12 stations) participate in 24-hour observing sessions that are run several times per week and in 1-hour intensive sessions for UT1 determination every day. The current VLBI network was developed mainly in the 1970s and 1980s. A number of factors, including aging infrastructure and demanding new scientific requirements, started to challenge its future sustainability and relevance. In response, the IVS and other groups developed and started implementing the next generation VLBI system, called VGOS (VLBI Global Observing System), at existing and new sites. The VGOS network is expected to reach maturity in the early 2020s. We describe the current status, progress, and anticipated prospects of geodetic/astrometric VLBI and the IVS.

  17. Erha Uncertainty Analysis: Planning for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brami, T.R.; Hopkins, D.F.; Loguer, W.L.; Cornagia, D.M.; Braisted, A.W.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Erha field (OPL 209) was discovered in 1999 approximately 100 km off the coast of Nigeria in 1,100 m of water. The discovery well (Erha-1) encountered oil and gas in deep-water clastic reservoirs. The first appraisal well (Erha-2) drilled 1.6 km downdip to the northwest penetrated an oil-water contact and confirmed a potentially commercial discovery. However, the Erha-3 and Erha-3 ST-1 boreholes, drilled on the faulted east-side of the field in 2001, encountered shallower fluid contacts. As a result of these findings, a comprehensive field-wide uncertainty analysis was performed to better understand what we know versus what we think regarding resource size and economic viability The uncertainty analysis process applied at Erha is an integrated scenario-based probabilistic approach to model resource and reserves. Its goal is to provide quantitative results for a variety of scenarios, thus allowing identification of and focus on critical controls (the variables that are likely to impose the greatest influence).The initial focus at Erha was to incorporate the observed fluid contacts and to develop potential scenarios that included the range of possibilities in unpenetrated portions of the field. Four potential compartmentalization scenarios were hypothesized. The uncertainty model combines these scenarios with reservoir parameters and their plausible ranges. Input data comes from multiple sources including: wells, 3D seismic, reservoir flow simulation, geochemistry, fault-seal analysis, sequence stratigraphic analysis, and analogs. Once created, the model is sampled using Monte-Carlo techniques to create probability density functions for a variety of variables including oil in-place and recoverable reserves.Results of the uncertainty analysis support that despite a thinner oil column on the faulted east-side of the field, Erha is an economically attractive opportunity. Further, the results have been to develop data acquisition plans and mitigation strategies that

  18. The Past, Present, and Future of Discharge Planning in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chuan Lin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Discharge planning is an interdisciplinary approach to provide continuity of care; it is a process that includes identification, assessment, goal setting, planning, implementation, coordination, and evaluation. Discharge planning has been viewed as a major way to enhance a smooth transition for patients from the hospital to home or other chronic care units and as a solution to solve problems associated with postdischarge care. The promotion of discharge planning began in the United States in the 1960s. Nursing scholars from Taiwan learned about the concept of discharge planning from the United States in the early 1980s and subsequently introduced it to Taiwanese medical institutions in 1985. A policy to promote discharge planning in Taiwan was announced by the Executive Yuan, Department of Health in 1993. Following the healthcare reforms in 1995, discharge planning has since been strongly promoted. Studies concerning discharge planning in Taiwan showed some promising results, including increased satisfaction of patients and their families, improved preparation of caregivers, and improved quality of life for patients. However, patients receiving interdisciplinary discharge planning services were still in the minority. There was no standard evaluation procedure for interdisciplinary discharge planning, and a high percentage of patients thought that hospitals handled the postdischarge long-term care services referral procedure inadequately. Despite the positive attitudes toward discharge planning, many physicians still demonstrate an unsatisfactory level of knowledge and behaviors with regard to discharge planning. To enhance the implementation of discharge planning, a standard evaluation procedure for interdisciplinary discharge planning and improved physician awareness concerning the importance of discharge planning are needed. In Taiwan, the improvement of discharge planning in the foreseeable future is promising with the accreditation of the

  19. Experimental Test Plan DOE Tidal and River Reference Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL

    2012-09-01

    Our aim is to provide details of the experimental test plan for scaled model studies in St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) Main Channel at the University of Minnesota, including a review of study objectives, descriptions of the turbine models, the experimental set-up, instrumentation details, instrument measurement uncertainty, anticipated experimental test cases, post-processing methods, and data archiving for model developers.

  20. Fontan Surgical Planning: Previous Accomplishments, Current Challenges, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusty, Phillip M; Slesnick, Timothy C; Wei, Zhenglun Alan; Rossignac, Jarek; Kanter, Kirk R; Fogel, Mark A; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2018-04-01

    The ultimate goal of Fontan surgical planning is to provide additional insights into the clinical decision-making process. In its current state, surgical planning offers an accurate hemodynamic assessment of the pre-operative condition, provides anatomical constraints for potential surgical options, and produces decent post-operative predictions if boundary conditions are similar enough between the pre-operative and post-operative states. Moving forward, validation with post-operative data is a necessary step in order to assess the accuracy of surgical planning and determine which methodological improvements are needed. Future efforts to automate the surgical planning process will reduce the individual expertise needed and encourage use in the clinic by clinicians. As post-operative physiologic predictions improve, Fontan surgical planning will become an more effective tool to accurately model patient-specific hemodynamics.

  1. Future prospects of antiarrhythmic treatment based on experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Based on recent experimental studies, a number of speculations about future developments are made regarding the treatment of atrial fibrillation, the problem of proarrhythmia in patients with heart failure, and the treatment of ventricular tachycardia developing during the first 6 weeks following

  2. Foundation for the Future. 2013-2015 Strategic Plan. FY13 Organizational Performance Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats ( SWOT ) Analysis 192013–2015 Strategic Plan tr t ic l The Planning, Policy, and Leadership Support (PPLS...and public cloud mix Conduct government/private market survey to determine future cloud strategy Implement future cloud strategy  Thin Client...Systems Acquisition Reform Act of 2009, National Security Strategy , and the Digital Government Strategy • Department of Defense, as set forth in the

  3. Planning for a Better Future: California 2025. 2011 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Policy Institute of California, 2011

    2011-01-01

    California's current economic and fiscal realities make nonpartisan, objective information on the state's future challenges all the more critical. Understandably, the search is on for immediate solutions to the unprecedented crises people face today. But if the present crises make policymakers shelve long-term planning, the result may be an even…

  4. Regional Planning, Local Visions : Participatory Futuring in West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Easton

    2000-01-01

    The note examines regional planning, and future participatory methods for economic development in West Africa, based on the work carried out by the Club du Sahel - a branch of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) - responsible for coordinating northern donor agencies, in support of food security, and natural resource management in the desert-edge portions of Wes...

  5. Status and future plan of nuclear data activities in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang Youxiang; Tang Hongqing [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy

    1997-03-01

    The present status and future plan of nuclear data measurement and evaluation in China are presented, including the supplement, improvement on CENDL-2.1 and benchmark test of CENDL-2.1, the progress on nuclear data measurement and CENDL-3. (author)

  6. FFTF-cycle 10 program and future plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, Akira

    1988-04-01

    Brief outlines are provided of the FFTF cycle 10 program and future plans in consideration. The primary objective of the Japan-US collaboration program is to enable predictions of material behavior in MFRs to be made from data obtained in other irradiation environments. Major program goals are outlined.

  7. Time orientation, planning horizons and responsibility into the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svenson, O.; Nilsson, G.

    1988-01-01

    Subjects of four categories (social science students, engineering students, retired people and nuclear waste experts) were asked about past events, planning, risks and future time with emphasis on energy related issues and in particular questions concerning spent nuclear waste. Among, the results reported it was found that events in the past were located more or less correctly and that events further back systematically too close to the present. Today's responsibility into the future was judged to cover 3 to 6 generations ahead and an adequate planning horizon for a local community to be on the average 11 to 14 years. Adequate planning horizons for the handling of spent nuclear fuel were judged to be from 100 to 500 years. The responsibility for effects of today's decisions was judged to be from about 100 to 300 years into the future for environmental pollution and from about 50 to 600 years for nuclear waste. However, non-negliqable proportions of the subjects choose a more moral standpoint and gave answers indicating that responsibility had to be unlimited. Some sex differences were found and an interaction with age offered as a hypothesis to be investigated in the future. Interrelations between clusters of questions revealed some links from past time and planning to judgements of environmental and nuclear power related risks. (orig.)

  8. Ocean Studies Board annual report 1989 and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The major activities of the Ocean Studies Board of the National Research Council for 1989 are reviewed. The following are discussed: the Navy Panel, the CO2 Panel, the Committee on the Ocean's Role in Global Change, the Committee on the Coastal Ocean, the Workshop on Issues of U.S. Marine Fisheries, and the Continental Margins Workshop Committee. Future plans are covered

  9. Optimism and Planning for Future Care Needs among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, Silvia; Hirsch, Jameson K.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increase in need for assistance. Preparation for future care (PFC) is related to improved coping ability as well as better mental and physical health outcomes among older adults. We examined the association of optimism with components of PFC among older adults. We also explored race differences in the relationship between optimism and PFC. In Study 1, multiple regression showed that optimism was positively related to concrete planning. In Study 2, optimism was related to gathering information. An exploratory analysis combining the samples yielded a race interaction: For Whites higher optimism, but for Blacks lower optimism was associated with more planning. High optimism may be a barrier to future planning in certain social and cultural contexts. PMID:26045699

  10. VICTORIA Class Submarine Human-in-the-Loop Experimentation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    1472G. VICTORIA Class Submarine Human-in-the-Loop Experimentation Plan and Preliminary Results © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of...19 th International Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium Title: VICTORIA Class Submarine Human-in-the-Loop...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE VICTORIA Class Submarine Human-in-the-Loop Experimentation Plan 5a. CONTRACT

  11. Weather, climate and the future : B.C.'s plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    This plan lays the groundwork for a comprehensive long-term response to climate change in British Columbia (BC). Three key objectives were identified: decreasing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and reducing vulnerability to future climate change; contributing to BC's economic revitalization by improving energy efficiency and supporting development of market opportunities; and ensuring BC's interests are protected in the implementation of national climate policies. A summary of actions was provided in the areas of sustainable energy production and sustainable forest management. Outlines of the government's plans to provide support to the BC Agriculture Council were also provided along with plans concerning infrastructure and the ways in which climate change will be incorporated into transportation planning and investment strategies. A list of government leadership and outreach actions was given, as well as details of water management plans. It was concluded that further policy developments will be required in incremental forest sinks, energy efficiency, bioenergy and fuel cell technology. Improved urban development and performance targets are necessary for public buildings. It was noted that regulatory changes to provide further incentives in these areas are necessary. Partnerships between the private sector, federal, local and regional governments will be essential for the future success of this plan. tabs., figs

  12. ANSTO's future plans for nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackburne, I.

    2003-01-01

    There are four key themes in ANSTO's future plans for nuclear science and technology: 1) ANSTO plans for the future - within its established 'core business areas', following a rigorous process, and incorporating extensive interaction with organisations around Australia and overseas. 2) The replacement research reactor (RRR) - a Major National Research Facility and the cornerstone of ANSTO's future activities. 3) A number of business development initiatives that have been launched by ANSTO over the past year, under the banner of Good science is good business at ANSTO. 4) ANSTO involvement in the national research priorities that the Prime Minister announced last December, in particular, by pursuing new research in the security and forensics area; its contribution to the 'Safeguarding Australia' national research priority. The Replacement Research Reactor now under construction will make an enormous difference to the work that ANSTO can undertake, and that others can perform using ANSTO's facilities

  13. MATLAB platform for Monte Carlo planning and dosimetry experimental evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, J. A.; Ureba, A.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Pereira-Barbeiro, A. R.; Leal, A.

    2013-01-01

    A new platform for the full Monte Carlo planning and an independent experimental evaluation that it can be integrated into clinical practice. The tool has proved its usefulness and efficiency and now forms part of the flow of work of our research group, the tool used for the generation of results, which are to be suitably revised and are being published. This software is an effort of integration of numerous algorithms of image processing, along with planning optimization algorithms, allowing the process of MCTP planning from a single interface. In addition, becomes a flexible and accurate tool for the evaluation of experimental dosimetric data for the quality control of actual treatments. (Author)

  14. Future plans for the MP line (Both general and specific)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, D.G.

    1988-01-01

    This talk consists of three sections. Topics range from suggestions of possible physics, which are presented to provoke thought and discussion about the distant future, to specific goals of E-704 for the next running period. The sections are on physics issues, possible upgrades of the beam and experimental apparatus, and goals for the next running period. 4 refs., 5 figs

  15. Automatic Scheduling and Planning (ASAP) in future ground control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlin, Sam

    1988-01-01

    This report describes two complementary approaches to the problem of space mission planning and scheduling. The first is an Expert System or Knowledge-Based System for automatically resolving most of the activity conflicts in a candidate plan. The second is an Interactive Graphics Decision Aid to assist the operator in manually resolving the residual conflicts which are beyond the scope of the Expert System. The two system designs are consistent with future ground control station activity requirements, support activity timing constraints, resource limits and activity priority guidelines.

  16. GammeV: results and future plans at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wester, William; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    GammeV is an axion-like particle photo regeneration experiment that employs the light shining through a wall technique. We obtain limits on the coupling of a photon to an axion-like particle that extend previous limits for both scalar and pseudoscalar particles in the milli-eV mass range. We have reconfigured our apparatus to search for chameleon particles. We describe the current results and future plans for similar activities at Fermilab.

  17. Deja vu: The Unified Command Plan of the Future Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited Déjà vu : The Unified Command Plan of the Future Revisited A Monograph by Lieutenant...DD-MM-YYYY) 19-05-2011 2. REPORT TYPE Monograph 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) JUL 2010 – MAY 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Déjà vu : The Unified...i SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES MONOGRAPH APPROVAL Lieutenant Colonel Edward Francis Martignetti Title of Monograph: Déjà vu : The Unified

  18. Air Force Strategic Planning: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Raphael S. Cohen Air Force Strategic Planning Past, Present, and Future C O R P O R A T I O N Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This... intelligence , surveillance, and reconnaissance QDR Quadrennial Defense Review TAC Tactical Air Command UAV unmanned aerial vehicles 1 1...Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2000, p. 258. 5 U.S. Government Printing Office, Army Air Forces Field Manual: Employment of Aviation of the

  19. Learning from the Past, Planning for the Future...

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanche Cameron

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the National Planning Policy Framework hove into view, it has been polarising opinions, either for or against this most radical shake up of UK planning policy since just after the Second World War. Suddenly, what was a highly (some say over complex system of thousands of pages of detailed planning guidance has been simplified to a 58 page document, which has been through a year of consultation before coming into law. It is interesting to consider how the NPPF is now being viewed and applied in different contexts. Flatman and Perring’s paper explores the potential (positive and negative impacts of the NPPF on archaeological practice, in terms of conservation, but also in social and cultural terms – the fear being that, without the proper requirements in place, archaeological evidence may at best be conserved, but without sufficient capacity to research, understand and integrate its meaning for us and our future.

  20. THE EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH OF THE TECHONOLOGY OF FUTURE ATCO-TRAINERS’ PEDAGOGY COMPETENCE FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Людмила Немлій

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the experimental research of pedagogical competence formation of future air traffic control officers-trainers (ATCO-trainers. At the stage of forming experiment a course «Fundamentals of ATCOtrainer’s educational activities» was developed and introduced into the process of professional training of future ATCO-trainers. According to the plan of this course, the organization of educational process was carried out based on the integrative technology. The results of the forming experiment demonstrate the effectiveness of the implemented technologies.

  1. Planned obsolescence publishing, technology, and the future of the academy

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Academic institutions are facing a crisis in scholarly publishing at multiple levels: presses are stressed as never before, library budgets are squeezed, faculty are having difficulty publishing their work, and promotion and tenure committees are facing a range of new ways of working without a clear sense of how to understand and evaluate them. Planned Obsolescence is both a provocation to think more broadly about the academy’s future and an argument for reconceiving that future in more communally-oriented ways. Facing these issues head-on, Kathleen Fitzpatrick focuses on the technological changes—especially greater utilization of internet publication technologies, including digital archives, social networking tools, and multimedia—necessary to allow academic publishing to thrive into the future. But she goes further, insisting that the key issues that must be addressed are social and institutional in origin. Springing from original research as well as Fitzpatrick’s own hands-on experiments in ne...

  2. Planning future care services: Analyses of investments in Norwegian municipalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Terje P; Tingvold, Laila

    2018-06-01

    To analyse whether the Norwegian Central Government's goal of subsidizing 12,000 places in nursing homes or sheltered housing using an earmarked grant was reached and to determine towards which group of users the planned investments were targeted. Data from the investment plans at municipal level were provided by the Norwegian Housing Bank and linked to variables describing the municipalities' financial situation as well as variables describing the local needs for services provided by Statistics Norway. Using regression analyses we estimated the associations between municipal characteristics and planned investments in total and by type of care place. The Norwegian Central Government reached its goal of giving subsidies to 12,000 new or rebuilt places in nursing homes and sheltered housing. A total of 54% of the subsidies (6878 places) were given to places in nursing homes. About 7500 places were available by the end of the planning period and the rest were under construction. About 50% of the places were planned for user groups aged Investments in nursing homes were correlated with the share of the population older than 80 years and investments in sheltered houses were correlated with the share of users with intellectual disabilities. Earmarked grants to municipalities can be adequate measures to affect local resource allocation and thereby stimulate investments in future care. With the current institutional setup the municipalities adapt investments to local needs.

  3. Future plans on the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Seiichi

    2000-01-01

    The Research Reactor Institute (RRI), Kyoto University, for aiming at performing the 'Experiments using a reactor and its related research', was established in Showa 38 (1963) as a cooperative research institute for universities and so on in allover Japan. Operation using KUR of one of main facilities in RRI was started by 1 MW of its rated output in 1964, and converted to 5 MW in 1968, after which through development , addition and modification of various research apparatus it has been proposed to the cooperative application researches with universities and so on in allover Japan, hitherto. Among these periods, its research organization is improved to six departments containing twenty divisions and two attached research facilities to progress some investigations on future plans at RRI for response to new researching trends. Here were described on present state of research on use of low concentrated uranium fuels at research reactor, and future plans on neutron factory and hybrid reactor. The former aims at establishment of a new research facility capable of alternating to KUR for future academic research on research reactor containing high quality and high degree application of neutron field and safety management and feature upgrading of nuclear energy. And, the latter aims at development on an accelerator drive uncritical reactor combined an accelerator neutron source and an uncritical reactor. (G.K.)

  4. AFP: First experience with data and future plans

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00184415; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector system aims at the measurement of protons scattered diffractively or electromagnetically at very small angles. The first arm of the system was installed in 2016 and AFP took data in several commissioning and physics runs. The installation of the second arm is ongoing and will be completed in time for the 2017 data taking period. This will allow the measurements of processes with two tagged forward protons being a signature of: central diffraction, exclusive production, and two-photon processes. The early results and experience from the first year of data taking is presented together with the status of the secondarm installation and plans for the future.

  5. Status and future plans for the LEP accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placidi, M.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is given of the LEP performance in 1991 as compared to the goals defined in the design phase and the targets agreed with the physics experiments during the year. Achievements and limitations in the machine operation for physics in terms of beam current and luminosity are discussed and analyzed. Progress in beam polarization studies leading to improved energy calibration by the resonant depolarization technique are described. Finally, prospects and future plans to increase luminosity, to upgrade the energy and to implement polarization control are presented. (author)

  6. 20 Years of Dukovany NPP Operation and Plans for Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlcek, J.

    2006-01-01

    NPP Dukovany (4x440MW), the first Czech nuclear power plant and a keystone of Czech Electricity Grid, in 2005 celebrated 20 years of successful operation. In my presentation I am going to speak about next areas. I will start about construction and commissioning history of Dukovany NPP, then I'll put forward what milestones of Dukovany NPP operation were accomplished, I'll say examples about our modernisation and investment activities (including replacement of IandC equipment, modifications for increasing of power and support grid services) and in the end our plans for future. (author)

  7. Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included.

  8. Experimental program plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has prepared this Experimental Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (EPP) to provide a summary of the DOE experimental efforts needed for the performance assessment process for the WIPP, and of the linkages of this process to the appropriate regulations. The Plan encompasses a program of analyses of the performance of the planned repository based on scientific studies, including tests with transuranic waste at laboratory sites, directed at evaluating compliance with the principal regulations governing the WIPP. The Plan begins with background information on the WIPP project, the requirements of the LWA (Land Withdrawal Act), and its objective and scope. It then presents an overview of the regulatory requirements and the compliance approach. Next are comprehensive discussions of plans for compliance with disposal regulations, followed by the SWDA (Solid Waste Disposal Act) and descriptions of activity programs designed to provide information needed for determining compliance. Descriptions and justifications of all currently planned studies designed to support regulatory compliance activities are also included

  9. Realistic Goals and Processes for Future Space Astronomy Portfolio Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jon

    2015-08-01

    It is generally recognized that international participation and coordination is highly valuable for maximizing the scientific impact of modern space science facilities, as well as for cost-sharing reasons. Indeed, all large space science missions, and most medium and small missions, are international, even if one country or space agency has a clear leadership role and bears most of the development costs. International coordination is a necessary aspect of future mission planning, but how that coordination is done remains debatable. I propose that the community's scientific vision is generally homogeneous enough to permit international coordination of decadal-scale strategic science goals. However, the timing and budget allocation/funding mechanisms of individual countries and/or space agencies are too disparate for effective long-term strategic portfolio planning via a single international process. Rather, I argue that coordinated space mission portfolio planning is a natural consequence of international collaboration on individual strategic missions. I review the process and outcomes of the U.S. 2010 decadal survey in astronomy & astrophysics from the perspective of a government official who helped craft the survey charter and transmitted guidance to the scientific community on behalf of a sponsoring agency (NASA), while continuing to manage the current portfolio that involved ongoing negotiations with other space agencies. I analyze the difficulties associated with projecting long-term budgets, obtaining realistic mission costs (including the additional cost burdens of international partnerships), and developing new (possibly transformational) technologies. Finally, I remark on the future role that privately funded space science missions can have in accomplishing international science community goals.

  10. Overview of EAST progress and near future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, X.; Li, J.; Wan, B.N.; Qian, J.P.; Cao, L.

    2015-01-01

    with good confinement, concomitant with oscillating zonal flows and a high-frequency broad-band turbulence, has been observed for the first time in the pedestal of H-mode plasmas, which have significant implications for ITER operations. This paper presents some highlights of these new achievements in EAST. EAST will be in operation with 20 MW CW Heating and Current Drive powers (LHCD, ICRH, NBI and ECRH), enhanced diagnostic capabilities and full actively-cooled metal wall from 2013. It will therefore allow to access new confinement regimes and extend these regimes towards to steady state operation. The future plan of EAST in 2013 and next 3-5 years also will be presented in this paper. (authors)

  11. Status of the SNS superconducting linac and future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho

    2008-01-01

    The use of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities in particle accelerator is becoming more widespread. Among the projects that make use of that technology is the Spallation Neutron Source, where H- ions are accelerated to about 1 GeV, mostly making use of niobium elliptical cavities. SNS generates neutrons by the spallation reaction with the accelerated short (about 700 ns) sub-bunches of protons, which will in turn allow probing structural and magnetic properties of new and existing materials. The SNS superconducting linac is the largest application of RF superconductivity to come on-line in the last decade and has been operating with beam for almost two years. As the first operational pulsed superconducting linac, many of the aspects of its performance were unknown and unpredictable. A lot of experiences and data have been gathered on the pulsed behavior of cavities and cryomodules at various repetition rates and at various temperatures during the commissioning of its components and beam operations. This experience is of great value in determining future optimizations of SNS as well in guiding in the design and operation of future pulsed superconducting linacs. The testing of the superconducting cavities, the operating experience with beam, the performance of the superconducting linac and the future plans will be presented.

  12. Experimental area plans for an advanced hadron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; Tschalear, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the current plans for an experimental area for a new advanced hadron facility for the exploration of nuclear and particle physics. The facility, LAMPF II, is presently visualized as consisting of the LAMPF linac sending 800 MeV protons to a 6 GeV booster ring followed by a 45 GeV main ring. Two experimental areas area planned. The first is intended to provide neutrinos via a pair of pulsed focusing horns. The other is designed to accommodate secondary beams that span the range of useful energies up to GeV/c. Beam specification goals are discussed with respect to source brightness, beam purity, and beam-line acceptance and length. The various beam lines are briefly described. Production cross sections and rates are estimated for antiproton production. Problems of thermal energy deposition in both components and targets and of effectiveness of particle separators are discussed. 9 refs. (LEW)

  13. Experimental area plans for an advanced hadron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.W.; Macek, R.J.; Tschalear, C.

    1986-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the current plans for an experimental area for a new advanced hadron facility for the exploration of nuclear and particle physics. The facility, LAMPF II, is presently visualized as consisting of the LAMPF linac sending 800 MeV protons to a 6 GeV booster ring followed by a 45 GeV main ring. Two experimental areas area planned. The first is intended to provide neutrinos via a pair of pulsed focusing horns. The other is designed to accommodate secondary beams that span the range of useful energies up to GeV/c. Beam specification goals are discussed with respect to source brightness, beam purity, and beam-line acceptance and length. The various beam lines are briefly described. Production cross sections and rates are estimated for antiproton production. Problems of thermal energy deposition in both components and targets and of effectiveness of particle separators are discussed. 9 refs

  14. AFP: First Experience with Data and Future Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Gach, Grzegorz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) detector system is the measurement of protons scattered diffractively or electromagnetically at very small angles. The first arm of the system was installed last year and AFP took data in several commissioning and physics runs. The installation of the second arm is ongoing and will be completed in time for the 2017 data taking period. This will allow measurements of processes with two forward protons: central diffraction, exclusive production, and two-photon processes. During the presentation, the early results and experience from the first year of data taking will be presented together with the status of the second-arm installation and plans for the future.

  15. Status and future plans of polarized beams at COSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentz, B.; Gebel, R.; Lehrach, A.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stockhorst, H.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we report on the present status and future plans of polarized beams in the COSY synchrotron ring. COSY is a synchrotron ring in the momentum range from 295 to 3700 MeV/c. Polarized deuterons and protons are routinely delivered to experiments over the whole momentum range. No depolarization occurs during the acceleration of deuterons in COSY. For polarized protons many depolarizing resonances are crossed without polarization loss. At imperfection resonances, vertical steerer magnets are used to increase the resonance strength, leading to a complete polarization reversal. At intrinsic resonances a fast tune jump quadrupole is used to quickly cross the resonances without loss of polarization. Typical proton polarizations are close to 0.8 below 2.1 GeV/c and about 0.6 for higher momenta. During recent operation an induced depolarizing resonance was used for accurate determination of the relative momentum spread dp/p of the stored beam yielding an accuracy of better than 10-4. For spin filter studies of the PAX collaboration a low beta target section was installed in 2009 and was successfully put into operation early 2010. An upgrade of the EDDA polarimeter electronics and data acquisition system is underway to ensure continued availability of the polarimeter, which is essential for the polarized proton operation of COSY. In the near future it is planned to install a Siberian snake solenoid of 4.5 Tm to be able to provide in addition to vertically polarized protons, longitudinal polarization as well. This solenoid will allow the preparation of a longitudinally polarized beam up to a kinetic energy of 500 MeV.

  16. Rationalization and future planning for AECL's research reactor capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    AECL's research reactor capability has played a crucial role in the development of Canada's nuclear program. All essential concepts for the CANDU reactors were developed and tested in the NRX and NRU reactors, and in parallel, important contributions to basic physics were made. The technical feasibility of advanced fuel cycles and of the organic-cooled option for CANDU reactors were also demonstrated in the two reactors and the WR-1 reactor. In addition, an important and growing radio-isotope production industry was established and marketed on a world-wide basis. In 1984, however, it was recognized that a review and rationalization of the research reactor capability was required. The commercial success of the CANDU reactor system had reduced the scope and size of the required development program. Limited research and development funding and competition from other research facilities and programs, required that the scope be reduced to a support basis essential to maintain strategic capability. Currently, AECL, is part-way through this rationalization program and completion should be attained during 1992/93 when the MAPLE reactor is operational and decisions on NRX decommissioning will be made. A companion paper describes some of the unique operational and maintenance problems which have resulted from this program and the solutions which have been developed. Future planning must recognize the age of the NRU reactor (currently 32 years) and the need to plan for eventual replacement. Strategy is being developed and supporting studies include a full technical assessment of the NRU reactor and the required age-related upgrading program, evaluation of the performance characteristics and costs of potential future replacement reactors, particularly the advanced MAPLE concept, and opportunities for international co-operation in developing mutually supportive research programs

  17. Building on the past, planning for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodall, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    A University Working Conference (UWC) sponsored by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) was held on June 14 and 15, 1996, prior to the ANS Annual Meeting in Reno, Nevada. With a theme of open-quotes Building on the Past, Planning for the Future,close quotes the meeting was the successor to the first UWC held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1995. This workshop refined the recommendations to the national nuclear engineering academic community of the earlier UWC on strategies for success in the 21st century. This UWC had 40 attendees from academe and industry, and the program was developed around the outcomes of the Philadelphia meeting. The general chair of UWC96 was Don Miller of Ohio State University, while the author of this paper served as the technical program chair. Assistant technical program chairs included Madeline Feltus of Pennsylvania State University, Dan Bullen of Iowa State University, and Gilbert Brown of the University of Massachusetts Lowell. A working conference is often loosely structured, with an informal, flexible program, consisting of a few highlight or keynote presentations followed by workshop sessions devoted to a theme area. The workshop sessions at this meeting included the following: 1. strategic planning in today's climate; 2. university/industry research collaboration; 3. profiles of nuclear engineering and radiological engineering students, now and in the future; 4. accreditation issues, especially ABET's engineering 2000; 5. employment of nuclear and radiological engineers; 6. new program thrusts in nuclear engineering departments; 7. uses of new technology in the classroom and laboratory; 8. internet access to information for education; 9. distance education/remote delivery of curricula

  18. Middle East physics collaboration plans for the future

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The SESAME initiative, the Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East, is making progress. At a recent SESAME Council meeting at the end of May, Jordan, Iran and Israel confirmed their cash contributions to the project’s storage ring. The Palestinian Authority and Pakistan have confirmed their in-kind support and Egypt and Turkey are taking steps to allow their participation. Technically planned to start operation in 2015, SESAME has begun to show significant potential as a science for peace initiative in the Middle East.   The SESAME site in Allaan, Jordan.                   (© SESAME) Jordan has provided the land and an elegant building that will house the accelerator complex and associated infrastructure; a number of states, organizations and synchrotron light laboratories have donated the injector and booster, beam lines or components, support for infras...

  19. The JET Intershot Analysis: Current infrastructure and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layne, R.; Cook, N.; Harting, D.; McDonald, D.C.; Tidy, C.

    2010-01-01

    The JET Intershot Analysis (Chain1) generates processed data following a pulse. Maintaining the pulse repetition rate is one of JET's key success factors, so performance of Chain1 is crucial. This paper will describe JET's experience of managing Chain1, including a description of the control system used to ensure the analysis chain runs as quickly as possible, and a discussion of JET's experience of integrating externally developed codes into a standard analysis framework. The current Chain1 infrastructure was developed in 1999 and although reliable and efficient is starting to prove costly in terms of flexibility and extensibility to meet JET's current and future needs. For this reason JET is planning to re-implement the Chain1 system. The paper will outline the work done towards this aim, and present a model of the proposed new system. Finally, possible future steps towards an integrated data production chain for JET will be discussed, and the potential applicability to next generation fusion devices will be outlined.

  20. Using memories to motivate future behaviour: an experimental exercise intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondolillo, Mathew J; Pillemer, David B

    2015-01-01

    This study tested a novel memory-based experimental intervention to increase exercise activity. Undergraduate students completed a two-part online survey ostensibly regarding college activity choices. At Time 1, they completed questionnaires that included assessments of exercise-related attitudes, motivation and self-reported behaviours. Next, they described a memory of a positive or negative experience that would increase their motivation to exercise; students in a control condition did not receive a memory prompt. Finally, they rated their intentions to exercise in the future. Eight days following Time 1, students received a Time 2 survey that included an assessment of their self-reported exercise during the prior week. Students in the positive memory condition reported higher levels of subsequent exercise than those in the control condition; students in the negative memory condition reported intermediate levels of exercise. Activating a positive motivational memory had a significant effect on students' self-reported exercise activity even after controlling for prior attitudes, motivation and exercise activity.

  1. USGCRP's Sustained Assessment Process: Progress to date and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelo, B. J.; Reidmiller, D.; Lipschultz, F.; Cloyd, E. T.

    2016-12-01

    One of the four main objectives of the U.S. Global Change Research Program's (USGCRP's) Strategic Plan is to "Conduct Sustained Assessments", which seeks to build a process that synthesizes and advances the state of scientific knowledge on global change, develops future scenarios and potential impacts, and evaluates how effectively science is being and can be used to inform and support the Nation's response to climate change. To do so, USGCRP strives to establish a standing capacity to conduct national climate assessments with sectoral and regional information to evaluate climate risks and opportunities, and to inform decision-making, especially with regard to resiliency planning and adaptation measures. Building on the success of the 3rd National Climate Assessment (NCA) (2014), we discuss the range of USGCRP activities that embody the sustained assessment concept. Special reports, such as the recent Climate and Human Health Assessment and upcoming Climate Science Special Report, fill gaps in our understanding and provide crucial building blocks for next NCA report (NCA4). To facilitate the use of consistent assumptions across NCA4, new scenario products for climate, population, and land use will be made available through initiatives such as NOAA's Climate Resilience Toolkit. NCA4 will be informed by user engagement to advance the customization of knowledge. The report will strive to advance our ability to quantify various risks, monetize certain impacts, and communicate the benefits (i.e., avoided impacts) of various mitigation pathways. NCAnet (a national network of climate-interested stakeholders) continues to grow and foster collaborations across levels of governance and within civil society. Finally, USGCRP continues to actively engage with other assessment processes, at international, state, city, and tribal levels, to exchange ideas and to facilitate the potential for "linked" assessments across spatial scales.

  2. Planned Environmental Microbiology Aspects of Future Lunar and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark; Castro, Victoria A.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2006-01-01

    With the establishment of the Constellation Program, NASA has initiated efforts designed similar to the Apollo Program to return to the moon and subsequently travel to Mars. Early lunar sorties will take 4 crewmembers to the moon for 4 to 7 days. Later missions will increase in duration up to 6 months as a lunar habitat is constructed. These missions and vehicle designs are the forerunners of further missions destined for human exploration of Mars. Throughout the planning and design process, lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS) and past programs will be implemented toward future exploration goals. The standards and requirements for these missions will vary depending on life support systems, mission duration, crew activities, and payloads. From a microbiological perspective, preventative measures will remain the primary techniques to mitigate microbial risk. Thus, most of the effort will focus on stringent preflight monitoring requirements and engineering controls designed into the vehicle, such as HEPA air filters. Due to volume constraints in the CEV, in-flight monitoring will be limited for short-duration missions to the measurement of biocide concentration for water potability. Once long-duration habitation begins on the lunar surface, a more extensive environmental monitoring plan will be initiated. However, limited in-flight volume constraints and the inability to return samples to Earth will increase the need for crew capabilities in determining the nature of contamination problems and method of remediation. In addition, limited shelf life of current monitoring hardware consumables and limited capabilities to dispose of biohazardous trash will drive flight hardware toward non-culture based methodologies, such as hardware that rapidly distinguishes biotic versus abiotic surface contamination. As missions progress to Mars, environmental systems will depend heavily on regeneration of air and water and biological waste remediation and

  3. Shippingport Atomic Power Station Operating Experience, Developments and Future Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.; Oldham, G.M.; Stiefel, J.T.

    1963-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates five years of operation and test of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station and discusses the current technical developments and future plans of the Shippingport programme. This programme is directed towards development of the basic technology of light-water reactors to provide the basis for potential reduction in the costs of nuclear power. The Shippingport reactor plant has operated for over five years and has been found to integrate readily into a utility system either as a base load or peak load unit. Plant component performance has been reliable. There have been no problems in contamination or waste disposal. Access to primary coolant components for maintenance has been good, demonstrating the integrity of fuel elements. Each of the three refuelling operations performed since start-up of Shippingport has required successively less time to accomplish. Recently, the third seed was refuelled in 32 working days, about one quarter the time required for the first refuelling. The formal requirements of personnel training, written administrative procedures, power plant manuals, etc., which have been a vital factor in the successful implementation of the Shippingport programme, are described. The results obtained from the comprehensive test programme carried out at Shippingport are compared with calculations, and good agreement has been obtained. Reactor core performance, plant stability, and response to load changes, fuel element and control rod performance, long-term effects such as corrosion and radiation level build-up, component performance, etc., are discussed in this paper. The principal objective of the current and future programmes of the Shippingport Project in advancing the basic technology of water-cooled reactors is discussed. This programme includes the continued operation of the Shippingport plant, and the development, design, manufacture and test operation of a long-life, highpower density second core - Core 2. At its

  4. Radiation planning in small complex lesions and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jess-Hempen, A.; Wowra, B.; Mack, A.; Kreiner, H.J.; Heck, B.

    2003-01-01

    The Gamma Knife is used as a sterotactic tool for the conformal treatment of very small, complex-shape cranial lesions. The combination of planning software and treatment equipment enables a highly-precise conformal dose distribution and positioning. The purpose of the present study was to experimentally verify the precision actually achievable in case of extremely irregular, small target volumes. For this purpose, a complete treatment procedure was performed using a standard head phantom complemented with a specially developed insert that simulates an L-shaped lesion. The spatial precision of the irradiation was recorded by means of high-resolution film dosimetry using GafChromic TM films. The analysis of the films showed for the film in the center plane an excellent conformity of the 75% isodose line used to circumscribe the lesion. A very good agreement between planning and measurement resulted also for isodose lines residing outside of the target volume. (orig.) [de

  5. Program planning for future improvement in managing ORNL's radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report is intended to serve as a reference document and guide in developing the long-term improvements section of ORNL's radioactive waste management plan. The report reviews ORNL's operations and future program needs in terms of currently applicable DOE regulations and also in terms of regulations and accepted practices of the commerical sector of the nuclear power industry so that the impact of potential future adoption of these regulations and standards on ORNL's operations can be fully evaluated. The principal conclusion reached after reviewing ORNL's waste management operations is that these operations are currently being conducted in a manner that does not endanger the health or safety of workers or the general public and that does not have an adverse effect on the environment. Although nineteen specific problem areas have been identified all of these problems can be attributed to one of the following: a) the legacy of past practices; b) gradual deterioration of systems which have reached (or are near to reaching) the end of their reasonable design lives; and c) potential changes in regulations applicable to ORNL. All of the programs designed to improve or correct these problem areas could be accomplished within a four year period. However, given current limitations on manpower and capital, these programs would more likely be spread out over a five to ten year period of time if they were all to be undertaken. The cost of undertaking all of these projects concurrently is estimated to be between 60 and 100 million dollars. Due to the many unknowns and uncertainties associated with the problem areas, actual total costs for specific projects could vary from those presented in this report by as much as 300 percent

  6. Urban Planning for a Renewable Energy Future: Methodological Challenges and Opportunities from a Design Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandevijvere, H.; Stremke, S.

    2012-01-01

    Urban planning for a renewable energy future requires the collaboration of different disciplines both in research and practice. In the present article, the planning of a renewable energy future is approached from a designer’s perspective. A framework for analysis of the planning questions at hand is

  7. 75 FR 55776 - Request for Comments on Vaccine Production and Additional Planning for Future Possible Pandemic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... Production and Additional Planning for Future Possible Pandemic Influenza AGENCY: International Trade... additional planning for future possible pandemic influenza. DATES: Written comments must be submitted on or... influenza pandemic (see World Health Organization announcement of August 10, 2010) and the need to plan for...

  8. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies: Current Challenges and Future Plans - 12558

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Andrew [U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The mission of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies office (FCT program) is to provide options for possible future changes in national nuclear energy programs. While the recent draft report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future stressed the need for organization changes, interim waste storage and the establishment of a permanent repository for nuclear waste management, it also recognized the potential value of alternate fuel cycles and recommended continued research and development in that area. With constrained budgets and great expectations, the current challenges are significant. The FCT program now performs R and D covering the entire fuel cycle. This broad R and D scope is a result of the assignment of new research and development (R and D) responsibilities to the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), as well as reorganization within NE. This scope includes uranium extraction from seawater and uranium enrichment R and D, used nuclear fuel recycling technology, advanced fuel development, and a fresh look at a range of disposal geologies. Additionally, the FCT program performs the necessary systems analysis and screening of fuel cycle alternatives that will identify the most promising approaches and areas of technology gaps. Finally, the FCT program is responsible for a focused effort to consider features of fuel cycle technology in a way that promotes nonproliferation and security, such as Safeguards and Security by Design, and advanced monitoring and predictive modeling capabilities. This paper and presentation will provide an overview of the FCT program R and D scope and discuss plans to analyze fuel cycle options and support identified R and D priorities into the future. The FCT program is making progress in implanting a science based, engineering driven research and development program that is evaluating options for a sustainable fuel cycle in the U.S. Responding to the BRC recommendations, any resulting legislative

  9. Europe Unveils 20-Year Plan for Brilliant Future in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Astronomy is enjoying a golden age of fundamental, exciting discoveries. Europe is at the forefront, thanks to 50 years of progress in cooperation. To remain ahead over the next two to three decades, Europe must prioritise and coordinate the investment of its financial and human resources even more closely. The ASTRONET network, backed by the entire European scientific community, supported by the European Commission, and coordinated by the CNRS, today presents its Roadmap for a brilliant future for European astronomy. ESO's European Extremely Large Telescope is ranked as one of two top-priority large ground-based projects. Astronet and the E-ELT ESO PR Photo 43a/08 The E-ELT Europe is a leader in astronomy today, with the world's most successful optical observatory, ESO's Very Large Telescope, and cutting-edge facilities in radio astronomy and in space. In an unprecedented effort demonstrating the potential of European scientific cooperation, all of European astronomy is now joining forces to define the scientific challenges for the future and construct a common plan to address them in a cost-effective manner. In 2007, a top-level Science Vision was prepared to assess the most burning scientific questions over the next quarter century, ranging from dark energy to life on other planets. European astronomy now presents its Infrastructure Roadmap, a comprehensive 20-year plan to coordinate national and community investments to meet these challenges in a cost-effective manner. The Roadmap not only prioritises the necessary new frontline research facilities from radio telescopes to planetary probes, in space and on the ground, but also considers such key issues as existing facilities, human resources, ICT infrastructure, education and outreach, and cost -- of operations as well as construction. This bold new initiative -- ASTRONET -- was created by the major European funding agencies with support from the European Commission and is coordinated by the National Institute

  10. The Australian Geodetic Observing Program. Current Status and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, G.; Dawson, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, the Australian government has through programs like AuScope, the Asia Pacific Reference Frame (APREF), and the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project made a significant contribution to the Global Geodetic Observing Program. In addition to supporting the national research priorities, this contribution is justified by Australia's growing economic dependence on precise positioning to underpin efficient transportation, geospatial data management, and industrial automation (e.g., robotic mining and precision agriculture) and the consequent need for the government to guarantee provision of precise positioning products to the Australian community. It is also well recognised within Australia that there is an opportunity to exploit our near unique position as being one of the few regions in the world to see all new and emerging satellite navigation systems including Galileo (Europe), GPS III (USA), GLONASS (Russia), Beidou (China), QZSS (Japan) and IRNSS (India). It is in this context that the Australian geodetic program will build on earlier efforts and further develop its key geodetic capabilities. This will include the creation of an independent GNSS analysis capability that will enable Australia to contribute to the International GNSS Service (IGS) and an upgrade of key geodetic infrastructure including the national VLBI and GNSS arrays. This presentation will overview the significant geodetic activities undertaken by the Australian government and highlight its future plans.

  11. Status of MAD (version 8.5) and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iselin, F.C.

    1993-01-01

    The MAD computer code project was started in 1981 at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) to provide a flexible framework for particle optical computations. From the beginning various features were considered important. Open-ended and modular design of the program would allow easy addition of new features. Format-free input language would facilitate data preparation. Later the requirement was added that the language should be understood by a variety of other programs. When moving data to other programs this would avoid extensive translations of the data with the corresponding danger of making errors. The internal data structure would describe the machine in a flexible manner and access to this structure should be simple. The program should be easy to maintain. Canonical variables should be used throughout the computations. All these features should not hamper the computational efficiency. This article describes the features of the MAD code. This is followed by two sections giving a general description of the ''standard input language'' and extensions to this language. Finally the data structures introduced and future plans are summarized. (Author)

  12. Decommissioning program and future plan for research hot laboratory (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koya, Toshio; Nozawa, Yukio; Hanada, Yasushi; Ono, Katsuto; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Nihei, Yasuo; Owada, Isao

    2010-01-01

    The Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was constructed in 1961, as the first one in JAPAN, to perform the examinations of irradiated fuels and materials. RHL consists of 10 heavy concrete cells and 38 lead cells, which had been contributed to research and development program in or out of JAEA for the investigation of irradiation behavior for fuels and nuclear materials. However, RHL is the one of target as the rationalization program for decrepit facilities in former Tokai institute. Therefore the decommissioning works of RHL have been started on April 2003. The decommissioning work will be progressing, dismantling the lead cells and decontamination of concrete caves then release in the regulation of controlled area. The 18 lead cells (including semi-hot cell and junior-cell) had been dismantled. Removal of the applause from the cells, survey of the contamination revel in the lead cells and prediction of radio active waste have been finished as the preparing work for dismantling of the remained 20 lead cells. The future plan of decommissioning work has been prepared to incarnate the basic vision and dismantling procedure. (author)

  13. Fukushima and energy plans for the future - I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    Till the fatal day of March 11, 2011, Japan had 55 nuclear reactors in operation generating about 27.3 per cent of her total supply of electricity and the country had an ambitious future plan of further building up the nuclear capacity to meet half of its national demand of electricity from nuclear reactors. Toshiba Corporation of Japan is one of the biggest and most successful names as the manufacturers of commercial nuclear reactors and, at present, they have acquired ownership of electric power companies in other countries as well. The Westinghouse of USA, for example, is presently owned by Toshiba. Japan and her people have earned the praise, for many years, of the nuclear lobbyists around the world for having opted for nuclear energy in a big way despite the fact that the Japanese are the only people that have experienced the nuclear holocaust of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Some home truth about this popular acceptance of nuclear reactors in Japan will be revealed later in this article

  14. Positive futures? The impact of HIV infection on achieving health, wealth and future planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Richard; Molloy, Tim

    2008-05-01

    Although HIV is now cast as a chronic condition with favourable clinical outcomes under new treatments, it is unclear how living with HIV affects expectations and planning for the future. This mixed-methods study aimed to investigate UK gay men's expectations of their own future when living with HIV, and to identify the heath and social interventions required to enhance roles, participation and personal fulfilment. A preliminary focus group identified relevant domains of enquiry for a subsequent online cross-sectional survey. A total of 347 gay men living in the UK with HIV participated in the survey, and 56.6% were currently on treatment. However, high 7-day prevalence of psychological and physical symptoms was identified (42.6% in pain, 80.2% worrying); 57.8% perceived reduced career options due to their infection and 71.8% reduced life expectancy. Being on treatment was not significantly associated with perceived life expectancy. Coded open-ended survey data identified eight principle themes related to goal planning and attainment. The integrated open and closed data items offer an understanding of barriers and challenges that focus on poor mental health due to clinical inattention, discrimination and stigma, poor career and job opportunities due to benefit and workplace inflexibility and lack of understanding, a lack of personal goals and associated skills deficit related to confidence and self esteem. Gay men living with HIV require an integrated holistic approach to wellbeing that incorporates clinical, social and individual intervention in order to lead productive lives with maximum benefit from treatment gains.

  15. Are the Planning of the Sustainable Future to be left for the chemical engineers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Morten

    1997-01-01

    The paper discuss the need for new ways of planning and managing the environment. Traditional spatial planning has been reduced to a question of putting colours on maps, there are a need for the planning to restrengthen it's position and gain a future in the planning of the city of tomorrow....

  16. Planning for Crew Exercise for Future Deep Space Mission Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Cherice; Ryder, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Providing the necessary exercise capability to protect crew health for deep space missions will bring new sets of engineering and research challenges. Exercise has been found to be a necessary mitigation for maintaining crew health on-orbit and preparing the crew for return to earth's gravity. Health and exercise data from Apollo, Space Lab, Shuttle, and International Space Station missions have provided insight into crew deconditioning and the types of activities that can minimize the impacts of microgravity on the physiological systems. The hardware systems required to implement exercise can be challenging to incorporate into spaceflight vehicles. Exercise system design requires encompassing the hardware required to provide mission specific anthropometrical movement ranges, desired loads, and frequencies of desired movements as well as the supporting control and monitoring systems, crew and vehicle interfaces, and vibration isolation and stabilization subsystems. The number of crew and operational constraints also contribute to defining the what exercise systems will be needed. All of these features require flight vehicle mass and volume integrated with multiple vehicle systems. The International Space Station exercise hardware requires over 1,800 kg of equipment and over 24 m3 of volume for hardware and crew operational space. Improvements towards providing equivalent or better capabilities with a smaller vehicle impact will facilitate future deep space missions. Deep space missions will require more understanding of the physiological responses to microgravity, understanding appropriate mitigations, designing the exercise systems to provide needed mitigations, and integrating effectively into vehicle design with a focus to support planned mission scenarios. Recognizing and addressing the constraints and challenges can facilitate improved vehicle design and exercise system incorporation.

  17. The Global Geostationary Wildfire ABBA: Current Implementation and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, E.; Schmidt, C. C.; Hoffman, J.; Brunner, J.; Hyer, E. J.; Reid, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Wild Fire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA), developed at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), has a long legacy of operational near real-time wildfire detection and characterization in the Western Hemisphere. The first phase of the global geostationary WF_ABBA was made operational at NOAA NESDIS in 2009 and currently includes diurnal active fire monitoring from GOES-East, GOES-South America, GOES-West, Meteosat-9 and MTSAT-1R/-2. This allows for near global active fire monitoring with coverage of Europe, Africa, Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific utilizing distinct geostationary sensors and a consistent algorithm. Version 6.5.006 of the WF_ABBA was specifically designed to address the capabilities and limitations of diverse geostationary sensors and requests from the global fire monitoring and user community. This presentation will provide an overview of version 6.5.006 of the global WF_ABBA fire product including the new fire and opaque cloud mask and associated metadata. We will demonstrate the WF_ABBA showing examples from around the globe with a focus on the capabilities and plans for integrating new geostationary platforms with coverage of Eastern Europe and Asia (INSAT-3D, Korean COMS, Russian GOMS Elektro-L MSU-GS). We are also preparing for future fire monitoring in the Western Hemisphere, Europe, and Africa utilizing the next generation GOES-R Imager and Meteosat Third Generation Flexible Combined Imager (MTG - FCI). The goal is to create a globally consistent long-term fire product utilizing the capabilities of each of these unique operational systems and a common fire detection algorithm. On an international level, development of a global geostationary fire monitoring system is supported by the IGOS GOFC/GOLD Fire Implementation Team. This work also generally supports Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) activities and the Group on Earth Observations (GEO).

  18. Futures markets, cognitive ability, and mispricing in experimental asset markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noussair, Charles; Tucker, Steven; Xu, Yilong

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of a futures market, in which contracts maturing in the last period of the life of the asset can be traded. Our experiment has two treatments, one in which a spot market operates on its own, and a second treatment, in which a spot and a futures market are active simultaneously.

  19. Planning for a Nondriving Future: Behaviors and Beliefs Among Middle-Aged and Older Drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Annie C; Babulal, Ganesh; Vivoda, Jonathon M; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Carr, David B

    2018-01-01

    Despite the reality of older adults living many years after driving cessation, few prepare for the eventuality; empirically, planning for a nondriving future has not been directly quantified or explored. The following study quantifies 1) the extent of current drivers' planning, 2) specific planning behaviors, 3) beliefs about benefits of planning, 4) drivers' intention to plan more for future transportation needs, and 5) group differences associated with planning. In a predominantly female, black, urban sample of current drivers ages 53-92, fewer than half (42.1%) had planned at all for a nondriving future, with correspondingly low levels of planning behaviors reported. However, over 80% believed planning would help them meet their needs post-cessation and transition emotionally to being a nondriver. Most (85%) intended to plan more in the future as well, indicating further potential openness to the topic. Drivers who planned were older, drove less frequently, limited their driving to nearby places, reported less difficulty believing they would become a nondriver, and expected to continue driving three years less than non-planners. These findings suggest that drivers' perceived nearness to driving cessation impacts planning for future transportation needs, and existing perceived benefits of planning may provide leverage to motivate action.

  20. Case mix planning in hospitals: a review and future agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, Sebastian; Fügener, Andreas; Schoenfelder, Jan; Brunner, Jens O

    2017-06-01

    The case mix planning problem deals with choosing the ideal composition and volume of patients in a hospital. With many countries having recently changed to systems where hospitals are reimbursed for patients according to their diagnosis, case mix planning has become an important tool in strategic and tactical hospital planning. Selecting patients in such a payment system can have a significant impact on a hospital's revenue. The contribution of this article is to provide the first literature review focusing on the case mix planning problem. We describe the problem, distinguish it from similar planning problems, and evaluate the existing literature with regard to problem structure and managerial impact. Further, we identify gaps in the literature. We hope to foster research in the field of case mix planning, which only lately has received growing attention despite its fundamental economic impact on hospitals.

  1. Alternate Futures for 2025: Security Planning to Avoid Surprise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Engelbrecht, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    .... The methodology details how the study participants identified the three drivers, created the strategic planning space, selected the worlds of interest, created the plausible histories, and developed...

  2. A Vision for the Future: Site-Based Strategic Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Jerry J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a model to help principals with strategic planning. Success hinges on involving stakeholders, scanning for relevant data, identifying critical success factors, developing vision and mission statements, analyzing the site manager's supports and constraints, creating strategic goals and objectives, developing action plans, allocating…

  3. An Experimental Evaluation of Competing Age-Predictions of Future Time Perspective between Workplace and Retirement Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Matthew J; Embretson, Susan E

    2017-01-01

    Future time perspective (FTP) is defined as "perceptions of the future as being limited or open-ended" (Lang and Carstensen, 2002; p. 125). The construct figures prominently in both workplace and retirement domains, but the age-predictions are competing: Workplace research predicts decreasing FTP age-change, in contrast, retirement scholars predict increasing FTP age-change. For the first time, these competing predictions are pitted in an experimental manipulation of subjective life expectancy (SLE). A sample of N = 207 older adults (age 45-60) working full-time (>30-h/week) were randomly assigned to SLE questions framed as either 'Live-to' or 'Die-by' to evaluate competing predictions for FTP. Results indicate general support for decreasing age-change in FTP, indicated by independent-sample t -tests showing lower FTP in the 'Die-by' framing condition. Further general-linear model analyses were conducted to test for interaction effects of retirement planning with experimental framings on FTP and intended retirement; While retirement planning buffered FTP's decrease, simple-effects also revealed that retirement planning increased intentions for sooner retirement, but lack of planning increased intentions for later retirement. Discussion centers on practical implications of our findings and consequences validity evidence in future empirical research of FTP in both workplace and retirement domains.

  4. Command and Control Planning and Teamwork: Exploring the Future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sterling, Bruce S; Lickteig, Carl W

    2000-01-01

    .... This paper examines how participant ratings of command and control planning and observer assessments of teamwork were related in a series of futuristic missions conducted by the Mounted Maneuver...

  5. Future plans for HEP computing in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballam, J.

    1985-06-01

    The computing requirements of the US HEP Community are set forth. These will be dominated in the next five years by the pantip (TEV I) and e + e - (SLC and CESR) experiments. The ensuing period will be almost completely driven by the data generated by the superconducting super collider (SSC). Plans for near term computing are presented along with speculations for the SSC. Brief descriptions of accelerator and theoretical physics plans are also presented

  6. Planning for the Future of Geo-Cybereducation: Outcomes of the Workshop, Challenges, and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.; Eriksson, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    Inspired by the recommendations of the NSF report “Fostering Learning in the Networked World: The Cyberlearning Opportunity and Challenge” (NSF08204), the NSF National STEM Digital Learning program funded “Planning for the Future of Geocybereducation” Workshop sought to bring together leaders from the geoscience education community, from major geoscience research initiatives, and from the growing public- and private-sector geoscience information community. The objectives of the workshop were to begin conversations aimed at identifying best practices and tools for geoscience cyber-education, in the context of both the changing nature of learners and of rapidly evolving geo-information platforms, and to provide guidance to the NSF as to necessary future directions and needs for funding. 65 participants met and interacted live for the two-day workshop, with ongoing post-meeting virtual interactions via a collaborative workspace (www.geocybered.ning.com). Topics addressed included the rapidly changing character of learners, the growing capabilities of geoscience information systems and their affiliated tools, and effective models for collaboration among educators, researchers and geoinformation specialists. Discussions at the meeting focused on the implications of changing learners on the educational process, the challenges for teachers and administrators in keeping pace, and on the challenges of communication among these divergent professional communities. Ongoing virtual discussions and collaborations have produced a draft workshop document, and the workshop conveners are maintaining the workshop site as a venue for ongoing discussion and interaction. Several key challenges were evident from the workshop discussions and subsequent interactions: a) the development of most of the large geoinformatics and geoscience research efforts were not pursued with education as a significant objective, resulting in limited financial support for such activities after the

  7. Planning for a Sustainable Future of the Cincinnati Union Terminal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-04-30

    The Cincinnati Museum Center invited a number of local stakeholders, political leaders, nationally and internationally recognized design professionals and the Design Team, that has been engaged to help shape the future of this remarkable resource, to work together in a Workshop that would begin to shape a truly sustainable future for both the Museum and its home, the Union Terminal, one of the most significant buildings in America. This report summarizes and highlights the discussions that took place during the Workshop and presents recommendations for shaping a direction and a framework for the future.

  8. Localization experience and future plan of NSLS primary components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Haesoo

    1992-01-01

    Korea Heavy Industries and Construction Company is planning to obtain technical self-reliance of the component design, manufacturing and installation of the NSLS primary components as much as the target of 87% by 1995 as indicated in the technical self-reliance plan by the Korea Electric Power Company in 1988. In order to achieve this target, Koch has been involved in the component design, manufacturing and project management of the NSLS components from the early stage of the Young 3 and 4 project. In parallel, Koch has increased the self-reliance of the various fields taking full advantage of the technical documents, computer codes, training and consultation supplied by the technology transfer agreement. This paper presents the re-evaluation of the current status of technical self reliance as well as the make up plan to be implemented during the UCH 3 and 4 project for the area identified as the weakness

  9. ATLAS Future Plans: Upgrade and the Physics with High Luminosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan S.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS experiment is planning a series of detector upgrades to cope with the planned increases in instantaneous luminosity and multiple interactions per crossing to maintain its physics capabilities. During the coming decade, the Large Hadron Collider will collide protons on protons at a center of mass energy up to 14 TeV with luminosities steadily increasing in a phased approach to over 5 × 1034 cm−2s−1. The resulting large data sets will significantly enhance the physics reach of the ATLAS detector building on the recent discovery of the Higgs-like boson. The planned detector upgrades being designed to cope with the increasing luminosity and its impact on the ATLAS physics program will be discussed.

  10. Nuclear disasters: current plans and future directions for oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    To show that there is a significant role for oncologists in the event of a terrorist nuclear disaster. Professionals need data on current political issues regarding a nuclear attack already put in place by the administration and the military. Review of what actually occurs during a fission bomb's explosion helps to point out what medical care will be most needed. The author contends that those trained in the oncologies could play a major part. Modern-day America. Potential civilian survivors. Large gaps noted in statewide disaster plans in the public domain. Oncologists must get involved now in disaster planning; statewide plans are necessary throughout the nation; the public needs to know the basics of what to do in the advent of a nuclear bomb explosion.

  11. Present status and future plans at the Bonn synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    The electron stretcher ring ELSA presently under construction in Bonn and the associated experimental equipment are described. The ring will deliver electron and photon beams with close to 100% duty cycle for experiments in elementary particle and photonuclear physics. (author)

  12. The Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil (RIBRAS) facility. Description, program, main results, future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Guimaraes, V. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) is a facility installed at the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo (IFUSP), Brazil. The RIBRAS system consists of two superconducting solenoids and uses the ''in-flight method'' to produce radioactive ion beams using the primary beam provided by the 8UD Pelletron Tandem of IFUSP. The ion beams produced so far by RIBRAS are {sup 6}He, {sup 8}Li, {sup 7}Be, {sup 10}Be, {sup 8}B, {sup 12}B with intensities that can vary from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} pps. Initially the experimental program covered the study of elastic and inelastic scattering with the objective to study the interaction potential and the reaction mechanisms between weakly bound (RIB) and halo ({sup 6}He and {sup 8}B) projectiles on light, medium and heavy mass targets. With highly purified beams, the study of resonant elastic scattering and resonant transfer reactions, using inverse kinematics and thick targets, has also been included in our experimental program. Also, transfer reactions of astrophysical interest and fusion reactions induced by halo nuclei are part of the near-future research program. Our recent results on elastic scattering, alpha-particle production and total reaction cross sections, as well as the resonant elastic and transfer reactions, are presented. Our plans for the near future are related to the installation of a new beam line and a cave for gamma-ray detection. We intend to place in operation a large area neutron detector available in our laboratory. The long-range plans could be the move of the RIBRAS system to the more energetic beam line of the LINAC post-accelerator (10MeV/nucleon primary beams) still in construction in our laboratory. (orig.)

  13. The Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil (RIBRAS) facility. Description, program, main results, future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lépine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Guimarães, V.

    2014-08-01

    RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) is a facility installed at the Institute of Physics of the University of São Paulo (IFUSP), Brazil. The RIBRAS system consists of two superconducting solenoids and uses the "in-flight method" to produce radioactive ion beams using the primary beam provided by the 8UD Pelletron Tandem of IFUSP. The ion beams produced so far by RIBRAS are 6He, 8Li, 7Be, 10Be, 8B, 12B with intensities that can vary from 104 to 106 pps. Initially the experimental program covered the study of elastic and inelastic scattering with the objective to study the interaction potential and the reaction mechanisms between weakly bound (RIB) and halo (6He and 8B projectiles on light, medium and heavy mass targets. With highly purified beams, the study of resonant elastic scattering and resonant transfer reactions, using inverse kinematics and thick targets, has also been included in our experimental program. Also, transfer reactions of astrophysical interest and fusion reactions induced by halo nuclei are part of the near-future research program. Our recent results on elastic scattering, alpha-particle production and total reaction cross sections, as well as the resonant elastic and transfer reactions, are presented. Our plans for the near future are related to the installation of a new beam line and a cave for gamma-ray detection. We intend to place in operation a large area neutron detector available in our laboratory. The long-range plans could be the move of the RIBRAS system to the more energetic beam line of the LINAC post-accelerator (10MeV/nucleon primary beams) still in construction in our laboratory.

  14. Developing a planning model to estimate future cash flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenbaum, L; Monahan, T F

    1988-03-01

    Financial managers are discovering that net income and other traditional measures of cash flow may not provide them with the flexibility needed for comprehensive internal planning and control. By using a discretionary cash flow model, financial managers have a forecasting tool that can help them measure anticipated cash flows, and make better decisions concerning financing alternatives, capital expansion, and performance appraisal.

  15. TIME TO CHANGE : The foreseeable future for water planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segrave, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The decisions people make, and the actions they take, depend on how they conceptualize and experience time. This fundamental and influential factor is seldom acknowledged, little understood, and rarely considered explicitly in planning; be that for the material systems or the knowledge systems in

  16. Righting Your Future: LRE Lesson Plans for Today and Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRADLE: Center for Research and Development in Law-Related Education, Winston-Salem, NC.

    A compilation of more than 50 lesson plans on law related education, these materials were written by middle school and high school teachers from around the United States. The lessons cover a broad range of topics including "DNA Fingerprints and the Constitutional Right to Privacy"; "Censorship and Book Banning in Public Schools"; "The Death…

  17. Will Schroedinger's cat be proved experimentally in near future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamm, D.

    1988-01-01

    The difference between a pure state, a statistically mixed state and the importance of interference in pure states are emphasized. Examples of quantum states are given where location, momentum or energy of a particle are not determined. As a model of a microscopic system a SQID is considered. Legget and Garg have derived inequalities analogous to the Bell's to decide experimentally if in a SQID at absolute zero temperature the magnetic flux is in a pure, i.e. indetermined state, or a statistically mixed state. Even if quantum mechanics is valid in macroscopic systems 'realism' need not to be abolished. (qui)

  18. Summary on experimental facilities and future developments at SINQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, G S [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    With 13 experimental facilities under construction to become available during the first year of SINQ operation, a nearly complete suite of options for users will be made available to carry out research with neutrons at PSI. Three more facilities are under design and will come on line somewhat later. To complete the suite, three more specialized instruments are being evaluated. SINQ being a novel neutron source concept, significant scope for improvement is also seen on the source side. It is a major goal of PSI to exploit these opportunities and to make - among others - use of neutron instruments to carry out the necessary research. (author) 9 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs.

  19. Experimental facilities for plate-out investigations and future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenchow, K.; Dederichs, H.; Iniotakis, N.; Sackmann, B.

    1981-01-01

    The safety of HTR under normal operation and accident conditions, the possibility of inspection, maintenance and repair or decontamination of single primary components as well as the safety of maintenance personnel are essentially determined by the transport- and deposition behaviour of the non gaseous fission - and activation products in the primary loop of the reactor. A comprehensive program has been started in 1969 in KFA in collaboration with various industrial firms and foreign institutions to investigate these problems. The program includes in-pile and out-pile experiments, simulating reactor conditions and also different laboratory experiments and extensive theoretical investigations. The aim of these efforts is to test experimentally the models and computercodes, which are used for prediction of transport and deposition behaviour of fission products for HTR's as well under normal as under accident conditions. Further more a verified dataset is to be established. In this paper a survey is given of the experimental facilities carried out by KFA or in cooperation with KFA

  20. Future Practice Plans of Orthodontic Postgraduate Residents in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjyot Singh Walia

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Indian Orthodontic programs would not find a shortage of full-time academicians in the future. Residents favor 35- to 36-month programs with a research-based component. Newer techniques, e.g. Digital Imaging, TAD, SLB are here to stay.

  1. Experimental tests of general relativity: recent progress and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turyshev, S G

    2009-01-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity is the standard theory of gravity, especially where the needs of astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics are concerned. As such, this theory is used for many practical purposes involving spacecraft navigation, geodesy, and time transfer. We review the foundations of general relativity, discuss recent progress in tests of relativistic gravity, and present motivations for the new generation of high-accuracy tests of new physics beyond general relativity. Space-based experiments in fundamental physics are presently capable of uniquely addressing important questions related to the fundamental laws of nature. We discuss the advances in our understanding of fundamental physics that are anticipated in the near future and evaluate the discovery potential of a number of recently proposed space-based gravitational experiments. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials: Recent Progress and Future Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Ray Johnson; Sidney Diamond

    2001-01-01

    The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program provides enabling materials technology for the U.S. DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program is based on an industry assessment and the technology roadmap for the OHVT. A five-year program plan was published in 2000. Major efforts in the program are materials for diesel engine fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, and air handling. Additional efforts include diesel engine valve-train materials, structural components, and thermal management. Advanced materials, including high-temperature metal alloys, intermetallics, cermets, ceramics, amorphous materials, metal- and ceramic-matrix composites, and coatings, are investigated for critical engine applications. Selected technical issues and planned and ongoing projects as well as brief summaries of several technical highlights are given

  3. Role of nuclear safety research and future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W. S.; Lee, J. I.; Kang, S. C.; Park, Y. W.; Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. W.; Lee, C. J.; Park, Y. I.

    2000-01-01

    For promoting and improving nuclear safety research activities, this report gives an insight on the scope of safety research and its role in the safety management of nuclear installations, and suggests measures to adequately utilize the research results through taking an optimized role share among research organizations. Several measures such as cooperative planning of common research areas and proper role assignment, improvement of the interfaces among researchers, and reflection of end-users' opinion in the course of planning and conducting research to promote application of research results are identified. It is expected that the identified measures will contribute to enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear safety research, if they are implemented after deliberating with the government and safety research organizations

  4. Academic visibility for urban planning and the webometric future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez Thomas W.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The author focuses on the analysis problems of the main metrics of scientific productivity for the faculty in the USA universities specializing in the investigations and teaching in the field of urban planning. The increasing role of the Internet is highlighted in the process of communicating the ideas of planning scientists to the professionals and public, extending the reach of academic communications and possibilities of estimating the quality of the investigations and impact. Using case study the methods of applying webometrics for citation analysis in the Internet are investigated. The analysis focused on the main criteria: productivity, visibility, reputation, and impact. The article proposes an expanded approach for estimating general scientific popularity and impact of academics in the Internet, which includes publication analysis in frames of “gray literature”, teaching and outreach activity, which may also be a significant part of the scientific activity. The author stated the importance of academic visibility estimation both for promotion, improving competitiveness of a faculty member on the labor market in the sphere of educational services, and for urban planning schools’ development in general, raising their reputation, prestige and impact, getting the opportunities for financed researches, consolidating the positions on the global educational and science market.

  5. Recent results from DIII-D and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent DIII-D tokamak experimental results, describes new hardware being implemented to carry out the DIII-D 1990's tokamak research program, and discusses their implications for engineering designs for next generation tokamaks, such as ITER

  6. 1990-1991 Marketing Plan. Year II: Planning To Meet the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcott, Frances; And Others

    In Maryland, Catonsville Community College's (CCC) 1990-91 marketing plan deals with the community's perceptions of the institution and strategies to improve CCC's image. Both the 1989-90 and 1990-91 plans targeted the same markets for special recruitment strategies; i.e., high school graduates with transfer plans, part-time adult students,…

  7. Energy future Santa Cruz. A citizens plan for energy self-reliance: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, J.; Stayton, R.

    A grassroots energy conservation project which involved more than 3100 residents of Santa Cruz, California, is discussed. Citizens attended forums and town meetings to suggest ideas for solving the community's energy problems. These ideas were then evaluated by the Energy Future Advisory Board and compiled into the Energy Future Plan. The plan covers such topics as new residences, residential retrofit, automobile efficiency, farm efficiency, commercial greenhouses, local food production, commercial efficiency, land use planning, energy eduction and financing, and solar, wind, and ocean energy. If the plan is successfully implemented, the energy that the community is projected to use in 1991 can be lowered by 24 to 35 percent.

  8. SLC status and SLAC [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1989-08-01

    In this presentation, I shall discuss the linear collider program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as it is now, and as we hope to see it evolve over the next few years. Of greatest interest to the high energy accelerator physics community gathered here is the development of the linear collider concept, and so I shall concentrate most of this paper on a discussion of the present status and future evolution of the SLC. I will also briefly discuss the research and development program that we are carrying out aimed at the realization of the next generation of high-energy linear colliders. SLAC had a major colliding-beam storage-ring program as well, including present rings and design studies on future high-luminosity projects, but time constraints preclude a discussion of them. 8 figs., 3 tabs

  9. ESA remote-sensing programme - Present activities and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevin, J [ESA, Directorate of Planning and Future Programmes, Paris, France; Pryke, I [ESA, Directorate of Applications Programmes, Toulouse, France

    1979-02-01

    The present activities and future missions of the ESA program of spaceborne remote sensing of earth resources and environment are discussed. Program objectives have been determined to be the satisfaction of European regional needs by agricultural, land use, water resources, coastal and polar surveys, and meeting the requirements of developing nations in the areas of agricultural production, mineral exploration and disaster warning and assessment. The Earthnet system of data processing centers presently is used for the distribution of remote sensing data acquired by NASA satellites. Remote sensing experiments to be flown aboard Spacelab are the Metric Camera, to test high resolution mapping capabilities of a large format camera, and the Microwave Remote-Sensing Experiment, which operates as a two-frequency scatterometer, a synthetic aperture radar and a passive microwave radiometer. Studies carried out on the definition of future remote sensing satellite systems are described, including studies of system concepts for land applications and coastal monitoring satellites.

  10. Problems of future energy market planning and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelek, V.; Jaluvka, D.

    2007-01-01

    Probable development of energy market is described in the article and special attention is devoted to the nuclear energy, which not only consume, but also produce raw material and how to proceed to avoid crises in supply. Problems of future energy supply of heat, liquid fuel, electricity are described. Expected effect will be jump in prices or regulated supply to equalize supply and use. It can completely change our standard consideration of profit

  11. New Strategic Plan Takes the ALS into the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirz, J.; Chemla, D. S.; Feinberg, B.; Krebs, G. F.; Padmore, H. A.; Robin, D. S.; Robinson, A. L.; Smith, N. V.; Warwick, T.; Hussain, Z.

    2007-01-01

    A new strategic plan is in place to upgrade the ALS so it can continue to address fundamental questions, such as size-dependent and dimensional-confinement phenomena at the nanoscale; correlation and complexity in physical, biological, and environmental systems; and temporal evolution, assembly, dynamics and ultrafast phenomena. Moreover, the growing number of ALS users (now exceeding 2,000 per year) requires increased attention. Accordingly, our plan concentrates on projects that will continue to make it possible for ALS users to address grand scientific and technological challenges with incisive world-class tools and quality user support. Our highest priority is to begin top-off operation, in which electrons are injected into the storage ring at intervals of approximately 1 minute. The combination of top-off and concurrent development of small-gap in-vacuum undulators and superconducting undulators will allow an increase in brightness from eight to more than 100 times, depending on the specific undulators and photon energy range. As part of our core mission in the VUV and soft x-ray regions, we plan to exploit these accelerator developments to extend our capabilities for high spatial and temporal resolution and utilize the remarkable coherence properties of the ALS in a new generation of beamlines. Ranked by priority, several proposed beamlines will follow completion of five new beamlines already under construction or funded. The intellectual excitement of the ALS has been a powerful tool in the recruitment and retention of outstanding staff, but additional sustained efforts are required to increase diversity both in gender and in underrepresented groups. To this end, we intend to expand the ALS Doctoral Fellowship Program by giving special emphasis to underrepresented groups. We also envision a distinguished postdoctoral fellowship program with the same emphasis, to increase and diversify our pool of candidates for beamline scientist positions

  12. New Strategic Plan Takes the ALS into the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirz, J.; Chemla, D.S.; Feinberg, B.; Hussain, Z.; Krebs, G.F.; Padmore, H.A.; Robin, D.S.; Robinson, A.L.; Smith, N.V.; Warwick, T.

    2006-01-01

    A new strategic plan is in place to upgrade the ALS so it can continue to address fundamental questions, such as size-dependent and dimensional-confinement phenomena at the nanoscale; correlation and complexity in physical, biological, and environmental systems; and temporal evolution, assembly, dynamics and ultrafast phenomena. Moreover, the growing number of ALS users (now exceeding 2,000 per year) requires increased attention. Accordingly, our plan concentrates on projects that will continue to make it possible for ALS users to address grand scientific and technological challenges with incisive world-class tools and quality user support. Our highest priority is to begin top-off operation, in which electrons are injected into the storage ring at intervals of approximately 1 minute. The combination of top-off and concurrent development of small-gap in-vacuum undulators and superconducting undulators will allow an increase in brightness from eight to more than 100 times, depending on the specific undulators and photon energy range. As part of our core mission in the VUV and soft x-ray regions, we plan to exploit these accelerator developments to extend our capabilities for high spatial and temporal resolution and utilize the remarkable coherence properties of the ALS in a new generation of beamlines. Ranked by priority, several proposed beamlines will follow completion of five new beamlines already under construction or funded. The intellectual excitement of the ALS has been a powerful tool in the recruitment and retention of outstanding staff, but additional sustained efforts are required to increase diversity both in gender and in under represented groups. To this end, we intend to expand the ALS Doctoral Fellowship Program by giving special emphasis to under represented groups. We also envision a distinguished postdoctoral fellowship program with the same emphasis, to increase and diversify our pool of candidates for beamline scientist positions

  13. Decompression to altitude: assumptions, experimental evidence, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Philip P; Butler, Bruce D

    2009-02-01

    Although differences exist, hypobaric and hyperbaric exposures share common physiological, biochemical, and clinical features, and their comparison may provide further insight into the mechanisms of decompression stress. Although altitude decompression illness (DCI) has been experienced by high-altitude Air Force pilots and is common in ground-based experiments simulating decompression profiles of extravehicular activities (EVAs) or astronauts' space walks, no case has been reported during actual EVAs in the non-weight-bearing microgravity environment of orbital space missions. We are uncertain whether gravity influences decompression outcomes via nitrogen tissue washout or via alterations related to skeletal muscle activity. However, robust experimental evidence demonstrated the role of skeletal muscle exercise, activities, and/or movement in bubble formation and DCI occurrence. Dualism of effects of exercise, positive or negative, on bubble formation and DCI is a striking feature in hypobaric exposure. Therefore, the discussion and the structure of this review are centered on those highlighted unresolved topics about the relationship between muscle activity, decompression, and microgravity. This article also provides, in the context of altitude decompression, an overview of the role of denitrogenation, metabolic gases, gas micronuclei, stabilization of bubbles, biochemical pathways activated by bubbles, nitric oxide, oxygen, anthropometric or physiological variables, Doppler-detectable bubbles, and potential arterialization of bubbles. These findings and uncertainties will produce further physiological challenges to solve in order to line up for the programmed human return to the Moon, the preparation for human exploration of Mars, and the EVAs implementation in a non-zero gravity environment.

  14. Nanomedicine and experimental tuberculosis: facts, flaws, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rajesh; Ahmad, Zahoor

    2011-06-01

    Nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems form the crux of nanomedicine and are suitable for targeting chronic diseases such as tuberculosis. Extensive experimental data supports the possibility of intermittent chemotherapy with key first-line as well as second-line antituberculosis drugs by employing synthetic or natural carriers, chiefly polymers. Besides sustained release of drugs in plasma and organs, other potential advantages of the system include the possibility of selecting various routes of chemotherapy; reduction in drug dosage, adverse effects, and drug interactions; and targeting drug-resistant and latent bacteria. On the other hand, the choice of carrier, large-scale production, stability, and toxicity of the formulation are some of the major issues that merit immediate attention and resolution. Nevertheless, keeping in view the hurdles in new antituberculosis drug development, nanomedicine has provided a sound platform and a ray of hope for an onslaught against tuberculosis. Tuberculosis remains a major public health concern worldwide. In this paper, the role and significance of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems are discussed for targeting tuberculosis, including strains that are drug resistant with conventional methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lithuanian female physicists: Reality and plans for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šatkovskienė, Dalia; Giriunienė, Ramutė; Ruželė, Živilė; Rutkunienė, Živilė

    2013-03-01

    Changes in the issue of women in physics in Lithuanian in the three years since the 3rd IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics are discussed on the basis of statistics as well as an exploratory study recently conducted among women physicists. The situation has changed slowly since 2008. However, the study shows that women physicists more clearly understand the inequities and the need for changes, including an active European Union mainstreaming policy targeted to ensure gender equality in the sciences, which gives hope for accelerating changes. Continued plans for improving women physicists' situation in Lithuania are discussed.

  16. Radwaste management in the UK - present status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyre, B.

    1991-01-01

    In 1976, the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, chaired by Lord Flowers, undertook a thorough review of the status of radioactive waste management in the United Kingdom (UK). Its report became the stimulus which launched a new programme of strategic and technical work to establish a total system plan for the processing, storage, transport and disposal of all radioactive wastes in the UK. This article, which describes the evolution of the programme, is the basis of the presentation to the Korean nuclear industry earlier this year by the Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive of AEA Technology. (author)

  17. Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. Discovering Sustainable Solutions to Power and Secure America’s Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2010-09-01

    Sustainability is fundamental to the Department of Energy’s research mission and operations as reflected in the Department’s Strategic Plan. Our overarching mission is to discover the solutions to power and secure America’s future.

  18. Highways of the future : a strategic plan for highway infrastructure research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This Highways of the FutureA Strategic Plan for Highway Infrastructure Research and Development was developed in response to a need expressed by the staff of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Office of Infrastructure Research and Developme...

  19. Westinghouse accident tolerant fuel program. Current results and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sumit; Xu, Peng; Lahoda, Edward; Hallstadius, Lars; Boylan, Frank [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Hopkins, SC (United States)

    2016-07-15

    This paper discusses the current status, results from initial tests, as well as the future direction of the Westinghouse's Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) program. The current preliminary testing is addressed that is being performed on these samples at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test reactor, initial results from these tests, as well as the technical learning from these test results. In the Westinghouse ATF approach, higher density pellets play a significant role in the development of an integrated fuel system.

  20. Nuclear physics at PEP: First test and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Bibber, K.; Dietrich, F.S.; Melnikoff, S.O.

    1986-09-01

    A test run of internal target nuclear physics at the PEP storage ring is described. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC-2γ detector) was used to detect the inelastically scattered electron and complete hadronic final state in the interaction of 14.5 GeV electrons with D 2 , Ar and Xe gas targets. The data comprise mostly low-x low-Q 2 events, but some deep inelastic scattering as well. The future possibilities of a dedicated nuclear physics program at PEP are outlined. 15 refs., 25 figs

  1. Personalized medicine: CCO's vision, accomplishments and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jennifer; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Rutherford, Michael; Hart, Jennifer; Melamed, Saul; Pollett, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is a rapidly expanding field, with the potential to improve patient care. Its benefits include increasing efficiency in cancer screening, diagnosis and treatment through early detection, targeted therapy and identifying individuals with an underlying genetic risk for cancer or adverse outcomes. Through the work of Cancer Care Ontario (CCO)'s Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Program, a number of initiatives have been undertaken to support developments in personalized medicine. In keeping with the momentum of recent accomplishments, CCO has led the formation of the Personalized Medicine Steering Committee to develop a comprehensive provincial genetics strategy for the future of cancer care. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  2. Achievement and future plan on plutonium use in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Kunihiko

    1998-05-01

    The plutonium recycle option has been supported from the early stage of nuclear development by Japanese Government because of the very weak structure of energy supplying system. Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has been developing the plutonium recycling technology such as fast breeder reactor, MOX fuel fabrication and reprocessing technologies based on the decision of the government. The paper describes the obtained result of technical development and the future R and D program in the field of plutonium recycle. (J.P.N.)

  3. The ATLAS Trigger: Recent Experience and Future Plans

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    This paper will give an overview of the ATLAS trigger design and its innovative features. It will describe the valuable experience gained in running the trigger reconstruction and event selection in the fastchanging environment of the detector commissioning during 2008. It will also include a description of the trigger selection menu and its 2009 deployment plan from first collisions to the nominal luminosity. ATLAS is one of the two general-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The trigger system needs to efficiently reject a large rate of background events and still select potentially interesting ones with high efficiency. After a first level trigger implemented in custom electronics, the trigger event selection is made by the High Level Trigger (HLT) system, implemented in software. To reduce the processing time to manageable levels, the HLT uses seeded, step-wise and fast selection algorithms, aiming at the earliest possible rejection of background events. The ATLAS trigger event selection...

  4. Australia's master plan for uranium: questions still cloud the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Although the Australian Government has given the long-awaited green light for mining and export of uranium, potential uranium producers will have to battle a welter of red tape before the production outlook from the 1980s on becomes clear. An extensive number of bureaucratic agencies must be established before site work can begin. However, it now seems reasonably certain that by the mid-1980s Australian uranium mines will be producing 10,000 to 15,000 mtpy of uranium oxide. After that, production should grow rapidly, given the government's optimism about longer term market prospects. In the months ahead the government will assess the levels of international demand to be expected in coming years and will plan production and sales to meet those needs. Uranium deposits developed so far are described briefly

  5. STS operations planning - Current status and outlook for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to the status of Space Shuttle operations planning and outlook for the period 1982-94, with some speculations on Shuttle-related space operations early in the next century. Attention is given to the evolution of Shuttle payload capabilities over the next five years. The following list of near-earth environment factors to be exploited by the Space Shuttle is given: (1) easy control of gravity; (2) absence of atmosphere; (3) a comprehensive view of the earth's surface and atmosphere; (4) isolation of hazardous processes from earth biosphere; (5) freely available light, heat and photovoltaic power; (6) an infinite natural reservoir for the disposal of radioactive waste products; and (7) a super-cold heat sink.

  6. The Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project: Experiences and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D.E.; Lego, A.J.; Clifford, A.E.

    1995-12-31

    Fully operational in June of 1994, the Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project was started to gain insight into the costs and benefits of providing ISDN service to the homes of Fermilab researchers. Fourteen users were chosen from throughout Fermilab, but the number of Fermilab-employed spouses pushed the total user count to 20. Each home was equipped with a basic rate ISDN (BRI) line, a BRI Ethernet half-bridge, and an NT-1. An inter-departmental team coordinated the project. Usage at each home was tracked and frequent surveys were attempted. Lessons learned include: working with Ameritech can be difficult; careful monitoring is essential; and configuration of home computing equipment is very time consuming. Plans include moving entirely to primary rate ISDN hubs, support for different home ISDN equipment and better usage and performance tracking.

  7. The Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project: Experiences and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.E.; Lego, A.J.; Clifford, A.E.

    1995-01-01

    Fully operational in June of 1994, the Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project was started to gain insight into the costs and benefits of providing ISDN service to the homes of Fermilab researchers. Fourteen users were chosen from throughout Fermilab, but the number of Fermilab-employed spouses pushed the total user count to 20. Each home was equipped with a basic rate ISDN (BRI) line, a BRI Ethernet half-bridge, and an NT-1. An inter-departmental team coordinated the project. Usage at each home was tracked and frequent surveys were attempted. Lessons learned include: working with Ameritech can be difficult; careful monitoring is essential; and configuration of home computing equipment is very time consuming. Plans include moving entirely to primary rate ISDN hubs, support for different home ISDN equipment and better usage and performance tracking

  8. The Fermilab ISDN pilot project: experiences and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.E.; Lego, A.J.; Clifford, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fully operational in June of 1994, the Fermilab ISDN Pilot Project was started to gain insight into the costs and benefits of providing ISDN service to the homes of Fermilab researchers. Fourteen were chosen from throughout Fermilab, but the number of Fermilab-employed spouses pushed the total user count to 20. each home was equipped with a basic rate ISDN (BRI) Ethernet half-bridge, and an NT-1. An inter-departmental team coordinated the project. Usage at each home was tracked and frequent surveys were attempted. Lessons learned include: working with Ameritech can be difficult; careful monitoring is essential; and configuration of home computing equipment is very time consuming. Plans include moving entirely to primary rate ISDN hubs, support for different home ISDN equipment and better usage and performance tracking. (author)

  9. Future plans for the Imperial College CONSORT research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Imperial College (IC) research reactor was designed jointly by GEC and the IC Mechanical Engineering Department. It first went critical on 9 April 1965 and has been operating successfully for over 33 years. The reactor provides a service to both academia and industry for neutron activation analysis, reactor and applied nuclear physics training, neutron detector calibration, isotope production and irradiations. The reactor has strategic importance for the UK, as it is now the only remaining research reactor in the country. It is therefore important to put in place refurbishment programmes and to maintain and upgrade the safety case. This paper describes the current facilities, applications and users of the research reactor and outlines both the recent and the planned developments. (author)

  10. The Submillimeter Array – current status and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Raymond

    2018-01-01

    The current SMA receiver systems were designed in the mid-1990s and have been operating for more than fifteen years. With regular upgrades to receivers, deployment of the SWARM correlator, expansion of the IF signal transport bandwidth via improvements to the analog IF signal processing hardware, and many other enhancements, the SMA currently greatly outperforms its original specifications in terms of sensitivity, instantaneous bandwidth, and availability of observing modes such as full-Stokes polarization and dual frequency operation.We have recently started to implement a three-year instrument upgrade plan, which we are calling the wSMA. The wSMA will offer even wider bandwidth operation than the current SMA and improved sensitivity. The major subsystems that will form the wSMA include significantly improved, dual polarization receiver cartridges housed in a new cryostat; local oscillator units incorporating modern mm-wave technology; an upgraded signal transmission system; and a further expansion of the SWARM correlator. The cryostat will be cooled by a low-maintenance pulse-tube cryocooler. Two dual-polarization receiver cartridges will cover approximately the same sky frequencies as the current receiver sets; the low-band receiver will be fed by an LO unit covering 210-270 GHz, and the high-band receiver will be fed by an LO covering 280-360 GHz. With a receiver IF band of 4-20 GHz, this will enable continuous sky frequency coverage from 190 GHz to 380 GHz.Details of the upgrade plans will be presented together with a discussion of scientific opportunities afforded by this upgrade, which, once implemented, will enable the SMA to continue to produce the highest quality science throughout the next decade.

  11. Sustainable winter cities: Future directions for planning, policy and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Norman E. P.

    Attempts to generate a "climate-responsive" northern urban form are part of a relatively recent phenomenon and field of investigation. In conjunction with the international "winter cities" movement, the need has been established for explicit, systematic inquiry directed toward national and local action to improve the comfort and lifestyles of all northern inhabitants. It is important to recognize that winter-induced discomforts exist and that they must be acknowledged in planning theory and practice. For northern cities to function more satisfactorily, the negative impacts of winter must be reduced while its beneficial characteristics are enhanced. While not all summer activities can or should be abandoned during winter, proper micro-climatic control is essential if human life is to be retained outside. The outdoor season should be extended since so much indoor isolation occurs. The main principles to be incorporated in exemplary "winter city" design should be contact with nature, year-round usability, user participation, cultural continuity, and the creation of comfortable micro-climatic conditions throughout much of the city's open spaces. All valuable sources of inspiration must be harnessed in the attempt to mediate between organic regionalism and internationalism, on the one hand, and romanticism and pragmatic realism, on the other. Creating optimum conditions for human well-being, habitation, work and intellectual development in each of the four seasons is vital under harsh environments. Adopting a climate-sensitive approach to planning policy and urban design can render everyday life less stressful, especially during the lengthy winter periods found in many northern latitude and high altitude settings.

  12. SAGES climate survey: results and strategic planning for our future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telem, Dana A; Qureshi, Alia; Edwards, Michael; Jones, Daniel B

    2018-03-30

    While SAGES prides itself on diversity and inclusivity, we also recognize that as an organization we are not impervious to blind spots impacting equity within the membership. To address this, the We R Sages task force was formed to identify the barriers and facilitators to creating a diverse organization and develop a strategic plan for the implementation of programing and opportunities that promote diversity and inclusivity within our membership. As the first step in the process, a survey was administered to gauge the current organizational climate. In September of 2017, a validated climate survey was administered to 704 SAGES committee members via SurveyMonkey®. Climate was assessed on: overall SAGES experience, consideration of leaving the organization, mentorship within the organization, resources and opportunities within the organization, and attitudes and experiences within the organization. Additional free text responses were encouraged to generate qualitative themes. The survey response rate was 52.1% (n = 367). Respondent self-identified demographics were: male (73%), white (63%), heterosexual (95.5%), and non-disabled (98%). Average overall satisfaction was 8.1/10. 12.5% of respondents had considered leaving the organization and 74.4% had not identified a formal mentor within the organization. Average agreement with equitable distribution of resources and opportunities was 5.8/10. 93.6% of respondents had not experienced bias within the organization. Overall SAGES has a very positive climate; however, several key issues were identified from the quantitative survey as well as the free text responses. Strategic planning to address issues of membership recruitment, committee engagement, advancement transparency, diversity awareness, leadership development, and formal mentorship are being implemented.

  13. MATLAB platform for Monte Carlo planning and dosimetry experimental evaluation; Plataforma Matlab para planificacion Monte Carlo y evaluacion dosimetrica experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeza, J. A.; Ureba, A.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Pereira-Barbeiro, A. R.; Leal, A.

    2013-07-01

    A new platform for the full Monte Carlo planning and an independent experimental evaluation that it can be integrated into clinical practice. The tool has proved its usefulness and efficiency and now forms part of the flow of work of our research group, the tool used for the generation of results, which are to be suitably revised and are being published. This software is an effort of integration of numerous algorithms of image processing, along with planning optimization algorithms, allowing the process of MCTP planning from a single interface. In addition, becomes a flexible and accurate tool for the evaluation of experimental dosimetric data for the quality control of actual treatments. (Author)

  14. Advancement of remote systems technology: past perspectives and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.J.; Hamel, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    In the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past five years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of admissible remote tasks and increasing remote work efficiency. The motivation and justification for the program are discussed by surveying the 40 years of remote operating experience which exists and considering the essential features of various old and new philosophies which have been, or are being, used in remote engineering. A future direction based upon the Remotex concept is explained, and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems capability is feasible through advanced technology. 9 references, 5 figures

  15. Advancement of remote systems technology: past perspectives and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.J.; Hamel, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    In the Fuel Recycle Division, Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past five years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of admissible remote tasks and increasing remote work efficiency. The motivation and justification for the program are discussed by surveying the 40 years of remote operating experience which exists and considering the essential features of various old and new philosophies which have been, or are being, used in remote engineering. A future direction based upon the Teletec concept is explained, and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems capability is feasible through advanced technology. 20 references, 9 figures, 1 table

  16. Advancement of remote technology: past perspectives and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.J.; Hamel, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    In the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past five years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of admissible remote tasks and increasing remote work efficiency. The motivation and justification for the program are discussed by surveying the 40 years of remote operating experience which exists and considering the essential features of various old and new philosophies which have been, or are being, used in remote engineering. A future direction based upon the Remotex concept is explained, and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems capability is feasible through advanced technology. 20 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  17. Advancement of remote technology: past perspectives and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.J.; Hamel, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    In the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past five years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of admissible remote tasks and increasing remote work efficiency. The motivation and justification for the program are discussed by surveying the 40 years of remote operating experience which exists and considering the essential features of various old and new philosophies which have been, or are being, used in remote engineering. A future direction based upon the Remotex concept is explained, and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems capability is feasible through advanced technology. 20 references, 9 figures, 1 table

  18. Planning for the future workforce in hematology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkowitz, Janis L.; Coller, Barry S.; DiMichele, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    The medical research and training enterprise in the United States is complex in both its scope and implementation. Accordingly, adaptations to the associated workforce needs present particular challenges. This is particularly true for maintaining or expanding national needs for physician-scientists where training resource requirements and competitive transitional milestones are substantial. For the individual, these phenomena can produce financial burden, prolong the career trajectory, and significantly influence career pathways. Hence, when national data suggest that future medical research needs in a scientific area may be met in a less than optimal manner, strategies to expand research and training capacity must follow. This article defines such an exigency for research and training in nonneoplastic hematology and presents potential strategies for addressing these critical workforce needs. The considerations presented herein reflect a summary of the discussions presented at 2 workshops cosponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the American Society of Hematology. PMID:25758827

  19. Advancement of remote systems technology: past perspectives and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, W.R.; Feldman, M.J.

    1984-04-01

    In the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past five years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of admissible remote tasks and increasing remote work efficiency. The motivation and justification for the program are discussed by surveying the 40 years of remote operating experience which exists and considering the essential features of various old and new philosophies which have been, or are being, used in remote engineering. A future direction based upon the Remotex concept is explained, and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems capability is feasible through advanced technology. 20 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  20. SPIRAL at GANIL: Latest Results and Plans for the Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.; Eleon, C.; Alves-Conde, R.; Angelique, J.C.; Barue, C.; Canet, C.; Dubois, M.; Dupuis, M.; Flambard, J.L.; Gaubert, G.; Jardin, P.; Lecesne, N.; Leherissier, P.; Lemagnen, F.; Leroy, R.; Maunoury, L.; Pacquet, J.Y.; Pellemoine, F.; Saint-Laurent, M.G.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The first accelerated exotic beam of the SPIRAL (Production System of Radioactive Ion and Acceleration On-Line) facility at GANIL at Caen has been delivered for experiments in September 2001. After working for almost 5 years, 32 experiments were performed in the facility using exotic isotopes of helium, oxygen, neon, argon and krypton. The intensities of the radioactive beams increased since the first beam was delivered. Nominal intensity values are achieved for most of noble gas beams. Developments of new beams as well as the increasing of present intensities for a number of isotopes are being undertaken. In particular, in this contribution it is presented the first results obtained for the production of light alkali beams. Other developments are also envisaged in the close future

  1. Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education. 2016 National Education Technology Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The National Education Technology Plan is the flagship educational technology policy document for the United States. The 2016 Plan, "Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education," articulates a vision of equity, active use, and collaborative leadership to make everywhere, all-the-time learning possible. While…

  2. ELearning Strategic Planning 2020: The Voice of Future Students as Stakeholders in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Glenn; Smart, Vicky

    2013-01-01

    Most universities are undertaking information technology (IT) strategic planning. The development of those plans often includes the voices of academics and sometimes engages alumni and current students. However, few engage and acknowledge the voice of future students. This paper is situated within the "Griffith University 2020 Strategic…

  3. Mercury flow tests (first report). Wall friction factor measurement tests and future tests plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Haga, Katsuhiro; Hino, Ryutaro; Sudo, Yukio

    1999-07-01

    In the neutron science project at JAERI, we plan to inject a pulsed proton beam of a maximum power of 5 MW from a high intense proton accelerator into a mercury target in order to produce high energy neutrons of a magnitude of ten times or more than existing facilities. The neutrons produced by the facility will be utilized for advanced field of science such as the life sciences etc. An urgent issue in order to accomplish this project is the establishment of mercury target technology. With this in mind, a mercury experimental loop with the capacity to circulate mercury up to 15 L/min was constructed to perform thermal hydraulic tests, component tests and erosion characteristic tests. A measurement of the wall friction factor was carried out as a first step of the mercury flow tests, while testing the characteristic of components installed in the mercury loop. This report presents an outline of the mercury loop and experimental results of the wall friction factor measurement. From the wall friction factor measurement, it was made clear that the wettability of the mercury was improved with an increase of the loop operation time and at the same time the wall friction factors were increased. The measured wall friction factors were much lower than the values calculated by the Blasius equation at the beginning of the loop operation because of wall slip caused by a non-wetted condition. They agreed well with the values calculated by the Blasius equation within a deviation of 10% when the sum of the operation time increased more than 11 hours. This report also introduces technical problems with a mercury circulation and future tests plan indispensable for the development of the mercury target. (author)

  4. Identifying the Correlates and Barriers of Future Planning among Parents of Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan; Arnold, Catherine; Owen, Aleksa

    2018-01-01

    Although individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are living longer lives, fewer than half of parents of individuals with IDD conduct future planning. The correlates and barriers to future planning must be identified to develop targeted interventions to facilitate future planning. In this study, 388 parents of individuals…

  5. Requirements for advanced decision support tools in future distribution network planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grond, M.O.W.; Morren, J.; Slootweg, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the need and requirements for advanced decision support tools in future network planning from a distribution network operator perspective. The existing tools will no longer be satisfactory for future application due to present developments in the electricity sector that increase

  6. The JPEG XT suite of standards: status and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Thomas; Bruylants, Tim; Schelkens, Peter; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2015-09-01

    The JPEG standard has known an enormous market adoption. Daily, billions of pictures are created, stored and exchanged in this format. The JPEG committee acknowledges this success and spends continued efforts in maintaining and expanding the standard specifications. JPEG XT is a standardization effort targeting the extension of the JPEG features by enabling support for high dynamic range imaging, lossless and near-lossless coding, and alpha channel coding, while also guaranteeing backward and forward compatibility with the JPEG legacy format. This paper gives an overview of the current status of the JPEG XT standards suite. It discusses the JPEG legacy specification, and details how higher dynamic range support is facilitated both for integer and floating-point color representations. The paper shows how JPEG XT's support for lossless and near-lossless coding of low and high dynamic range images is achieved in combination with backward compatibility to JPEG legacy. In addition, the extensible boxed-based JPEG XT file format on which all following and future extensions of JPEG will be based is introduced. This paper also details how the lossy and lossless representations of alpha channels are supported to allow coding transparency information and arbitrarily shaped images. Finally, we conclude by giving prospects on upcoming JPEG standardization initiative JPEG Privacy & Security, and a number of other possible extensions in JPEG XT.

  7. Problems of future energy market planning and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir Lelek; David Jaluvka

    2007-01-01

    Problems of future energy supply in the form, which is demanded - heat, liquid fuel, electricity - are described. There are several factors, which probably could be studied separately: technology and its sustain ability with respect to the raw materials resources, long time for capacity construction, for some form of energy even absence of sufficiently deep technology knowledge and model of prices. Prices are specially peculiar problem - they could be very different from the standard approach (investment, operation and maintenance, fuel, profit), if there are market instabilities and you are not able to supply market by the demanded amount form of energy with the consequences on production. Expected effect will be jump in prices or regulated supply to equalize supply and use. Such situation will be until the new capacities are put into operation or new technologies of production are established - it could be time about ten or more years and this can completely change our standard consideration of profit. The main profit will be to avoid losses and unemployment. Also concept of local or domestic raw material resources could be changed - in the free market your resources will be sold to those paying more. Probable development of energy market is described in the article and special attention is devoted to the nuclear energy, which not only consume, but also produce raw material and how to proceed to avoid crises in supply. Contemporary understanding of the problem does not enable to formulate it strictly as mathematical optimization task (Authors)

  8. Development, operating experience and future plan of ABWR in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujihara, N.

    2001-01-01

    construction at Hamaoka unit No. 5, Shika unit No. 2, and in plan at Ohma unit No. 1, Shimane unit No. 3. TEPCO is now progressing cost reduction of ABWR with other Japanese utilities. The most significant point is standardization. And we also plan to adopt some design improvements. By using these measures, TEPCO intends a 30% cost reduction of our next ABWR plants, compared with Kashiwazaki-Kariwa No. 6 and 7 of ABWR first plant. We would like to further develop ABWR for moreover cost reduction. And we start to develop ABWR-II as a large-scale (1700 MW(e)) next generation reactor with the aim to commence plant operation in the late 2010s. (author)

  9. Succession Planning and Management: The Backbone of the Radiology Group's Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, E Michael; Gridley, Daniel; Ulreich, Sidney; Bluth, Edward I

    2017-01-01

    The transition of leadership within radiology practices is often not a planned replacement process with formal development of potential future leaders. To ensure their ongoing success, however, practices need to develop comprehensive succession plans that include a robust developmental program for potential leaders consisting of mentoring, coaching, structured socialization, 360-degree feedback, developmental stretch assignments, job rotation, and formal education. Succession planning and leadership development will be necessary in the future for a practice to be successful in its business relationships and to be financially viable. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy future Santa Cruz: A citizens' plan for energy self-reliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, J.; Stayton, R.

    The results of a grassroots energy conservation project which involved more than 3,100 residents of Santa Cruz, California, is discussed. Citizens attended forums and town meetings to suggest ideas for solving the community's energy problems. These ideas were then evaluated by the Energy Future Advisory Board and compiled into the Energy Future Plan. The energy plan covers such topics as new residences, residential retrofit, automobile efficiency, farm efficiency, commercial greenhouses, local food production, commercial efficiency, land use planning, energy education and financing, and solar, wind, and ocean energy. An energy implementation guide and glossary are included.

  11. RSG-GAS. Current and strategic plan of future activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antariksawan, Anhar R; Tarigan, A [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN), Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2012-03-15

    The Multi Purpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy, so-called RSG-GAS, is the third research reactor built in Indonesia and operated by National Nuclear Energy of Indonesia (BATAN). This MTR type reactor achieved its first criticality in July 1987. Since then it has been operated about 77.300 hours. It uses LEU fuel in the form of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al at the beginning, but then converted to silicide fuel, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al by a density of 2.96 g/cm{sup 3} preserving its nominal power of 30 MW and average flux of 2.5x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} sec. In the last two years the reactor is operated more than 3.500 hours per year. Several equipments have been refurbished due to ageing. The reactor is operated mainly for serving radioisotopes production, neutron activation analysis (NAA), neutron beam experiments and general irradiation for research and development activities. The future activities of the RSG-GAS reactor will be prioritized first on increasing the reliability and availability of the reactor operation to assure the fulfillment of the demand of the isotope production, along with the improvement of neutron beam instruments and NAA facilities to increase its utilization. In this context, the collaboration in the utilization of RSG-GAS for many application with the countries in the region is also expected. The human resource development for the new recruited RSG-GAS staff is also a challenge and become a priority. (author)

  12. Corporate strategy and viable future land use: Planning for closure from the outset of mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warhurst, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the environmental impact of mining on viable future land use and underlines the imperative of improved environmental management and closure planning. It argues that pollution prevention, through planning for closure, can lead to cost-effective strategies for sustainable minerals development and viable future land use. This seems to be most true for greenfield sites since, generally, the earlier closure planning and pollution prevention is built into a project, the more cost-effective and environmentally benign closure will be. Further, for greenfield sites, pollution prevention techniques can be employed from the outset, at the stages of exploration and mine development, and then monitored and improved through the operation stage to closure, and can be kept in place to manage future land use. The paper discusses how global changes in the industry, following the liberalisation of investment regimes, and mergers and strategic alliances between key firms, has, by virtue of the diffusion of new technology, led to further opportunities to prevent pollution and optimise future land use through planning for closure from the outset. The objectives and components of closure plans are also reviewed as the paper draws on case studies to highlight some of the possible constraints and challenges to pollution prevention that may be faced at the level of both public policy and corporate strategy. The article concludes by suggesting a forward-looking approach to integrated environmental management and viable future land-use planning based on a dynamic model for environmental management. (author)

  13. Hyperspectral Soil Mapper (HYSOMA) software interface: Review and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrillat, Sabine; Guillaso, Stephane; Eisele, Andreas; Rogass, Christian

    2014-05-01

    With the upcoming launch of the next generation of hyperspectral satellites that will routinely deliver high spectral resolution images for the entire globe (e.g. EnMAP, HISUI, HyspIRI, HypXIM, PRISMA), an increasing demand for the availability/accessibility of hyperspectral soil products is coming from the geoscience community. Indeed, many robust methods for the prediction of soil properties based on imaging spectroscopy already exist and have been successfully used for a wide range of soil mapping airborne applications. Nevertheless, these methods require expert know-how and fine-tuning, which makes them used sparingly. More developments are needed toward easy-to-access soil toolboxes as a major step toward the operational use of hyperspectral soil products for Earth's surface processes monitoring and modelling, to allow non-experienced users to obtain new information based on non-expensive software packages where repeatability of the results is an important prerequisite. In this frame, based on the EU-FP7 EUFAR (European Facility for Airborne Research) project and EnMAP satellite science program, higher performing soil algorithms were developed at the GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences as demonstrators for end-to-end processing chains with harmonized quality measures. The algorithms were built-in into the HYSOMA (Hyperspectral SOil MApper) software interface, providing an experimental platform for soil mapping applications of hyperspectral imagery that gives the choice of multiple algorithms for each soil parameter. The software interface focuses on fully automatic generation of semi-quantitative soil maps such as soil moisture, soil organic matter, iron oxide, clay content, and carbonate content. Additionally, a field calibration option calculates fully quantitative soil maps provided ground truth soil data are available. Implemented soil algorithms have been tested and validated using extensive in-situ ground truth data sets. The source of the HYSOMA

  14. Astrobiology: guidelines and future missions plan for the international community

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, L.; Miller, D.

    The search for extra-terrestrial life has been going on ever since humans realized there was more to the Universe than just the Earth. These quests have taken many forms including, but not limited to: the quest for understanding the biological origins of life on Earth; the deployment of robotic probes to other planets to look for microbial life; the analysis of meteorites for chemical and fossil remnants of extra - terrestrial life; and the search of the radio spectrum for signs of extra-solar intelligence. These searches so far have yielded hints, but no unambiguous proof of life with origins from off Earth. The emerging field of astrobiology studies the origin, distribution, and future of life in the Universe. Technical advances and new, though not conclusive, evidence of extinct microbial life on Mars have created a new enthusiasm for astrobiology in many nations. However, the next steps to take are not clear, and should a positive result be returned, the follow-on missions are yet to be defined. This paper reports on the results of an eight-week study by the students of the International Space University during the summer of 2002. The study created a source book that can be used by mission designers and policy makers to chart the next steps in astrobiology. In particular, the study addresses the following questions:1.What is the full set of dimensions along which we can search forextra-terrestrial life?2.What activities are currently underway by the internationalcommunity along each of these dimensions?3.What are the most effective next steps that can be taken by theinternational space community in order to further this search (from a policy,sociological and mission point of view)?4.What are the proper steps for eliminating possible contaminationof the Earth's biosphere?5.What are the issues with planetary quarantine with regards tounwanted contamination of other biospheres with terrestrial organisms? Integrating all the considerations affecting the search for

  15. Sixth General Radioactive Waste Plan. Planning to the future of ENRESA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espejo Hernandez, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The Government approved last June 23''rd the Sixth General Radioactive Waste Plan that presents the activities to be carried out by ENRESA in all its field of responsibility to the year 2070. The document considers as one of the principal changes that ENRESA will be restructured to corporate public entity assigned to the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade as well as the need of a Centralised Temporary Storage for the spent fuel and the high level radioactive wastes generated in Spain. Nevertheless, information is provided on the plans for the full decommissioning of the nuclear power plants to complete their operational life and also the economic and financial aspects related to the activities contemplated in the Plan. (Author) 13 refs

  16. The effect of differentiated margin on futures market investors' behavior and structure An experimental research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-hui Luo; Di-fang Wan; Yang Yang; Guang Yang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose-The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyze the role of differentiated margin system in leading investors' investing behavior and then optimize investor structure in futures markets.Design/methodology/approach-Using economic experimental research method,this paper designs and conducts a futures market experiment according to experimental research's basic norms,thus acquiring needed and credible empirical data.Findings-By analyzing the experimental data,it is found that compared with situations in futures markets that implement uniform margin system,investors' (especially speculators') futures open position and the ratio of their open position and futures turnover are both significantly higher,in futures markets that implement differentiated margin system.On the other hand,differentiated margin system has no effects on hedgers' futures turnover,but significantly reduces speculators' futures turnover.Research limitations/implications-The findings suggest that compared with uniform margin system,differentiated margin system is beneficial to effectively restrict both speculators' and hedgers' speculating behavior and lead hedgers' market participation.Practical implications-In order to resolve the problem of unreasonable investor structure in China's futures market,i.e.lack of hedgers and over-speculating China's futures market's regulators should reform the margin system and adopt differentiated margin system to lead investors' rational behavior and optimize investor structure.Originality/value-This paper empirically analyzes and verifies,for the first time,the roles of differentiated margin system in affecting investors' investing behavior.The futures market experiment designed and used in this study is a pioneering and exploratory experiment.

  17. Recent results and future plans for a 45 actuator adaptive x-ray optics experiment at the advanced light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brejnholt, Nicolai F., E-mail: brejnholt1@llnl.gov; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Hill, Randal M.; Pardini, Tommaso; Hagler, Lisle; Jackson, Jessie; Jeon, Jae; McCarville, Thomas J.; Palmer, David W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Celestre, Richard [Advanced Light Source - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Brooks, Audrey D. [Northrop Grumman - AOA Xinetics Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We report on the current status of the Adaptive X-ray Optics project run by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LLNL is collaborating with the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to demonstrate a near real-time adaptive X-ray optic. To this end, a custom-built 45 cm long deformable mirror has been installed at ALS beamline 5.3.1 (end station 2) for a two-year period that started in September 2014. We will outline general aspects of the instrument, present results from a recent experimental campaign and touch on future plans for the project.

  18. Planning for the Future, a Look from Apollo to the Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segrera, David

    2008-01-01

    Future missions out of low Earth orbit, returning to the moon and Mars, will be some of the most complicated endeavors ever attempted by mankind. It will require the wealth of nations and the dedicated efforts of thousand of individuals working in a concerted effort to take man to the moon, Mars and beyond. These missions will require new equipment and new approaches to optimize our limited resources and time in space. This daily planning and optimization which currently is being performed by scores of people in MCC Houston and around the world will need to adapt to the challenges faced far from Earth. By studying the processes, methodologies, and tools employed from Apollo, Skylab, Shuttle, ISS, and other programs such as NEEMO, we can learn from the past to plan for the future. This paper will explore the planning process used from Apollo onward and will discuss their relevancy in future applications.

  19. Water planning in a changing climate: how do you plan for a future when the past no longer represents the future?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, Emma

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Full text: By 2030, the catchments across south-west Western Australia can expect decreases in runoff ranging from 5% to 40% relative to 1990. This has ramifications, not only for consumptive and non-consumptive uses, but for the way decisions are made in an environment of uncertainty. Traditionally, water planning has assumed a static environment whereby statistically defensible climatic records have been used in decision-making. While climate modelling may provide projections of plausible climatic futures, this needs to be integrated with socio-political and economic futures when considering the environment in which regional water plans will apply. Where climate change is slow, enabling biophysical and social systems have time to adapt to long-term water resources planning needs that incorporate principles of intergenerational equity, the precautionary principle and resilience in management strategies. However where changes in climate are poorly recognised against the background of inherent climate variability or where step changes in rainfall occur or threshold assimilative levels of ecosystems are exceeded, conflict and uncertainty challenge the decisionmaking processes. Within the backdrop of climate change, the Department of Water is developing a Regional Water Plan for the southwest which will set the strategic direction on water resources for the next 25 years. In order to move forward with this process, the water sector must undergo a number of transformations: from linear science to complex dynamic systems thinking; from 'decide and defend'to increased community engagement when dealing with both complexity and uncertainty; from conservation of 'museum pieces' to innovation, partnerships and adaptive management. This paper will discuss the philosophy behind the decision-making framework based on experiences from business management and other sectors. It will also discuss an action research process that could be used in the South West Water Plan

  20. Developing a vision and strategic action plan for future community-based residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Jann B; Owen, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Community Pharmacy Residency Program (CPRP) Planning Committee convened to develop a vision and a strategic action plan for the advancement of community pharmacy residency training. Aligned with the profession's efforts to achieve provider status and expand access to care, the Future Vision and Action Plan for Community-based Residency Training will provide guidance, direction, and a strategic action plan for community-based residency training to ensure that the future needs of community-based pharmacist practitioners are met. National thought leaders, selected because of their leadership in pharmacy practice, academia, and residency training, served on the planning committee. The committee conducted a series of conference calls and an in-person strategic planning meeting held on January 13-14, 2015. Outcomes from the discussions were supplemented with related information from the literature. Results of a survey of CPRP directors and preceptors also informed the planning process. The vision and strategic action plan for community-based residency training is intended to advance training to meet the emerging needs of patients in communities that are served by the pharmacy profession. The group anticipated the advanced skills required of pharmacists serving as community-based pharmacist practitioners and the likely education, training and competencies required by future residency graduates in order to deliver these services. The vision reflects a transformation of community residency training, from CPRPs to community-based residency training, and embodies the concept that residency training should be primarily focused on training the individual pharmacist practitioner based on the needs of patients served within the community, and not on the physical location where pharmacy services are provided. The development of a vision statement, core values statements, and strategic action plan will provide support, guidance, and direction to the profession of pharmacy to

  1. Time reversal violation in radiative beta decay: experimental plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, J. A.; McNeil, J.; Anholm, M.; Gorelov, A.; Melconian, D.; Ashery, D.

    2017-01-01

    Some explanations for the excess of matter over antimatter in the universe involve sources of time reversal violation (TRV) in addition to the one known in the standard model of particle physics. We plan to search for TRV in a correlation between the momenta of the beta, neutrino, and the radiative gamma sometimes emitted in nuclear beta decay. Correlations involving three (out of four) momenta are sensitive at lowest order to different TRV physics than observables involving spin, such as electric dipole moments and spin-polarized beta decay correlations. Such experiments have been done in radiative kaon decay, but not in systems involving the lightest generation of quarks. An explicit low-energy physics model being tested produces TRV effects in the Fermi beta decay of the neutron, tritium, or some positron-decaying isotopes. We will present plans to measure the TRV asymmetry in radiative beta decay of laser-trapped 38mK at better than 0.01 sensitivity, including suppression of background from positron annihilation. Supported by NSERC, D.O.E., Israel Science Foundation. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  2. Medical oncology future plan of the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology: challenges and future needs of the Spanish oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, F; Andres, R; Felip, E; Garcia-Campelo, R; Lianes, P; Llombart, A; Piera, J M; Puente, J; Rodriguez, C A; Vera, R; Virizuela, J A; Martin, M; Garrido, P

    2017-04-01

    The SEOM Future Plan is aimed at identifying the main challenges, trends and needs of the medical oncology speciality over the next years, including potential oncologist workforce shortages, and proposing recommendations to overcome them. The estimations of the required medical oncologists workforce are based on an updated Medical Oncologist Register in Spain, Medical Oncology Departments activity data, dedication times and projected cancer incidence. Challenges, needs and future recommendations were drawn from an opinion survey and an advisory board. A shortage of 211 FTE medical oncologist specialists has been established. To maintain an optimal ratio of 158 new cases/FTE, medical oncology workforce should reach 1881 FTE by 2035. Main recommendations to face the growing demand and complexity of oncology services include a yearly growth of 2.5% of medical oncologist's workforce until 2035, and development and application of more accurate quality indicators for cancer care and health outcomes measure.

  3. An Experimental Study Related to Planning Abilities of Gifted and Average Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena Z. Leana-Taşcılar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gifted students differ from their average peers in psychological, social, emotional and cognitive development. One of these differences in the cognitive domain is related to executive functions. One of the most important executive functions is planning and organization ability. The aim of this study was to compare planning abilities of gifted students with those of their average peers and to test the effectiveness of a training program on planning abilities of gifted students and average students. First, students’ intelligence and planning abilities were measured and then assigned to either experimental or control group. The groups were matched by intelligence and planning ability (experimental: (13 gifted and 8 average; control: 14 gifted and 8 average. In total 182 students (79 gifted and 103 average participated in the study. Then, a training program was implemented in the experimental group to find out if it improved students’ planning ability. Results showed that boys had better planning abilities than girls did, and gifted students had better planning abilities than their average peers did. Significant results were obtained in favor of the experimental group in the posttest scores

  4. Monitoring plan and maintenance NPP the Vandellos I and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margalef Escoda, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper intends to give to know the singularities of an installation phase of latency and your monitoring and maintenance plan. the horizons that has the installation medium-term to guide the future dismantling level 3 monitoring and maintenance activities are also described.

  5. Does reading scenarios of future land use changes affect willingness to participate in land use planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle L. Johnson; Kathleen P. Bell; Mario F. Teisl

    2016-01-01

    Scenarios of future outcomes often provide context for policy decisions and can be a form of science communication, translating complex and uncertain relationships into stories for a broader audience. We conducted a survey experiment (n = 270) to test the effects of reading land use change scenarios on willingness to participate in land use planning activities. In the...

  6. Older and Younger Family Caregivers of Adults with Intellectual Disability: Factors Associated with Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lee, Yue-Chune; Lin, Li-Chan; Kroger, Teppo; Chang, Ai-Ning

    2009-01-01

    A structured interview survey was conducted in a major city in Taiwan to explore and compare older and younger family primary caregivers' well being and their future caregiving plans for these adults with intellectual disability. The sample size was 315 caregivers who were 55 years or older and who cared for adults with intellectual disability and…

  7. Planned Change in Future Models of Project Follow Through: A Concept Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Edward; Brown, Asa

    The three chapters included in this paper establish a basis for organizing future implementations of Project Follow Through. Specifically, chapter 1 identifies four planning objectives for coordinating such programs. Emphasis is given to the need to focus on one fundamental, pervasive variable possibly accounting for program success: time…

  8. Factors Influencing Teaching Choice, Professional Plans about Teaching, and Future Time Perspective: A Mediational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Altay; Tezel, Kadir Vefa

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the mediating role of prospective English teachers' future time perspectives in relation to their motivations for teaching, beliefs about the profession, career choice satisfaction, and professional plans. A total of 423 prospective English teachers voluntarily participated in the study. The mediating role of the future…

  9. Prospective Teachers' Future Time Perspective and Professional Plans about Teaching: The Mediating Role of Academic Optimism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Altay

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the mediating role of prospective teachers' academic optimism in the relationship between their future time perspective and professional plans about teaching. A total of 396 prospective teachers voluntarily participated in the study. Correlation, regression, and structural equation modeling analyses were conducted in…

  10. Futuring, Strategic Planning and Shared Awareness: An Ohio University Libraries' Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, David J.; Seaman, Scott; Theodore-Shusta, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    A critical component of strategic planning is creating a shared-awareness among library staff of the potential societal, political, economic and technological changes that will influence how future users will create and consume scholarly materials, what will be expected of library services, and how facilities will be used. The ACRL Futuring…

  11. Transparency about past, present and future conduct : Experimental evidence on the impact of competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, J.J.M.; Hinloopen, J.; Normann, H-T

    2009-01-01

    Transparency relates to communication and information about the conduct of firms. Transparency can relate to the past, the present and the future and it can vary in format, content and reliability. In this chapter I review experimental evidence which relates to the impact of transparency on the

  12. Planning, Implementation and Optimization of Future space Missions using an Immersive Visualization Environement (IVE) Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E.

    Planning, Implementation and Optimization of Future Space Missions using an Immersive Visualization Environment (IVE) Machine E. N. Harris, Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, CO and George.W. Morgenthaler, U. of Colorado at Boulder History: A team of 3-D engineering visualization experts at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company have developed innovative virtual prototyping simulation solutions for ground processing and real-time visualization of design and planning of aerospace missions over the past 6 years. At the University of Colorado, a team of 3-D visualization experts are developing the science of 3-D visualization and immersive visualization at the newly founded BP Center for Visualization, which began operations in October, 2001. (See IAF/IAA-01-13.2.09, "The Use of 3-D Immersive Visualization Environments (IVEs) to Plan Space Missions," G. A. Dorn and G. W. Morgenthaler.) Progressing from Today's 3-D Engineering Simulations to Tomorrow's 3-D IVE Mission Planning, Simulation and Optimization Techniques: 3-D (IVEs) and visualization simulation tools can be combined for efficient planning and design engineering of future aerospace exploration and commercial missions. This technology is currently being developed and will be demonstrated by Lockheed Martin in the (IVE) at the BP Center using virtual simulation for clearance checks, collision detection, ergonomics and reach-ability analyses to develop fabrication and processing flows for spacecraft and launch vehicle ground support operations and to optimize mission architecture and vehicle design subject to realistic constraints. Demonstrations: Immediate aerospace applications to be demonstrated include developing streamlined processing flows for Reusable Space Transportation Systems and Atlas Launch Vehicle operations and Mars Polar Lander visual work instructions. Long-range goals include future international human and robotic space exploration missions such as the development of a Mars

  13. The planning of future research program of underground laboratories in overseas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, Nobuyuki; Tanai, Kenji; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2002-02-01

    The objectives of this study is to identify the research issues, which are to be conducted in the future underground research laboratory, about operation and logistics systems for the planning of future research and development program. The research programs and experiments, etc. were investigated for the geological disposal projects in overseas sedimentary rocks and coastal geological environments aiming to reflect in the future underground research facility plan in Japan. In the investigation, information on the engineered-barrier performance, design and construction of underground facilities, tunnel support, transportation and emplacement, and backfilling technology, etc. were collected. Based on these informations, the purpose, the content, and the result of each investigations and tests were arranged. The strategy and the aim in the entire underground research facility, and the flow of investigations and tests, etc. were also arranged from the purpose, the relations and the sequence of each investigation and experiment, and the usage of results, etc. (author)

  14. Los Alamos Experimental Engineering Waste Burial Facility: design considerations and preliminary experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePoorter, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Experimental Engineered Waste Burial Facility is a field test site where generic experiments can be performed on several scales to get the basic information necessary to understand the processes occurring in low-level waste disposal facilities. The experiments include hydrological, chemical, mechanical, and biological factors. In order to separate these various factors in the experiments and to extrapolate the experimental results to actual facilities, experiments will be performed on several different scales

  15. 77 FR 36406 - Connect America Fund; a National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... America Fund; a National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable Rates for Local Exchange Carriers; High-Cost Universal Service Support; Correction AGENCY: Federal Communications...

  16. Critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies in dental traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens O; Andersson, Lars

    2011-08-01

    In vivo studies are sometimes needed to understand healing processes after trauma. For several reasons, not the least ethical, such studies have to be carefully planned and important considerations have to be taken into account about suitability of the experimental model, sample size and optimizing the accuracy of the analysis. Several manuscripts of in vivo studies are submitted for publication to Dental Traumatology and rejected because of inadequate design, methodology or insufficient documentation of the results. The authors have substantial experience in experimental in vivo studies of tissue healing in dental traumatology and share their knowledge regarding critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. An integrated model for long-term power generation planning toward future smart electricity systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qi; Mclellan, Benjamin C.; Tezuka, Tetsuo; Ishihara, Keiichi N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • An integrated model for planning future smart electricity systems was developed. • The model consists of an optimization model and an hour-by-hour simulation model. • The model was applied to Tokyo area, Japan in light of the Fukushima Accident. • Paths to best generation mixes of smart electricity systems were obtained. • Detailed hourly operation patterns in smart electricity systems were obtained. - Abstract: In the present study, an integrated planning model was developed to find economically/environmentally optimized paths toward future smart electricity systems with high level penetration of intermittent renewable energy and new controllable electric devices at the supply and demand sides respectively for regional scale. The integrated model is used to (i) plan the best power generation and capacity mixes to meet future electricity demand subject to various constraints using an optimization model; (ii) obtain detailed operation patterns of power plants and new controllable electric devices using an hour-by-hour simulation model based on the obtained optimized power generation mix. As a case study, the model was applied to power generation planning in the Tokyo area, Japan, out to 2030 in light of the Fukushima Accident. The paths toward best generation mixes of smart electricity systems in 2030 based on fossil fuel, hydro power, nuclear and renewable energy were obtained and the feasibility of the integrated model was proven

  18. Challenging the Future - Journey to Excellence. Aeropropulsion strategic plan for the 1990's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past several months, the Lewis Aeropropulsion Management Council (AMC) has conducted a critical assessment of its strategic plan. This assessment clearly indicated a need for change, both in the aeropropulsion program emphasis and in the approach to carrying out that program. Customers sent a strong message that the program must improve the timeliness of research and technology products and services and must work more closely with them to develop and transfer new technology. The strategic plan defines AMC's vision for the future and underlying organizational values. It contains a set of broad strategies and actions that point the way toward achieving the goals of customer satisfaction, organizational effectiveness, and programmatic excellence. Those strategies are expected to form the basis for the development of specific tactical plans by Lewis aeropropulsion thrust teams, divisions, and branches. To guide tactical planning of the aeropropulsion program, this strategic plan outlines the agency's strategic directions and long-range aeronautics goals, the aeropropulsion goals and key objectives for achieving them, projections of Lewis aeropropulsion budgets, planned allocations of resources, and the processes that will be used to measure success in carrying out the strategic plan.

  19. Career destinations, views and future plans of the UK medical qualifiers of 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kathryn; Lambert, Trevor; Goldacre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To report the career destinations, views and future plans of a cohort of senior doctors who qualified in the 1980s. Postal questionnaire survey of all doctors who qualified from all UK medical schools in 1988. The response rate was 69%. We estimated that 81% of the total cohort was working in the NHS, 16 years after qualification; and that at least 94% of graduates who, when students, were from UK homes, were working in medicine. Of NHS doctors, 30% worked part-time. NHS doctors rated their job satisfaction highly (median score 19.9, scale 5-25) but were less satisfied with the amount of leisure time available to them (median score 5.4, scale 1-10). NHS doctors were very positive about their careers, but were less positive about working hours and some other aspects of the NHS. Women were more positive than men about working conditions; general practitioners were more positive than hospital doctors. Twenty-five percent reported unmet needs for further training or career-related advice, particularly about career development. Twenty-nine percent intended to reduce their hours in future, while 6%, mainly part-time women, planned to increase their hours. Overall, 10% of NHS doctors planned to do more service work in future and 24% planned to do less; among part-time women, 18% planned to do more and only 14% less. These NHS doctors, now in their 40s, had a high level of satisfaction with their jobs and their careers but were less satisfied with some other aspects of their working environment. A substantial percentage had expectations about future career development and change.

  20. Unraveling the Importance of Climate Change Resilience in Planning the Future Sustainable Energy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarroja, B.; AghaKouchak, A.; Forrest, K.; Chiang, F.; Samuelsen, S.

    2017-12-01

    In response to concerns regarding the environmental impacts of the current energy resource mix, significant research efforts have been focused on determining the future energy resource mix to meet emissions reduction and environmental sustainability goals. Many of these studies focus on various constraints such as costs, grid operability requirements, and environmental performance, and develop different plans for the rollout of energy resources between the present and future years. One aspect that has not yet been systematically taken into account in these planning studies, however, is the potential impacts that changing climates may have on the availability and performance of key energy resources that compose these plans. This presentation will focus on a case study for California which analyzes the impacts of climate change on the greenhouse gas emissions and renewable resource utilization of an energy resource plan developed by Energy Environmental Economics for meeting the state's year 2050 greenhouse gas goal of 80% reduction in emissions by the year 2050. Specifically, climate change impacts on three aspects of the energy system are investigated: 1) changes in hydropower generation due to altered precipitation, streamflow and runoff patterns, 2) changes in the availability of solar thermal and geothermal power plant capacity due to shifting water availability, and 3) changes in the residential and commercial electric building loads due to increased temperatures. These impacts were discovered to cause the proposed resource plan to deviate from meeting its emissions target by up to 5.9 MMT CO2e/yr and exhibit a reduction in renewable resource penetration of up to 3.1% of total electric energy. The impacts of climate change on energy system performance were found to be mitigated by increasing the flexibility of the energy system through increased storage and electric load dispatchability. Overall, this study highlights the importance of taking into account and

  1. Innovative experimental particle physics through technological advances: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Harry W.K.; Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    This mini-course gives an introduction to the techniques used in experimental particle physics with an emphasis on the impact of technological advances. The basic detector types and particle accelerator facilities will be briefly covered with examples of their use and with comparisons. The mini-course ends with what can be expected in the near future from current technology advances. The mini-course is intended for graduate students and post-docs and as an introduction to experimental techniques for theorists

  2. 77 FR 3635 - Connect America Fund; A National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ...-208; Report No. 2945] Connect America Fund; A National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable Rates for Local Exchange Carriers; High-Cost Universal Service Support et al... applicability. Subject: Connect America Fund: A National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and...

  3. Proposal for a strategic management plan for experimental agricultural and academic farm "El Cairo" of Arauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Nieves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design for a strategic management plan for the Experimental Agricultural and Academic Farm: El Cairo of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Orinoquía branch. A non-experimental methodological design was used, from which a situational analysis of the farm was generated, which was used as a basis to formulate and design a Strategic Management plan for a five-year period. It was concluded that the current organization and management plan does not meet the mission objectives of research, teaching, and continuing education, suggesting a need for the articulation of the farm with the administrative and academic structure of the university in carrying out the strategic management plan derived from the current research.

  4. Environmental studies for mining of deep-sea polymetallic nodules - Accomplishments and future plans

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.

    on marine ecosystem, the project on ‘EIA studies for nodule mining in CIB’ was initiated in 1996, under the national programme on polymetallic nodules funded by the Dept. of Ocean Development. Mining of the deep-sea minerals [1] is expected to alter... for the future • Development of predictive ecosystem models • Creation of environmental database • Evaluating the biogeochemical coupling of biota with deep-sea ecosystem • Development of environment management plan for nodule mining References...

  5. Status and Future Plans of JAERI Eergy-Recovery Linac FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Hajima, R; Kikuzawa, N; Minehara, E J; Nagai, R; Nishimori, N; Nishitani, T; Sawamura, M; Yamauchi, T

    2005-01-01

    An energy-recovery linac for a high-power free-electron laser is in operation at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In this paper, we report results of research activities and future plans of JAERI ERL-FEL, which are the construction of FEL transport line, the operation of newly-installed RF controller and IOTs, the development of super-lattice photo cathode.

  6. Application of mathematical experimental planning in the investigation of thermodynamic properties of three- component alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovskaya, E.M.; Guzej, L.S.; Tikhankin, G.A.; Meshkov, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of solid solutions of niobium and tungsten in nickel have been investigated by the method of electromotive forces with the use of simplex-matrix experiment planning techniques. The planning matrix and the results of investigating the thermodynamic properties of alloys of the nickel-niobium-tungsten system at 1250 deg are presented. The application of experiment planning has made it possible to obtain sufficient information concerning the thermodynamics of solid solutions of niobium and tungsten in nickel from the experimental data for six ternary alloys only

  7. Land use planning and wildfire: development policies influence future probability of housing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Massada, Avi Bar; Butsic, Van; Keeley, Jon E.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of homes are being destroyed by wildfire in the wildland-urban interface. With projections of climate change and housing growth potentially exacerbating the threat of wildfire to homes and property, effective fire-risk reduction alternatives are needed as part of a comprehensive fire management plan. Land use planning represents a shift in traditional thinking from trying to eliminate wildfires, or even increasing resilience to them, toward avoiding exposure to them through the informed placement of new residential structures. For land use planning to be effective, it needs to be based on solid understanding of where and how to locate and arrange new homes. We simulated three scenarios of future residential development and projected landscape-level wildfire risk to residential structures in a rapidly urbanizing, fire-prone region in southern California. We based all future development on an econometric subdivision model, but we varied the emphasis of subdivision decision-making based on three broad and common growth types: infill, expansion, and leapfrog. Simulation results showed that decision-making based on these growth types, when applied locally for subdivision of individual parcels, produced substantial landscape-level differences in pattern, location, and extent of development. These differences in development, in turn, affected the area and proportion of structures at risk from burning in wildfires. Scenarios with lower housing density and larger numbers of small, isolated clusters of development, i.e., resulting from leapfrog development, were generally predicted to have the highest predicted fire risk to the largest proportion of structures in the study area, and infill development was predicted to have the lowest risk. These results suggest that land use planning should be considered an important component to fire risk management and that consistently applied policies based on residential pattern may provide substantial benefits for

  8. Motivations and future practice plans of orthodontic residents in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamlan, Nasir; Al-Ruwaithi, Moatazbellah M.; Al-Shraim, Nasir; El-Metwaaly, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Aims: This study aims to explore the criteria used by graduate students while selecting a career as orthodontists and their future aspirations. Materials and Methods: A list of Saudi Board of Orthodontics (SB-Ortho) residents was obtained from the Central and Western regions of the Kingdom and all orthodontic residents (excluding the 1st year residents) were invited to participate in this survey. Permission to contact the orthodontic residents was obtained from the respective program directors. The final study sample composed of 36 orthodontic residents. Results: About 39% of residents chose orthodontic specialty after graduation, nearly 33% selected the career during the undergraduate education while the rest chose the specialty at other stages. Approximately, 67% of the residents chose orthodontic specialty because it is intellectual challenging. Around 25% of residents choose orthodontic to improve their earning and 39% join orthodontic for job prestige. Around 50% of orthodontic Saudi residents planned to use self-ligating brackets; 63.9% planned to use invisalign; 86.1% plan to use temporary anchorage devices. About 72% of residents plan to use a cone-beam computerized tomography; 89% plan to use a digital imaging program; 39% plan to use indirect bonding; and 28% plan to use lingual orthodontics. More than half of the residents showed interest to participate in the research and about a quarter of them were willing to work in small cities. Conclusions: Most of the orthodontic residents in Saudi Arabia take up this specialty as they felt that it was intellectually challenging. The SB-Ortho program adequately prepares the residents in all the modern aspects of the specialty. PMID:24987645

  9. Plant life extension program for Indian PHWR power plants - Actual experience and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, M.B.; Ghoshal, B.; Shirolkar, K.M.; Ahmad, S.N.

    2002-01-01

    emergency core cooling system, inspection and replacement of heat exchangers and steam generators, and enhancement of emergency power supplies. It needs to be recognised that RAPS was built in the 1970s. Thus considerable upgrades have been done to meet latest safety requirements. Hence jobs like segregation of safety related power supplies and cables to meet more stringently groups and channel philosophy, installation of fire barriers and modernisation of fire detection system have also been carried out. The paper discusses the tools developed including remote tooling, mock-ups done and special training given to ensure that the work is done safely in the shortest possible time and with the lowest man-rem consumption. For RAPS-2 results are compared with the original planned values and it will be noticed that considerable savings were achieved in man-rem, monetary expenditure and time taken for the job. One significant aspect of the coolant channel replacement and upgradation work has been that all the work was done within the department of atomic energy. This included theoretical work, experimental studies, actual execution of the jobs and inspection and testing. The role of industry has been limited to supply of equipment. For MAPS outside agencies have been invited to participate in actual execution of the jobs at site. This has considerably changed the method of planning and execution of the jobs. For future reactors greater role of industry in development and actual site work is envisaged. The paper discusses the options being considered by NPCIL. Plant life extension and upgradation of older plants throws up several issues related to safety regulatory criteria that the upgraded plant should meet. This paper discusses the methodology formed by the utility and regulatory authority to meet agreed criteria for safety. Also discussed are special areas of concern like configuration control, documentation, training and re-qualification of operations staff. This paper

  10. The future orientation of foresters: An exploratory research among Dutch foresters into the prerequisite for strategic planning in forestry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogstra, M.A.; Schanz, H.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of strategic planning as an instrument to cope with the uncertain future has been long recognized, especially in forestry which is characterized by its relationship with the distant future. Surprisingly, the question to what extent the future is indeed considered in forestry

  11. GIS-Based Planning and Modeling for Renewable Energy: Challenges and Future Research Avenues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Resch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the face of the broad political call for an “energy turnaround”, we are currently witnessing three essential trends with regard to energy infrastructure planning, energy generation and storage: from planned production towards fluctuating production on the basis of renewable energy sources, from centralized generation towards decentralized generation and from expensive energy carriers towards cost-free energy carriers. These changes necessitate considerable modifications of the energy infrastructure. Even though most of these modifications are inherently motivated by geospatial questions and challenges, the integration of energy system models and Geographic Information Systems (GIS is still in its infancy. This paper analyzes the shortcomings of previous approaches in using GIS in renewable energy-related projects, extracts distinct challenges from these previous efforts and, finally, defines a set of core future research avenues for GIS-based energy infrastructure planning with a focus on the use of renewable energy. These future research avenues comprise the availability base data and their “geospatial awareness”, the development of a generic and unified data model, the usage of volunteered geographic information (VGI and crowdsourced data in analysis processes, the integration of 3D building models and 3D data analysis, the incorporation of network topologies into GIS, the harmonization of the heterogeneous views on aggregation issues in the fields of energy and GIS, fine-grained energy demand estimation from freely-available data sources, decentralized storage facility planning, the investigation of GIS-based public participation mechanisms, the transition from purely structural to operational planning, data privacy aspects and, finally, the development of a new dynamic power market design.

  12. The Role of Environmentally Conscious Architecture and Planning As Components of Future National Development Plans in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim M. Ayyad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Egypt has been experiencing challenging economic, social and political disturbance during the end of the twentieth century and towards the beginning of the twenty-first. With its fast expanding population, high consumption rate and economic deficit, the Egyptian community continues to experience a low quality of living. These issues contributed greatly to the uprising, following the Tunisian model, in January, 2011. However, the political change that followed did not help a lot, as development strategies are still far from being sustainable. In the beginning of the millennium, Egypt experienced an 8.6% energy deficit, followed by a growing energy crisis [1]. Knowing that almost 50% of the energy produced in Egypt is consumed inside buildings [2], environmentally conscious architecture can be a very powerful tool in development plans, as it can reasonably reduce the consumption of energy and other resources and enhance the quality of living for people. This work analyzes the supposed role of environmentally conscious architecture and, hence, evaluates its importance as a major component of national development plans in the near future. The analysis encompasses a review of the status quo in terms of consumption patterns and required services and, then, compares it with the case in which environmentally conscious architecture is adopted.

  13. The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System architecture: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalesio, L.R.; Hill, J.O.; Kraimer, M.; Lewis, S.; Murray, D.; Hunt, S.; Claussen, M.; Watson, W.

    1993-01-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), has been used at a number of sites for performing data acquisition, supervisory control, closed-loop control, sequential control, and operational optimization. The EPICS architecture was originally developed by a group with diverse backgrounds in physics and industrial control. The current architecture represents one instance of the ''standard model.'' It provides distributed processing and communication from any LAN device to the front end controllers. This paper will present the genealogy, current architecture, performance envelope, current installations, and planned extensions for requirements not met by the current architecture

  14. Critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies in dental traumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens O; Andersson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    In vivo studies are sometimes needed to understand healing processes after trauma. For several reasons, not the least ethical, such studies have to be carefully planned and important considerations have to be taken into account about suitability of the experimental model, sample size and optimizing...

  15. Pediatric hospital medicine: a strategic planning roundtable to chart the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Daniel A; Lye, Patricia S; Carlson, Douglas; Daru, Jennifer A; Narang, Steve; Srivastava, Rajendu; Melzer, Sanford; Conway, Patrick H

    2012-04-01

    Given the growing field of Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM) and the need to define strategic direction, the Society of Hospital Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Academic Pediatric Association sponsored a roundtable to discuss the future of the field. Twenty-one leaders were invited plus a facilitator utilizing established health care strategic planning methods. A "vision statement" was developed. Specific initiatives in 4 domains (clinical practice, quality of care, research, and workforce) were identified that would advance PHM with a plan to complete each initiative. Review of the current issues demonstrated gaps between the current state of affairs and the full vision of the potential impact of PHM. Clinical initiatives were to develop an educational plan supporting the PHM Core Competencies and a clinical practice monitoring dashboard template. Quality initiatives included an environmental assessment of PHM participation on key committees, societies, and agencies to ensure appropriate PHM representation. Three QI collaboratives are underway. A Research Leadership Task Force was created and the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network was refocused, defining a strategic framework for PRIS, and developing a funding strategy. Workforce initiatives were to develop a descriptive statement that can be used by any PHM physician, a communications tool describing "value added" of PHM; and a tool to assess career satisfaction among PHM physicians. We believe the Roundtable was successful in describing the current state of PHM and laying a course for the near future. Copyright © 2011 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Using genetic algorithms to optimise current and future health planning - the example of ambulance locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulance response time is a crucial factor in patient survival. The number of emergency cases (EMS cases requiring an ambulance is increasing due to changes in population demographics. This is decreasing ambulance response times to the emergency scene. This paper predicts EMS cases for 5-year intervals from 2020, to 2050 by correlating current EMS cases with demographic factors at the level of the census area and predicted population changes. It then applies a modified grouping genetic algorithm to compare current and future optimal locations and numbers of ambulances. Sets of potential locations were evaluated in terms of the (current and predicted EMS case distances to those locations. Results Future EMS demands were predicted to increase by 2030 using the model (R2 = 0.71. The optimal locations of ambulances based on future EMS cases were compared with current locations and with optimal locations modelled on current EMS case data. Optimising the location of ambulance stations locations reduced the average response times by 57 seconds. Current and predicted future EMS demand at modelled locations were calculated and compared. Conclusions The reallocation of ambulances to optimal locations improved response times and could contribute to higher survival rates from life-threatening medical events. Modelling EMS case 'demand' over census areas allows the data to be correlated to population characteristics and optimal 'supply' locations to be identified. Comparing current and future optimal scenarios allows more nuanced planning decisions to be made. This is a generic methodology that could be used to provide evidence in support of public health planning and decision making.

  17. Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, A

    2008-07-31

    While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation.

  18. Tsunami evacuation plans for future megathrust earthquakes in Padang, Indonesia, considering stochastic earthquake scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Muhammad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study develops tsunami evacuation plans in Padang, Indonesia, using a stochastic tsunami simulation method. The stochastic results are based on multiple earthquake scenarios for different magnitudes (Mw 8.5, 8.75, and 9.0 that reflect asperity characteristics of the 1797 historical event in the same region. The generation of the earthquake scenarios involves probabilistic models of earthquake source parameters and stochastic synthesis of earthquake slip distributions. In total, 300 source models are generated to produce comprehensive tsunami evacuation plans in Padang. The tsunami hazard assessment results show that Padang may face significant tsunamis causing the maximum tsunami inundation height and depth of 15 and 10 m, respectively. A comprehensive tsunami evacuation plan – including horizontal evacuation area maps, assessment of temporary shelters considering the impact due to ground shaking and tsunami, and integrated horizontal–vertical evacuation time maps – has been developed based on the stochastic tsunami simulation results. The developed evacuation plans highlight that comprehensive mitigation policies can be produced from the stochastic tsunami simulation for future tsunamigenic events.

  19. Planning and Response to the Detonation of an Improvised Nuclear Device: Past, Present, and Future Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, A.

    2008-01-01

    While the reality of an improvised nuclear device (IND) being detonated in an American city is unlikely, its destructive power is such that the scenario must be planned for. Upon reviewing the academic literature on the effects of and response to IND events, this report looks to actual responders from around the country. The results from the meetings of public officials in the cities show where gaps exist between theoretical knowledge and actual practice. In addition to the literature, the meetings reveal areas where future research needs to be conducted. This paper recommends that local response planners: meet to discuss the challenges of IND events; offer education to officials, the public, and responders on IND events; incorporate 'shelter-first' into response plans; provide information to the public and responders using the 3 Cs; and engage the private sector (including media) in response plans. In addition to these recommendations for the response planners, the paper provides research questions that once answered will improve response plans around the country. By following the recommendations, both groups, response planners and researchers, can help the country better prepare for and mitigate the effects of an IND detonation

  20. Systematic Reviews of Mechanisms for Financing Family Planning: Findings, Implications, and Future Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissner, Craig L; Ali, Moazzam

    2016-12-01

    The article describes an international collaboration that systematically reviewed the evidence on financing mechanisms for family planning/contraception, assessed the strength of and summarized the evidence, identified research gaps, and proposed a new research agenda to address the gaps. The review found that the evidence base is weak owing to the paucity of studies, diversity in findings, and variations in intervention, study design, and outcome measures. Of more than 17,000 papers reviewed only 38 met the eligibility criteria. A number of general recommendations on the directions and areas of future research can be drawn. There is a strong need for more robust study designs on the effectiveness of financial incentives in family planning. © 2016 The Population Council, Inc.

  1. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  2. Assessing Future Flood Hazards for Adaptation Planning in a Northern European Coastal Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Broge, Niels H.; Molgaard, Mads R.

    2016-01-01

    From a transdisciplinary approach in the town of Thyboron, Denmark, we investigate couplings between sea state (i.e., mean and extreme) and flooding hazards today and ahead. This includes analyses of change and variability in the groundwater table, precipitation, land motion, geotechnical ground ......, and it will provide for more holistic solutions that both serve to protect the town and allow for business development and better municipal planning ahead....... properties, sewerage systems and other infrastructure to outline a more complete platform for the integration of knowledge into climate adaptation schemes at this highly vulnerable coastal location. It involves the engagement of the main stakeholders who, although having different responsibilities, interests......, needs of knowledge and data, and different timeframes for investment and planning, must join in a common appraisal of the challenges faced ahead to provide for better adaptation measures. Apart from obvious adverse effects from future storm surge events, knowledge about the coupled effects...

  3. Software to support planning for future waste treatment, storage, transport, and disposal requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holter, G.M.; Shay, M.R.; Stiles, D.L.

    1990-04-01

    Planning for adequate and appropriate treatment, storage, transport and disposal of wastes to be generated or received in the future is a complex but critical task that can be significantly enhanced by the development and use of appropriate software. This paper describes a software system that has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to aid in such planning. The basic needs for such a system are outlined, and the approach adopted in developing the software is described. The individual components of the system, and their integration into a unified system, are discussed. Typical analytical applications of this type of software are summarized. Conclusions concerning the development of such software systems and the necessary supporting data are then presented. 2 figs

  4. Outline of Fukushima nuclear accident and future action. Lessons learned from accident and countermeasure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima nuclear accident was caused by loss of all AC power sources (SBO) and loss of ultimate heat sink (LUHS) at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) hit by the Great East Japan Earthquake. This article reviewed outline of Fukushima nuclear accident progression when on year had passed since and referred to lessons learned from accident and countermeasure plan to prevent severe accident in SBO and LUHS events by earthquake and tsunami as future action. This countermeasure would be taken to (1) prevent serious flooding in case a tsunami overwhelms the breakwater, with improving water tightness of rooms for emergency diesel generator, batteries and power centers, (2) enhance emergency power supply and cooling function with mobile electricity generator, high pressure fire pump car and alternate water supply source, (3) mitigate environmental effects caused by core damage with installing containment filtered venting, and (4) enforce emergency preparedness in case of severe accident. Definite countermeasure plan for Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPPs was enumerated. (T. Tanaka)

  5. Experimental dosimetry in conformal breast teletherapy compared with the planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana Batista; Silva, Hugo Leonardo Lemos; Passos Ribeiro de Campos, Tarcísio

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare and analyse the absorbed dose profiles from the conformal radiotherapy planning and experimental dosimetry taken in a breast anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom. Conformal radiotherapy planning was elaborated in the Treatment Planning System (TPS). EBT2 Gafchromic radiochromic films were applied as dosimeters, positioned internally and superficially in the breast phantom. The standard radiation protocol was applied in the breast phantom. The films were digitalised, and their responses were analysed in RGB. The optical densities were processed, reproducing the spatial dose distribution. - Highlights: • Distributions of absorbed doses were generated by the TPS and measured by radiochromic films. • The breast phantom simulated a human breast in position for treatment. • A large portion of the glandular tissue absorbed doses that were equivalent to the radiotherapy planning. • There were regions of hot spots and small areas of under dosage in deeper areas at the lung interface

  6. Performance Demonstration Program Plan for the WIPP Experimental-Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The Performance Demonstration Program is designed to ensure that compliance with the Quality Assurance Objective, identified in the Quality Assurance Program Plan for the WIPP Experimental-Waste Characterization Program (QAPP), is achieved. This Program Plan is intended for use by the WPO to assess the laboratory support provided for the characterization of WIPP TRU waste by the storage/generator sites. Phase 0 of the Performance Demonstration Program encompasses the analysis of headspace gas samples for inorganic and organic components. The WPO will ensure the implementation of this plan by designating an independent organization to coordinate and provide technical oversight for the program (Program Coordinator). Initial program support, regarding the technical oversight and coordination functions, shall be provided by the USEPA-ORP. This plan identifies the criteria that will be used for the evaluation of laboratory performance, the responsibilities of the Program Coordinator, and the responsibilities of the participating laboratories. 5 tabs

  7. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor and the future of nuclear fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Chuanhong

    2010-01-01

    Energy shortage and environmental problems are now the two largest challenges for human beings. Magnetic confinement nuclear fusion, which has achieved great progress since the 1990's, is anticipated to be a way to realize an ideal source of energy in the future because of its abundance, environmental compatibility, and zero carbon release. Exemplified by the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the development of nuclear fusion energy is now in its engineering phase, and should be realized by the middle of this century if all objectives of the ITER project are met. (author)

  8. Experimental Design for CMIP6: Aerosol, Land Use, and Future Scenarios Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnott, James [AGCI

    2015-10-30

    The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical science workshop entitled, “Experimental design for CMIP6: Aerosol, Land Use, and Future Scenarios,” on August 3-8, 2014 in Aspen, CO. Claudia Tebaldi (NCAR) and Brian O’Neill (NCAR) served as co-chairs for the workshop. The Organizing committee also included Dave Lawrence (NCAR), Jean-Francois Lamarque (NCAR), George Hurtt (University of Maryland), & Detlef van Vuuren (PBL Netherlands Environmental Change). The meeting included the participation of 22 scientists representing many of the major climate modeling centers for a total of 110 participant days.

  9. Program plan for future regulatory activity in nuclear-power-plant maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalamente, R.V.

    1982-10-01

    The intent of this paper is to describe the results of a study of nuclear power plant (NPP) maintenance conducted by Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The purpose of the study for the NRC was to determine problems affecting human performance in NPP maintenance, pinpoint those which adversely affect public health and safety, review strategies for overcoming the problems, and suggest the direction that regulatory activities should take. Results of the study were presented to the NRC (Division of Human Factors Safety) in the form of a recommended program plan for future regulatory activity in NPP maintenance

  10. Current status and future plan of the G.A. Siwabessy Multipurpose Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastowo, Hudi; Tarigan, Alim; Mardi, Alfahari [Centre for Multipurpose Reactor, National Atomic Energy Agency, Serpong (Indonesia)

    1998-10-01

    Since the first criticality in July 1987, the G.A. Siwabessy Multipurpose Reactor, RSG-GAS, in Serpong-Indonesia has been operated about 26.000 hours up to now. In the last two years the reactor is operated more than 5000 hours per year or equivalent to seven cycles a year. The reactor is utilized for conducting research studies and isotopes production. In the near future the core will be converted to silicide fuel to improve the core performance instead of oxide fuel. The planned maintenance activities are performed according to the schedule. The modifications and remedial maintenance are also performed to ensure that all structures, systems and important to safety are capable of performing as intended. The future activities of the G.A. Siwabessy reactor will be stressed to maintain the reliability and availability of the reactor operation and to optimize the reactor utilization. (author)

  11. Current and future plans for wind energy development on San Clemente Island, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, P.J.F. [RLA Consulting, Inc., Bothell, WA (United States); Cable, S.B. [Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Navy is considering possible ways to maximize the use of wind energy technology for power supply to their auxiliary landing field and other facilities on San Clemente Island. A summary of their past analysis and future considerations is presented. An analysis was performed regarding the technical and economic feasibility of installing and operating a sea-water pumped hydro/wind energy system to provide for all of the island`s electric power needs. Follow-on work to the feasibility study include wind resource monitoring as well as procurement and preliminary design activities for a first-phase wind-diesel installation. Future plans include the consideration of alternative siting arrangements and the introduction of on-island fresh water production. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Allocating time to future tasks: the effect of task segmentation on planning fallacy bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Darryl K; Burt, Christopher D B

    2008-06-01

    The scheduling component of the time management process was used as a "paradigm" to investigate the allocation of time to future tasks. In three experiments, we compared task time allocation for a single task with the summed time allocations given for each subtask that made up the single task. In all three, we found that allocated time for a single task was significantly smaller than the summed time allocated to the individual subtasks. We refer to this as the segmentation effect. In Experiment 3, we asked participants to give estimates by placing a mark on a time line, and found that giving time allocations in the form of rounded close approximations probably does not account for the segmentation effect. We discuss the results in relation to the basic processes used to allocate time to future tasks and the means by which planning fallacy bias might be reduced.

  13. How Do High School Seniors See Their Future? Parental and Peer Influences on Their Personal and Professional Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovu Mihai-Bogdan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: Future orientation is a multidimensional and multistage phenomenon. Studies have indicated that how adolescents anticipate and plan for their future is greatly influenced by the particular context in which they are placed, but most of the research in this area has been conducted with adolescents from western cultures. Aim: This study examined the personal (getting married, moving with the partner, having a child and professional (having a job, starting a business future planning of adolescents in contemporary Romania and its relation with adolescents’ background and with parents and friends support. Method: We administered a questionnaire measuring their future orientation and support from parents and friends to 3524 high school seniors from Romania. Results: Adolescents’ personal future planning varies across different life domains. Females were more likely to plan moving with the partner and getting married, while males were more likely to plan a career option. Family had an effect on professional plans, but the effect is negative, while friends were positive associated with all the future planning

  14. Review of past experiments at the FELIX facility and future plans for ITER applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, T.Q.; Turner, L.R.

    1993-01-01

    FELIX is an experimental test facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the study of electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, shield systems of fusion reactors. From 1983 to 1986 five major test series, including static and dynamic tests, were conducted and are reviewed in this paper. The dynamic tests demonstrated an important coupling effect between eddy currents and motion in a conducting structure. Recently the U.S. has proposed to the ITER Joint Central Team to use FELIX for testing mock-up components to study electromagnetic effects encountered during plasma disruptions and other off-normal events. The near and long term plans for ITER applications are discussed. (author)

  15. An innovative approach for planning and execution of pre-experimental runs for Design of Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Arsalan Farooq

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the study of the pre-experimental planning phase of the Design of Experiments (DoE in order to improve the final product quality. The pre-experimental planning phase includes a clear identification of the problem statement, selection of control factors and their respective levels and ranges. To improve production quality based on the DoE a new approach for the pre-experimental planning phase, called Non-Conformity Matrix (NCM, is presented. This article also addresses the key steps of the pre-experimental runs considering a consumer goods manufacturing process. Results of the application for an industrial case show that this methodology can support a clear definition of the problem and also a correct identification of the factor ranges in particular situations. The proposed new approach allows modeling the entire manufacturing system holistically and correctly defining the factor ranges and respective levels for a more effective application of DoE. This new approach can be a useful resource for both research and industrial practitioners who are dedicated to large DoE projects with unknown factor interactions, when the operational levels and ranges are not completely defined.

  16. Generation of an activation map for decommissioning planning of the Berlin Experimental Reactor-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapins, Janis; Guilliard, Nicole; Bernnat, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    The BER-II is an experimental facility with 10 MW that was operated since 1974. Its planned operation will end in 2019. To support the decommissioning planning, a map with the overall distribution of relevant radionuclides has to be created according to the state of the art. In this paper, a procedure to create these 3-d maps using a combination of MCNP and deterministic methods is presented. With this approach, an activation analysis is performed for the whole reactor geometry including the most remote parts of the concrete shielding.

  17. Planning for the future : the role of mobility in residential and lifestyle choices of baby boomers and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the extent to which Baby Boomers and older adults take mobility and : transportation issues into consideration as they make individual residential and lifestyle plans for : their future older years. While transportation and urban ...

  18. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter After Three Years of LHC Operation and Plans for a Future Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Performance of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter during three years of LHC operation is presented. Upgrades and plans for future upgrades in order to prepare the LAr calorimeter for higher luminosity are presented.

  19. Results and future plans for the innovative basic research on high temperature engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is under the rise-to-power stage at the Oarai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). This reactor is aimed not only at establishment of the infrastructural technology on high temperature gas-cooled reactor and its upgrading, but also at promotion of the innovative basic research on high temperature engineering. The research is a series of innovative high-temperature irradiation studies, making the best use of the characteristic of the HTTR that it provides a very wide irradiation space at high temperatures. The JAERI has been conducting preliminary tests of the innovative research since 1994, in collaboration with universities and other research institutes, in the fields of 1) new materials development, 2) high temperature radiation chemistry and fusion-related research, and 3) high temperature irradiation techniques and other nuclear research. The HTTR Utilization Research Committee has been examining the results and methodology of the preliminary tests and the future plans, as well as examining the preparatory arrangements of facilities for the HTTR irradiation and post-irradiation examinations. This report presents a summary of results of the preliminary tests and preparatory arrangements for about seven years, together with an outline of the future plans. (author)

  20. Evolution of strategic risks under future scenarios for improved utility master plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, Ana; Lickorish, Fiona; Pollard, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Integrated, long-term risk management in the water sector is poorly developed. Whilst scenario planning has been applied to singular issues (e.g. climate change), it often misses a link to risk management because the likelihood of impacts in the long-term are frequently unaccounted for in these analyses. Here we apply the morphological approach to scenario development for a case study utility, Empresa Portuguesa das Águas Livres (EPAL). A baseline portfolio of strategic risks threatening the achievement of EPAL's corporate objectives was evolved through the lens of three future scenarios, 'water scarcity', 'financial resource scarcity' and 'strong economic growth', built on drivers such as climate, demographic, economic, regulatory and technological changes and validated through a set of expert workshops. The results represent how the baseline set of risks might develop over a 30 year period, allowing threats and opportunities to be identified and enabling strategies for master plans to be devised. We believe this to be the first combined use of risk and futures methods applied to a portfolio of strategic risks in the water utility sector. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Strategic planning for future learning environments: an exploration of interpersonal, interprofessional and political factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Cathrine

    2013-09-01

    This article, written from the stance of a public planner and a policy maker, explores the challenges and potential in creating future learning environments through the concept of a new learning landscape. It is based on the belief that physical planning can support the strategic goals of universities. In Denmark, a political focus on education as a mean to improve national capacity for innovation and growth are redefining the universities role in society. This is in turn changing the circumstances for the physical planning. Drawing on examples of physical initiatives in three different scales--city, building and room scale, the paper highlights how space and place matters on an interpersonal, an interprofessional and a political level. The article suggests that a wider understanding of how new learning landscapes are created--both as a material reality and a political discourse--can help frame an emerging community of practice. This involves university leaders, faculty and students, architects, designers and urban planners, citizens and policy makers with the common goal of creating future learning environments today.

  2. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Urban Growth Dynamics in Perth, Western Australia: Using Applied Remote Sensing for Sustainable Future Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew MacLachlan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth observation data can provide valuable assessments for monitoring the spatial extent of (unsustainable urban growth of the world’s cities to better inform planning policy in reducing associated economic, social and environmental costs. Western Australia has witnessed rapid economic expansion since the turn of the century founded upon extensive natural resource extraction. Thus, Perth, the state capital of Western Australia, has encountered significant population and urban growth in response to the booming state economy. However, the recent economic slowdown resulted in the largest decrease in natural resource values that Western Australia has ever experienced. Here, we present multi-temporal urban expansion statistics from 1990 to 2015 for Perth, derived from Landsat imagery. Current urban estimates used for future development plans and progress monitoring of infill and density targets are based upon aggregated census data and metrics unrepresentative of actual land cover change, underestimating overall urban area. Earth observation provides a temporally consistent methodology, identifying areal urban area at higher spatial and temporal resolution than current estimates. Our results indicate that the spatial extent of the Perth Metropolitan Region has increased 45% between 1990 and 2015, over 320 km2. We highlight the applicability of earth observation data in accurately quantifying urban area for sustainable targeted planning practices.

  4. Capital planning for operating theatres based on projecting future theatre requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Jennifer A; Tyler, Peter; Jayasinha, Hirani; Meleady, Kathleen T; Jones, Neill

    2011-05-01

    During 2006, NSW and ACT Health Departments jointly engaged KPMG to develop an Operating Theatre Requirements' Projection Model and an accompanying planning guideline. A research scan was carried out to identify drivers of surgical demand, theatre capacity and theatre performance, as well as locating existing approaches to modelling operating theatre requirements for planning purposes. The project delivered a Microsoft Excel-based model for projecting future operating theatre requirements, together with an accompanying guideline for use of the model and interpretation of its outputs. It provides a valuable addition to the suite of tools available to Health staff for service and capital planning. The model operates with several limitations, largely due to being data dependent, and the state and completeness of available theatre activity data. However, the operational flexibility built into the model allows users to compensate for these limitations, on a case by case basis, when the user has access to suitable, local data. The design flexibility of the model means that updating the model as improved data become available is not difficult; resulting in revisions being able to be made quickly, and disseminated to users rapidly.

  5. Comprehensive Care Plan Development Using Resident Assessment Instrument Framework: Past, Present, and Future Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ellen Dellefield

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Development of the comprehensive care plan (CCP is a requirement for nursing homes participating in the federal Medicare and Medicaid programs, referred to as skilled nursing facilities. The plan must be developed within the context of the comprehensive interdisciplinary assessment framework—the Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI. Consistent compliance with this requirement has been difficult to achieve. To improve the quality of CCP development within this framework, an increased understanding of complex factors contributing to inconsistent compliance is required. In this commentary, we examine the history of the comprehensive care plan; its development within the RAI framework; linkages between the RAI and registered nurse staffing; empirical evidence of the CCP’s efficacy; and the limitations of extant standards of practices in CCP development. Because of the registered nurse’s educational preparation, professional practice standards, and licensure obligations, the essential contributions of professional nurses in CCP development are emphasized. Recommendations for evidence-based micro and macro level practice changes with the potential to improve the quality of CCP development and regulatory compliance are presented. Suggestions for future research are given.

  6. Energy futures, state planning policies and coal mine contests in rural New South Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, Linda H.

    2016-01-01

    The United Nations 2015 Climate Change Conference established a framework for keeping global temperature increase “well below” two degrees Celsius through commitments by the parties to significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The agreement has implications for the energy policies of all countries, not least major coal exporters like Australia. By contrast, the government's 2015 Energy White Paper lays out the vision for the country's future as a “global energy superpower” dominated by the export of fossil fuels for decades to come. Legislative frameworks around planning, land use, mining, heritage and environment have moved in synchrony with this agenda. Rural landowners in the big coal rich geological basins of Australia are directly impacted by current government policies on energy exports and on domestic supply. This article follows the coal value chain to rural communities in New South Wales where new mines are being built, and analyses the politics of land use, natural resources and energy from the vantage point of landowner engagement with government and corporations in the policy, legislative and regulatory domains. The need for more equitable, democratic and precautionary approaches to energy policy, heritage and environmental planning and agricultural land use is highlighted. - Highlights: • Australian energy policies prioritise coal and gas exports to emerging economies. • Rural landholders are marginalised in mining law, environmental protection legislation and planning regulations. • Disputes with companies centre on control of natural resources necessary for agriculture.

  7. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  8. Soil class around me Serpong experimental power reactor (EPR) site plan base on micro tremor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjiyono; Soehaimi A; Hadi Suntoko; Yuliastuti; Syaeful H

    2015-01-01

    Surface geological characteristics has an important role on site response analysis in a region. In regard with experimental power reactor (EPR) construction plan in Serpong, the subsurface modeling from combination array and single station micro tremor data was done. The array and single station micro tremor measurement were performed in 9 and 90 sites, respectively, at ± 1 km radius around the EPR site plan. The Vs30 value was calculated from shear wave velocity structure around the investigated area. The soil classification based on Vs30 in the investigated area generally consists of SD (medium soil) and SC (soft rock) class. The EPR site plan its self in the SD class region. (author)

  9. Future Career Plans and Practice Patterns of Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residents in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Jason; Coolen, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The practice patterns of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists continue to evolve with each new generation of physicians. Diversifying subspecialties, changes in resident duty hours, job market saturation, and desire for work-life balance are playing stronger roles. Professional practice direction and needs assessment may be aided by awareness of future Obstetrics and Gynaecology physician career plans and expectations. The objective of this study was to determine the expected career plans and practice patterns of Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology residents following residency. The SOGC Junior Member Committee administered its third career planning survey to Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology residents electronically in December 2011. The data collected was statistically analyzed and compared to previous surveys. There were 183 responses giving a response rate of 43%. More than one half of all residents were considering postgraduate training (58%). Projected practice patterns included: 84% maintaining obstetrical practice, 60% locuming, and 50% job-sharing. The majority of residents expected to work in a 6 to 10 person call group (48%), work 3 to 5 call shifts per month (72%), work 41 to 60 hours weekly (69%), and practise in a city with a population greater than 500 000 (45%). Only 18% of residents surveyed were in favour of streaming residency programs in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Canadian resident career plan and expected practice pattern assessment remains an important tool for aiding in resource allocation and strategic development of care and training in Obstetrics and Gynaecology in Canada. Copyright © 2016 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Examining the support needs of ageing family carers in developing future plans for a relative with an intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Laurence; Truesdale-Kennedy, Maria; Ryan, Assumpta; McConkey, Roy

    2012-09-01

    Planning for the future care of adults with an intellectual disability after the main family carer ceases their care, continues to be a sensitive and difficult time posing challenges for service providers internationally. Limited research has been undertaken on this topic because until recently, people with intellectual disability usually pre-deceased their parents. This study examined ageing carers' preferences for future care and the support systems required to make such future plans. The study was conducted in one region of the United Kingdom with a high proportion of family carers. A mixed methods design was employed. In Stage 1, a structured questionnaire was used to collate information on the health, caregiving demands and future planning preferences of 112 parent and sibling carers; aged 60-94 years. In Stage 2, 19 in-depth semistructured interviews were undertaken with a sample of carers to explore a range of issues around future planning. Over half of the carers were lone carers, mainly female, with many reporting a wide range of health problems. A third of these carers reported that their caregiving resulted in high levels of anxiety. The main preference of the carers was for the person to remain in the family home, with either the family and/or paid staff to support them. A minority of parent carers preferred the person to move into the home of a sibling, although some favoured the person moving to a residential facility with other people with intellectual disabilities. The majority of carers did not want their relative to move into an older people's residential/nursing facility. In the qualitative data, four main themes were identified around future planning: unremitting apprehension, the extent of planning, obstacles encountered and solutions for future planning. Avoidance, lack of guidance and a lack of appropriate residential provision were cited as obstacles to making future plans compounded by the emotional upset experienced by carers in thinking

  11. The future of health economics: The potential of behavioral and experimental economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Hansen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Health care systems around the globe are facing great challenges. The demand for health care is increasing due to the continuous development of new medical technologies, changing demographics, increasing income levels, and greater expectations from patients. The possibilities and willingness to expand health care resources, however, are limited. Consequently, health care organizations are increasingly required to take economic restrictions into account, and there is an urgent need for improved efficiency. It is reasonable to ask whether the health economics field of today is prepared and equipped to help us meet these challenges. Our aim with this article is twofold: to introduce the fields of behavioral and experimental economics and to then identify and characterize health economics areas where these two fields have a promising potential. We also discuss the advantages of a pluralistic view in health economics research, and we anticipate a dynamic future for health economics.

  12. Gut Microbiota in Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: Current Applications and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Yue

    2018-01-01

    The gut environment and gut microbiome dysbiosis have been demonstrated to significantly influence a range of disorders in humans, including obesity, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is an autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The etiology of MS is not clear, and it should involve both genetic and extrinsic factors. The extrinsic factors responsible for predisposition to MS remain elusive. Recent studies on MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), have found that gastrointestinal microbiota may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MS/EAE. Thus, gut microbiome adjustment may be a future direction of treatment in MS. In this review, we discuss the characteristics of the gut microbiota, the connection between the brain and the gut, and the changes in gut microbiota in MS/EAE, and we explore the possibility of applying microbiota therapies in patients with MS. PMID:29805314

  13. Personalized translational epilepsy research - Novel approaches and future perspectives: Part II: Experimental and translational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sebastian; van Alphen, Natascha; Becker, Albert; Chiocchetti, Andreas; Deichmann, Ralf; Deller, Thomas; Freiman, Thomas; Freitag, Christine M; Gehrig, Johannes; Hermsen, Anke M; Jedlicka, Peter; Kell, Christian; Klein, Karl Martin; Knake, Susanne; Kullmann, Dimitri M; Liebner, Stefan; Norwood, Braxton A; Omigie, Diana; Plate, Karlheinz; Reif, Andreas; Reif, Philipp S; Reiss, Yvonne; Roeper, Jochen; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W; Schorge, Stephanie; Schratt, Gerhard; Schwarzacher, Stephan W; Steinbach, Joachim P; Strzelczyk, Adam; Triesch, Jochen; Wagner, Marlies; Walker, Matthew C; von Wegner, Frederic; Rosenow, Felix

    2017-11-01

    Despite the availability of more than 15 new "antiepileptic drugs", the proportion of patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy has remained constant at about 20-30%. Furthermore, no disease-modifying treatments shown to prevent the development of epilepsy following an initial precipitating brain injury or to reverse established epilepsy have been identified to date. This is likely in part due to the polyetiologic nature of epilepsy, which in turn requires personalized medicine approaches. Recent advances in imaging, pathology, genetics, and epigenetics have led to new pathophysiological concepts and the identification of monogenic causes of epilepsy. In the context of these advances, the First International Symposium on Personalized Translational Epilepsy Research (1st ISymPTER) was held in Frankfurt on September 8, 2016, to discuss novel approaches and future perspectives for personalized translational research. These included new developments and ideas in a range of experimental and clinical areas such as deep phenotyping, quantitative brain imaging, EEG/MEG-based analysis of network dysfunction, tissue-based translational studies, innate immunity mechanisms, microRNA as treatment targets, functional characterization of genetic variants in human cell models and rodent organotypic slice cultures, personalized treatment approaches for monogenic epilepsies, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, therapeutic focal tissue modification, computational modeling for target and biomarker identification, and cost analysis in (monogenic) disease and its treatment. This report on the meeting proceedings is aimed at stimulating much needed investments of time and resources in personalized translational epilepsy research. This Part II includes the experimental and translational approaches and a discussion of the future perspectives, while the diagnostic methods, EEG network analysis, biomarkers, and personalized treatment approaches were addressed in Part I [1]. Copyright © 2017

  14. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF FORMING A PROFESSIONAL IMAGE OF THE FUTURE PUBLIC RELATIONS SPECIALIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Mikhailovna Semenova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the organization of research work on forming professional image of the future public relations specialist. The purposes of the work were to study components of students’ image, to test the concept of a professional image of the specialist, and also to process and evaluate the results. The author has presented three phases of experimental research: statement, formative and evaluative. As a result, a positive trend of forming a professional image was found. The conceptual model of forming a professional image of the future experts tested in the course of experiment has shown to be highly effective, while new methods of training (training, workshops, panel discussions, action games, etc. have substantially improved the level of development of a professional image. The results can be used in the training and retraining of specialists of higher education and people whose profession related to communications.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-48

  15. Modeling the impact of future development and public conservation orientation on landscape connectivity for conservation planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lechner, Alex Mark; Brown, Greg; Raymond, Christopher Mark

    2015-01-01

    aspects of conservation planning. Objectives We present an approach for characterizing the potential effects of public conservation orientation and projected future development land use scenarios on landscape connectivity. Methods Using public participation GIS techniques (mail-based surveys linked...... to a mapping component), we classified spatially explicit conservation values and preferences into a conservation orientation index consisting of positive, negative, or neutral scores. Connectivity was then modeled using a least-cost path and graph-network approach for a range of conservation orientation...... and development scenarios in the Lower Hunter region, Australia. Scenarios were modelled through either adding vegetation (positive orientation) or removing vegetation (negative orientation, development). Results Scenarios that included positive conservation orientation link the isolated eastern and western...

  16. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR for 0νββ: Current Status and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M. P.; Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Byram, D.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y.-D.; Christofferson, C. D.; Combs, D. C.; Cuesta, C.; Detwiler, J. A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yu.; Egorov, V.; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Fast, J. E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, F. M.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Howard, S.; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K. J.; Kidd, M. F.; Kochetov, O.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kouzes, R. T.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Leon, J.; Leviner, L. E.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, J.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Meijer, S.; Mertens, S.; Nomachi, M.; Orrell, J. L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, N. R.; Phillips, D. G.; Poon, A. W. P.; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rager, J.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Romero-Romero, E.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, A. G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, K. J.; Snyder, N.; Suriano, A. M.; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Trimble, J. E.; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, S.; Vetter, K.; Vorren, K.; White, B. R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Wiseman, C.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A. R.; Yu, C.-H.; Yumatov, V.

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for neutrinoless-double-beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge, while establishing the feasibility of a future tonne-scale germanium-based 0νββ experiment, and performing searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment, currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD, will consist of a pair of modular high-purity germanium detector arrays housed inside of a compact copper, lead, and polyethylene shield. Through a combination of strict materials qualifications and assay, low-background design, and powerful background rejection techniques, the Demonstrator aims to achieve a background rate in the 0νββ region of interest (ROI) of no more than 3 counts in the 0νββ-decay ROI per tonne of target isotope per year (cnts/(ROI-t-y)). The current status of the Demonstrator is discussed, as are plans for its completion.

  17. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Green, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system's ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed

  18. ALARA database value in future outage work planning and dose management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.W.; Green, W.H. [Clinton Power Station Illinois Power Co., IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    ALARA database encompassing job-specific duration and man-rem plant specific information over three refueling outages represents an invaluable tool for the outage work planner and ALARA engineer. This paper describes dose-management trends emerging based on analysis of three refueling outages at Clinton Power Station. Conclusions reached based on hard data available from a relational database dose-tracking system is a valuable tool for planning of future outage work. The system`s ability to identify key problem areas during a refueling outage is improving as more outage comparative data becomes available. Trends over a three outage period are identified in this paper in the categories of number and type of radiation work permits implemented, duration of jobs, projected vs. actual dose rates in work areas, and accuracy of outage person-rem projection. The value of the database in projecting 1 and 5 year station person-rem estimates is discussed.

  19. The Majorana Demonstrator for 0νββ: Current Status and Future Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Matthew P. [ORNL; Avignone, F. T. [University of South Carolina/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bertrand, Jr, Fred E [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo [ORNL; Radford, David C [ORNL; Romero-Romero, Elisa [ORNL; Varner, Jr, Robert L [ORNL; White, Brandon R [ORNL; Wilkerson, J. F. [UNC/Triangle Univ. Nucl. Lab, Durham, NC/ORNL; Yu, Chang-Hong [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for neutrinoless-double-beta decay (0νββ) in 76Ge, while establishing the feasibility of a future tonne-scale germanium-based 0νββ experiment, and performing searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment, currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD, will consist of a pair of modular high-purity germanium detector arrays housed inside of a compact copper, lead, and polyethylene shield. Through a combination of strict materials qualifications and assay, low-background design, and powerful background rejection techniques, the Demonstrator aims to achieve a background rate in the 0νββ region of interest (ROI) of no more than 3cnts/(ROI-t-y). The current status of the Demonstrator is discussed, as are plans for its completion.

  20. Status and future plan of KUR-ISOL for new isotope search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Akihiro [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1997-07-01

    He gas-jet type ISOL (KUR-ISOL: Kyoto University Reactor-Isotope Separator On-Line) was set up in Kyoto University Reactor in 1979. The thema of researches using KUR-ISOL are investigation of new isotope elements, study of nuclear structure of neutron-enrich nucleide in the neighborhood of 150 of mass number, development of unstable nuclide production unit and research of physical properties using unstable nuclide as probe. By KUR-ISOL, four kinds of new isotopes such as {sup 156}Pm, {sup 155}Nd, {sup 154}Pr and {sup 152}Ce and {beta}-decay of {sup 150}La had been identified. {beta}-decay of {sup 150}La as a sample of them was explained in this report. Today, the experiment of {sup 153}Pr, {sup 152}Pr and {sup 149,150}Ce are proceeding. For future plans, new beam line and new target used transuranic elements will be developed. (S.Y.)

  1. Future Plans of the ATLAS Collaboration for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hristova, Ivana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    These proceedings report the current plans to upgrade the ATLAS detector at CERN for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The HL-LHC is expected to start operations in the middle of 2026, aiming to reach an ultimate peak instantaneous luminosity of 7.5$\\times10^{34}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, corresponding to approximately 200 inelastic proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing, and to deliver over a period of twelve years more than ten times the integrated luminosity of the large hadron collider (LHC) Runs 1-3 combined (up to $4000$ fb$^{-1}$). This is a huge challenge to all sub-systems of the detector which will need extensive upgrades to allow the experiment to pursue a rich and interesting physics programme in the future.

  2. Optimization design study of an innovative divertor concept for future experimental tokamak-type fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willem Janssens, Ir.; Crutzen, Y.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.; Matera, R.

    1991-01-01

    The design optimization study of an innovative divertor concept for future experimental tokamak-type fusion devices is both an answer to the actual problems encountered in the multilayer divertor proposals and an illustration of a rational modelling philosophy and optimization strategy for the development of a new divertor structure. Instead of using mechanical attachment or metallurgical bonding of the protective material to the heat sink as in most actual divertor concepts, the so-called brush divertor in this study uses an array of unidirectional fibers penetrating in both the protective armor and the underling composite heat sink. Although the approach is fully concentrated on the divertor performance, including both a description of its function from the theoretical point of view and an overview of the problems related to the materials choice and evaluation, both the approach followed in the numerical modelling and the judgment of the results are thought to be valid also for other applications. Therefore the spin-off of the study must be situated in both the technological progress towards a feasible divertor solution, which introduces no additional physical uncertainties, and in the general area of the thermo-mechanical finite-element modelling on both macro-and microscale. The brush divertor itself embodies the use, and thus the modelling, of advanced materials such as tailor-made metal matrix composites and dispersion strengthened metals, and is shown to offer large potential advantages, demanding however and experimental validation under working conditions. It is clearly indicated where the need originates for an integrated experimental program which must allow to verify the basic modelling assumptions in order to arrive at the use of numerical computation as a powerful and realistic tool of structural testing and life-time prediction

  3. Energy for our future : a plan for British Columbia progress to date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostergaard, P.

    2004-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation provided a brief overview of British Columbia's electric power system, the policies affecting it, the province's energy plans and support mechanisms to address issues and challenges. In British Columbia, 80 per cent of the electricity is primarily hydro based and is generated by BC Hydro, a public utility. The market structure is regulated and the electricity rates are based on cost of service. The BC market includes western North America with interconnections to Washington State and Alberta. The key issues and challenges facing the electricity sector in the province are meeting domestic demand; adopting clean competitive energy alternatives; export market access and downstream benefits; interest and exchange rates; firming, storage and shaping; transmission upgrades to an aging infrastructure; local governments and First Nations relationships and, permitting and approvals. The transmission system was reviewed with reference to trade with the Pacific Northwest, flexibility and storage. The province's future energy plans are based on low rates and public ownership, secure and reliable supply, more private sector opportunities, and environmental responsibility. figs

  4. Assessing future flood hazards for adaptation planning in a northern European coastal community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo eSorensen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available From a transdisciplinary approach in the town of Thyboron, Denmark, we investigate couplings between sea state (i.e. mean and extreme and flooding hazards today and ahead. This includes analyses of change and variability in the groundwater table, precipitation, land motion, geotechnical ground properties, sewerage systems and other infrastructure to outline a more complete platform for the integration of knowledge into climate adaptation schemes at this highly vulnerable coastal location. It involves the engagement of the main stakeholders who, although having different responsibilities, interests, needs of knowledge and data, and different timeframes for investment and planning, must join in a common appraisal of the challenges faced ahead to provide for better adaptation measures. Apart from obvious adverse effects from future storm surge events, knowledge about the coupled effects of the abovementioned parameters needs to be taken into account to reach optimal mitigation and adaptation measures. Through stakeholder interviews it becomes clear that an enhanced focus on transdisciplinary research is a viable way forward to develop such measures: it will bring in more knowledge, a broader scope, and it will provide for more holistic solutions that both serve to protect the town and allow for business development and better municipal planning ahead.

  5. Present status and future plans of the study for preparation of Pu reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Mika; Kageyama, Tomio; Suzuki, Toru

    2007-01-01

    All accountancy analysis at the Plutonium Fuel Development Center of JAEA is performed by isotope dilution mass spectrometry with well-characterized standard materials. Though Pu reference materials has been supplied from foreign country, importing those Pu materials is gradually becoming more difficult and may be almost impossible to import them in future. Thus, in order to establish the capability and expertise for the preparation of Pu reference materials, JAEA has started collaborative work with NBL who has high skills for preparing and supplying nuclear reference materials for long periods. One of the targets of this collaboration is preparation of standard material for IDMS (LSD spike). MOX powder which has been stored in JAEA was dissolved and Purified to obtain Pu solution. A small portion of the Purified solution was transported to NBL for analysis. LSD spike will be prepared from this Pu solution and then validation analysis and performance test including stability test will be performed with NBL and JAEA. This report presents status and future plans for the collaboration work. (author)

  6. Clermont Preferred Future: Stakeholder Reflections on a Community Foresight and Planning Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Parsons

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the potential of the mining industry to contribute to social development (community building, resilience and wellbeing and to economic transitioning post-mining. A number of factors may facilitate the realisation of this potential, in particular community engagement activities that build community resilience and capacity to adapt to changing environments. This paper reviews a community foresight initiative, named Clermont Preferred Future (CPF, which is associated with a coal mine development in the town of Clermont in Queensland, Australia. The purpose of CPF, which was adopted in 2008 and is intended to continue to 2020, is to facilitate a transition to a prosperous and sustainable future by leveraging opportunities from coal mining while reducing dependence on the industry. CPF has been cited as a successful model of engagement and community development, and was highly commended in the Community Economic Development category at the 2011 Australian National Awards for Economic Development Excellence. This review draws on the experiences of stakeholders involved in CPF, and on foresight, community engagement, and community development literature. It identifies what has worked well, what has fallen short of the project’s rhetorical aspirations, and how processes and outcomes might be improved. It also trials artwork as an engagement tool. The findings are valuable for Clermont specifically, but also for the mining industry and mining communities more broadly, as well as for other industries in the context of community engagement and strategic planning.

  7. In-situ tuff water migration/heater experiment: experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnstone, J.K.

    1980-08-01

    Tuffs on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are currently under investigation as a potential isolation medium for heat-producing nuclear wastes. The National Academy of Sciences has concurred in our identification of the potentially large water content (less than or equal to 40 vol %) of tuffs as one of the important issues affecting their suitability for a repository. This Experimental Plan describes an in-situ experiment intended as an initial assessment of water generation/migration in response to a thermal input. The experiment will be conducted in the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff in Tunnel U12g (G-Tunnel) located in the north-central region of the NTS. While the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff is not a potential repository medium, it has physical, thermal, and mechanical properties very similar to those tuffs currently under consideration and is accessible at depth (400 m below the surface) in an existing facility. Other goals of the experiment are to support computer-code and instrumentation development, and to measure in-situ thermal properties. The experimental array consists of a central electrical heater, 1.2 m long x 10.2 cm diameter, surrounded by three holes for measuring water-migration behavior, two holes for measuring temperature profiles, one hole for measuring thermally induced stress in the rock, and one hole perpendicular to the heater to measure displacement with a laser. This Experimental Plan describes the experimental objectives, the technical issues, the site, the experimental array, thermal and thermomechanical modeling results, the instrumentation, the data-acquisition system, posttest characterization, and the organizational details

  8. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental-Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) identifies the quality of data necessary to meet the specific objectives associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental-Waste Characterization Program (the Program). DOE plans to conduct experiments in the WIPP during a Test Phase of approximately 5 years. These experiments will be conducted to reduce the uncertainties associated with the prediction of several processes (e.g., gas generation) that may influence repository performance. The results of the experiments will be used to assess the ability of the WIPP to meet regulatory requirements for the long-term protection of human health and the environment from the disposal of TRU wastes. 37 refs., 25 figs., 18 tabs

  9. LASL experimental engineered waste burial facility: design considerations and preliminary plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePoorter, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The LASL Experimental Engineered Waste Burial Facility is a part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program on Shallow-Land Burial Technology. It is a test facility where basic information can be obtained on the processes that occur in shallow-land burial operations and where new concepts for shallow-land burial can be tested on an accelerated basis on an appropriate scale. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the factors considered in the design of the facility and to present a preliminary description of the experiments that are initially planned. This will be done by discussing waste management philosophies, the purposes of the facility in the context of the waste management philosophy for the facility, and the design considerations, and by describing the experiments initially planned for inclusion in the facility, and the facility site

  10. Monitoring plan and maintenance NPP the Vandellos I and future prospects; Plan de vigilancia y mantenimiento de la instalacion nuclear Vandellos 1 y perspectivas de futuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margalef Escoda, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper intends to give to know the singularities of an installation phase of latency and your monitoring and maintenance plan. the horizons that has the installation medium-term to guide the future dismantling level 3 monitoring and maintenance activities are also described.

  11. CDApps: integrated software for experimental planning and data processing at beamline B23, Diamond Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rohanah; Benning, Kristian; Javorfi, Tamas; Longo, Edoardo; Rudd, Timothy R; Pulford, Bill; Siligardi, Giuliano

    2015-03-01

    The B23 Circular Dichroism beamline at Diamond Light Source has been operational since 2009 and has seen visits from more than 200 user groups, who have generated large amounts of data. Based on the experience of overseeing the users' progress at B23, four key areas requiring the most assistance are identified: planning of experiments and note-keeping; designing titration experiments; processing and analysis of the collected data; and production of experimental reports. To streamline these processes an integrated software package has been developed and made available for the users. The subsequent article summarizes the main features of the software.

  12. The experimental plan of displacement- and frequency-noise free laser interferometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokeyama, K; Sato, S; Kawamura, S; Nishizawa, A; Chen, Y; Pai, A; Somiya, K; Ward, R; Sugamoto, A

    2008-01-01

    We present the partial demonstration of displacement- and laser-noise free interferometer (DFI) and the next experimental plan to examine the complete configuration. A part of the full implementation of DFI has been demonstrated to confirm the cancellation of beamsplitter displacements. The displacements were suppressed by about two orders of magnitude. The aim of the next experiment is to operate the system and to confirm the cancellation of all displacement noises, while the gravitational wave (GW) signals survive. The optical displacements will be simulated by electro-optic modulators (EOM). To simulate the GW contribution to laser lights, we will use multiple EOMs

  13. Semi-inclusive DIS Experiments Using Transversely Polarized Targets in Hall-A: Current Results and Future Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allada Kalyan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of single (SSA and double spin asymmetries (DSA in semiinclusive DIS reactions using polarized targets provide a powerful method to probe transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs. In particular, the experimentally measured SSA on nucleon targets can help in extracting the transversity and Sivers distribution functions of u and d-quarks. Similarly, the measured DSA are sensitive to the quark spin-orbital correlations, and provide an access to the TMD parton distribution function (g1T. A recent experiment conducted in Hall-A Jefferson Lab using transversely polarized 3He provide first such measurements on “effective” neutron target. The measurement was performed using 5.9 GeV beam from CEBAF and measured the target SSA/DSA in the SIDIS reaction 3He↑(e, e′π±X. The kinematical range, x = 0.19 ~ 0.34, at Q2 = 1.77 ~ 2.73 (GeV/c2, was focused on the valence quark region. The results from this measurement along with our plans for future high precision measurements in Hall-A are presented.

  14. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental-Waste Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) identifies the quality of data necessary to meet the specific objectives associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental-Waste Characterization Program (the Program). This experimental-waste characterization program is only one part of the WIPP Test Phase, both in the short- and long-term, to quantify and evaluate the characteristics and behavior of transuranic (TRU) wastes in the repository environment. Other parts include the bin-scale and alcove tests, drum-scale tests, and laboratory experiments. In simplified terms, the purpose of the Program is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data describing the characteristics of the wastes that will be emplaced in the WIPP, while the remaining WIPP Test Phase is directed at examining the behavior of these wastes in the repository environment. 50 refs., 35 figs., 33 tabs

  15. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor: Physics issues, capabilities and physics program plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesley, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Present status and understanding of the principal plasma-performance determining physics issues that affect the physics design and operational capabilities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER EDA Agreement and Protocol 2 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1994)] are presented. Emphasis is placed on the five major physics-basis issues emdash energy confinement, beta limit, density limit, impurity dilution and radiation loss, and the feasibility of obtaining partial-detached divertor operation emdash that directly affect projections of ITER fusion power and burn duration performance. A summary of these projections is presented and the effect of uncertainties in the physics-basis issues is examined. ITER capabilities for experimental flexibility and plasma-performance optimization are also described, and how these capabilities may enter into the ITER physics program plan is discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. The impact of adolescent females' assessments of parenthood and employment on plans for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, L A

    1986-02-01

    This study explores adolescent females' assessments of the rewards and costs of employment and parenthood, and the impact of these assessments on their plans for organizing their adult lives. 549 young women enrolled in the 11th and 12 grades at public schools in New York City completed questionnaires addressing their future work and fertility plans, characteristics of their present family life, and their assessments of how rewarding and costly the roles of employee and parent would be to them. Results suggest that daughters of homemakers and daughters of employed women differ in their assessment of each role, and take different factors into consideration when making these assessments. In evaluating work, daughters whose mothers are employed were likely to depend on their mothers' experiences for guidance. On the other hand, daughters whose mothers are homemakers have to go through a more elaborate process of deduction. They appear to assess whether their mothers are happy where they are now and then project whether another role would be more satisfying. These young women also tend to incorporate the opinion of the father more than do daughters of employed mothers. In evaluating the impact of children, the young woman's relation with her own mother is a critical factor affecting both group' assessments of the costs of children as well as the employed group's assessments of the rewards of children. Finally, the limitations of the sample should be kept in mind when discussing the results. Though the sample was large numerically, the overall response rate was low. In addition, the sample consisted of a large number of Catholic respondents.

  17. Proceedings of the Workshop on Experimental and theoretical problems around actinides for future reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerveno, Maelle; Dupuis, Marc; Bauge, E.; Hilaire, S.; Romain, P.; Morillon, B.; Delaroche, J.P.; Dupuis, M.; Peru, S.; Belier, G.; Bonnet, T.; Laborie, J.M.; Laurent, B.; Ledoux, X.; Varignon, C.; Meot, V.; Bernard, David; Capote, Roberto; Kawano, T.; Bond, E.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Raynal, J.; Plompen, Arjan J.M.; Drohe, J.C.; Nankov, N.; Nyman, M.; Rouki, C.; Bacquias, A.; Dessagne, Ph.; Henning, G.; Karam, H.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Thiry, J.C.; Borcea, C.; Negret, A.; Stanoiu, M.; Bucurescu, D.; Deleanu, D.; Filipescu, D.; Ghita, D.; Glodariu, T.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Olacel, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Goriely, S.; Pavlik, A.; Jericha, E.; Ledoux, X.; Becker, J.A.; Macri, R.; Authier, N.; Hyneck, D.; Jansen, Y.; Legendre, J.; Jacquet, X.; Gunsing, Frank; Henning, Greg

    2014-03-01

    Since the two last decades, in the framework of general researches on future reactors, strong efforts have been devoted to improve the quantity and quality of nuclear data. Indeed, in order to improve safety margins and fuel optimization, but also to develop new kind of reactors or fuel cycles, accurate nuclear data are mandatory. At the end of the twentieth century, nuclear data bases did not reach the required quality level to be used in future reactor simulations. Therefore, both experimentalists and theoreticians, in the framework of several European research programs (HINDAS, NUDATRA, ANDES, CHANDA...), have tried to make the situation better. New sets of precise data measurements concerning fission, capture, (n,xn),..., reaction cross sections for a large variety of nuclei have been initiated. From evaluation point of view, the JEFF project has also improved the quality of nuclear data bases for several nuclei. In parallel, on the theoretical side, progress has also been made concerning cross section modeling in a wide range of energy (eV to GeV). The goal was to provide theoretical models with a good predictive power to feed data bases where experimental data are still missing and where the measurement is too complex. In this context, for example, a new nuclear reaction code TALYS has been developed. Collaboration between experimentalists, theoreticians and evaluators are then of strong interest to make progress. The number of problems to be solved covers various fields of nuclear reactions such as fission, capture or inelastic scattering. In order to avoid too large an audience we have decided, as a first step, to focus on inelastic scattering on actinides. Experimentally, three main methods exist to measure the total inelastic cross section: activation, detection of the emitted neutrons and prompt-gamma spectroscopy. This last method is, nevertheless, dependent on theoretical models since it provides (n,xn γ) cross sections and not the total inelastic

  18. Experimental Plan for EDF Energy Creep Rabbit Graphite Irradiations- Rev. 2 (replaces Rev. 0 ORNL/TM/2013/49).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2014-07-01

    The experimental results obtained here will assist in the development and validation of future models of irradiation induced creep of graphite by providing the following data: Inert creep stain data from low to lifetime AGR fluence Inert creep-property data (especially CTE) from low to lifetime AGR fluence Effect of oxidation on creep modulus (by indirect comparison with experiment 1 and direct comparison with experiment 3 NB. Experiment 1 and 3 are not covered here) Data to develop a mechanistic understanding, including oAppropriate creep modulus (including pinning and high dose effects on structure) oInvestigation of CTE-creep strain behavior under inert conditions oInformation on the effect of applied stress/creep strain on crystallite orientation (requires XRD) oEffect of creep strain on micro-porosity (requires tomography & microscopy) This document describes the experimental work planned to meet the requirements of project technical specification [1] and EDF Energy requests for additional Pre-IE work. The PIE work is described in detail in this revision (Section 8 and 9).

  19. Read-only-memory-based quantum computation: Experimental explorations using nuclear magnetic resonance and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sypher, D.R.; Brereton, I.M.; Wiseman, H.M.; Hollis, B.L.; Travaglione, B.C.

    2002-01-01

    Read-only-memory-based (ROM-based) quantum computation (QC) is an alternative to oracle-based QC. It has the advantages of being less 'magical', and being more suited to implementing space-efficient computation (i.e., computation using the minimum number of writable qubits). Here we consider a number of small (one- and two-qubit) quantum algorithms illustrating different aspects of ROM-based QC. They are: (a) a one-qubit algorithm to solve the Deutsch problem; (b) a one-qubit binary multiplication algorithm; (c) a two-qubit controlled binary multiplication algorithm; and (d) a two-qubit ROM-based version of the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm. For each algorithm we present experimental verification using nuclear magnetic resonance ensemble QC. The average fidelities for the implementation were in the ranges 0.9-0.97 for the one-qubit algorithms, and 0.84-0.94 for the two-qubit algorithms. We conclude with a discussion of future prospects for ROM-based quantum computation. We propose a four-qubit algorithm, using Grover's iterate, for solving a miniature 'real-world' problem relating to the lengths of paths in a network

  20. Planning to Explore: Using a Coordinated Multisource Infrastructure to Overcome Present and Future Space Flight Planning Challenges

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Few human endeavors present as much of a planning and scheduling challenge as space flight, particularly manned space flight. Just on the operational side of it,...

  1. Program planning for future improvement in managing ORNL's radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This report is intended to serve as a reference document and guide in developing the long-term improvements section of ORNL's radioactive waste management plan. The report reviews ORNL's operations and future program needs in terms of currently applicable DOE regulations and also in terms of regulations and accepted practices of the commerical sector of the nuclear power industry so that the impact of potential future adoption of these regulations and standards on ORNL's operations can be fully evaluated. The principal conclusion reached after reviewing ORNL's waste management operations is that these operations are currently being conducted in a manner that does not endanger the health or safety of workers or the general public and that does not have an adverse effect on the environment. Although nineteen specific problem areas have been identified all of these problems can be attributed to one of the following: a) the legacy of past practices; b) gradual deterioration of systems which have reached (or are near to reaching) the end of their reasonable design lives; and c) potential changes in regulations applicable to ORNL. All of the programs designed to improve or correct these problem areas could be accomplished within a four year period. However, given current limitations on manpower and capital, these programs would more likely be spread out over a five to ten year period of time if they were all to be undertaken. The cost of undertaking all of these projects concurrently is estimated to be between 60 and 100 million dollars. Due to the many unknowns and uncertainties associated with the problem areas, actual total costs for specific projects could vary from those presented in this report by as much as 300 percent. (DMC)

  2. NASA Life Sciences Data Repositories: Tools for Retrospective Analysis and Future Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D.; Wear, M.; VanBaalen, M.; Lee, L.; Fitts, M.

    2011-01-01

    As NASA transitions from the Space Shuttle era into the next phase of space exploration, the need to ensure the capture, analysis, and application of its research and medical data is of greater urgency than at any other previous time. In this era of limited resources and challenging schedules, the Human Research Program (HRP) based at NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) recognizes the need to extract the greatest possible amount of information from the data already captured, as well as focus current and future research funding on addressing the HRP goal to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. To this end, the Science Management Office and the Medical Informatics and Health Care Systems Branch within the HRP and the Space Medicine Division have been working to make both research data and clinical data more accessible to the user community. The Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA), the research repository housing data and information regarding the physiologic effects of microgravity, and the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH-R), the clinical repository housing astronaut data, have joined forces to achieve this goal. The task of both repositories is to acquire, preserve, and distribute data and information both within the NASA community and to the science community at large. This is accomplished via the LSDA s public website (http://lsda.jsc.nasa.gov), which allows access to experiment descriptions including hardware, datasets, key personnel, mission descriptions and a mechanism for researchers to request additional data, research and clinical, that is not accessible from the public website. This will result in making the work of NASA and its partners available to the wider sciences community, both domestic and international. The desired outcome is the use of these data for knowledge discovery, retrospective analysis, and planning of future

  3. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor U.S. Home Team Quality Assurance Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowder, W. K.

    1998-10-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is unique in that the work is divided among an international Joint Central Team and four Home Teams, with the overall responsibility for the quality of activities performed during the project residing with the ITER Director. The ultimate responsibility for the adequacy of work performed on tasks assigned to the U.S. Home Team resides with the U.S. Home Team Leader and the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy (DOE-OFE). This document constitutes the quality assurance plan for the ITER U.S. Home Team. This plan describes the controls exercised by U.S. Home Team management and the Performing Institutions to ensure the quality of tasks performed and the data developed for the Engineering Design Activities assigned to the U.S. Home Team and, in particular, the Research and Development Large Projects (7). This plan addresses the DOE quality assurance requirements of 10 CFR 830.120, "Quality Assurance." The plan also describes U.S. Home Team quality commitments to the ITER Quality Assurance Program. The ITER Quality Assurance Program is based on the principles described in the International Atomic Energy Agency Standard No. 50-C-QA, "Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants and Other Nuclear Facilities." Each commitment is supported with preferred implementation methodology that will be used in evaluating the task quality plans to be submitted by the Performing Institutions. The implementing provisions of the program are based on guidance provided in American National Standards Institute/American Society of Mechanical Engineers NQA-1 1994, "Quality Assurance." The individual Performing Institutions will implement the appropriate quality program provisions through their own established quality plans that have been reviewed and found to comply with U.S. Home Team quality assurance plan commitments to the ITER Quality Assurance Program. The extent of quality program provisions

  4. A challenge in future transportation research and planning: paper presented at the Conference "Energy Technologies for a Sustainable Future", Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen, 24.11.2000

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Peter

    2000-01-01

    To understand the future challenge for transportation research and planning, we must make a clear distinction between “mobility” and “transportation”. Mobility is understood to be the ca- pability or possibility of changing position within a specific system (space, society, economy, etc.). On the other hand “transportation” is “spatial mobility”, that is the capability or possibility of changing position within a spatial system (change of location, overcoming of space by peo- ple, goods, ener...

  5. Korean national QPE technique development: Analysis of current QPE results and future plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Joo Wan

    2013-04-01

    Korea Meteorological Administration(KMA) has developed a Real-time ADjusted Radar-AWS (Automatic Weather Station) Rainrate (RAD-RAR) system using eleven radars over the South Korea. The procedure of the RAD-RAR system in real time consists of four steps: 1) the quality control of volumetric reflectivity for each radar, 2) the computation of the every 10-min rain gauge rainfall within each radar, 3) the real time (10 min-updated) rainfall estimation by the Z-R relationship minimizing the difference between the 1.5-km constant altitude plan precipitation indicator and rain gauge rainfall based on Window Probability Matching Method(WPMM) and by the real-time bias correction of RAD-RAR conducted at every 10 minutes for each radar by making the bias, and 4) the composition of the 11-radar estimated rainfall data. In addition, a local gauge correction method applies for RAD-RAR system. Therefore, the correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.81 is obtained between the daily accumulated observed and RAD-RAR estimated rainfall in 2012. We like to develop a new QPE system using the multi-sensor(radar, rain gauge, numerical model output, and lightning) data for newly improving Korean national QPE system. We made the prototype QPE system in 2012 and improve the detail techniques now. In the future, the new high performance QPE system will include a dual polarization radar observation technique for providing more accurate and valuable national QPE data

  6. American’s Energy Future: An Analysis of the Proposed Energy Policy Plans in Presidential Election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsun Cheng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As the leader of the largest economy, President of the United States has substantive influence on addressing climate change problems. However, a presidential election is often dominated by issues other than energy problems. This paper focuses on the 2016 presidential election, and examines the energy plans proposed by the leading Democrat and Republican candidates. Our data from the Iowa caucus survey in January 2016 suggests that voters were more concerned about terrorism and economic issues than environmental issues. We then compare the Democratic and Republican candidate’s view of America’s energy future, and evaluate their proposed renewable energy targets. We find that the view on renewable energy is polarized between Democratic and Republican candidates, while candidates from both parties agree on the need for energy efficiency. Results from our ordinal least squares regression models suggests that Democratic candidates have moderate to ambitious goals for developing solar and other renewables. The Republican candidates favor fossil fuels and they choose not to provide any specific target for developing renewable energy. In addition, this trend of party polarization has grown more significant when compared with the past three presidential elections. Our observation suggests that energy policies need to be discussed more often regarding the diversification and decarbonization of the nation’s energy system.

  7. Mapping the receptivity of malaria risk to plan the future of control in Somalia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegana, Victor Adagi; Patil, Anand Prabhakar; Moloney, Grainne; Borle, Mohammed; Yusuf, Fahmi; Amran, Jamal; Snow, Robert William

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To measure the receptive risks of malaria in Somalia and compare decisions on intervention scale-up based on this map and the more widely used contemporary risk maps. Design Cross-sectional community Plasmodium falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) data for the period 2007–2010 corrected to a standard age range of 2 to Somalia. Participants Randomly sampled individuals of all ages. Main outcome measure Cartographic descriptions of malaria receptivity and contemporary risks in Somalia at the district level. Results The contemporary annual PfPR2–10 map estimated that all districts (n=74) and population (n=8.4 million) in Somalia were under hypoendemic transmission (≤10% PfPR2–10). Of these, 23% of the districts, home to 13% of the population, were under transmission of 10%–50% PfPR2–10) and the rest as hypoendemic. Conclusion Compared with maps of receptive risks, contemporary maps of transmission mask disparities of malaria risk necessary to prioritise and sustain future control. As malaria risk declines across Africa, efforts must be invested in measuring receptivity for efficient control planning. PMID:22855625

  8. Latest experiences and future plans on NSLS-II insertion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, T.; Hidaka, Y.; Kitegi, C.; Hidas, D.; Musardo, M.; Harder, D. A.; Rank, J.; Cappadoro, P.; Fernandes, H.; Corwin, T. [Energy Sciences Directorate, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, U.S.A (United States)

    2016-07-27

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is the latest storage ring of 3 GeV energy at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The horizontal emittance of the electron beam with the currently installed six damping wigglers is 0.9 nm.rad, which could be further reduced to 0.5 nm.rad with more insertion devices (IDs). With only one RF cavity the beam current is restricted to 200 mA. Five hundred mA operation is envisaged for next year with an addition of the second cavity. Six (plus two branches) beamlines have been commissioned in the initial phase of the project. In July 2015, three NIH funded beamlines called “Advanced Beamlines for Biological Investigations with X-rays” (ABBIX) will be added for operation. This paper describes the experiences of ID development, installation, and commissioning for the NSLS-II project as well as our future plans to improve the performance of the facility in terms of source development.

  9. Irradiation project of SiC/SiC fuel pin 'INSPIRE': Status and future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohyama, Akira; Kishimoto, Hirotatsu

    2015-01-01

    After the March 11 Disaster in East-Japan, Research and Development towards Ensuring Nuclear Safety Enhancement for LWR becomes a top priority R and D in nuclear energy policy of Japan. The role of high temperature non-metallic materials, such as SiC/SiC, is becoming important for the advanced nuclear reactor systems. SiC fibre reinforced SiC composite has been recognised to be the most attractive option for the future, now, METI fund based project, INSPIRE, has been launched as 5-year termed project at OASIS in Muroran Institute of Technology aiming at early realisation of this system. INSPIRE is the irradiation project of SiC/SiC fuel pins aiming to accumulate material, thermal, irradiation effect data of NITE-SiC/SiC in BWR environment. Nuclear fuel inserted SiC/SiC fuel pins are planned to be installed in the Halden reactor. The project includes preparing the NITE-SiC/SiC tubes, joining of end caps, preparation of rigs to control the irradiation environment to BWR condition and the instruments to measure the condition of rigs and pins in operation. Also, basic neutron irradiation data will be accumulated by SiC/SiC coupon samples currently under irradiation in BR2. The output from this project may present the potentiality of NITE-SiC/SiC fuel cladding with the first stage fuel-cladding interaction. (authors)

  10. Outline of J-PARC and development of J-PARC from nuclear physics future plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamiya, Shoji

    2006-01-01

    The origin of the Nuclear Physics Future Plan was the NUMATRON project, with which high energy heavy ions were to be accelerated. This project was not successful and another project 'Large Hadron Project' was proposed in 1986 to deliver both of high energy heavy ions and high intensity protons. This project was somewhat modified to build a 1GeV 200μA proton linac in KEK (Institute for High Energy Physics) site to produce pulsed neutrons, pulsed muons and unstable nuclei as a first step to 'Japan Hadron Project'. The linac was expected also to be an injector for KEK 12GeV synchrotron. In 2001 accelerator projects under the Ministry of Education and the Science and Technology Agency were unified to form J-PARC project, which was approved on a chance when the former two government organizations were integrated. J-PARC project aims at performing the materials and life sciences by 3GeV protons, nuclear and elementary particle physics by 50GeV protons and the researches on nuclear transmutation by 0.6GeV protons. (K.Y.)

  11. Czech interim spent fuel storage facility: operation experience, inspections and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajman, V.; Bartak, L.; Coufal, J.; Brzobohaty, K.; Kuba, S.

    1999-01-01

    The paper describes the situation in the spent fuel management in the Czech Republic. The interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility (ISFSF) at Dukovany, which was commissioned in January 1997 and is using dual transport and storage CASTOR - 440/84 casks, is briefly described. The authors deal with their experience in operating and inspecting the ISFSF Dukovany. The structure of the basic safety document 'Limits and Conditions of Normal Operation' is also mentioned, including the experience of the performance. The inspection activities focused on permanent checking of the leak tightness of the CASTOR 440/84 casks, the maximum cask temperature and inspections monitoring both the neutron and gamma dose rate as well as the surface contamination. The results of the inspections are mentioned in the presentation as well. The operator's experience with re-opening partly loaded and already dried CASTOR-440/84 cask, after its transport from NPP Jaslovske Bohunice to the NPP Dukovany is also described. The paper introduces briefly the concept of future spent fuel storage both from the NPP Dukovany and the NPP Temelin, as prepared by the CEZ. The preparatory work for the Central Interim Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facility (CISFSF) in the Czech Republic and the information concerning the planned storage technology for this facility is discussed in the paper as well. The authors describe the site selection process and the preparatory steps concerning new spent fuel facility construction including the Environmental Impact Assessment studies. (author)

  12. Present status and future plan of development on National Nuclear Forensics Library at JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Yoshiki; Shinohara, Nobuo; Funatake, Yoshio; Sato, Kaneaki; Toda, Nobufumi; Shinoda, Yoshiharu; Watahiki, Masaru; Kuno, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has initiated R and D project on nuclear forensics technology such as analytical technologies towards the establishment of nuclear forensics capabilities in Japan. National Nuclear Forensics Library (NNFL) is one of the fundamental nuclear forensics capabilities and a prototype NNFL has been developed as one topic of the R and D project at JAEA. Main objective of NNFL is to determine whether a seized nuclear or other radioactive material from nuclear security event (e.g. illicit trafficking) is originated from one's country or not. Analytical data of the seized material are compared with the existing materials populated in a NNFL, and its attributions such as origin and history will be identified. This paper describes the current status and future plan on the development of prototype NNFL. The outline and the results of the participation in an international table top exercise on NNFL named 'Galaxy Serpent' are also reported in the present paper. (author)

  13. Current situation and future plans in radioactive waste management in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, H.; Jimenez, M.

    1992-01-01

    A brief introduction is offered in this document in order to explain the importance which is given in Mexico to the safe management of radioactive wastes. The Secretaria de Energia, Minas e Industria Paraestatal is the organization responsible for this issue. Also, a brief historical background is offered so as to understand the evolution of these activities since they were originated. This background allows us to describe the present situation, which consists in a substantial change in the volume of produced radioactive wastes; in other words, before the present situation only the, nuclear wastes from the application of radioisotopes were generated whereas currently, with the starting of commercial operation of the first unit of Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (LVNPP), large volumes of industrial radioactive wastes are being generated. A mention is given as well of the acquired experience during more than 20 years of waste management and of the technologies which have been applied or practiced in the use and disposal of such wastes. Finally, some general trends in relation to the future planning are indicated, which essentially consist in the siting and characterization of a site so as to, design and construct a permanent disposal facility in order to dispose the operational radioactive wastes from LVNPP

  14. Present status and future plans at INS 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.

    1984-01-01

    The 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron at the Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, was completed in 1961, and it was the first accelerator in Japan that was able to be used for the study on particle physics. The brief chronicle is shown. One of the purposes to construct the electron synchrotron was to train accelerator physicists for the next big project of building a high energy proton synchrotron. This project led to the foundation of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, and the Photon Factory was completed in 1982 there. The electron synchrotron has been continuously operated for 22 years. Meanwhile, the major components such as the injector linac, the vacuum system and the of acceleration system were renewed. By these improvement, the beam intensity and stability of the synchrotron were much improved. The circulating current is now 160 mA, and the number of accelerated electrons is 2.5 x 10 12 /sec. These are the highest values in the world. The parameters of the present synchrotron and the operational status are shown. There are five beam channels, that is, bremsstrahlung channel, tagged photon beam, fast extracted electron beam, synchrotron light channel and detector test channel. The recent activities with the INS electron synchrotron and the future plans are summarized. (Kako, I.)

  15. The National Diabetes Education Program at 20 Years: Lessons Learned and Plans for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminerio, Linda M; Albright, Ann; Fradkin, Judith; Gallivan, Joanne; McDivitt, Jude; Rodríguez, Betsy; Tuncer, Diane; Wong, Faye

    2018-02-01

    The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) was established to translate findings from diabetes research studies into clinical and public health practice. Over 20 years, NDEP has built a program with partnership engagement that includes science-based resources for multiple population and stakeholder audiences. Throughout its history, NDEP has developed strategies and messages based on communication research and relied on established behavior change models from health education, communication, and social marketing. The program's success in continuing to engage diverse partners after 20 years has led to time-proven and high-quality resources that have been sustained. Today, NDEP maintains a national repository of diabetes education tools and resources that are high quality, science- and audience-based, culturally and linguistically appropriate, and available free of charge to a wide variety of audiences. This review looks back and describes NDEP's evolution in transforming and communicating diabetes management and type 2 diabetes prevention strategies through partnerships, campaigns, educational resources, and tools and identifies future opportunities and plans. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  16. Mapping the receptivity of malaria risk to plan the future of control in Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Abdisalan Mohamed; Alegana, Victor Adagi; Patil, Anand Prabhakar; Moloney, Grainne; Borle, Mohammed; Yusuf, Fahmi; Amran, Jamal; Snow, Robert William

    2012-01-01

    To measure the receptive risks of malaria in Somalia and compare decisions on intervention scale-up based on this map and the more widely used contemporary risk maps. Cross-sectional community Plasmodium falciparum parasite rate (PfPR) data for the period 2007-2010 corrected to a standard age range of 2 to contemporary (2010) mean PfPR(2-10) and the maximum annual mean PfPR(2-10) (receptive) from the highest predicted PfPR(2-10) value over the study period as an estimate of receptivity. Randomly sampled communities in Somalia. Randomly sampled individuals of all ages. Cartographic descriptions of malaria receptivity and contemporary risks in Somalia at the district level. The contemporary annual PfPR(2-10) map estimated that all districts (n=74) and population (n=8.4 million) in Somalia were under hypoendemic transmission (≤10% PfPR(2-10)). Of these, 23% of the districts, home to 13% of the population, were under transmission of 10%-50% PfPR(2-10)) and the rest as hypoendemic. Compared with maps of receptive risks, contemporary maps of transmission mask disparities of malaria risk necessary to prioritise and sustain future control. As malaria risk declines across Africa, efforts must be invested in measuring receptivity for efficient control planning.

  17. An Approach to Evaluate Comprehensive Plan and Identify Priority Lands for Future Land Use Development to Conserve More Ecological Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization has significant impacts on the regional environmental quality through altering natural lands, converting them to urban built-up areas. One common strategy applied by urban planners to manage urbanization and preserve natural resources is to make a comprehensive plan and concentrate future land use in certain areas. However, in practice, planners used to make future land use planning mainly based on their subjective interpretations with limited ecological supporting evidence and analysis. Here, we propose a new approach composed of ecological modelling and land use zoning in the spatial matrix to evaluate the comprehensive plan and identify priority lands for sustainable land use planning. We use the city of Corvallis, OR, as the test bed to demonstrate this new approach. The results indicate that the Corvallis Comprehensive Plan 1998–2020 featured with compact development is not performing efficiently in conserving ecological values, and the land use plan featured with mixed-use spreading development generated by the proposed approach meets the city’s land demands for urban growth, and conserves 103% more ecological value of retaining storm water nitrogen, 270% more ecological value of retaining storm water phosphorus and 19% more ecological value in storing carbon in the whole watershed. This study indicates that if planned with scientific analysis and evidence, spreading urban development does not necessarily result in less sustainable urban environment than the compact development recommended in smart growth.

  18. Planning for Future Care and the End of Life: A Qualitative Analysis of Gay, Lesbian, and Heterosexual Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomeer, Mieke Beth; Donnelly, Rachel; Reczek, Corinne; Umberson, Debra

    2017-12-01

    Two key components of end-of-life planning are (1) informal discussions about future care and other end-of-life preferences and (2) formal planning via living wills and other legal documents. We leverage previous work on the institutional aspects of marriage and on sexual-minority discrimination to theorize why and how heterosexual, gay, and lesbian married couples engage in informal and formal end-of-life planning. We analyze qualitative dyadic in-depth interviews with 45 midlife gay, lesbian, and heterosexual married couples ( N = 90 spouses). Findings suggest that same-sex spouses devote considerable attention to informal planning conversations and formal end-of-life plans, while heterosexual spouses report minimal formal or informal planning. The primary reasons same-sex spouses give for making end-of-life preparations are related to the absence of legal protections and concerns about discrimination from families. These findings raise questions about future end-of-life planning for same- and different-sex couples given a rapidly shifting legal and social landscape.

  19. Experimental logistics plan in support of Extensive Separations for Hanford tank waste remediation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enderlin, W.I.; Swanson, J.L.; Carlson, C.D.; Hirschi, E.J.

    1993-12-01

    All proposed methods for remediating the radioactive and chemical waste stored in single- and double-shell tanks (SSTs and DSTs) at the Hanford Site require the separation of the waste mixtures in the tank into high-level and low-level fractions, the safe transport of this separated waste to appropriate immobilization facilities, and the long-term disposal of the immobilized waste forms. Extensive experimentation, especially in waste separations, will be required to develop the technologies and to produce the data that support the most effective and safe cleanup processes. As part of this effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing this detailed experimental logistics plan to determine the logistical/resource requirements, and ultimately the critical paths, necessary to effectively and safely conduct the multitude of experiments within the Extensive Separations Development Program, which addresses the experimental needs of a concept that provides a high degree of separation for the high-level and low-level waste fractions. The logistics issues developed for this program are expected to be similar to those for other programs aimed at remediating and disposing of the wastes

  20. Clinical experimentation with aerosol antibiotics: current and future methods of administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarogoulidis P

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul Zarogoulidis,1,2 Ioannis Kioumis,1 Konstantinos Porpodis,1 Dionysios Spyratos,1 Kosmas Tsakiridis,3 Haidong Huang,4 Qiang Li,4 J Francis Turner,5 Robert Browning,6 Wolfgang Hohenforst-Schmidt,7 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis1 1Pulmonary Department, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Department of Interventional Pneumology, Ruhrlandklinik, West German Lung Center, University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Saint Luke Private Hospital of Health Excellence, Thessaloniki, Greece; 4Department of Respiratory Diseases, Shanghai Hospital/First Affiliated Hospital of the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 5Pulmonary Medicine, University of Nevada School of Medicine, National Supercomputing Center for Energy and the Environment University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA; 6Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Interventional Pulmonology, National Naval Medical Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 7II Medical Department, Regional Clinic of Coburg, University of Wuerzburg, Coburg, Germany Abstract: Currently almost all antibiotics are administered by the intravenous route. Since several systems and situations require more efficient methods of administration, investigation and experimentation in drug design has produced local treatment modalities. Administration of antibiotics in aerosol form is one of the treatment methods of increasing interest. As the field of drug nanotechnology grows, new molecules have been produced and combined with aerosol production systems. In the current review, we discuss the efficiency of aerosol antibiotic studies along with aerosol production systems. The different parts of the aerosol antibiotic methodology are presented. Additionally, information regarding the drug molecules used is presented and future applications of this method are discussed

  1. Thinking Ahead: Improving Support for People with Learning Disabilities and Their Families to Plan for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The increasing life expectancy of people with learning disabilities makes it imperative that families plan for the future. The number of people with learning disabilities over the age of 65 is predicted to double over the next two decades. The greatest increase in life expectancy will be amongst people with mild learning disabilities who will have…

  2. Digital Story-Based Problem Solving Applications: Preservice Primary Teachers' Experiences and Future Integration Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Çigdem; Sancar-Tokmak, Hatice

    2017-01-01

    This case study investigates how preservice primary school teachers describe their experiences with digital story-based problem solving applications and their plans for the future integration of this technology into their teaching. Totally 113 preservice primary school teachers participated in the study. Data collection tools included a…

  3. 77 FR 30903 - Connect America Fund; A National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... America Fund; A National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable Rates for Local Exchange Carriers; High-Cost Universal Service Support AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... of information collections associated with the Commission's; Connect America Fund; A National...

  4. 77 FR 35623 - Connect America Fund; a National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... America Fund; a National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable Rates for Local Exchange Carriers; High-Cost Universal Service Support AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION... Fund, Report and Order (Order). The Commission submitted revisions to this information collection under...

  5. 78 FR 29655 - Connect America Fund; A National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... Fund; A National Broadband Plan for Our Future; Establishing Just and Reasonable Rates for Local Exchange Carriers; High-Cost Universal Service Support AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION.... Subpart D--Universal Service Support for High Cost Areas 0 2. In Sec. 54.313, revise paragraph (a)(9...

  6. How Europe Plans Its Energy Future and How Croatia Tries to Do It

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urli, N.

    2009-01-01

    Although each country is independent in planning its energy development and investment in energy sources, up to now, EU has put forward a great number of recommendations, directives, and legally binding documents for its member states and for the new countries joining EU in a near future. In December 2008, the EU Parliament and the European Commission declared the so-called 20%/20%/20% legally binding document, requesting, up to 2020, a decrease in emission of greenhouse gases, a decrease in energy consumption by increasing energy efficiency, and an adequate contribution of renewable energy sources in the total energy consumption (all in cited percentages). 60 percent of generated electricity should be provided by 'low carbon' technologies, i.e. in approximately equal shares between nuclear and renewable energy sources. The rest will be provided by gas and coal (under condition of development of capturing and underground storage of emitted CO 2 ). Oil would still cover 40 to 50 percent of primary energy demand predominating in transport sector, and Europe will still be very dependent on oil and gas import. In 2008, Croatia started to plan its new energy strategy with the aim to replace the strategy adopted in 2002. In November 2008, the first draft of the new strategy was announced and available for open public discussion for duration of one month. There have been a number of constructive proposals improving the first draft. However, this period was followed by a silence and no answer to the proposals up to the June 2009 when a completely new final text of the strategy document was drafted under strong influence of the coal and oil lobbies, to be offered for acceptance by the Croatian Parliament, which finally accepted the strategy in the form proposed. In this final version, great savings potentials in civil engineering and construction industry were totally neglected as well as new revolutionary development in solar photovoltaic conversion technologies, ignoring

  7. Managing wastes from the atomic age and into the future: programs, plans and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    implementation schedules to address the current waste inventory and future wastes from both AECL's operational and decommissioning activities. This paper provides an overview of AECL's waste management practices, AECL's low- and intermediate-level waste inventory, current activities for the management of those wastes, and the plans for moving forward. (author)

  8. Current status and future plans of R and D on geological disposal of HLW in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Noriaki

    1994-01-01

    As to the final disposal of HLW, it is considered highly important to provide a clear distinction between implementation of disposal and the research and development as independent processes, and to increase the transparency of the overall disposal program by defining concrete schedules and the roles and responsibilities of the organizations involved. The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has being conducted research and development on the geological disposal of HLW, as the leading organization. The responsibility of PNC is to ensure smooth progress of research and development project and to carry out studies of geological environment. The role of the Japanese government is to take overall responsibilities for appropriate and steady implementations of the program, as well as enacting any laws or policies required. On the other hand, electricity supply utilities are responsible to secure necessary funds for disposal, and in accordance with their role as waste producers, they are expected to cooperate even at the stage of research and development. Fundamental features of research and development of PNC carried out at this stage are as follows; (1) Generic research and development, (2) To establish scientific and technical bases of geological isolation of HLW in Japan, (3) About 15 years program from 1989 with documentation of progress reports, (4) Approach from near-field to far-field. PNC summarized the findings obtained by 1991, and submitted a document (H3 Report) in September 1992 as the first progress report. H3 Report is the first and comprehensive technical report on geological disposal of HLW in Japan, and provides information for the public to find out the current status of the research and development. This paper reviews the conclusions of H3 Report, overall procedures and schedule for implementing geological disposal, and future plans of R and D in PNC. (J.P.N.)

  9. Ten Years of Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI): Results and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, P. Y.; Gutman, G.; Gulev, S.; Maksyutov, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    During recent decades, Northern Eurasia was affected by unprecedented climate and environmental changes. Several droughts and heat waves alternated with hazardous extreme precipitation and flood events. Permafrost thaw, retreating Arctic sea ice, increasing areas of forest fire, and dramatic regional warming buffeted this region, tossing northern Eurasia from one extreme condition to the next. The region stores nearly half of the Earth's terrestrial carbon in permafrost, wetlands, and forested land, so ecosystem changes that release stored carbon could profoundly affect the world's climate. Furthermore, changes to climate and to hydrological and biogeochemical cycles are starting to affect daily life. For example, infrastructure is collapsing as permafrost thaws, severe winter storms increasingly bring businesses to a halt, and a growing water deficit is beginning to strain agricultural production and forestry. To pool resources and facilitate research, the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI, http://neespi.org) was launched in 2004. With its multidisciplinary focus, the internationally funded NEESPI (more than165 individual international projects during the past decade) has challenged participants to research climate-ecosystem interactions, societal impacts from extreme events in Northern Eurasia, and the feedbacks of these interactions and impacts to the global Earth system. Among the numerous Institutional and private sponsors from the United States, European Union, Russia, China, and Japan, the cornerstone support for the NEESPI studies was provided by the NASA Land Cover and Land Use Change Program and the Russian Academy of Sciences. At this presentation we shall overview the environmental studies conducted by the NEESPI community, brief the audience about the main achievements of the NEESPI researchers, and lay down the plans for the future studies. At the side event of the Meeting, we are going to initiate preparation of the book

  10. Current practice and future prospects for social data in coastal and ocean planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cornu, Elodie; Kittinger, John N; Koehn, J Zachary; Finkbeiner, Elena M; Crowder, Larry B

    2014-08-01

    Coastal and ocean planning comprises a broad field of practice. The goals, political processes, and approaches applied to planning initiatives may vary widely. However, all planning processes ultimately require adequate information on both the biophysical and social attributes of a planning region. In coastal and ocean planning practice, there are well-established methods to assess biophysical attributes; however, less is understood about the role and assessment of social data. We conducted the first global assessment of the incorporation of social data in coastal and ocean planning. We drew on a comprehensive review of planning initiatives and a survey of coastal and ocean practitioners. There was significantly more incorporation of social data in multiuse versus conservation-oriented planning. Practitioners engaged a wide range of social data, including governance, economic, and cultural attributes of planning regions and human impacts data. Less attention was given to ecosystem services and social-ecological linkages, both of which could improve coastal and ocean planning practice. Although practitioners recognize the value of social data, little funding is devoted to its collection and incorporation in plans. Increased capacity and sophistication in acquiring critical social and ecological data for planning is necessary to develop plans for more resilient coastal and ocean ecosystems and communities. We suggest that improving social data monitoring, and in particular spatial social data, to complement biophysical data, is necessary for providing holistic information for decision-support tools and other methods. Moving beyond people as impacts to people as beneficiaries, through ecosystem services assessments, holds much potential to better incorporate the tenets of ecosystem-based management into coastal and ocean planning by providing targets for linked biodiversity conservation and human welfare outcomes. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Experimental plans for LMFBR cavity liner sodium spill test LT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, R.K.; Newell, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    Reinforced concrete is an important material of construction in LMFBR cavities and cells. Steel liners are often installed on the concrete surfaces to provide a gastight seal for minimizing air inleakage to inerted cell atmospheres and to protect the concrete from direct contact with sodium in the event of a sodium spill. In making safety assessment analyses, it is of interest to determine the adequacy of the liners to maintain their leaktightness during postulated accidents involving large sodium spills. However, data for basing analytical assessments of cell liners are very meager and an experimental program is underway at HEDL to provide some of the needed information. The HEDL cell liner evaluation program consists of both bench-scale feature tests and large-scale sodium spill demonstration tests. The plans for the first large-scale sodium spill test (LT-1) are the subject of this paper

  14. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems. Operations and Transmission Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ela, Erik [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hein, Jeff [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schneider, Thomas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brinkman, Gregory [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Denholm, Paul [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%–90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Learn more at the RE Futures website. http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/re_futures/

  15. A Review of the Experimental and Modeling Development of a Water Phase Change Heat Exchanger for Future Exploration Support Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognata, Thomas; Leimkuehler, Thomas; Ramaswamy, Balasubramaniam; Nayagam, Vedha; Hasan, Mohammad; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Water affords manifold benefits for human space exploration. Its properties make it useful for the storage of thermal energy as a Phase Change Material (PCM) in thermal control systems, in radiation shielding against Solar Particle Events (SPE) for the protection of crew members, and it is indisputably necessary for human life support. This paper envisions a single application for water which addresses these benefits for future exploration support vehicles and it describes recent experimental and modeling work that has been performed in order to arrive at a description of the thermal behavior of such a system. Experimental units have been developed and tested which permit the evaluation of the many parameters of design for such a system with emphasis on the latent energy content, temperature rise, mass, and interstitial material geometry. The experimental results are used to develop a robust and well correlated model which is intended to guide future design efforts toward the multi-purposed water PCM heat exchanger envisioned.

  16. The Healthy Primary School of the Future: study protocol of a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeboordse, M; Jansen, M W; van den Heijkant, S N; Simons, A; Winkens, B; de Groot, R H M; Bartelink, N; Kremers, S P; van Assema, P; Savelberg, H H; de Neubourg, E; Borghans, L; Schils, T; Coppens, K M; Dietvorst, R; Ten Hoopen, R; Coomans, F; Klosse, S; Conjaerts, M H J; Oosterhoff, M; Joore, M A; Ferreira, I; Muris, P; Bosma, H; Toppenberg, H L; van Schayck, C P

    2016-07-26

    Unhealthy lifestyles in early childhood are a major global health challenge. These lifestyles often persist from generation to generation and contribute to a vicious cycle of health-related and social problems. This design article presents a study evaluating the effects of two novel healthy school interventions. The main outcome measure will be changes in children's body mass index (BMI). In addition, lifestyle behaviours, academic achievement, child well-being, socio-economic differences, and societal costs will be examined. In close collaboration with various stakeholders, a quasi-experimental study was developed, for which children of four intervention schools (n = 1200) in the southern part of the Netherlands are compared with children of four control schools (n = 1200) in the same region. The interventions started in November 2015. In two of the four intervention schools, a whole-school approach named 'The Healthy Primary School of the Future', is implemented with the aim of improving physical activity and dietary behaviour. For this intervention, pupils are offered an extended curriculum, including a healthy lunch, more physical exercises, and social and educational activities, next to the regular school curriculum. In the two other intervention schools, a physical-activity school approach called 'The Physical Activity School', is implemented, which is essentially similar to the other intervention, except that no lunch is provided. The interventions proceed during a period of 4 years. Apart from the effectiveness of both interventions, the process, the cost-effectiveness, and the expected legal implications are studied. Data collection is conducted within the school system. The baseline measurements started in September 2015 and yearly follow-up measurements are taking place until 2019. A whole-school approach is a new concept in the Netherlands. Due to its innovative, multifaceted nature and sound scientific foundation, these integrated programmes

  17. Futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Haldrup

    2017-01-01

    Currently both design thinking and critical social science experience an increased interest in speculating in alternative future scenarios. This interest is not least related to the challenges issues of global sustainability present for politics, ethics and design. This paper explores the potenti......Currently both design thinking and critical social science experience an increased interest in speculating in alternative future scenarios. This interest is not least related to the challenges issues of global sustainability present for politics, ethics and design. This paper explores...... the potentials of speculative thinking in relation to design and social and cultural studies, arguing that both offer valuable insights for creating a speculative space for new emergent criticalities challenging current assumptions of the relations between power and design. It does so by tracing out discussions...... of ‘futurity’ and ‘futuring’ in design as well as social and cultural studies. Firstly, by discussing futurist and speculative approaches in design thinking; secondly by engaging with ideas of scenario thinking and utopianism in current social and cultural studies; and thirdly by showing how the articulation...

  18. The future of trusts as an estate planning tool / Burger T.

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Trinette

    2011-01-01

    Estate planning is an important exercise aimed at increasing, preserving and protecting assets during a person's lifetime and providing for the disposition and continued utilisation of these assets after his death. The minimisation of estate duty, however, often dominates the motivation behind estate planning and many of the tools, structures and techniques used as part of the estate planning exercise are aimed at reducing or avoiding estate duty. One of these tools is the trust. In the 2010 ...

  19. Applying comprehensive environmental assessment to research planning for multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Refinements to inform future stakeholder engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Christina M; Grieger, Khara; Meacham, Connie A; Gooding, Meredith Lassiter; Gift, Jeffrey S; Lehmann, Geniece M; Hendren, Christine O; Davis, J Michael; Burgoon, Lyle

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessments and risk management efforts to protect human health and the environment can benefit from early, coordinated research planning by researchers, risk assessors, and risk managers. However, approaches for engaging these and other stakeholders in research planning have not received much attention in the environmental scientific literature. The Comprehensive Environmental Assessment (CEA) approach under development by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is a means to manage complex information and input from diverse stakeholder perspectives on research planning that will ultimately support environmental and human health decision making. The objectives of this article are to 1) describe the outcomes of applying lessons learned from previous CEA applications to planning research on engineered nanomaterial, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and 2) discuss new insights and refinements for future efforts to engage stakeholders in research planning for risk assessment and risk management of environmental issues. Although framed in terms of MWCNTs, this discussion is intended to enhance research planning to support assessments for other environmental issues as well. Key insights for research planning include the potential benefits of 1) ensuring that participants have research, risk assessment, and risk management expertise in addition to diverse disciplinary backgrounds; 2) including an early scoping step before rounds of formal ratings; 3) using a familiar numeric scale (e.g., US dollars) versus ordinal rating scales of "importance"; 4) applying virtual communication tools to supplement face-to-face interaction between participants; and 5) refining criteria to guide development of specific, actionable research questions. © 2015 SETAC.

  20. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

    2012-06-01

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  1. Future Plans in US Flight Missions: Using Laser Remote Sensing for Climate Science Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Lisa W.

    2010-01-01

    Laser Remote Sensing provides critical climate science observations necessary to better measure, understand, model and predict the Earth's water, carbon and energy cycles. Laser Remote Sensing applications for studying the Earth and other planets include three dimensional mapping of surface topography, canopy height and density, atmospheric measurement of aerosols and trace gases, plume and cloud profiles, and winds measurements. Beyond the science, data from these missions will produce new data products and applications for a multitude of end users including policy makers and urban planners on local, national and global levels. NASA Missions in formulation including Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat 2) and the Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI), and future missions such as the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS), will incorporate the next generation of LIght Detection And Ranging (lidar) instruments to measure changes in the surface elevation of the ice, quantify ecosystem carbon storage due to biomass and its change, and provide critical data on CO 2 in the atmosphere. Goddard's plans for these instruments and potential uses for the resulting data are described below. For the ICESat 2 mission, GSFC is developing a micro-pulse multi-beam lidar. This instrument will provide improved ice elevation estimates over high slope and very rough areas and result in improved lead detection for sea ice estimates. Data about the sea ice and predictions related to sea levels will continue to help inform urban planners as the changes in the polar ice accelerate. DESDynI is planned to be launched in 2017 and includes both lidar and radar instruments. GSFC is responsible for the lidar portion of the DESDynI mission and is developing a scanning laser altimeter that will measure the Earth's topography, the structure of tree canopies, biomass, and surface roughness. The DESDynI lidar will also measure and

  2. Patient preferences for future care - how can Advance Care Planning become embedded into dementia care: a study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Louise; Bamford, Claire; Beyer, Fiona; Clark, Alexa; Dickinson, Claire; Emmet, Charlotte; Exley, Catherine; Hughes, Julian; Robson, Lesley; Rousseau, Nikki

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background People living with a long term condition may wish to be able to plan ahead, so that if in future they cannot make decisions, their wishes about their care will be known; this process is termed Advance Care Planning (ACP). In dementia, guidance stipulates that ACP discussions should take place whilst the person still has capacity to make decisions. However there is a lack of evidence on the effectiveness of ACP in influencing patient choice and resource use. The aims of thi...

  3. A Comparative Study of the Determinants of Future Plans and Expectations of Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Gregory S.; Schofield, April L.

    2018-01-01

    Current university juniors and seniors have plans and expectations for after they graduate. In an effort to better understand these plans and expectations, the authors assessed a sample of 334 university students enrolled in business classes. The study examined the impact of three categories of independent variables--family influences, demographic…

  4. Lessons Learned from Research on Individual Educational Plans in Sweden: Obstacles, Opportunities and Future Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasson, Ingela; Asp-Onsjö, Lisa; Isaksson, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Since 1995, all Swedish compulsory schools have had a legal obligation to establish individual educational plans (IEPs) for pupils with special educational needs. However, previous research shows that there are a number of issues associated with how these plans are used in schools' overall work and identifies a discrepancy between educational…

  5. Shuffling the Operational Deck: Future Requirements for the Plans, Operations, Medical Intelligence (POMI) Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    countries. PepsiCo, IBM and Nike are current examples of the so-called "game planning" approach to succession and talent ~anagement.21 Annual...Rothwell and associates, inc .; a full-service consulting Succession Planning finn provides other partner industries with the value of strategic

  6. Educational Planning, Administration, and Management [in Africa]: A Regional Study of Achievements, Shortcomings, and Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinapah, Vinayagum

    Prepared for a UNESCO international congress on the planning and management of educational development, this document provides an overview of a number of educational policy and planning issues as they pertain to Africa. It consists of six main sections. Section 1 provides an overview of the contemporary political, socioeconomic situation in…

  7. The Planning of Latin American Universities: In Search of Its Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, Miguel J.

    College planning in Latin America is discussed, with attention to underdevelopment, political instability, and the economic crisis of the 1980s. Alternative planning approaches used in U.S. higher education institutions are considered. Latin America refers to 18 Spanish-speaking republics of the Western Hemisphere, along with Brazil and Haiti. The…

  8. Experimental investigation of thermal limits in parallel plate configuration for the future material testing reactor (JHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigitte Noel

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The design of the future material testing reactor, named Jules Horowitz Reactor and dedicated to technological irradiations, will allow very high performances. The JHR will be cooled and moderated by light water. The preliminary core of JHR consists of 46 assemblies, arranged in a triangular lattice inside a rectangular aluminium matrix. It is boarded on two sides by a beryllium reflector. The other two sides are left free in order to introduce mobile irradiation devices. The JHR assembly would be composed of 3 x 6 cylindrical fuel plates maintained by 3 stiffeners. The external diameter of the assembly is close to 8 cm with a 600 mm heated length, coolant channels having a 1.8 mm gap width. The JHR core must be designed to accommodate high power densities using a high coolant mass flux and sub-cooling level at moderate pressure. The JHR core configuration with multi-channels is subject to a potential excursive instability, called flow redistribution, and is distinguished from a true critical heat flux which would occur at a fixed channel flow rate. At thermal-hydraulic conditions applicable to the JHR, the availability of experimental data for both flow redistribution and CHF is very limited. Consequently, a thermal-hydraulic test facility (SULTAN-RJH) was designed and built in CEA-Grenoble to simulate a full-length coolant sub-channel representative of the JHR core, allowing determination of both thermal limits under relevant thermal hydraulics conditions. The SULTAN-RJH test section simulates a single sub-channel in the JHR core with a cross section corresponding to a mean span (∼50 mm) that has a full reactor length (600 mm), the same flow channel gap (1.5 mm) and Inconel plates of 1 mm thickness. The tests with light water flowing vertically upward will investigate a heat flux range of 0-7 MW/m 2 , velocity range of 0.6-18 m/s, exit pressure range of 0.2-1.0 MPa and inlet temperature range of 25-180 deg. C. The test section

  9. The strategies, experiences and future challenges of the information component in the Indonesian Family Planning Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyono, H

    1988-12-01

    In 1957, the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Federation was established. In 1970, the National Family Planning Board (BKKBN) was created. The current contraceptive prevalence rate is 45-50%. The family planning program began with a health-oriented approach. To promote acceptance, religious leaders were asked to provide legitimacy to the program. Through their efforts, it became possible to include all the means and medication used for family planning services within the program. In developing an IEC strategy to encourage couples to accept family planning, 3 main factors were studied: 1) the types of innovations that were to be introduced, 2) the characteristics of the Indonesian community, and 3) the need for an IEC strategy to convey the programs messages the community and make the community itself the agent of the innovation being introduced. The elements of the strategy were introduced stage by stage to avoid unnecessary debate. Another strategic step was the introduction of family planning using a community approach. A 3rd strategic step was a shift from couples as family planning acceptors to the introduction of the norm of a small, happy, and prosperous family. The 1st stage, expansion of program coverage, 1) promoted the need for and desirability of family planning to make the small and happy family the norm and 2) supplied contraceptives and information about contraceptives throughout Indonesia. The 2nd stage, the program maintenance approach, included 1) an increase in the frequency of visits to villages by mobile family planning teams, 2) the integration of family planning activities with other health-related activities, and 3) giving people a wider choice of methods and helping them to choose the most suitable method for them. The 3rd stage made family planning a community activity, integrated within the economic and social fabric of community life. The general strategy of the IEC program is to make the various target groups full family planning

  10. Experimental Plan for Crystal Accumulation Studies in the WTP Melter Riser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-28

    This experimental plan defines crystal settling experiments to be in support of the U.S. Department of Energy – Office of River Protection crystal tolerant glass program. The road map for development of crystal-tolerant high level waste glasses recommends that fluid dynamic modeling be used to better understand the accumulation of crystals in the melter riser and mechanisms of removal. A full-scale version of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) melter riser constructed with transparent material will be used to provide data in support of model development. The system will also provide a platform to demonstrate mitigation or recovery strategies in off-normal events where crystal accumulation impedes melter operation. Test conditions and material properties will be chosen to provide results over a variety of parameters, which can be used to guide validation experiments with the Research Scale Melter at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and that will ultimately lead to the development of a process control strategy for the full scale WTP melter. The experiments described in this plan are divided into two phases. Bench scale tests will be used in Phase 1 (using the appropriate solid and fluid simulants to represent molten glass and spinel crystals) to verify the detection methods and analytical measurements prior to their use in a larger scale system. In Phase 2, a full scale, room temperature mockup of the WTP melter riser will be fabricated. The mockup will provide dynamic measurements of flow conditions, including resistance to pouring, as well as allow visual observation of crystal accumulation behavior.

  11. Hierarchical path planning and control of a small fixed-wing UAV: Theory and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dongwon

    2007-12-01

    Recently there has been a tremendous growth of research emphasizing control of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) either in isolation or in teams. As a matter of fact, UAVs increasingly find their way into military and law enforcement applications (e.g., reconnaissance, remote delivery of urgent equipment/material, resource assessment, environmental monitoring, battlefield monitoring, ordnance delivery, etc.). This trend will continue in the future, as UAVs are poised to replace the human-in-the-loop during dangerous missions. Civilian applications of UAVs are also envisioned such as crop dusting, geological surveying, search and rescue operations, etc. In this thesis we propose a new online multiresolution path planning algorithm for a small UAV with limited on-board computational resources. The proposed approach assumes that the UAV has detailed information of the environment and the obstacles only in its vicinity. Information about far-away obstacles is also available, albeit less accurately. The proposed algorithm uses the fast lifting wavelet transform (FLWT) to get a multiresolution cell decomposition of the environment, whose dimension is commensurate to the on-board computational resources. A topological graph representation of the multiresolution cell decomposition is constructed efficiently, directly from the approximation and detail wavelet coefficients. Dynamic path planning is sequentially executed for an optimal path using the A* algorithm over the resulting graph. The proposed path planning algorithm is implemented on-line on a small autopilot. Comparisons with the standard D*-lite algorithm are also presented. We also investigate the problem of generating a smooth, planar reference path from a discrete optimal path. Upon the optimal path being represented as a sequence of cells in square geometry, we derive a smooth B-spline path that is constrained inside a channel that is induced by the geometry of the cells. To this end, a constrained optimization

  12. The past, the present and the future of experimental research on myocardial ischemia and protection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 1 (2009), s. 3-12 ISSN 1734-1140 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : myocardial ischemia * protection * cell death Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Disease s incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.086, year: 2009

  13. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG ampersand G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG ampersand G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG ampersand G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and

  14. Hospital organizational response to the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island: implications for future-oriented disaster planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, C.

    1982-01-01

    The 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, caused severe organizational problems for neighboring health care institutions. Dauphin County, just north of TMI, contained four hospitals ranging in distance from 9.5 to 13.5 miles from the stricken plant. Crash plans put into effect within 48 hours of the initial incident successfully reduced hospital census to below 50 per cent of capacity, but retained bedridden and critically ill patients within the risk-zone. No plans existed for area-wide evacuation of hospitalized patients. Future-oriented disaster planning should include resource files of host institution bed capacity and transportation capabilities for the crash evacuation of hospitalized patients during non-traditional disasters

  15. A central continuous integration platform: Agile Infrastructure use case and future plans

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; ANDERSEN, Terje; GEORGIOU, Stefanos

    2014-01-01

    We shall describe the use of Jenkins as a CI solution by the Configuration Team and present the requirements and plans for a central CI platform, as well as the associated challenges and possible solutions.

  16. Strengthening Hope and Purpose in Community College Futures through Strategic Marketing Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scigliano, John A.

    1981-01-01

    After defining marketing, describes the application of strategic marketing planning to community college funding problems. Delineates alternative sources of funding and creative techniques for tapping them. A marketing index for higher education is appended. (AYC)

  17. Planning of Truck Platoons: a Literature Review and Directions for Future Research

    OpenAIRE

    Kishore Bhoopalam, Anirudh; Agatz, Niels; Zuidwijk, Rob

    2017-01-01

    textabstractA truck platoon is a set of virtually linked trucks that drive closely behind one another using automated driving technology. Benefits of truck platooning include cost savings, reduced emissions, and more efficient utilization of road capacity. To fully reap these benefits in the initial phases requires careful planning of platoons based on trucks’ itineraries and time schedules. This paper provides a framework to classify various new transportation planning problems that arise in...

  18. Policy recommendations for improvement and strengthening of future provincial environmental five years plans in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-11-15

    Since the Eleventh Five-Year Plan (2006-2010) started, the environmental protection plan has been playing a more and more important role in the implementation of Chinas national environmental protection strategy as well as promoting and carrying out the 'three historical transitions' in environmental protection, and enhancing the functions of environmental protection for macroscopic adjustment and control and optimizing economic growth.(auth)

  19. Status and Plans for the National Spherical Torus Experimental Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bialek, J.M.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high beta, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high beta Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high beta and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions

  20. Status and plans for the national spherical torus experimental research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Masayuki; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the research capabilities and the future plans on the MA-class National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is presented. NSTX research is exploring the scientific benefits of modifying the field line structure from that in more conventional aspect ratio devices, such as the tokamak. The relevant scientific issues pursued on NSTX include energy confinement, MHD stability at high β, non-inductive sustainment, solenoid-free start-up, and power and particle handling. In support of the NSTX research goal, research tools are being developed by the NSTX team. In the context of the fusion energy development path being formulated in the US, an ST-based Component Test Facility (CTF) and, ultimately a high β Demo device based on the ST, are being considered. For these, it is essential to develop high performance (high β and high confinement), steady-state (non-inductively driven) ST operational scenarios and an efficient solenoid-free start-up concept. We will also briefly describe the Next-Step-ST (NSST) device being designed to address these issues in fusion-relevant plasma conditions. (author)

  1. Can Strategic Spatial Planning Contribute to Land Degradation Reduction in Urban Regions? State of the Art and Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Oliveira

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Land degradation is becoming a serious environmental issue threatening fertile agricultural soils and other natural resources. There are many driving forces behind land degradation. The expansion of artificial surfaces due to various economic activities, such as housing, industry, and transport infrastructure, known as soil sealing, constitutes one of the most intensive forms of land degradation in urban regions. Measures to halt and reverse land degradation require both strong land-use management policies, as well as effective spatial planning mechanisms. In this regard, strategic spatial planning has been increasingly practised in many urban regions worldwide, as a means to achieve sustainable land-use patterns and to guide the location of development and physical infrastructures. It is reasonable, therefore, to expect that strategic spatial planning can counteract the outlined undesired land degradation effects, specifically those resulting from soil sealing. In this paper, we review strategic spatial planning literature published between 1992 and 2017. The focus is on the phenomena causing land degradation that are addressed by strategic spatial planning literature, as well as on the mechanisms describing the role of strategic spatial planning in land degradation reduction. Results show that sustainable development and environmental concerns have become core objectives of strategic planning in recent years, yet references to the drivers of land degradation are rare. The mechanisms that exist are mainly intended to address environmental issues in general, and are not aimed at reducing particular forms of land degradation. The paper concludes by sketching future research directions, intended to support strategic spatial planning and land-use policymaking related to coping with the global phenomenon of land degradation.

  2. Advances and Future Directions for Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research: Recommendations From the 2015 Strategic Planning Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mustafa; Henske, Elizabeth P; Manning, Brendan D; Ess, Kevin C; Bissler, John J; Klann, Eric; Kwiatkowski, David J; Roberds, Steven L; Silva, Alcino J; Hillaire-Clarke, Coryse St; Young, Lisa R; Zervas, Mark; Mamounas, Laura A

    2016-07-01

    On March 10 to March 12, 2015, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance sponsored a workshop in Bethesda, Maryland, to assess progress and new opportunities for research in tuberous sclerosis complex with the goal of updating the 2003 Research Plan for Tuberous Sclerosis (http://www.ninds.nih.gov/about_ninds/plans/tscler_research_plan.htm). In addition to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance, participants in the strategic planning effort and workshop included representatives from six other Institutes of the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense Tuberous Sclerosis Complex Research Program, and a broad cross-section of basic scientists and clinicians with expertise in tuberous sclerosis complex along with representatives from the pharmaceutical industry. Here we summarize the outcomes from the extensive premeeting deliberations and final workshop recommendations, including (1) progress in the field since publication of the initial 2003 research plan for tuberous sclerosis complex, (2) the key gaps, needs, and challenges that hinder progress in tuberous sclerosis complex research, and (3) a new set of research priorities along with specific recommendations for addressing the major challenges in each priority area. The new research plan is organized around both short-term and long-term goals with the expectation that progress toward specific objectives can be achieved within a five to ten year time frame. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sixth General Radioactive Waste Plan. Planning to the future of ENRESA; El Sexto Plan General de Residuos. La planificacion del futuro de Enresa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espejo Hernandez, J. M.

    2006-07-01

    The Government approved last June 23''rd the Sixth General Radioactive Waste Plan that presents the activities to be carried out by ENRESA in all its field of responsibility to the year 2070. The document considers as one of the principal changes that ENRESA will be restructured to corporate public entity assigned to the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade as well as the need of a Centralised Temporary Storage for the spent fuel and the high level radioactive wastes generated in Spain. Nevertheless, information is provided on the plans for the full decommissioning of the nuclear power plants to complete their operational life and also the economic and financial aspects related to the activities contemplated in the Plan. (Author) 13 refs.

  4. Strategic Plan for the Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venerology (AEDV): FuturAEDV 2013-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera Pibernat, M; Moreno Jiménez, J C; Valcuende Cavero, F; Soto de Delás, J; Vázquez Veiga, H; Lázaro Ochaíta, P; Giménez Arnau, A

    2014-09-01

    The Spanish Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (AEDV) has decided that a Strategic Plan is needed to help the association adapt to new circumstances and anticipate future developments. 1) To position the AEDV as a medical association that can exert an influence in everything related to dermatology. 2) To contribute to the development of the specialty, strengthening the prestige and reputation of dermatology and dermatologists. 3) To establish a model for operating and strategic thinking that can be handed on to successive Boards of Directors and will enable the Academy to identify future challenges. The approach used to develop the Strategic Plan was as follows: analysis of trends in the health care system; assessment of the current situation of AEDV and of dermatology in general through an internal analysis based on surveys and interviews with academics; analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; preparation of a mission statement; and identification, development, and implementation of a strategy map prioritizing strategic lines of action. The strategy map set out 16 general goals grouped into 4 main topics (achieving the vision, internal and external customers, internal processes, and innovation) and detailed in an action plan with 19 initiatives, each with specific actions. The plan will be monitored by the Strategic Plan Monitoring Committee, which is made up of the members of the Standing Committee and the chairs of the 9 Technical Committees responsible for implementing the initiatives. The Functional Plan should guide the management of AEDV until 2017, and its implementation will enable the association to contribute to the development and prestige of the specialty and position itself as a reference in terms of its functional model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Application of experimental plans method to formulate a self compacting cement paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mebrouki, A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The self-compacting concrete formulation means to elaborate a self-compacting cement paste to which will be injected aggregates. The purpose of this work is to find the composition of this cement paste containing local materials (pozzolanic cement, limestone fillers, superplasticizer and water having self-compacting properties. The use of the experimental plans method shows that it is possible to delimit an experimental field bounded by the volumetric proportions of materials composing the paste. The field was transformed in equations form conditioned by implicit constraints, defining zones of minimal shearing threshold and maximum viscosity; numerical resolution submitted to the optimization criteria permitted to define the volumetric proportions of each mixing parameter contributing to the preparation of an optimal paste. After experimental checking to validate obtained results, conclusions are that, from results given by ternary diagrams and desirability’s functions, a composition of an optimal self-compacting cement pas was obtained.

    En este trabajo se estudia la constitución de una pasta autocompactante a base de materiales locales argelinos (cemento binario de base puzolánica natural de Beni Saf y filler calizo de cantera. La reología de la pasta se estudia en función de las dosificaciones de cemento, caliza, superplastificante y agua. La fluidez de las pastas así formadas se deducen de los ensayos de escurrimiento del mini cono y del tiempo de flujo en el cono de Marsh. Utilizando el diseño estadístico de mezclas, el número de ensayos se ha visto considerablemente reducido, el problema se transformó en ecuaciones y después se resolvió numéricamente. A partir de las curvas de los diagramas ternarios, uniendo las respuestas de escurrimiento y el tiempo de flujo de las pastas en función de las dosificaciones en constituyentes y estudiando las funciones de conveniencia para cada respuesta, se terminará por deducir una

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, Ruben P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, Wendy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-04

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  7. LLNL Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  8. Future high school teachers' difficulties and alternatives found to planning electromagnetism activities designed for visual handicapped students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Pires de Camargo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We report here partial outcomes of a study aimed to verify future High School teachers' performance when, during the development of a called "Teaching Practice" undergraduate course, were asked to plan, elaborate and teach, in classroom situations, electromagnetism topics to a students class which included visual handicapped pupils. Data analyzed show that the main difficulties presented by the future Physics High School teachers are related to the approach to know physics phenomena as dependent of vision and to break with some elements of the traditional pedagogy. By other hand, as alternatives, future teachers showed creativity in order to surpass passive aptitudes related to this educational problem, working out methodological strategies deprived of the relation knowing/seeing, as well as, the work with orality in a physics education context.

  9. Planning for community resilience to future United States domestic water demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costs of repairing and expanding aging infrastructure and competing demands for water from other sectors such as industry and agriculture are stretching water managers’ abilities to meet essential domestic drinking water needs for future generations. Using Bayesian statistical mo...

  10. Tools of the Future: How Decision Tree Analysis Will Impact Mission Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterstatter, Matthew R.

    2005-01-01

    The universe is infinitely complex; however, the human mind has a finite capacity. The multitude of possible variables, metrics, and procedures in mission planning are far too many to address exhaustively. This is unfortunate because, in general, considering more possibilities leads to more accurate and more powerful results. To compensate, we can get more insightful results by employing our greatest tool, the computer. The power of the computer will be utilized through a technology that considers every possibility, decision tree analysis. Although decision trees have been used in many other fields, this is innovative for space mission planning. Because this is a new strategy, no existing software is able to completely accommodate all of the requirements. This was determined through extensive research and testing of current technologies. It was necessary to create original software, for which a short-term model was finished this summer. The model was built into Microsoft Excel to take advantage of the familiar graphical interface for user input, computation, and viewing output. Macros were written to automate the process of tree construction, optimization, and presentation. The results are useful and promising. If this tool is successfully implemented in mission planning, our reliance on old-fashioned heuristics, an error-prone shortcut for handling complexity, will be reduced. The computer algorithms involved in decision trees will revolutionize mission planning. The planning will be faster and smarter, leading to optimized missions with the potential for more valuable data.

  11. Archive and laboratory embedded in the landscape: Future of the Santa Rita Experimental Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas E. Sheridan

    2003-01-01

    The Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER) is both an archive of past ecological research and a laboratory for continuing research embedded in the southern Arizona landscape. The scientific questions being asked there have changed over the last 100 years, but SRER with its monitoring stations and its legacy of repeat photography still offers a unique opportunity to study...

  12. Built for the future: New directions in silviculture research and demonstration at Montana's Lubrecht Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher R. Keyes; Thomas E. Perry

    2010-01-01

    Manipulative experiments at the University of Montana’s Lubrecht Experimental Forest have long been set aside as permanent research and demonstration areas (RDA’s) to communicate the tradeoffs among different stand management strategies. However, most of these have either degraded over time or have diminished relevance to contemporary forest management issues. An...

  13. Overview of experimental work to ensure innovation of nuclear fuel for future advanced PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zymak, J.; Valach, M.; Hejna, J.

    2002-11-01

    It is envisaged that advanced nuclear fuel will be operated in high burnup conditions, at a high linear power and at considerable mechanical fuel-cladding interactions. The report gives an overview of experimental work investigating phenomena that will affect APWR fuel, such as the manufacturing technology, thermal properties and safety requirements

  14. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 8: Instrumentation Frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demarteau, M; Lipton, R; Nicholson, H; Shipsey, I; Akerib, D; Albayrak-Yetkin, A; Alexander, J; Anderson, J; Artuso, M; Asner, D; Ball, R; Battaglia, M; Bebek, C; Beene, J; Benhammou, Y; Bentefour, E; Bergevin, M; Bernstein, A; Bilki, B; Blucher, E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Bowden, N; Brooijmans, G; Byrum, K; Cabrera, B; Cancelo, G; Carlstrom, J; Casey, B; Chang, C; Chapman, J; Chen, CH; Childres, I; Christian, D; Convery, M; Corso, WCJ; Cumalat, J; Cushman, P; Via, CD; Dazeley, S; Debbins, P; Deptuch, G; Dhawan, S; Benedetto, VD; DiGiovene, B; Djurcic, Z; Dye, S; Elagin, A; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Etzion, E; Fast, J; Ferretti, C; Fisher, P; Fleming, B; Francis, K; Friedman, P; Frisch, H; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Gatto, C; Geronim, G; Gilchriese, G; Golwala, S; Grant, C; Grillo, A; Grünendahl, E; Gorham, P; Guan, L; Gutierrez, G; Haber, C; Hall, J; Haller, G; Hast, C; Heintz, U; Hemmick, T; Hitlin, DG; Hogan, C; Hohlmann, M; Hoppe, E; Hsu, L; Huffer, M; Irwin, K; Izraelevitch, F; Jennings, G; Johnson, M; Jung, A; Kagan, H; Kenney, C; Kettell, S; Khanna, R; Khristenko, V; Krennrich, F; Kuehn, K; Kutschke, R; Learned, J; Lee, AT; Levin, D; Liu, T; Liu, ATK; Lissauer, D; Love, J; Lynn, D; MacFarlane, D; Magill, S; Majewski, S; Mans, J; Maricic, J; Marleau, P; Mazzacane, A; McKinsey, D; Mehl, J; Mestvirisvilli, A; Meyer, S; Mokhov, N; Moshe, M; Mukherjee, A; Murat, P; Nahn, S; Narain, M; Nadel-Turonski, P; Newcomer, M; Nishimura, K; Nygren, D; Oberla, E; Onel, Y; Oreglia, M; Orrell, J; Paley, J; Para, A; Parker, S; Polychronakos, V; Pordes, S; Privitera, P; Prosser, A; Pyle, M; Raaf, J; Ramberg, E; Rameika, R; Rebel, B; Repond, J; Reyna, D; Ristori, L; Rivera, R; Ronzhin, A; Rusack, R; Russ, J; Ryd, A; Sadrozinski, H; Sahoo, H; Sanchez, MC; Sanzeni, C; Schnetzer, S; Seidel, S; Seiden, A; Schmidt, I; Shenai, A; Shutt, T; Silver, Y; Smith, W; Snowden-Ifft, D; Sonnenschein, A; Southwick, D; Spiegel, L; Stanitzki, M; Striganov, S; Su, D; Sumner, R; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Talaga, R; Tayloe, R; Tentindo, S; Terentiev, N; Thom-Levy, J; Thorn, C; Tiffenberg, J; Trischuk, W; Tschirhart, R; Turner, M; Underwood, D; Uplegger, L; Urheim, J; Vagins, M; Bibber, KV; Varner, G; Varner, R; Va' vra, J; Lippe, HVD; Wagner, R; Wagner, S; Weaverdyck, C; Wenzel, H; Weinstein, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wigman, R; Wilson, P; Winn, D; Winter, P; Woody, C; Xia, L; Xie, JQ; Ye, Z; Yeh, MF; Yetkin, T; Yoo, JH; Yu, J; Yu, JM; Zeller, S; Zhang, JL; Zhu, JJ; Zhou, B; Zhu, RY; Zitzer, B

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 8, on the Instrumentation Frontier, discusses the instrumentation needs of future experiments in the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers, promising new technologies for particle physics research, and issues of gathering resources for long-term research in this area.

  15. Ontario's long-term energy plan, building our clean energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The first energy priority of the plan is to provide all Ontarians with a clean, modern and reliable electricity system. It gives a summary of the means implemented to help families and businesses with increasing electricity costs. The plan is to shift the province from a coal-dependent system. Over the next 20 years, 15,000 MW (megawatt) of generating capacity will have to be rebuilt or constructed to replace older Ontario's energy infrastructures. In Ontario, an increase of about 3.5% per year in residential prices, resulting from the need to enjoy clean air, reliable generation and modernized transmission, is expected to occur over the next two decades. The expected electricity needs in Ontario and efficient means to satisfy them are described in this plan.

  16. Trying to predict the future – resource planning and allocation in CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, Kenneth; Fisk, Ian; Kreuzer, Peter; Merino, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    In the large LHC experiments the majority of computing resources are provided by the participating countries. These resource pledges account for more than three quarters of the total available computing. The experiments are asked to give indications of their requests three years in advance and to evolve these as the details and constraints become clearer. In this paper we will discuss the resource planning techniques used in CMS to predict the computing resources several years in advance. We will discuss how we attempt to implement the activities of the computing model in spread-sheets and formulas to calculate the needs. We will talk about how those needs are reflected in the 2012 running and how the planned long shutdown of the LHC in 2013 and 2014 impacts the planning process and the outcome. In the end we will speculate on the computing needs in the second major run of LHC.

  17. Trying to Predict the Future - Resource Planning and Allocation in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Peter; Fisk, Ian; Merino, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    In the large LHC experiments the majority of computing resources are provided by the participating countries. These resource pledges account for more than three quarters of the total available computing. The experiments are asked to give indications of their requests three years in advance and to evolve these as the details and constraints become clearer. In this presentation we will discuss the resource planning techniques used in CMS to predict the computing resources several years in advance. We will discuss how we attempt to implement the activities of the computing model in spreadsheets and formulas to calculate the needs. We will talk about how those needs are reflected in the 2012 running and how the planned long shutdown of the LHC in 2013 and 2014 impact the planning process and the outcome. In the end we will speculate on the computing needs in the second major run of LHC.

  18. A low-carbon future: Spatial planning's role in enhancing technological innovation in the built environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, Jenny; French, Will

    2008-01-01

    The scope of spatial planning activity includes issues of governance, corporate organisation, policy integration, statutory and regulatory frameworks, and technical analysis and design. The nature of its potential contribution to achieving low-carbon built environments will vary according to the resolution of tensions between pressures for leadership, consistent decision making and speed of change and the value placed on diversity, flexibility and innovation. A planning system that can support technological innovation will be characterised by high levels of organisational and institutional capacity and high-quality knowledge systems that support a focus on delivering place-based objectives. The paper reflects on further aspects of such a system and the issues that spatial planning needs to address in delivering low-carbon energy systems

  19. Current status of experimental breeder reactor-II [EBR-II] shutdown planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, M. D.; Griffin, C. D.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Earle, O. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor--II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory--West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was shutdown in September, 1994 as mandated by the US Department of Energy. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the Sodium Process Facility. The sodium environment and the EBR-II configuration, combined with the radiation and contamination associated with thirty years of reactor operation, posed problems specific to liquid metal reactor deactivation. The methods being developed and implemented at EBR-II can be applied to other similar situations in the US and abroad

  20. Assessment of Probable Future Land Use and Habitat Conditions in Water Resources Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    R. Varney, and F. C. Craighead, Jr. 1974. A population analysis of the Yellowstone grizzly bears. Montana Forest Conservation Experiment Station Bull...34The wolves of Isle Royale." University of Georgia, Contributions in Systems Ecology. No. 5. Sargent, F. 0. and P. R. Berke. 1979. Planning undeveloped

  1. We Can Dream! Ways of Planning for the Future for Young People with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jill; Burke, Christine; Mattingly, Molly

    2009-01-01

    This booklet is for young people and their families, friends and supporters to read and talk about together. It is based on the stories of four young people. Big changes happened for some of them; others are still waiting for things to change. The goal of the booklet is to give students ideas about how they may want to plan or change things when…

  2. The future of mega sport events : Examining the ‘Dutch Approach’ to legacy planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, S.; Zandberg, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – Mega sport events (MSE) are immensely popular but also highly criticized because these nclude large public budgets and involve politically sensitive topics. In this context, there is an increasing attention toward legacy planning, the effort to confer long-term benefits to a host

  3. Strategic Urban Planning in Latin America: Experiences of Building and Managing the Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Steinberg (Florian)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractStrategic Planning is a process which permits the articulation of the initiatives of public and private stakeholders which seek synergies for the development of a city. It is about: • An adaptable, non-rigid methodology for which flexibility is an indispensable precondition. • A tool for

  4. Strategic R and D Planning for an Energy Future in an Interdependent World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schainker, R.B.; Gellings, C.; Rosinski, S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a summary of key results of a comprehensive analysis of technology R and D needs for the U.S. electric utility industry. It focuses on the impacts of the world-wide interdependencies for the price of gas/oil fuel and the costs for environmental emissions as drivers to define four 'what-if' scenarios that act as a basis to define key R and D topics U.S. electric utilities need to address. This paper is based on past work the U.S. Electric Power Research Institute performed on a technology roadmap, which is a high-level document that provides guidance on strategic technology planning over the next 40-50 years for the electricity industry. However, critical uncertainties over this timeframe - such as fuel prices, the economy, the environment, technology advances, and regulatory policies - complicate effective identification and development of R and D priorities. To address these uncertainties and to develop a nearer-term technology-oriented action plan, EPRI undertook an Electric Power Industry Technology Scenarios project that uses scenario planning to explicitly incorporate uncertainty and focuses on a 20-year planning horizon. (auth)

  5. Proceedings - Limits of Acceptable Change and related planning processes: Progress and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen F. McCool; David N. Cole

    1997-01-01

    Experience with Limits of Acceptable Change (LAC) and related planning processes has accumulated since the mid-1980's. These processes were developoed as a means of dealing with recreation carrying capacity issues in wilderness and National Parks. These processes clearly also have application outside of protected areas and to issues other than recreation...

  6. General description of preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor and the future problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Kiyoshi

    1976-01-01

    Recently, the studies on plasma physics has progressed rapidly, and promising experimental data emerged successively. Especially expectation mounts high that Tokamak will develop into power reactors. In Japan, the construction of large plasma devices such as JT-60 of JAERI is going to start, and after several years, the studies on plasma physics will come to the end of first stage, then the main research and development will be directed to power reactors. The studies on the design of practical fusion reactors have been in progress since 1973 in JAERI, and the preliminary design is being carried out. The purposes of the preliminary design are the clarification of the concept of the experimental reactor and the requirements for the studies on core plasma, the examination of the problems for developing main components and systems of the reactor, and the development of design technology. The experimental reactor is the quasi-steady reactor of 100 MW fusion reaction output, and the conditions set for the design and the basis of their setting are explained. The outline of the design, namely core plasma, blankets, superconductive magnets and the shielding with them, vacuum wall, neutral particle injection heating device, core fuel supply and exhaust system, and others, is described. In case of scale-up the reactor structural material which can withstand neutron damage must be developed. (Kako, I.)

  7. The state of head injury biomechanics: past, present, and future part 2: physical experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Werner; Monson, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    This presentation is the continuation of the article published in Critical Reviews of Biomedical Engineering, 29(5-6), 2001. That issue contained topics dealing with components and geometry of the human head, classification of head injuries, some early experimental studies, and tolerance considerations. It then dealt with head motion and load characterization, investigations during the period from 1939 to 1966, injury causation and early modeling efforts, the 1966 Head Injury Conference and its sequels, mechanical properties of solid tissues, fluid characterization, and early investigation of the mechanical properties of cranial materials. It continued with a description of the systematic investigations of solid cranial components and structural properties since 1966, fetal cranial properties, analytical head modeling, and numerical solutions of head injury. The paper concluded with experimental dynamic loading of human living and cadaver heads, dynamic loading of surrogate heads, and head injury mechanics. This portion of the paper describes physical head injury experimentation involving animals, primarily primates, human cadavers, volunteers, and inanimate physical models. In order to address the entire domain of head injury biomechanics in the two-part survey, it was intended that this information be supplemented by discussions of head injury tolerance and criteria, automotive and sports safety considerations, and the design of protective equipment, but Professor Goldsmith passed away before these sections could be completed. It is nevertheless anticipated that this attenuated installment will provide, in conjunction with the first part of the survey, a valuable resource for students and practitioners of head injury biomechanics.

  8. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, Pattrick

    2010-01-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogeneous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R and D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part

  9. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  10. Experimental plan for tracer testing in the Culebra Dolomite at the WIPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauheim, R.L.; Davies, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    This Experimental Plan provides a conceptual description of a proposed series of tracer tests to be conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the WIPP site. The new tracer tests are intended to address deficiencies that have been identified both in the performance and interpretation of previously conducted tracer tests' Tracer tests were conducted at the H-2 hydropad in 1980, at the H-6 hydropad in 1981, 1982, and 1983, at the H-4 hydropad from 1982 to 1984, at the H-3 hydropad in 1984, and at the H-11 hydropad in 1988. These tests were all performed over the entire 7-m thickness of the Culebra and, therefore, provided no information on the effects of vertical heterogeneity within the Culebra on transport. In addition, each of the previous tracer tests provided data only from 1 to 3 flow paths, allowing calibration of interpretive models but not validation of those models. The tracer tests at the H-3, H-6, and H-11 hydropads have been interpreted using a double-porosity continuum model (SWIFT 11) in which advective transport occurs through a uniform network of fractures while diffusion of tracer from the fractures to the porosity in the rock matrix causes a physical retardation of the transport. External reviewers, particularly participants in the international INTRAVAL program, have suggested that alternative mechanisms, such as fracture channeling, could explain the observed physical retardation and have recommended that additional tracer tests be designed and performed to distinguish among these mechanisms. The previous tracer tests also provided no information on chemical-retardation processes within the Culebra, which have been shown through performance-assessment calculations to have a large impact on cumulative releases of radionuclides from the WIPP to the accessible environment

  11. A Tale of Two Regions: Landscape Ecological Planning for Shale Gas Energy Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtha, T., Jr.; Schroth, O.; Orland, B.; Goldberg, L.; Mazurczyk, T.

    2015-12-01

    As we increasingly embrace deep shale gas deposits to meet global energy demands new and dispersed local and regional policy and planning challenges emerge. Even in regions with long histories of energy extraction, such as coal, shale gas and the infrastructure needed to produce the gas and transport it to market offers uniquely complex transformations in land use and landcover not previously experienced. These transformations are fast paced, dispersed and can overwhelm local and regional planning and regulatory processes. Coupled to these transformations is a structural confounding factor. While extraction and testing are carried out locally, regulation and decision-making is multilayered, often influenced by national and international factors. Using a geodesign framework, this paper applies a set of geospatial landscape ecological planning tools in two shale gas settings. First, we describe and detail a series of ongoing studies and tools that we have developed for communities in the Marcellus Shale region of the eastern United States, specifically the northern tier of Pennsylvania. Second, we apply a subset of these tools to potential gas development areas of the Fylde region in Lancashire, United Kingdom. For the past five years we have tested, applied and refined a set of place based and data driven geospatial models for forecasting, envisioning, analyzing and evaluating shale gas activities in northern Pennsylvania. These models are continuously compared to important landscape ecological planning challenges and priorities in the region, e.g. visual and cultural resource preservation. Adapting and applying these tools to a different landscape allow us to not only isolate and define important regulatory and policy exigencies in each specific setting, but also to develop and refine these models for broader application. As we continue to explore increasingly complex energy solutions globally, we need an equally complex comparative set of landscape ecological

  12. Experimental W boson physics at future e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklow, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    The study of triple and quartic gauge boson vertices will be the centerpiece of experimental W boson physics at the next generation e + e - linear collider. We examine the sensitivity of a √ bar s = 500 GeV e + e - linear collider to anomalous structure in the W + W - γ and W + W - Z vertices. These vertices are tested by observing the reactions e - γ → νW - , γγ → W + W - , and e +- → W + W - . We also look at W + W - rescattering in e + e - → W + W - as a means to study W + W - → W + W -

  13. Thirty years of experience in health physics education at Purdue University and plans for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landolt, R.R.; Ziemer, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    One way of anticipating areas of emphasis which health physics education should stress in the future is to study the employment trends of graduates. This study has been carried out by evaluating employment trends in six categories : medical, university (academic and radiation safety), federal laboratories, regulatory agencies, nuclear power and waste management/remedial action

  14. Geophysical Survey of McMurdo Ice Shelf to Determine Infrastructure Stability and for Future Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    further encouraged research to deter- mine if other englacial features exist that may contribute to future MIS in- stability. The National Science...surrounding topography by roughly 5 m. The structure is capped by a hyperbolic reflection at a 10 m depth, lacks any fine firn stratigraphy within, and

  15. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 1: Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, J.L.; et al.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 1 contains the Executive Summary and the summaries of the reports of the nine working groups.

  16. Funding Early Childhood Education: The President's Plan for the Future and States' Current Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Jane; Cohen, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Increased attention to proposed federal early childhood education (ECE) legislation has sparked a debate on what the future holds for state-funded ECE systems. This brief explores how the goal of universal preschool is being shaped by the federal agenda and examines state programs in various stages of development. President Obama's Preschool for…

  17. Planning for an uncertain future: Restoration to mitigate water scarcity and sustain carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven T. Brantley; James M. Vose; David N. Wear; Larry Band

    2018-01-01

    The desired future conditions of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) can be described by ecosystem structural characteristics as well as by the provision of ecosystem services. Although the desired structural characteristics of restored longleaf pine ecosystems have been described at length, these characteristics deserve a brief review here because...

  18. Future thinking improves prospective memory performance and plan enactment in older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altgassen, A.M.; Rendell, P.G.; Bernhard, A.; Henry, J.D.; Bailey, P.E.; Phillips, L.H.; Kliegel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient intention formation might improve prospective memory by reducing the need for resource-demanding strategic processes during the delayed performance interval. The present study set out to test this assumption and provides the first empirical assessment of whether imagining a future action

  19. Key Factors in Planning a Sustainable Energy Future Including Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedstrom, Lars; Saxe, Maria; Folkesson, Anders; Wallmark, Cecilia; Haraldsson, Kristina; Bryngelsson, Marten; Alvfors, Per

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a number of future energy visions, especially those basing the energy systems on hydrogen, are discussed. Some often missing comparisons between alternatives, from a sustainability perspective, are identified and then performed for energy storage, energy transportation, and energy use in vehicles. It is shown that it is important…

  20. Evaluation of the current landscape of respiratory nurse specialists in the UK: planning for the future needs of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorke, Janelle; Prigmore, Sam; Hodson, Matt; Stonham, Carol; Long, Hannah; Bellhouse, Sarah; Fletcher, Monica; Edwards, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    The National Health Service currently faces significant challenges and must optimise effective workforce planning and management. There are increasing concerns regarding poor workforce planning for respiratory medicine; a greater understanding of the role of respiratory nurse specialists will inform better workforce planning and management. This was a survey study. Two surveys were administered: an organisational-level survey and an individual respiratory nurse survey. There were 148 and 457 respondents to the organisational and individual nurse survey, respectively. Four main themes are presented: (1) breadth of service provided; (2) patient care; (3) work environment; and (4) succession planning. The majority of work conducted by respiratory nurse specialists relates to patient care outside the secondary care setting including supporting self-management in the home, supporting patients on home oxygen, providing hospital-at-home services and facilitating early discharge from acute care environments. Yet, most respiratory nursing teams are employed by secondary care trusts and located within acute environments. There was evidence of multidisciplinary working, although integrated care was not prominent in the free-text responses. High workload was reported with one-quarter of nursing teams short-staffed. Respiratory nurses reported working unpaid extra hours and a lack of administrative support that often took them away from providing direct patient care. Nearly half of the present sample either plan to retire or are eligible for retirement within 10 years. This survey report provides a current snapshot of the respiratory nurse specialist workforce in the UK. This workforce is an ageing population; the results from this survey can be used to inform succession planning and to ensure a viable respiratory nurse specialist workforce in future.

  1. Current status and future planning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station after Great East Japan earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inouer, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) clean-up and decommissioning activities require a lot of R and D and careful project management due to its severity of damage. Inability of access inside the reactor and turbine buildings due to harsh environment results in large uncertainties which make the project planning difficult R and R activities will be conducted in parallel with on-site clean-up and maintenance activities. In order to cope with this unprecedented challenge, the government, laboratories, academicians, vendors, manufacturers, and other partners have joined together to support tokyo electric Power Company, Inc (TEPCO). This paper will summarize the current status and mid-and long-term plan for the clean-up and decommissioning of Units 1 to 4 of Fukushima Daiichi NPS as of March, 2012. (Author) 15 refs.

  2. [Progress and Future of the Training Plan for Cancer Professionals - Looking Back for 10 Years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Nariaki

    2017-06-01

    In order to increase cancer professionals in Japan, the first phase of training plan for cancer professionals was performed for 5 years from 2007t o 2011, and the second one was performed for 5 years from 2012 to 2016. 95 universities for 18 hubs in the first phase and 100 universities for 15 hubs in the second one participated in this project 2,590 graduate students in the first phase and 2,319 students for 3 years in the second phase learned. Although the number of cancer professionals increased after the start of this project, it is still half of the set points and more efforts are required for this project. From 2017, the new training plan for cancer professionals will start for the third phase, and various professionals such as genome medicine professionals, rare cancer professionals, pediatric cancer professionals and those for the life-stage problems in cancer patients will be educated.

  3. Is Planning Paying Attention to "the future?" Experiences in Eight South African Municipalities

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Petzer, Engela

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Province Zandile Nkosi, Gauteng Province Willemien van Niekerk, CSIR Peter Dacomb, The Planning Practice Group Fana Sihlongonyane, University of Witwatersrand Herman Pienaar, City of Johannesburg Geci Karuri-Sebina, SACN Scientific Committee... and Evaluation Assessment Tool Report of Results 2011/2012 highlights the need for improved project management practices that are key for improving local government performance and service delivery (RSA 2011: 10). However, a significant number of South...

  4. Experimental plan of Σp scatterings at J-PARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamura H.

    2012-02-01

    beams of 2×107/spill at 1.32 GeV/c and 1.42 GeV/c for the Σ− and Σ+ productions, respectively, are used to produce as many hyperon beam as possible.With 16×106 Σ− beam and 55×106 Σ+ beam around 500 MeV/c which are tagged by the spectrometers, we will detect ~10,000 Σ− p and Σ+ p scattering events and ~6,000 Σ− p → Λn inelastic reaction events in 60 days beam time in total. In this proceedings, we will present the experimental plan of the scattering experiment and results of the detailed simulation studies.

  5. Virtual reality in decommissioning projects: experiences, lessons learned and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindahl, G.; Mark, N.K.F.; Meyer, G.

    2006-01-01

    The work on Virtual Reality (VR) tools for decommissioning planning, dose estimation and work management started at the Norwegian Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in 1999 in the VR dose project with Japan Nuclear Cycle development institute (JNC), now JAEA. The main aim of this effort has been to help minimize workers' radiation exposure, as well as help to achieve more efficient use of human resources. VR dose is now used in the decommissioning of one of JNC's reactors, the Fugen Nuclear Power Station. This VR decommissioning project has later resulted in a series of projects and applications. In addition to decommissioning, IFE also put great focus on two other branches of VR tools, namely tools for knowledge management, training and education in operating facilities and tools for control room design. During the last years, this work, beginning at different ends, has been converging more and more towards VR technology for use through out the life cycle of a facility. A VR training simulator for a refuelling machine of the Leningrad NPP (LNPP) developed in cooperation with the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (RRC KI) is now planned to be used in connection with the decommissioning of the three intact reactors at Chernobyl in Ukraine. In this paper we describe experiences from use of VR in decommissioning processes, as well as results from bringing the VR technology initially developed for planned or productive facilities into the decommissioning toolbox. (author)

  6. A National Plan for Energy Research, Development and Demonstration: Creating Energy Choices for the Future (1976)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seamans, Jr., Robert C. [Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), Washington, DC (United States)

    1976-04-15

    This is the first annual update of the initial report submitted to you in June 1975 (ERDA-48), and complies with the requirements of Section 15 of the Federal Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act of 1974. This report represents an evolution in approach over the previous document. ERDA's proposed National Plan has been expanded in scope and depth of coverage and the basic goals and strategy are refined, but remain essentially intact. The Plan summarizes ERDA's current views on the energy technologies the Nation will need to achieve longer-term energy independence, specifically: The paramount role of the private sector in the development and commercialization of new energy technologies is addressed; Conservation (energy efficiency) technologies are singled out for increased attention and are now ranked with several supply technologies as being of the highest priority for national action; The President's 1977 budget requests a large increase - 30% over 1976 - in funding for energy RD&D with particular emphasis on accelerating energy RD&D programs directed at achieving greater long-term energy independence, encouraging cost-sharing with private industry and avoiding the undertaking of RD&D more appropriately the responsibility of the private sector, and supporting the commercial demonstration of synthetic fuel production by providing loan guarantees beginning in FY 76; Federal programs to assist industry in accelerating the market penetration of energy technologies with near-term potential are a key element of the Plan.

  7. Long-range planning cost model for support of future space missions by the deep space network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, J. S.; Remer, D. S.; Buchanan, H. R.

    1990-01-01

    A simple model is suggested to do long-range planning cost estimates for Deep Space Network (DSP) support of future space missions. The model estimates total DSN preparation costs and the annual distribution of these costs for long-range budgetary planning. The cost model is based on actual DSN preparation costs from four space missions: Galileo, Voyager (Uranus), Voyager (Neptune), and Magellan. The model was tested against the four projects and gave cost estimates that range from 18 percent above the actual total preparation costs of the projects to 25 percent below. The model was also compared to two other independent projects: Viking and Mariner Jupiter/Saturn (MJS later became Voyager). The model gave cost estimates that range from 2 percent (for Viking) to 10 percent (for MJS) below the actual total preparation costs of these missions.

  8. A national survey of residents in combined Internal Medicine and Dermatology residency programs: educational experience and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Wanat, Karolyn; Crotty, Bradley H; Rosenbach, Misha

    2015-10-16

    In response to a perceived erosion of medical dermatology, combined internal medicine and dermatology programs (med/derm) programs have been developed that aim to train dermatologists who take care of medically complex patients. Despite the investment in these programs, there is currently no data with regards to the potential impact of these trainees on the dermatology workforce. To determine the experiences, motivations, and future plans of residents in combined med/derm residency programs. We surveyed residents at all United States institutions with both categorical and combined training programs in spring of 2012. Respondents used visual analog scales to rate clinical interests, self-assessed competency, career plans, and challenges. The primary study outcomes were comfort in taking care of patients with complex disease, future practice plans, and experience during residency. Twenty-eight of 31 med/derm residents (87.5%) and 28 of 91 (31%) categorical residents responded (overall response rate 46%). No significant differences were seen in self-assessed dermatology competency, or comfort in performing inpatient consultations, cosmetic procedures, or prescribing systemic agents. A trend toward less comfort in general dermatology was seen among med/derm residents. Med/derm residents were more likely to indicate career preferences for performing inpatient consultation and taking care of medically complex patients. Categorical residents rated their programs and experiences more highly. Med/derm residents have stronger interests in serving medically complex patients. Categorical residents are more likely to have a positive experience during residency. Future work will be needed to ascertain career choices among graduates once data are available.

  9. Family members and health professionals' perspectives on future life planning of ageing people with Down syndrome: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelli, Venusia; Raggi, Alberto; Paganelli, Chiara; Leonardi, Matilde

    2017-08-08

    To address the way in which primary caregivers of people over 45 with Down syndrome describe daily life activities and context and foresee their future. Thirteen family members and 15 health professionals participated to four focus groups. Meaningful concepts were identified and linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health using established linking rules. A total of 258 relevant concepts were identified and linked to 75 categories of the classification: 38 were from activity and participation and 17 from environmental factors domains. The most commonly reported issues were mental functions (b117-intellectual functions and b152-emotional functions), community life activities (d910-community life and d920-recreation and leisure) and environmental factors (e310-support of immediate family, e355-support from health professionals and e555-associations and organizational services). Information on the daily life and health of ageing people with Down syndrome is important to plan social and health care interventions tailored to deal with problems that they may encounter in older age. Considering the interaction between health and environment and maintaining a continuity of daily routines were reported as the most relevant topics for managing daily lives of persons with Down syndrome in older ages. Implications for rehabilitation Pay more attention to the interaction between environmental factors and health condition in ageing people with Down syndrome. Information about the life contest are important in order to plan present and future social-health care interventions. Future planning for people with Down syndrome is a great concern for family members.

  10. Exposure to Experimental Preeclampsia in Mice Enhances the Vascular Response to Future Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Dafina; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Blanton, Robert M.; Aronovitz, Mark; Burke, Suzanne D.; McCurley, Amy; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading killer of women in developed nations. One gender-specific risk factor is preeclampsia (PE), a syndrome of hypertension and proteinuria that complicates 5% of pregnancies. Although PE resolves after delivery, exposed women are at increased long term risk of premature CVD and mortality. Preexisting CVD risk factors are associated with increased risk of developing PE but whether PE merely uncovers risk or contributes directly to future CVD remains a critical unanswered question. A mouse PE model was used to test the hypothesis that PE causes an enhanced vascular response to future vessel injury. A PE-like state was induced in pregnant CD1 mice by overexpressing soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), a circulating anti-angiogenic protein that induces hypertension and glomerular disease resembling human PE. Two months post-partum, sFlt-1 levels and blood pressure normalized and cardiac size and function by echocardiography and renal histology were indistinguishable in PE-exposed compared to control mice. Mice were then challenged with unilateral carotid injury. PE-exposed mice had significantly enhanced vascular remodeling with increased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation (180% increase, P<0.01) and vessel fibrosis (216% increase, P<0.001) compared to control pregnancy. In the contralateral uninjured vessel, there was no difference in remodeling after exposure to PE. These data support a new model in which vessels exposed to PE retain a persistently enhanced vascular response to injury despite resolution of PE after delivery. This new paradigm may contribute to the substantially increased risk of CVD in woman exposed to PE. PMID:25712723

  11. The operation of accelerators as entrusted business and our company's future plans concerning this tie-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Y.; Tanaka, M.

    2004-01-01

    Research Institutes have entrusted the operation of large-scale accelerators to private enterprise in Japan. Research Institutes expect private enterprise to operate and maintain accelerators in a stable condition. With the use of highly advanced accelerators and the diversification of the research to which they are applied, operators of accelerators have come to be considered as supporters of research and are expected to understand the associated highly advanced technologies. In this paper, we are going to consider the present operation of accelerators and discuss our company's future plans concerning this business tie-up. (author)

  12. FRAME, animal experimentation and the Three Rs: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balls, Michael

    2009-12-01

    At the opening of a meeting to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique, by W.M.S. Russell and R.L. Burch, and the 40th anniversary of the establishment of FRAME, some comments on the early days of the Charity are made, with particular reference to the special contributions made by its founder-Chairman, Dorothy Hegarty, and the author's own appointment as a Trustee, and later as Chairman. Reference is made to some key events and successes, and especially to the importance of FRAME's move from London to Nottingham, and the establishment of an ongoing collaboration with the University of Nottingham, including the setting-up of the FRAME Alternatives Laboratory. 2009 FRAME.

  13. THE MODERN TRENDS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS OF TRAINING FUTURE SPECIALISTS IN THE FIELD OF HISTRIONIC ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Sergeevna Skvortsova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects the specific ways of training specialists in the sphere of histrionic art, contemporary trends and special scientific experiments in the education of actors.We consider the traditional aspects of histrionic art specialists’ occupational fitness and modern requirements upon actor’s psycho-physical training.There also follows historical parallels in studying actor’s energy in the researches of K. Stanislavsky, M. Chekhov, T. Reebo, W. James, A. Maneggetty as well as in the modern researches of L. Gracheva.And there was proved the reason for including some Yoga elements and Academician M.Norbecov’s exercises system into the actors training practice.In the article Yoga for actors considers as a system of emotional and physical preparation to the artistic creative work, as a method of self-control that let an actor be really deep in his creative condition.There also was described an advantageous result of applying at our experimental laboratory of actors Yoga classes some exercises that reveal connection of person’s carriage and his condition in the process of working on the outward demonstration of this or that emotion in order to create appropriate inner state.Object: Studying the influence on the productivity of actors’ professional education of the Yoga elements included into the actors’ psycho-technique practice training.Methods: theoretical, experimental and observational methods of research.Results: After using these methods during the classes the rate of student’s psycho-physical APPARATUS has extremely increased.The area of application: the educational process at artistic creative high schools.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-52

  14. NASA Global Hawk Project Update and Future Plans: A New Tool for Earth Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftel, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Science objectives include: First demonstration of the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) for NASA and NOAA Earth science research and applications; Validation of instruments on-board the Aura satellite; Exploration of trace gases, aerosols, and dynamics of remote upper Troposphere/lower Stratosphere regions; Sample polar vortex fragments and atmospheric rivers; Risk reduction for future missions that will study hurricanes and atmospheric rivers.

  15. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 4: Cosmic Frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, J. L. [MIT, LNS; Ritz, S. [UC, Santa Cruz; Beatty, J. J. [Ohio State U.; Buckley, J. [Washington U., Seattle; Cowen, D. F. [Penn State U.; Cushman, P. [Minnesota U.; Dodelson, S. [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Galbiati, C. [PNPI, CSTD; Honscheid, K. [Ohio State U.; Hooper, D. [Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Kaplinghat, M. [UC, Irvine; Kusenko, A. [Unlisted; Matchev, K. [Florida U.; McKinsey, D. [Yale U.; Nelson, A. E. [Washington U., Seattle; Olinto, A. [Chicago U., EFI; Profumo, S. [UC, Santa Cruz; Robertson, H. [Washington U., Seattle; Rosenberg, L. [Unlisted; Sinnis, G. [Los Alamos; Tait, T. M.P. [UCLA

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 4, on the Cosmic Frontier, discusses the program of research relevant to cosmology and the early universe. This area includes the study of dark matter and the search for its particle nature, the study of dark energy and inflation, and cosmic probes of fundamental symmetries.

  16. Planning the Future of U.S. Particle Physics (Snowmass 2013): Chapter 3: Energy Frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, R.; et al.

    2014-01-23

    These reports present the results of the 2013 Community Summer Study of the APS Division of Particles and Fields ("Snowmass 2013") on the future program of particle physics in the U.S. Chapter 3, on the Energy Frontier, discusses the program of research with high-energy colliders. This area includes experiments on the Higgs boson, the electroweak and strong interactions, and the top quark. It also encompasses direct searches for new particles and interactions at high energy.

  17. Experimental validation of hyperthermia SAR treatment planning using MR B1+ imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Cornelis A T van den; Bartels, Lambertus W; Leeuw, Astrid A C De; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Kamer, Jeroen B Van de

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the concept of using B 1+ imaging as a means to validate SAR models for radiofrequency hyperthermia is presented. As in radiofrequency hyperthermia, in common clinical MR imaging which applies RF frequencies between 64 and 128 MHz, the RF field distribution inside a patient is largely determined by the dielectric distribution of the anatomy. Modern MR imaging techniques allow measurement of the RF magnetic field component B 1+ making it possible to measure at high resolution the dielectric interaction of the RF field with the patient. Given these considerations, we propose to use MR imaging to verify the validity of our dielectric patient model used for SAR models of radiofrequency hyperthermia. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of this concept by performing B 1+ measurements and simulations on cylindrical split phantoms consisting of materials with dielectric properties similar to human tissue types. Important topics of investigation were the accuracy and sensitivity of B 1+ measurements and the validity of the electric model of the MR body coil. The measurements were performed on a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner with its quadrature body coil operating at 64 MHz. It was shown that even small B 1+ variations of 2 to 5% could be measured reliably in the phantom experiments. An electrical model of the transmit coil was implemented on our FDTD-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform and the RF field distributions were calculated assuming an idealized quadrature current distribution in the coil. A quantitatively good correlation between measurements and simulations was found for phantoms consisting of water and oil, while highly conductive phantoms show considerable deviations. However, assuming linear excitation for these conductive phantoms resulted in good correspondence. As an explanation it is suggested that the coil is being detuned due to the inductive nature of the conductive phantoms, breaking up the phase difference of

  18. Future plans for the design and construction of fast reactor power stations in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, G.; Ghilardotti, G.

    1978-01-01

    Studies related to fast reactor technology have been pursued in Italy for a long time and this country is now deeply engaged in the demonstration and marketing phases, in accordance with the outlines of the Italian national energy plan. In the paper the following topics are examined: current possibilities for introducing fast reactors in Italy; the main social and political constraints concerning their introduction; the necessary industrial and organizational structures (in the broadest meaning) existing or foreseen; the national programme pertaining to activities towards achieving this goal. (author)

  19. The D0 detector at Fermilab: Recent results and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoftun, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    The D0 Collaboration at Fermilab consists of about 400 physicists from institutions in 8 countries. The detector built by this collaboration has three main parts, a Central Detector, a liquid Argon - Uranium calorimeter and an outer muon detector. A very successful run was completed in May of 1993; analyses of this data are nearing completion and several physics results have already been presented. Another run started in January of 1994 and is still continuing. Some of the results from the first run, prospects for forthcoming physics results and plans for detector upgrades will be presented in this paper

  20. Planning the future of JPL's management and administrative support systems around an integrated database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    JPL's management and administrative support systems have been developed piece meal and without consistency in design approach over the past twenty years. These systems are now proving to be inadequate to support effective management of tasks and administration of the Laboratory. New approaches are needed. Modern database management technology has the potential for providing the foundation for more effective administrative tools for JPL managers and administrators. Plans for upgrading JPL's management and administrative systems over a six year period evolving around the development of an integrated management and administrative data base are discussed.

  1. Is ambiguity tolerance malleable? Experimental evidence with potential implications for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Megan L; Camp, Richaurd; Milner, Morgan

    2015-01-01

    We conducted two research studies to address the malleability of tolerance of ambiguity (TA) by manipulating situational ambiguity. Students participated in a semester-end assessment of their management skills (n = 306). In Study 1, students in low and moderate ambiguity conditions had significantly higher post-experiment TA, more positive change in self-efficacy, and marginally higher faculty ratings. In Study 2, a control group (n = 103) did not participate in the assessment and was established for comparison to the first study results. The Study 2 students reported TA significantly lower than Study 1 students in the low and moderate ambiguity conditions. The control group TA was not significantly different from that of the Study 1 high ambiguity condition. This further suggested TA's situational malleability, as those who had controlled access to structured information appeared to have increased their TA over that observed in the other two groups. These results suggest that TA may be malleable. We review the relevant literature, offer hypotheses, report our analyses and findings, and then propose future research, and potential prescriptive applications in such areas as management development, assessment, and decision-making.

  2. Is ambiguity tolerance malleable? Experimental evidence with potential implications for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L Endres

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We conducted two research studies to address the malleability of TA by manipulating situational ambiguity. Students participated in a semester-end assessment of their management skills (n = 306. In Study 1, students in low and moderate ambiguity conditions had significantly higher post-experiment TA, more positive change in self-efficacy, and marginally higher faculty ratings. In Study 2, a control group (n = 103 did not participate in the assessment and was established for comparison to the first study results. The Study 2 students reported TA significantly lower than Study 1 students in the low and moderate ambiguity conditions. The control group TA was not significantly different from that of the Study 1 high ambiguity condition. This further suggested TA’s situational malleability, as those who had controlled access to structured information appeared to have increased their TA over that observed in the other two groups. These results suggest that TA may be malleable. We review the relevant literature, offer hypotheses, report our analyses and findings, and then propose future research and potential prescriptive applications in such areas as management development, assessment, and decision-making.

  3. The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Present status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alton, G.D.; Beene, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a first generation national user facility for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs). The reconfiguration, construction, and equipment commissioning phases have been completed and the beam development program is in progress. In this article, descriptions of the facility and newly implemented experimental equipment for use in the nuclear and astrophysics programs will be given and an outline of the initial experimental program will be presented. Special target ion source related problems, endemic to the production of specific short lived RIBs will be discussed. In addition, plans, which involve either a 200 MeV or a 1 GeV proton linac driver for a second generation ISOL facility, will be presented

  4. Airport surface moving map displays: OpEval-2 evaluation results and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livack, Garret; McDaniel, James I.; Battiste, Vernol

    2001-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), in cooperation with the Cargo Airline Association (CAA) and three of its member airlines (Airborne Express, Federal Express, and United Parcel Service), have embarked upon an aggressive yet phased approach to introduce new Free Flight-enabling technologies into the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS). General aviation is also actively involved, represented primarily by the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA). These new technologies being evaluated include advanced cockpit avionics and a complimentary ground infrastructure. In support of this initiative, a series of operational evaluations (OpEvals) have been conducted or are planned. The OpEvals have evaluated in-flight as well as airport surface movement applications. Results from the second OpEval, conducted at Louisville, Kentucky in October 2000, indicated that runway incursions might be significantly reduced with the introduction of a cockpit-based moving map system derived from emerging technologies. An additional OpEval is planned to evaluate the utility of an integrated cockpit and airport surface architecture that provides enhanced pilot and controller awareness of airport surface operations. It is believed that the combination of such an airborne and a ground-based system best addresses many of the safety issues surrounding airport surface operations. Such a combined system would provide both flight crews and controllers with a common awareness, or shared picture of airport surface operations.

  5. Rethinking Design and Urban Planning for the Cities of the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Saaty

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Growth of urban areas and abandonment of rural areas are phenomena that increase quickly. The main consequences of urbanization are pollution, consumption of resources and energy, waste dumps, and junk yards. These aspects require a better planning and design of European urban metropolitan areas, considering benefits, opportunities, costs and risks (B.O.C.R., derivable by urban transformations and available resources. The paper consists of five parts. The first part contains some reflections on consequences of urban sprawl. In the second part, some possible kinds of cities are discussed (sustainable city, smart city, and compact city. The third part briefly describes a multicriteria decision-making approach known as the ‘analytic hierarchy process’ to deal with complex decisions. In the fourth part, alternative city models are analyzed (compact city, elevated city, green house city, and water city. Finally, in the fifth part, the criteria selected for the planning and design of the alternative city models are used for the prioritization of some European cities.

  6. Projecting Future Sea Level Rise for Water Resources Planning in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.; Kao, K.; Chung, F.

    2008-12-01

    Sea level rise is one of the major concerns for the management of California's water resources. Higher water levels and salinity intrusion into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta could affect water supplies, water quality, levee stability, and aquatic and terrestrial flora and fauna species and their habitat. Over the 20th century, sea levels near San Francisco Bay increased by over 0.6ft. Some tidal gauge and satellite data indicate that rates of sea level rise are accelerating. Sea levels are expected to continue to rise due to increasing air temperatures causing thermal expansion of the ocean and melting of land-based ice such as ice on Greenland and in southeastern Alaska. For water planners, two related questions are raised on the uncertainty of future sea levels. First, what is the expected sea level at a specific point in time in the future, e.g., what is the expected sea level in 2050? Second, what is the expected point of time in the future when sea levels will exceed a certain height, e.g., what is the expected range of time when the sea level rises by one foot? To address these two types of questions, two factors are considered: (1) long term sea level rise trend, and (2) local extreme sea level fluctuations. A two-step approach will be used to develop sea level rise projection guidelines for decision making that takes both of these factors into account. The first step is developing global sea level rise probability distributions for the long term trends. The second step will extend the approach to take into account the effects of local astronomical tides, changes in atmospheric pressure, wind stress, floods, and the El Niño/Southern Oscillation. In this paper, the development of the first step approach is presented. To project the long term sea level rise trend, one option is to extend the current rate of sea level rise into the future. However, since recent data indicate rates of sea level rise are accelerating, methods for estimating sea level rise

  7. TomoMINT - the current status and future plan of MINT's computed tomography scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesan Sinnakaruppan; Jaafar Abdullah

    2000-01-01

    TomoMINT, a second generation computed tomography scanner developed by MINT, is a powerful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for producing two-dimensional cross-sectional images of an object without physically sectioning it. Characteristics of the internal structure of an object such as dimensions, shape, internal defects, density and component distribution are readily available from the scan. Tomographs of wood, metal components and concrete slabs have been successfully obtained from TomoMINT. This paper deals with the current status and future development of this scanner. (author)

  8. Present status and future plan of the research using HIMAC of NIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawachi, Kiyomitsu

    1996-01-01

    The Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) was completed in 1993, and since June of 1994 heavy ion therapy has made a new start at this facility after closed-down of the BEVALAC accelerator at LBL in Berkeley, California in 1992. The HIMAC is also opened for the researchers of outside of NIRS as well as the clinical trial of the heavy ion therapy. In this report, I will describe on the present status of HIMAC facility, the beam characteristics and the future developments of HIMAC. (author)

  9. Environmental application research and future plans in plasma arc technology at the georgia institute of technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the facilities and past, current, and future research efforts at the georgia institute of technology plasma Arc research facility established in 1992. This research facility was established specifically to develop and test applications related to waste management and various remediation concepts. The results of research programs in the vitrification of asbestos materials, municipal incinerator ash, and in situ testing programs, including soil remediation, waste to energy research, landfill remediation and capacity management. The presentation will also include conference and symposium announcements and invitations. 9 tabs

  10. Social Media Technology and Public Health in Ontario: Findings from a Planning Meeting Exploring Current Practices and Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Richard; McMurray, Josephine; Regan, Sandra; Kothari, Anita; Donelle, Lorie; McBride, Susan; Sobel, Annette; Hall, Jodi; Fraser, Robert; Foisey, Lyndsay

    2017-01-01

    In the province of Ontario, many of the public health units (PHUs) now possess and use social media as part of their daily health promotion and communication operations. To explore this topic, a planning meeting was held to generate deeper insights toward the use of these forms of technology for preventative services delivery. The planning meeting was held with 50 participants, comprising representatives from 20 of the 36 PHUs in Ontario, interested academics, students and government representatives. A nominal group technique (NGT) was used to build consensus related to future research needs, as related to public health and social media. Participants generated a range of insights around the use of social media, including the need for: leadership buy-in and resource allocation; social media policy and governance structure; performance measurement and evaluation; practices related to engagement with program recipients and addressing the lack of resources faced by many health units. Future research priorities were also generated, related to evaluating the cost-benefit of social media activities and understanding behaviour change implications. Further research is needed to evaluate the functionality, leadership and competency requirements and impact(s) of these new forms of health communication technology within public health service delivery. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  11. General practice registrars' intentions for future practice: implications for rural medical workforce planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Catherine; Seal, Alexa; McGirr, Joe; Caton, Tim

    2016-11-01

    The models of practice that general practice registrars (GPRs) envisage undertaking will affect workforce supply. The aim of this research was to determine practice intentions of current GPRs in a regional general practice training program (Coast City Country General Practice Training). Questionnaires were circulated to 220 GPRs undertaking general practice placements to determine characteristics of ideal practice models and intentions for future practice. Responses were received for 99 participants (45%). Current GPRs intend to work an average of less than eight half-day sessions/week, with male participants intending to work more hours (t(91)=3.528, P=0.001). More than one-third of this regional cohort intends to practice in metropolitan centres. Proximity to family and friends was the most important factor influencing the choice of practice location. Men ranked remuneration for work as more important (t (88)=-4.280, Pmedical graduates intend to own their own practice compared with 52% of international medical graduates (χ 2 (1)=8.498, P=0.004). Future general practitioners (GPs) intend to work fewer hours than current GPs. Assumptions about lifestyle factors, practice models and possible professional roles should be carefully evaluated when developing strategies to recruit GPs and GPRs into rural practice.

  12. Present status and future plans of the National Atomic Research Center of Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, N.K.

    1980-01-01

    The Malaysian Atomic Research Center (PUSPATI) was established in 1972 and operates under the Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment. It is the first research center of this kind in Malaysia. Some of the objectives of this center are: operation and maintenance of the research reactor; research and development in reactor science and technology; production of short-lived radioisotopes for use in medicine, agriculture and industry; coordination of the utilization of the reactor and its experimental facilities among the various research institutes and universities; training in nuclear radiation field; personnel monitoring and environmental surveillance

  13. Operational status and future plans for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Kevin W.; Schoenberg, Kurt F.

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) continues to be a signature experimental science facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The 800 MeV linear proton accelerator provides multiplexed beams to five unique target stations to produce medical radioisotopes, ultra-cold neutrons, thermal and high energy neutrons for material and nuclear science, and to conduct proton radiography of dynamic events. Recent operating experience will be reviewed and the role of an enhanced LANSCE facility in LANL's new signature facility initiative, Matter and Radiation in Extremes (MaRIE) will be discussed.

  14. Status report of a high luminosity muon collider and future research and development plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.; Sessler, A.

    1996-11-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV (c-of-m) high luminosity μ + μ - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are analyzed. Finally, we present an R ampersand D plan to determine whether such machines are practical, and, if they are, lead to the construction of a 0.5 TeV demonstration by 2010, and to a 4 TeV collider by the year 2020

  15. A culture of future planning: perceptions of sexual risk among educated young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Ann M; Ostrach, Bayla; Marcus, Ruthanne; Frank, Cynthia; Ball, Cassandra; Erickson, Pamela I

    2014-10-01

    In this study we examined how social processes, specifically the acquisition of postsecondary education and capital, shaped perceptions of sexual risk and impacted sexual practices and sexual health among young adults. Using qualitative research methods we collected and analyzed data among students attending a 4-year university in the northeastern region of the United States over a 1-year period. By analyzing participants' narratives, we found that the reproduction of shared norms and values encouraged educated young adults to focus on educational and professional success, pressing many of them to be concerned about preventing pregnancy rather than preventing disease transmission, and increasing their risk for sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS. Sexual-health educators need to address how social processes shape sexual practices, encourage educated young adults to challenge unequal gender expectations, and consider how sexually transmitted infections might also interfere with life plans. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Operational experience of the upgraded LHC injection kicker magnets during Run 2 and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M. J.; Adraktas, A.; Bregliozzi, G.; Goddard, B.; Ducimetière, L.; Salvant, B.; Sestak, J.; Vega Cid, L.; Weterings, W.; Vallgren, C. Yin

    2017-07-01

    During Run 1 of the LHC, one of the injection kicker magnets caused occasional operational delays due to beam induced heating with high bunch intensity and short bunch lengths. In addition, there were also sporadic issues with vacuum activity and electrical flashover of the injection kickers. An extensive program of studies was launched and significant upgrades were carried out during Long Shutdown 1 (LS 1). These upgrades included a new design of beam screen to reduce both beam coupling impedance of the kicker magnet and the electric field associated with the screen conductors, hence decreasing the probability of electrical breakdown in this region. This paper presents operational experience of the injection kicker magnets during the first years of Run 2 of the LHC, including a discussion of faults and kicker magnet issues that limited LHC operation. In addition, in light of these issues, plans for further upgrades are briefly discussed.

  17. Future Plans of the ATLAS Collaboration for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hristova, Ivana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With the already outstanding LHC luminosity performance, and planned LHC upgrades in the upcoming shutdowns, it is expected that within a short time-scale, the general purpose LHC experiments will have to cope with luminosities beyond their original design. In order to maintain detector performance and sensitivity to expected and new physics processes, ATLAS has defined a continuous upgrade programme which foresees staged enhancements during the next 10 years of operation, and then more widespread changes before the transition to the highest luminosities after 2024. This talk will describe several components of the ATLAS upgrade, focusing in particular on the systems for acquiring large samples of data for the study of benchmark physics processes. The detector systems face two challenges in the higher luminosity environment: high particle occupancies and increased radiation dose. These will be addressed by a complete replacement of the inner detector and the readout electronics of the calorimeter and muon det...

  18. Triggers for the Pierre Auger Observatory, the current status and plans for the future

    CERN Document Server

    Szadkowski, Z

    2009-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a multi-national organization for research on ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The Southern Auger Observatory (Auger-South) in the province of Mendoza, Argentina, has been completed in 2008. First results on the energy spectrum, mass composition and distribution of arrival directions on the southern sky are really impressive. The planned Northern Auger Observatory in Colorado, USA, (Auger-North) will open a new window into the universe and establish charged particle astronomy to determine the origin and nature of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. These cosmic particles carry information complementary to neutrinos and photons and to gravitational waves. They also provide an extremely energetic beam for the study of particle interactions at energies that thirty times higher than those reached in terrestrial accelerators. The Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector consisting of a Surface Detector (SD) and an atmospheric Fluorescence Detector (FD). The hybrid data set obtained when both...

  19. The Healthy Primary School of the Future: study protocol of a quasi-experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Willeboordse

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unhealthy lifestyles in early childhood are a major global health challenge. These lifestyles often persist from generation to generation and contribute to a vicious cycle of health-related and social problems. This design article presents a study evaluating the effects of two novel healthy school interventions. The main outcome measure will be changes in children’s body mass index (BMI. In addition, lifestyle behaviours, academic achievement, child well-being, socio-economic differences, and societal costs will be examined. Methods In close collaboration with various stakeholders, a quasi-experimental study was developed, for which children of four intervention schools (n = 1200 in the southern part of the Netherlands are compared with children of four control schools (n = 1200 in the same region. The interventions started in November 2015. In two of the four intervention schools, a whole-school approach named ‘The Healthy Primary School of the Future’, is implemented with the aim of improving physical activity and dietary behaviour. For this intervention, pupils are offered an extended curriculum, including a healthy lunch, more physical exercises, and social and educational activities, next to the regular school curriculum. In the two other intervention schools, a physical-activity school approach called ‘The Physical Activity School’, is implemented, which is essentially similar to the other intervention, except that no lunch is provided. The interventions proceed during a period of 4 years. Apart from the effectiveness of both interventions, the process, the cost-effectiveness, and the expected legal implications are studied. Data collection is conducted within the school system. The baseline measurements started in September 2015 and yearly follow-up measurements are taking place until 2019. Discussion A whole-school approach is a new concept in the Netherlands. Due to its innovative, multifaceted

  20. Tax-Rate Biases in Tax-Planning Decisions: Experimental Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Amberger, Harald; Eberhartinger, Eva; Kasper, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to standard economic theory, recent empirical findings suggest that firms do not always engage in economically optimal tax planning. We conduct a laboratory experiment and find robust evidence that decision biases offer a behavioral explanation for suboptimal tax planning. When facing time pressure in an intra-group cross-border financing decision, subjects apply heuristics based on the salience of statutory tax rates. This stirs decision makers to underestimate the effects of tax-ba...

  1. The advancement of remote systems technology: Past perspectives and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.J.; Hamel, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    In the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past five years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of admissible remote tasks and increasing remote work efficiency. The motivation and justification for the program are discussed by surveying the 40 years of remote operating experience which exists and considering the essential features of various old and new philosophies which have been, or are being, used in remote engineering. A future direction based upon the Remotex concept is explained, and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems capability is feasible through advanced technology

  2. The advancement of remote systems technology: Past perspectives and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.J.; Hamel, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    In the Fuel Recycle Division, Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past five years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of admissible remote tasks and increasing remote work efficiency. The motivation and justification for the program are discussed by surveying the 40 years of remote operating experience which exists and considering the essential features of various old and new philosophies which have been, or are being, used in remote engineering. A future direction based upon the Teletec concept is explained, and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems capability is feasible through advanced technology

  3. Back from the future: to plan the best way nuclear can get US there

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanborn Scott, D.

    2004-01-01

    We will start by giving two answers to a single question, 'Why hydrogen?' We will follow this with a brief discussion of the energy system architecture's five-link chain, to emphasize the key role of the central link, energy currencies. Then, gluing these two concepts together - (a) systemic architecture and (b) the answer to why hydrogen - we can set out the rationale leading to the premise that our system will ultimately be dominated by the twin currencies, hydrogen and electricity. All this will serve as a foundation for considering the sources, infrastructures and service technologies likely to characterise the deeper future (2100 ∼ 2200). Finally, based on this long view (and our sliver of tine within it) we can use the perspective to suggest near-term strategies. (author)

  4. Status and plans for future generations of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Seiji

    2003-01-01

    Several medium- to large-scale ground-based interferometric gravitational-wave antennas have been constructed around the world. Although these antennas of the first generation could detect gravitational waves within a few years, it is necessary to improve the sensitivity of the detectors significantly with advanced technologies to ensure more frequent detection of gravitational waves. Stronger seismic isolation and reduction of thermal noise, especially using cryogenic mirrors, are among the most important technologies that can lead us to the realization of advanced detectors. Some of the advanced technologies are already implemented in some of the existing detectors and others are currently being investigated for the future-generation detectors such as advanced LIGO, LCGT, upgrade of GEO600, AIGO, and EURO. We expect that such advanced detectors will eventually open a new window to the universe and establish a new field, 'gravitational wave astronomy'

  5. The current status and future plans for the Monte Carlo codes MONK and MCBEND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, N.; Shuttleworth, T.; Grimstone, M.; Hutton, L.; Armishaw, M.; Bird, A.; France, N.; Connolly, S.

    2001-01-01

    MONK and MCBEND are software tools used for criticality/reactor physics and shielding/dosimetry/general radiation transport applications respectively. The codes are developed by a collaboration comprising AEA Technology and BNFL, and AEA Technology's ANSWERS Software Service supplies them to customers throughout the world on a commercial basis. In keeping with this commercial nature it is vital that the codes' development programmes evolve to meet the diverse expectations of the current and potential customer base. This involves striving to maintain an acceptable balance in the development of the various components that comprise a modern software package. This paper summarises the current status of MONK and MCBEND by indicating how the task of trying to achieve this difficult balance has been addressed in the recent past and is being addressed for the future. (orig.)

  6. EO-1/Hyperion: Nearing Twelve Years of Successful Mission Science Operation and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Campbell, Petya K.; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Zhang, Qingyuan; Landis, David R.; Ungar, Stephen G.; Ong, Lawrence; Pollack, Nathan H.; Cheng, Yen-Ben

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite is a technology demonstration mission that was launched in November 2000, and by July 2012 will have successfully completed almost 12 years of high spatial resolution (30 m) imaging operations from a low Earth orbit. EO-1 has two unique instruments, the Hyperion and the Advanced Land Imager (ALI). Both instruments have served as prototypes for NASA's newer satellite missions, including the forthcoming (in early 2013) Landsat-8 and the future Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI). As well, EO-1 is a heritage platform for the upcoming German satellite, EnMAP (2015). Here, we provide an overview of the mission, and highlight the capabilities of the Hyperion for support of science investigations, and present prototype products developed with Hyperion imagery for the HyspIRI and other space-borne spectrometers.

  7. Experimental studies on lung carcinogenesis and their relationship to future research on radiation-induced lung cancer in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-03-01

    The usefulness of experimental systems for studying human lung carcinogenesis lies in the ease of studying components of a total problem. As an example, the main thrust of attack on possible synergistic interactions between radiation, cigarette smoke, and other irritants must be by means of research on animals. Because animals can be serially sacrificed, a systematic search can be made for progressive lung changes, thereby improving our understanding of carcinogenesis. The mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis have not yet been delineated, but modern concepts of molecular and cellular biology and of radiation dosimetry are being increasingly applied to both in vivo and in vitro exposure to determine the mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, to elucidate human data, and to aid in extrapolating experimental animal data to human exposures. In addition, biologically based mathematical models of carcinogenesis are being developed to describe the nature of the events leading to malignancy; they are also an essential part of a rational approach to quantitative cancer risk assessment. This paper summarizes recent experimental and modeling data on radon-induced lung cancer and includes the confounding effects of cigarette-smoke exposures. The applicability of these data to understanding human exposures is emphasized, and areas of future research on human radiation-induced carcinogenesis are discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  8. The Coastal Resilience Index: High School Students Planning for Their Community's Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastler, J. A.; Dorcik, S.; Sempier, T.; Kimbrell, C.

    2017-12-01

    Communities in Jackson County, Mississippi sustained heavy damages during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and are expected to experience early effects as sea level rise and increasing episodes of nuisance flooding. Many high school students still remember months-long evacuations and other disruptions to home and family in 2005. Others do not remember or moved here recently. None anticipate their communities are likely to face similar challenges in the future, nor do they have a strong understanding that preparing for such an event is a practical, local career choice for a science major. Through a series of classroom and field lessons, students in two coastal communities learned how and why coastal habitats are changing, and how modeling predicts future impacts. During a culminating experience students learn how to use the Coastal Resilience Index developed by Mississippi Alabama Sea Grant Consortium. Working in teams or three to four students, the students addressed one of twelve scenarios based on real experiences observed by Gulf Coast communities during their post-hurricane assessments. Each team explored its topic using internet resources and conversations with family members, then worked together to brainstorm possible approaches to address the situation described in their scenario. They selected one potential solution for their focus and developed it, ultimately producing a poster of the scenario and their idea of its solution. The teams gathered at the University of Southern Mississippi at the end of the term to present their work, science fair style, to a selection of community leaders from the Climate Community of Practice. Posters were judged and best poster presentations were awarded. This talk will focus on the evaluation results. Existing qualitative observations show differences in awareness and self-efficacy to work productively in this field. Community leaders expressed interest in the solutions offered. Ongoing quantitative evaluations will also be

  9. Planned experimental studies on natural-circulation and stability performance of boiling water reactors in four experimental facilities and first results (NACUSP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de E-mail: kruijf@iri.tudelft.nl; Ketelaar, K.C.J.; Avakian, G.; Gubernatis, P.; Caruge, D.; Manera, A.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Yadigaroglu, G.; Dominicus, G.; Rohde, U.; Prasser, H.-M.; Castrillo, F.; Huggenberger, M.; Hennig, D.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Aguirre, C

    2003-04-01

    Within the 5th Euratom framework programme the NACUSP project focuses on natural-circulation and stability characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This paper gives an overview of the research to be performed. Moreover, it shows the first results obtained by one of the four experimental facilities involved. Stability boundaries are given for the low-power low-pressure operating range, measured in the CIRCUS facility. The experiments are meant to serve as a future validation database for thermohydraulic system codes to be applied for the design and operation of BWRs.

  10. Planned experimental studies on natural-circulation and stability performance of boiling water reactors in four experimental facilities and first results (NACUSP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Ketelaar, K.C.J.; Avakian, G.; Gubernatis, P.; Caruge, D.; Manera, A.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Yadigaroglu, G.; Dominicus, G.; Rohde, U.; Prasser, H.-M.; Castrillo, F.; Huggenberger, M.; Hennig, D.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Aguirre, C.

    2003-01-01

    Within the 5th Euratom framework programme the NACUSP project focuses on natural-circulation and stability characteristics of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). This paper gives an overview of the research to be performed. Moreover, it shows the first results obtained by one of the four experimental facilities involved. Stability boundaries are given for the low-power low-pressure operating range, measured in the CIRCUS facility. The experiments are meant to serve as a future validation database for thermohydraulic system codes to be applied for the design and operation of BWRs

  11. Microwave tokamak experiment (MTX) first year of operation and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began plasma operations in November 1988, and our main goal is the study of electron-cyclotron heating (ECH) in plasma discharges. The MTX tokamak was relocated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and we have re-created plasma parameters that are similar to those generated while the tokamak was at MIT. After stable ohmic operation was achieved, single-pulse FEL heating experiments began. During this phase, the FEL operated at low power levels on the way to its ultimate goal of 2 GW and 140 GHz with a 30-ns pulse length. We have developed a number of new diagnostics to measure these fast FEL pulses and the resulting plasma effects. In this paper, we present results that show the correlation of MTX data with MIT data, some of the operational modifications and procedures used, results to date from preliminary tokamak operations with the FEL, and our near-term operational plans. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  12. Subsea well intervention; Learning from the past - planning for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsnes, Trond Inge

    2010-07-01

    Over many years Statoil has focussed on increasing hydrocarbon recovery factors from their reservoirs. The company has a stated ambition for achieving an average 55% recovery factor from subsea wells. Considering that the majority of the company's oil production originates from subsea wells, it is clear that this is a major strategic area for development. Continuous technology development has been is delivering more safe, efficient and cost effective well intervention operations in subsea wells. During 2009 new technology has been taken into use for the first time, this consists of a fit-for-purpose LRP (Lower Riser Package), high pressure riser and near-surface BOP system operating from the Stena Don semi-submersible unit. This unique system enables, for the first time, coiled tubing and TTRD (Through Tubing Rotary Drilling) operations on subsea wells with the same riser and well control system. The presentation will review some history relating to increasing reserves recovery from subsea wells. Activities from light to medium well intervention operations will be discussed with a focus on the technical and operational experiences. A review of the 2009 activities will be provided - with several coiled tubing and TTRD operations with Stena Don. The presentation will also provide a look ahead to further plans for improvement and optimisation in this area. (Author)

  13. NOAA's Role in Sustaining Global Ocean Observations: Future Plans for OAR's Ocean Observing and Monitoring Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, James; Legler, David; Piotrowicz, Stephen; Raymond, Megan; Smith, Emily; Tedesco, Kathy; Thurston, Sidney

    2017-04-01

    The Ocean Observing and Monitoring Division (OOMD, formerly the Climate Observation Division) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Program Office provides long-term, high-quality global observations, climate information and products for researchers, forecasters, assessments and other users of environmental information. In this context, OOMD-supported activities serve a foundational role in an enterprise that aims to advance 1) scientific understanding, 2) monitoring and prediction of climate and 3) understanding of potential impacts to enable a climate resilient society. Leveraging approximately 50% of the Global Ocean Observing System, OOMD employs an internationally-coordinated, multi-institution global strategy that brings together data from multiple platforms including surface drifting buoys, Argo profiling floats, flux/transport moorings (RAMA, PIRATA, OceanSITES), GLOSS tide gauges, SOOP-XBT and SOOP-CO2, ocean gliders and repeat hydrographic sections (GO-SHIP). OOMD also engages in outreach, education and capacity development activities to deliver training on the social-economic applications of ocean data. This presentation will highlight recent activities and plans for 2017 and beyond.

  14. Transperineal Ultrasound as a Tool to Plan Surgical Strategies in Pediatric Urology: Back to the Future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Lisieux Eyer; Fazecas, Tatiana; Ribeiro, Bianca G; Dekermacher, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    To demonstrate the usefulness and advantages of transperineal ultrasound (TPUS) on planning the surgical tactics to treat childhood pelviperineal disease (CPPD). A cohort of CPPD is reviewed to provide a pictorial review of TPUS as imaging method variety of CPPD. Other imaging methods are compared with TPUS. TPUS studies of patients showing different conditions on the spectrum of pelviperineal malformation are shown in detail (pictorial review, graphically shown-see figures in the article and as supplementary material), highlighting the advantages of the method and comparing TPUS findings with other imaging techniques. Magnetic resonance imaging, contrast genitograms, voiding cystourethrography, and genital or urologic endoscopy have some important disadvantages, especially radiation exposure, high cost, not easily available equipment, and the need of general anesthesia or deep sedation in children. TPUS is easily available, including in impoverished environments, portable, painless, reproducible, inexpensive, and capable of providing detailed and specific information about pelviperineal malformation with accuracy. Data provided by TPUS are comparable with other imaging techniques (Table 1). Its main disadvantage is the dependency on the expertise of the operator to obtain high-quality, well-interpreted images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Current status and future plan of INSS's analysis of overseas trouble information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akazawa, Takashi; Okumoto, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    In order to enhance safety of nuclear power stations, it is important to analyze trouble information of both domestic and overseas to understand the causes, so as to prevent similar troubles which may be caused by the ones at our own nuclear power stations, by carrying out countermeasures beforehand. At Institute of Nuclear Safety System (INSS), we mainly collect and analyze overseas trouble information. So far, we have accumulated about 130,000 of such data, making analysis on about 4,000 of event reports every year, and presenting suggestions to PWR utilities from which we recognized needs of countermeasures in Japan. For example, we submitted 5 suggestions to PWR utilities last year. Moreover, we are learning about similar activities which are carried out by Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) in France to help us further improve our analyzing skills. As our plan for further improvement, we have started our effort to share knowledge and co-operate between PWR and BWR for deepening analysis. Our activity of Operating Experience (OE) analysis is to be consolidated in the fiscal year of 2019 under the structure of JANSI including BWR OE analysis, to effectively follow additional activities such as suggestions co-operating with JANSI's peer reviews. (author)

  16. U. K. rad waste management-present status and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyre, Brian Leonard

    1991-01-01

    It is essential that we demonstrate that the nuclear industry world-wide has the technology to carry out the necessary operations to the highest standards. Management of radioactive wastes requires a range of technical skills, together with a sensitive appreciation of planning issues and of the need for two-way communication with public representatives and politicians. In the UK there is today a well-founded technology in this subject, based upon an overall strategy which has been carefully developed by the nuclear industry. Government and Regulatory Agencies. Large-scale operations of waste processing, packaging, storage and disposal are now taking shape in many countries, so that real experience of plant design, costs and public relations issues is available. In the UK this experience resides with UKAEA, BNFL, Neurox, Nuclear Electric plc, Government Departments and increasingly with private suppliers of process plant and services. This is a subject area in which there is no need for secrecy, so for many years there have been valuable international exchanges. The IAEA, Nea and CAC have all been very active in encouraging and facilitating collaboration.

  17. Northern Eurasia Future Initiative (NEFI): Presentation and Justification of the NEFI Science Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, P. Y.; Gutman, G.; Gulev, S.; Maksyutov, S. S.; Qi, J.; Shugart, H. H., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Since 2004, the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI) - an interdisciplinary program of internationally-supported Earth systems and science research - has addressed large-scale and long-term manifestations of climate and environmental changes over Northern Eurasia and their impact on the Global Earth system. With more than 1500 peer-reviewed journal publications and 40 books to its credit, NEESPI's activities resulted in significant scientific outreach. This created a new research realm through self-organization of NEESPI scientists in a broad research network, accumulation of knowledge while developing new tools (observations, models, and collaborative networks) and producing new, exciting results that can be applied to directly support decision-making for societal needs. At the Synthesis NEESPI Workshop in Prague, Czechia (April 9-12, 2015) it was decided to shift gradually the foci of regional studies in Northern Eurasia towards applications with the following major Science Question: "What dynamic and interactive change(s) will affect societal well-being, activities, and health, and what might be the mitigation and adaptation strategies that could support sustainable development and decision-making activities in Northern Eurasia?". To answer this question requires a stronger socio-economic component in the ongoing and future regional studies focused on sustainable societal development under changing climatic and environmental conditions. The NEESPI Research Team has reorganized itself into "Northern Eurasia Future Initiative" (NEFI) and began development of the NEFI Programmatic White Paper released at http://neespi.org in June 2016. Presentation will provide justification of the new NEFI research foci and approach examples addressing them. The societal challenges, particularly the socio-economic challenges are the top priority in most of them. Throughout the NEESP Initiative duration, support for it studies has been provided by

  18. Deeply virtual Compton scattering. Results and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, W.D.

    2005-03-01

    Access to generalised parton distributions (GPDs) through deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is briefly described. Presently available experimental results on DVCS are summarized in conjunction with plans for future measurements. (orig.)

  19. Noxious substances in the air - traffic planning measures - traffic of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koestenberger, H

    1985-01-01

    Necessary bundle of measures: Extension of public transport and restriction of individual traffic, extension and activation of large main roads (by-passes) to unload inhabited areas, building garages, creation of residential streets, pedestrian precincts and cycle paths. The best possible traffic system can only be achieved if all means of transport are used efficiently. It is the duty of traffic planners to develop an overall traffic system with the aims of benefiting the whole community. Due to wrong slowing down of traffic, the reduction of emitted quantities of noxious substances from private cars can be counteracted by general slowing down of traffic; frequent braking and restarting. The functional separation of residential areas for living, areas for working, supply, education and leisure pursuits which has been aimed at in recent decades must be slowly changed. This could reduce the traffic and mobility (mixed functions). The aims for traffic of the future are: suitability for the environment, economy, safety and capacity. In an integrated road network, the traffic must take over the correct purpose of traffic. (orig.).

  20. Planning future studies based on the conditional power of a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Verena; Higgins, Julian PT; Sutton, Alex J

    2013-01-01

    Systematic reviews often provide recommendations for further research. When meta-analyses are inconclusive, such recommendations typically argue for further studies to be conducted. However, the nature and amount of future research should depend on the nature and amount of the existing research. We propose a method based on conditional power to make these recommendations more specific. Assuming a random-effects meta-analysis model, we evaluate the influence of the number of additional studies, of their information sizes and of the heterogeneity anticipated among them on the ability of an updated meta-analysis to detect a prespecified effect size. The conditional powers of possible design alternatives can be summarized in a simple graph which can also be the basis for decision making. We use three examples from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to demonstrate our strategy. We demonstrate that if heterogeneity is anticipated, it might not be possible for a single study to reach the desirable power no matter how large it is. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22786670

  1. Present status and future plan on LMFBR steam generator safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Hiromi; Kuroha, Mitsuo

    1985-01-01

    The results of the sodium-water reaction test which has been carried out for the safety evaluation of the water leak phenomena in the steam generators for the prototype FBR were summarized. This is related to the behavior of minute leak, the behavior of wear and damage propagation of neighboring tubes due to small and medium leaking jets, and the pressure/flow phenomena occurring at the time of large leak. Moreover, this is related to the development of analysis codes, the development of water leak-detecting system, and the development of the techniques for treating reaction products remaining in the system at the time of accidents. Also the research and development required hereafter for determining the basic specification of the steam generators for a demonstration FBR and future FBRs and reducing the cost were examined. The water leaks in the steam generators for FBRs have been reported in the Fermi reactor of USA, the PFR of Great Britain, the BN-350 of USSR, the Phenix reactor of France and so on. In Japan, the sodium-water reaction has been well understood, and the facilities for the countremeasures to it have been established. The sodium-water reaction phenomena, the present status of sodium-water reaction research and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Homogeneous Studies of Transiting Extrasolar Planets: Current Status and Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John

    2011-09-01

    We now know of over 500 planets orbiting stars other than our Sun. The jewels in the crown are the transiting planets, for these are the only ones whose masses and radii are measurable. They are fundamental for our understanding of the formation, evolution, structure and atmospheric properties of extrasolar planets. However, their characterization is not straightforward, requiring extremely high-precision photometry and spectroscopy as well as input from theoretical stellar models. I summarize the motivation and current status of a project to measure the physical properties of all known transiting planetary systems using homogeneous techniques (Southworth 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 in preparation). Careful attention is paid to the treatment of limb darkening, contaminating light, correlated noise, numerical integration, orbital eccentricity and orientation, systematic errors from theoretical stellar models, and empirical constraints. Complete error budgets are calculated for each system and can be used to determine which type of observation would be most useful for improving the parameter measurements. Known correlations between the orbital periods, masses, surface gravities, and equilibrium temperatures of transiting planets can be explored more safely due to the homogeneity of the properties. I give a sneak preview of Homogeneous Studies Paper 4, which includes the properties of thirty transiting planetary systems observed by the CoRoT, Kepler and Deep Impact space missions. Future opportunities are discussed, plus remaining problems with our understanding of transiting planets. I acknowledge funding from the UK STFC in the form of an Advanced Fellowship.

  3. Exploration of Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, East Antarctica: Background and Plans for the Near Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talalay, Pavel; Sun, Youhong; Zhao, Yue; Li, Yuansheng; Cao, Pinlu; Xu, Huiwen; Zheng, Zhichuan; Wang, Rusheng; Zhang, Nan; Markov, Alexey; Yu, Dahui; Fan, Xiaopeng; Hu, Zhengyi; Yang, Cheng; Gong, Da; Hong, Jialing; Liu, Chunpeng; Han, Junjie; Yu, Chengfeng; Wang, Lili

    2014-05-01

    drilling of upper permeable snow-firn layer with bottom-air reverse circulation; (2) reaming; (3) casing installation; (4) fluid core drilling of glacial ice with bottom-fluid reverse circulation; (5) bedrock core drilling. All drilling equipment will be installed inside a movable sledge-mounted warm-keeping and wind-protecting drilling shelter that is transported to the chosen site with crawler-tractor. The new approaches of subglacial bedrock drilling technology are connected with utilization of environmental friendly, low-toxic drilling fluids, e.g. low-molecular dimethyl siloxane oils or ester type. They have suitable density-viscosity properties, and can be consider as a viable alternative for drilling in glacial ice and subglacial bedrock. According to approved schedule, the first field tests are planned to carry out just outside Zhongshan Station near Antarctic coast in season 2015-2016. Next season 2016-2017 the movable drilling shelter is planned to be transported to the chosen drilling site in the GSM region, and drilling to the bedrock would be finished during two seasons.

  4. NASA International Year of Astronomy 2009 Programs: Impacts and Future Plans (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H.; Smith, D.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The opportunity offered by the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009 to increase the exposure of the public and students to NASA discoveries in astronomy resulted in several innovative programs which have reached audiences far and wide. Some examples of the impact of these programs and building on the success of these programs beyond 2009 will be discussed in this talk. The spectacular success of the traveling exhibit of NASA images to public libraries around the country prompted NASA to extend it to include more libraries. As a part of the IYA Cornerstone project From Earth To The Universe, NASA images were displayed at non-traditional sites such as airports, parks, and music festivals, exposing them to an audience which would otherwise have been unaware of them. The NASA IYA Student Ambassadors engaged undergraduate and graduate students throughout the U.S. in outreach programs they created to spread NASA astronomy to their local communities. NASA’s Afterschool Universe provided IYA training to community-based organizations, while pre-launch teacher workshops associated with the Kepler and WISE missions were designed to engage educators in the science of these missions. IYA activities have been associated with several missions launched this year. These include the Hubble Servicing Mission 4, Kepler, Herschel/Planck, LCROSS. NASA’sIYA website and Go Observe! feature remain popular. The associated IYA Discovery Guides and Observing with NASA MicroObservatory activities have guided the public and students to perform their own observations of the night sky and to interpret them. NASA intends to work with its Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (SEPOF) to develop a strategy to take forward the best of its IYA2009 plans forward so as to build on the momentum generated by IYA2009 and continue to keep the public and students engaged in the scientific exploration of the universe.

  5. ASSESSING CHEMICAL HAZARDS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT FOR PLANNING FUTURE DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.; MINETT, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper documents the fiscal year (FY) 2006 assessment to evaluate potential chemical and radiological hazards associated with vessels and piping in the former plutonium process areas at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Evaluations by PFP engineers as design authorities for specific systems and other subject-matter experts were conducted to identify the chemical hazards associated with transitioning the process areas for the long-term layup of PFP before its eventual final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities in the main process facilities were suspended in September 2005 for a period of between 5 and 10 years. A previous assessment conducted in FY 2003 found that certain activities to mitigate chemical hazards could be deferred safely until the D and D of PFP, which had been scheduled to result in a slab-on-grade condition by 2009. As a result of necessary planning changes, however, D and D activities at PFP will be delayed until after the 2009 time frame. Given the extended project and plant life, it was determined that a review of the plant chemical hazards should be conducted. This review to determine the extended life impact of chemicals is called the ''Plutonium Finishing Plant Chemical Hazards Assessment, FY 2006''. This FY 2006 assessment addresses potential chemical and radiological hazard areas identified by facility personnel and subject-matter experts who reevaluated all the chemical systems (items) from the FY 2003 assessment. This paper provides the results of the FY 2006 chemical hazards assessment and describes the methodology used to assign a hazard ranking to the items reviewed

  6. The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF): Overview, research programs and future plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardor, Israel; Aviv, Ofer; Avrigeanu, Marilena; Berkovits, Dan; Dahan, Adi; Dickel, Timo; Eliyahu, Ilan; Gai, Moshe; Gavish-Segev, Inbal; Halfon, Shlomi; Hass, Michael; Hirsh, Tsviki; Kaiser, Boaz; Kijel, Daniel; Kreisel, Arik; Mishnayot, Yonatan; Mukul, Ish; Ohayon, Ben; Paul, Michael; Perry, Amichay; Rahangdale, Hitesh; Rodnizki, Jacob; Ron, Guy; Sasson-Zukran, Revital; Shor, Asher; Silverman, Ido; Tessler, Moshe; Vaintraub, Sergey; Weissman, Leo

    2018-05-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) is under construction in the Soreq Nuclear Research Center at Yavne, Israel. When completed at the beginning of the next decade, SARAF will be a user facility for basic and applied nuclear physics, based on a 40 MeV, 5 mA CW proton/deuteron superconducting linear accelerator. Phase I of SARAF (SARAF-I, 4 MeV, 2 mA CW protons, 5 MeV 1 mA CW deuterons) is already in operation, generating scientific results in several fields of interest. The main ongoing program at SARAF-I is the production of 30 keV neutrons and measurement of Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections (MACS), important for the astrophysical s-process. The world leading Maxwellian epithermal neutron yield at SARAF-I (5 × 10^{10} epithermal neutrons/s), generated by a novel Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), enables improved precision of known MACSs, and new measurements of low-abundance and radioactive isotopes. Research plans for SARAF-II span several disciplines: precision studies of beyond-Standard-Model effects by trapping light exotic radioisotopes, such as 6He, 8Li and 18, 19, 23Ne, in unprecedented amounts (including meaningful studies already at SARAF-I); extended nuclear astrophysics research with higher energy neutrons, including generation and studies of exotic neutron-rich isotopes relevant to the rapid (r-) process; nuclear structure of exotic isotopes; high energy neutron cross sections for basic nuclear physics and material science research, including neutron induced radiation damage; neutron based imaging and therapy; and novel radiopharmaceuticals development and production. In this paper we present a technical overview of SARAF-I and II, including a description of the accelerator and its irradiation targets; a survey of existing research programs at SARAF-I; and the research potential at the completed facility (SARAF-II).

  7. Prediction of future urban growth using CA-Markov for urban sustainability planning of Banda Aceh, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achmad, A.; Irwansyah, M.; Ramli, I.

    2018-03-01

    Banda Aceh experienced rapid growth, both physically, socially, and economically, after the Tsunami that devastated it the end of December in 2004. Hence policy controls are needed to direct the pattern of urban growth to achieve sustainable development for the future. The purpose of this paper is to generate a growth model for Banda Aceh using the CA-Markov process. By knowing the changes in land use between 2005 and 2009 from the results of previous research, simulations for 2013, 2019 and 2029 using the application of Idrisi@Selva. CA-Markov models were prepared to determine the quantity of changes. The simulation results showed that, after the Tsunami, the City of Banda Aceh tended to grow towards the coast. For the control of the LUC, the Banda Aceh City government needs to prepare comprehensive and detailed maps and inventory of LUC for the city to provide basic data and information needed for monitoring and evaluation that can be done effectively and efficiently. An institution for monitoring and evaluation of the urban landscape and the LUC should be formed immediately. This institution could consist of representatives from government, academia, community leaders, the private sector and other experts. The findings from this study can be used to start the monitoring and evaluation of future urban growth. Especially for the coastal areas, the local government should immediately prepare special spatial coastal area plans to control growth in those areas and to ensure that the economic benefits from disaster mitigation and coastal protection are preserved. For the development of the city in the future, it is necessary to achieve a balance between economic development, and social welfare with environmental protection and disaster mitigation. iIt will become a big challenge to achieve sustainable development for the future.

  8. The International Gravity Field Service (IGFS): Present Day Activities And Future Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzaghi, R.; Vergos, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    IGFS is a unified "umbrella" IAG service that coordinates the servicing of the geodetic and geophysical community with gravity field related data, software and information. The combined data of the IGFS entities will include global geopotential models, terrestrial, airborne, satellite and marine gravity observations, Earth tide data, GPS/levelling data, digital models of terrain and bathymetry, as well as ocean gravity field and geoid from satellite altimetry. The IGFS structure is based on the Gravity Services, the "operating arms" of IGFS. These Services related to IGFS are: BGI (Bureau Gravimetrique International), Toulouse, France ISG (International Service for the Geoid), Politecnico di Milano, Milano, Italy IGETS (International Geodynamics and Earth Tides Service), EOST, Strasbourg, France ICGEM (International Center for Global Earth Models), GFZ, Potsdam, Germany IDEMS (International Digital Elevation Model Service), ESRI, Redlands, CA, USA The Central Bureau, hosted at the Aristotle Thessaloniki University, is in charge for all the interactions among the services and the other IAG bodies, particularly GGOS. In this respect, connections with the GGOS Bureaus of Products and Standards and of Networks and Observations have been recently strengthened in order to align the Gravity services to the GGOS standards. IGFS is also strongly involved in the most relevant projects related to the gravity field such as the establishment of the new Global Absolute Gravity Reference System and of the International Height Reference System. These projects, along with the organization of Geoid Schools devoted to methods for gravity and geoid estimate, will play a central role in the IGFS future actions in the framework of GGOS.

  9. Current products and future plan of regulatory research for risk-informed regulation in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Key Yong; Lee, Chang Ju; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2003-01-01

    The first phase of a regulatory research project for risk-informed regulation (RIR) and applications (RIA) was finished in March of 2002. Various results that could be useful for preparing Korean RIR system have been developed. One of the remarkable outputs is development of reactor safety goals and acceptance criteria for RIR and RIA in Korea. The Safety Goal has a 4-tier hierarchical structure and each tier has specified goals classified for their usage. Regulatory review guides for probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) including level-1, level-2 and low power and shutdown PSA have been updated by reflecting new information obtained from not only the overseas documents but also experience and insights from regulatory review in Korea. In addition, draft regulatory guides for risk-informed in-service inspection, in-service testing, importance ranking of motor-operated valves, and AOT/STI change of Technical Specifications have been developed for preparing ongoing and future licensing work. Risk-based inspection guides with inspection items selected from a viewpoint of risk importance have been suggested for Korean standard NPPs as well. In the second phase of a research project (April of 2002 to March of 2005), two regulatory research projects on RIR were initiated. One is a study on institutionalization of risk-informed and performance-based regulation. Main topics of this project are evaluation of benefit and characteristics of RIR, development of optimized Korean RIR model, impact analysis for the change of current regulation framework, and suggestion of RIR-related laws and rules. The other is focusing on the development in the areas of a regulatory audit PSA model and regulatory guides for risk monitoring, and application techniques of risk information to the significance determination of plant performance indicators and inspection findings. It is expected that a concrete scheme and detailed regulatory techniques for embodiment of RIR system in Korea will be

  10. MYRRHA. A European experimental ADS for R and D applications status at mid-2005 and prospective towards future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiet Abderrahim, Hamid; D'hondt, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Since 1998, SCK/CEN in partnership with many European research laboratories, is designing a multipurpose ADS for R and D applications - MYRRHA - and is conducting an associated R and D support program. MYRRHA is an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) under development at Mol in Belgium and aiming to serve as a basis for the European experimental ADS to provide protons and neutrons for various R and D applications. It consists of a linac proton accelerator delivering a 350 MeV*5 mA proton beam to a windowless liquid Pb-Bi spallation target that in turn couples to a Pb-Bi cooled, subcritical fast core of 50 MWth. In this paper we report on the status of the MYRRHA project at mid-2005 and prospective towards the future. (author)

  11. Evidence for Future Cognition in Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence concerning the possibility of mental time travel into the future by animals was reviewed. Both experimental laboratory studies and field observations were considered. Paradigms for the study of future anticipation and planning included inhibition of consumption of current food contingent on future receipt of either a larger quantity or…

  12. Status Report and Future Plans for the PEP-II B Factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Alan S.

    2001-01-01

    The PEP-II B Factory at SLAC has been in operation with the BABAR detector since the summer of 1999. The peak currents and luminosity steadily increased through the end of the 2000 run on October 31. By that time, 0.75 A of electrons (the design current) routinely collided with 1.4 A of positrons in 657 bunches, to give a peak luminosity of 2.6 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 . We delivered an integrated luminosity of up to 184 pb -1 per day and 1033 per week; BABAR logged a total of 25 fb -1 . Three days of machine development at the end of the run raised the peak luminosity to 3.29 x 10 33 , exceeding the design goal of 3.0. BABAR then logged data for an hour, starting with a peak of 3.20. Next, we achieved the design value for positron current, 2.14 A, operating without collisions. The major limitation has been growth in the size of the positron beam in the low-energy ring (LER) due to electron clouds and multipacting. Since the arcs benefit from antechambers and a TiN coating with low secondary emission, our efforts have concentrated on the straights, where we added solenoid windings. Each straight wound allowed higher LER current without blow-up, and a consequent increase in luminosity. Measurements of the bunch-by-bunch luminosity showed that the effect becomes significant by about the tenth bunch in a train, but clears after a short gap. Careful control of the fill pattern has thus been essential in raising luminosity. For the 2001 run, which began in February, we added a third LER RF station, to collide with more LER current and more bunches, and also tried reducing β* x from 50 to 35 cm, with the goal of reaching a luminosity of 5 x 10 33 by year's end. In 2003, we plan to add a fourth LER and sixth HER RF station to reach 1 x 10 34

  13. Life science experiments performed in space in the ISS/Kibo facility and future research plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past several years, current techniques in molecular biology have been used to perform experiments in space, focusing on the nature and effects of space radiation. In the Japanese 'Kibo' facility in the International Space Station (ISS), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has performed five life science experiments since 2009, and two additional experiments are currently in progress. The first life science experiment in space was the 'Rad Gene' project, which utilized two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines containing a mutated P53 : gene (m P53 : ) and a parental wild-type P53 : gene (wt P53 : ) respectively. Four parameters were examined: (i) detecting space radiation-induced DSBs by observing γH2AX foci; (ii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression during space flight; (iii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression after space flight; and (iv) observing the adaptive response in the two cell lines containing the mutated and wild type P53 : genes after exposure to space radiation. These observations were completed and have been reported, and this paper is a review of these experiments. In addition, recent new information from space-based experiments involving radiation biology is presented here. These experiments involve human cultured cells, silkworm eggs, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse eggs in various experiments designed by other principal investigators in the ISS/Kibo. The progress of Japanese science groups involved in these space experiments together with JAXA are also discussed here. The Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space (JSBSS), the Utilization Committee of Space Environment Science (UCSES) and the Science Council of Japan (ACJ) have supported these new projects and new experimental facilities in ISS/Kibo. Currently, these organizations are proposing new experiments for the ISS through 2024. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and

  14. Life science experiments performed in space in the ISS/Kibo facility and future research plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, current techniques in molecular biology have been used to perform experiments in space, focusing on the nature and effects of space radiation. In the Japanese ‘Kibo’ facility in the International Space Station (ISS), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has performed five life science experiments since 2009, and two additional experiments are currently in progress. The first life science experiment in space was the ‘Rad Gene’ project, which utilized two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines containing a mutated p53 gene (mp53) and a parental wild-type p53 gene (wtp53) respectively. Four parameters were examined: (i) detecting space radiation–induced DSBs by observing γH2AX foci; (ii) observing p53-dependent gene expression during space flight; (iii) observing p53-dependent gene expression after space flight; and (iv) observing the adaptive response in the two cell lines containing the mutated and wild type p53 genes after exposure to space radiation. These observations were completed and have been reported, and this paper is a review of these experiments. In addition, recent new information from space-based experiments involving radiation biology is presented here. These experiments involve human cultured cells, silkworm eggs, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse eggs in various experiments designed by other principal investigators in the ISS/Kibo. The progress of Japanese science groups involved in these space experiments together with JAXA are also discussed here. The Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space (JSBSS), the Utilization Committee of Space Environment Science (UCSES) and the Science Council of Japan (ACJ) have supported these new projects and new experimental facilities in ISS/Kibo. Currently, these organizations are proposing new experiments for the ISS through 2024

  15. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforou, Nikiforos

    2013-06-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry as well as hadronic calorimetry in the end-caps. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then, approximately 27 fb -1 of data have been collected at an unprecedented center of mass energy. During all these stages, the calorimeter and its electronics have been operating almost optimally, with a performance very close to specifications. This paper covers all aspects of these first years of operation. The excellent performance achieved is especially presented in the context of the discovery of the elusive Higgs boson. The future plans to preserve this performance until the end of the LHC program are also presented. (authors)

  16. Delivering Innovation: The Joint Concept Development and Experimentation Campaign Plan FY2004-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-26

    Janushkowsky (STRATCOM), Maj Gen Stenner (SOUTHCOM), LTC Butts (TRANSCOM) Campaign Plan; J9 UpdateFace to Face Conference12 Feb 2003 COL (P) Verbeck (EUCOM... Stenner (SOUTHCOM), Ms. Young (TRANSCOM), MG Higgins (USFK), Dr. Hanley (OSD-OFT), RADM Gallagher (ACT) Combatant Commander Attendees IWS IWS VTC

  17. Hybrid path planning for non-holonomic autonomous vehicles: An experimental evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposto, F.; Goos, J.; Teerhuis, A.; Alirezaei, M.

    2017-01-01

    Path planning of an autonomous vehicle as a non-holonomic system is an essential part for many automated driving applications. Parking a car into a parking lot and maneuvering it through a narrow corridor would be a common driving scenarios in an urban environment. In this study a hybrid approach

  18. Aviation Human-in-the-Loop Simulation Studies: Experimental Planning, Design, and Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    requires careful planning and execution. It also involves people working as a team. In addition to providing detailed information about how data...RA BKN005 OVC008 20/17 A29.85 Teterboro 1253 Zulu automated weather, wind is 220° at 9 gusting to 15, visibility 2 miles in light rain, 500

  19. Future Marine Polar Research Capacities - Science Planning and Research Services for a Multi-National Research Icebreaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebow, N.; Lembke-Jene, L.; Wolff-Boenisch, B.; Bergamasco, A.; De Santis, L.; Eldholm, O.; Mevel, C.; Willmott, V.; Thiede, J.

    2011-12-01

    Despite significant advances in Arctic and Antarctic marine science over the past years, the polar Southern Ocean remains a formidable frontier due to challenging technical and operational requirements. Thus, key data and observations from this important region are still missing or lack adequate lateral and temporal coverage, especially from time slots outside optimal weather seasons and ice conditions. These barriers combined with the obligation to efficiently use financial resources and funding for expeditions call for new approaches to create optimally equipped, but cost-effective infrastructures. These must serve the international science community in a dedicated long-term mode and enable participation in multi-disciplinary expeditions, with secured access to optimally equipped marine platforms for world-class research in a wide range of Antarctic science topics. The high operational and technical performance capacity of a future joint European Research Icebreaker and Deep-sea Drilling Vessel (the AURORA BOREALIS concept) aims at integrating still separately operating national science programmes with different strategic priorities into joint development of long-term research missions with international cooperation both in Arctic and Antarctica. The icebreaker is planned to enable, as a worldwide first, autonomous year-round operations in the central Arctic and polar Southern Ocean, including severest ice conditions in winter, and serving all polar marine disciplines. It will facilitate the implementation of atmospheric, oceanographic, cryospheric or geophysical observatories for long-term monitoring of the polar environment. Access to the biosphere and hydrosphere e.g. beneath ice shelves or in remote regions is made possible by acting as advanced deployment platform for instruments, robotic and autonomous vehicles and ship-based air operations. In addition to a report on the long-term strategic science and operational planning objectives, we describe foreseen

  20. The role of decentralized generation and storage technologies in future energy systems planning for a rural agglomeration in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdanie, Mashael; Densing, Martin; Wokaun, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a framework to quantitatively evaluate decentralized generation and storage technology (DGST) performance and policy impacts in a rural setting. The role of DGSTs in the future energy systems planning of a rural agglomeration in Switzerland is examined using a cost optimization modeling approach. Heat and electricity demand for major sectors are considered. Scenarios introduce DGSTs in a stepwise manner to measure incremental impacts on future capacity planning compared to a baseline scenario. Sub-scenarios also examine the impacts of carbon mitigation policies, and a sensitivity analysis is carried out for key energy carriers and conversion technologies. DGSTs enable a significant reduction in electricity grid usage for the community considered. Small hydro with a storage reservoir and photovoltaics enable the community to become largely self-sufficient with over 80% reductions in grid imports by 2050 compared to the baseline scenario. Storage enables maximum usage of the available hydro potential which also leads to network upgrade deferrals and a significant increase in photovoltaic installations. Investment decisions in small hydro are robust against cost variations, while heating technology investment decisions are sensitive to oil and grid electricity prices. Carbon pricing policies are found to be effective in mitigating local fossil fuel emissions. - Highlights: •Rural case study on decentralized generation and storage technology (DGST) benefits. •Cost optimization model and scenarios developed to assess DGSTs until 2050. •Small hydro and photovoltaics (PV) increase self-sufficiency of community. •Storage enables full hydro potential usage and increased PV penetration. •Carbon price policies effective in mitigating local fossil fuel emissions.

  1. The Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP): (I) Status and Future Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elders, W. A.; Fridleifsson, G. O.; Bird, D. K.; Schiffman, P.; Zierenberg, R.; Reed, M. H.

    2006-12-01

    The IDDP represents a challenging step forward in the worldwide development of geothermal energy by assessing the potential of power production from natural supercritical fluids. A feasibility study in 2003 concluded that in order to reach fluids at temperatures of >400°C drilling to depths of 4 to 5 km is necessary, but the resultant superheated steam should have a power output ten times that of conventional subcritical steam with the same volumetric flow rate. A consortium of leading Icelandic energy companies together with a government agency, the Icelandic Energy Authority, is carrying out the IDDP. In late 2003 a member of the consortium offered a planned exploratory well to the IDDP for deepening. This is in a geothermal system that produces hydrothermally modified seawater on the Reykjanes peninsula, in southern Iceland, where the Mid-Atlantic Ridge comes on land. Processes at depth at Reykjanes should be similar to those responsible for black smokers on ocean spreading centers. This well reached 3.1 km in February 2005, and research on the downhole samples began. Unfortunately the well became plugged during a flow test and was abandoned in February 2006 after attempts to recondition it failed. This led to the IDDP deciding to move the site for the first deep borehole to Krafla, near the northern end of the central rift zone of Iceland, within a volcanic caldera that has had recent volcanic activity. The Krafla geothermal system has higher temperature gradients than at Reykjanes but produces hydrothermally modified meteoric water with magmatic gases. The drill site chosen is near an existing well that encountered 340°C at only 2.5 km depth. It will be rotary drilled with spot coring to 3.5 km depth, and then deepened to ~4.5 km, using continuous wireline coring for scientific purposes. However, given the competition for drilling rigs internationally, and the year-long lead times in obtaining specialized well casings, it will be a year before IDDP begins

  2. Report on Workshop "Planning of Future Science in the Polar Ocean Study with Cooperation among Study Groups"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuo Fukuchi

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available A workshop on "Planning of Future Science in the Polar Ocean Study with Cooperation among Study Groups" was held on November 1,2000,at the National Institute of Polar Research with 21 participants. In this workshop, a plan to charter a research vessel other than "Shirase" was introduced and a science plan using the chartered research vessel by 43rd Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition was discussed. This study is going to be conducted in the sea ice area around 140-150°E in mid-summer (February 2002, when biological production becomes active in the Antarctic Ocean. Oceanographic observations using "Shirase" are difficult to conduct in this season since she supports a wide range of summer operations around Syowa Station. The relationships between biological production and greenhouse effect gas production and the vertical transport of organic materials from the surface to deep ocean will be the focus of this study. At this stage, one deputy leader and three members of JARE, and 25-26 other scientists including graduate students and foreign scientists, will participate in the field observations using the chartered vessel. The members of JARE will conduct a project science program of the VI Phase of JARE, while the other participants will do part of the science program "Antarctic Ocean in Earth System". Since further observations for several years after the summer of 2002 will be required to understand the role of the Antarctic Ocean in global climate change, we have applied for a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research for the next project, which will start from 2001,to the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture of Japan. The proposal was discussed in detail in this workshop.

  3. Behavioral Health and Performance at NASA JSC: Recent Successes and Future Plan for BHP Research and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveton, L. B.; VanderArk, S. T.

    2014-01-01

    The Behavioral Health and Performance discipline at NASA Johnson Space Center is organized into two distinct Divisions (Biomedical Research and Environmental Science Division and Space and Clinical Operations Division) but is integrated and interrelated in its day-to-day work. Ongoing operations supporting NASA's spaceflight goals benefit from the research portfolios that address risks to mission success. Similarly, these research portfolios are informed by operations to ensure investigations stay relevant given the dynamic environment of spaceflight. There are many success stories that can be presented where initial work begun as a BHP Research project, and funded through the Human Research Program, was fully implemented in operations or addressed an operational need. Examples include improving effectiveness of the debriefings used within Mission Control by the Mission Operations Directorate and countermeasures for fatigue management. There is also ongoing collaboration with research and operations for developing selection methods for future generation astronauts, and to enhance and inform the current family support function. The objective of this panel is to provide examples of recent success stories, describe areas where close collaboration is benefitting ongoing research and operations, and summarize how this will come together as NASA plans for the one year ISS mission - a unique opportunity for both BHP operations and research to learn more about preparing and supporting crewmembers for extended missions in space. The proposed panel will be comprised of six presentations, each describing a unique aspect of research or operations and the benefits to current and future spaceflight.

  4. Water Resource Planning Under Future Climate and Socioeconomic Uncertainty in the Cauvery River Basin in Karnataka, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Ajay Gajanan; Conway, Declan; Dessai, Suraje; Stainforth, David A.

    2018-02-01

    Decision-Making Under Uncertainty (DMUU) approaches have been less utilized in developing countries than developed countries for water resources contexts. High climate vulnerability and rapid socioeconomic change often characterize developing country contexts, making DMUU approaches relevant. We develop an iterative multi-method DMUU approach, including scenario generation, coproduction with stakeholders and water resources modeling. We apply this approach to explore the robustness of adaptation options and pathways against future climate and socioeconomic uncertainties in the Cauvery River Basin in Karnataka, India. A water resources model is calibrated and validated satisfactorily using observed streamflow. Plausible future changes in Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) precipitation and water demand are used to drive simulations of water resources from 2021 to 2055. Two stakeholder-identified decision-critical metrics are examined: a basin-wide metric comprising legal instream flow requirements for the downstream state of Tamil Nadu, and a local metric comprising water supply reliability to Bangalore city. In model simulations, the ability to satisfy these performance metrics without adaptation is reduced under almost all scenarios. Implementing adaptation options can partially offset the negative impacts of change. Sequencing of options according to stakeholder priorities into Adaptation Pathways affects metric satisfaction. Early focus on agricultural demand management improves the robustness of pathways but trade-offs emerge between intrabasin and basin-wide water availability. We demonstrate that the fine balance between water availability and demand is vulnerable to future changes and uncertainty. Despite current and long-term planning challenges, stakeholders in developing countries may engage meaningfully in coproduction approaches for adaptation decision-making under deep uncertainty.

  5. ITER vacuum vessel fabrication plan and cost study (D 68) for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    ITER Task No. 8, Vacuum Vessel Fabrication Plan and Cost Study (D68), was initiated to assess ITER vacuum vessel fabrication, assembly, and cost. The industrial team of Raytheon Engineers ampersand Constructors and Chicago Bridge ampersand Iron (Raytheon/CB ampersand I) reviewed the current vessel basis and prepared a manufacturing plan, assembly plan, and cost estimate commensurate with the present design. The guidance for the Raytheon/CB ampersand I assessment activities was prepared by the ITER Garching Work Site. This guidance provided in the form of work descriptions, sketches, drawings, and costing guidelines for each of the presently identified vacuum vessel Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) elements was compiled in ITER Garching Joint Work Site Memo (Draft No. 9 - G 15 MD 01 94-17-05 W 1). A copy of this document is provided as Appendix 1 to this report. Additional information and clarifications required for the Raytheon/CB ampersand I assessments were coordinated through the US Home Team (USHT) and its technical representative. Design details considered essential to the Task 8 assessments but not available from the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) were generated by Raytheon/CB ampersand I and documented accordingly

  6. Effect of carboxymethylcellulose on the rheological and filtration properties of bentonite clay samples determined by experimental planning and statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. A. Brito

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the past few years, considerable research has been conducted using the techniques of mixture delineation and statistical modeling. Through this methodology, applications in various technological fields have been found/optimized, especially in clay technology, leading to greater efficiency and reliability. This work studied the influence of carboxymethylcellulose on the rheological and filtration properties of bentonite dispersions to be applied in water-based drilling fluids using experimental planning and statistical analysis for clay mixtures. The dispersions were prepared according to Petrobras standard EP-1EP-00011-A, which deals with the testing of water-based drilling fluid viscosifiers for oil prospecting. The clay mixtures were transformed into sodic compounds, and carboxymethylcellulose additives of high and low molar mass were added, in order to improve their rheology and filtrate volume. Experimental planning and statistical analysis were used to verify the effect. The regression models were calculated for the relation between the compositions and the following rheological properties: apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity, and filtrate volume. The significance and validity of the models were confirmed. The results showed that the 3D response surfaces of the compositions with high molecular weight carboxymethylcellulose added were the ones that most contributed to the rise in apparent viscosity and plastic viscosity, and that those with low molecular weight were the ones that most helped in the reduction of the filtrate volume. Another important observation is that the experimental planning and statistical analysis can be used as an important auxiliary tool to optimize the rheological properties and filtrate volume of bentonite clay dispersions for use in drilling fluids when carboxymethylcellulose is added.

  7. Experimental platforms in support of the ASTRID program: existing and planned facilities - 15126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastaldi, O.; Rodriguez, G.; Ayrault, L.; Collard, B.; Dumesnil, J.; Dujet, F.; Journeau, C.; Latge, C.; Sanseigne, E.; Serre, F.; Tkatschenko, I.; Willermoz, G.

    2015-01-01

    The sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) French program currently focused on the design of the ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) reactor in different fields: energy conversion system, instrumentation for continuous monitoring, In Service Inspection and Repair, core design, fuel handling, thermo hydraulic, severe accidents, large flow electromagnetic pumps... Even if the French experimental prototype implies the development of innovative techniques, concepts and feedback of operations of SFRs are important, the new challenges coming from the objectives to meet GEN-IV requirements need some research and development. To achieve this goal, the generation four French SFR program includes the development of technological platforms with experimental facilities to develop and evaluate innovative options and also qualify some ASTRID specific components. The needs in terms of development, validation and qualification of techniques, components or systems to be used on ASTRID have been reviewed exhaustively in 2014. It allowed to consolidate or to precise the experimental purposes of the four CEA platforms regrouping technological facilities with different strategy of erection. PAPIRUS platform (largely already constructed) is dedicated to in-sodium experimental testing; GISEH platform (also largely already constructed) is devoted to water and air tests in support to hydraulic, thermal-hydraulic and fluid-structure interaction studies; CHEOPS platform (detailed studies and realization contract launched in 2014 aiming at commissioning and start up in 2018) deals with in sodium research and development and some qualifications requiring large scale; and last, PLINIUS-2 platform (commissioning and start up in 2019) concerns prototypic corium behavior studies in severe accident conditions and mitigation device qualification. This paper presents the four platforms and for each of them the experimental needs which are covered by their facilities

  8. Electoral Mobilization for European Parliament Elections – A Portuguese Quasi-Experimental Plan for The 2004/2009 Elections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge De Sá

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The European Parliament (EP elections have registered high rates of abstention and Portugal is no different from all the other EU countries. From a relational marketing paradigm, we have tried to define the concept of local proximity-based political communication, the grounds for a research program based on a quasi-experimental plan aimed at verifying a set of assumptions on the effects of local proximity-based political communication on the mobilization of Portuguese voters for the EP elections of 2004 and 2009. The results are clear: the proximity-based political communication generated significant electoral mobilization in those two elections.

  9. An experimental quality control related to the regional monitoring plan against Aedes albopticus (tiger-mosquito

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Morelli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the epidemic disease caused by the Chikungunya virus detected in the Provinces of Romagna during 2007, a specific monitoring-plan against the bug-vector Aedes albopticus was set up by the Agenzia Regionale Prevenzione e Ambiente dell’Emilia Romagna (ARPA in the he Emilia-Romagna region (Italy. The analytical method consisted in the simple enumeration of the mosquitoes eggs spawned on a appropriate substratum, using an optic microscope.The aim of this study was to guarantee data comparability among the several laboratories involved in the project. Using the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA, homogeneous and comparable analytical data were emphasised.

  10. Draft Test Plan for Brine Migration Experimental Studies in Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Amy B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Robinson, Bruce Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-02

    The primary objective of the experimental effort described here is to aid in understanding the complex nature of liquid, vapor, and solid transport occurring around heated nuclear waste in bedded salt. In order to gain confidence in the predictive capability of numerical models, experimental validation must be performed to ensure that (a) hydrological and physiochemical parameters and (b) processes are correctly simulated. The experiments proposed here are designed to study aspects of the system that have not been satisfactorily quantified in prior work. In addition to exploring the complex coupled physical processes in support of numerical model validation, lessons learned from these experiments will facilitate preparations for larger-scale experiments that may utilize similar instrumentation techniques.

  11. Overview of C-2U FRC Experimental Program and Plans for C-2W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, H.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Putvinski, S.; Tuszewski, M.; Dettrick, S.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Yang, X.; Cappello, M.; Ivanov, A. A.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy's experimental program has been focused on a demonstration of reliable field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment, driven by fast ions via high-power neutral-beam (NB) injection. The world's largest compact-toroid experimental devices, C-2 and C-2U, have successfully produced a well-stabilized, sustainable FRC plasma state with NB injection (input power, PNB 10 + MW; 15 keV hydrogen) and end-on coaxial plasma guns. Remarkable improvements in confinement and stability of FRC plasmas have led to further improved fast-ion build up; thereby, an advanced beam-driven FRC state has been produced and sustained for up to 5 + ms (longer than all characteristic system time scales), only limited by hardware and electric supply constraints such as NB and plasma-gun power supplies. To further improve the FRC performance the C-2U device is being replaced by C-2W featuring higher injected NB power, longer pulse duration as well as enhanced edge-biasing systems and substantially upgraded divertors. Main C-2U experimental results and key features of C-2W will be presented. Tri Alpha Energy, Inc.

  12. A Global Remote Laboratory Experimentation Network and the Experiment Service Provider Business Model and Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Ivar Eikaas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the IST KAII Trial project ReLAX - Remote LAboratory eXperimentation trial (IST 1999-20827, and contributes with a framework for a global remote laboratory experimentation network supported by a new business model. The paper presents this new Experiment Service Provider business model that aims at bringing physical experimentation back into the learning arena, where remotely operable laboratory experiments used in advanced education and training schemes are made available to a global education and training market in industry and academia. The business model is based on an approach where individual experiment owners offer remote access to their high-quality laboratory facilities to users around the world. The usage can be for research, education, on-the-job training etc. The access to these facilities is offered via an independent operating company - the Experiment Service Provider. The Experiment Service Provider offers eCommerce services like booking, access control, invoicing, dispute resolution, quality control, customer evaluation services and a unified Lab Portal.

  13. Advance directives for future dementia can be modified by a brief video presentation on dementia care: An experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia Volhard

    Full Text Available To investigate whether life-sustaining measures in medical emergency situations are less accepted for an anticipated own future of living with dementia, and to test whether a resource-oriented, in contrast to a deficit-oriented video about the same demented person, would increase the acceptance of such life-saving measures.Experimental study conducted between September 2012 and February 2013.Community dwelling female volunteers living in the region of Bonn, Germany.278 women aged 19 to 89 (mean age 53.4 years.Presentation of a video on dementia care focusing either on the deficits of a demented woman (negative framing, or focusing on the remaining resources (positive framing of the same patient.Approval of life-sustaining treatments in five critical medical scenarios under the assumption of having comorbid dementia, before and after the presentation of the brief videos on care.At baseline, the acceptance of life-sustaining measures in critical medical situations was significantly lower in subjects anticipating their own future life with dementia. Participants watching the resource-oriented film on living with dementia had significantly higher post-film acceptance rates compared to those watching the deficit-oriented negatively framed film. This effect particularly emerges if brief and efficient life-saving interventions with a high likelihood of physical recovery are available (eg, antibiotic treatment for pneumonia.Anticipated decisions regarding life-sustaining measures are negatively influenced by the subjective imagination of living with dementia, which might be shaped by common, unquestioned stereotypes. This bias can be reduced by providing audio-visual information on living with dementia which is not only centred around cognitive and functional losses but also focuses on remaining resources and the apparent quality of life. This is particularly true if the medical threat can be treated efficiently. These findings have implications for the

  14. Finite element modelling and associated experimentations to optimize and predict the pressing cycle of a future AMBB manufacturing press

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayle, J.P.; Mezeix, P.; Tronche, E.; Delette, G.; Remy, E.; Picart, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an approach based on the use of pellet forming numerical digital simulation which enables optimization of the die pressing cycle. Semi-empirical mechanical models were used in an FEM code, CAST3M. Specific powder characterizations were also performed to supply the mechanical parameters of compaction model. The methodology for the identification of five main coefficients (index flow, elastic and plastic parameters) was used with two different powders. The results show that the axial distribution of frictional forces may be changed during die pressing by a modification of the sequence of punch displacements. According to these results and the literature, the pressing cycle can be considered to have an influence on the shape of a sintered pellet through the axial distribution of green density. The process used for the identification of the Cam-Clay model coefficients seems to be in good agreement, even if the changes in certain parameters remain rather unclear and will require follow-up studies to confirm some of the results. The experimental device used produces good quality pellets, and the Radial Open Die Modulus remains the first choice for reduced pellet damage. Much work still remains to be done to fully define the identification process and create the most representative simulations possible before launching an industrial version of a nuclearized press, planned for the last quarter of year 2014. (authors)

  15. First phase plan for experimental study of heavy-ion inertial fusion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Toshiyuki; Okamura, Masahiro; Oguri, Yoshiyuki; Aida, Toshihiro; Takeuchi, Kouichi; Sasa, Kimikazu; Itoh, Takashi; Okada, Masashi; Takahashi, Yousuke; Ishii, Yasuyuki.

    1993-01-01

    We propose the basic experiment plan of driver for heavy-ion inertial fusion by heavy-ion linac [1-3] system and the heavy-ion cooler synchrotron. As the first phase of planning, we will improve old heavy-ion accelerator system that accelerate small intensity around Cl ion with charge to mass ratio of 1/4 up to 2.4 MeV/amu. The injector of the system will exchange from the 1.6 MV Peletron Tandem accelerator to an RFQ type linac with an ECR heavy-ion source. According to building up the power sources of RF and focusing magnet, then it is able to accelerate intense around Xe ion with charge to mass ratio of 1/6 up to 2.4 MeV/amu. At the next stage of it, we will construct a heavy-ion cooler synchrotron having magneticrigidity of 3 or 6 Tm and begin to study about HIF driver. (author)

  16. Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS: An Integrated, Prioritized Work Plan for Diagnostic Development and Maintenance and Supporting Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Integrated Program of Experimental Diagnostics at the NNSS is an integrated prioritized work plan for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), program that is independent of individual National Security Enterprise Laboratories (Labs) requests or specific Subprograms being supported. This prioritized work plan is influenced by national priorities presented in the Predictive Capability Framework (PCF) and other strategy documents (Primary and Secondary Assessment Technologies Plans and the Plutonium Experiments Plan). This document satisfies completion criteria for FY 2010 MRT milestone No.3496: Document an integrated, prioritized work plan for diagnostic development, maintenance, and supporting capability. This document is an update of the 3-year NNSS plan written a year ago, September 21, 2009, to define and understand Lab requests for diagnostic implementation. This plan is consistent with Lab interpretations of the PCF, Primary Assessment Technologies, and Plutonium Experiment plans.

  17. The development of mentoring-relationship quality, future-planning style, and career goal setting among adolescents from a disadvantaged background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wendy S Y; Zhou, Xiao-Chun; Lai, Simon M K

    2017-03-01

    Our behaviors are regulated by our perception of the future based on past experiences and knowledge. Children from a disadvantaged background might encounter obstacles more frequently when they plan their future. It is possible that a good relationship with an adult volunteer who provides assistance and guidance in the disadvantaged youth's development may facilitate their future-planning style and career goal setting. The present study investigated the role of a good mentoring relationship in promoting a disadvantaged youth's future-planning style and goal-setting ability. It focused on children from a disadvantaged background who participated in the Child Development Fund (CDF) in Hong Kong. In the study, 187 CDF participants (93 with high mentoring-relationship quality [MRQ] and 94 with low MRQ) and 208 comparison group participants were able to complete all four times of the survey. Repeated-measures analyses of covariance showed that Group main effects were observed for both future-planning style, F(2, 374) = 5.92, p career goal-setting self-efficacy, F(2, 376) = 6.07, p planning style only, F(5.78, 1081.21) = 2.17, p planning style and career goal-setting self-efficacy. Multiple regression analyses revealed that mean MRQ score accounted for 3.9% (p planning style and 4.1% (p career goal-setting self-efficacy, supporting the role of a good mentoring relationship. Mentors have introduced new resources to the disadvantaged youths with high MRQ and have promoted the development of various skills through modeling. © 2017 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. 810 future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platner, E.D.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Kruk, J.W.; Miettinen, H.E.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Roberts, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    It is believed that a good bet for finding the Quark-Gluon Plasma at AGS energies is with the heaviest projectiles on the heaviest target, i.e. Au on Au. One of the likely signatures of the plasma is strangeness enhancement. Al Saulys has shown what it's like to find Λ and Κ O with Si projectiles. The Monte Carlo simulations show track densities 4x higher for Au projectiles. In addition, the Au beam itself produces 30 times more ionization. Thus the present TPC's will be limited to only a few hundred ions per sec

  19. BNL future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.

    1998-01-01

    In 1999, after almost 40 years of independent existence, the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) is scheduled to be pressed into service as an injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Although at first sight this seems like the end of an era, in actuality, it represents a very attractive new opportunity. For the AGS is actually needed by RHIC for only a few hours per day. The balance of the time it is available for extracted proton beam work at a very small incremental cost. This represents the reverse of the current situation in which the nuclear physics program gets access to the AGS (for fixed target heavy ion experiments) at incremental cost, while the base cost of maintaining the accelerator is borne by the high energy physics program. Retaining the AGS for particle physics work would broaden the US HEP program considerably, allowing continued exploitation of the world`s most intense source of medium energy protons. High energy possibilities include incisive probes of Standard Model and non-SM CP-violation, and of low energy manifestations of supersymmetry.

  20. Planning Our Future Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Alba A.

    1993-01-01

    This memo outlines priorities of the Council for Exceptional Children in accomplishing its mission. Priorities include increasing membership, retaining a higher percentage of current members, promoting education standards, improving professional education offerings, and influencing public policy. (JDD)