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Sample records for fusobacterium necrophorum necrobacillosis

  1. Empiema por Fusobacterium necrophorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ML. Valle Feijoo

    2014-09-01

    Systemic infection by Fusobacerium necrophorum is characterized by the classic triad of thrombosis of the jugular internal vein, bacteriemia and metastatic spread and it is known as Lemiere syndrome (LS, post-amigdalitis sepsis or necrobacillosis. Pulmonary impairement due to septic embolism is very common in LS, but Fusobacterium necrophorum is hardly ever found in empyemas without LS. We report a new case.

  2. Empiema por Fusobacterium necrophorum

    OpenAIRE

    ML. Valle Feijoo; M. Rodriguez Arias; A. Cobas Paz; J. De la Fuente Aguado

    2014-01-01

    Resumen La infección sistémica por Fusobacterium necrophorum se caracteriza por la tríada clásica de trombosis de la vena yugular interna, bacteriemia y focos metastásicos y se conoce como Síndrome de Lemierre (SL), sepsis post-angina o necrobacilosis. El compromiso pulmonar precipitado por la embolización séptica es extremadamente común en el SL, sin embargo el F. necrohorum raramente se asila en empiemas sin SL concurrente, por lo que hemos estimado oportuno comunicar un nuevo caso clíni...

  3. Characterization of Fusobacterium necrophorum isolated from llama and alpaca.

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    Kumar, Amit; Anderson, David; Amachawadi, Raghavendra G; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Narayanan, Sanjeev K

    2013-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram-negative, anaerobic bacterium, is an opportunistic animal and human pathogen that causes a variety of infections termed necrobacillosis. There are 2 subspecies of F. necrophorum (subsp. necrophorum and subsp. funduliforme) that differ morphologically and biochemically and in virulence. Leukotoxin, a secreted protein, is considered to be the major virulence factor. In camelids, F. necrophorum causes a variety of infections, generally involving the lips, tongue, pharynx, interdigital spaces, foot pad, larynx, mandible, or maxillary bones. The objective of the current study was to characterize the presumptive Fusobacterium isolates from a variety of necrotic infections in llama (Lama glama) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos) and determine whether the strains possess leukotoxin activities. A total of 7 isolates from alpaca and 2 isolates from llama were characterized. Based on growth characteristics in broth culture, and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analyses, all 9 isolates belonged to subsp. necrophorum and possessed the putative hemagglutinin gene. Western blot analysis with antileukotoxin antibodies raised in rabbit showed the presence of leukotoxin protein in the culture supernatant of all isolates. Furthermore, flow cytometry of the culture supernatants demonstrated cytotoxicity to bovine and alpaca polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The extent of cytotoxicity to either alpaca or bovine PMNs differed among camelid strains. The cytotoxicity of many of the camelid strains was higher (P llama and alpaca are similar to bovine isolates, and leukotoxin may be a major virulence factor.

  4. Fusobacterium necrophorum in North American Bighorn Sheep ( Ovis canadensis ) Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Narayanan, Sanjeevkumar; Batra, Sai Arun; Jegarubee, Bavananthasivam; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2016-07-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum has been detected in pneumonic bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis ) lungs, in addition to the aerobic respiratory pathogens Mannheimia haemolytica , Bibersteinia trehalosi , Pasteurella multocida , and Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae . Similar to M. haemolytica , F. necrophorum produces a leukotoxin. Leukotoxin-induced lysis and degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and macrophages are responsible for acute inflammation and lung tissue damage characteristic of M. haemolytica -caused pneumonia. As one approach in elucidating the role of F. necrophorum in BHS pneumonia, we determined the frequency of the presence of F. necrophorum in archived pneumonic BHS lung tissues, and susceptibility of BHS leukocytes to F. necrophorum leukotoxin. A species-specific PCR assay detected F. necrophorum in 37% of pneumonic BHS lung tissues (total tested n=70). Sequences of PCR amplicons were similar to the less virulent F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme. Fusobacterium necrophorum leukotoxin exhibited cytotoxicity to BHS PMNs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As with the M. haemolytica leukotoxin, F. necrophorum leukotoxin was more toxic to BHS PMNs than domestic sheep PMNs. It is likely that F. necrophorum enters the lungs after M. haemolytica and other aerobic respiratory pathogens enter the lungs and initiate tissue damage, thereby creating a microenvironment that is conducive for anaerobic bacterial growth. In summary, Fusobacterium leukotoxin is highly toxic for BHS leukocytes; however, based on the PCR findings, it is unlikely to play a direct role in the development of BHS pneumonia.

  5. Fusobacterium necrophorum Pharyngitis Complicated by Lemierre's Syndrome.

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    Faraone, Antonio; Fortini, Alberto; Nenci, Gabriele; Boccadori, Costanza; Mangani, Valerio; Oggioni, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman who was referred to our outpatient clinic because of a 2-week history of sore throat, high fever, and neck tenderness unresponsive to a 7-day amoxicillin/clavulanic acid course. Infectious mononucleosis was initially suspected, but an extremely high value of procalcitonin and clinical deterioration suggested a bacterial sepsis, prompting the patient admission to our internal medicine ward. Blood cultures were positive for Fusobacterium necrophorum. CT scan detected a parapharyngeal abscess, a right internal jugular vein thrombosis, and multiple bilateral lung abscesses, suggesting the diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome. The patient was treated with a 2-week course of metronidazole and meropenem with a gradual clinical recovery. She was thereafter discharged home with metronidazole and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for 14 days and a 3-month course of enoxaparin, experiencing an uneventful recovery. The present case highlights the importance of taking into consideration the Lemierre's syndrome whenever a pharyngotonsillitis has a severe and unusual course.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme Bovine Liver Abscess Isolate B35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G; Stewart, George C

    2014-05-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that causes foot rot and liver abscesses in cattle. F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and the less virulent organism F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme are recognized. We present here a draft genome sequence of the bovine liver abscess isolate F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strain B35, which affords a genomic perspective of virulence and bovine adaptation.

  7. Livstruende appendicitis forårsaget af Fusobacterium necrophorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Trine Langfeldt; Maeda, Yasuko; Lindberg, Jens Aage;

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a well-known cause of Lemierre's syndrome. Recent studies suggest a causative association between F. necrophorum and acute appendicitis. We present a case of a 15-year-old previously healthy girl who presented with acute non-perforated appendicitis, intra......-abdominal abscesses and thrombosis that led to omental necrosis. This resulted in a life-threatening septic shock with the need for prolonged intensive care. We suggest that F. necrophorum identified in pus from the abdomen caused this fulminant variation of appendicitis with findings similar to those seen...

  8. A Rare Case of Fusobacterium Necrophorum Liver Abscesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannoodi, Faris; Sabbagh, Hussam; Kulairi, Zain; Kumar, Sarwan

    2017-01-01

    Liver abscesses are an uncommon disease that can present with vague symptoms. Fusobacterium necrophorum causing liver abscesses is a rare condition and only a few cases have been reported. An 88-year-old female presented to her primary care physician with one week of fevers, night sweats, chills, fatigue and vague right upper quadrant abdominal pain. She denied nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea and unintentional weight loss. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed two liver abscesses in the right lobe as well as extensive diverticulosis. Percutaneous drainage was performed and draining catheters were placed in the abscesses. Culture of the abscess fluid grew Fusobacterium necrophorum. She was treated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole as per sensitivities. Rare cases of F. necrophorum hepatic abscesses have been published. The source of infection described in reported cases included hematogenous spread from dental caries/peritonsillar abscess and those involving the gastrointestinal tract resulting from inflammation of the bowel wall or from inflamed diverticuli via the portal circulation. In one study, thirteen cases of liver abscess due to F. necrophorum were studied, and two of these cases had diverticular disease without inflammation.

  9. Necrobacillosis - A resurgence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Andrea C.Y.; Argent, Julie D

    2002-05-01

    Necrobacillosis is a rare life threatening illness caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. It usually affects previously healthy adolescents and presents as symptomatic pharyngeal infection followed by bacteraemia and metastatic abscesses. A high degree of clinical suspicion is needed because there is often a delay between the presentation of sore throat and the development of systemic illness. The clinical and radiological features of four cases of necrobacillosis are reported and a review of the spectrum of manifestations of metastatic infection presented. Liu, A.C.Y. and Argent, J.D. (2002)

  10. Fusobacterium necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis in infants and young toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulou, T; Walsh, T J

    2016-05-01

    There is an increased recovery of Fusobacterium necrophorum from cases of otitis media and mastoiditis in the pediatric population. These infections may be highly severe, causing local osteomyelitis, bacteremia, and Lemierre's syndrome. The severity and difficulties in providing optimal treatment for these infections may be especially difficult in this age group due to immunological immaturity and delayed presentation. In this review of literature, we present and analyze the clinical presentation, management, and outcome of otic infections caused by F. necrophorum in infants and young toddlers less than 2 years old. Search in Pubmed was conducted for reported cases in the English literature for the time period of the last 50 years. Twelve well-described cases were retrieved with F. necrophorum otitis and mastoiditis and complications reported in all cases. Treatment included both intravenously with antimicrobial agents (beta lactams plus metronidazole) and mastoidectomy. Lemierre's syndrome and Lemierre's syndrome variants developed in 60 % of the patients. Dissemination of the infection as distal osteomyelitis and septic shock were also reported. The outcome was favorable in all the cases. Otitis and mastoiditis infections in children less then 2 years old are invasive infections, and severe complications can occur.

  11. Fusobacterium necrophorum findings in Denmark from 2010 to 2014 using data from the Danish microbiology database.

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    Bank, Steffen; Jensen, Anders; Nielsen, Hanne Merete; Kristensen, Lena Hagelskjaer; Voldstedlund, Marianne; Prag, Jørgen

    2016-12-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum findings in Denmark and estimation of the incidence of F. necrophorum bacteraemia was described using data from the nationwide Danish microbiology database (MiBa). All microbiological reports on any Fusobacterium species in Denmark were extracted for a period of 5 years from 2010 to 2014 from MiBa and from the local department of clinical microbiology. The overall incidence of F. necrophorum bacteraemia from 2010 to 2014 was 2.8 cases per million/year vs 9.4 in the age group 15-24 years. F. necrophorum was rare in blood cultures from children and middle-aged patients and then raised again. However, 48 of 232 cases of Fusobacterium bacteraemia were not identified to species level, so the incidences of F. necrophorum bacteraemia may be underestimated in our study. F. necrophorum was found in throat swabs in the age group between 13 and 40 years and in otitis media in children below 2 years in those departments which performed anaerobic culture. The incidence of F. necrophorum bacteraemia found was comparable to earlier reported figures for Lemierre's syndrome. Fusobacterium bacteraemia should always be identified to species level. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Fusobacterium necrophorum Pharyngitis Complicated by Lemierre’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Faraone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an 18-year-old woman who was referred to our outpatient clinic because of a 2-week history of sore throat, high fever, and neck tenderness unresponsive to a 7-day amoxicillin/clavulanic acid course. Infectious mononucleosis was initially suspected, but an extremely high value of procalcitonin and clinical deterioration suggested a bacterial sepsis, prompting the patient admission to our internal medicine ward. Blood cultures were positive for Fusobacterium necrophorum. CT scan detected a parapharyngeal abscess, a right internal jugular vein thrombosis, and multiple bilateral lung abscesses, suggesting the diagnosis of Lemierre’s syndrome. The patient was treated with a 2-week course of metronidazole and meropenem with a gradual clinical recovery. She was thereafter discharged home with metronidazole and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid for 14 days and a 3-month course of enoxaparin, experiencing an uneventful recovery. The present case highlights the importance of taking into consideration the Lemierre’s syndrome whenever a pharyngotonsillitis has a severe and unusual course.

  13. Detection of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp funduliforme in tonsillitis in young adults by real-time PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Hagelskjær Kristensen, Lena; Prag, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Throat swabs from 61 patients, aged 18-32 years, with non-streptococcal tonsillitis (NST) and 92 healthy controls were examined for the presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum DNA using a novel TaqMan-based real-time quantitative PCR assay for F. necrophorum subspecies. The assay was based on the gyr...... that on swabs from controls (p compared to patients with acute NST (p 0.04). In addition, 26 patients with tonsillitis and group C streptococci (GCS) had a significantly higher load of F. necrophorum DNA...... compared to the NST group (p

  14. Espondilodiscitis por Fusobacterium necrophorum: a propósito de un caso

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Se presenta un caso de espondilodiscitis por Fusobacterium necrophorum que es un germen gramnegativo. El paciente evolucionó de forma satisfactoria, a pesar de que no siguió correctamente las indicaciones terapéuticas. A propósito del caso, se hacen algunas reflexiones sobre el diagnóstico y el tratamiento de las infecciones raquídeas The authors report a case of spondylodiscitis due to Fusobacterium necrophorum, an anaerobic gram-negative bacillus. The patient's recovery was s...

  15. The detection of Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum from ovine footrot in Kashmir, India.

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    Farooq, Shaheen; Wani, Shakil A; Hassan, Mir Nadeem; Nazir, Nazima; Nyrah, Qazi Javed

    2015-10-01

    In a study conducted, a total of 450 swab samples from footrot lesions of naturally infected sheep were collected in all the ten districts of the Kashmir valley and were examined for the presence of Dichelobacter nodosus (D. nodosus) and Fusobacterium necrophorum (F. necrophorum), in order to determine if F. necrophorum was associated with ovine footrot. The detection of F. necrophorum and D. nodosus was carried out by polymerase chain reaction targeting the leukotoxin (lktA) and 16S rRNA genes, respectively. In this study, only less than 50% of positive samples contained both the bacteria, so it is not possible to conclude with certainty that both bacteria are together required for the disease manifestation.

  16. Fusobacterium necrophorum determined as abortifacient in sheep by laser capture microdissection and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Mette; Aalbæk, Bent; Agerholm, Jørgen S.

    2006-01-01

    at late pregnancy by a technique that combines laser capture microdissection (LCM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (LCM-FISH). Cultural bacteriological examination had failed to identify an infectious agent but by histological examination, large colonies of bacteria associated with tissue......Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) has been extensively used for identification of individual microbial cells within their natural environment. The present work describes the identification of Fusobacterium necrophorum in formalin-fixed tissue samples from three sets of ovine twins aborted......RNA-targeting oligonucleotide probe specific for F. necrophorum was used in a FISH assay. In situ hybridization showed a high density of F. necrophorum in all examined tissue sections. Simultaneous probing with a general bacterial probe EUB338 and the specific probe for F. necrophorum showed that no other bacteria could...

  17. Effect of disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora on the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G. R.; Thornton, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Oral pretreatment of mice with either a mixture of kanamycin and erythromycin or metronidazole to modify the gut microflora greatly enhanced the faecal excretion of Fusobacterium necrophorum biovar A given by mouth. This lends support to the suggestion that disturbance of the gastrointestinal microflora in animals such as cattle, which often carry the organism in the rumen, may lead to intestinal multiplication and faecal excretion, thereby providing a source of infection that may lead to nec...

  18. [Brain abscess due to Fusobacterium necrophorum in a patient with convulsion and no signs of meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohata, Mitsuteru; Naruse, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yumiko; Koyama, Miyako; Ito, Yasushi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report brain abscess due to Fusobacterium necrophorum (F. necrophorum) in a 78-year-old healthy man. He developed convulsion and did not have any signs of meningitis. Although the brain magnetic resonance imaging findings of the left occipital lobe were typical of a brain abscess, his cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed only slight pleocytosis and mild increase in protein levels. Thus, it was difficult to rule out the possibility of metastatic brain tumor; the patient's condition was provisionally diagnosed as symptomatic epilepsy secondary to brain abscess. His convulsion disappeared soon after administration of antiepileptic, antibacterial, and steroid agents. A craniotomy was performed to evacuate the abscess, and F. necrophorum was identified by culturing the abscess contents. After the operation, he was treated with appropriate antibacterial agents, which resulted in resolution of the brain abscess. Although Fusobacterium species are gram-negative anaerobic bacilli commensal of the human oropharynx, we need to recognize that Fusobacterium species can be a primary pathogen causing brain abscesses and may leave residual neurological sequelae without early appropriate treatment.

  19. Prevalence of Fusobacterium necrophorum in tonsils from patients with chronic tonsillitis.

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    Dapefrid, Anna; Lundström, Birgitta; Tano, Krister

    2017-03-01

    There was a high prevalence of Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN) in patients with chronic tonsillitis in the age group 15-23 years. This indicates that FN might play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic tonsillitis in this age group, which is also the age group in which chronic or recurrent tonsillitis is most common. The role of FN in patients with acute and chronic tonsillitis is unclear. Thus, this study investigated the occurrence of FN in tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillitis. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of FN in patients that underwent tonsillectomy due to chronic tonsillitis. This study also investigated if FN was found at different areas in the tonsils. One hundred and twenty-six consecutive patients undergoing tonsillectomy due to chronic tonsillitis were included from the ENT clinics at Sunderby Hospital and Gällivare Hospital, Sweden. Both children and adults were included to encompass various age groups (age =2-57 years). Culture swabs were taken from three different levels of the tonsils - the surface, the crypts, and the inner core of the tonsils. Selective agar plates for detecting FN were used for culture. Culture was also made for detecting β-hemolytic streptococci, Haemophilus influenzae, and Arcanobacterium. FN was the most common pathogen (19%). The highest prevalence of FN was found in the age group 15-23 years (in 34% of the patients). FN was detected both at the surface and in the core of the tonsils. Furthermore, in the few patients where FN was not detected in all three areas, FN was always detected at the tonsillar surface, in spite of being an anaerobic bacterium. Streptococci group G and C also occurred most frequently (30%) in the same age group as FN (15-23 years), whereas Streptococci group A was more evenly spread among the age groups.

  20. In vivo antianaerobe activity of DS-8587, a new fluoroquinolone, against Fusobacterium necrophorum in a mouse model.

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    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Kurosaka, Yuichi; Hoshino, Kazuki; Kohno, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    DS-8587 is a novel parenteral fluoroquinolone, which has an activity equivalent to sitafloxacin against various pathogens including anaerobes. We examined the in vivo anti-anaerobic activity of DS-8587, and compared it with that of levofloxacin (LVFX), using a murine model of Fusobacterium necrophorum-induced liver abscess developed via blood borne infection. Mice with liver abscess infection caused by F. necrophorum were treated with saline (control), DS-8587 (0.8, 4, and 20 mg/kg twice daily), or LVFX (20 and 100 mg/kg) for a day. After treatment, the number of viable bacteria in liver was analyzed. We also analyzed the pharmacokinetics of these agents in plasma and the liver after initial treatment. The MICs of DS-8587 and LVFX were 0.015 and 1 mg/mL, respectively. DS-8587 eradicated the viable bacteria in the liver even at doses as low as 4 mg/kg. In contrast, the liver bacteria were not eradicated in any of the LVFX-treated mice even at a dose of 100 mg/kg (P DS-8587, 4 or 20 mg/kg). The pharmacokinetic parameter AUC/MIC ratios for DS-8587 (4 mg/kg) and LVFX (100 mg/kg) were 96.7 and 60.8 in plasma and 600 and 145.6 in the liver, respectively. The AUC/MIC ratio showed the best correlation with efficacy of DS-8587. DS-8587 significantly reduced the number of viable bacteria in a murine model of F. necrophorum-induced liver abscess compared to LVFX. Our study demonstrated that the anti-anaerobic activity of quinolones in vivo was different from the MICs in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mixed species biofilms of Fusobacterium necrophorum and Porphyromonas levii impair the oxidative response of bovine neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Joey S; Buret, Andre G; Ceri, Howard; Storey, Douglas G; Anderson, Stefanie J; Morck, Douglas W

    2017-10-01

    Biofilms composed of anaerobic bacteria can result in persistent infections and chronic inflammation. Host immune cells have difficulties clearing biofilm-related infections and this can result in tissue damage. Neutrophils are a vital component of the innate immune system and help clear biofilms. The comparative neutrophilic response to biofilms versus planktonic bacteria remains incompletely understood, particularly in the context of mixed infections. The objective of this study was to generate mixed species anaerobic bacterial biofilms composed of two opportunistic pathogens, Fusobacterium necrophorum and Porphyromonas levii, and evaluate neutrophil responses to extracellular fractions from both biofilms and planktonic cell co-cultures of the same bacteria. Purified bovine neutrophils exposed to culture supernatants from mixed species planktonic bacteria showed elevated oxidative activity compared to neutrophils exposed to biofilms composed of the same bacteria. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide plays a significant role in the stimulation of neutrophils; biofilms produced substantially more lipopolysaccharide than planktonic bacteria under these experimental conditions. Removal of lipopolysaccharide significantly reduced neutrophil oxidative response to culture supernatants of planktonic bacteria. Oxidative responses to LPS-removed biofilm supernatants and LPS-removed planktonic cell supernatants were similar. The limited neutrophil response to biofilm bacteria observed in this study supports the reduced ability of the innate immune system to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. Lipopolysaccharide is likely important in neutrophil response; however, the presence of other extracellular, immune modifying molecules in the bacterial media also appears to be important in altering neutrophil function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Digital necrobacillosis in Norwegian wild tundra reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handeland, K; Boye, M; Bergsjø, B; Bondal, H; Isaksen, K; Agerholm, J S

    2010-07-01

    Outbreaks of digital necrobacillosis in Norwegian wild tundra reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) are described. The outbreaks occurred in late summer and autumn 2007 and 2008, subsequent to periods with an unusually high number of days with precipitation and high air temperature. Lesions were generally restricted to one foot and the disease incidence was highest in calves. Single limbs from 20 animals and six whole carcasses were submitted for laboratory examination. Gross lesions were characterized by swelling of the fetlock to coronary band area and cutaneous sinus tracts with sparse discharge of pus. Subcutaneous tissue was inflamed and oedematous with focal necrosis. Tendons, tendon sheaths, joints and periosteum of the digital bones were often affected. Animals shot during winter showed severe chronic periostitis and osteomyelitis and necrotizing deforming arthritis. Microscopically, skin lesions were characterized by deep ulcers with centrally located necrotic tissue, bordered by a zone of oedema and intense inflammation with granulation tissue and fibrosis. Necrosis, suppurative inflammation and oedema were found in the synovial membranes, tendons and tendon sheaths. Digital bone lesions were characterized by necrosis, fibrosis and extensive bone proliferation. Vasculitis and thrombosis were common in all lesions. Elongate filamentous gram-negative bacteria in necrotic lesions from all animals were identified as Fusobacterium necrophorum by fluorescence in-situ hybridization. F. necrophorum was cultured from the foot lesions of six animals. Five of these isolates were examined by 16S rRNA sequencing. The sequences were identical and differed from all other strains listed in GenBank. These results are consistent with circulation of a reindeer-adapted pathogenic strain of F. necrophorum in the wild reindeer population, causing outbreaks of digital necrobacillosis following warm and humid summers.

  3. Rehabilitation and functional outcomes after extensive surgical debridement of a knee infected by fusobacterium necrophorum: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Andrew R; Briggs, Matthew S; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K; Kloos, Anne D

    2013-06-01

    Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year-old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. The subject was a 17 year-old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10-week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must incorporate evidence-based treatment principles including eccentric

  4. REHABILITATION AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER EXTENSIVE SURGICAL DEBRIDEMENT OF A KNEE INFECTED BY FUSOBACTERIUM NECROPHORUM: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Matthew S.; Kegelmeyer, Deborah K.; Kloos, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Joint infection is a rare but serious complication after knee injury that should be part of a physical therapist's differential diagnosis. This case report presents the care of a 17 year‐old female athlete with septic arthritis from a Fusobacterium infection after sustaining a right lateral meniscus tear. Joint pathology combined with the aggressive infectious agent led to arthrofibrosis of her knee joint and resultant activity limitations and participation restrictions. The purpose of this case report is to highlight a rare and unique pathology, the serious effects that a joint infection can have on musculoskeletal function, and the challenges encountered during the rehabilitation process. Case Description: The subject was a 17 year‐old volleyball player who injured her right knee while playing volleyball. Within 7 days, the subject developed a severe joint infection that spread into surrounding gluteal, quadriceps, and gastrocnemius musculature. The infection was surgically debrided eight times during a 10‐week inpatient hospital stay. A manipulation under anesthesia was performed to restore range of motion in her knee joint. Outpatient physical therapy was initiated 4 days later in order to restore musculoskeletal function. Outcome: Over eight months of physical therapy services were utilized to address the impairments and activity limitations caused by her joint dysfunction. She met her physical therapy goals and made significant improvements on the Knee Outcome Survey and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Success in physical therapy and completion of additional strength training exercise allowed this subject to return to competitive softball at the club level during her freshman year of college. Discussion: Though rare after musculoskeletal injury, joint infection can lead to soft tissue damage, partial or complete degradation of articular cartilage, and arthrofibrosis causing significant disability. Physical therapists must

  5. A systematic review of Fusobacterium necrophorum-positive acute tonsillitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, T E; Rusan, M; Fuursted, K;

    2016-01-01

    .2 %) compared to healthy controls (7.6 %) (p smoking young (15-25 years) male presenting with tonsillar...... exudates and a Centor score of 2 or higher. A clear association between FN and AT was found. FN is likely to be a significant and prevalent pathogen in AT, especially in teenagers and young adults. However, no evidence for causality between FN and AT has been established and it is unexplored if timely...

  6. Prevotella bivia necrobacillosis following infectious mononucleosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huits, R.M.H.G.; van Assen, S.; Wildeboer- Veloo, Alida; Verschuuren, E.A.M.; Koeter, G.H.

    2006-01-01

    A case of Lemierre's syndrome is reported. Although Fusobacterium species are commonly associated with this presentation, Prevotella bivia was the causative micro-organism identified in this case. The finding that disseminated anaerobic sepsis followed primary EBV infection led to the construction o

  7. Infections caused by Fusobacterium in children: a 14-year single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamriz, Oded; Engelhard, Dan; Temper, Violeta; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Benenson, Shmuel; Brooks, Rebecca; Tenenbaum, Ariel; Stepensky, Polina; Koplewitz, Benjamin; Kaufmann, Michal; Averbuch, Diana

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at reviewing our experience with infections caused by Fusobacterium in children. A retrospective analysis of medical records of children admitted to Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center from 2000 to 2013, in whom Fusobacterium spp. was identified in any specimen. A total of 22 patients (males = 12) at a mean ± SE age of 5 ± 1 (range 1-17) years, were identified. The most common complication was abscess formation (n = 11, 50 %). Eight children (36.4 %) had intracranial complications, including brain abscess (n = 4), meningitis (n = 4) and cerebral sinus vein thrombosis (CSVT, n = 5). Seventeen children (77 %) had bacteremia. Primary site of infection was otogenic (n = 9), oropharyngeal (n = 7), respiratory (n = 2), sinuses (n = 2), intra-abdominal (n = 1) and mucositis (n = 1). Fourteen cases were caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum, including four cases with CSVT, 7/8 cases of mastoiditis, four of them with subperiosteal abscess formation; all four cases with meningitis and two brain abscesses. Fifteen (68 %) patients required surgical intervention and 3 (14 %) received anti-coagulation therapy. Excluding one patient with overwhelming sepsis with fatal outcome, all patients recovered. Fusobacterium infections in children can cause a diverse spectrum of disease and is associated with high rates of abscess formation and intracranial complications. Although Fusobacterium nucleatum is abundant in the oral cavity, F. necrophorum is the main pathogen that causes severe infections in healthy children.

  8. Fusobacterium infections in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arane, Karen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Question A 2-year-old patient in my practice with acute otitis media that has progressed to mastoiditis with a high fever returns with positive culture results for Fusobacterium. What should I do next? Answer Fusobacterium is a genus of anaerobic bacteria. Although Fusobacterium infections are rare, they can become severe if not treated promptly. Appropriate treatment is combination antibiotic therapy consisting of a β-lactam (penicillin, cephalosporin) and an anaerobic antimicrobial agent (metronidazole, clindamycin). At times surgical involvement is required for mastoiditis such as drainage of abscesses or insertion of a ventilation tube. Delayed treatment of an infection caused by Fusobacterium can lead to serious complications, including Lemierre syndrome. Children should be seen in a hospital for close monitoring. PMID:27737977

  9. Fusobacterium Liver Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben D. Buelow

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium is well characterized as an oropharyngeal pathogen that may induce a septic thrombophlebitis by direct extension of abscess into an adjacent neck vessel (Lemierre's syndrome; its potential for visceral abscess formation, however, remains under-recognized. A 65-year-old man with a recent history of multiple rim-enhancing liver lesions presented to the emergency room with fever and abdominal pain. Based on interval increase in the size of the lesions, abscess was suspected. A liver biopsy was performed, and although no organism could be identified on routine microscopy, Warthin-Starry stain revealed Gram-negative bacilli consistent with an anaerobic Fusobacterium species as the underlying etiology of liver abscess formation. Subsequent anaerobic culture results confirmed the diagnosis. This case highlights the importance of consideration for Fusobacterium infection in the setting of liver abscess if anaerobic organisms have not yet been excluded on initial culture evaluation.

  10. Clinical Fusobacterium mortiferum Isolates Cluster with Undifferentiated Clostridium rectum Species Based on 16S rRNA Gene Phylogenetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangsoon; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo

    2016-05-01

    The most commonly encountered clinical Fusobacterium species are F. nucleatum and F. necrophorum; other Fusobacteria, such as F. mortiferum and F. varium, have occasionally been isolated from human specimens. Clostridium rectum is a gram-positive species characterized as a straight bacillus with oval sub-terminal spores. The close 16S rRNA gene sequence relationship of C. rectum with the genus Fusobacterium is unexpected given their very different phenotypic characteristics. Between 2014 and 2015, a total of 19 Fusobacterium isolates were recovered from the colonic tissue of 10 patients at a university hospital. All isolates were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The phylogenetic relationship among these isolates was estimated using the neighbor-joining method and the Molecular Evolutionary Genetic Analysis (MEGA) version 6. Based on phylogenetic analysis, the F. mortiferum isolates clustered into two groups - F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) and F. mortiferum ATCC 25557 (group II) - even though they are of the same species. Furthermore, the F. mortiferum DSM 19809 (group I) showed a close phylogenetic relationship with C. rectum, even though C. rectum is classified as a gram-positive spore-producing bacillus. C. rectum is clearly unrelated to the genus Clostridium as it shows highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with species from the genus Fusobacterium Therefore, additional methods such as Gram staining and other biochemical methods should be performed for Fusobacterium identification.

  11. Carcinogenesis mechanisms of Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2017-03-07

    Transformed cells of cancers may be related to stromal cells, immune cells, and some bacteria such as Fusobacterium nucleatum. This review aimed to evaluate carcinogenesis mechanisms of Fusobacterium spp. in the oral cavity, pancreatic and colorectal cancers. These cancers are the three of the ten most prevalence cancer in the worldwide. Recent findings demonstrated that F. nucleatum could be considered as the risk factor for these cancers. The most important carcinogenesis mechanisms of F. nucleatum are chronic infection, interaction of cell surface molecules of these bacteria with immune system and stromal cells, immune evasion and immune suppression. However, there are some uncertainty carcinogenesis mechanisms about these bacteria, but this review evaluates almost all the known mechanisms. Well-characterized virulence factors of F. nucleatum such as FadA, Fap2, LPS and cell wall extracts may act as effector molecules in the shift of normal epithelial cells to tumor cells. These molecules may provide new targets, drugs, and strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with oral necrobacillosis (lumpy jaw disease) using an automated handheld testing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotohira, Yukari; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Sasaki, Haruka; Sano, Tadashi; Tsuchiya, Masakazu; Suzuki, Yohko; Shimamori, Toshio; Tsukano, Kenji; Sato, Ayano; Yokota, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability and effectiveness of directly determining endotoxin activity in plasma samples from kangaroos with lumpy jaw disease (LJD, n=15) and healthy controls (n=12). Prior to the present study, the ability of the commercially available automated handheld portable test system (PTS(TM)) to detect endotoxin activity in kangaroo plasma was compared with that of the traditional LAL-kinetic turbidimetric (KT) assay. Plasma samples, which were obtained from endotoxin-challenged cattle, were diluted 1:20 in endotoxin-free water and heated to 80°C for 10 min. The performance of the PTS(TM) was not significantly different from that of the traditional LAL-based assay. The data obtained using PTS(TM) correlated with those using KT (r(2)=0.963, PPTS(TM) is applicable as a simplified system to assess endotoxin activity in macropods. In the present study, we demonstrated the diagnostic value of plasma endotoxin activity in kangaroos with systemic inflammation caused by oral necrobacillosis and identified plasma endotoxin activity as a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation in kangaroos with LJD. Based on ROC curves, we proposed a diagnostic cut-off point for endotoxin activity of >0.22 EU/ml for the identification of LJD. Our results indicate that the assessment of plasma endotoxin activity is a promising diagnostic tool for determining the outcome of LJD in captive macropods.

  13. Cytology of pulmonary Fusobacterium nucleatum infection. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C Y; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    A patient with pulmonary Fusobacterium nucleatum infection presenting as a solitary nodule is reported. The infectious nature of the lung nodule was disclosed by ultrasound-guided percutaneous transthoracic fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) with Liu's stain. The cytologic characteristics of F nucleatum infection are described. The usefulness of real-time ultrasound in fine needle aspiration diagnosis of a peripheral lung lesion is demonstrated, and the role of Liu's stain in FNAC is emphasized.

  14. 21 CFR 520.2260a - Sulfamethazine oblet, tablet, and bolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for use. For treatment of diseases caused by organisms susceptible to sulfamethazine. (A) Beef cattle and nonlactating dairy cattle. Treatment of bacterial pneumonia and bovine respiratory disease complex... pododermatitis (foot rot) (Fusobacterium necrophorum), calf diphtheria (Fusobacterium necrophorum),...

  15. Ovine fetal necrobacillosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, J.S.; Boye, Mette; Aalbæk, B.

    2007-01-01

    were found in several tissues. Histologically, placental lesions were characterized by locally diffuse infiltration of neutrophils, closely associated with abundant small Gram-negative and FISH-positive rods, thrombosis and necrosis. Lesions in the fetal-maternal interface were multifocal and consisted...... of villous necrosis and suppurative inflammation. Spread to the fetus from the placenta appeared to occur in two ways. Some fetuses had multifocal necrotizing hepatitis consistent with haematogenous spread through the umbilical vein; further dissemination to other organs occurred. Transplacental spread...

  16. Fusobacterium nucleatum Promotes Chemoresistance to Colorectal Cancer by Modulating Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, TaChung; Guo, Fangfang; Yu, Yanan; Sun, Tiantian; Ma, Dan; Han, Jixuan; Qian, Yun; Kryczek, Ilona; Sun, Danfeng; Nagarsheth, Nisha; Chen, Yingxuan; Chen, Haoyan; Hong, Jie; Zou, Weiping; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2017-07-27

    Gut microbiota are linked to chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy failure is the major cause of recurrence and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. Here, we investigated the contribution of gut microbiota to chemoresistance in patients with colorectal cancer. We found that Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum was abundant in colorectal cancer tissues in patients with recurrence post chemotherapy, and was associated with patient clinicopathological characterisitcs. Furthermore, our bioinformatic and functional studies demonstrated that F. nucleatum promoted colorectal cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, F. nucleatum targeted TLR4 and MYD88 innate immune signaling and specific microRNAs to activate the autophagy pathway and alter colorectal cancer chemotherapeutic response. Thus, F. nucleatum orchestrates a molecular network of the Toll-like receptor, microRNAs, and autophagy to clinically, biologically, and mechanistically control colorectal cancer chemoresistance. Measuring and targeting F. nucleatum and its associated pathway will yield valuable insight into clinical management and may ameliorate colorectal cancer patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Noncontiguous finished genome sequence and description of Fusobacterium massiliense sp. nov. isolated from human duodenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mailhe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The strain Marseille-P2749T (= CSUR P2749=DSM 103085 was isolated as part of culturomics study from a liquid duodenum sample from a French man. Bacterial cells were Gram-negative bacilli, fusiform shaped and non–spore forming, and they grew in microaerophilic and anaerobic atmosphere. Its genome is 1 809 169 bp long and contains 1646 protein-coding genes. The DNA G+C content was 27.33 mol%. This strain exhibited a 95.9% sequence similarity with Fusobacterium periodonticum, the phylogenetically closest species with standing in nomenclature. Strain Marseille-P2749T is suggested to be a novel species belonging to the genus Fusobacterium, for which the name Fusobacterium massiliense sp. nov. is proposed.

  18. Fusobacterium canifelinum sp. nov., from the oral cavity of cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Georg; Citron, Diane M; Mutters, Reinier; Jang, Spencer; Goldstein, Ellie J C

    2004-08-01

    Fourteen strains of Gram-negative, anaerobic, fluoroquinolone-resistant, non-sporulating rods were isolated from various infections in cats and dogs, as well as from wounds in humans after cat- or dog-bites. These strains were characterized by sequencing of the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions, 16S rDNA, DNA-DNA hybridization, phylogenetic analysis, and phenotypic tests. The results indicate that the novel strains belong to a distinct species, closely related to Fusobacterium nucleatum. The species Fusobacterium canifelinum sp. nov. is proposed, with strain ATCC BAA 689T as the type strain.

  19. 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences in Bacteroides and Fusobacterium: evolutionary relationships within these genera and among eubacteria in general

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Eynde, H.; De Baere, R.; Shah, H. N.; Gharbia, S. E.; Fox, G. E.; Michalik, J.; Van de Peer, Y.; De Wachter, R.

    1989-01-01

    The 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) sequences were determined for Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides capillosus, Bacteroides veroralis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Anaerorhabdus furcosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. A dendrogram constructed by a clustering algorithm from these sequences, which were aligned with all other hitherto known eubacterial 5S rRNA sequences, showed differences as well as similarities with respect to results derived from 16S rRNA analyses. In the 5S rRNA dendrogram, Bacteroides clustered together with Cytophaga and Fusobacterium, as in 16S rRNA analyses. Intraphylum relationships deduced from 5S rRNAs suggested that Bacteroides is specifically related to Cytophaga rather than to Fusobacterium, as was suggested by 16S rRNA analyses. Previous taxonomic considerations concerning the genus Bacteroides, based on biochemical and physiological data, were confirmed by the 5S rRNA sequence analysis.

  20. FUSOBACTERIUM PYOMYOSITIS OF THE SHOULDER AFTER TONSILLITIS - REPORT OF A CASE OF LEMIERRES SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; KONINGS, JG; PRINS, TR; WEITS, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of nontropical pyomyositis is reported in a young male without predisposing factors. The disease was preceded by a tonsillitis, and the presentation initially suggested a septic arthritis of the shoulder. Fusobacterium, a highly unusual pathogen in pyomyositis, was isolated from an abscess in

  1. FUSOBACTERIUM PYOMYOSITIS OF THE SHOULDER AFTER TONSILLITIS - REPORT OF A CASE OF LEMIERRES SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLF, RFE; KONINGS, JG; PRINS, TR; WEITS, J

    1991-01-01

    A case of nontropical pyomyositis is reported in a young male without predisposing factors. The disease was preceded by a tonsillitis, and the presentation initially suggested a septic arthritis of the shoulder. Fusobacterium, a highly unusual pathogen in pyomyositis, was isolated from an abscess in

  2. Biologic Activity of Type I and Type II Fusobacterium nucleatum Isolates from Clinically Characterized Sites,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-26

    journal of choice is the Journal of Periodontology . 1 ncl JACK W. VINCENT as COL, DC Microbiology Branch SGRD-UDZ (19 Jul 84) TO COL Jack W. Vincent...Activitity of Type I and Type II Manuscript for Publication Fusobacterium nucleatum Isolates From Clinically Chatacterized Sites. 6. PERFORMING ONG...120) were obtained from subgingival plaque samples taken from 27 clinically characterized sites utilizing a selec- tive culture medium. All isolates

  3. Periodontal disease induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Storrer, Carmen Mueller; Aun, Juliana Cleaver; Pustiglioni, Francisco E.; Romito,Giuseppe Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that it is necessary to place ligatures around molars to study periodontal destruction in rats. The present research aims to examine a periodontal disease model in which specific pathogen-free Wistar rats are orally exposed to Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with Fusobacterium nucleatum. Periodontitis was induced by specific infection with P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. Twenty adult male Wistar rats were divided into two groups. The control animals were not infec...

  4. Rendimento dos meios seletivos para bactérias do gênero Fusobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson C. de Araújo

    1968-10-01

    Full Text Available Meios seletivos para Fusobacterium foram, comparados no aspecto de sua eficiência no isolamento dos microrganismos fusiformes e quanto à inibição da flora concomitante. Material não calcificado do sulco gengival foi homogeneizado e diluído em tampão de fosfato (0,067 M - pH 7,2; 0,1 ml foi semeado em agar sangue, no meio de Omata & Disraely, meio de Omata & Disraely sem sôro, meio de McMarthy & Snyder, agar sangue com vancomicina, meio de Onisi, meio de Onisi com sôro de cavalo e meio de Onisi com pH 7,0. Em todos os casos a incubação foi realizada em anaerobiose, em jarra tipo Brewer, com 95% nitrogênio e 5% gás carbônico, durante 4 dias. O meio de McCarthy & Snyder mostrou-se tão eficiente quanto o agar sangue em relação ao isolamento de Fusobacterium, ainda inibindo a flora concomitante, o meio de Omata & Disraely, com cristal violeta e estreptomicina, foi de certo modo inibidor também para Fusobacterium. O meio de Onisi, sugerido, sem sôro, possibilitou o isolamento de pequeno número de fusobactérias, provàvelmente as amostras não exigentes de proteínas naturais.

  5. Growth requirements and fermentation products of Fusobacterium prausnitzii, and a proposal to reclassify it as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii gen. nov., comb. nov.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duncan, SH; Hold, GL; Harmsen, HJM; Stewart, CS; Flint, HJ

    2002-01-01

    Two newly isolated strains of obligately anaerobic bacteria from human faeces are shown here to be related to Fusobacterium prausnitzii, which is regarded as one of the most abundant colonizers of the human colon. These strains, along with Fusobacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27768(T) and 27766, are

  6. Growth requirements and fermentation products of Fusobacterium prausnitzii, and a proposal to reclassify it as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii gen. nov., comb. nov.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duncan, SH; Hold, GL; Harmsen, HJM; Stewart, CS; Flint, HJ

    2002-01-01

    Two newly isolated strains of obligately anaerobic bacteria from human faeces are shown here to be related to Fusobacterium prausnitzii, which is regarded as one of the most abundant colonizers of the human colon. These strains, along with Fusobacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27768(T) and 27766, are non-m

  7. Perfil de isolamento e resistência a antimicrobianos de Fusobacterium spp. isolados do sulco gengival eqüino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva I.N.G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 30 strains of Fusobacterium sp. isolated from gengival sulcus of 28 equines was studied in the period between January/1997 and April/1998. Bacterial isolation and antimicrobial resistance were determined by biochemical analyses and by the disk elution method. The species most frequently isolated was Fusobacterium nucleatum. The following resistance rates were observed: 10% for penicillin G, 87% for eritromycin, and 97% for sulfonamide. Theses results emphasize the need for monitoring the susceptibility patterns of this important bacterial group frequently isolated from normal sites in equines.

  8. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with immunity and molecular alterations in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Ito, Miki; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Ishigami, Keisuke; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Maruyama, Reo; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-14

    The human intestinal microbiome plays a major role in human health and diseases, including colorectal cancer. Colorectal carcinogenesis represents a heterogeneous process with a differing set of somatic molecular alterations, influenced by diet, environmental and microbial exposures, and host immunity. Fusobacterium species are part of the human oral and intestinal microbiota. Metagenomic analyses have shown an enrichment of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Using 511 colorectal carcinomas from Japanese patients, we assessed the presence of F. nucleatum. Our results showed that the frequency of F. nucleatum positivity in the Japanese colorectal cancer was 8.6% (44/511), which was lower than that in United States cohort studies (13%). Similar to the United States studies, F. nucleatum positivity in Japanese colorectal cancers was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI)-high status. Regarding the immune response in colorectal cancer, high levels of infiltrating T-cell subsets (i.e., CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO+, and FOXP3+ cells) have been associated with better patient prognosis. There is also evidence to indicate that molecular features of colorectal cancer, especially MSI, influence T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Concerning the association between the gut microbiome and immunity, F. nucleatum has been shown to expand myeloid-derived immune cells, which inhibit T-cell proliferation and induce T-cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer. This finding indicates that F. nucleatum possesses immunosuppressive activities by inhibiting human T-cell responses. Certain microRNAs are induced during the macrophage inflammatory response and have the ability to regulate host-cell responses to pathogens. MicroRNA-21 increases the levels of IL-10 and prostaglandin E2, which suppress antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity through the inhibition of the antigen-presenting capacities of dendritic cells and T-cell proliferation in

  9. Influence of subinhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials on hydrophobicity, adherence and ultra-structure of Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Ana C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is considered a bridge organism between earlier and later colonizers in dental biofilms and a putative periodontopathogen. In Dentistry, antimicrobial agents are used for treatment and control of infectious diseases associated with dental plaque. Antiseptics have been used in association with antibiotics to reduce infections after oral surgeries. In this study, the influence of subinhibitory concentrations (SC of chlorhexidine, triclosan, penicillin G and metronidazole, on hydrophobicity, adherence to oral epithelial cells, and ultra-structure of F. nucleatum was examined. All isolates were susceptible to chlorhexidine, triclosan, and metronidazole; however, most of the isolates were susceptible to penicillin G, and all of them were hydrophilic when grown with or without antimicrobials. Adherence was decreased by all antimicrobials. Results suggest that adherence of F. nucleatum was influenced by adhesins because structures such as fimbries or capsule were not observed by transmission electronic microscope.

  10. Virulence of oral Fusobacterium nucleatum from humans and non-human primates in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetti-Jardim Júnior Elerson

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The lethal action in Balb/c mice of 80 oral Fusobacterium nucleatum recovered from patients with adult periodontitis, healthy subjects or Cebus apella monkeys was studied. Mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with each bacterial inoculum of 5 x 10(8 CFU/ml. All the clinical isolates induced weight and coordinated movements loss. Pathological alterations in liver, CNS, heart, and kidney with inflammatory reactions or vascular congestion were observed. Of all the tested F. nucleatum isolates, 61.2% from periodontal patients, 57.1% from healthy subjects and 60% from monkeys, were capable of killing the mice in 48h. The clinical isolates were significantly more pathogenic than F. nucleatum ATCC 10953 or ATCC 25586. B. fragilis ATCC 23745 showed lethality against control mice. Our results suggest that LPS could be involved in lethal action against mice and it may play an important role in producing tissue damage or death of mice.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data of the FadA adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nithianantham, Stanley [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Xu, Minghua [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4905 (United States); Wu, Nan [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Han, Yiping W., E-mail: ywh2@case.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4905 (United States); Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shoham, Menachem, E-mail: ywh2@case.edu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States)

    2006-12-01

    The FadA adhesin from F. nucleatum, which is involved in bacterial attachment and invasion of human oral epithelial cells, has been crystallized in space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, and X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å resolution. Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobe prevalent in the oral cavity that is associated with periodontal disease, preterm birth and infections in other parts of the human body. The bacteria attach to and invade epithelial and endothelial cells in the gum tissue and elsewhere via a 13.7 kDa adhesin protein FadA (Fusobacterium adhesin A). FadA exists in two forms: the intact form (pre-FadA), consisting of 129 amino acids, and the mature form (mFadA), which lacks an 18-residue signal sequence. Both forms have been expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. mFadA has been crystallized. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 59.3, c = 125.7 Å and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals exhibit an unusually high solvent content of 74%. Synchrotron X-ray data have been collected to 1.9 Å. The crystals are suitable for X-ray structure determination. The crystal structure of FadA may provide a basis for the development of therapeutic agents to combat periodontal disease and other infections associated with F. nucleatum.

  12. EFECTO ANTIBACTERIANO IN VITRO DEL ACEITE ESENCIAL DE CINNAMOMUM ZEYLANICUM (CANELA) SOBRE EL FUSOBACTERIUM NUCLEATUM ATCC 25586

    OpenAIRE

    GARCÍA RUBIO, KHATTERYNE MARISOL

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present research work was to determine in vitro the antibacterial effect of the essential oil of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. The study was carried out in the laboratories of Pharmacognosy and microbiological laboratories in the School of Medicine at the National University of Trujillo. Samples consisted in two sets of 12 repeats for each concentration of cinnamon and sample control (penicillin). One set was used to determine the se...

  13. High occurrence of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Clostridium difficile in the intestinal microbiota of colorectal carcinoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia H. Fukugaiti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractColorectal carcinoma is considered the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Several microorganisms have been associated with carcinogenesis, including Enterococcus spp., Helicobacter pylori, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, pathogenic E. coli strains and oral Fusobacterium. Here we qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated the presence of oral and intestinal microorganisms in the fecal microbiota of colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. Seventeen patients (between 49 and 70 years-old visiting the Cancer Institute of the Sao Paulo State were selected, 7 of whom were diagnosed with colorectal carcinoma. Bacterial detection was performed by qRT-PCR. Although all of the tested bacteria were detected in the majority of the fecal samples, quantitative differences between the Cancer Group and healthy controls were detected only for F. nucleatum and C. difficile. The three tested oral microorganisms were frequently observed, suggesting a need for furthers studies into a potential role for these bacteria during colorectal carcinoma pathogenesis. Despite the small number of patients included in this study, we were able to detect significantly more F. nucleatumand C. difficile in the Cancer Group patients compared to healthy controls, suggesting a possible role of these bacteria in colon carcinogenesis. This finding should be considered when screening for colorectal cancer.

  14. Oral Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum binds to human salivary α-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfiqar, M; Yamaguchi, T; Sato, S; Oho, T

    2013-12-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum acts as an intermediate between early and late colonizers in the oral cavity. In this study, we showed that F. nucleatum subsp. polymorphum can bind to a salivary component with a molecular weight of approximately 110 kDa and identified the protein and another major factor of 55 kDa, as salivary α-amylase by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and immuno-reactions. Salivary α-amylase is present in both monomeric and dimeric forms and we found that formation of the dimer depends on copper ions. The F. nucleatum adhered to both monomeric and dimeric salivary α-amylases, but the numbers of bacteria bound to the dimeric form were more than those bound to the monomeric form. The degree of adherence of F. nucleatum to four α-amylases from different sources was almost the same, however its binding to β-amylase was considerably decreased. Among four α-amylase inhibitors tested, acarbose and type 1 and 3 inhibitors derived from wheat flour showed significant activity against the adhesion of F.nucleatum to monomeric and dimeric amylases, however voglibose had little effect. Moreover F. nucleatum cells inhibited the enzymatic activity of salivary α-amylase in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that F. nucleatum plays more important and positive role as an early colonizer for maturation of oral microbial colonization.

  15. Characterization of Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 23726 adhesins involved in strain-specific attachment to Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jane Park; Bhumika Shokeen; Susan K Haake; Renate Lux

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adherence is an essential virulence factor in pathogenesis and infection. Fusobacterium nucleatum has a central role in oral biofilm architecture by acting as a bridge between early Gram-positive and late Gram-negative colonizers that do not otherwise adhere to each other. In this study, we survey a key adherence interaction of F. nucleatum with Porphyromonas gingivalis, and present evidence that multiple fusobacterial adhesins have a role in the attachment of F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 to P. gingivalis in a highly strain-dependent manner. Interaction between these species displayed varying sensitivities to arginine, galactose and lactose. Arginine was found to hamper coaggregation by at least 62%and up to 89%with several P. gingivalis strains and galactose inhibition ranged from no inhibition up to 58%with the same P. gingivalis strains. Lactose consistently inhibited F. nucleatum interaction with these P. gingivalis strains ranging from 40% to 56%decrease in coaggregation. Among the adhesins involved are the previously described Fap2 and surprisingly, RadD, which was described in an earlier study for its function in attachment of F. nucleatum to Gram-positive species. We also provide evidence for the presence of at least one additional adhesin that is sensitive to arginine but unlike Fap2 and RadD, is not a member of the autotransporter family type of fusobacterial large outer membrane proteins. The strain-specific binding profile of multiple fusobacterial adhesins to P. gingivalis highlights the heterogeneity and complexity of interspecies interactions in the oral cavity.

  16. Fusobacterium nucleatum, the first Gram-negative bacterium demonstrated to produce polyglutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Thomas; Moya, Marie; Haustant, Michel; Fouet, Agnès

    2009-05-01

    Poly-gamma-glutamate has been described in many Gram-positive organisms. When anchored to the surface, it is a capsule and as such a virulence factor. Based on sequence similarities, few Gram-negative organisms have been suggested to synthesize poly-gamma-glutamate. For the first time, a Gram-negative bacterium, Fusobacterium nucleatum, is shown to produce and secrete poly-gamma-glutamate. Putative poly-gamma-glutamate-synthesizing genes from Gram-negative organisms have been compared with their Gram-positive homologs by in silico analysis, i.e., gene sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Clusters of three instead of four genes were highlighted by our screen. The products of the first two genes display similarity with their Gram-positive equivalents, yet the sequences from the Gram-negative organisms can be distinguished from those of the Gram-positives. Interestingly, the sequence of the predicted product of the third gene is conserved among Gram-negative bacteria but displays no similarity to that of either the third or fourth gene of the Gram-positive operons. It is suggested that, like for Gram-positive bacteria, poly-gamma-glutamate has a role in virulence for pathogens and one in survival for other Gram-negative bacteria.

  17. Plasmid profile in oral Fusobacterium nucleatum from humans and Cebus apella monkeys

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    Paula Marcia O.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is a strict anaerobe and is indigenous of the human oral cavity. This organism is commonly recovered from different monomicrobial and mixed infections in humans and animals. In this study, the plasmid profile, the plasmid stability and the penicillin-resistance association in oral F. nucleatum isolated from periodontal patients, healthy subjects and Cebus apella monkeys were evaluated. Forty-five F. nucleatum strains from patients, 38 from healthy subjects and seven from C. apella were identified and analyzed. Plasmid extraction was performed in all the isolated strains. These elements were found in 26.7% strains from patients and one strain from C. apella. Strains from healthy subjects did not show any plasmid. Most of strains showed two plasmid bands ranging from 4 to 16 Kb, but digestions with endonucleases showed that they belonged to a single plasmid. The plasmid profile was similar and stable in human and monkey strains. Also, plasmids were classified into three groups according to size. Two strains were positive to beta-lactamase production and no plasmid DNA-hybridization with a beta-lactamase gene probe was observed, suggesting a chromosomal resistance.

  18. Fusobacterium nucleatum and Tannerella forsythia induce synergistic alveolar bone loss in a mouse periodontitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settem, Rajendra P; El-Hassan, Ahmed Taher; Honma, Kiyonobu; Stafford, Graham P; Sharma, Ashu

    2012-07-01

    Tannerella forsythia is strongly associated with chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, leading to tooth loss. Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic pathogen, is thought to promote dental plaque formation by serving as a bridge bacterium between early- and late-colonizing species of the oral cavity. Previous studies have shown that F. nucleatum species synergize with T. forsythia during biofilm formation and pathogenesis. In the present study, we showed that coinfection of F. nucleatum and T. forsythia is more potent than infection with either species alone in inducing NF-κB activity and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in monocytic cells and primary murine macrophages. Moreover, in a murine model of periodontitis, mixed infection with the two species induces synergistic alveolar bone loss, characterized by bone loss which is greater than the additive alveolar bone losses induced by each species alone. Further, in comparison to the single-species infection, mixed infection caused significantly increased inflammatory cell infiltration in the gingivae and osteoclastic activity in the jaw bones. These data show that F. nucleatum subspecies and T. forsythia synergistically stimulate the host immune response and induce alveolar bone loss in a murine experimental periodontitis model.

  19. Effect of kefir on Fusobacterium nucleatum in potentially preventing intestinal cancer

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    Zeynep Banu Guzel-Seydim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fusobacterium spp. are known to be part of mouth and intestinal microbiota. Fusobacterium nucleatum is an obligate anaerobe, Gram negative, non-spore forming pleomorphic bacillus that can cause diseases not only in the mouth and teeth but also in the brain, pleura, lungs and liver. It was noted that F. nucleatum induces fetal death (fetal demise in pregnant women. Recent studies indicate that F. nucleatum could lead to colon cancer by binding to the epithelial tissue. Kefir is produced from kefir grains that are a source of probiotics. Fermented dairy products and especially kefir and yogurt are significant for functional nutrition. In kefir grains, lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria and yeasts are embedded in a polysaccharide matrix, called kefiran. When kefir grains are added to milk and incubated for approximately 22 h at 25°C, microorganisms in the grains continue to proliferate in milk with the production of functional metabolic compounds. While yogurt has mainly two bacteria, authentic kefir has its characteristic Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Lactobacillus kefir and Lactobacillus kefirgranum, in addition to many other types of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. Previous studies have indicated that fermented dairy products can cause probiotic effects such as improvement in digestive system health, reduction in serum cholesterol, improvement in lactose tolerance, improvement in immune function, control of irritable bowel symptoms, and anticarcinogenic properties. Objective: The aim of this research was to report the effects of fermented dairy products in vitro on the growth of F. nucleatum. Milk, kefir made from natural kefir grains, commercial kefir produced from kefir starter culture, yogurt produced from natural yogurt starter culture and commercial yogurt produced from yogurt starter culture were used against F. nucleatum. Methods: F. nucleatum (ATCC 25586 was grown in Fluid Thioglycollate Medium at 37°C for 3 days under

  20. Characterization of aid1, a novel gene involved in Fusobacterium nucleatum interspecies interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Aida; Kaplan, Christopher W; He, Xuesong; McHardy, Ian; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-08-01

    The oral opportunistic pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum is known to interact with a large number of different bacterial species residing in the oral cavity. It adheres to a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, including oral streptococci via the arginine-inhibitable adhesin RadD. In this study, we describe a novel protein encoded by the predicted open reading frame FN1253 that appears to play a role in interspecies interactions of F. nucleatum, particularly with oral streptococci and related Gram-positive species. We designated FN1253 as aid1 (Adherence Inducing Determinant 1). Expression analyses demonstrated that this gene was induced in F. nucleatum single species biofilms, while the presence of representative members of the oral microbiota known to adhere to F. nucleatum triggered its suppression. Inactivation as well as overexpression of aid1 affected the ability of F. nucleatum to coaggregate with oral streptococci and the closely related Enterococcus faecalis, but not other Gram-positive oral species tested. Furthermore, overexpression of aid1 led to a drastic change in the structure of dual species biofilms of F. nucleatum with oral streptococci. Aid1 function was abolished in the presence of arginine and found to be dependent on RadD. Interestingly, differential expression of aid1 did not affect messenger RNA and protein levels of RadD. These findings indicate that RadD-mediated adhesion to oral streptococci involves more complex cellular processes than the simple interaction of adhesins on the surface of partner strains. Aid1 could potentially play an important role in facilitating RadD-mediated interaction with oral streptococci by increasing binding specificity of F. nucleatum to other microbial species.

  1. The Danger Signal Extracellular ATP Is an Inducer of Fusobacterium nucleatum Biofilm Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qinfeng; Tan, Kai Soo

    2016-01-01

    Plaque biofilm is the primary etiological agent of periodontal disease. Biofilm formation progresses through multiple developmental stages beginning with bacterial attachment to a surface, followed by development of microcolonies and finally detachment and dispersal from a mature biofilm as free planktonic bacteria. Tissue damage arising from inflammatory response to biofilm is one of the hallmark features of periodontal disease. A consequence of tissue damage is the release of ATP from within the cell into the extracellular space. Extracellular ATP (eATP) is an example of a danger associated molecular pattern (DAMP) employed by mammalian cells to elicit inflammatory and damage healing responses. Although, the roles of eATP as a signaling molecule in multi-cellular organisms have been relatively well studied, exogenous ATP also influences bacteria biofilm formation. Since plaque biofilms are continuously exposed to various stresses including exposure to the host damage factors such as eATP, we hypothesized that eATP, in addition to eliciting inflammation could potentially influence the biofilm lifecycle of periodontal associated bacteria. We found that eATP rather than nutritional factors or oxidative stress induced dispersal of Fusobacterium nucleatum, an organism associated with periodontal disease. eATP induced biofilm dispersal through chelating metal ions present in biofilm. Dispersed F. nucleatum biofilm, regardless of natural or induced dispersal by exogenous ATP, were more adhesive and invasive compared to planktonic or biofilm counterparts, and correspondingly activated significantly more pro-inflammatory cytokine production in infected periodontal fibroblasts. Dispersed F. nucleatum also showed higher expression of fadA, a virulence factor implicated in adhesion and invasion, compared to planktonic or biofilm bacteria. This study revealed for the first time that periodontal bacterium is capable of co-opting eATP, a host danger signaling molecule to detach

  2. Fusobacterium nucleatum-associated beta-defensin inducer (FAD-I): identification, isolation, and functional evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanhita; Ghosh, Santosh K; Scott, Mary E; Bainbridge, Brian; Jiang, Bin; Lamont, Richard J; McCormick, Thomas S; Weinberg, Aaron

    2010-11-19

    Human β-defensins (hBDs) are small, cationic antimicrobial peptides, secreted by mucosal epithelial cells that regulate adaptive immune functions. We previously reported that Fusobacterium nucleatum, a ubiquitous gram-negative bacterium of the human oral cavity, induces human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) upon contact with primary oral epithelial cells. We now report the isolation and characterization of an F. nucleatum (ATCC 25586)-associated defensin inducer (FAD-I). Biochemical approaches revealed a cell wall fraction containing four proteins that stimulated the production of hBD2 in human oral epithelial cells (HOECs). Cross-referencing of the N-terminal sequences of these proteins with the F. nucleatum genome revealed that the genes encoding the proteins were FadA, FN1527, FN1529, and FN1792. Quantitative PCR of HOEC monolayers challenged with Escherichia coli clones expressing the respective cell wall proteins revealed that FN1527 was most active in the induction of hBD2 and hence was termed FAD-I. We tagged FN1527 with a c-myc epitope on the C-terminal end to identify and purify it from the E. coli clone. Purified FN1527 (FAD-I) induced hBD2 mRNA and protein expression in HOEC monolayers. F. nucleatum cell wall and FAD-I induced hBD2 via TLR2. Porphorymonas gingivalis, an oral pathogen that does not induce hBD2 in HOECs, was able to significantly induce expression of hBD2 in HOECs only when transformed to express FAD-I. FAD-I or its derivates offer a potentially new paradigm in immunoregulatory therapeutics because they may one day be used to bolster the innate defenses of vulnerable mucosae.

  3. Antibody and T cell responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in health and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Shin

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9. The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3(+CD4(+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  4. Cloning and Eukaryotic Expression Vector Construction of bsbse-gas-sh of Leukotoxin from Fusobacterium necrophorum%坏死梭杆菌白细胞毒素 bsbse -gas -sh 真核表达载体的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪孙杰; 陈立志; 刘晓颖; 冯二凯; 曹阅; 徐晶

    2012-01-01

      根据GeneBank中提供的白细胞毒素基因序列,设计引物并扩增bsbse和gas-sh片段.通过T4 DNA Ligase连接形成融合片段bsbse-gas-sh ,亚克隆pMD○R 18-T质粒和测序.成功构建表达bsbse-gas-sh毕赤酵母表达载体pPIC9K-bsbse-gas-sh.为下一步bsbse-gas-sh的真核表达及免疫机理研究奠定了基础.

  5. Bad news itself or just the messenger? The high mortality of Fusobacterium spp. infections is related to disseminated malignancy and other comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Dessau, Ram Benny; Heltberg, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Background Fusobacterium species are pleomorphic, obligate anaerobic gram-negative bacilli. They are difficult to culture and grow slowly. If antibiotic treatment is initiated prior to blood cultures, the bacteria might evade detection. This is a comprehensive report on mortality in non...

  6. Genetic diversity of oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolated from patients with different clinical conditions Diversidade genética de Fusobacterium nucleatum orais isolados de pacientes com diferentes condições clínicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario J. Avila-Campos

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of 23 oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolated from 15 periodontal patients, eight from seven healthy subjects, nine from nine AIDS patients and two from two Cebus apella monkeys were analyzed. EcoRI restricted the bacterial DNA and 28 ribotypes grouped from A to J groups were obtained. Isolates formed 24 ribotypes which were contained into A, B, C, D, E and F groups, and three reference strains and two clinical isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, and E. coli CDC formed four different ribotypes into the G, H, I and J groups. Moreover, from nine F. nucleatum from AIDS patients, six were ribotyped as group C and three as group D. By using ribotyping we distinguished F. nucleatum recovered from different sources. It is possible that isolates from AIDS patients may contain some phenotypic or genotypic factor did not observed in this study.Neste estudo foi avaliada a diversidade genética de 23 amostras de Fusobacterium nucleatum isoladas da cavidade bucal de 15 pacientes com doença periodontal, de oito cepas isoladas de sete indivíduos sadios, de nove isoladas de nove pacientes com AIDS e de duas isoladas de dois macacos Cebus apella. Pela ação da enzima EcoRI sobre o DNA bacteriano foram reconhecidos 28 ribotipos agrupados de A a J. Os isolados testados formaram 24 ribotipos os quais foram contidos nos grupos A, B, C, D, E e F, e as três cepas de referência e dois isolados clínicos de A. actinomycetemcomitans e E. coli CDC formaram quatro diferentes ribotipos contidos nos grupos G, H, I e J. Em adição, as nove cepas de F. nucleatum isoladas de pacientes com AIDS, seis pertenciam ao grupo C e três ao grupo D. Usando-se a ribotipagem foi possível distinguir F. nucleatum isolados de diferentes origens.

  7. 21 CFR 522.2260 - Sulfamethazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... disease complex (shipping fever complex) (Pasteurella spp.), colibacillosis (bacterial scours) (Escherichia coli), necrotic pododermatitis (foot rot) (Fusobacterium necrophorum), calf diphtheria... with sulfonamides. Treatment should continue 24 to 48 hours beyond the remission of disease...

  8. Presence and localization of bacteria in the bovine endometrium postpartum using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstrup, C. C.; Agerholm, J. S.; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bacterial invasiveness of the bovine endometrium during the postpartum period. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to endometrial biopsies using probes for Fusobacterium necrophorum, Porphyromonas levii, Trueperella pyogenes, Escherichia coli...

  9. Quantitative profiling of colorectal cancer-associated bacteria reveals associations between fusobacterium spp., enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF and clinicopathological features of colorectal cancer.

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    Katie S Viljoen

    Full Text Available Various studies have presented clinical or in vitro evidence linking bacteria to colorectal cancer, but these bacteria have not previously been concurrently quantified by qPCR in a single cohort. We quantify these bacteria (Fusobacterium spp., Streptococcus gallolyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC, and afaC- or pks-positive E. coli in paired tumour and normal tissue samples from 55 colorectal cancer patients. We further investigate the relationship between a the presence and b the level of colonisation of each bacterial species with site and stage of disease, age, gender, ethnicity and MSI-status. With the exception of S. gallolyticus, we detected all bacteria profiled here in both tumour and normal samples at varying frequencies. ETBF (FDR = 0.001 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples and afaC-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.03, normal samples were significantly enriched in the colon compared to the rectum. ETBF (FDR = 0.04 and 0.002 for normal and tumour samples, respectively and Fusobacterium spp. (FDR = 0.03 tumour samples levels were significantly higher in late stage (III/IV colorectal cancers. Fusobacterium was by far the most common bacteria detected, occurring in 82% and 81% of paired tumour and normal samples. Fusobacterium was also the only bacterium that was significantly higher in tumour compared to normal samples (p = 6e-5. We also identified significant associations between high-level colonisation by Fusobacterium and MSI-H (FDR = 0.05, age (FDR = 0.03 or pks-positive E. coli (FDR = 0.01. Furthermore, we exclusively identified atypical EPEC in our cohort, which has not been previously reported in association with colorectal cancer. By quantifying colorectal cancer-associated bacteria across a single cohort, we uncovered inter- and intra-individual patterns of colonization not previously recognized, as well as important associations with clinicopathological

  10. Bacteriocin-like activity of oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolated from human and non-human primates Atividade semelhante a bacteriocina de Fusobacterium nucleatum orais isolados de primatas humanos e não-humanos

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    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusobacterium nucleatum is indigenous of the human oral cavity and has been involved in different infectious processes. The production of bacteriocin-like substances may be important in regulation of bacterial microbiota in oral cavity. The ability to produce bacteriocin-like substances by 80 oral F. nucleatum isolates obtained from periodontal patients, healthy individuals and Cebus apella monkeys, was examinated. 17.5% of all tested isolates showed auto-antagonism and 78.8% iso- or hetero-antagonism. No isolate from monkey was capable to produce auto-inhibition. In this study, the antagonistic substances production was variable in all tested isolates. Most of the F. nucleatum showed antagonistic activity against tested reference strains. These data suggest a possible participation of these substances on the oral microbial ecology in humans and animals. However, the role of bacteriocins in regulating dental plaque microbiota in vivo is discussed.Fusobacterium nucleatum é indígena da cavidade oral humana e tem sido envolvido em diferentes processos infecciosos. A produção de substâncias semelhantes a bacteriocinas pode ser importante na regulação da microbiota bacteriana da cavidade oral. A capacidade de produzir substâncias tipo bacteriocina de 80 isolados de F. nucleatum orais, obtidos de pacientes com doença periodontal, indivíduos sadios e macaco Cebus apella, foi avaliada. 17,5% de todos os isolados mostrou auto-antagonismo e 78,8% iso- ou hetero-antagonismo. Nenhum isolado de macaco foi capaz de produzir auto-inibição. Neste estudo, a produção de substâncias antagonístas foi variável em todos os isolados testados. A maioria dos F. nucleatum mostrou atividade antagonísta para as cepas de referência testadas. Esses dados sugerem a possível participação dessas substâncias sobre a ecologia microbiana em humanos e animais. Entretanto, o papel das bacteriocinas na regulação da microbiota da placa dental in vivo

  11. Bad news itself or just the messenger? The high mortality of Fusobacterium spp. infections is related to disseminated malignancy and other comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine Marie Harries; Dessau, Ram; Heltberg, Ole;

    2016-01-01

    -bacteraemia fusobacterial infection. Methods Data were collected retrospectively in adults having a positive culture with Fusobacterium spp. admitted during 2000–2012 at the medical department. Data on culture specimens, number of cultures, admission and culture dates, patient age, gender, clinical disease, Charlson......'s index of co-morbidity, CRP level and survival were obtained. For comparison, we traced 60 consecutive, similarly obtained cultures from 2009 to 2010 containing Staphylococcus aureus. Results Within a 12-year period, we identified 28 patients with a positive culture of Fusobacterium spp. in a medical...... ward serving a population of 220,000. Only a minority (39%) had a positive blood culture, and 54% had focus in respiratory tract or pleura. Overall 6-month mortality was 32%, and unrelated to subspecies, treatment or anatomic location but significantly related to age >60 years, admission for severe...

  12. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility of Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium species isolated from patients of the N. N. Blokhin Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilnikova, Irina I; Dmitrieva, Natalia V

    2015-02-01

    In total 122 non-duplicate Bacteroides, Prevotella and Fusobacterium spp isolated from cancer patients between 2004 and 2014 were involved in this study. Most of the strains belonged to the B. fragilis group (55%), followed by Prevotella strains (34.4%) and Fusobacterium spp (10.6%). The species identification was carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), and they were identified on species level with a log (score) >2.0. The most common isolates were B. fragilis, B. thetaiotaomicron, B. ovatus and B. vulgatus. Among Prevotella species, the most frequently isolated species were P. buccae, P. buccalis, P. oris, P. denticola and P. nigrescens, and most of the Fusobacterium spp. were F. nucleatum. Susceptibilities of the strains were determined by the E-test methodology. The percentage of the susceptibility of B. fragilis group isolates were: metronidazole (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 97%; imipenem (MIC ≤2 μg/ml), 95.5%; amoxicillin/clavulanate (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 95.5% and clindamycin (MIC ≤4 μg/ml), 77.6%. Three B. fragilis isolates proved to be multidrug-resistant (parallel resistance to imipenem, amoxicillin/clavulanate and metronidazole or clindamycin was observed). All Prevotella strains tested were susceptible to imipenem and amoxicillin/clavulanate, whereas 78.6% of the pigmented Prevotella species and 46.4% of the non-pigmented species were resistant to penicillin (MIC >0.5 μg/ml). The susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin were 93% and 88%, respectively. All Fusobacterium strains were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, including penicillin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fastidious anaerobe agar compared with Wilkins-Chalgren agar, brain heart infusion agar, and brucella agar for susceptibility testing of Fusobacterium species.

    OpenAIRE

    Brazier, J. S.; Goldstein, E J; Citron, D M; Ostovari, M I

    1990-01-01

    Fastidious anaerobe agar supported the growth of 82 strains of fusobacteria better than brain heart infusion agar, brucella agar, and Wilkins-Chalgren agar. Fastidious anaerobe agar showed less hazing and fewer tailing endpoints with beta-lactam antibiotics. Whole-blood supplementation improved the performance of all media. Wilkins-Chalgren agar without blood failed to support the growth of 17% of the strains. All Fusobacterium ulcerans strains were resistant to clindamycin.

  14. Direct recognition of Fusobacterium nucleatum by the NK cell natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp46 aggravates periodontal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Chaushu

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a common human chronic inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of the tooth attachment apparatus and tooth loss. Although infections with periopathogenic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum are essential for inducing periodontitis, the nature and magnitude of the disease is determined by the host's immune response. Here, we investigate the role played by the NK killer receptor NKp46 (NCR1 in mice, in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Using an oral infection periodontitis model we demonstrate that following F. nucleatum infection no alveolar bone loss is observed in mice deficient for NCR1 expression, whereas around 20% bone loss is observed in wild type mice and in mice infected with P. gingivalis. By using subcutaneous chambers inoculated with F. nucleatum we demonstrate that immune cells, including NK cells, rapidly accumulate in the chambers and that this leads to a fast and transient, NCR1-dependant TNF-α secretion. We further show that both the mouse NCR1 and the human NKp46 bind directly to F. nucleatum and we demonstrate that this binding is sensitive to heat, to proteinase K and to pronase treatments. Finally, we show in vitro that the interaction of NK cells with F. nucleatum leads to an NCR1-dependent secretion of TNF-α. Thus, the present study provides the first evidence that NCR1 and NKp46 directly recognize a periodontal pathogen and that this interaction influences the outcome of F. nucleatum-mediated periodontitis.

  15. Characterization of extracellular polymeric matrix, and treatment of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilms with DNase I and proteinase K

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    Marwan Mansoor Ali Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilms are organized communities of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix (EPM, often with great phylogenetic variety. Bacteria in the subgingival biofilm are key factors that cause periodontal diseases; among these are the Gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The objectives of this study were to characterize the major components of the EPM and to test the effect of deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I and proteinase K. Methods: F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis bacterial cells were grown in dynamic and static biofilm models. The effects of DNase I and proteinase K enzymes on the major components of the EPM were tested during biofilm formation and on mature biofilm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used in observing biofilm structure. Results: Proteins and carbohydrates were the major components of the biofilm matrix, and extracellular DNA (eDNA was also present. DNase I and proteinase K enzymes had little effect on biofilms in the conditions used. In the flow cell, F. nucleatum was able to grow in partially oxygenated conditions while P. gingivalis failed to form biofilm alone in similar conditions. F. nucleatum supported the growth of P. gingivalis when they were grown together as dual species biofilm. Conclusion: DNase I and proteinase K had little effect on the biofilm matrix in the conditions used. F. nucleatum formed biofilm easily and supported the growth of P. gingivalis, which preferred anaerobic conditions.

  16. Fap2 Mediates Fusobacterium nucleatum Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Enrichment by Binding to Tumor-Expressed Gal-GalNAc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Jawad; Emgård, Johanna E M; Zamir, Gideon; Faroja, Mouhammad; Almogy, Gideon; Grenov, Amalie; Sol, Asaf; Naor, Ronit; Pikarsky, Eli; Atlan, Karine A; Mellul, Anna; Chaushu, Stella; Manson, Abigail L; Earl, Ashlee M; Ou, Nora; Brennan, Caitlin A; Garrett, Wendy S; Bachrach, Gilad

    2016-08-10

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with colorectal cancer and promotes colonic tumor formation in preclinical models. However, fusobacteria are core members of the human oral microbiome and less prevalent in the healthy gut, raising questions about how fusobacteria localize to CRC. We identify a host polysaccharide and fusobacterial lectin that explicates fusobacteria abundance in CRC. Gal-GalNAc, which is overexpressed in CRC, is recognized by fusobacterial Fap2, which functions as a Gal-GalNAc lectin. F. nucleatum binding to clinical adenocarcinomas correlates with Gal-GalNAc expression and is reduced upon O-glycanase treatment. Clinical fusobacteria strains naturally lacking Fap2 or inactivated Fap2 mutants show reduced binding to Gal-GalNAc-expressing CRC cells and established CRCs in mice. Additionally, intravenously injected F. nucleatum localizes to mouse tumor tissues in a Fap2-dependent manner, suggesting that fusobacteria use a hematogenous route to reach colon adenocarcinomas. Thus, targeting F. nucleatum Fap2 or host epithelial Gal-GalNAc may reduce fusobacteria potentiation of CRC.

  17. Rapid detection of nusG and fadA in Fusobacterium nucleatum by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Simo; Yang, Zhan; Zou, Dayang; Dong, Derong; Liu, Anheng; Liu, Wei; Huang, Liuyu

    2016-08-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is associated with various human diseases such as periodontal disease and colorectal cancer (CRC); thus, F. nucleatum detection might serve as a novel diagnostic tool. Here, we describe the development of a sensitive and rapid molecular method for detecting two F. nucleatum genes: the highly conserved nusG and fadA, which encode a critical host colonization factor. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primer sets for the rapid detection of nusG and fadA were designed and optimized. The nusG primers yielded consistent negative results for 20 non-F. nucleatum bacterial strains, confirming the high specificity of the primers. LAMP reaction primer sensitivity was determined, and its detection rate in comparison to conventional PCR was assessed using 57 clinical stool samples. The LAMP detection limit for nusG and fadA was 22.5 and 0.225 pg µl-1, respectively, indicating that the sensitivity of this method was 10-fold higher than that of conventional PCR. These results suggest that the LAMP technique is able to effectively identify F. nucleatum via nusG as well as detect its virulence factor. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to report the application of LAMP for the detection of nusG and fadA in F. nucleatum. The LAMP method constitutes a sensitive and specific visual assay for the rapid detection of the pathogen F. nucleatum.

  18. Biofilm formation enhances the oxygen tolerance and invasiveness of Fusobacterium nucleatum in an oral mucosa culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursoy, Ulvi Kahraman; Pöllänen, Marja; Könönen, Eija; Uitto, Veli-Jukka

    2010-07-01

    The present study evaluates the survival capability of Fusobacterium nucleatum strains in an aerobic environment and compares the invasive capability of F. nucleatum in biofilm and planktonic forms in an organotypic cell culture (OCC) model. Biofilms of F. nucleatum American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 25586 or Anaerobe Helsinki Negative (AHN) 9508 were produced by culturing on semipermeable membranes on brucella agar plates. The oxygen tolerance of the F. nucleatum strains was examined by incubating 3-day-old anaerobically grown biofilms in an aerobic environment (CO(2) [5% in air] incubator) for an additional 48 hours. The OCC model was constructed by seeding keratinocytes on a fibroblast-containing collagen gel. In invasion assays, a 3-day-old anaerobically grown biofilm (and planktonic bacteria in solution as the control) was placed upside down on the top of OCC and incubated under 5% CO(2) for 24 hours. Invasion of the bacteria and morphologic changes in OCC were assessed using hematoxylin and eosin, Ki-67, and periodic acid-Schiff stainings. In biofilms, both F. nucleatum strains continuously increased their cell numbers in an aerobic environment for 48 hours. After incubating the bacterial biofilm in contact with the OCC model, F. nucleatum AHN 9508 was able to pass through the epithelial/basement membrane barrier and invade the collagen matrix. The invasiveness of biofilm F. nucleatum ATCC 25586 was limited to the epithelium. Cytotoxic effects and invasiveness of F. nucleatum on the OCC were much stronger when the bacteria were in biofilms than in the planktonic form. Biofilm formation regulates the survival and invasiveness of F. nucleatum in an aerobic environment.

  19. Actividad antibacteriana in vitro del extracto etanólico de propóleo de Oxapampa-Perú, sobre cepas de Porphyromonas gingivalis y Fusobacterium nucleatum

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Suyo, Juan A.; Practica privada; Proaño de Casalino, Doris; Facultad de Estomatología, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima,

    2014-01-01

    En la presente investigación se buscó comparar la actividad antibacteriana in vitro del extracto etanólico de propóleo de Oxapampa, Perú, en concentraciones al 1%, 5% y 10% con gluconato de clorhexidina al 0,2% sobre cepas de Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 y Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586. La actividad antibacteriana se determinó usando el método de difusiónen el agar. Los halos de inhibición se midieron con un calibrador y fueron anotados en una ficha de registro. Los datos fueron a...

  20. Signal peptide of FadA adhesin from Fusobacterium nucleatum plays a novel structural role by regulating the filament's length and width

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    FadA, a novel adhesin of periodontal pathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum is composed of two forms, pre-FadA and mature FadA (mFadA), constituting the functional FadA complex (FadAc). By electron microscopy, we observed that mFadA formed uniformly long and thin filaments, while FadAc formed heterogeneous filaments of varying lengths and widths, as well as “knots”. Mutants in signal peptide or in the non-alpha helical loop retaining heterogeneous structures had binding activity while those forming...

  1. Osteomyelitis of a long bone due to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Actinomyces meyeri in an immunocompetent adult: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Min

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusobacterium species are uncommon causes of osteomyelitis. These organisms are normal flora of the oral cavity. Therefore, they mostly cause osteomyelitis of the head and neck. Hematogenous osteomyelitis at distant sites other than the head and neck has rarely been reported in pediatric or immunocompromised patients. Here, we report the first case of osteomyelitis of a long bone combined with a muscle abscess due to Fusobacterium nucleatum in an otherwise healthy adult. Case presentation A 59-year-old Korean man was admitted for pain and swelling of the right lower leg, which had been persistent for two weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging showed osteomyelitis of the right fibula with a surrounding muscle abscess of the right lower leg. Incision and drainage was performed, and repetitive tissue cultures grew F. nucleatum. In this patient, it was presumed that recurrent periodontitis caused hematogenous seeding of F. nucleatum to a distant site leading to osteomyelitis with a muscle abscess. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous ampicillin-sulbactam for three weeks and oral amoxicillin-clavulanate for eight weeks. He also underwent repeated surgical drainage. He has no evidence of recurrence after seven months of follow-up. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware that F. nucleatum could be the etiologic agent of hematogenous osteomyelitis of a long bone in an immunocompetent patient.

  2. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (pgingivitis group than in health people (pgingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis.

  3. "Messieurs, c'est les microbes qui auront le dernier mot": Gentlemen, it is the microbes who have the last word (Louis Pasteur)-Fusobacterium nucleatum protect tumors from killing by immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Chamutal; Mandelboim, Ofer; Bachrach, Gilad

    2015-09-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is present in colon cancers where it was shown to generate a proinflammatory microenvironment that supports colorectal neoplasia progression. Remarkably, alongside with proinflammatory stimulation, fusobacteria also inhibit cytotoxicity of immune cells. Thus, it appears as if tumors exploit fusobacteria to generate a favorable proinflammatory and anti-cytotoxic microenvironment.

  4. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharath, Nagaraj; Sowmya, Nagur Karibasappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease.

  5. Determination of antibacterial activity of green coffee bean extract on periodontogenic bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans: An in vitrostudy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraj Bharath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of pure green coffee bean extract on periodonto pathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, Prevotella intermedia (Pi, Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa. Materials and Methods: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC were used to assess the antibacterial effect of pure green coffee bean extract against periodonto pathogenic bacteria by micro dilution method and culture method, respectively. Results: MIC values of Pg, Pi and Aa were 0.2 μg/ml whereas Fn showed sensitive at concentration of 3.125 μg/ml. MBC values mirrors the values same as that of MIC. Conclusion: Antimicrobial activity of pure green coffee bean extract against Pg, Pi, Fn and Aa suggests that it could be recommended as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease.

  6. Digital Necrobacillosis in Norwegian Wild Tundra Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handeland, K.; Boye, Mette; Bergsjø, B.;

    2010-01-01

    of pus. Subcutaneous tissue was inflamed and oedematous with focal necrosis. Tendons, tendon sheaths, joints and periosteum of the digital bones were often affected. Animals shot during winter showed severe chronic periostitis and osteomyelitis and necrotizing deforming arthritis. Microscopically, skin...

  7. 具核梭杆菌在牙菌斑生物膜中的作用%The role of Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque biofilms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛红蕾(综述); 杨德琴(审校)

    2013-01-01

    具核梭杆菌广泛存在于牙菌斑生物膜中,在生物膜的形成、演替、代谢交流及水平基因转移方面起着重要的作用。具核梭杆菌在维护口腔微生态环境动态平衡的过程中具有重要意义。本文就具核梭杆菌在牙菌斑生物膜中发挥的作用作一综述。%Fusobacterium nucleatum(F. nucleatum)?is?a?prominent?component?in?dental?plaque?biofilms.?It?is?also?regarded?as?a?key?organism?for?dental?plaque?biofilm?formation,?shifts,?metabolic?exchanges,?and?horizontal?gene?transfer.?Meanwhile,?F. nucleatum?is?an?important?pathogen?implicated?in?periodontitis?and?dental?caries,?and?it?acts?as?a?“bridge”?of?coaggregation?between?supragingival?and?subgingival?plaque?microbiota.?In?summary,?F. nucleatum?significantly?affects?oral?health?balance.?This?review?focused?on?F. nucleatum?and?its?role?in?the?ecology?of?dental?plaque?biofilms.

  8. Tea polyphenols inhibit the activation of NF-κB and the secretion of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases by macrophages stimulated with Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagha, Amel Ben; Grenier, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum has been associated with both periodontal disease and inflammatory bowel disease. This Gram-negative bacterium possesses a high inflammatory potential that may contribute to the disease process. We hypothesized that green and black tea polyphenols attenuate the inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages mediated by F. nucleatum. We first showed that the tea extracts, EGCG and theaflavins reduce the NF-κB activation induced by F. nucleatum in monocytes. Since NF-κB is a key regulator of genes coding for inflammatory mediators, we tested the effects of tea polyphenols on secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and CXCL8 by macrophages. A pre-treatment of macrophages with the tea extracts, EGCG, or theaflavins prior to a stimulation with F. nucleatum significantly inhibited the secretion of all four cytokines and reduced the secretion of MMP-3 and MMP-9, two tissue destructive enzymes. TREM-1 expressed by macrophages is a cell-surface receptor involved in the propagation of the inflammatory response to bacterial challenges. Interestingly, tea polyphenols inhibited the secretion/shedding of soluble TREM-1 induced by a stimulation of macrophages with F. nucleatum. The anti-inflammatory properties of tea polyphenols identified in the present study suggested that they may be promising agents for the prevention and/or treatment of periodontal disease and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27694921

  9. Identification of an L-methionine γ-lyase involved in the production of hydrogen sulfide from L-cysteine in Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwabe, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Yasuo; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2011-10-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum produces an abundance of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the oral cavity that is mediated by several enzymes. The identification and characterization of three distinct enzymes (Fn0625, Fn1055 and Fn1220) in F. nucleatum that catalyse the production of H(2)S from l-cysteine have been reported. In the current study, a novel enzyme involved in the production of H(2)S in F. nucleatum ATCC 25586, whose molecular mass had been estimated to be approximately 130 kDa, was identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS. The enzyme, Fn1419, has previously been characterized as an l-methionine γ-lyase. SDS-PAGE and gel-filtration chromatography indicated that Fn1419 has a molecular mass of 43 kDa and forms tetramers in solution. Unlike other enzymes associated with H(2)S production in F. nucleatum, the quaternary structure of Fn1419 was not completely disrupted by exposure to SDS. The purified recombinant enzyme exhibited a K(m) of 0.32±0.02 mM and a k(cat) of 0.69±0.01 s(-1). Based on current and published data, the enzymic activity for H(2)S production from l-cysteine in F. nucleatum is ranked as follows: Fn1220>Fn1055>Fn1419>Fn0625. Based on kinetic values and relative mRNA levels of the respective genes, as determined by real-time quantitative PCR, the amount of H(2)S produced by Fn1419 was estimated to be 1.9 % of the total H(2)S produced from l-cysteine in F. nucleatum ATCC 25586. In comparison, Fn1220 appeared to contribute significantly to H(2)S production (87.6 %).

  10. [Lemierre's syndrome as differential diagnosis of lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt Jensen, Jacob; Weinreich, Ulla Møller

    2012-05-28

    Lemierre's syndrome is a disseminated infection which is usually caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. An oropharyngeal infection progresses to a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and later metastatic infections throughout the body occur. We present a clinical case in which a patient, initially presenting with symptoms characteristic of pulmonary cancer, turned out to have a rare variant of Lemierre's syndrome caused by Fusobacterium nucleatum.

  11. Cell Based Drug Delivery: Micrococcus luteus Loaded Neutrophils as Chlorhexidine Delivery Vehicles in a Mouse Model of Liver Abscesses in Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian O Wendel

    Full Text Available The recent WHO report on antibiotic resistances shows a dramatic increase of microbial resistance against antibiotics. With only a few new antibiotics in the pipeline, a different drug delivery approach is urgently needed. We have obtained evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of a cell based drug delivery system that utilizes the innate immune system as targeting carrier for antibacterial drugs. In this study we show the efficient loading of neutrophil granulocytes with chlorhexidine and the complete killing of E. coli as well as Fusobacterium necrophorum in in-vitro studies. Fusobacterium necrophorum causes hepatic abscesses in cattle fed high grain diets. We also show in a mouse model that this delivery system targets infections of F. necrophorum in the liver and reduces the bacterial burden by an order of magnitude from approximately 2•106 to 1•105.

  12. Cell Based Drug Delivery: Micrococcus luteus Loaded Neutrophils as Chlorhexidine Delivery Vehicles in a Mouse Model of Liver Abscesses in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Sebastian O; Menon, Sailesh; Alshetaiwi, Hamad; Shrestha, Tej B; Chlebanowski, Lauren; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Bossmann, Stefan H; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Troyer, Deryl L

    2015-01-01

    The recent WHO report on antibiotic resistances shows a dramatic increase of microbial resistance against antibiotics. With only a few new antibiotics in the pipeline, a different drug delivery approach is urgently needed. We have obtained evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of a cell based drug delivery system that utilizes the innate immune system as targeting carrier for antibacterial drugs. In this study we show the efficient loading of neutrophil granulocytes with chlorhexidine and the complete killing of E. coli as well as Fusobacterium necrophorum in in-vitro studies. Fusobacterium necrophorum causes hepatic abscesses in cattle fed high grain diets. We also show in a mouse model that this delivery system targets infections of F. necrophorum in the liver and reduces the bacterial burden by an order of magnitude from approximately 2•106 to 1•105.

  13. Comparing culture and molecular methods for the identification of microorganisms involved in necrotizing soft tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Vibeke Børsholt; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Xu, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    made including infection by a) Acinetobacter baumannii, b) Streptococcus pneumoniae, and c) fungi, mycoplasma and Fusobacterium necrophorum. CONCLUSION: The study emphasizes that many pathogens can be involved in NSTIs, and that no specific "NSTI causing" combination of species exists. This means...

  14. Direct 16S rRNA gene sequencing of polymicrobial culture-negative samples with analysis of mixed chromatograms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmeyer, Gitte N; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2010-01-01

    Two cases involving polymicrobial culture-negative samples were investigated by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, with analysis of mixed chromatograms. Fusobacterium necrophorum, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus constellatus were identified from pleural fluid in a patient with Lemierre's syndrome...

  15. Revisiting bovine pyometra-New insights into the disease using a culture-independent deep sequencing approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lif Rødtness Vesterby; Karstrup, Cecilia Christensen; Pedersen, Hanne Gervi;

    2015-01-01

    The bacteria present in the uterus during pyometra have previously been studied using bacteriological culturing. These studies identified Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes as the major contributors to the pathogenesis of pyometra. However, an increasing number of culture-independ...... rights reserved....

  16. 21 CFR 520.2260c - Sulfamethazine sustained-release tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520... grams (1 tablet) per 45 pounds of body weight as a single dose. (2) Indications for use. In calves for... Escherichia coli; and calf diptheria caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. (3) Limitations. If there is...

  17. FAD-I, a Fusobacterium nucleatum Cell Wall-Associated Diacylated Lipoprotein That Mediates Human Beta Defensin 2 Induction through Toll-Like Receptor-1/2 (TLR-1/2) and TLR-2/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Santosh K; Shokeen, Bhumika; Eapan, Betty; Lux, Renate; Kiselar, Janna; Nithianantham, Stanley; Young, Andrew; Pandiyan, Pushpa; McCormick, Thomas S; Weinberg, Aaron

    2016-05-01

    We previously identified a cell wall-associated protein from Fusobacterium nucleatum, a Gram-negative bacterium of the oral cavity, that induces human beta defensin 2 (hBD-2) in primary human oral epithelial cells (HOECs) and designated it FAD-I (Fusobacterium-associated defensin inducer). Here, we report differential induction of hBD-2 by different strains of F. nucleatum; ATCC 25586 and ATCC 23726 induce significantly more hBD-2 mRNA than ATCC 10953. Heterologous expression of plasmid-borne fadI from the highly hBD-2-inducing strains in a ΔfadI mutant of ATCC 10953 resulted in hBD-2 induction to levels comparable to those of the highly inducing strains, indicating that FAD-I is the principal F. nucleatum agent for hBD-2 induction in HOECs. Moreover, anti-FAD-I antibodies blocked F. nucleatum induction of hBD-2 by more than 80%. Recombinant FAD-I (rFAD-I) expressed in Escherichia coli triggered levels of hBD-2 transcription and peptide release in HOECs similar to those of native FAD-I (nFAD-I) isolated from F. nucleatum ATCC 25586. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed a diacylglycerol modification at the cysteine residue in position 16 for both nFAD-I and rFAD-I. Cysteine-to-alanine substitution abrogated FAD-I's ability to induce hBD-2. Finally, FAD-I activation of hBD-2 expression was mediated via both Toll-like receptor-1/2 (TLR-1/2) and TLR-2/6 heterodimerization. Microbial molecules like FAD-I may be utilized in novel therapeutic ways to bolster the host innate immune response at mucosal surfaces.

  18. Lemierre syndrome presenting as acute mastoiditis in a 2-year-old girl with congenital dwarfism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason B. Fischer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre syndrome is defined by septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein caused by Fusobacterium. Historically, these infections originate from the oropharynx and typically are seen in older children, adolescents and young adults. More recently, otogenic sources in younger children have been described with increasing frequency. We present a case of a two-year old, who initially developed an otitis media with perforation of the tympanic membrane and went on to develop mastoiditis and non-occlusive thrombosis of the venous sinus and right internal jugular vein. Fusobacterium necrophorum was grown from operative cultures of the mastoid, ensuing computed tomography scan revealed occlusion of the internal jugular vein and the patient was successfully treated with clindamycin, ciprofloxacin and enoxaparin. This case demonstrates the importance of considering Fusobacterium in otogenic infections and the consideration of Lemierre syndrome when F. necrophorum is identified.

  19. Susceptibilities of bovine summer mastitis bacteria to antimicrobial agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Jousimies-Somer, H; Pyörälä, S.; Kanervo, A

    1996-01-01

    The susceptibility to 9 antimicrobial agents of 32 aerobic bacterial isolates and to 10 antimicrobial agents of 37 anaerobic bacterial isolates from 23 cases of bovine summer mastitis (16 Actinomyces pyogenes isolates, 8 Streptococcus dysgalactiae isolates, 3 S. uberis isolates, 3 S. acidominimus isolates, 2 Streptococcus spp., 15 Peptostreptococcus indolicus isolates, 10 Fusobacterium necrophorum isolates, and 12 isolates of anaerobic gram-negative rods) was determined by the agar dilution m...

  20. Comparison of Lactoperoxidase System in Saliva and Buffer Solution on the Inhibition of the Growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum%不同溶液中乳过氧化物酶系统对Pg和Fn的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红旭; 胡德渝

    2005-01-01

    比较唾液和缓冲液对含硫氰酸根离子(SCN -)或I -的乳过氧化物酶(LP)抗菌系统抑制牙龈卟啉单胞菌(Porphyromonas gingivalis,Pg)和具核梭杆菌(Fusobacterium nucleatum,Fn) 生长的影响.以Pg(6.0×10 8 /mL)为例,根据所含底物不同,将实验分 2 大组:第 1 大组(含SCN -),分 3 小组:Saliva(对照组),Saliva+(LP-SCN -)组,Buffer+(LP-SCN -)组;第 2 大组(含I -)分 3 小组:Saliva(对照组),Saliva+(LP-I -)组,Buffer+(LP-I -) 组;各组均含H 2O 2(对照组除外),Fn (1.0×10 8 /mL) 分组同Pg.将 2 大组分别在 37 ℃震荡水浴培养 30 min和 60 min,5 μL DTT终止反应,10 倍浓度系列稀释,接种于BHI-S琼脂培养基厌氧培养 4 d并记数CFU.反应至 30 min时,实验组抑制Pg和Fn生长的作用明显高于对照组(P<0.05),Buffer+(LP-I -) 组抑制Pg和Fn生长的作用明显高于Saliva+(LP-I -) 组,且持续到 60 min(P<0.05);反应 60 min时,Buffer+(LP-SCN -) 组抑制Pg生长的作用明显高于Saliva+(LP-SCN -) 组(P<0.05).LP系统在唾液和缓冲液中均能有效抑制Pg和Fn的生长,但是唾液的存在可削弱LP抗菌系统的抑菌作用.

  1. In vivo dynamics of Streptococcus spp.and Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque biofilm analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization%荧光原位杂交观察口腔原位菌斑中链球菌和具核梭杆菌的动态变化的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘靖; 王韦玮; 胡凡; 陈武

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察口腔原位菌斑形成过程中链球菌和具核梭杆菌的动态变化.方法 专业洁治后,7个志愿者佩戴可形成口内菌斑生物膜以供原位菌斑研究的上颌装置,分别佩戴12 h、1d、2d、3d、5d后,取下样本,与链球菌和具核梭杆菌的特异性寡核苷酸探针进行荧光原位杂交,于激光共聚焦显微镜下观察菌斑生物膜的形成过程及2种细菌在菌斑形成发育中的分布及比例.结果 菌斑生物膜厚度由5.26 μm逐渐发育增加为46.93 μm.12h细菌仅形成平铺片状,链球菌占绝大多数,未见具核梭杆菌;此后细菌排列趋于密集,菌斑厚度逐渐增加,最后形成团块状菌斑.链球菌在2、3d菌斑中比例下降;具核梭杆菌在5d菌斑中比例比3d上升107%.结论 链球菌在早期菌斑中为优势菌,具核梭杆菌在菌斑发育中期数量逐渐增加.2种细菌在菌斑形成中起到重要作用.%Objective To quantify formation and composition of Streptococcus spp. And Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque u-sing fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Methods After professional toothcleaning, seven volunteers had to wear a special acrylic appliance, in which six specimens were inserted to allow the build-up of intra-oral biofilms. After (12 h/1 d/2 d/3 d/5 d) wearing, the specimens with the adhering biofilms were removed from the splints and stained with three oligonu-cleotide probes. Under the confocal laser scanning microscope, biofilm thickness (BT) was evaluated. Formation and composition of Streptococcus spp. And Fusobacterium nucleatum in dental plaque were examined the biofilms were scanned and digital images were made. Results The thickness of formed biofilm increased from 5. 26 jjum after 12 hours after wearing to 46. 93 u,m 5 days after wearing. Streptococcus spp. Were predominant in 1 -day-old dental plaque and decreased 2 days later( P < 0.05 ). Compared to the first day

  2. Rare but numerous serious complications of acute otitis media in a young child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Munster, Mariëtte P E; Brus, Frank; Mul, Dick

    2013-03-12

    Acute otitis media is a very common disease in children. Most children recover with symptomatic therapy like potent analgesics, but occasionally serious complications occur. We present a 3-year-old girl who suffered from acute otitis media for already 2 weeks and presented with fever, abducens nerve palsy of her left eye and vomiting. She was finally diagnosed with an acute otitis media complicated by a mastoiditis, sinus thrombosis, meningitis and cerebellar empyema. Fusobacterium necrophorum was cultured from cerebrospinal fluid. The girl recovered following appropriate antibiotic and anticoagulation treatment.

  3. Behandling af peritonsillær absces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthonsen, Kristian; Trolle, Waldemar

    2012-01-01

    Peritonsillar abscess (PTA) is associated with high morbidity and can cause serious and life-threatening complications. In Denmark, the most commonly isolated bacteria are Fusobacterium necrophorum and Streptococcus pyogenes gr. A. The incidence of PTA in Denmark is 41/100,000/year, the highest...... incidence ever reported for PTA. There is no definite consensus on the treatment. We recommend most patients treated with puncture and antibiotics as outpatients, and if necessary acute tonsillectomy instead of interval tonsillectomy. Steroids may be of value....

  4. Lemierre's Syndrome Associated with Periodontal Injury-derived Odontogenic Infection that Did Not Respond to Meropenem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Morihiko; Tanimoto, Takao; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Hakozaki, Yukiya

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old previously healthy man injured his gums and subsequently developed dyspnea and fever. A chest X-ray showed nodules and infiltrates in both lungs, and the patient was initially diagnosed with pneumonia and administered meropenem hydrate, although his symptoms did not improve. A blood culture identified Fusobacterium necrophorum, and thrombophlebitis in the internal jugular vein of the neck was observed on computed tomography and ultrasound scans. We replaced the meropenem with clindamycin, sulbactam/ampicillin and metronidazole, and the patient's symptoms improved.

  5. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  6. Effects of methanol on the growth of gastrointestinal anaerobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, D.R. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The effects of methanol on the growth of representative, predominant, anaerobic gut bacteria were studied. Growth yields and rates were determined in a base medium to which methanol was added to produce media with methanol concentrations varying, in twofold steps, over a concentration range of 0.01 to 25%, by volume. The growth of many of the organisms were completely inhibited by a methanol concentration equal to, or less than, 6.2%. Isolates representing cellulolytic species were completely inhibited at a methanol concentration of 3.1%, and inhibitory effects on the yield of some cellulolytic isolates were found at a methanol concentration as small as 0.01%. Although most of the organisms studied were inhibited at relatively small methanol concentrations, isolates of Selenomonas ruminantium, Bacteroides ovatus, and Fusobacterium necrophorum were relatively methanol resistant. A methanol concentration of 12.5% was required to completely inhibit S. ruminantium. Substantial growth of B. ovatus was obtained in media containing 12.5% methanol, and for F. necrophorum, substantial growth occurred in media containing 25% methanol. The yields of F. necrophorum strain B85 and S. ruminantum strain PC18 were enhanced by relatively small methanol concentrations and reduced with further methanol concentration increase. Anaerobic, nonsporing gut bacteria exhibit a diversity of responses to methanol. 12 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Studies on some characteristics of hydrogen production by cell-free extracts of rumen anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, A E; Winter, W T; Godbout, D M

    1977-03-01

    Hydrogen production was studied in the following rumen anaerobes: Bacteroides clostridiiformis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Enbacterium limosum, Fusobacterium necrophorum, Megasphaera elsdenii, Ruminococcus albus, and Ruminococcus flavefaciens. Clostridium pasteurianum and Escherichia coli were included for comparative purposes. Hydrogen production from dithionite, dithionite-reduced methyl viologen, pyruvate, and formate was determined. All species tested produced hydrogen from dithionite-reduce methyl viologen, but only C. pasteurianum, B. clostridiiformis, E. limosum, and M. elsdenii produced hydrogen from dithionite. All species except E. coli produced hydrogen from pyruvate, but activity was low or absent in extracts of E. limosum, F. necrophorum, R. albus, and R. flavefaciens unless methyl viologen was added. Hydrogen was produced from formate only by E. coli, B. clostridiiformis, E. limosum, F. necrophorum, and R. flavefaciens. Extracts were subjected to ultracentrifugation in an effort to determine the solubility of hydrogenase. The hydrogenase of all species except E. coli appeared to be soluble, although variable amounts of hydrogenase activity were detected in the pellet. Treatment of extracts of the rumen microbial species with DEAE-cellulose resulted in loss ofhydrogen production from pyruvate. Activity was restored by the addition of methyl viologen. It is concluded that hydrogen production in these rumen microorganisms is similar to that in the saccharolytic clostridia.

  8. Bacterial invasion of the uterus and oviducts in bovine pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstrup, C C; Pedersen, H G; Jensen, T K; Agerholm, J S

    2017-04-15

    Pyometra is a common disease of cattle that causes infertility and thereby financial losses to the cattle industry. Bacteria involved in the development and progression of pyometra have been investigated by microbial culture but their tissue invading abilities, which is an important aspect of bacterial pathogenicity and development of lesions, have not been investigated. Bacterial invasion of the uterus and oviducts was studied in 21 cows diagnosed with pyometra at the time of slaughter by applying fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes targeting 16S ribosomal RNA of Fusobacterium necrophorum, Porphyromonas levii, Trueperella pyogenes and the overall bacterial domain Bacteria. Fusobacterium necrophorum and P. levii were found to invade the endometrium, especially if the endometrium was ulcerated, and penetrated deep into the lamina propria. These species co-localized within the tissue thus indicating a synergism. Trueperella pyogenes did not invade the uterine tissue. In addition to endometrial lesions, most cows with pyometra also had salpingitis but without significant bacterial invasion of the oviductal wall.

  9. Study of Antagonistic Effects of Sanguicin on Salivary Biofilm of Porphyromonas Gingivalis and Fusobacterium Nucleatum in Vitro.%血链球菌细菌素对唾液生物膜中牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌拮抗作用的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晟利; 李旭明; 王琪波; 李海清; 李春梅

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects ot sanguicin extracted from streptococcus sanguis on salivary biofilm of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F.n) in vitro.Methods: Ultrasonic, centrifugation and ammonium sulfate were used to extract sanguicin.The minimal inhibitory concentration(MIC) of sanguicin against P.g and F.n was measured by the broth dilution technique.Biofilms formed by P.g and F.n were observed by confocal laser scan microscope(CLSM) to determine the percentage of vital cells.Results: The MIC of Sanguicin on planktonic P.g and F.n was 0.5mg/ml and the percentage of vital bacteria of biofilm reduced significantly after using Sanguicin (P<0.05).Conclusion: Sanguicin is an effective anti-P.g and F.n agent in both planktonic and the biofilms.%目的:提取血链球菌标准菌株(ATCC10556)细菌素,研究其对唾液生物膜中牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌的拮抗作用.方法:通过超声破碎,高速离心,盐析等方法提取血链球菌细菌素;采用二倍稀释法,测定血链球菌细菌素对浮游状态下牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌的最小抑制浓度(MIC);在体外建立牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌唾液生物膜模型,利用激光共聚焦扫描电镜观察该生物膜中细菌活性的变化.结果:血链球菌细菌素对浮游状态下的牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌的MIC为0.5 g/L;使用血链球菌细菌素作用牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌生物膜,活菌百分比显著下降,与对照组相比具有显著性差异(P<0.05).结论:血链球菌细菌素对浮游状态下和生物膜中的牙龈卟啉单胞菌和具核梭杆菌生长均有显著的抑制作用.

  10. Revisiting bovine pyometra--new insights into the disease using a culture-independent deep sequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Lif Rødtness Vesterby; Karstrup, Cecilia Christensen; Pedersen, Hanne Gervi; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Klitgaard, Kirstine

    2015-02-25

    The bacteria present in the uterus during pyometra have previously been studied using bacteriological culturing. These studies identified Fusobacterium necrophorum and Trueperella pyogenes as the major contributors to the pathogenesis of pyometra. However, an increasing number of culture-independent studies have demonstrated that the bacterial diversity in most environments is underestimated in culture-based studies. Consequently, fastidious pyometra-associated pathogens may have been overlooked. Therefore, the primary purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of bacteria in the uterus of cows with pyometra by using culture-independent 16S rRNA PCR combined with next generation sequencing. We investigated the microbial composition in the uterus of 21 cows with pyometra, which were obtained from a Danish slaughterhouse. Similar to the observations from the culture studies, Fusobacteriaceae, the family that F. necrophorum belongs to, was the operational taxonomic unit (OTU) observed in the largest quantities. By contrast, the Actinomycetaceae family, which includes T. pyogenes, constituted only 1% of the total number of reads. Thus we cannot confirm the previously reported role of species from this family in the pathogenesis of pyometra. Finally, we identified a large number of sequences representing three families of Gram-negative bacteria in the pyometra samples: Porphyromonadaceae, Mycoplasmataceae, and Pasteurellaceae. It is likely that these families comprise potential pathogenic species of a fastidious nature, which have been overlooked in previous studies. Our results increase the knowledge of the complexity of the pyometra microbiota and suggest that pathogens in addition to F. necrophorum may be involved in the pathogenesis of pyometra.

  11. ITIH4 (inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain 4) is a new acute-phase protein isolated from cattle during experimental infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pineiro, M.; Andres, M.; Iturralde, M.;

    2004-01-01

    We have isolated from calf serum a protein with an apparent M, of 120,000. The protein was detected by using antibodies against major acute-phase protein in pigs with acute inflammation. The amino acid sequence of an internal fragment revealed that this protein is the bovine counterpart of ITIH4......, the heavy chain 4 of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor family. The response of this protein in the sera was determined for animals during experimental bacterial and viral infections. In the bacterial model, animals were inoculated with a mixture of Actinomyces pyogenes, Fusobacterium necrophorum....... Because of the significant induction of the protein in the animals in the mastitis and BRSV infection models, we can conclude that ITIH4 is a new positive acute-phase protein in cattle....

  12. Emphysematous osteomyelitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luey, Christopher; Tooley, Debbie; Briggs, Simon

    2012-03-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with pelvic and sacral emphysematous osteomyelitis caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum. This infection was cured following four surgical procedures and 4 weeks of intravenous then 4 weeks of oral antibiotics. We review our case alongside the 24 previously reported cases of emphysematous osteomyelitis in the literature. The 25 cases include 15 monomicrobial and 10 polymicrobial infections. The causative organism(s) in all but three cases included an anaerobe or a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family. A significant underlying comorbidity was reported in 18 cases. At least 15 cases required one or more surgical procedures. There was a significant associated mortality with eight (32%) patients dying in hospital at 7 to 56 days after the diagnosis of emphysematous osteomyelitis.

  13. Lemierre syndrome: study of 11 cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righini, Christian Adrien; Karkas, Alexandre; Tourniaire, Romain; N'Gouan, Jean-Michel; Schmerber, Sébastien; Reyt, Emile; Atallah, Ihab

    2014-07-01

    Lemierre syndrome is a rare but serious illness that associates throat infection and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) or one of its tributaries with subsequent distant septic emboli. The purpose of our study was to review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and treatment of this disease. Patients with confirmed Lemierre syndrome were included in our retrospective monocentric study. All patients had bacteriologic analyses as well as radiologic imaging. There were 11 patients in our study (from 1998-2012). Fusobacterium necrophorum was responsible for the infection in 45% of cases. Surgical drainage of pharyngeal, cervical, or mediastinal abscesses was carried out in 8 cases. All patients received broad-spectrum antibiotics. Six patients were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). One patient (9%) died. Treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics is the primary choice of treatment of Lemierre syndrome. Surgery is indicated in case of abscess formation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A case of Lemierre's syndrome with septic shock and complicated parapneumonic effusions requiring intrapleural fibrinolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Croft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre's syndrome is a septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein, which can lead to severe systemic illness. We report a case of an otherwise healthy 26-year-old man who suffered from pharyngitis followed by septic shock requiring intubation and vasopressor support from Fusobacterium necrophorum bacteremia. The septic emboli to his lungs caused complicated bilateral parapneumonic effusions, which recurred after initial drainage. He required bilateral chest tubes and intrapleural tPA to successfully drain his effusions. His fever curve and overall condition improved with the resolution of his effusions and after a 33-day hospitalization, he recovered without significant disability. The severity of his illness and difficult to manage complicated parapneumonic effusions were the unique facets of this case. Using an evidence-based approach of tPA and DNase for complicated parapneumonic effusions in Lemierre's syndrome can be safe and effective.

  15. [Design of artificial foetor flatus based on bacterial volatile compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2016-12-12

    Excessive flatulence can be a huge social problem. The purpose of this study was to design artificial flatus from bacterial volatile compounds to stimulate research into neutralizing measures. Anaerobic bacteria, representing a broad spectrum, from a recognized international culture collection were included. The strains were incubated in an anaerobic jar. After 24 hours the lid was removed, and the odour was evaluated by a specialist in clinical microbiology. Four different anaerobic strains were chosen for further studies based on their individual odours. In total, seven different combinations of two or three strains were tested. The combination of Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285, Clostridium difficile ATCC 700057 and Fusobacterium necrophorum ATCC 25286 was chosen as it had a suitably foul odour. It is possible to design artificial flatus from bacterial volatile compounds. The method is easy and inexpensive and can stimulate further research into neutralizing measures. none. none.

  16. Severe Sepsis Associated with Lemierre’s Syndrome: A Rare but Life-Threatening Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Tawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of Lemierre’s syndrome has increased in the past decade. This posttonsillitis complication may be life threatening. Case Presentation. A 19-year-old patient was admitted to Surgical Intensive Care Unit of a French University Hospital for high fever, low blood pressure, and haemoptysis following a sore throat episode. Blood analysis revealed a thrombopenia, an acute renal failure, and an elevated lactate serum. Fusobacterium necrophorum was found in blood cultures. Computed tomography of the neck and lungs confirmed the diagnosis of Lemierre’s syndrome: pleural effusions, bilateral lung infiltrates, and an internal jugular vein thrombosis. Fluid administration and antibiotic treatment were quickly initiated. Patient left the unit four days after his admission without any organ dysfunction. Conclusion. Lemierre’s syndrome may lead to multiorgan dysfunction and should be rapidly identified.

  17. [Noma in a 4 year-old girl: a case report from Chad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocquempot, K; Javaudin, O; Lerasle, P; Aigle, L

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a 4-year-old girl in Chad with noma, also called cancrum oris. This acute gangrenous stomatitis has a combined morbidity-mortality rate that can reach 70%. It occurs worldwide but is most common in sub-Saharan Africa in children aged 2 to 16 years. Its pathogenesis is uncertain, but several bacteria including Fusobacterium necrophorum, Prevotella intermedia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be responsible for the development of noma, which develops over the oral lesions these bacteria cause. Poverty is its most important risk factor. Due to its rapid course and high lethality, it requires emergency treatment with antibiotics, daily dressing of the lesion, and nutritional rehabilitation. Surgical removal of the remaining necrotic tissue can be followed by reconstructive procedures. Physical and speech therapy should be initiated to prevent functional complications.

  18. [Noma/Cancrum oris: a neglected disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moro, Maria; García-Merino, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Angel; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-Sánchez, José Elías

    2015-10-01

    Noma is an aggressive orofacial gangrenous pathology that damages hard and soft tissues of the mouth and the face. Throughout the centuries it has been present around the globe, but nowadays it has practically disappeared from developed countries and mainly affects children from the most disadvantaged places, especially in Africa. Noma disease is a multifactorial process; malnutrition, debilitating diseases (bacterial or viral systemic diseases, HIV-associated immunosuppression, etc.) and intraoral infections are some of the factors implied. The characteristic tissue necrosis is produced by a polymicrobial infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Bacillus cereus, Trueperella pyogenes, spyrochetes, etc, are some of the species that have been isolated from the affected areas. Without treatment, noma is lethal in a short period of time, and the patients that survive show severe sequelae that hinder their life and interpersonal relationships. The aim of this paper is to unify the existing information and to promote wider knowledge and awareness among the population.

  19. Microbiota anaeróbia isolada de bovinos com pododermatite Anaerobic bacterial species isolated from bovines with pododermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Silva

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo isolar e identificar espécies bacterianas anaeróbias presentes nos pés de bovinos portadores de vários graus de pododermatite. Foram utilizados 60 bovinos, distribuídos em quatro grupos de 15. O grupo I foi constituído por animais saudáveis e serviu de controle; o grupo II, por bovinos na fase inicial do processo; o grupo III, por animais portadores de pododermatite interdigital vegetativa e o grupo IV, por bovinos portadores de pododermatite necrosante. Foram colhidos fragmentos de tecido interdigital para cultura e as principais espécies bacterianas isoladas foram: Dichelobacter nodosus nos grupos II, III e IV e Fusobacterium necrophorum nos grupos III e IV, com freqüências de 26,7%, 6,7%, 20,0%, 6,7% e de 13,3%, respectivamente. Encontraram-se também Fusobacterium symbiosum em 40,0% no gb>rupo I, 6,7% no grupo II, 13,3% no grupo III e 13,3% no grupo IV, Bacteroides sp. em 6,7% nos grupos I e IV, Bacteroides ruminatus em 33,3% no grupo I, 6,7% no grupo II, 33,3% no grupo III e 13,3% no grupo IV, Bacteroides oralis em 6,7% no grupo III e Fusobacterium mortiferum em 6,7% no grupo IV.The objective of this study was to isolate and identify the anaerobic bacteria species in bovine with different degrees of pododermatitis. Sixty bovines were divided into four groups of 15 as follows: group I included healthy animals, used as control; group II with animals in the initial phase of the process; group III, with animals displaying interdigital skin hyperplasia and group IV with animals with footrot. Interdigital tissue fragments were collected and processed for isolation and identification of anaerobic agents. The bacteria species isolated were: Dichelobacter nodosus in groups II, III and IV and Fusobacterium necrophorum only in groups III and IV, with frequencies of 26.7%, 6.7%, and 20.0% for the former and 6.7% and 13.3% for the latter, respectively. In addition, Fusobacterium symbiosum was present in

  20. Decreased interleukin-2 responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis in generalized aggressive periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Tanja Skuldbøl; Løbner, Morten; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compromised T-cell responses to periodontal pathogens may contribute to the pathogenesis of generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP). In this study, we attempted to characterize T-helper cell (Th1, Th2, and Th17) responses in patients with GAgP and healthy controls upon stimulation...... with GAgP to Pg and Fn combined with adequate IL-2 responses to TT suggest an impaired antigen-specific T-cell reactivity with periodontal pathogens in GAgP. The decreased IFN-gamma responses of smokers within the patient group suggest that smoking may aggravate this impairment....

  1. A case of adolescent pelvic inflammatory disease caused by a rare bacterium: Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Allison; Black, Amanda Y; Lortie, Karine; Fleming, Nathalie A

    2013-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a polymicrobial infection that typically occurs in sexually active females. PID is rare in premenarchal and/or noncoital young women; however, there are case reports of PID occurring in virginal females. We present the first reported case of PID associated with F. nucleatum. In this unusual case of PID in an adolescent, the responsible organism may have originated from the patient's oral cavity. A 13-year-old noncoital Caucasian female presented to a tertiary children's hospital with fever and acute abdominal/pelvic pain. She had experienced a perforated appendix 14 months prior, which was treated by laparoscopy. Postoperatively, she experienced intermittent episodes of recurrent abdominal pain. During this presentation, the physical examination and ultrasound findings were suspicious for an ovarian torsion. She was taken to the operating room where she had an examination under anesthesia and a diagnostic laparoscopy. Findings at the time of laparoscopy were in keeping with a diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease. Oral and pelvic fluid cultures were positive for F. nucleatum. She was subsequently treated with antibiotics and her symptoms resolved. This case highlights the importance of including PID in the differential diagnosis of noncoital adolescent females presenting with an acute abdomen. Although most Fusobacteria infections are periodontal in nature, translocated infections to the pelvis may have long-term implications for reproductive health. This case also highlights the importance of the role of diagnostic laparoscopy in young women who have persistent pain following previous surgery due to the potential of missed pathology or subclinical infection. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lemierre’s syndrome: current perspectives on diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannesen KM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Katrine M Johannesen,1 Uffe Bodtger1–3 1Department of Lung Medicine, Naestved Hospital, Naestved, 2Institute for Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 3Department of Pulmonology, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark Abstract: This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre’s syndrome (LS in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and/or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre-antibiotic era but has diminished with the advent of antibiotics. This review showed a mortality rate of only 2% of which none of the cases involved fusobacteria. Duration of treatment varied; a 4–6-week course of carbapenem or piperacillin/tazobactam in combination with metronidazole was optimum. Other treatment options included anticoagulants in 46% of cases, which is unwarrantedly high, as to date, no evidence of the positive effects of anticoagulants in LS exists. Only two cases had ligation of the internal jugular vein performed. This review confirms the rare, but severe aspects of LS. Mortality from LS in this day and age appears to be low, however the syndrome is difficult to recognize, and still requires the full attention of the clinician. Keywords: Lemierre’s syndrome

  3. A molecular epidemiology of treponemes in beef cattle digital dermatitis lesions and comparative analyses with sheep contagious ovine digital dermatitis and dairy cattle digital dermatitis lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, L E; Evans, N J; Blowey, R W; Grove-White, D H; Clegg, S R; Duncan, J S; Carter, S D

    2015-07-09

    Bovine digital dermatitis (BDD) is an infective foot disease commonly reported in dairy cattle where Treponema are considered as the primary causative infectious agents. There still remains little definitive information on the etiology of BDD in beef cattle suggesting further investigations are warranted. Beef BDD lesions (n=34) and healthy beef foot tissues (n=38) were analysed by PCR for three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and also for Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. Spirochete culture was attempted on all BDD lesion samples. One or more BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups were detected in 100% of beef BDD lesions. "Treponema medium/Treponema vincentii-like", "Treponema phagedenis-like" and Treponema pedis spirochetes were identified in 27/34 (79%), 31/34 (91%) and 24/34 (71%) of BDD lesions, respectively. No BDD-associated treponeme DNA was amplified from beef healthy foot tissues. D. nodosus and F. necrophorum were present in 24/34 (71%) and 15/34 (44%) of lesions and 10/38 (26%) and 12/38 (32%) of healthy foot tissues, respectively. Twenty spirochetes were isolated from beef BDD lesions; 19 were representatives of the three BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups. One spirochete isolate shared less than 97% 16S rRNA gene similarity to the three cultivable BDD-associated Treponema phylogroups and therefore may represent a novel taxa of Treponema. Upon comparison, sheep contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD), dairy cattle and beef cattle BDD lesions appear to have extremely similar bacteriological data and therefore provides evidence of a shared etiopathogenesis posing concerns for cross-species transmission. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evolução Atípica de Angina de Plaut-Vincent em Criança: Relato de Caso/Atypical Evolution of Plaut-Vincent’s Angina in Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Fortes Lima

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A angina de Plaut-Vincent é uma afecção úlcero-necrótica causada pela simbiose de um bacilo fusiforme (Fusobacterium necrophorum e um espirilo (Borrelia vincenti. Ambos são agentes saprófitas habituais da cavidade oral, porém, quando associados, determinam o caráter patogênico da doença. Casuística: Trata-se do caso de uma paciente do sexo feminino, 4 anos de idade, que deu entrada no pronto socorro com choque séptico descompensado não responsivo a volume com necessidade de drogas vasoativas (DVA, além de má conservação dentária, e amigdalas necrosadas. Em 48h evoluiu com piora hemodinâmica refratária a DVA e introdução de hidrocortisona, com crises convulsivas e hemiplegia à esquerda. Foi solicitada TC crânio a qual evidenciou AVC isquêmico. Discussão: Ocorre geralmente em condições de desnutrição e má higiene oral, tendo sua maior incidência entre os adultos-jovens e adolescentes. Cursa com necrose das amigdalas, halitose intensa e disfagia. Conclusão: Considerando que a Angina de Plaut-Vincent acomete principalmente adultos jovens, torna-se de grande relevância relatar o caso de uma paciente pediátrica, que evoluiu de forma incomum, apresentando lesões isquêmicas cerebrovasculares. Introduction: Plaut–Vincent’s angina is an ulcer-necrotic disease caused by the symbiosis of a fusiform bacillus (Fusobacterium necrophorum and spirillum (Borrelia vincenti. Both are common saprophytic agents of the oral cavity, but when combined determine the pathogenic of the disease. Case report: We describe the case of a female patient, 4 years old, which gave entered the emergency room with decompensated septic shock unresponsive to volume in the need of vasoactive drugs (DVA, moreover poor dental conservation and necrotic tonsils. After 48h evolved with hemodynamic deterioration refractory to VAD and insertion of hydrocortisone, with convulsion and left hemiplegia. A cranial CT was requested and revealed

  5. Molecular mapping to species level of the tonsillar crypt microbiota associated with health and recurrent tonsillitis.

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    Anders Jensen

    Full Text Available The human palatine tonsils, which belong to the central antigen handling sites of the mucosal immune system, are frequently affected by acute and recurrent infections. This study compared the microbiota of the tonsillar crypts in children and adults affected by recurrent tonsillitis with that of healthy adults and children with tonsillar hyperplasia. An in-depth 16S rRNA gene based pyrosequencing approach combined with a novel strategy that included phylogenetic analysis and detection of species-specific sequence signatures enabled identification of the major part of the microbiota to species level. A complex microbiota consisting of between 42 and 110 taxa was demonstrated in both children and adults. This included a core microbiome of 12 abundant genera found in all samples regardless of age and health status. Yet, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria species, and Streptococcus pneumoniae were almost exclusively detected in children. In contrast, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae was present in all samples. Obligate anaerobes like Porphyromonas, Prevotella, and Fusobacterium were abundantly present in children, but the species diversity of Porphyromonas and Prevotella was larger in adults and included species that are considered putative pathogens in periodontal diseases, i.e. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, and Tannerella forsythia. Unifrac analysis showed that recurrent tonsillitis is associated with a shift in the microbiota of the tonsillar crypts. Fusobacterium necrophorum, Streptococcus intermedius and Prevotella melaninogenica/histicola were associated with recurrent tonsillitis in adults, whereas species traditionally associated with acute tonsillitis like pyogenic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus were scarce. The findings suggest that recurrent tonsillitis is a polymicrobial infection in which interactions within consortia of taxa play an etiologic role. The study contributes to the human microbiome data, to the

  6. Antimicrobial effect of human serum on oral Fusobacterium nucleatum isolates from humans and monkeys Atividade antimicrobiana do soro humano sobre isolados de Fusobacterium nucleatum obtidos de humanos e macacos

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    Elerson GAETTI-JARDIM JÚNIOR

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of eighty F. nucleatum isolates from periodontal patients, healthy subjects and Cebus apella monkeys to human pooled sera was tested. The resistance to serum bactericidal effects was observed in 46.9% of the isolates from periodontal patients, 28.6% of the healthy subjects and 40% of the monkeys. These results support the hypothesis that serum plays an ecological role by controlling the microbial population inside either the gingival crevice or periodontal pocket.Foi avaliada a susceptibilidade de oitenta isolados de F. nucleatum obtidos de pacientes com doença periodontal, indivíduos sadios e Cebus apella (macaco-prego frente ao soro humano. A resistência à atividade bactericida do soro foi observada em 46,9% das fusobactérias isoladas de pacientes com doença periodontal, 28,6% das obtidas de indivíduos sadios e em 40% das fusobactérias de primatas não humanos. Esses resultados suportam o conceito de que o soro possui um papel ecológico em controlar a população microbiana no interior do sulco gengival ou bolsa periodontal.

  7. Investigating the etiology of bovine digital dermatitis by a combination of 16S rRNA gene analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kirstine Klitgaard; Rasmussen, Marianne; Capion, Nynne

    Bovine digital dermatitis, the cause of lameness and wasting in cattle, was first reported in 1974. Today, this disease has considerable negative effects on animal welfare and production economy in many parts of the world. A bacterial etiology of digital dermatitis is now well documented, and the......Bovine digital dermatitis, the cause of lameness and wasting in cattle, was first reported in 1974. Today, this disease has considerable negative effects on animal welfare and production economy in many parts of the world. A bacterial etiology of digital dermatitis is now well documented...... and previously examined digital dermatitis lesions. All skin samples were evaluated histopathologically for possible predisposing abnormalities. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization tests for Fusobacterium. necrophorum and D. nodosus was applied. All lesions revealed intermingled infections......, and were histopathologically categorized as subclinical digital dermatitis. We propose that external noxious stimuli allow D. nodosus to break down the epidermal barrier creating a suitable environment for the secondary invaders, Treponema species, which gradually take over the infection site. The variety...

  8. Microarray analysis of microbiota of gingival lesions in noma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Huyghe

    Full Text Available Noma (cancrum oris is a gangrenous disease of unknown etiology affecting the maxillo-facial region of young children in extremely limited resource countries. In an attempt to better understand the microbiological events occurring during this disease, we used phylogenetic and low-density microarrays targeting the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the gingival flora of acute noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis (ANG lesions, and compared them to healthy control subjects of the same geographical and social background. Our observations raise doubts about Fusobacterium necrophorum, a previously suspected causative agent of noma, as this species was not associated with noma lesions. Various oral pathogens were more abundant in noma lesions, notably Atopobium spp., Prevotella intermedia, Peptostreptococcus spp., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus anginosus. On the other hand, pathogens associated with periodontal diseases such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacteriales were more abundant in healthy controls. Importantly, the overall loss of bacterial diversity observed in noma samples as well as its homology to that of ANG microbiota supports the hypothesis that ANG might be the immediate step preceding noma.

  9. Occurrence of anaerobic bacteria in diseases of the dog and cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J N; Fales, W H; Scanlan, C M

    1979-06-01

    A survey for anaerobic bacteria was conducted in 314 clinical specimens from dogs and cats. A total of 187 anaerobic isolates in pure and mixed culture were isolated from 111 of the specimens that contained anaerobic bacteria. Common isolated included Actinomyces (9.1%), Clostridium perfringens (19.3%), other Clostridium spp (11.2%), Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (7.5%), Bacteroides melaninogenicus (13.4%), other Bacteroides spp (17.6%), and Fusobacterium necrophorum (5.3%). Anaerobic bacteria were involved in serious lesions that often were life threatening to the animals. Antibiotic susceptibility data indicated that the lincomycin family, the penicillin family, chloramphenicol, and cephaloridine are preferred drugs for treatment of anaerobic infections. Data from the survey were used in formulation of a table to aid practitioners in clinical diagnosis of disease caused by anaerobes. Clostridium perfringens was isolated in large numbers from five of six dogs with a clinical diagnosis of canine hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and from one cat with hemorrhagic diarrhea. Experimental infections were induced in rats, using caine feces as inoculum. Induced lesions contained aerobic and anaerobic bacteria similar to those bacteria isolated in the clinical survey, indicating that feces may serve as a major source of these bacteria in clinical infections of the dog.

  10. The role of DNA amplification and cultural growth in complicated acute appendicitis

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    Francesca Tocchioni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial growth of peritoneal fluid specimens obtained during surgical procedures for acute appendicitis may be useful to optimize further antibiotic therapy in complicated cases. DNA amplification represents a fast technique to detect microbial sequences. We aimed to compare the potential of DNA amplification versus traditional bacterial growth culture highlighting advantages and drawbacks in a surgical setting. Peritoneal fluid specimens were collected during surgery from 36 children who underwent appendectomy between May and December 2012. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and cultures were performed on each sample. RT-PCR showed an amplification of 16S in 18/36 samples, Escherichia coli (in 7 cases, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3, Fusobacterium necrophorum (3, Adenovirus (2, E.coli (1, Klebsiella pneumoniae (1, Serratia marcescens/Enterobacter cloacae (1. Bacterial growth was instead observed only in four patients (3 E.coli and 1 P.aeruginosa and Bacteroides ovatus. Preoperative C-reactive protein and inflammation degree, the most reliable indicators of bacterial translocation, were elevated as expected. DNA amplification was a quick and useful method to detect pathogens and it was even more valuable in detecting aggressive pathogens such as anaerobes, difficult to preserve in biological cultures; its drawbacks were the lack of biological growths and of antibiograms. In our pilot study RT-PCR and cultures did not influence the way patients were treated.

  11. Internal jugular vein thrombosis complicating cervicofacial infection of dental origin. Case report

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    Christos DENDRINOS

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Septic thrombosis of the internal jugular vein or Lemierre’s syndrome is a rare form of metastatic septic thromboembolitis, typically involving superinfection with Fusobacterium Necrophorum, internal jugular vein thrombosis and remote septic emboli.CASE REPORT: A 49-year-old male was referred for a painful cervicofacial swelling on the left, obliteration of the buccal sulcus, as well as swelling of both the soft and hard palate and the floor of the mouth ipsilaterally, accompanied by severe trismus and difficulty in swallowing. The patient underwent intraoral and extraoral incisions and drainage of the affected anatomical spaces and tracheotomy. The patient’s clinical condition was steadily improving; following examination with CT scan,9 days post-op, internal jugular vein thrombosis was diagnosed. The patient was put on anticoagulants. The postoperative course continued uneventfully, and the patient was discharged. One month post-operatively the vessel was normal and anticoagulant treatment was discontinued.CONCLUSION: Since Lemierre’s syndrome is not only rare but also tends to be underdiagnosed when there is no obvious cause of sepsis, it should be included in the differential diagnosis if the patient’s general contition deteriorates in spite of the treatment.

  12. The Role of DNA Amplification and Cultural Growth in Complicated Acute Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Tani, Chiara; Bartolini, Laura; Moriondo, Maria; Nieddu, Francesco; Pecile, Patrizia; Azzari, Chiara; Messineo, Antonio; Ghionzoli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial growth of peritoneal fluid specimens obtained during surgical procedures for acute appendicitis may be useful to optimize further antibiotic therapy in complicated cases. DNA amplification represents a fast technique to detect microbial sequences. We aimed to compare the potential of DNA amplification versus traditional bacterial growth culture highlighting advantages and drawbacks in a surgical setting. Peritoneal fluid specimens were collected during surgery from 36 children who underwent appendectomy between May and December 2012. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cultures were performed on each sample. RT-PCR showed an amplification of 16S in 18/36 samples, Escherichia coli (in 7 cases), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3), Fusobacterium necrophorum (3), Adenovirus (2), E.coli (1), Klebsiella pneumoniae (1), Serratia marcescens/Enterobacter cloacae (1). Bacterial growth was instead observed only in four patients (3 E.coli and 1 P.aeruginosa and Bacteroides ovatus). Preoperative C-reactive protein and inflammation degree, the most reliable indicators of bacterial translocation, were elevated as expected. DNA amplification was a quick and useful method to detect pathogens and it was even more valuable in detecting aggressive pathogens such as anaerobes, difficult to preserve in biological cultures; its drawbacks were the lack of biological growths and of antibiograms. In our pilot study RT-PCR and cultures did not influence the way patients were treated. PMID:27777701

  13. The oral microbial community of gingivitis and lumpy jaw in captive macropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiabong, John F; Boardman, Wayne; Moore, Robert B; Brown, Melissa H; Ball, Andrew S

    2013-12-01

    Gingivitis and lumpy jaw are diseases of polymicrobial aetiology. Although Fusobacterium necrophorum has been associated with these diseases in macropods, little is known about other organisms associated with these diseases in this animal species. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed the potential pathogens associated with gingivitis and lumpy jaw in macropods. PCR-DGGE profile comparison between the healthy and disease groups indicated a shift in the oral bacterial community structures with similarity coefficients of 48% and 35% for gingivitis and lumpy jaw respectively. Moreover, gingivitis was associated with increase in bacterial diversity (Shannon index = 2.87; PL curve = 45%) while lumpy jaw resulted in a decline in bacterial diversity (Shannon index = 2.47; PL curve = 74%). This study suggest that the establishment of gingivitis and lumpy jaw diseases follows the ecological plaque hypothesis. This forms the basis for an expanded investigation in an epidemiological scale and suggests the need for the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agent(s) and for the effective management and control of polymicrobial diseases.

  14. Differential Susceptibility of Bacteria to Mouse Paneth Cell a-Defensins under Anaerobic Conditions

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    Jennifer R. Mastroianni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Small intestinal Paneth cells secrete a-defensin peptides, termed cryptdins (Crps in mice, into the intestinal lumen, where they confer immunity to oral infections and define the composition of the ileal microbiota. In these studies, facultative bacteria maintained under aerobic or anaerobic conditions displayed differential sensitivities to mouse a-defensins under in vitro assay conditions. Regardless of oxygenation, Crps 2 and 3 had robust and similar bactericidal activities against S. typhimurium and S. flexneri, but Crp4 activity against S. flexneri was attenuated in the absence of oxygen. Anaerobic bacteria varied in their susceptibility to Crps 2-4, with Crp4 showing less activity than Crps 2 and 3 against Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacteroides fragilis in anaerobic assays, but Fusobacterium necrophorum was killed only by Crp4 and not by Crps 2 and 3. The influence of anaerobiosis in modulating Crp bactericidal activities in vitro suggests that a-defensin effects on the enteric microbiota may be subject to regulation by local oxygen tension.

  15. Mastoiditis and Gradenigo’s Syndrome with anaerobic bacteria

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    Jacobsen Chris

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gradenigo’s syndrome is a rare disease, which is characterized by the triad of the following conditions: suppurative otitis media, pain in the distribution of the first and the second division of trigeminal nerve, and abducens nerve palsy. The full triad may often not be present, but can develop if the condition is not treated correctly. Case presentation We report a case of a 3-year-old girl, who presented with fever and left-sided acute otitis media. She developed acute mastoiditis, which was initially treated by intravenous antibiotics, ventilation tube insertion and cortical mastoidectomy. After 6 days the clinical picture was complicated by development of left-sided abducens palsy. MRI-scanning showed osteomyelitis within the petro-mastoid complex, and a hyper intense signal of the adjacent meninges. Microbiological investigations showed Staphylococcus aureus and Fusobacterium necrophorum. She was treated successfully with intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy with anaerobic coverage. After 8 weeks of follow-up there was no sign of recurrent infection or abducens palsy. Conclusion Gradenigo’s syndrome is a rare, but life-threatening complication to middle ear infection. It is most commonly caused by aerobic microorganisms, but anaerobic microorganisms may also be found why anaerobic coverage should be considered when determining the antibiotic treatment.

  16. Lemierre's syndrome due to community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and presenting with orbital cellulitis: a case report

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    Kadhiravan Tamilarasu

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Lemierre's syndrome is septic thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein leading to metastatic septic complications following an oropharyngeal infection. It is usually caused by the anaerobe, Fusobacterium necrophorum. Of late, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is increasingly being recognised as a cause of community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections. We report a rare case of Lemierre's syndrome caused by community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Case presentation A previously healthy 16-year-old girl presented with fever of 13 days duration, painful swelling around the right eye and diplopia followed by the appearance of pulmonary infiltrates. Imaging studies confirmed the clinical suspicion of bilateral jugular venous thrombosis with septic pulmonary embolism. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated on blood cultures. The hospital course was complicated by massive haemoptysis and pulmonary aspiration necessitating mechanical ventilation. The patient subsequently made a complete recovery. Conclusion Lemierre's syndrome, although rare, is a potentially lethal but treatable complication of head and neck sepsis. Early clinical recognition of Lemierre's syndrome and appropriate antibiotic treatment can be life-saving. One should consider the possibility of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in patients with suspected Lemierre's syndrome.

  17. The Incidence Increasing of Sheep some Diseases Caused by Heavy Rainy Spring of 2010 in the West Part of the Country

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    Daniela Moţ

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available As a result of heavy rains from spring of 2010 became to appear, after two months of animals maintaining in high humidity conditions, some health problems. Were been examined by clinical point of view 280 sheep from four herds of Timiş district particular breeders from Transilvanian Merinos and Ţurcană breeds, 2-5 years aged. In the same time were been taken samples from foot lesions of affected sheep and were been examined from morphopathological point of view the 29 sheep bodies slaughtered by necessity. After all examinations was been observed that 197 sheep (70.35%, more than half from examined animals had foot lesions and respiratory clinic signs caused by exceeded rains from last months. From the necessity slaughtered sheep bodies were been isolated larvae from Dictyocaulus filaria, Oestrus ovis and adults of Psoroptes ovis, parasites who had found optimum conditions of development and to produce infections in rainy springs, with water and mud remained long time on pastures. From foot samples was been isolated in Microbiology laboratory Fusobacterium necrophorum, a bacteria responsible of interdigitally dermatitis in sheep. All these problems caused by heavy rains had as results important economic damages through milk and wool decreased productions and high costs with antiinfectious and antiparasitical treatments.

  18. A Lemierre syndrome variant caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae

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    Yih-Jeng Tsai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre syndrome is an extremely rare disease characterized by oropharyngeal infection, septicemia, internal jugular vein thrombosis, and skip lesions. The most common causative pathogen is Fusobacterium necrophorum. We reported a 45-year-old woman who presented with left neck painful swelling and septicemia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head and neck demonstrated venous thrombosis extending from the left internal jugular vein to the sigmoid sinus. During admission we discovered that the patient had uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. We also found a metastatic lesion through chest radiography. Klebsiella pneumoniae was cultivated from both blood samples and pus from deep neck spaces. Surgical drainage, early and adequate antibiotic treatment, anticoagulation, and strict control of blood glucose led to the patient's complete recovery. Because Lemierre syndrome is a forgotten disease in the era of antibiotics, awareness of the signs and symptoms of this disease is important because of its associated high mortality rate. This case illustrated that the presence of K pneumoniae can lead to Lemierre syndrome.

  19. Microarray analysis of microbiota of gingival lesions in noma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyghe, Antoine; François, Patrice; Mombelli, Andrea; Tangomo, Manuela; Girard, Myriam; Baratti-Mayer, Denise; Bolivar, Ignacio; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Noma (cancrum oris) is a gangrenous disease of unknown etiology affecting the maxillo-facial region of young children in extremely limited resource countries. In an attempt to better understand the microbiological events occurring during this disease, we used phylogenetic and low-density microarrays targeting the 16S rRNA gene to characterize the gingival flora of acute noma and acute necrotizing gingivitis (ANG) lesions, and compared them to healthy control subjects of the same geographical and social background. Our observations raise doubts about Fusobacterium necrophorum, a previously suspected causative agent of noma, as this species was not associated with noma lesions. Various oral pathogens were more abundant in noma lesions, notably Atopobium spp., Prevotella intermedia, Peptostreptococcus spp., Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus anginosus. On the other hand, pathogens associated with periodontal diseases such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Capnocytophaga spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacteriales were more abundant in healthy controls. Importantly, the overall loss of bacterial diversity observed in noma samples as well as its homology to that of ANG microbiota supports the hypothesis that ANG might be the immediate step preceding noma.

  20. Semi-quantitative digital analysis of polymerase chain reactionelectrophoresis gel: Potential applications in low-income veterinary laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Antiabong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The interpretation of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay results is often limited to either positive or negative (non-detectable. The more robust quantitative PCR (qPCR method is mostly reserved for quantitation studies and not a readily accessible technology in laboratories across developing nations. The aim of this study was to evaluate a semi-quantitative method for conventional PCR amplicons using digital image analysis of electrophoretic gel. The potential applications are also discussed. Materials and Methods: This study describes standard conditions for the digital image analysis of PCR amplicons using the freely available ImageJ software and confirmed using the qPCR assay. Results and Conclusion: Comparison of ImageJ analysis of PCR-electrophoresis gel and qPCR methods showed similar trends in the Fusobacterium necrophorum DNA concentration associated with healthy and periodontal disease infected wallabies (p≤0.03. Based on these empirical data, this study adds descriptive attributes (“more” or “less” to the interpretation of conventional PCR results. The potential applications in low-income veterinary laboratories are suggested, and guidelines for the adoption of the method are also highlighted.

  1. The Anticomplementary Activity of ’Fusobacterium polymorphum’ in Normal and C-4 Deficient Sources of Guinea Pig Complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-12

    Dentistry A U University of Maryland * Baltimore, Maryland. 21201 Short Title.: Anticoinplementary Activity of F. poiymorphwn 1. Present Address...C-4 Deficient GP sera (C4D). The C4D was kindly provided by Dr. Jerry A. Winkelstein, Depart- ment of Pediatrics , The Johns Hopkins School of...Plaque on Epoxy Resin Crowns in Man. 3. Periodontol. 46: 10—26. S ! S ~ L 5- ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 20a

  2. The reduction of Fusobacterium nucleatum in mice is irrelevant to the nitric oxide induced by iNOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Chihomi; Mikami, Masato; Suzuki, Anri; Saito, Kazuko

    2003-01-01

    Previously we reported that mice infected recurrently with live Fusobacterim nucleatum (Fn) synthesize a significant amount of NO between 12 hr and 24 hr after the Fn injection. We now investigated whether the NO has the capability of killing Fn, a gram-negative rod periodontal pathogen. The mice were divided into three groups: treated with live bacteria (LB), treated with heat-killed bacteria (HKB) and untreated: normal (N). The Fn reduction, NO production and cell number after Fn injection were then compared in these mice. In the LB group, no Fn was detected at 6 hr, whereas it was still detected in the HKB and N groups at 24 hr as assessed by both colony counts and PCR assays. A significant amount of NO was synthesized in the LB group at 24 hr after the Fn injection. Fn is not killed by SNAP-generated NO in vitro. An increase in the total cell number was accompanied by an increase of the neutrophil numbers in the LB group. Intracellular O2(-) generation (including ONOO(-)) was visualized using dihydrorhodamine (DHR)-123. The peak of O2(-) generation by PEC was shown to be at 3 hr in all 3 groups. The number of O2(-) positive cells in the LB group at 3 hr was remarkably high, and most of them were likely to be neutrophils. The Fn reduction would be performed cooperatively via oxygen dependent and oxygen independent mechanisms. Thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) included in the oxygen dependent mechanism appear to be important for Fn reduction. However the significant amounts of NO derived from the iNOS synthesized in the LB group between 12 hr and 24 hr after injection of LFn were not involved in the Fn reduction.

  3. 21 CFR 522.313b - Ceftiofur hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., Pasteurella multocida, Salmonella Choleraesuis, and Streptococcus suis. (iii) Limitations. Treated swine must not be slaughtered for 4 days following the last treatment. (2) Cattle—(i) Amount. For bovine... haemolytica, P. multocida, and Histophilus somni; acute bovine interdigital necrobacillosis (foot...

  4. Noma management in a child with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irna Sufiawati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noma, also known as cancrum oris, is an orofacial gangrene, which during its fulminating stage causes progressive and mutilating destruction of the infected tissues. The disease occurs mainly in children with malnutrition, poor oral hygiene and debilitating concurrent illness. Purpose: The aim of this paper was to report a unique case of noma associated with systemic lupus erythematosus in an 8-year-old boy. Case: An 8-year-old boy referred to Oral Medicine Department complaining about an ulcer at the left corner of his mouth for 1 month, painful and difficulty in opening the mouth. The patient was diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus since 14 months before and had been given immunosuppressive therapy. The patient was also diagnosed severe malnutrition. Haematologic investigations revealed anemia. Case management: Panoramic radiography was performed to check for dental or periodontal foci of infection, but no abnormalities were present. The microbiology examination revelaed Fusobacterium necrophorum, Staphylococcus aureus, and Klabsiella. The patient has been treated with oral irrigation using hydrogen peroxide, saline and 0.2% chlorhexidine, thus helped to slough the necrotic tissue. Oral antibiotics and analgesics were prescribed. The patient was admitted to hospital under the care of a pediatrician, allergy and immunology specialist, and a nutritionist. The result of the comprehensive disease management showed that the lesion healed completely, but leaving a scar on his corner of the mouth. Its physical effects are permanent and may require reconstructive surgery to be repaired by oral surgeon. Conclusion: Noma is not a primary disease, there are various predisposing factors usually precede its occurrence. The management of noma requires a multidisciplinary approach.Latar Belakang: Noma, dikenal sebagai cancrum oris, adalah gangren pada daerah orofasial, yang menyebabkan kerusakan progresif dari jaringan yang terinfeksi

  5. A suspected virus infection of the oral mucosa in Swedish reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L

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    C. Rehbinder

    1985-05-01

    Full Text Available During the winter 1980 reindeer herds in the Tornedalen area, along the Finnish border, were hit by grazing difficulties. Thus minor parts of the reindeer her*ds in this area were given supplementary feed in pens. Some of the supplementary fed animals were taken ill and some deaths occurred. According to the owners sick animals showed loss of appetite and signs of fever. A total of 8 carcasses were necropsied at The National Veterinary Institute. In 5 of these cases oral lesions were observed. The histological investigation of the oral mucosa revealed intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, inter- and intracellular oedema and vesicle formation. An electron-microscopical study of 2 of the cases confirmed the histological findings. At the bacteriological investigations Coli, ß-haemolyzing streptococci, Conrynebacterium pyogenes and Fusobacterium necrophorum could be indentified. The found bacteria were all considered secondary invaders. Serological samples from four affected reindeer flocks were tested for antibodies against BVD-, P13 and IBR-virus as well as Chlamydia. A few samples showed low positive titres for agents tested but for BVDV. The result of the investigation indicates that a still unidentified virus could be the primary cause of this enzootically appearing disease of the oral mucosa in reindeer.Misstanke om virusinfektion i munnslemhinnan på svensk ren.Abstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning: Under vintern 1980 drabbades renhjordar i Tornedalsområdet av betessvårigheter. Av denna anledning fördes mindre flockar, ur hjordarna, till inhägnader och tillskottsutfodrades. En del av de tillskottsutfodrade djuren insjuknade och dödsfall inträffade. Enligt djurägarna förlorade de sjuka djuren aptiten och uppvisade tecken på feber. Av de döda renarna erhölls åtta fôr obduktion vid Statens Veterinärmedicinska anstalt. Hos fem av de obducerade renarna forelåg skador i munhålan. Vid histologisk undersokning av munslemhinnan p

  6. Foot rot and other foot diseases of goat and sheep in the semiarid region of northeastern Brazil

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    Gildeni M.N Aguiar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the occurrence and epidemiology of outbreaks of foot rot and other foot diseases in goats and sheep in the semiarid region of Paraíba, northeastern Brazil. Four farms were inspected for the presence of foot lesion in sheep and goats and for environmental conditions, general hygiene, pastures, and disease control measures. The prevalence of foot lesions was 19.41% (170/876 in sheep and 17.99% (52/289 in goats, ranging between 5.77% and 33.85% in different farms. Foot rot was the most common disease, affecting 12.1% of the animals examined (141/1165, but with significantly higher (p<0.05 prevalence in sheep (13.69% than in goats (7.27%. The frequency of malignant foot rot was also significantly lower (p<0.05 in goats (9.53% than in the sheep (40.83%. On one farm, Dorper sheep showed significantly higher (p<0.05 prevalence of foot rot (17.5% than Santa Inês sheep (6.79%, and the number of digits affected was also higher in the former. Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum were isolated from cases of foot rot. White line disease was found in 3.95% of the animals, sole ulcers in 1.29%, foot abscess in 1.03% and hoof overgrowth in 0.5%. The high rainfall at the time of occurrence, grazing in wetlands, clay soils with poor drainage, presence of numerous stony grounds, closure of the flocks in pens at night, and introduction of affected animals were considered predisposing factors for the occurrence of foot diseases.

  7. Synergic phototoxic effect of visible light or Gallium-Arsenide laser in the presence of different photo-sensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Ghanbari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the synergic phototoxic effect of visible light in combination with each of the photosensitizers on P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. However, the synergic phototoxic effect of laser exposure and hydrogen peroxide and curcumin as photosensitizers on F. nucleatum was not shown.

  8. BUSQUEDA Y CARACTERIZACION DE BACTERIOFAGOS ESPECIFICOS PARA AGGREGATIBACTER ACTINOMYCETEMCOMITANS Y FUSOBACTERIUM NUCLEATUM: DETERMINACION DEL EFECTO BACTERIOLITICO SOBRE ESTAS BACTERIAS EMBEBIDAS EN UNA BIOPELICULA DENTAL

    OpenAIRE

    CASTILLO RUIZ, MARIO HERNAN

    2012-01-01

    Las enfermedades periodontales asociadas a la placa dental son un importante problema de salud pública, tanto en nuestro país como en todo el mundo. Se estima que en Chile la prevalencia de esta enfermedad en la población adulta es mayor al 90%. Los tratamientos actuales son largos y en algunos casos muy costosos lo que impide que todas las personas tengan acceso a ellos. La etiología de las enfermedades periodontales es atribuida tanto a factores del hospedero como a la placa dental, que cor...

  9. Ammonia-Hyperproducing Bacteria from New Zealand Ruminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Graeme T.; Klieve, Athol V.; Ouwerkerk, Diane; Patel, Bharat K. C.

    1998-01-01

    Pasture-grazed dairy cows, deer, and sheep were tested for the presence of ammonia-hyperproducing (HAP) bacteria in roll tubes containing a medium in which tryptone and Casamino Acids were the sole nitrogen and energy sources. Colonies able to grow on this medium represented 5.2, 1.3, and 11.6% of the total bacterial counts of dairy cows, deer, and sheep, respectively. A total of 14 morphologically distinct colonies were purified and studied further. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of 16S rRNA genes indicated that all isolates differed from the previously described HAP bacteria, Clostridium aminophilum, Clostridium sticklandii, and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius. Carbon source utilization experiments showed that five isolates (C2, D1, D4, D5, and S1) were unable to use any, or very few, of the carbon sources tested. Biochemical tests and phylogenetic analyses of 16S ribosomal DNA sequences indicated that all isolates were monensin sensitive; that D1 and S1 belonged to the genus Peptostreptococcus, that D4 and D5 belonged to the family Bacteroidaceae, where D4 was similar to Fusobacterium necrophorum; and that C2 was most similar to an unidentified species from the genus Eubacterium. Growth on liquid medium containing tryptone and Casamino Acids as the sole nitrogen and energy source showed that D1, D4, and S1 grew rapidly (specific growth rates of 0.40, 0.35, and 0.29 h−1, respectively), while C2 and D5 were slow growers (0.25 and 0.10 h−1, respectively). Ammonia production rates were highest in D1 and D4, which produced 945.5 and 748.3 nmol/min per mg of protein, respectively. Tests of individual nitrogen sources indicated that D1 and D4 grew best on tryptone, S1 grew equally well on Casamino Acids or tryptone, and C2 and D5 grew poorly on all nitrogen sources. The intact proteins casein and gelatin did not support significant growth of any of the isolates. These isolates extend the diversity of known HAP rumen bacteria and indicate the presence of

  10. [Cases of nacrobacillosis in calves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simov, I; Pavlov, N

    1978-01-01

    Necrobacillosis was established in 48 out of a total of 90 calves aged from 1 to 6 months, raised on a common premise. The disease affected only calves under the age of 3 months, running a more severe course with high mortality in the younger animals. Along with the clinical manifestations associated with the organs involved there was also bradicardia in most of the diseased calves. Nonreactive necroses were observed in the digestive organs, liver, spleen, lungs, and lymph nodes with adjacent resorptive foci of histiocytes, fibroblasts, and giant cells.

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0185 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0185 ref|ZP_05552373.1| cobalt ABC transporter, permease CbiQ [Fusobac...terium sp. 3_1_36A2] gb|EEU31276.1| cobalt ABC transporter, permease CbiQ [Fusobacterium sp. 3_1_36A2] ZP_05552373.1 0.086 32% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DSIM-03-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DSIM-03-0025 ref|NP_602793.1| Permease [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleat...um ATCC 25586] gb|AAL94092.1| Permease [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] NP_602793.1 1.4 23% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-33-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-33-0017 ref|ZP_00144285.1| hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium nucleatum ...subsp. vincentii ATCC 49256] gb|EAA24117.1| hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vincentii ATCC 49256] ZP_00144285.1 0.002 28% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-02-0160 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-02-0160 ref|ZP_04861523.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium ...varium ATCC 27725] gb|EES63460.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium varium ATCC 27725] ZP_04861523.1 0.76 23% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-1475 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-1475 ref|ZP_04571481.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium ...sp. 4_1_13] gb|EEO41256.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium sp. 4_1_13] ZP_04571481.1 0.96 29% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0282 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0282 ref|NP_603571.1| Transporter [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucl...eatum ATCC 25586] gb|AAL94870.1| Transporter [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] NP_603571.1 0.12 26% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0175 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0175 ref|NP_603288.1| hypothetical protein FN0384 [Fusobacterium nucle...atum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] gb|AAL94587.1| Hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 25586] NP_603288.1 9.0 32% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-01-0431 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-01-0431 ref|ZP_04861523.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium ...varium ATCC 27725] gb|EES63460.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium varium ATCC 27725] ZP_04861523.1 1.1 25% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0568 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0568 ref|ZP_04570219.1| integral membrane protein [Fusobacterium sp. 2..._1_31] gb|EEO38393.1| integral membrane protein [Fusobacterium sp. 2_1_31] ZP_04570219.1 0.17 26% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-01-0134 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-01-0134 ref|ZP_04861523.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium ...varium ATCC 27725] gb|EES63460.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Fusobacterium varium ATCC 27725] ZP_04861523.1 0.11 25% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-01-0134 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-01-0134 ref|ZP_00144067.1| Transporter [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vi...ncentii ATCC 49256] gb|EAA24330.1| Transporter [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. vincentii ATCC 49256] ZP_00144067.1 0.038 30% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0086 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0086 ref|ZP_04858658.1| amino acid carrier protein alsT [Fusobacterium... varium ATCC 27725] gb|EES65038.1| amino acid carrier protein alsT [Fusobacterium varium ATCC 27725] ZP_04858658.1 0.17 32% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1219 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-1219 ref|ZP_04860495.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Fusobacterium... varium ATCC 27725] gb|EES62432.1| arsenical pump membrane protein [Fusobacterium varium ATCC 27725] ZP_04860495.1 0.13 21% ...

  4. Uterine bacterial flora in postpartum Danish Holstein dairy cows determined using DNA-based fingerprinting: Correlation to uterine condition and calving management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, K.; Ancker, M.-L.; Gustafsson, H.

    2013-01-01

    /Acinetobacter and Bacteroides/Sphingobacterium/Prevotellaceae were among the most common at both examinations. In four herds there was a percentage decrease of F. necrophorum from first to second examination, and in all herds there was a percentage increase of Pseudomonas/Acinetobacter from first to second examination...

  5. Isolated Facial Vein Thrombophlebitis: A Variant of Lemierre Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karnov, Kirstine KS; Lilja-Fischer, Jacob Kinggaard; Randrup, Thomas Skov

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is a rare complication of acute tonsillitis. It is caused by the anaerobic bacterium Fu- sobacterium necrophorum and is characterized by bacteremia and septic thrombosis of the internal jug- ular vein. Dissemination of septic emboli may occur. The diagnosis can be difficult since...

  6. EFFECTS OF REGULAR PERIODONTAL SCALING ON FUSOBACTERIUM NUCLEATUM OF SUBGINGIVAL PLAQUE IN FIXED ORTHODONTIC PATIENTS%定期牙周洁治对固定正畸病人龈下菌斑中具核梭杆菌的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏青; 白雪雁; 于新波; 申勇; 金娜; 范存晖

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨定期牙周洁治对固定正畸病人龈下菌斑中具核梭杆菌(Fn)的影响.方法 选取固定正畸病人48例,随机分为A、B、C共3组,每组16例,牙周洁治周期分别为1、3、6个月,分别于矫治前及矫治1、3、6、9个月时,采用荧光定量PCR法检测各组龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量.结果 A组和B组矫治1、3、6、9个月时龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量与矫治前比较差异无显著性(P>0.05),C组在矫治6个月时龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量较矫治前显著升高(t=2.81,P<0.05).矫治6个月时,C组龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量明显高于A组(F=6.62,q=5.14,P<0.05),而其他各组间各时间点龈下菌斑中Fn的百分含量比较差异无显著性(P>0.05).结论 定期牙周洁治对控制固定正畸病人龈下菌斑中Fn的含量具有一定作用.

  7. Peritonsillar abscess: clinical aspects of microbiology, risk factors, and the association with parapharyngeal abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Tejs Ehlers

    2017-03-01

    transportation of appropriate specimens, choice of methodology for detection and quantification of microorganisms, current or recent antibiotic treatment of patients, potential shift in significant pathogens during the course of infection, and factors associated with increased risk of PTA development.  The trend towards de-escalated surgical intervention and increasing reliance on antibiotic treatment, require studies defining the significant pathogens in PTA in order to determine optimal antibiotic regimens. Complications secondary to PTA may be avoided or better controlled with improved knowledge concerning the significant pathogens in PTA. Furthermore, identification of pathogens other than GAS, may lead the way for earlier bacterial diagnosis and timely intervention before abscess formation in sore throat patients. The identification and quantification of risk factors for PTA development constitutes another approach to reduce the incidence of PTA. As clinicians, we noticed that FN was recovered from PTA patients with increasing frequency and that patients infected with Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN) seemed to be more severely affected than patients infected with other bacteria. Furthermore, we occationally observed concomitant PPA in addition to a PTA, which made us hypothesize that PPA and PTA is often closely related and may share significant pathogens. Hence, our aims were: 1. To explore the microbiology of PTA with a special attention to Fusobacterium necrophorum (FN). 2. To elucidate whether smoking, age, gender, and seasons are risk factors for the development of PTA. 3. To characterize patients with PPA, explore the relationship between PPA and PTA, identify the pathogens associated with PPA, and review our management of PPA. In a retrospective study on all 847 PTA patients admitted to the ENT department at Aarhus University Hospital (AUH) from 2001 to 2006, we found that FN was the most prevalent (23%) bacterial strain in pus specimens. FN-positive patients

  8. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva-coate...

  9. Enzymatic removal and disinfection of bacterial biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Falholt, Per; Gram, Lone

    1997-01-01

    Model biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were made on steel and polypropylene substrata. Plaque-resembling biofilms of Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces, viscosus, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were made on saliva...

  10. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and...... necrophorum. We found a total of 137 cases of LS, of which 47 were infected with F. necrophorum and others with Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Complications of this rare but severe disease included osteomyelitis, meningitis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mortality was extremely high in the pre......-antibiotic era but has diminished with the advent of antibiotics. This review showed a mortality rate of only 2% of which none of the cases involved fusobacteria. Duration of treatment varied; a 4-6-week course of carbapenem or piperacillin/tazobactam in combination with metronidazole was optimum. Other...

  11. Lemierre’s syndrome and right adnexal abscess; A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malak Al-Hakeem

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre’s syndrome is an extremely rare but a completely curable condition. A high index of suspicion is needed for early diagnosis and proper treatment. We report a 20 year old virgin Caucasian lady presented with sore throat, fever, neck pain, nausea and vomiting followed by acute abdomen. Her laboratory investigations revealed white blood count 13,300/mm3, C-reactive protein 332 mg/L. Abdominal computed tomography scan showed pelvic abscess 6.2 x 6.1 cm mainly involving the right ovary. Intra-abdominal swab showed growth of Fusobactrerium necrophorum. Right adnexectomy and proper antibiotic was carried out. High index of doubt is the most important key in diagnosing this fatal syndrome. In our case the diagnosis of the syndrome was made only after the isolation of F. necrophorum from the intra-abdominal swab culture.J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(3: 114-117

  12. Influence of flavomycin on ruminal fermentation and microbial populations in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Joan E; McEwan, Neil R; McKain, Nest; Walker, Nicola; Wallace, R John

    2005-03-01

    Flavomycin is a phosphoglycolipid antibiotic that promotes growth in ruminants. The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of flavomycin on ruminal micro-organisms and their metabolic consequences. In sheep receiving a mixed grass hay/concentrate diet, inclusion of 20 mg flavomycin day(-1) decreased ruminal ammonia and total volatile fatty acid concentrations (Pprofiles differed from animal to animal, but remained consistent from day to day. The community structure changed when flavomycin was introduced. The roles of F. necrophorum and HAP species in ammonia formation and of F. necrophorum in the invasion of wall tissue are consistent with the observed effects of flavomycin on ruminal ammonia formation and, in other studies, on decreasing tissue-turnover rates.

  13. Causes of Mortality and Diseases in Farmed Deer in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Sieber

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate diseases and causes of mortality in Swiss farmed deer, deer found dead or shot due to diseased condition between March 2003 and December 2004 were requested for a complete postmortem examination. One hundred and sixty-two animals were submitted. Perinatal mortality, necrobacillosis in 3 week to 6 month old deer, and endoparasitosis in 6 month to 2 year old deer were identified as the most important causes of loss, followed by ruminal acidosis, which was diagnosed in 22% of deer older than 1 year. Congenital malformations were observed in 15% of deer less than 6 months old. Reportable infectious diseases known as major problems in deer farming in other countries were rare (yersiniosis, malignant catarrhal fever or not observed (tuberculosis, chronic wasting disease. Overall, the results indicate that the Swiss deer population does not present major health problems of concern for domestic animals.

  14. Isolated Facial Vein Thrombophlebitis: A Variant of Lemierre Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karnov, Kirstine KS; Lilja-Fischer, Jacob Kinggaard; Randrup, Thomas Skov

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is a rare complication of acute tonsillitis. It is caused by the anaerobic bacterium Fu- sobacterium necrophorum and is characterized by bacteremia and septic thrombosis of the internal jug- ular vein. Dissemination of septic emboli may occur. The diagnosis can be difficult since...... different organs can be involved. We discuss a case of Lemierre syn- drome in a 35-year-old woman with isolated throm- bophlebitis of the facial vein and fusobacteria growth in blood culture. This case emphasizes the need for awareness of the condition....

  15. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    /or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium...

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12288-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available onomously Replicating Sequence(ARS) of pLLE1. 36 3.2 3 ( X51832 ) Lentinus edodes m...nome. 32 3.0 15 ( AE009951 ) Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum ATCC 255... 34 3.2 19 ( E06069 ) Aut

  17. Prelude to Oral Microbes and Chronic Diseases: Past, Present and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Atanasova, Kalina R.; Yilmaz, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Associations between oral and systemic health are ancient. Oral opportunistic bacteria, particularly, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, have recently been deviated from their traditional roles and arguably ascended to central players based on their participations in complex co-dependent mechanisms of diverse systemic chronic diseases risk and pathogenesis, including cancers, rheumatoid-arthritis, and diabetes.

  18. Estimation of bacterial hydrogen sulfide production in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Basic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oral bacterial hydrogen sulfide (H2S production was estimated comparing two different colorimetric methods in microtiter plate format. High H2S production was seen for Fusobacterium spp., Treponema denticola, and Prevotella tannerae, associated with periodontal disease. The production differed between the methods indicating that H2S production may follow different pathways.

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1271 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-1271 ref|ZP_04969615.1| cobalt (Co2+) ABC superfamily ATP binding cass...ette transporter membrane protein CbiQ [Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum ATCC 10953] gb|EDK87699.1| cobalt (Co2

  20. Genome Sequences of Nine Gram-Negative Vaginal Bacterial Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitzler, Grace E.; Ruiz, Maria J.; Lu, Wendy; Weimer, Cory; Park, SoEun; Robinson, Lloyd S.; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Wollam, Aye; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2016-01-01

    The vagina is home to a wide variety of bacteria that have great potential to impact human health. Here, we announce reference strains (now available through BEI Resources) and draft genome sequences for 9 Gram-negative vaginal isolates from the taxa Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Fusobacterium, Proteus, and Prevotella. PMID:27688330

  1. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from anaerobic empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayall, B C; Snashall, E A; Peel, M M

    1998-11-01

    We report the isolation of Clostridium tetani (along with Fusobacterium mortiferum) from empyema pus. The patient, a 68 year old retired farmer from rural NSW, had recently undergone cholecystectomy, had heart failure and developed an empyema. He improved after drainage of the empyema and penicillin therapy, but died suddenly during convalescence.

  2. Anti-inflammatory, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Effects of Artemisinin Extracts from Artemisia annua L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wan-Su; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Sunwoo; Kim, Woo Joong; Lee, Dong Chae; Sohn, Uy Dong; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of artemisinin derived from water, methanol, ethanol, or acetone extracts of Artemisia annua L. were evaluated. All 4 artemisinin-containing extracts had anti-inflammatory effects. Of these, the acetone extract had the greatest inhibitory effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β , IL-6, and IL-10) production. Antioxidant activity evaluations revealed that the ethanol extract had the highest free radical scavenging activity, (91.0±3.2%), similar to α-tocopherol (99.9%). The extracts had antimicrobial activity against the periodontopathic microorganisms Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. animalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, and Prevotella intermedia. This study shows that Artemisia annua L. extracts contain anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antimicrobial substances and should be considered for use in pharmaceutical products for the treatment of dental diseases. PMID:25605993

  3. Antibacterian in vitro determinatíon of Menthostachys mollis (Muña) opposite to oral bacterial stomatological importance

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz L., Karin; Bachiller en Odontología. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Moromi N., Hilda; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas,Microbiología. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to determine the antimícrobial action of the essential oil of Methosthachys mollis (Muña); in design at random one strains standard ATCC of Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus sp, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Actinobacillus actinomicetencomitans and Actinomyces sp, to: Amoxicilina (positive witness), essential oil of Methosthachys mollis and, distilled water (negative witness); to measure the halos of antitmicrobial action. For the mentioned bacteria one found, respectively, in Amoxi...

  4. Effects by periodontitis on pristane-induced arthritis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Kaja; Lönnblom, Erik; Tour, Gregory; Kats, Anna; Mydel, Piotr; Georgsson, Pierre; Hultgren, Catharina; Kharlamova, Nastya; Norin, Ulrika; Jönsson, Jörgen; Lundmark, Anna; Hellvard, Annelie; Lundberg, Karin; Jansson, Leif; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background An infection-immune association of periodontal disease with rheumatoid arthritis has been suggested. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pre-existing periodontitis on the development and the immune/inflammatory response of pristane-induced arthritis. Methods We investigated the effect of periodontitis induced by ligature placement and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) infection, in combination with Fusobacterium nucleatum to promote its colonization, on the develop...

  5. Atividade antimicrobiana de infusões de vegetais sobre fusobactérias bucais e sua capacidade de adesão a eritrócitos humanos

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the result of the interrelationship between microbiotic aggression and the host’s organic defence. Amongst the microorganisms involved in periodontopathies, Fusobacterium nucleatum is conspicuous by establishing a link between the initial and final colonizers, besides producing toxic compounds and adhering to the host’s cells. Control of bacterial biofilm can be achieved by use of chemical agents, many of which extracted from plants. Thus the object of this study was to...

  6. Antibacterial effect of chlorine dioxide and hyaluronate on dental biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Al-bayaty, F.; Taiyeb-ali, T.; Abdulla, M. A.; Hashim, F.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate antimicrobial action of chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) gel and hyaluronate gel (Gengigel (R)) on dental biofilm. Pooled supra and subgingival dental biofilm were obtained from healthy individuals and incubated aerobically and anaerobically. Plaque bacteria investigated including Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus mitis, Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, dental plaque pool samples (aerobic and anaerobic) and Staphylococcus aureus and ...

  7. Fusobacterial head and neck infections in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2015-07-01

    Fusobacterium species are increasingly recognized as a cause of head and neck infections in children. These infections include acute and chronic otitis, sinusitis, mastoiditis, and tonsillitis; peritonsillar and retropharyngeal abscesses; Lemierre syndrome; post-anginal cervical lymphadenitis; and periodontitis. They can also be involved in brain abscess and bacteremia associated with head and neck infections. This review describes the clinical spectrum of head and neck fusobacterial infection in children and their management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Ethan B.; Xiong, Yong; Wang, Jimin; Strobel, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6Å crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for ho...

  9. Bacterial invasion of the uterus and oviducts in bovine pyometra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstrup, C. C.; Pedersen, H. G.; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2017-01-01

    of bacterial pathogenicity and development of lesions, have not been investigated. Bacterial invasion of the uterus and oviducts was studied in 21 cows diagnosed with pyometra at the time of slaughter by applying fluorescence in situ hybridization using probes targeting 16S ribosomal RNA of Fusobacterium...... thus indicating a synergism. Trueperella pyogenes did not invade the uterine tissue. In addition to endometrial lesions, most cows with pyometra also had salpingitis but without significant bacterial invasion of the oviductal wall....

  10. Antibakterijska svojstva retrogradnih punila korijenskih kanala

    OpenAIRE

    Provenzano, José C.; Julio C. M. de Oliveira; Flávio R F Alves; Rôças, Isabela N.; Siqueira Jr, José F.; Uzeda, Milton de

    2011-01-01

    Svrha istraživanja bila je ocijeniti i usporediti antibakterijsku učinkovitost pet retrogradnih punila korijenskih kanala. Materijal i metode: Metodom difuzije u agru ocijenjena je zona inhibicije bakterijskog rasta na podlozi pet retrogradnih punila korijenskih kanala: Pro Root MTA, cementa Portland, Super-EBA, IRM-a, Sealera 26 te amalgama. Za ciljane mikroorganizme bilo je odabrano pet anaeroba (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Parvimonas micra, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Propionibacterium acnes i ...

  11. The influence of biofilm formation by Gardnerella vaginalis and other anaerobes on bacterial vaginosis

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, António; Cerca, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the worldwide leading vaginal disorder in women of reproductive age. BV is characterized by the replacement of beneficial lactobacilli and the augmentation of anaerobic bacteria. Gardnerella vaginalis is a predominant bacterial species, however, BV is also associated with other numerous anaerobes, such as Atopobium vaginae, Mobiluncus mulieris, Prevotella bivia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptoniphilus sp.. Currently, the role of G. vaginalis in the etiology of BV...

  12. Partial characterization of antagonistic substance produced by a Clostridium butyricum strain

    OpenAIRE

    Nely Cristina Medeiros Caires; Aline Magalhães Matos; Luiz Macedo Farias; Maria Auxiliadora Roque Carvalho; Regina Maria Nardi Drummond; Jacques Robert Nicoli; Antônio Paulino Ribeiro Sobrinho

    2007-01-01

    The production of antagonistic substance by bacterium present in the infected root canal system (RCS) probably is an important ecological factor for its successful colonization of the local. The objective of this study was to partially characterize an antagonistic substance produced by a Clostridium butyricum isolated from infected RCS.Production of inhibitory compound was evaluated by the agar double layer diffusion technique using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Bifidobacterium adolescentis as ...

  13. Increased Enterococcus faecalis infection is associated with clinically active Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youlian; Chen, Huiting; He, Hanchang; Du, Yanlei; Hu, Jiaqi; Li, Yingfei; Li, Yuyuan; Zhou, Yongjian; Wang, Hong; Chen, Ye; Nie, Yuqiang

    2016-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the abundance of pathogenic gut microbes in Chinese patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and disease severity.We collected clinical data and fecal samples from 47 therapy-naive Chinese patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 67 patients with Crohn disease (CD), and 48 healthy volunteers. Bacteria levels of Fusobacterium species (spp), enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (B fragilis), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E coli), and Enterococcus faecalis (E faecalis) were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to test associations between bacterial content and clinical parameters.Compared to healthy controls, the levels of both Fusobacterium spp and E faecalis were significantly increased in the feces of patients with IBD (P disease activity (P = 0.015), Crohn disease activity index (CDAI; R = 0.3118, P = 0.0108), and fecal calprotectin (P = 0.016).E faecalis and Fusobacterium spp are significantly enriched in patients with IBD, and increased E faecalis infection is associated with clinically active CD.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Intestinal Flora of Uygur and Han Ethnic Chinese Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the correlation between intestinal flora and ulcerative colitis by analyzing the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in the intestinal of ulcerative colitis (UC patients and healthy controls with Uygur and Han ethnic. Methods. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples and analyzed with real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR to identify the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Results. The samples from UC patients, Uygur and Han ethnic combined, had higher abundance of Bacteroides (P=0.026 but lower Clostridium (P=0.004, Bifidobacterium spp. (P=0.009, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (P=0.008 than those from healthy controls. Among UC patients, Bacteroides population was raised in acute UC patients (P≤0.05, while the abundance of Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., Fusobacterium, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii decreased (P≤0.05 compared with the remission. In both UC patients group and control group, no difference was observed in the abundance of these 5 bacteria between the Han and the Uygur group. Conclusions. Variations in the abundance of these five bacterial strains in intestines may be associated with the occurrence of UC in Uygur and Han populations; however, these variations were not associated with ethnic difference.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Intestinal Flora of Uygur and Han Ethnic Chinese Patients with Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ping; Cui, Min; Wang, Haikun; Gao, Hongliang; Wang, Lei; Yang, Tao; Cheng, Yongbo

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To study the correlation between intestinal flora and ulcerative colitis by analyzing the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in the intestinal of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and healthy controls with Uygur and Han ethnic. Methods. Bacterial genomic DNA was extracted from fecal samples and analyzed with real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify the abundance of Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Results. The samples from UC patients, Uygur and Han ethnic combined, had higher abundance of Bacteroides (P = 0.026) but lower Clostridium (P = 0.004), Bifidobacterium spp. (P = 0.009), and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (P = 0.008) than those from healthy controls. Among UC patients, Bacteroides population was raised in acute UC patients (P ≤ 0.05), while the abundance of Clostridium, Bifidobacterium spp., Fusobacterium, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii decreased (P ≤ 0.05) compared with the remission. In both UC patients group and control group, no difference was observed in the abundance of these 5 bacteria between the Han and the Uygur group. Conclusions. Variations in the abundance of these five bacterial strains in intestines may be associated with the occurrence of UC in Uygur and Han populations; however, these variations were not associated with ethnic difference.

  16. Disinfection of dental impressions and occlusal records by ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, T; Fiehn, N E; Peutzfeldt, A; Owall, B

    2000-06-01

    As chemical disinfection of dental impressions may cause adverse effects on materials and the dental personnel this study examined disinfection by ultraviolet radiation. Alginate, addition silicone rubber and red wax contaminated by Streptococcus salivarius, Fusobacterium nucleatum and five other bacteria in different suspension media were radiated for up to 18 min, and the number of colony forming units was compared to non-radiated controls. The effect of ultraviolet radiation differed among bacterial species and depended on the organic content in the suspension. Generally, the bacterial reduction after ultraviolet radiation was below 4 log steps and thus insufficient for disinfection of dental impressions.

  17. Estudo bacteriológico de lesões periapicais

    OpenAIRE

    ROCHA Márcia Maria de Negreiros Pinto; Moreira,José Luciano Bezerra; Dalgimar Bezerra de MENEZES; CUNHA Maria do Perpétuo Socorro Saldanha da; de Carvalho, Cibele Barreto Mano

    1998-01-01

    O tecido perirradicular de 30 casos cirúrgicos foi submetido a exame microbiológico e histopatológico. Foram isoladas 137 cepas bacterianas das 30 lesões periapicais estudadas. Do total de bactérias isoladas, 90 (65,7%) foram caracterizadas como anaeróbias estritas, 40 (29,2%) como anaeróbias facultativas e 7 (5,1%) como aeróbias estritas. Fusobacterium nucleatum, bacilos Gram-negativos pigmentados anaeróbios estritos, Peptostreptococcus sp, Streptococcus mitis e bacilos Gram-positivos não es...

  18. Immunochemical Investigations of Cell Surface Antigens of Anaerobic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-15

    Peptococcus micros 5.8 Fusobacterium varium 5.2 Clostridium sartagoformum 5.2 Clostridium tyrobutyricum 5.0 Bacteriological studies were also performed on...4.5 Non-sooreforming Gram- Corynebacterium sp. 4.4 positive rod 6.3 c-hemolytic streptococcus 4.0 Clostridium perfringens 6.1 Proteus mirabilis 4.0... Clostridium paraputrificum 6.0 Proteus morganii 3.9 Clostridium species 6.0 Moraxella sp. 3.1 Bacteroides fragilis 5.8 Peptococcus morbillorum 5.7

  19. Metagenomic analysis of faecal microbiome as a tool towards targeted non-invasive biomarkers for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Jun; Feng, Qiang; Wong, Sunny Hei

    2017-01-01

    known associations of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus stomatis with CRC, we found significant associations with several species, including Parvimonas micra and Solobacterium moorei. We identified 20 microbial gene markers that differentiated CRC and control microbiomes, and validated 4...... in the independent Chinese cohort with AUC=0.84 and OR of 23. These genes were enriched in early-stage (I-II) patient microbiomes, highlighting the potential for using faecal metagenomic biomarkers for early diagnosis of CRC. CONCLUSIONS: We present the first metagenomic profiling study of CRC faecal microbiomes...

  20. Sore Throat Progressing to Embolic Sepsis: A Case of Lemierre’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn Dirks

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre’s syndrome is a rare clinical syndrome defined as oropharyngeal sepsis, thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and septic thombo-emboli. It is typically encountered in young, immunocompetent individuals, with a mean incident age of 20 years. The organism that is most commonly associated is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacterium: Fusobacterium species. The defined treatment course is at least six weeks of antibiotics, with the role of anticoagulation being unclear. The present article documents a case of Lemierre’s syndrome complicated by acute renal failure and loculated pleural effusion in an otherwise healthy 16-year-old patient.

  1. [Microbiological composition of dental plaque using Sprague Dawley rats as an experimental model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, F R; Perrone, M; Acevedo, A M

    1990-01-01

    In this study, the microbiological composition of the dental plaque in 12 male Sprague-Dawley rats was determined. Analysis using the light microscope showed the presence of nine colonies which suggested the presence of cocci, (6) diplococci (1) and rods. (2) Five of the bacteria were Gram positive and three were Gram negative. The morphological characteristic suggested the presence of Actinomyces in the case of Gram positive rods; Fusobacterium in the case of Gram negative rods; Neisseria and Veillonella in the of Gram negative cocci and Streptococci for the rest of the colonies. The biochemical characterization of the bacteria suggested the absence of Streptococcus mutans in the dental plaque of this animals.

  2. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  3. Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to analyze multispecies oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karygianni, Lamprini; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) constitutes a favorable microbiological method for the analysis of spatial distribution of highly variable phenotypes found in multispecies oral biofilms. The combined use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) produces high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of individual bacteria in their natural environment. Here, we describe the application of M-FISH on early (Streptococcus spp., Actinomyces naeslundii) and late colonizers (Fusobacterium nucleatum, Veillonella spp.) of in situ-formed oral biofilms, the acquisition of CLSM images, as well as the qualitative and quantitative analysis of these digitally obtained and processed images.

  4. Avaliação da resposta tecidual em ratos, a microrganismos anaeróbios e facultativos inativados associados a soluções preparadas com extratos vegetais aquoso e hidroalcoólico de Araçá (Psidium cattleianum): análise edemogênica e microscópica

    OpenAIRE

    Ruviére, Denise Belucio [UNESP

    2008-01-01

    O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar, in vivo, a resposta biológica imediata e tardia de soluções aquosa e hidroalcoólica preparadas com extrato vegetal de Araçá (Psidium cattleianum) associadas a microrganismos inativados. O controle utilizado foi soro fisiológico associado aos microrganismos inativados. Foi utilizado 0,1mL de uma suspensão contendo Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, Prevotella intermedia ATCC 25611, Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212...

  5. Bacterial pericarditis in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole LeBlanc

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 4-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat was presented to the Oregon State University cardiology service for suspected pericardial effusion. Cardiac tamponade was documented and pericardiocentesis yielded purulent fluid with cytologic results supportive of bacterial pericarditis. The microbial population consisted of Pasteurella multocida, Actinomyces canis, Fusobacterium and Bacteroides species. Conservative management was elected consisting of intravenous antibiotic therapy with ampicillin sodium/sulbactam sodium and metronidazole for 48 h followed by 4 weeks of oral antibiotics. Re-examination 3 months after the initial incident indicated no recurrence of effusion and the cat remained free of clinical signs 2 years after presentation. Relevance and novel information Bacterial pericarditis is a rare cause of pericardial effusion in cats. Growth of P multocida, A canis, Fusobacterium and Bacteroides species has not previously been documented in feline septic pericarditis. Conservative management with broad-spectrum antibiotics may be considered when further diagnostic imaging or exploratory surgery to search for a primary nidus of infection is not feasible or elected.

  6. Oral Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli as a reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes facilitating infections with multiresistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Clarisse; Tamanai-Shacoori, Zohreh; Ehrmann, Elodie; Dupont, Anais; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Bousarghin, Latifa; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Many β-lactamases have been described in various Gram-negative bacilli (Capnocytophaga, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, etc.) of the oral cavity, belonging to class A of the Ambler classification (CepA, CblA, CfxA, CSP-1 and TEM), class B (CfiA) or class D in Fusobacterium nucleatum (FUS-1). The minimum inhibitory concentrations of β-lactams are variable and this variation is often related to the presence of plasmids or other mobile genetic elements (MGEs) that modulate the expression of resistance genes. DNA persistence and bacterial promiscuity in oral biofilms also contribute to genetic transformation and conjugation in this particular microcosm. Overexpression of efflux pumps is facilitated because the encoding genes are located on MGEs, in some multidrug-resistant clinical isolates, similar to conjugative transposons harbouring genes encoding β-lactamases. All these facts lead us to consider the oral cavity as an important reservoir of β-lactam resistance genes and a privileged place for genetic exchange, especially in commensal strictly anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. Synergic activity, for anaerobes, of trovafloxacin with clindamycin or metronidazole: chequerboard and time-kill methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ednie, L M; Credito, K L; Khantipong, M; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C

    2000-05-01

    Chequerboard titrations were used to test the activity of trovafloxacin, alone and in combination with clindamycin or metronidazole, against 156 Gram-positive or Gram-negative anaerobes, including 47 Bacteroides fragilis group, 36 Prevotella spp., 26 fusobacteria, 21 peptostreptococci and 26 clostridia. MIC50/MIC90 values (mg/L) of each drug alone against all 156 strains were: trovafloxacin, 0.5/1; clindamycin, 0.25/2; metronidazole, 1/2. Synergy (FIC indices 0. 5-2.0); no antagonism (FIC indices >4.0) was seen. In addition, synergy was tested by time-kill methodology for each of the above combinations against 12 Gram-positive or Gram-negative strains. Results indicated that synergy (defined as a >/= 2 log(10) decrease in cfu/mL at 48 h compared with the more active drug alone) was found between trovafloxacin at or below the MIC and both clindamycin and metronidazole at or below the MIC in one strain each of Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium varium, Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus and Clostridium bifermentans. Synergy between trovafloxacin (Fusobacterium mortiferum, P. asaccharolyticus and C. bifermentans. In many cases of synergy, including those at the trovafloxacin MIC, regrowth after 48 h, which was commonly seen with trovafloxacin alone, was inhibited, and 99.9% killing was observed with the combination after 48 h, but not with trovafloxacin alone.

  8. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body. gamma. irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-11-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body ..gamma.. irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice.

  9. Microbiology of infected poison ivy dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, I; Frazier, E H; Yeager, J K

    2000-05-01

    We report the aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of secondarily infected poison ivy dermatitis. The study involved retrospective review of clinical and microbiology laboratory records of patients with secondarily infected poison ivy lesions. Bacterial growth was noted in 33 specimens. Aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacteria only were present in 18 (55%) patients, anaerobic bacteria only in seven (21%), and mixed anaerobic-aerobic bacteria in eight (24%). Forty-five isolates were recovered (1.4 per specimen): 27 aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacteria, and 18 strict anaerobes. The predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus (13 isolates) and group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (six). The predominant anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus spp. (seven isolates), pigmented Prevotella and Porphyromonas spp. (four) and Fusobacterium spp. (two). Single bacterial isolates were recovered in 18 (55%) patients, eight of which were S. aureus. Nineteen of the organisms isolated from 16 (48%) patients produced the enzyme beta-lactamase. Organisms that resided in the mucous membranes close to the lesions predominated in those infections. Enteric gram-negative rods and Bacteroides fragilis group predominated in leg and buttock lesions. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococci, pigmented Prevotella and Porphyromonas and Fusobacterium spp. were most frequently recovered from lesions of the finger, face and neck. The polymicrobial aetiology of secondarily infected poison ivy lesions, and the association of bacterial flora with the anatomical site of the lesions, are demonstrated.

  10. Furcation Therapy With Enamel Matrix Derivative: Effects on the Subgingival Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Lucas A; Casarin, Renato C V; Dabdoub, Shareef M; Tatakis, Dimitris N; Sallum, Enilson A; Kumar, Purnima S

    2017-07-01

    Although enamel matrix derivative (EMD) has been used to promote periodontal regeneration, little is known of its effect on the microbiome. Therefore, this investigation aims to identify changes in periodontal microbiome after treatment with EMD using a deep-sequencing approach. Thirty-nine patients with mandibular Class II buccal furcation defects were randomized to beta-tricalcium-phosphate/hydroxyapatite graft (BONE group), EMD+BONE, or EMD alone. Plaque was collected from furcation defects at baseline and 3 and 6 months post-treatment. Bacterial DNA was analyzed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S pyrotag sequencing, resulting in 169,000 classifiable sequences being compared with the Human Oral Microbiome Database. Statistical comparisons were made using parametric tests. At baseline, a total of 422 species were identified from the 39 defects, belonging to Fusobacterium, Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, Filifactor, and Parvimonas. All three regenerative procedures predictably altered the disease-associated microbiome, with a restitution of health-compatible species. However, EMD and BONE+EMD groups demonstrated more long-term reductions in a higher number of species than the BONE group (P <0.05), especially disease-associated species, e.g., Selenomonas noxia, F. alocis, and Fusobacterium. EMD treatment predictably alters a dysbiotic subgingival microbiome, decreasing pathogen richness and increasing commensal abundance. Further investigations are needed to investigate how this impacts regenerative outcomes.

  11. Estudio microbiológico de la periimplantitis: Presentación de 9 casos clínicos Microbiological study of the peri-implantitis: presentation of 9 clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Quinteros Borgarello

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: La periimplantitis es un proceso inflamatorio de los tejidos que rodean a un implante sometido a carga que produce la pérdida de soporte óseo. En este trabajo se muestran los resultados del estudio microbiológico y del antibiograma realizado a partir del exudado y/o del tejido periimplantario de 16 implantes funcionales con periimplantitis de 9 pacientes que fueron tratados en nuestro servicio. Material y método: Se estudiaron 16 periimplantitis observadas en 9 pacientes; de 14 de ellas se obtuvieron muestras con puntas de papel estériles que se introdujeron en la bolsa periimplantaria. En 2 implantes las muestras procedian de tejido de granulación periimplantario. Inmediatamente después de ser obtenidas, se colocaban en placas de agar-chocolate con brain heart infusion para proceder a su cultivo. Resultados: Los especímenes bacterianos aislados fueron: Stomatococcus, Prevotella oralis, Peptostreptococcus y Fusobacterium nucleatum. En 9 muestras fue imposible aislar una bacteria predominante debido a la complejidad de la flora. Respecto al resto de muestras, la bacteria predominante fue Stomatococcus en 3, Prevotella oralis en 1,Peptostreptococcus en 1 y Fusobacterium nucleatum en 2. Los antibiogramas mostraron una mayor sensibilidad a la asociación de la amoxicilina con el ácido clavulánico, comparada con la amoxicilina, el metronidazol o una combinación de estos dos últimos antimicrobianos. Conclusiones: En este trabajo las bacterias asociadas más frecuentemente a la periimplantitis fueron: Stomatococcus, Prevotella oralis, Peptostreptococcus y Fusobacterium nucleatum. En ningún caso se aislaron cepas de Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. Los posibles factores de riesgo asociados a periimplantitis en nuestra serie fueron los implantes recubiertos con hidroxiapatita, implantes de 3,25mm de diámetro y la localización más distal del implante en las prótesis que rehabilitaban extremos libres edéntulos superiores

  12. Clinical Research of Synthetic Antibacterial Peptide in Antibacterial Properties of Oral Bacteria%人工合成抗菌肽对口腔细菌抗菌性能的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓丹

    2016-01-01

    菌肽对口腔细菌的抗菌性能不同,Temporin-1CEa的最小抑菌浓度较小,且抑菌效果佳。%Objective To investigate synthetic antibacterial peptide in antibacterial properties of oral bacteria.Methods 9 kinds of synthetic antibacterial peptide(Brevinin,chensinin-1,chensinin-1b,L-K5V1,L-K6,L-K6V1, L-K6V2 and temporin lcea,Temporin-1CEb)and 6 kinds of oral bacteria(Candida albicans,Fusobacterium nucleatum, Lactobacilus acidophilus,Streptococcus mutans,Streptococcus salivarius,Streptococcus sanguinis)were used to vitro experiment.Synthetic antibacterial peptide in antibacterial properties of oral bacteria was analyzed.Results Chensinin-1b,L-K5V1,L-K6,L-K6V1,L-K6V2,Temporin-1CEa had high inhibitory rate with Candida albicans.Brevinin, chensinin-1b,L-K5V1,L-K6,L-K6V1,L-K6V2,Temporin-1CEa,Temporin-1CEb had high inhibitory rate with Fusobacterium nucleatum,Streptococcus mutans,Streptococcus salivarius,Streptococcus sanguinis.Brevinin,chensinin-1,chensinin-1b, L-K5V1,L-K6,L-K6V1,L-K6V2,Temporin-1CEa,Temporin-1CEb had high inhibitory rate with Lactobacilus acidophilus. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of Brevinin:Streptococcus sanguinis>Fusobacterium nucleatum>Streptococcus salivarius>Streptococcus mutans>Lactobacilus acidophilus.Minimum inhibitory concentrations of chensinin-1: Lactobacilus acidophilus.Minimum inhibitory concentrations of chensinin-1b:Lactobacilus acidophilus>Streptococcus salivarius>Streptococcus sanguinis>Fusobacterium nucleatum>Candida albicans>Streptococcus mutans. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of L-K5V1:Lactobacilus acidophilus>Fusobacterium nucleatum>Streptococcus mutans>Candida albicans>Streptococcus salivarius>Streptococcus sanguinis.Minimum inhibitory concentrations of L-K6:Streptococcus salivarius>Streptococcus sanguinis>Candida albicans>Streptococcus mutans>Fusobacterium nucleatum>Lactobacilus acidophilus.Minimum inhibitory concentrations of L-K6V1:Lactobacilus acidophilus>Streptococcus sanguinis>Streptococcus salivarius

  13. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE BACTERIAL POPULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ITS CANCER AND BENIGN HYPERPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Kogan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A bacteriological study of prostate biopsy specimens was conducted in patients with prostate benign hyperplasia (PBH and in those with prostate cancer (PC. It revealed a wide range of aerobic (Corynebacterium sp., Enterococcus sp., E. coli, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis and nonclostridial anaerobic (Bacteroides sp., Bifidobacterium sp., Eubacterium sp., Propionibacterium sp., Рeptococcus niger, Peptostreptococcus sp., Prevotella sp., Veilonella sp., Fusobacterium sp., Capnocytophaga ochracea, Streptococcus parvulus bacteria. Differences were seen in the detection rate of these microorganisms and in the level of tissue infectivity in PBH and PC. The average seeding of the prostate biopsy specimens and the detection rate of different types of bacteria in PBH were greater than those in PC; moreover, some bacteria were undetectable in PC at all.

  14. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE BACTERIAL POPULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ITS CANCER AND BENIGN HYPERPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Kogan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A bacteriological study of prostate biopsy specimens was conducted in patients with prostate benign hyperplasia (PBH and in those with prostate cancer (PC. It revealed a wide range of aerobic (Corynebacterium sp., Enterococcus sp., E. coli, S. haemolyticus, S. hominis and nonclostridial anaerobic (Bacteroides sp., Bifidobacterium sp., Eubacterium sp., Propionibacterium sp., Рeptococcus niger, Peptostreptococcus sp., Prevotella sp., Veilonella sp., Fusobacterium sp., Capnocytophaga ochracea, Streptococcus parvulus bacteria. Differences were seen in the detection rate of these microorganisms and in the level of tissue infectivity in PBH and PC. The average seeding of the prostate biopsy specimens and the detection rate of different types of bacteria in PBH were greater than those in PC; moreover, some bacteria were undetectable in PC at all.

  15. Anaerobes in pleuropulmonary infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 76 anaerobes and 122 aerobes were isolated from 100 patients with pleuropulmonary infections, e.g. empyema (64, pleural effusion (19 and lung abscess (13. In 14% of the patients, only anaerobes were recovered, while a mixture of aerobes and anaerobes was encountered in 58%. From all cases of lung abscess, anaerobic bacteria were isolated, alone (04 or along with aerobic bacteria (13. From empyema and pleural effusion cases, 65.6% and 68.4% anaerobes were recovered respectively. Amongst anaerobes, gram negative anaerobic bacilli predominated (Prevotella melaninogenicus 16, Fusobacterium spp. 10, Bacteroides spp. 9, followed by gram positive anaerobic cocci (Peptostreptococcus spp. 31. Coliform bacteria (45 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42 were the predominant aerobic isolates.

  16. Association between periodontal condition and subgingival microbiota in women during pregnancy: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Viola BORGO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectivo In this study, the gingival conditions and the quantitative detection for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia in pregnant women were determined. Material and Methods Quantitative determinations of periodontal bacteria by using a SyBr green system in women during pregnancy were performed. Women at the 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy and non-pregnant women were included in this study. A. actinomycetemcomitans was observed in high numbers in women at the 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy with a significant difference (p<0.05. F. nucleatum and P. intermedia were also observed in high levels. Results and Conclusion Our results show that pregnant women are more susceptible to gingivitis, and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in subgingival biofilm might be taken into account for the treatment of periodontal disease.

  17. Association between periodontal condition and subgingival microbiota in women during pregnancy: a longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    BORGO, Priscila Viola; RODRIGUES, Viviane Aparecida Arenas; FEITOSA, Alfredo Carlos Rodrigues; XAVIER, Karla Correa Barcelos; AVILA-CAMPOS, Mario Julio

    2014-01-01

    Objectivo In this study, the gingival conditions and the quantitative detection for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia in pregnant women were determined. Material and Methods Quantitative determinations of periodontal bacteria by using a SyBr green system in women during pregnancy were performed. Women at the 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy and non-pregnant women were included in this study. A. actinomycetemcomitans was observed in high numbers in women at the 2nd and 3rd trimesters of pregnancy with a significant difference (p<0.05). F. nucleatum and P. intermedia were also observed in high levels. Results and Conclusion Our results show that pregnant women are more susceptible to gingivitis, and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans in subgingival biofilm might be taken into account for the treatment of periodontal disease. PMID:25591021

  18. ASSOCIATION OF THE BONE LOSS WITH MAIN CLINICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velitchka Dosseva-Panova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Literature data have reported that certain Gram-negative anaerobe bacteria from the subgingival environment are important etiological agents of chronic periodontal disease. Based on published criteria identifying periodontal pathogens, major evidences has been shown for: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia; moderate evidences for: Prevotella intermedia, Peptostreptococcus /Micromonas/ micros, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eubacterium nodatum, Campylobacter rectus, and spirochetes (Treponema denticola. Microbiological data has been suggested by several studies as a useful indicator of disease progression, selection of an adjunctive antimicrobial administration, healing assessment and disease recurrence. The results of this study demonstrate statistically significant correlation between periodontal attachment loss and the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Peptostreptococcus (Micromonas micros in deep periodontal pockets of severe chronic periodontitis patients.

  19. 副干酪乳杆菌对口腔致病菌选择性抑制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高鹰; 宁科功; 蔡英; 李劲峰; 李黎仙; 秦皖民

    2016-01-01

    利用灭活后的副干酪乳杆菌(CPT)粉悬液,在特定条件下与口腔中常见的致病菌和有益菌进行共同培养,实验结果表明:CPT能够有效抑制变形链球菌(Streptococcus mutans)、牙龈卟啉单胞菌(Porphyromonas gingivalis)、伴放线放线杆菌(Actinomycetemcomitans)及具核梭杆菌(Fusobacterium nucleatum)四种典型口腔致病菌的生长,而对口腔中的有益菌,鼠李糖乳杆菌(Lactobacillus rhamnosus)、嗜酸乳杆菌(Lactobacillus acidophilus)、干酪乳杆菌(Lactobacillus casei)有良好的促进增值作用.

  20. Influence of age and immunization on development of gingivitis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekic, P; Klausen, B; Friis-Hasché, E

    1989-01-01

    To study the effect of age and antigenic priming on the development of gingivitis, 33 healthy rats were placed in contact with Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces viscosus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Bacteroides gingivalis. On days 0, 3, 7, and 14 after inoculation, the gingival condition...... was judged clinically and histologically, and serum antibody titers against the bacteria were measured. The rats were divided into three groups: 1 month old, 3 months old, and 3 months old immunized. None of the young rats developed gingivitis during the experiment, whereas half of the adult and all...... of the adult immunized rats bled on probing on days 7 and 14. In general, antibody titers against the bacteria were low in young rats, moderate in adult rats, and high in adult immunized rats. These results indicate that adult rats react stronger to plaque antigens than young rats and that previous contact...

  1. A case of brain abscess extended from deep fascial space infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Haruo; Karakida, Kazunari; Otsuru, Mitsunobu; Arai, Masayuki; Shimoda, Masami

    2009-09-01

    A case of brain abscess in the temporal lobe caused by direct intracranial extension of deep neck abscess is described. The abscess also spread to the orbital cavity through infraorbital fissure. The possible etiology of this case might be dental surgery. The diagnostic imaging clearly showed the routes of intracranial and -orbital extension of parapharyngeal and masticator space abscesses. From the abscess specimens, oral streptococci, anaerobic streptococci, and anaerobic gram-negative bacilli were isolated. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolates showed that some Prevotella and Fusobacterium strains had decreased susceptibility to penicillin, and these bacteria produced beta-lactamase. The bacteria from the deep neck abscess were consistent with those detected from the brain abscess. Proper diagnosis, aggressive surgical intervention, and antibiotics chemotherapy saved the patient from this life-threatening condition.

  2. Microbiology of the pericoronal pouch in mandibular third molar pericoronitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, W K; Theilade, E; Comfort, M B; Lim, P L

    1993-10-01

    The microorganisms associated with mandibular third molar pericoronitis were investigated using direct microscopy and anaerobic culture method. The pericoronal pouch was sampled with paper points in A) 8 patients without mandibular third molar pericoronitis and B) 6 patients with mandibular third molar pericoronitis. Under the microscope, the microflora was found to be a complex mixture comprising gram-positive and gram-negative cocci, rods and filaments (including fusiform and curved rods), motile rods and spirochetes. Significantly higher proportions of motile, gram-negative rods were found in group B than in group A. The predominant cultivable microflora of 9 samples: A (4) and B (5) comprised several species of facultative and obligate anaerobic bacteria, namely Peptostreptococcus, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Eubacterium, Propionibacterium, Veillonella, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Bacteriodes, Fusobacterium, Campylobacter, Staphylococcus, Stomatococcus, Lactobacillus, Neisseria, Capnocytophaga, Haemophilus, Selenomonas and Centipeda species. The microflora in pericoronitis appeared similar to that of diseased periodontal pockets.

  3. Evaluation of periodontal pathogens of the mandibular third molar pericoronitis by using real time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sencimen, Metin; Saygun, Isil; Gulses, Aydin; Bal, Vehbi; Acikel, Cengiz H; Kubar, Ayhan

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mandibular third molar pericoronitis flora by using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The quantitative values of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Campylobacter rectus (Cr), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Tannerella forsythia (Tf) were evaluated in comparison with the healthy third molar flora by using real time PCR. Aa, Cr, Pg, and Pi were not statistically significant but numerically higher than the pericoronitis group. In contrast to samples from control subjects, statistically significant higher numbers of Tf were detected in samples from pericoronitis patients. The study revealed the strong relation between risk of pericoronitis and the presence of Tf. Individuals who have Tf in their samples present with an almost eight times relative risk of pericoronitis as the individuals with an absence of Tf in their samples. Tf plays an important role in the development of clinical symptoms related to pericoronitis. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  4. [Effect of compound Chinese traditional medicine on infected root canal bacteria biofilm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Huang, Li-li; Xia, Wen-wei; Zhu, Cai-lian; Ye, Dong-xia

    2010-08-01

    To assess the efficacy of compound Chinese traditional medicine(CTM), which composed of gallic acid, magnolol and polysaccharide of Blettila striata, against the infected root canal bacterial biofilm. Actinomyces viscosus (Av), Enterococcus faecalis (Ef), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) were composed to form biofilm, then confocal laser scan microscope (CLSM) was used to observe and study the bacterial activity. SAS6.12 software package was used for statistical analysis. The biofilm thickness reduced after treatment by both CTM and ZnO (P>0.05),while there was a significant decrease of the percentage of vital bacterias after treatment by CTM (P<0.01). The compound Chinese traditional medicine is effective on biofilm control, so that it would be an effective disinfecting drug for root canal sealers. Supported by Research Fund of Bureau of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Shanghai Municipality (Grant No.2008L008A).

  5. Bi-Mix Antimicrobial Scaffolds for Regenerative Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palasuk, Jadesada; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Hippenmeyer, Lauren; Platt, Jeffrey A.; Spolnik, Kenneth J.; Gregory, Richard L.; Bottino, Marco C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Eliminating and/or inhibiting bacterial growth within the root canal system have been shown to play a key role in the regenerative outcome. The aim of this study was to synthesize and determine in vitro both the antimicrobial effectiveness and cytocompatibility of bi-mix antibiotic-containing polydioxanone (PDS)-based polymer scaffolds. Methods Antibiotic-containing (metronidazole, MET and ciprofloxacin, CIP) polymer solutions (distinct antibiotic weight ratios) were spun into fibers as a potential mimic to the double antibiotic paste (DAP, a MET/CIP mixture). Fiber morphology, chemical characteristics, and tensile strength were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and tensile testing, respectively. Antimicrobial efficacy was tested over time (aliquot collection) against Enterococcus faecalis (Ef), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). Similarly, cytotoxicity was evaluated in human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Data were statistically analyzed (pendodontics. PMID:25201643

  6. Characteristics of enriched cultures for bio-huff-`n`-puff tests at Jilin oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiu-Yuan Wang; Gang Dai; Yan-Fen Xue; Shu-Hua Xie [Institute of Microbiology, Beijing (China)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Three enriched cultures (48, 15a, and 26a), selected from more than 80 soil and water samples, could grow anaerobically in the presence of crude oil at 30{degrees}C and could ferment molasses to gases and organic acids. Oil recovery by culture 48 in the laboratory model experiment was enhanced by 25.2% over the original reserves and by 53.7% over the residual reserves. Enriched culture 48 was composed of at least 4 species belonging to the genera Eubacterium, Fusobacterium, and Bacteroides. This enriched culture was used as inoculum for MEOR field trials at Jilin oil field with satisfactory results. The importance of the role of these isolates in EOR was confirmed by their presence and behavior in the fluids produced from the microbiologically treated reservoir.

  7. Antibacterial activity of commercially available plant-derived essential oils against oral pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardají, D K R; Reis, E B; Medeiros, T C T; Lucarini, R; Crotti, A E M; Martins, C H G

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the antibacterial activity of 15 commercially available plant-derived essential oils (EOs) against a panel of oral pathogens. The broth microdilution method afforded the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the assayed EOs. The EO obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum (Lauraceae) (CZ-EO) displayed moderate activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Actinomyces naeslundii (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL), Prevotella nigrescens (MIC and MBC = 125 μg/mL) and Streptococcus mutans (MIC = 200 μg/mL; MBC = 400 μg/mL). (Z)-isosafrole (85.3%) was the main chemical component of this oil. We did not detect cinnamaldehyde, previously described as the major constituent of CZ-EO, in specimens collected in other countries.

  8. Bimix antimicrobial scaffolds for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palasuk, Jadesada; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Hippenmeyer, Lauren; Platt, Jeffrey A; Spolnik, Kenneth J; Gregory, Richard L; Bottino, Marco C

    2014-11-01

    Eliminating and/or inhibiting bacterial growth within the root canal system has been shown to play a key role in the regenerative outcome. The aim of this study was to synthesize and determine in vitro both the antimicrobial effectiveness and cytocompatibility of bimix antibiotic-containing polydioxanone-based polymer scaffolds. Antibiotic-containing (metronidazole [MET] and ciprofloxacin [CIP]) polymer solutions (distinct antibiotic weight ratios) were spun into fibers as a potential mimic to the double antibiotic paste (DAP, a MET/CIP mixture). Fiber morphology, chemical characteristics, and tensile strength were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and tensile testing, respectively. Antimicrobial efficacy was tested over time (aliquot collection) against Enterococcus faecalis (Ef), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). Similarly, cytotoxicity was evaluated in human dental pulp stem cells. Data were statistically analyzed (P regenerative endodontics. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of Bacteroides tectum and Bacteroides fragilis from the oral cavity of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D

    1993-01-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes was used to differentiate Bacteroides tectum from Bacteroides fragilis. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes. The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. tectum from B. fragilis and both from a variety of other species (including other members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. However, even at very high stringencies, B. tectum homology groups I, II and III were not distinguishable from one another using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. Thus, DIG-labelled whole chromosome probes directed against cellular DNA released directly onto nitrocellulose membranes is considered a useful method for diagnostic veterinary laboratories wishing to identify B. tectum and distinguish it from B. fragilis and other oral anaerobic flora of cats.

  10. Bite-related and septic syndromes caused by cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Richard L; Velez, Ana P; Mizrachi, Michelle; Lamarche, Jorge; Gompf, Sandra

    2009-07-01

    Bite infections can contain a mix of anaerobes and aerobes from the patient's skin and the animal's oral cavity, including species of Pasteurella, Streptococcus, Fusobacterium, and Capnocytophaga. Domestic cat and dog bite wounds can produce substantial morbidity and often require specialised care techniques and specific antibiotic therapy. Bite wounds can be complicated by sepsis. Disseminated infections, particularly those caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus and Pasteurella multocida, can lead to septic shock, meningitis, endocarditis, and other severe sequelae. An emerging syndrome in veterinary and human medicine is meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections shared between pets and human handlers, particularly community-acquired MRSA disease involving the USA300 clone. Skin, soft-tissue, and surgical infections are the most common. MRSA-associated infections in pets are typically acquired from their owners and can potentially cycle between pets and their human acquaintances.

  11. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed.

  12. Metagenomics Study on the Polymorphism of Gut Microbiota and Their Function on Human Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Qiang

    diversity and functional complexity of the gut microbiome. Facilitated by the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies and the progress of bioinformatics in the past decade, we have acquired substantial achievements in metagenomic studies on human gut microbiome and established the fundamentals of our...... and their mothers were collected and analyzed after parturition. In this study, we found that delivery methods (vaginally- or C-section-delivered) and feeding regime (breast-feeding or mixed feeding) had significant impacts on the gut microbiome of the infants. Moreover, metagenome-wide association studies (MGWAS...... low abundannce microbes in their gut, which were positively related to the red meat intake, while taxa associated with fruit and vegetable intake were depleted. Abundance changes in certain bacteria, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Parvimonas micra, were correlated with the different stages during...

  13. Association between periodontal disease and septicemia due to pyogenic hepatic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Análida Elizabeth Pinilla

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Case of a 65 year-old man with type-2 diabetes mellitus for 15 years who complained of abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant associated with unquantified fever and weight loss over a period of 25 days. In the emergency room, he presented tachycardia, tachypnea and fever of 37 º C, diffuse abdominal pain from light palpation without peritoneal irritation or right upper quadrant tenderness upon fist percussion test. Within a few hours the patient evolved to septic shock and required transfer to the intermediate care unit. The abdominal computerized axial tomography showed multiloculated hepatic abscess. Percutaneous drainage was performed with the culture positive for Escherichia coli and Fusobacterium spp. Then, the differential diagnosis was made between pyogenic or amebic liver abscess. Subsequently, oral cavity examination revealed severe periodontal disease with coronal destruction; therefore, extraction was scheduled.

  14. Efecto bactericida del láser de diodo en periodoncia Bactericidal effects of diode laser in periodontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Caccianiga

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available El láser en odontología, gracias a su capacidad antibacteriana, hemostática y de menor sintomatología operatoria, encuentra un amplio campo de aplicación en el ámbito de la terapia periodontal. En este estudio ha sido probada la eficacia de un protocolo que prevé el utilizo asociado de irradiación láser y de agua oxigenada con el fin de reducir a carga bacteriana de cepas comúnmente presentes en las bolsas periodontales activas y resistentes a la acción bactericida de solamente la irradiación láser como la Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum y Peptostreptococcus micron. La metodología de laboratorio preveía el siguiente protocolo: cada una de las suspensiones bacterianas ha sido expuesta al agua oxigenada a una concentración del 3% y ha sido irradiada con láser por 10, 15 o 20 segundos utilizando tubos estériles Eppendorf de 1,5 ml. Los resultados confirman la mayor eficacia bactericida de la acción combinada de agua oxigenada y láser. Los cultivos microbiológicos efectuados revelan como, no obstante el efecto bactericida, el láser tiene una escasa acción sobre las cepas bacterianas testeadas si no es asociado al agua oxigenada. En particular, en el caso de la Prevotela intermedia y del Fusobacterium nucleatum la utilización de agua oxigenada al 3% solamente ha dado resultado mejores respecto a solamente el láser, mientras que la asociación de los dos tratamientos ha dado siempre óptimos resultados. En el caso del Peptostreptococcus micron, la utilización de agua oxigenada y el láser separadamente han dado una escasa disminución de la cuenta bacteriana mientras que la asociación de los tratamientos ha potenciado la acción bactericida.Laser in odontology, thanks to its antibacterial capabilities, haemostatic and of minor operating symptomatology, finds a vast field of application within the framework of periodontal therapy. In this study has been tested the effectiveness of a protocol that foresees the

  15. Ocorrência de microrganismos anaeróbios estritos no escarro de pacientes com bronquite crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge R. Spitz

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available No escarro de pacientes hospitalizados com bronquite crônica foram isolados microrganismos anaeróbios estritos - Fusobacterium, Veillonella, Bacteroides melaninogenicus, Peptrostreptococcus, Actinomyces ou difteróides anaeróbios. Como o isolamento de anaeróbios estritos foi realizado em alíquotas da diluição 1O-³ do escarro fluidificado e em 83% dos casos não houve isolamento simultâneo no material do orofaringe, considera-se como de origem brônquica os anaeróbios isolados e não como contaminação do escarro no orofaringe e cavidade oral.

  16. Antimicrobial Activity of Diterpenes from Viguiera arenaria against Endodontic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H. G. Martins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six pimarane-type diterpenes isolated from Viguiera arenaria Baker and two semi-synthetic derivatives were evaluated in vitro against a panel of representative microorganisms responsible for dental root canal infections. The microdilution method was used for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC against Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella buccae, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bacteroides fragilis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces viscosus, Peptostreptococcus micros, Enterococcus faecalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The compounds ent-pimara-8(14,15-dien-19-oic acid, its sodium salt and ent-8(14,15-pimaradien-3β-ol were the most active, displaying MIC values ranging from 1 to 10 μg mL-1. The results also allow us to conclude that minor structural differences among these diterpenes significantly influence their antimicrobial activity, bringing new perspectives to the discovery of new chemicals for use as a complement to instrumental endodontic procedures.

  17. Activity of endodontic antibacterial agents against selected anaerobic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Cláudio Maniglia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of substances used as antibacterial agents (solutions of 10% calcium hydroxide, camphorated paramonochlorophenol - PMCC, 2% chlorhexidine digluconate and 10% castor oil plant detergent on anaerobic bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586, Prevotella nigrescens ATCC 33563, Clostridium perfringens ATCC 13124 and Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 25285, using a broth dilution technique, was evaluated in vitro. For determination of minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericide concentrations (MIC and MBC, two culture broths, Reinforced Clostridial Medium (RCM and supplemented Brucella, standardized inoculum and serially diluted solutions were used. All antibacterial agents presented antimicrobial activity that varied for different bacteria. There were no differences in the performance of the two broths. Chlorhexidine digluconate was the most effective, with the lowest MICs, followed by castor oil detergent, PMCC and calcium hydroxide. C. perfringens and B. fragilis were the most resistant bacteria to all agents.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Periodontal Pathogens Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Mª José; Figuero, Elena; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a variant of PCR aimed to detect and quantify a targeted DNA molecule through the addition of probes labeled with fluorescent molecules that emit fluorescence within each amplification cycle, what results in fluorescence values proportional to the amount of accumulated PCR product. This chapter presents the detailed procedures for quantification of different periodontal pathogens (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Campylobacter rectus, and Fusobacterium spp.) using qPCR. It also includes the description of the most frequent problems encountered and how to solve them. In addition, a detailed protocol for multiplex qPCR to detect and quantify P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans is included.

  19. Coaggregation of Streptococcus salivarius with periodontopathogens: evidence for involvement of fimbriae in the interaction with Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, C; Lamothe, J; Frenette, M

    2003-10-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is divided into two serological subgroups that carry either fibrils or fimbriae. Although fimbriae have been observed on up to 50% of S. salivarius strains in the human oral cavity, no function has yet been assigned to them. To determine whether S. salivarius fimbriae have a role in adhesion, we examined the ability of S. salivarius to coaggregate with selected microorganisms involved in periodontal diseases. Our results show that S. salivarius coaggregated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia. However, only fimbriated S. salivarius cells were able to coaggregate with P. intermedia, suggesting a specific role for these structures in the interaction. Heat treatment, sensitivity to sugars, amino acids, and EDTA, as well as protease treatment were also used to further characterize coaggregation between S. salivarius and periodontopathogens.

  20. Effect of S-PRG Eluate on Biofilm Formation and Enzyme Activity of Oral Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Yoneda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the antibacterial activity of a composite resin containing prereacted glass ionomer (S-PRG filler was revealed. We examined the effect of an S-PRG eluate on various biologic activities of Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Adherence ability of S. mutans was evaluated by microtiter plate assay; protease and gelatinase activities of P. gingivalis were examined by synthetic substrate hydrolysis and gelatin film spot assay, respectively. Coaggregation of P. gingivalis with Fusobacterium nucleatum was also examined. S-PRG eluate was found to suppress streptococcal adherence. S-PRG eluate inhibited the protease and gelatinase activities of P. gingivalis and the coaggregation between P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. These results indicate that S-PRG eluate suppresses streptococcal adherence and inhibits the protease and coaggregation activities of P. gingivalis. These findings may prompt research into novel strategies for preventing caries and periodontitis.

  1. Oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, R; Kirakodu, S S; Novak, K F; Ebersole, J L

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the use of a novel model of multispecies biofilms to stimulate profiles of cytokines/chemokines from oral epithelial cells that contribute to local inflammation in the periodontium. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg)/S. oralis (So)/S. sanguinis (Ss) and Sg/Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn)/Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) biofilms elicited significantly elevated levels of IL-1α and showed synergistic stimulatory activity compared with an additive effect of the 3 individual bacteria. Only the Sg/Actinomyces naeslundii (An)/Fn multispecies biofilms elicited IL-6 levels above those of control. IL-8 was a primary response to the Sg/An/Fn biofilms, albeit the level was not enhanced compared with a predicted composite level from the monospecies challenges. These results represent some of the first data documenting alterations in profiles of oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies biofilms.

  2. DIAGNOSIS AND MEDICAL AND SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC INFECTIOUS FIBRINOUS PLEURITIS IN AN OKAPI (OKAPIA JOHNSTONI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Dana; Lamberski, Nadine; Zuba, Jeffery; Richardson, G Lynn; Fischer, A T; Rantanen, Norman W

    2015-06-01

    A 10-yr-old female okapi (Okapia johnstoni) at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park was evaluated for intermittent malaise, inappetence, occasional cough, abdominal splinting, and licking at both flanks. Physical examination revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and fluid sounds on thoracic auscultation. Transthoracic ultrasound showed multiple uniform, anechoic filled structures in the right and left pleural space. Surgical exploration of the thoracic cavity revealed bilateral, mature, fibrous, compartmentalizing adhesions between the visceral and parietal pleura, confirming a diagnosis of chronic, infectious, fibrinous pleuritis. The suspected etiology was occult aspiration pneumonia secondary to historical episodes of regurgitation associated with general anesthesia. Culture of the pleural fluid and fibrous adhesions grew Trueperella (Arcanobacterium) pyogenes, Arcanobacterium haemolyticum, and few Fusobacterium species. Treatment consisted of chest-tube placement to establish drainage, thoracic lavage, unilateral surgical debridement, and long-term antibiotics. The animal made a complete clinical recovery over 7 mo.

  3. Mucosal invasion by fusobacteria is a common feature of acute appendicitis in Germany, Russia, and China

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    Alexander Swidsinski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: To investigate the geographic occurrence of mucosa-invading Fusobacteria in acute appendicitis. Patients and Methods: Carnoy- and formalin-fixated appendices from Germany, Russia, and China were comparatively investigated. Bacteria were detected using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Cecal biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and other conditions were used as disease controls. Results: Fusobacteria represented mainly by Fusobacterium nucleatum were the major invasive component in bacterial infiltrates in acute appendicitis but were completely absent in controls. The occurrence of invasive Fusobacteria in Germany, Russia, and China was the same. The detection rate in Carnoy-fixated material was 70-71% and in formalin-fixated material was 30-36%. Conclusions: Acute appendicitis is a polymicrobial infectious disease in which F. nucleatum and other Fusobacteria play a key role.

  4. Assessing the efficacy of vesicle fusion with planar membrane arrays using a mitochondrial porin as reporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila Justyna; Hansen, Jesper S.; Stibius, Karin B.

    2011-01-01

    reconstitution in biomimetic membrane arrays may be quantified using the developed FomA assay. Specifically, we show that FomA vesicles are inherently fusigenic. Optimal FomA incorporation is obtained with a proteoliposome lipid-to-protein molar ratio (LPR)=50 more than 105 FomA proteins could be incorporated......Reconstitution of functionally active membrane protein into artificially made lipid bilayers is a challenge that must be overcome to create a membrane-based biomimetic sensor and separation device. In this study we address the efficacy of proteoliposome fusion with planar membrane arrays. We...... establish a protein incorporation efficacy assay using the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) as reporter. We use electrical conductance measurements and fluorescence microscopy to characterize proteoliposome fusion with an array of planar membranes. We show that protein...

  5. Antibacterial efficacy of triple-layered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/nanoapatite/lauric acid guided bone regeneration membrane on periodontal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarani, Nur Najiha; Jamuna-Thevi, Kalitheerta; Shahab, Neelam; Hermawan, Hendra; Saidin, Syafiqah

    2017-01-20

    A guided bone regeneration (GBR) membrane has been extensively used in the repair and regeneration of damaged periodontal tissues. One of the main challenges of GBR restoration is bacterial colonization on the membrane, constitutes to premature membrane degradation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the antibacterial efficacy of triple-layered GBR membrane composed of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), nanoapatite (NAp) and lauric acid (LA) with two types of Gram-negative periodontal bacteria, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis through a disc diffusion and bacterial count tests. The membranes exhibited a pattern of growth inhibition and killing effect against both bacteria. The increase in LA concentration tended to increase the bactericidal activities which indicated by higher diameter of inhibition zone and higher antibacterial percentage. It is shown that the incorporation of LA into the GBR membrane has retarded the growth and proliferation of Gram-negative periodontal bacteria for the treatment of periodontal disease.

  6. CLINICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL DATA IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS.

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    Christina Popova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an infectious disease concerning supporting tissues of the teeth. The primary etiological agent for disease development and progression is the subgingival biofilm, but recently it is known that host factors may modify the pathological process or may affect the severity and /or extent. The increasing levels of some specific pathogenic subgingival bacteria such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and others can result in periodontal destruction and possibly correlate with disease severity. Data from controlled studies show high prevalence of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and Tr. denticola which represent the red complex (coexistence of these three species in patients with moderate and severe chronic periodontitis. Parallel investigation of probing depth (PD and clinical attachment level (CAL with the microbiological testing may give a confirmation of relation between subgingival pathogenic bacteria and severity of periodontitis.

  7. A SONOGRAPHIC SHORT CERVIX AS THE ONLY CLINICAL MANIFESTATION OF INTRA-AMNIOTIC INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    HASSAN, SONIA; ROMERO, ROBERTO; HENDLER, ISRAEL; GOMEZ, RICARDO; KHALEK, NAHLA; ESPINOZA, JIMMY; NIEN, JYH KAE; BERRY, STANLEY M.; BUJOLD, EMMANUEL; CAMACHO, NATALIA; SOROKIN, YORAM

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A sonographically short cervix is a powerful predictor of spontaneous preterm delivery. However, the etiology and optimal management of a patient with a short cervix in the mid-trimester of pregnancy remain uncertain. Microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and intra-amniotic inflammation are frequently present in patients with spontaneous preterm labor or acute cervical insufficiency. This study was conducted to determine the rate of MIAC and intra-amniotic inflammation in patients with a cervical length <25 mm in the mid-trimester. STUDY DESIGN A retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients referred to our high risk clinic because of a sonographic short cervix or a history of a previous preterm birth. Amniocenteses were performed for the evaluation of MIAC and for karyotype analysis in patients with a short cervix. Fluid was cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, as well as genital mycoplasmas. Patients with MIAC were treated with antibiotics selected by their physician. RESULTS Of 152 patients with a short cervix at 14–24 weeks, 57 had amniotic fluid analysis. The prevalence of MIAC was 9% (5/57). Among these patients, the rate of preterm delivery (<32 weeks) was 40% (2/5). Microorganisms isolated from amniotic fluid included Ureaplasma urealyticum (n=4) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (n=1). Patients with a positive culture for Ureaplasma urealyticum received intravenous Azithromycin. Three patients with Ureaplasma urealyticum had a sterile amniotic fluid culture after treatment, and subsequently delivered at term. The patient with Fusobacterium nucleatum developed clinical chorioamnionitis and was induced. CONCLUSION 1) Sub-clinical MIAC was detected in 9% of patients with a sonographically short cervix (<25 mm); and 2) maternal parenteral treatment with antibiotics can eradicate MIAC caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum. This was associated with delivery at term in the three patients whose successful treatment was documented by

  8. Comparison of human gut microbiota in control subjects and patients with colorectal carcinoma in adenoma: Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and next-generation sequencing analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Chika; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Moritani, Isao; Tanaka, Junichiro; Oya, Yumi; Inoue, Hidekazu; Tameda, Masahiko; Shiraki, Katsuya; Ito, Masaaki; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Takase, Kojiro

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Japan. The etiology of CRC has been linked to numerous factors including genetic mutation, diet, life style, inflammation, and recently, the gut microbiota. However, CRC-associated gut microbiota is still largely unexamined. This study used terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze and compare gut microbiota of Japanese control subjects and Japanese patients with carcinoma in adenoma. Stool samples were collected from 49 control subjects, 50 patients with colon adenoma, and 9 patients with colorectal cancer (3/9 with invasive cancer and 6/9 with carcinoma in adenoma) immediately before colonoscopy; DNA was extracted from each stool sample. Based on T-RFLP analysis, 12 subjects (six control and six carcinoma in adenoma subjects) were selected; their samples were used for NGS and species-level analysis. T-RFLP analysis showed no significant differences in bacterial population between control, adenoma and cancer groups. However, NGS revealed that i), control and carcinoma in adenoma subjects had different gut microbiota compositions, ii), one bacterial genus (Slackia) was significantly associated with the control group and four bacterial genera (Actinomyces, Atopobium, Fusobacterium, and Haemophilus) were significantly associated with the carcinoma-in-adenoma group, and iii), several bacterial species were significantly associated with each type (control: Eubacterium coprostanoligens; carcinoma in adenoma: Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides fragiles, Clostridium nexile, Fusobacterium varium, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Prevotella stercorea, Streptococcus gordonii, and Veillonella dispar). Gut microbial properties differ between control subjects and carcinoma-in-adenoma patients in this Japanese population, suggesting that gut microbiota is related to CRC prevention and development.

  9. Microbial flora in chronic periodontitis: Study at a tertiary health care center from North Karnataka

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    Kirtilaxmi K Benachinmardi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Periodontitis is a major public health problem in India with a prevalence of 60-80%. If untreated it acts as a risk factor for systemic diseases. Data on anaerobic periodontal microflora in the Indian population is very scarce. Hence, this study was undertaken to know the nature of oral microbiota in chronic periodontitis in this region of India and also the semiquantitative study in pre- and post-treatment group and to determine antibiotic susceptibility pattern for aerobic isolates. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 60 cases. Material was collected from the subgingival pockets in patients with chronic periodontitis attending the Periodontology, Outpatient Department. Clinical samples were transported to the laboratory in fluid thioglycollate medium. Initially Gram′s stain and Fontana stains were done. Aerobic, anaerobic, and microaerophilic culture were put up. Antibiotic sensitivity test was done for aerobic isolates. Results: Sixty samples yielded 121 isolates of which 78.34% were polymicrobial, 11.66% were monomicrobial and oral commensals were grown in 10% cases. Out of 121 isolates 91.74% were anaerobic, 7.43% were aerobic and 0.83% were microaerophilic. Fusobacterium species was the most common isolate among anaerobes. Using "paired t-test" "P" value was significant indicating significant reduction in colony count after phase-I periodontal therapy. Conclusion: This study has shown that anaerobic bacteria are important cause of chronic periodontitis, along with aerobes and microaerophilic organisms. Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis, Porphyromonas spp and Prevotella intermedia are the most common anaerobic pathogens. Bacterial culture methods are still economical and gold standard.

  10. In vitro efficacy of cefovecin against anaerobic bacteria isolated from subgingival plaque of dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazandi, Manouchehr; Bird, Philip S; Owens, Jane; Wilson, Gary; Meyer, James N; Trott, Darren J

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal disease is a common disease of dogs and cats often requiring antimicrobial treatment as an adjunct to mechanical debridement. However, correct compliance with oral antimicrobial therapy in companion animals is often difficult. Cefovecin is a recently introduced veterinary cephalosporin that has demonstrated prolonged concentrations in extracellular fluid, allowing for dosing intervals of up to 14 days. Subgingival samples were collected from the oral cavity of 29 dogs and eight cats exhibiting grade 2 or grade 3 periodontal disease. Samples were cultivated on Wilkin Chalgrens agar and incubated in an anaerobic chamber for seven days. Selected anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified to species level using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for cefovecin and six additional antimicrobials using the agar dilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The 65 clinical isolates were identified as Porphyromonas gulae (n = 45), Porphyromonas crevioricanis (n = 12), Porphyromonas macacae (n = 1), Porphyromonas cangingivalis (n = 1) Fusobacterium nucleatum (n = 2), Fusobacterium russii (n = 1) and Solobacterium moorei (n = 3). This is the first report of S. moorei being isolated from companion animals with periodontal disease. All isolates were highly susceptible to cefovecin, with a MIC90 of ≤0.125 μg/ml. Conversely, different resistance rates to ampicillin, amoxicillin and erythromycin between isolates were detected. Cefovecin is thus shown to be effective in vitro against anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

  11. Comparative analysis of salivary bacterial microbiome diversity in edentulous infants and their mothers or primary care givers using pyrosequencing.

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    Kimberly D Cephas

    Full Text Available Bacterial contribution to oral disease has been studied in young children, but there is a lack of data addressing the developmental perspective in edentulous infants. Our primary objectives were to use pyrosequencing to phylogenetically characterize the salivary bacterial microbiome of edentulous infants and to make comparisons against their mothers. Saliva samples were collected from 5 edentulous infants (mean age = 4.6±1.2 mo old and their mothers or primary care givers (mean age = 30.8±9.5 y old. Salivary DNA was extracted, used to generate DNA amplicons of the V4-V6 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rDNA gene, and subjected to 454-pyrosequencing. On average, over 80,000 sequences per sample were generated. High bacterial diversity was noted in the saliva of adults [1012 operational taxonomical units (OTU at 3% divergence] and infants (578 OTU at 3% divergence. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Fusobacteria were predominant bacterial phyla present in all samples. A total of 397 bacterial genera were present in our dataset. Of the 28 genera different (P<0.05 between infants and adults, 27 had a greater prevalence in adults. The exception was Streptococcus, which was the predominant genera in infant saliva (62.2% in infants vs. 20.4% in adults; P<0.05. Veillonella, Neisseria, Rothia, Haemophilus, Gemella, Granulicatella, Leptotrichia, and Fusobacterium were also predominant genera in infant samples, while Haemophilus, Neisseria, Veillonella, Fusobacterium, Oribacterium, Rothia, Treponema, and Actinomyces were predominant in adults. Our data demonstrate that although the adult saliva bacterial microbiome had a greater OTU count than infants, a rich bacterial community exists in the infant oral cavity prior to tooth eruption. Streptococcus, Veillonella, and Neisseria are the predominant bacterial genera present in infants. Further research is required to characterize the development of oral microbiota early in life

  12. The effect of blue light on periodontal biofilm growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Carla R; Song, Xiaoqing; Polymeri, Angeliki; Goodson, J Max; Wang, Xiaoshan; Soukos, Nikolaos S

    2015-11-01

    We have previously shown that blue light eliminates the black-pigmented oral bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, and Prevotella melaninogenica. In the present study, the in vitro photosensitivity of the above black-pigmented microorganisms and four Fusobacteria species (Fusobacterium nucleatum ss. nucleatum, F. nucleatum ss. vincentii, F. nucleatum ss. polymorphum, Fusobacterium periodonticum) was investigated in pure cultures and human dental plaque suspensions. We also tested the hypothesis that phototargeting the above eight key periodontopathogens in plaque-derived biofilms in vitro would control growth within the dental biofilm environment. Cultures of the eight bacteria were exposed to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 80 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 4.8 J/cm2. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of bacteria was performed to demonstrate the presence and amounts of porphyrin molecules within microorganisms. Suspensions of human dental plaque bacteria were also exposed once to blue light at 455 nm with power density of 50 mW/cm2 and energy fluence of 12 J/cm2. Microbial biofilms developed from the same plaque were exposed to 455 nm blue light at 50 mW/cm2 once daily for 4 min (12 J/cm2) over a period of 3 days (4 exposures) in order to investigate the cumulative action of phototherapy on the eight photosensitive pathogens as well as on biofilm growth. Bacterial growth was evaluated using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. The selective phototargeting of pathogens was studied using whole genomic probes in the checkerboard DNA-DNA format. In cultures, all eight species showed significant growth reduction (p biofilms, respectively, (p biofilms. The cumulative blue light treatment suppressed biofilm growth in vitro. This may introduce a new avenue of prophylactic treatment for periodontal diseases.

  13. Prevalent bacterial species and novel phylotypes in advanced noma lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paster, B J; Falkler Jr, W A; Enwonwu, C O; Idigbe, E O; Savage, K O; Levanos, V A; Tamer, M A; Ericson, R L; Lau, C N; Dewhirst, F E

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial diversity in advanced noma lesions using culture-independent molecular methods. 16S ribosomal DNA bacterial genes from DNA isolated from advanced noma lesions of four Nigerian children were PCR amplified with universally conserved primers and spirochetal selective primers and cloned into Escherichia coli. Partial 16S rRNA sequences of approximately 500 bases from 212 cloned inserts were used initially to determine species identity or closest relatives by comparison with sequences of known species or phylotypes. Nearly complete sequences of approximately 1,500 bases were obtained for most of the potentially novel species. A total of 67 bacterial species or phylotypes were detected, 25 of which have not yet been grown in vitro. Nineteen of the species or phylotypes, including Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus spp., and the opportunistic pathogens Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Ochrobactrum anthropi were detected in more than one subject. Other known species that were detected included Achromobacter spp., Afipia spp., Brevundimonas diminuta, Capnocytophaga spp., Cardiobacterium sp., Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium spp., Gemella haemoylsans, and Neisseria spp. Phylotypes that were unique to noma infections included those in the genera Eubacterium, Flavobacterium, Kocuria, Microbacterium, and Porphyromonas and the related Streptococcus salivarius and genera Sphingomonas and TREPONEMA: Since advanced noma lesions are infections open to the environment, it was not surprising to detect species not commonly associated with the oral cavity, e.g., from soil. Several species previously implicated as putative pathogens of noma, such as spirochetes and Fusobacterium spp., were detected in at least one subject. However, due to the limited number of available noma subjects, it was not possible at this time to associate specific species with the disease.

  14. Anaerobic co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells and anaerobic pathogens - a new in vitro model system.

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    Katja Kriebel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established a model system with oral pathogenic bacterial species and eukaryotic cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. The facultative anaerobe bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were studied. Their effects on hMSCs and primary as well as permanent gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22, HGPEC were comparatively analyzed. We show that hMSCs cope with anoxic conditions, since 40% vital cells remain after 72 h of anaerobic culture. The Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells are significantly more sensitive to lack of oxygen. All bacterial species reveal a comparatively low adherence to and internalization into hMSCs (0.2% and 0.01% of the initial inoculum, respectively. In comparison, the Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells present better targets for bacterial adherence and internalization. The production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8 is higher in both gingival epithelial cell lines compared to hMSCs and Fusobacterium nucleatum induce a time-dependent cytokine secretion in both cell lines. Porphyromonas gingivalis is less effective in stimulating secretion of IL-8 in the co-cultivation experiments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HMSCs are suitable for use in anoxic regions of the oral cavity. The interaction with local pathogenic bacteria does not result in massive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. The test system established in this study allowed further investigation of parameters prior to set up of

  15. Bacterial communities associated with apical periodontitis and dental implant failure

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    Simon Dingsdag

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previously, we demonstrated that bacteria reside in apparently healed alveolar bone, using culture and Sanger sequencing techniques. Bacteria in apparently healed alveolar bone may have a role in peri-implantitis and dental implant failure. Objective: To compare bacterial communities associated with apical periodontitis, those colonising a failed implant and alveolar bone with reference biofilm samples from healthy teeth. Methods and results: The study consisted of 196 samples collected from 40 patients undergoing routine dental implant insertion or rehabilitation. The bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA sequences were amplified. Samples yielding sufficient polymerase chain reaction product for further molecular analyses were subjected to terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP; 31 samples and next generation DNA sequencing (454 GS FLX Titanium; 8 samples. T-RFLP analysis revealed that the bacterial communities in diseased tissues were more similar to each other (p<0.049 than those from the healthy reference samples. Next generation sequencing detected 13 bacterial phyla and 373 putative bacterial species, revealing an increased abundance of Gram-negative [Prevotella, Fusobacterium (p<0.004, Treponema, Veillonellaceae, TG5 (Synergistetes] bacteria and a decreased abundance of Gram-positive [(Actinomyces, Corynebacterium (p<0.008] bacteria in the diseased tissue samples (n=5 relative to reference supragingival healthy samples (n=3. Conclusion: Increased abundances of Prevotella, Fusobacterium and TG5 (Synergistetes were associated with apical periodontitis and a failed implant. A larger sample set is needed to confirm these trends and to better define the processes of bacterial pathogenesis in implant failure and apical periodontitis. The application of combined culture-based, microscopic and molecular technique-based approaches is suggested for future studies.

  16. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (pbacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:27115350

  17. Afecções podais em vacas da bacia leiteira de Rondon do Pará Foot disorders in cows from basin milk of Rondon do Pará

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    José Alcides S. Silveira

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available As doenças digitais estão entre as principais causas de performance reduzida de rebanhos leiteiros. Com o objetivo de determinar a prevalência, classificar clinicamente e estabelecer os fatores epidemiológicos das enfermidades podais em vacas da bacia leiteira de Rondon do Pará, foram avaliadas 1.236 vacas, das quais 275 apresentaram pelo menos um tipo de lesão podal. Identificou-se 655 lesões, o que resultou em uma prevalência de 22,25%. As enfermidades mais frequentes foram hiperplasia interdigital (80,92%, necrobacilose interdigital (6,11% e cascos com crescimento excessivo (6,42%. Os membros pélvicos foram os mais acometidos (61,83% e o espaço interdigital, tanto nos membros torácicos (36,34%, quanto nos pélvicos (48,09%, a região digital acometida com maior frequência. O estudo epidemiológico mostrou que características ambientais tais como relevo montanhoso, pastagem em formação com presença de troncos e galhos de árvores, irregularidades nos pisos dos currais, presença de piçarra e lama podem favorecer o aparecimento das lesões podais. Constatou-se a ausência de medidas de controle e profilaxia de afecções que acometem os cascos em 95,5% das propriedades estudadas. O exame clínico específico do casco foi eficiente no diagnóstico das enfermidades.Foot diseases are some of the main causes of low performance in dairy cows. In order to determine the prevalence, clinical classification and to establish the epidemio-logical factors of foot diseases in cows from basin milk of Rondon do Pará, 1,236 cows were evaluated and 275 had at least one type of foot injury. A total of 655 lesions was showed which a prevalence of 22.25%. Most frequent lesions were interdigital hyperplasia (80.92%, claw overgrowth (6.42%, and interdigital necrobacillosis (6.11%. Hind limbs were most frequently affected (61.83%, and lesions affecting the interdigital space were the most common in both the thoracic (36.34% and hind limbs (48

  18. Detection of putative periodontal pathogens in subgingival specimens of dogs Detecção de patógenos periodontais em amostras subgengivais de cães

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    Sheila Alexandra Belini Nishiyama

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the presence of putative periodontal organisms, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, Fusobacterium nucleatum,Dialister pneumosintes,Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans,Campylobacter rectus,Eikenella corrodens and Treponema denticola were examined from subgingival samples of 40 dogs of different breeds with (25 and without (15 periodontitis, by using the PCR method. The PCR products of each species showed specific amplicons. Of the 25 dogs with periodontitis, P. gingivalis was detected in 16 (64% samples, C. rectus in 9 (36%, A. actinomycetemcomitans in 6 (24%, P. intermedia in 5 (20%, T. forsythensis in 5 (20%, F. nucleatum in 4 (16% and E. corrodens in 3 (12%. T. denticola and D. pneumosintes were not detected in clinical samples from dogs with periodontitis. Moreover, P. gingivalis was detected only in one (6.66% crossbred dog without periodontitis. Our results show that these microorganisms are present in periodontal microbiota of dogs with periodontitits, and it is important to evaluate the role of these putative periodontal microorganisms play in the periodontitis in household pets particularly, dogs in ecologic and therapeutic terms, since these animals might acquire these periodontopahogens from their respective owners.Neste estudo, a presença de patógenos periodontais, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Dialister pneumosintes, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Campylobacter rectus, Eikenella corrodens e Treponema denticola foi determinada por PCR, em amostras subgengivais de 40 cães com (25 e sem (15 doença periodontal. Os produtos amplificados pelo PCR para cada espécie bacteriana mostraram amplicons específicos. Dos 25 cães apresentando doença periodontal, P. gingivalis foi detectado em 16 amostras (64%, C. rectus em 9 (36%, A. actinomycetemcomitans em 6 (24%, P. intermedia em 5 (20%, T. forsythensis em 5 (20

  19. Isolamento e identificação da microbiota periodontal de cães da raça Pastor Alemão Isolate and identify of periodontal microbiota of German Shepherd dogs

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    Carla Afonso da Silva Bitencourt Braga

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A microbiota indígena gengival de cães não está totalmente descrita, sendo sua identificação uma etapa importante no estabelecimento da etiopatogenia e terapia da doença periodontal. O objetivo deste trabalho foi isolar e identificar a microbiota periodontal de cães da raça Pastor Alemão, considerando sítios saudáveis e com doença periodontal. Foram utilizados 29 cães, com idade variando de três a seis anos, sendo analisados espécimes clínicos de sítios periodontais saudáveis de 12 cães e sítios com periodontite de outros 17. Foram isoladas 672 amostras microbianas, com predomínio dos gêneros Pasteurella, Staphylococcus, Porphyromonas e Fusobacterium. A microbiota dos sítios saudáveis equiparou-se à dos sítios doentes, tratando-se de uma microbiota indígena. A microbiota dos sítios doentes apresentou-se aumentada em relação a dos sítios saudáveis, indicando mudança do ambiente do sítio periodontal.The indigenous gingival microbiota of dogs is not totally described, although such identification is an important step to establish the etiopathogenesis and adequate therapy for the periodontal disease. The aims of this study were to isolate and identify the periodontal microbiota of German Shepherd dogs from healthy and with periodontal desease sites. Twenty nine German Shepherd dogs from three to six years of age were used in this study. Clinical specimens were analysed from healthy periodontal sites of 12 dogs and sites presenting gingivitis of 17 dogs. A total amount of 672 microbial samples, were isolated where the predominant genera were Pasteurella spp., Staphylococcus spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacterium spp. The microbiological population of the affected sites was similar to the healthy sites, consisting on an indigenous microbiota. The microbiota on the affecteded sites was higher in number than on the healthy sites, showing change in the environment of the periodontal sites.

  20. The bacteriology of the supragingival plaque of child dental patients in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salako, N O; Rotimi, V O; Preeta, R; Khodakhast, F

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the bacterial flora of the gingival plaques of pediatric dental patients in order to establish baseline data for future studies on the complex microbiota of the oral cavity of this group of child dental patients. Forty subjects, aged 3-12 years, were enrolled and investigated after informed consent was obtained. During the patients' first visit to the dental clinic supragingival plaque samples were collected from the gingival area of buccal and lingual tooth surfaces of all primary and permanent molar teeth using sterile curettes. Serially diluted samples were inoculated onto a set of selective and nonselective media and then incubated at the appropriate atmospheric conditions and temperatures. Representative colonies of isolates were identified by standard methods, including hemolytic characteristics on blood agar and profiling on API 20S and API 20A as appropriate. A total of 183 isolates (123 aerobes and 60 anaerobes) were recovered from the 40 patients with a mean count of 3 per sample of aerobes compared to 1.5 per sample for the anaerobes. Streptococcus sanguis was the predominant aerobic species (23.6%) isolated from 29 (72.5%) of the 40 patients, followed by Streptococcus mitis, 19.5 and 60%, Streptococcus salivarius, 17.1 and 52.5% and Streptococcus mutans, 17.1 and 52.5%. The frequency of isolation of anaerobic bacteria was Prevotella spp. 50% from 30 (75%) of the 40 patients, Fusobacterium spp., 18.3 and 27.5%, Bacteroides spp., Porphyromonas spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp., 6.7 and 10%, 6.7 and 10%, and 5 and 7.5%, respectively. Prevotella intermedia was the single most common species. The results show that there were more aerobic/facultative anaerobic bacteria than the obligate anaerobes in the dental plaque of the pediatric dental patients in Kuwait. The high prevalence of the pioneering streptococci as well as black-pigmented Prevotella spp. and Fusobacterium spp. indicates that the dental plaques of the children were in the

  1. Efecto bactericida del láser de diodo en periodoncia

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    G Caccianiga

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El láser en odontología, gracias a su capacidad antibacteriana, hemostática y de menor sintomatología operatoria, encuentra un amplio campo de aplicación en el ámbito de la terapia periodontal. En este estudio ha sido probada la eficacia de un protocolo que prevé la utilización asociada de irradiación láser y de agua oxigenada con el fin de reducir a carga bacteriana de cepas comúnmente presentes en las bolsas periodontales activas y resistentes a la acción bactericida de solamente la irradiación láser como la Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum y Peptostreptococcus micron. La metodología de laboratorio preveía el siguiente protocolo: cada una de las suspensiones bacterianas ha sido expuesta al agua oxigenada a una concentración del 3% y ha sido irradiada con láser por 10, 15 o 20 segundos utilizando tubos estériles Eppendorf de 1,5 ml. Los resultados confirman la mayor eficacia bactericida de la acción combinada de agua oxigenada y láser. Los cultivos microbiológicos efectuados revelan como, no obstante el efecto bactericida, el láser tiene una escasa acción sobre las cepas bacterianas testadas si no es asociado al agua oxigenada. En particular, en el caso de la Prevotela intermedia y del Fusobacterium nucleatum, la utilización de agua oxigenada al 3% solamente ha dado resultado mejores respecto a solamente el láser, mientras que la asociación de los dos tratamientos ha dado siempre óptimos resultados. En el caso del Peptostreptococcus micron, la utilización de agua oxigenada y el láser separadamente han dado una escasa disminución de la cuenta bacteriana mientras que la asociación de los tratamientos ha potenciado la acción bactericida.

  2. Microbiological evaluation of infected root canals and their correlation with pain

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    Nadine Luísa Soares de Lima Guimarães

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the endodontic microbiota of human teeth without pulp vitality presenting radiographically visible periapical lesions and its correlation with pre- and postoperative pain symptomatology. Material and methods: Sixteen young adult patients, both genders, aging from 18 to 45 years, presenting 21 single-rooted teeth with pulp necrosis and needing endodontic treatment were selected in the multidisciplinary clinic at the University of Fortaleza (UNIFOR. After crown surgical access, the ��������������root canals were embedded with 0.9% saline solution and the material from root canals was collected ���������������������������������������������� withhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhsterile paper point. The paper points were placed into Stuart transport medium and sent to the microbiology laboratory of the University of Fortaleza. Isolation and identification of bacteria were made by culture technique. The cleaning and shaping of root canals was performed by ��������������� ����� ���������������������������� crown-down technique..............................Intra-canal medication comprised calcium hydroxide mixed with chlorhexidine and after 14 days the canals were filled. Patients were asked about the occurrence of pain before treatment and 24 hours after cleaning and shaping procedures. Results: The most prevalent microbial group was Streptococcus sp. followed by Fusobacterium nucleatum, although Gram-positive cocci, non-sporulating Gram-positive bacilli, Gram-negative bacilli, pigmented Gram-negative bacilli, Veillonella, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas sp. were also frequently isolated. Conclusion: According to the results, it can be concluded that Fusobacterium

  3. Molecular diversity of bacteria in commercially available "Spirulina" food supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardaka, Elisabeth; Kormas, Konstantinos A; Katsiapi, Matina; Genitsaris, Savvas; Moustaka-Gouni, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Arthrospira is among the most well-known food supplements worldwide known as "Spirulina." While it is a widely recognized health-promoting natural product, there are no reports on the molecular diversity of commercially available brands of "Spirulina" supplements and the occurrence of other cyanobacterial and heterotrophic bacterial microorganisms in these products. In this study, 454-pyrosequencing analysis of the total bacterial occurrence in 31 brands of "Spirulina" dietary supplements from the Greek market was applied for the first time. In all samples, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of Arthrospira platensis were the predominant cyanobacteria. Some products contained additional cyanobacterial OTUs including a few known potentially toxic taxa. Moreover, 469 OTUs were detected in all 31 products collectively, with most of them being related to the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. All samples included heterotrophic bacterial OTUs, ranging from 9-157 per product. Among the most common OTUs were ones closely related to taxa known for causing health issues (i.e., Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Clostridium, Bacillus, Fusobacterium, Enterococcus). The observed high cyanobacterial and heterotrophic bacterial OTUs richness in the final product is a point for further research on the growth and processing of Arthrospira biomass for commercial purposes.

  4. Probiotics modify human intestinal mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with colorectal cancer.

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    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Wu, Wen; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-10-01

    Studies using animal models have demonstrated that probiotics may have a beneficial role in the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, the underlying mechanism of the beneficial effects of interventional probiotic treatment on gut microbiota has remained elusive. In the present study, pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes was conducted in order to determine the extent to which probiotics alter the microbiota. The observations of the present study indicated that the microbial structure of cancerous tissue differed significantly from that of healthy individuals and that the CRC microbiota exhibited lower diversity. It was indicated that interventional treatment with probiotics increased the density and diversity of mucosal microbes, and altered the mucosa‑associated microbiota. Pyrosequencing demonstrated that probiotics significantly reduced (5‑fold) the abundance of a bacterial taxon assigned to the genus Fusobacterium, which had been previously suggested to be a contributing factor to increase tumorigenesis. Accordingly, interventional probiotic therapy is suggested to be able to improve the composition of the mucosal microbial flora and significantly reduce the abundance of mucosa-associated pathogens in patients with CRC.

  5. Antimicrobial efficacy of 3 oral antiseptics containing octenidine, polyhexamethylene biguanide, or Citroxx: can chlorhexidine be replaced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Nadine; Widmer, Andreas F; Waltimo, Tuomas; Kulik, Eva M; Weiger, Roland; Filipuzzi-Jenny, Elisabeth; Walter, Clemens

    2010-07-01

    Use of oral antiseptics decreases the bacterial load in the oral cavity. To compare the antimicrobial activity of 3 novel oral antiseptics with that of chlorhexidine, which is considered the "gold standard" of oral hygiene. Comparative in vitro study. Four common oral microorganisms (Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, and Fusobacterium nucleatum) were tested under standard conditions and at different concentrations, by use of a broth dilution assay and an agar diffusion assay and by calculating the log10 reduction factor (RF). The antimicrobial activity of each antiseptic was assessed by counting the difference in bacterial densities (ie, the log10 number of colony-forming units of bacteria) before and after the disinfection process. The oral antiseptics containing octenidine (with an RF in the range of 7.1-8.24 CFU/mL) and polyhexamethylene biguanide (with an RF in the range of 7.1-8.24 CFU/mL) demonstrated antimicrobial activity comparable to that of chlorhexidine (with an RF in the range of 1.03-8.24 CFU/mL), whereas the mouth rinse containing Citroxx (Citroxx Biosciences; with an RF in the range of 0.22-1.36 CFU/mL) showed significantly weaker antimicrobial efficacy. Overall, octenidine and polyhexamethylene biguanide were more active at lower concentrations.conclusion. Oral antiseptics containing the antimicrobial agent octenidine or polyhexamethylene biguanide may be considered as potent alternatives to chlorhexidine-based preparations.

  6. The effect of sodium hypochlorite on Enterococcus faecalis when grown on dentine as a single- and multi-species biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Benlee; Zilm, Peter S; Briggs, Nancy; Rogers, Anthony H; Cathro, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is often involved in the aetiology of apical periodontitis after endodontic treatment. This project aimed to establish, on dentine in vitro, a multi-species biofilm containing E. faecalis, and to determine if the organism had an increased resistance to sodium hypochlorite compared with an axenic biofilm. Biofilms were established on dentine discs in flow cells with either E. faecalis alone (axenic) or together with Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus sanguinis. Following treatment with either 0.9% sodium hypochlorite or saline, the viability of E. faecalis was determined by serial plating and qualitative analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Viable counts indicated that 0.9% NaOCl is highly effective against E. faecalis grown alone and as part of a multi-species biofilm (P = 0.0005 and P = 0.001, respectively). No significant difference in its survival in the two biofilm types was found (P = 0.8276).

  7. The antibacterial activity of various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids against several oral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Park, Nam-Hee; Hwang, Seon-Yeong; Sohn, Jae Hak; Kwak, Inseok; Cho, Kwang Keun; Choi, In Soon

    2013-07-01

    The antibacterial activity of various saturated fatty acids (SFA) and unsaturated fatty acids (USFA) against different oral pathogens which are implicated in the cause of dental caries, stomatitis, gingivitis, and periodontitis was examined. The saturated fatty acids Pa, StA and ArA, and the unsaturated omega-7 fatty acids PLA and omega-9 fatty acids OA showed either none to low antimicrobial activity against all of the 12 oral pathogenic strains used in this study. In contrast, the omega-3 PUFAs, ALA, SDA, EPA and DHA, and the omega-6 PUFAs, LA, GLA, and AA showed considerable antimicrobial activity against 8, 7, 6 and 5 strains, and 6, 10 and 5 strains, respectively. In particular, the omega-3 and omega-6 PUFAs showed strong antimicrobial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis KCTC 381, the cause of periodontitis, and against Aggregatibacter segnis KCTC 5968, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. Polymorphum KCTC 5172 and Prevotella intermedia KCTC 25611, all organisms implicated in the cause of gingivitis. To date, no bacterial resistance to free fatty acids has been encountered and no resistance phenotype has emerged. Therefore, these results suggest that PUFAs may be useful in the development of therapeutic agents for oral diseases, and in particular, in the development of agents that have minimal side effects and against which there is no bacterial resistance.

  8. Antibacterial activity of sphingoid bases and fatty acids against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Carol L; Drake, David R; Dawson, Deborah V; Blanchette, Derek R; Brogden, Kim A; Wertz, Philip W

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that the role of lipids in innate immunity is more important than previously realized. How lipids interact with bacteria to achieve a level of protection, however, is still poorly understood. To begin to address the mechanisms of antibacterial activity, we determined MICs and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of lipids common to the skin and oral cavity--the sphingoid bases D-sphingosine, phytosphingosine, and dihydrosphingosine and the fatty acids sapienic acid and lauric acid--against four Gram-negative bacteria and seven Gram-positive bacteria. Exact Kruskal-Wallis tests of these values showed differences among lipid treatments (P 500 μg/ml). Sapienic acid (MBC range, 31.3 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus mitis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum but not active against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. marcescens, P. aeruginosa, Corynebacterium bovis, Corynebacterium striatum, and Corynebacterium jeikeium (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Lauric acid (MBC range, 6.8 to 375.0 μg/ml) was active against all bacteria except E. coli, S. marcescens, and P. aeruginosa (MBC > 500 μg/ml). Complete killing was achieved as early as 0.5 h for some lipids but took as long as 24 h for others. Hence, sphingoid bases and fatty acids have different antibacterial activities and may have potential for prophylactic or therapeutic intervention in infection.

  9. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases

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    Yasuko Sekita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Houttuynia cordata (HC (Saururaceae has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care.

  10. Role of oral microbiome on oral cancers, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Pourya; Eslami, Hosein; Yousefi, Mehdi; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2016-12-01

    The oral cavity is inhibited by many of the bacterial species. Some of them have a key role in the development of oral disease. Interrelationships between oral microbiome and systemic conditions such as head-and-neck cancer have become increasingly appreciated in recent years. Emerging evidence also suggests a link between periodontal disease and oral cancer, and the explanation being that chronic inflammation could be a major factor in both diseases. Squamous cell carcinoma is that the most frequently occurring malignancy of the oral cavity and adjacent sites, representing over 90% of all cancers. The incidence of oral cancer is increasing, significantly among young people and women. Worldwide there are 350,000-400,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Bacteria, viruses, and fungi are strongly implicated as etiological factors in certain cancers. In this review we will discuss the association between the development of oral cancer in potentially malignant oral lesions with chronic periodontitis, chronic Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, candida, other microbes and described mechanisms which may be involved in these carcinoma.

  11. The Use of Different Irrigation Techniques to Decrease Bacterial Loads in Healthy and Diabetic Patients with Asymptomatic Apical Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, Mai; Saber, Shehab ElDin; El-Badry, Tarek; Obeid, Maram; Hassib, Nehal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is a multisystem disease which weakens the human’s immunity. Subsequently, it worsens the sequelae of apical periodontitis by raising a fierce bacterial trait due to the impaired host response. AIM: This study aimed to estimate bacterial reduction after using different irrigation techniques in systemically healthy and diabetic patients with asymptomatic apical periodontitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Enterococcus faecalis, Peptostreptococcus micros, and Fusobacterium necleatum bacteria were chosen, as they are the most common and prevailing strains found in periodontitis. Bacterial samples were retrieved from necrotic root canals of systemically healthy and diabetic patients, before and after endodontic cleaning and shaping by using two different irrigation techniques; the conventional one and the EndoVac system. Quantitive polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was utilised to detect the reduction in the bacterial count. RESULTS: The EndoVac irrigation system was effective in reducing bacteria, especially Peptostreptococcus micros in the diabetic group when compared to conventional irrigation technique with a statistically significant difference. CONCLUSION: The EndoVac can be considered as a promising tool in combination with irrigant solution to defeat the bacterial colonies living in the root canal system. Additional studies ought to be done to improve the means of bacterial clearance mainly in immune-compromised individuals. PMID:28028421

  12. High-level antimicrobial efficacy of representative Mediterranean natural plant extracts against oral microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karygianni, Lamprini; Cecere, Manuel; Skaltsounis, Alexios Leandros; Argyropoulou, Aikaterini; Hellwig, Elmar; Aligiannis, Nektarios; Wittmer, Annette; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Nature is an unexplored reservoir of novel phytopharmaceuticals. Since biofilm-related oral diseases often correlate with antibiotic resistance, plant-derived antimicrobial agents could enhance existing treatment options. Therefore, the rationale of the present report was to examine the antimicrobial impact of Mediterranean natural extracts on oral microorganisms. Five different extracts from Olea europaea, mastic gum, and Inula viscosa were tested against ten bacteria and one Candida albicans strain. The extraction protocols were conducted according to established experimental procedures. Two antimicrobial assays--the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) assay--were applied. The screened extracts were found to be active against each of the tested microorganisms. O. europaea presented MIC and MBC ranges of 0.07-10.00 mg mL(-1) and 0.60-10.00 mg mL(-1), respectively. The mean MBC values for mastic gum and I. viscosa were 0.07-10.00 mg mL(-1) and 0.15-10.00 mg mL(-1), respectively. Extracts were less effective against C. albicans and exerted bactericidal effects at a concentration range of 0.07-5.00 mg mL(-1) on strict anaerobic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Parvimonas micra). Ethyl acetate I. viscosa extract and total mastic extract showed considerable antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms and could therefore be considered as alternative natural anti-infectious agents.

  13. Cross-talk among metabolic parameters, esophageal microbiota, and host gene expression following chronic exposure to an obesogenic diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Lecomte, Virginie; Maloney, Christopher A.; Morris, Margaret J.

    2017-01-01

    Unhealthy diets, and ensuing weight gain, predispose individuals to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. We examined the effect of chronic high fat diet (HFD) on the esophageal microbiota of Sprague Dawley rats using Illumina MiSeq amplicon sequencing (V4, 515 F/806 R) and on esophageal expression of IL18, PTGS2, PPARA, FFAR3, and CRAT. The relationships among metabolic parameters, esophageal microbiota, and host gene expression were determined. We observed a significant difference between the upper and lower esophageal microbiota in control fed rats, emphasized by enrichment of Lactobacillus species in the lower esophagus. Rats on HFD gained significantly more fat and had reduced insulin sensitivity. Diet type significantly affected the esophageal microbiota, with Clostridium sensu stricto being enriched in both upper and lower segments of HFD fed rats. Of interest, bacterial pathways related to carotenoid biosynthesis were significantly decreased in the lower esophagus of HFD fed rats. We observed strong correlations between metabolic parameters, the esophageal microbial profiles, and host esophageal gene expression. In particular, Fusobacterium, Rothia, and Granulicatella showed consistent correlations across a range of metabolic and gene markers. Our data indicates that unhealthy diets can significantly alter the esophageal microbiota, and enrich for bacterial species previously associated with chronic gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:28362001

  14. [Role of infectious agents in the emergence of malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutikhin, A G; Yuzhalin, A E; Brusina, E B; Briko, N I

    2012-01-01

    According to the data of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), at least 6 virus species (HPV, EBV, HHV-8/KSHV, HTLV-1, HBV, HCV), 4 helminthes species (Schistosoma haematobium and japonicum, Opisthorchis viverrini, Clonorchis sinensis) and I bacterium species (Helicobacter pylori) have been proved to be capable of causing the development of cancer. The analysis of the data available shows that Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), John Cunningham polyomavirus (JCV), monkey virus 40 (SV40), cytomegalovirus (CMV), xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMRV), Helicobacter bilis and hepaticus, Campylobacter jejuni, Fusobacterium varium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Prevotella spp., Streptococcus bovis and anginosus, Treponema denticola, Salmonella typhi, paratyphi and typhimurium, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bartonella spp., Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, trachomatis and psittaci, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Propionibacterium acnes, Tropheryma whippelii, Schistosoma mansoni, Opistorchis felineus, Strongyloides stercoralis, Taenia solium, Candida spp., Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Histoplasma capsulatum and Trichomonas vaginalis can also be potential etiological agents of cancer. Apparently, detection of new associations between infectious agents and risk of the development of cancer will facilitate progress in elaboration of prophylaxis measures, early diagnostic methods and, probably, methods of treatment of malignant tumors.

  15. Environmental Arsenic Exposure and Microbiota in Induced Sputum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison G. White

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic exposure from drinking water is associated with adverse respiratory outcomes, but it is unknown whether arsenic affects pulmonary microbiota. This exploratory study assessed the effect of exposure to arsenic in drinking water on bacterial diversity in the respiratory tract of non-smokers. Induced sputum was collected from 10 subjects with moderate mean household water arsenic concentration (21.1 ± 6.4 ppb and 10 subjects with low household water arsenic (2.4 ± 0.8 ppb. To assess microbiota in sputum, the V6 hypervariable region amplicons of bacterial 16s rRNA genes were sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Microbial community differences between arsenic exposure groups were evaluated using QIIME and Metastats. A total of 3,920,441 sequence reads, ranging from 37,935 to 508,787 per sample for 316 chips after QIIME quality filtering, were taxonomically classified into 142 individual genera and five phyla. Firmicutes (22%, Proteobacteria (17% and Bacteriodetes (12% were the main phyla in all samples, with Neisseriaceae (15%, Prevotellaceae (12% and Veillonellacea (7% being most common at the genus level. Some genera, including Gemella, Lactobacillales, Streptococcus, Neisseria and Pasteurellaceae were elevated in the moderate arsenic exposure group, while Rothia, Prevotella, Prevotellaceae Fusobacterium and Neisseriaceae were decreased, although none of these differences was statistically significant. Future studies with more participants and a greater range of arsenic exposure are needed to further elucidate the effects of drinking water arsenic consumption on respiratory microbiota.

  16. Diversity of microbes in amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiulio, Daniel B

    2012-02-01

    Recent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based studies estimate the prevalence of microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) to be ≥30-50% higher than that detected by cultivation-based methods. Some species that have been long implicated in causing MIAC remain among the common invaders (e.g. Ureaplasma spp., Mycoplasma spp., Fusobacterium spp. Streptococcus spp., Bacteroides spp. and Prevotella spp.). Yet we now know from studies based on PCR of the 16S ribosomal DNA that cultivation-resistant anaerobes belonging to the family Fusobacteriaceae (particularly Sneathia sanguinegens, and Leptotrichia spp.) are also commonly found in amniotic fluid. Other diverse microbes detected by PCR of amniotic fluid include as-yet uncultivated and uncharacterized species. The presence of some microbial taxa is associated with specific host factors (e.g. Candida spp. and an indwelling intrauterine device). It appears that MIAC is polymicrobial in 24-67% of cases, but the potential role of pathogen synergy is poorly understood. A causal relationship between diverse microbes, as detected by PCR, and preterm birth is supported by types of association (e.g. space, time and dose) proposed as alternatives to Koch's postulates for inferring causality from molecular findings. The microbial census of the amniotic cavity remains unfinished. A more complete understanding may inform future research directions leading to improved strategies for preventing, diagnosing and treating MIAC.

  17. The gut microbial community in metabolic syndrome patients is modified by diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Carmen; Garcia-Carpintero, Sonia; Alcala-Diaz, Juan F; Gomez-Delgado, Francisco; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Rangel Zuñiga, Oriol A; Quintana-Navarro, Gracia M; Landa, Blanca B; Clemente, Jose C; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Camargo, Antonio; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota changes may be involved in the development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is a multicomponent disorder frequently associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to test the effect of consuming two healthy diets: a Mediterranean diet and a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet, for 2years in the gut microbiota of MetS patients and those in the control group. We analyzed the differences in the bacterial community structure between the groups after 2years of dietary intervention (Mediterranean or low-fat diet) through quantitative polymerase chain reaction using primers, targeting specific bacterial taxa. We observed, at basal time, that the abundance of Bacteroides, Eubacterium and Lactobacillus genera is lower in the control group than in MetS patients, while Bacteroides fragilis group, Parabacteroides distasonis, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Ruminococcus flavefaciens subgroup and Eubacterium rectale are depleted in MetS patients (all P values diet partially restores the population of P. distasonis, B. thetaiotaomicron, F. prausnitzii, B. adolescentis and B. longum in MetS patients (all P values diet could be a useful tool to restore potentially beneficial members of the gut microbiota, although the stability of these changes over time still remains to be assessed.

  18. Microbial Diversity of Source and Point-of-Use Water in Rural Haiti – A Pyrosequencing-Based Metagenomic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Bartelli, Debra; Patra, Cyril; Chauhan, Bhavin V.; Dowd, Scot E.

    2016-01-01

    Haiti endures the poorest water and sanitation infrastructure in the Western Hemisphere, where waterborne diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality. Most of these diseases are reported to be caused by waterborne pathogens. In this study, we examined the overall bacterial diversity of selected source and point-of-use water from rural areas in Central Plateau, Haiti using pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA genes. Taxonomic composition of water samples revealed an abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A total of 38 bacterial families and 60 genera were identified. The presence of several Klebsiella spp. (tentatively, K. pneumoniae, K. variicola and other Klebsiella spp.) was detected in most water samples. Several other human pathogens such as Aeromonas, Bacillus, Clostridium, and Yersinia constituted significantly higher proportion of bacterial communities in the point-of-use water samples compared to source water. Bacterial genera traditionally associated with biofilm formation, such as Chryseobacterium, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, Pseudomonas were found in the point-of-use waters obtained from water filters or domestic water storage containers. Although the pyrosequencing method utilized in this study did not reveal the viability status of these pathogens, the abundance of genetic footprints of the pathogens in water samples indicate the probable risk of bacterial transmission to humans. Therefore, the importance of appropriate handling, purification, and treatment of the source water needed to be clearly communicated to the communities in rural Haiti to ensure the water is safe for their daily use and intake. PMID:27936055

  19. Microbial Diversity of Source and Point-of-Use Water in Rural Haiti - A Pyrosequencing-Based Metagenomic Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Nabanita; Bartelli, Debra; Patra, Cyril; Chauhan, Bhavin V; Dowd, Scot E; Banerjee, Pratik

    2016-01-01

    Haiti endures the poorest water and sanitation infrastructure in the Western Hemisphere, where waterborne diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality. Most of these diseases are reported to be caused by waterborne pathogens. In this study, we examined the overall bacterial diversity of selected source and point-of-use water from rural areas in Central Plateau, Haiti using pyrosequencing of 16s rRNA genes. Taxonomic composition of water samples revealed an abundance of Firmicutes phyla, followed by Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A total of 38 bacterial families and 60 genera were identified. The presence of several Klebsiella spp. (tentatively, K. pneumoniae, K. variicola and other Klebsiella spp.) was detected in most water samples. Several other human pathogens such as Aeromonas, Bacillus, Clostridium, and Yersinia constituted significantly higher proportion of bacterial communities in the point-of-use water samples compared to source water. Bacterial genera traditionally associated with biofilm formation, such as Chryseobacterium, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, Pseudomonas were found in the point-of-use waters obtained from water filters or domestic water storage containers. Although the pyrosequencing method utilized in this study did not reveal the viability status of these pathogens, the abundance of genetic footprints of the pathogens in water samples indicate the probable risk of bacterial transmission to humans. Therefore, the importance of appropriate handling, purification, and treatment of the source water needed to be clearly communicated to the communities in rural Haiti to ensure the water is safe for their daily use and intake.

  20. Potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer: Tongue diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuwen; Yang, Xi; Qi, Quan; Pan, Yuefen; Chen, Yongchao; Shen, Junjun; Liao, Haihong; Ji, Zhaoning

    2016-06-01

    Tongue diagnosis, as a unique method of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), was used to discriminate physiological functions and pathological conditions by observing the changes of the tongue and tongue coating. The aims of the present study were to explore a potential screening and early diagnosis method of cancer through evaluating the differences of the images of tongue and tongue coating and the microbiome on the tongue coating. The DS01-B tongue diagnostic information acquisition system was used to photograph and analyze the tongue and tongue coating. The next-generation sequencing technology was used to determine the V2-V4 hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA to investigate the microbiome on the tongue coating. Bioinformatics and statistical methods were used to analyze the microbial community structure and diversity. Comparing with the healthy people, the number of mirror-like tongue, thick tongue coating and the moisture of tongue were increased in cancers. The dominant color of the tongue in the healthy people was reddish while it was purple in the cancers. The relative abundance of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas in the healthy people were higher than that in the cancers. We also found 6 kinds of special microorganisms at species level in cancers. The study suggested that tongue diagnosis may provide potential screening and early diagnosis method for cancer.

  1. Subgingival Microbiota in White Patients With Desquamative Gingivitis: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Paolo G; Romano, Federica; Sasia, Danilo; Broccoletti, Roberto; Ricceri, Fulvio; Barbui, Anna Maria; Brossa, Silvia; Cipriani, Raffaella; Cricenti, Luca; Cabras, Marco; Aimetti, Mario

    2017-07-01

    Presence of epithelial desquamation, erythema, and erosions on gingival tissue is usually described in the literature as desquamative gingivitis (DG). A wide range of autoimmune/dermatologic disorders can manifest as DG, although the two more common are oral lichen planus and mucous membrane pemphigoid. The aim of this study is to investigate prevalence of 11 periodontopathogenic microorganisms in patients with DG and to compare it with the microbiologic status of individuals affected by plaque-induced gingivitis (pGI). Cross-sectional clinical and microbiologic data were obtained from 66 patients (33 in each group). Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed using semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Statistically significant difference, but with little clinical significance, was observed in gingival conditions between the two groups, probably due to the worse home control hygiene of patients with DG. Prevalence and levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum were statistically higher in samples from patients with DG than in those with pGI. In multivariate regression models, subgingival colonization of A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum/periodonticum was not statistically associated with DG, whereas, high levels of E. corrodens were associated with 13-fold increased odds for DG. Microbiologic differences were found in subgingival plaque for patients with DG and pGI. This may suggest possible association between periodontal pathogens and DG.

  2. Microbiota associated with chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws

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    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic osteomyelitis of maxilla and mandible is rare in industrialized countries and its occurrence in developing countries is associated with trauma and surgery, and its microbial etiology has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the microbiota associated with osteomyelitis of mandible or maxilla from some Brazilian patients. After clinical and radiographic evaluation, samples of bone sequestra, purulent secretion, and biopsies of granulomatous tissues from twenty-two patients with chronic osteomyelitis of mandible and maxilla were cultivated and submitted for pathogen detection by using a PCR method. Each patient harbored a single lesion. Bacterial isolation was performed on fastidious anaerobe agar supplemented with hemin, menadione and horse blood for anaerobes; and on tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract and horse blood for facultative bacteria and aerobes. Plates were incubated in anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, at 37ºC for 14 and 3 days, respectively. Bacteria were cultivated from twelve patient samples; and genera Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent. By PCR, bacterial DNA was detected from sixteen patient samples. The results suggest that cases of chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws are usually mixed anaerobic infections, reinforcing the concept that osteomyelitis of the jaws are mainly related to microorganisms from the oral environment, and periapical and periodontal infections may act as predisposing factors.

  3. Host susceptibility to periodontitis: mapping murine genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, A; Durrant, C; Mott, R; Polak, D; Schaefer, A; Weiss, E I; Iraqi, F A; Houri-Haddad, Y

    2013-05-01

    Host susceptibility to periodontal infection is controlled by genetic factors. As a step toward identifying and cloning these factors, we generated an A/J x BALB/cJ F2 mouse resource population. A genome-wide search for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) associated with periodontitis was performed. We aimed to quantify the phenotypic response of the progenies to periodontitis by microCT analysis, to perform a genome-wide search for QTL associated with periodontitis, and, finally, to suggest candidate genes for periodontitis. We were able to produce 408 F2 mice. All mice were co-infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum bacteria. Six weeks following infection, alveolar bone loss was quantified by computerized tomography (microCT) technology. We found normal distribution of the phenotype, with 2 highly significant QTL on chromosomes 5 and 3. A third significant QTL was found on chromosome 1. Candidate genes were suggested, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR) 1 and 6, chemokines, and bone-remodeling genes (enamelin, ameloblastin, and amelotin). This report shows that periodontitis in mice is a polygenic trait with highly significant mapped QTL.

  4. Alcohol Consumption and Periodontitis: Quantification of Periodontal Pathogens and Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, Eugênio J P; Costa, Fernando O; Cortelli, Sheila C; Cortelli, José R; Cota, Luís O M; Cyrino, Renata Magalhães; Lages, Elizabeth M B; Nobre-Franco, Gilson C; Brito, João A R; Gomez, Ricardo S

    2015-09-01

    There are few studies on periodontal status related to microbiologic and immunologic profiles among individuals not or occasionally using alcohol and those with alcohol dependence. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of alcohol consumption on the levels of subgingival periodontal pathogens and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) in the gingival fluid among individuals with and without periodontitis. This observational analytic study includes 88 volunteers allocated in four groups (n = 22): individuals with alcohol dependence and periodontitis (ADP), individuals with alcohol dependence and without periodontitis (ADNP), individuals not or occasionally using alcohol with periodontitis (NAP), and individuals not or occasionally using alcohol without periodontitis (NANP). Levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Eikenella corrodens, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction on the basis of the subgingival biofilm, and IL-1β and TNF-α were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in gingival fluid samples. Individuals with alcohol dependence showed worse periodontal status and higher levels of P. intermedia, E. corrodens, F. nucleatum, and IL-1β than non-users. No significant correlations between TNF-α and bacterial levels were observed. However, in the ADP group, higher levels of E. corrodens were correlated with higher levels of IL-1β. A negative influence of alcohol consumption was observed on clinical and microbiologic periodontal parameters, as well as a slight influence on immunologic parameters, signaling the need for additional studies.

  5. Total Antioxidant Capacity and Total Oxidant Status in Saliva of Periodontitis Patients in Relation to Bacterial Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Taowen; Andrukhov, Oleh; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Zhonghao; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response.

  6. Phylogenetic and functional gene structure shifts of the oral microbiomes in periodontitis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; He, Jinzhi; He, Zhili; Zhou, Yuan; Yuan, Mengting; Xu, Xin; Sun, Feifei; Liu, Chengcheng; Li, Jiyao; Xie, Wenbo; Deng, Ye; Qin, Yujia; VanNostrand, Joy D; Xiao, Liying; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong; Shi, Wenyuan; Zhou, Xuedong

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition and function of subgingival dental plaque is crucial to understanding human periodontal health and disease, but it is challenging because of the complexity of the interactions between human microbiomes and human body. Here, we examined the phylogenetic and functional gene differences between periodontal and healthy individuals using MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and a specific functional gene array (a combination of GeoChip 4.0 for biogeochemical processes and HuMiChip 1.0 for human microbiomes). Our analyses indicated that the phylogenetic and functional gene structure of the oral microbiomes were distinctly different between periodontal and healthy groups. Also, 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis indicated that 39 genera were significantly different between healthy and periodontitis groups, and Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, Treponema, Filifactor, Eubacterium, Tannerella, Hallella, Parvimonas, Peptostreptococcus and Catonella showed higher relative abundances in the periodontitis group. In addition, functional gene array data showed that a lower gene number but higher signal intensity of major genes existed in periodontitis, and a variety of genes involved in virulence factors, amino acid metabolism and glycosaminoglycan and pyrimidine degradation were enriched in periodontitis, suggesting their potential importance in periodontal pathogenesis. However, the genes involved in amino acid synthesis and pyrimidine synthesis exhibited a significantly lower relative abundance compared with healthy group. Overall, this study provides new insights into our understanding of phylogenetic and functional gene structure of subgingival microbial communities of periodontal patients and their importance in pathogenesis of periodontitis. PMID:24671083

  7. Oral bacteria in placental tissues: increased molecular detection in pregnant periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, V; O'Valle, F; Pozo, E; Puertas, A; León, R; Mesa, F

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the DNA of oral bacteria in placental samples from women with and without periodontitis who had or had not had preterm births and/or low birthweight (PB/LBW) neonates. Data were gathered from 57 puerperal women in relation to socio-demographic, gynaecological, and periodontal variables and to placental histomorphology. Fifty-seven biopsies, 28 from mothers with periodontitis, were taken aseptically from preterm placentas (n = 36) and from full-term placentas (n = 21). Total DNA was extracted, and the presence of 15 oral bacteria was assessed using Nested-PCR. The placentas from women with periodontitis showed a higher prevalence of periodontopathogens compared to those from women without periodontitis (P = 0.009). Samples showed low prevalences of Actinomyces israelii, Parvimonas micra and Tannerella forsythia. An association was found between Eikenella corrodens in placenta and periodontitis (P = 0.002). The most ubiquitous bacterium, Fusobacterium nucleatum, was more prevalent in mothers with periodontitis and PB/LBW (P = 0.033). Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were not detected. These results, along with previous findings, show that oral bacteria may be normally present in the placenta, however, the levels of certain oral pathogens in the placenta would highly depend on the mother's periodontal state. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Laser Supported Reduction of Specific Microorganisms in the Periodontal Pocket with the Aid of an Er,Cr:YSGG Laser: A Pilot Study

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    N. Gutknecht

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a radial firing tip of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser as an adjunct to a nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Methods. Twelve patients with chronic or aggressive periodontitis were treated by conventional periodontal treatment using ultrasonic devices and hand instruments and, additionally, in two quadrants with an Er,Cr:YSGG laser. A new radial firing tip (RFPT 14-5, Biolase was used with 1.5 W, 30 Hz, 11% air, 20% water, and pulse duration 140 μs. Microbiological smears were taken before treatment, one day after lasing, and three and six months after lasing. Pocket depths of all periodontal sites were measured before and six months after treatment. Results. The total bacterial load of Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans inside the pocket was reduced significantly throughout the whole examination time. Greater pocket depth reductions were observed in all groups. There was a slight higher reduction of pocket depth in the lased group after six months. Conclusions. These results support the thesis that Er,Cr:YSGG laser supported periodontal treatment leads to a significant reduction of periopathogenes and thereby helps the maintenance of periodontal health.

  9. The in Vitro Antimicrobial Efficacy of PDT against Periodontopathogenic Bacteria

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    Philippe A. Haag

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis, an inflammatory disease, is caused by biofilms with a mixed microbial etiology and involves the progressive destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. A rising number of studies investigate the clinical potential of photodynamic therapy (PDT as an adjunct during active therapy. The aim of the present review was to evaluate the available literature for the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of photodynamic therapy focusing on the periodontopathogenic bacteria Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum. The focused question was: “Is it possible to decrease (at least 3 log steps or 99.9% or even eliminate bacterial growth by photodynamic therapy in vitro when compared to untreated control groups or control groups treated by placebo?” In general, PDT resulted in a substantial reduction of surviving bacteria. However, not all studies showed the desired reduction or elimination. The ranges of log10-reduction were 0.38 (58% to a complete eradication (100% for P. gingivalis, 0.21 (39% to 100% for A. actinomycetemcomitans and 0.3 (50% to 100% for F. nucleatum. In conclusion, further and particularly more comparable studies are needed to evaluate if PDT can be clinically successful as an adjuvant in periodontal therapy.

  10. The relationship between physiologic halitosis and periodontopathic bacteria of the tongue and gingival sulcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohmori, Misaki; Sato, Soh

    2010-02-01

    To determine the influence of oral status on halitosis, the relationship between halitosis and periodontopathic bacteria present in plaque on the tongue and the subgingival sulcus was examined in 62 periodontally healthy adults. Halitosis indicators used were the organoleptic score; gas chromatography results [total volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) = H(2)S + CH(3)SH + (CH(3))(2)S]; Halimeter values; and the results of three clinical tests, plaque control record (PlCR), plaque index (PlI), and tongue coat status. Significant correlations with organoleptic scores was observed for PlCR, PlI, tongue coat status, VSC amounts, and Halimeter values, indicating that halitosis in periodontally healthy subjects tended to originate from tongue plaque deposits. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to detect six periodontopathic bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, and Treponema denticola) from the tongue and subgingival plaque. Significant effects on the organoleptic scores, tongue coat status, total VSC, H(2)S and CH(3)SH amounts, and Halimeter values were observed only for T. denticola and F. nucleatum and only in the tongue plaque, not in the subgingival plaque. Thus, therapies developed to inhibit the growth of these bacteria may lead to future treatments of halitosis.

  11. 口臭与主要产臭菌的相关性分析%Analysis of the relationship between halitosis and oral bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范亚贤; 王者玲; 杨圣辉; 李金陆; 果梅英; 刘颖

    2005-01-01

    目的分析口臭与主要产臭菌的相关性.方法选择口臭患者29名,用鼻闻法确定口臭的来源和部位,使用口气测量仪测量口腔中挥发性硫化物(volatile sulfur compounds,VSCs)的浓度;分别从产臭牙周袋、舌苔和唾液中采集标本,进行厌氧培养,并进行菌落计数.结果VSCs水平与龈下菌斑中的厌氧菌总数明显正相关(P<0.01),与龈下菌斑中产黑菌数(black-pigment bacteria,BPB)和具核梭杆菌数(Fusobacterium nucleatum,FN)也相关(P<0.05),舌苔上的厌氧菌总数、产黑菌和具核梭杆菌与VSCs水平呈正相关(P<0.05).结论牙周病和大量舌苔可能是引起口臭的主要原因,而细菌(主要包括产黑菌和具核梭杆菌)在口臭的形成中起重要作用.

  12. [NUG--necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Y

    2014-07-01

    Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (NUG) is an acute and rare (0.5-11% of the population) infectious disease of the gum tissue, which is characterized by ulceration and inflammation of the inter-dental gum tissue. NUG was documented by historians since the fourth century BC, most of the reports from the ancient world were in the context of illness among fighting troops, present studies of NUG in the modern world are still common among soldiers. NUG is associated with poor oral hygiene and weakening of the host, especially in immunocompromised patients, malnutrition and poor living conditions, as well as in the context of mental stress. NUG is more common in young adults, but reports of morbidity in young children with malnutrition in the background are not uncommon. NUG diagnosis is based on three essential symptoms: sore gums, bleeding gums and the most diagnostic characteristic, ulceration and necrosis of the interdental papillae. The disease is considered to have a clear initial infectious etiology, when the main bacteria, associated with the disease, include: Bacteroides intermedius and Fusobacterium sp. The infection involves anaerobic \\ aerobic bacteria with a majority of Gram-negative bacteria. The treatment of NUG is based on combining mechanical removal of tartar with local and systemic delivery of antimicrobial agents. Adequate treatment usually prevent the progression of the disease and ulcer healing is expected in a few days. Nevertheless, lack of treatment can lead to deterioration in the form NUP to Noma.

  13. Interactions between Lactobacillus crispatus and Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)-Associated Bacterial Species in Initial Attachment and Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, António; Jefferson, Kimberly Kay; Cerca, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Certain anaerobic bacterial species tend to predominate the vaginal flora during bacterial vaginosis (BV), with Gardnerella vaginalis being the most common. However, the exact role of G. vaginalis in BV has not yet been determined. The main goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that G. vaginalis is an early colonizer, paving the way for intermediate (e.g., Fusobacterium nucleatum) and late colonizers (e.g., Prevotella bivia). Theoretically, in order to function as an early colonizer, species would need to be able to adhere to vaginal epithelium, even in the presence of vaginal lactobacilli. Therefore, we quantified adherence of G. vaginalis and other BV-associated bacteria to an inert surface pre-coated with Lactobacillus crispatus using a new Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methodology. We found that G. vaginalis had the greatest capacity to adhere in the presence of L. crispatus. Theoretically, an early colonizer would contribute to the adherence and/or growth of additional species, so we next quantified the effect of G. vaginalis biofilms on the adherence and growth of other BV-associated species by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) technique. Interestingly, G. vaginalis derived a growth benefit from the addition of a second species, regardless of the species. Conversely, G. vaginalis biofilms enhanced the growth of P. bivia, and to a minor extent of F. nucleatum. These results contribute to our understanding of BV biofilm formation and the progression of the disorder. PMID:23739678

  14. Comparative Study on the Characteristics of Weissella cibaria CMU and Probiotic Strains for Oral Care

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    Hye-Jin Jang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics have been demonstrated as a new paradigm to substitute antibiotic treatment for dental caries, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis. The present work was conducted to compare the characteristics of oral care probiotics: Weissella cibaria CMU (Chonnam Medical University and four commercial probiotic strains. Survival rates under poor oral conditions, acid production, hydrogen peroxide production, as well as inhibition of biofilm formation, coaggregation, antibacterial activity, and inhibition of volatile sulfur compounds were evaluated. The viability of W. cibaria CMU was not affected by treatment of 100 mg/L lysozyme for 90 min and 1 mM hydrogen peroxide for 6 h. Interestingly, W. cibaria produced less acid and more hydrogen peroxide than the other four probiotics. W. cibaria inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans at lower concentrations (S. mutans/CMU = 8 and efficiently coaggregated with Fusobacterium nucleatum. W. cibaria CMU and two commercial probiotics, including Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus reuteri, showed high antibacterial activities (>97% against cariogens (S. mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, and against periodontopathogens (F. nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. All of the lactic acid bacterial strains in this study significantly reduced levels of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan produced by F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis (p < 0.05. These results suggest that W. cibaria CMU is applicable as an oral care probiotic.

  15. Experimental alveolitis in rats: microbiological, acute phase response and histometric characterization of delayed alveolar healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Moacyr Tadeu Vicente; Cardoso, Camila Lopes; Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri de; Cestari, Tânia Mary; Feres, Magda; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Ferreira, Osny

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alveolitis is not well known and therefore experimental situations that mimic some features of this disease should be developed. In this study, the evolution of the experimentally induced infection in rat sockets is characterized, which leads to clinical signs of suppurative alveolitis with remarkable wound healing disturbs. Non-infected (Group I) and experimentally infected sockets in Rattus novergicus (Group II) were histometrically evaluated regarding the kinetics of alveolar healing. In addition, the characterization of the present bacteria in inoculation material and the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were performed. The detected species were Capnocytophaga ochracea, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss nucleatum, Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus anginosus, Treponema socranskii and Streptococcus sanguis. All experimentally infected rats developed suppurative alveolitis, showing higher levels of CRP in comparison to those non-infected ones. Furthermore, infected rats presented a significant delayed wound healing as measured by the histometric analysis (higher persistent polymorphonuclear infiltrate and lower density of newly formed bone). These findings indicate that rat sockets with experimentally induced infection produced higher levels of serum CRP, showing the potential of disseminated infection and a disturb in the alveolar repair process in an interesting experimental model for alveolitis studies.

  16. Experimental alveolitis in rats: microbiological, acute phase response and histometric characterization of delayed alveolar healing

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    Moacyr Tadeu Vicente Rodrigues

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of alveolitis is not well known and therefore experimental situations that mimic some features of this disease should be developed. OBJECTIVE: In this study, the evolution of the experimentally induced infection in rat sockets is characterized, which leads to clinical signs of suppurative alveolitis with remarkable wound healing disturbs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Non-infected (Group I and experimentally infected sockets in Rattus novergicus (Group II were histometrically evaluated regarding the kinetics of alveolar healing. In addition, the characterization of the present bacteria in inoculation material and the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP were performed. The detected species were Capnocytophaga ochracea, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss nucleatum, Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus anginosus, Treponema socranskii and Streptococcus sanguis. RESULTS: All experimentally infected rats developed suppurative alveolitis, showing higher levels of CRP in comparison to those non-infected ones. Furthermore, infected rats presented a significant delayed wound healing as measured by the histometric analysis (higher persistent polymorphonuclear infiltrate and lower density of newly formed bone. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that rat sockets with experimentally induced infection produced higher levels of serum CRP, showing the potential of disseminated infection and a disturb in the alveolar repair process in an interesting experimental model for alveolitis studies.

  17. Comparative study of the effects of photodynamic therapy and conventional therapy on ligature induced peri-implantitis in dogs; Estudo comparativo dos efeitos do laser de baixa potencia associado a fotossensibilizador e terapia convencional em periimplantes induzidas em mandibulas de caes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayek, Ricardo Rada Ahmad

    2004-07-01

    Progressive peri-implanter bone losses, which are accompanied by inflammatory process in the soft tissues is referred to as peri-implantitis. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of lethal photosensitisation with the conventional technique on bacterial reduction in ligature induced peri-implantitis in dogs. Seventeen third pre-molars of Labrador dogs were extracted and, immediately after, the implants were submerged. After osteointegration, peri-implantitis was induced. After 4 months, ligature were removed and the same period was waited for natural induction of bacterial plaque. The dogs were randomly divided into two groups. In the conventional group, they were treated with the conventional techniques of mucoperiosteal flaps for scaling the implant surface and irrigate it. In the laser group, only mucoperiosteal scaling was carried out before photodynamic therapy. On the peri-implanter pocket an azulene paste was injected and a GaAlAs low-power laser ({lambda}= 660 nm, P= 30 mW, E= 5,4 J and {delta}t= 3 min.). Microbiological samples were obtained before and immediately after treatment. One implant was removed to be analyzed by scan electron microscopy to verify contamination on the implant surface. The results of this study showed that Prevotella sp., Fusobacterium e S. Beta-haemolyticus were significantly reduced for the conventional and laser groups. (author)

  18. Emerging role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis: a review with special reference to perio-pathogenic bacteria

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    Manosha Perera

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer, primarily oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, continues to be a major global health problem with high incidence and low survival rates. While the major risk factors for this malignancy, mostly lifestyle related, have been identified, around 15% of oral cancer cases remain unexplained. In light of evidence implicating bacteria in the aetiology of some cancer types, several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the last decade, employing methodologies ranging from traditional culture techniques to 16S rRNA metagenomics, to assess the possible role of bacteria in OSCC. While these studies have demonstrated differences in microbial composition between cancerous and healthy tissues, they have failed to agree on specific bacteria or patterns of oral microbial dysbiosis to implicate in OSCC. On the contrary, some oral taxa, particularly Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, show strong oral carcinogenic potential in vitro and in animal studies. Bacteria are thought to contribute to oral carcinogenesis via inhibition of apoptosis, activation of cell proliferation, promotion of cellular invasion, induction of chronic inflammation, and production of carcinogens. This narrative review provides a critical analysis of and an update on the association between bacteria and oral carcinogenesis and the possible mechanisms underlying it.

  19. Impact of growth conditions on susceptibility of five microbial species to alkaline stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändle, Nathalie; Zehnder, Matthias; Weiger, Roland; Waltimo, Tuomas

    2008-05-01

    The effects of different growth conditions on the susceptibility of five taxa to alkaline stress were investigated. Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Streptococcus sobrinus OMZ 176, Candida albicans ATCC 90028, Actinomyces naeslundii ATCC 12104, and Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953 were grown as planktonic cells, allowed to adhere to dentin for 24 hours, grown as monospecies or multispecies biofilms on dentin under anaerobic conditions with a serum-enriched nutrient supply at 37 degrees C for 5 days. In addition, suspended biofilm microorganisms and 5-day old planktonic multispecies cultures were used. Microbial recovery upon direct exposure to saturated calcium hydroxide solution (pH 12.5) for 10 and 100 minutes was compared with control exposure to physiologic saline. Planktonic microorganisms were most susceptible; only E. faecalis and C. albicans survived in saturated solution for 10 minutes, the latter also for 100 minutes. Dentin adhesion was the major factor in improving the resistance of E. faecalis and A. naeslundii to calcium hydroxide, whereas the multispecies context in a biofilm was the major factor in promoting resistance of S. sobrinus to the disinfectant. In contrast, the C. albicans response to calcium hydroxide was not influenced by the growth condition. Adherence to dentin and interspecies interactions in a biofilm appear to differentially affect the sensitivity of microbial species to calcium hydroxide.

  20. Comparative evaluation of subgingival plaque microflora in pregnant and non-pregnant women: A clinical and microbiologic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Emmatty

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Gingival changes in pregnancy have been attributed to changes in the subgingival biofilm related to hormonal variations. Aims: To evaluate the subgingival plaque microflora in pregnant and nonpregnant women to determine if pregnancy induces any alterations in the subgingival plaque and to associate these changes with changes in periodontal status. Settings and Design: Thirty pregnant and 10 nonpregnant women within the age group of 20-35 years having a probing pocket depth (PPD of 3-4 mm were included in the study. The pregnant women were equally divided into 3 groups of 10, each belonging to I, II, and III trimester. Materials and Methods: Plaque index, gingival index, PPD, and microbiologic evaluation for specific bacterial counts for Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Parvimonas micra, and Fusobacterium nucleatum were carried out for all subjects. Statistical Analysis: Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Increase in gingival inflammation was observed in II and III trimester as compared with I trimester and control. Plaque scores did not show any significant difference between pregnant and nonpregnant women. Specific bacterial examination revealed an increase in proportion of P. intermedia in pregnant women of both II and III trimester as compared with I trimester and nonpregnant women. Conclusions: A definite increase in proportions of P. intermedia occurs in subgingival plaque microflora in pregnancy that may be responsible for the exaggerated gingival response.

  1. Variation of perimplant biofilm induced by non surgical periodontal therapy and the use of probiotics

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    Marcello Gatti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to improved surgical tecniques the use of dental implants has increased greatly. However, high rates of osseointegrated correctly implants, over the years are undermined by disease of bacterial etiology in the perimplant zone, especially by Gram negative anaerobes such as in gingivitis and periodontitis, in particular: Fusobacterium spp.(F., Treponema denticola (T.d., Tannerella forsythensis (T.f., Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A.a., Prevotella intermedia (P.i. e Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.. The mechanic treatment (MS results in a reduction of the total bacterial count (TBC and a slight change in the subgingival bacterial microflora towards the less pathogenic species and more like those of a healthy periodontium.Also the use of a probiotic in the form of buccal tablets of Lactobacillus reuteri (L.r., as demonstrated in this study, is thought to improve and modulate the composition of plaque, as it is able to exert an inhibitory effect on oral bacteria that support caries, gingivitis, periodontal and perimplant disease with a combination of different mechanisms.

  2. Microbiology and management of peritonsillar, retropharyngeal, and parapharyngeal abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2004-12-01

    This review describes the microbiology, diagnosis, and management of peritonsillar, retropharyngeal, and parapharyngeal abscesses in children. Predominant anaerobic organisms isolated in peritonsillar, lateral pharyngeal, and retropharyngeal abscesses are Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus spp.; aerobic organisms are group A streptococcus ( Streptococcus pyogenes ), Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae . Anaerobic bacteria can be isolated from most abscesses whenever appropriate techniques for their cultivation have been used, while S. pyogenes is isolated in only about one third of cases. More than two thirds of deep neck abscesses contain beta-lactamase producing organisms. Management of tonsillar, peritonsillar, and retropharyngeal abscesses is similar. Systemic antimicrobial therapy should be given in large doses whenever the diagnosis is made. However, when pus is formed, antimicrobial therapy is effective only in conjunction with adequate surgical drainage. Untreated abscesses can rupture spontaneously into the pharynx, causing catastrophic aspiration. Other complications are extension of infection laterally to the side of the neck or dissection into the posterior mediastinum through facial planes and the prevertebral space. Death can occur from aspiration, airway obstruction, erosion into major blood vessels, or extension to the mediastinum.

  3. Deep sequencing reveals microbiota dysbiosis of tongue coat in patients with liver carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haifeng; Ren, Zhigang; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Jianwen; Xu, Shaoyan; Luo, Qixia; Zhou, Kai; Sun, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shusen; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-09-01

    Liver carcinoma (LC) is a common malignancy worldwide, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Characterizing microbiome profiles of tongue coat may provide useful insights and potential diagnostic marker for LC patients. Herein, we are the first time to investigate tongue coat microbiome of LC patients with cirrhosis based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. After strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, 35 early LC patients with cirrhosis and 25 matched healthy subjects were enrolled. Microbiome diversity of tongue coat in LC patients was significantly increased shown by Shannon, Simpson and Chao 1 indexes. Microbiome on tongue coat was significantly distinguished LC patients from healthy subjects by principal component analysis. Tongue coat microbial profiles represented 38 operational taxonomic units assigned to 23 different genera, distinguishing LC patients. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe) reveals significant microbial dysbiosis of tongue coats in LC patients. Strikingly, Oribacterium and Fusobacterium could distinguish LC patients from healthy subjects. LEfSe outputs show microbial gene functions related to categories of nickel/iron_transport, amino_acid_transport, energy produced system and metabolism between LC patients and healthy subjects. These findings firstly identify microbiota dysbiosis of tongue coat in LC patients, may providing novel and non-invasive potential diagnostic biomarker of LC.

  4. Biomechanical Loading Modulates Proinflammatory and Bone Resorptive Mediators in Bacterial-Stimulated PDL Cells

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    Andressa Vilas Boas Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluate in vitro whether biomechanical loading modulates proinflammatory and bone remodeling mediators production by periodontal ligament (PDL cells in the presence of bacterial challenge. Cells were seeded on BioFlex culture plates and exposed to Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 25586 and/or cyclic tensile strain (CTS of low (CTSL and high (CTSH magnitudes for 1 and 3 days. Synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 was evaluated by ELISA. Gene expression and protein secretion of osteoprotegerin (OPG and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. F. nucleatum increased the production of COX2 and PGE2, which was further increased by CTS. F. nucleatum-induced increase of PGE2 synthesis was significantly (P<0.05 increased when CTSH was applied at 1 and 3 days. In addition, CTSH inhibited the F. nucleatum-induced upregulation of OPG at 1 and 3 days, thereby increasing the RANKL/OPG ratio. OPG and RANKL mRNA results correlated with the protein results. In summary, our findings provide original evidence that CTS can enhance bacterial-induced syntheses of molecules associated with inflammation and bone resorption by PDL cells. Therefore, biomechanical, such as orthodontic or occlusal, loading may enhance the bacterial-induced inflammation and destruction in periodontitis.

  5. Microbiological features of Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome periodontitis.

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    Velazco, C H; Coelho, C; Salazar, F; Contreras, A; Slots, J; Pacheco, J J

    1999-09-01

    Papillon-Lefevre syndrome patients exhibit hyperkeratosis palmo-plantaris and severe periodontitis. The syndrome is an autosomal recessive trait, but the mechanism of periodontal destruction is not known. This report presents the clinical and microbiological features of an 11-year old girl with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. Clinical examination included conventional periodontal measurements and radiographic analysis. In samples from 3 deep periodontal lesions, the occurrence of major suspected periodontopathic bacteria was determined by selective and non-selective culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification, and the presence of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr type 1 virus by a nested-PCR detection method. 10 of 22 available teeth demonstrated severe periodontal breakdown. Major cultivable bacteria included Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3.4% of total isolates), Prevotella nigrescens (16.4%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (14.3%) and Peptostreptococcus micros (10.6%). A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. nigrescens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Eikenella corrodens were identified by PCR analysis. The patient's non-affected parents and older brother revealed several periodontal pathogens but not A. actinomycetemcomitans. The viral examination demonstrated cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr type 1 virus in the subgingival sample of the Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome patient. The father and brother yielded subgingival cytomegalovirus but not Epstein-Barr type 1 virus. We hypothesize that human herpesviruses in concert with A. actinomycetemcomitans play important rôles in the development of Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome periodontitis.

  6. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

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    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  7. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  8. Clinical and in vitro efficacy of amoxicillin against bacteria associated with feline skin wounds and abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Josée; Messier, Serge; Labrecque, Olivia; Cox, William R

    2007-06-01

    A clinical trial involving 122 cats with infected skin wounds or abscesses presented to 10 veterinary clinics was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of 2 oral amoxicillin drug products (a paste and a suspension). A 2nd objective of the study was to identify bacteria involved in such infections and verify their in vitro sensitivity to amoxicillin. Samples of wound exudate were harvested at the time of presentation and submitted for aerobic and anaerobic culture. The sensitivity to amoxicillin of isolates thought to be infecting agents was tested, using a standard minimum inhibitory concentration method. Pasteuralla multocida and obligate anaerobes of the genera Prevotella, Fusobacterium, and Porphyromonas were the most frequently isolated pathogens. Overall, their in vitro susceptibility to amoxicillin was very good. Both drug products were clinically efficacious with a global success rate of 95.1% for cats administered oral amoxicillin at 11-22 mg/kg bodyweight (mean 13.8 mg/kg bodyweight) twice daily for 7 to 10 days.

  9. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-04-08

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. RESULTS Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect.

  10. Molecular diversity of bacteria in commercially available “Spirulina” food supplements

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    Elisabeth Vardaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cyanobacterium Arthrospira is among the most well-known food supplements worldwide known as “Spirulina.” While it is a widely recognized health-promoting natural product, there are no reports on the molecular diversity of commercially available brands of “Spirulina” supplements and the occurrence of other cyanobacterial and heterotrophic bacterial microorganisms in these products. In this study, 454-pyrosequencing analysis of the total bacterial occurrence in 31 brands of “Spirulina” dietary supplements from the Greek market was applied for the first time. In all samples, operational taxonomic units (OTUs of Arthrospira platensis were the predominant cyanobacteria. Some products contained additional cyanobacterial OTUs including a few known potentially toxic taxa. Moreover, 469 OTUs were detected in all 31 products collectively, with most of them being related to the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. All samples included heterotrophic bacterial OTUs, ranging from 9–157 per product. Among the most common OTUs were ones closely related to taxa known for causing health issues (i.e., Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Clostridium, Bacillus, Fusobacterium, Enterococcus. The observed high cyanobacterial and heterotrophic bacterial OTUs richness in the final product is a point for further research on the growth and processing of Arthrospira biomass for commercial purposes.

  11. The microbiological signature of human cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions exhibits restricted bacterial diversity compared to healthy skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Vanessa R; de Queiroz, Artur TL; Sanabani, Sabri S; de Oliveira, Camila I; Carvalho, Edgar M; Costa, Jackson ML; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Barral, Aldina

    2016-01-01

    Localised cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL) is the most common form of cutaneous leishmaniasis characterised by single or multiple painless chronic ulcers, which commonly presents with secondary bacterial infection. Previous culture-based studies have found staphylococci, streptococci, and opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in LCL lesions, but there have been no comparisons to normal skin. In addition, this approach has strong bias for determining bacterial composition. The present study tested the hypothesis that bacterial communities in LCL lesions differ from those found on healthy skin (HS). Using a high throughput amplicon sequencing approach, which allows for better populational evaluation due to greater depth coverage and the Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology pipeline, we compared the microbiological signature of LCL lesions with that of contralateral HS from the same individuals.Streptococcus, Staphylococcus,Fusobacterium and other strict or facultative anaerobic bacteria composed the LCL microbiome. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria found in HS, including environmental bacteria, were significantly decreased in LCL lesions (p < 0.01). This paper presents the first comprehensive microbiome identification from LCL lesions with next generation sequence methodology and shows a marked reduction of bacterial diversity in the lesions. PMID:27074253

  12. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artese, Hilana Paula Carillo; de Sousa, Celso Oliveira; Torres, Maria Cynésia Medeiros de Barros; Silva-Boghossian, Carina Maciel; Colombo, Ana Paula Vieira

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the composition of subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Sixteen CKD pre-dialysis individuals (CKD) and 14 individuals without clinical evidence of kidney disease (C) presenting chronic periodontitis were treated by scaling and root planing. Subgingival samples were collected from each patient and analyzed for their composition by checkerboard at baseline and 3 months post-therapy. Significant differences between groups at baseline were sought by the Mann-Whitney and χ² tests. Changes over time were examined by the Wilcoxon test. At baseline, the CKD group had significantly lower counts of E. faecalis compared to the C group (p < 0.05). After treatment, the levels of a greater number of species were reduced in the C group. Higher levels of A. israelii, C. rectus, F. periodonticum, P. micra, P. nigrescens, T. forsythia, N. mucosa, and S. anginosus (p < 0.05) were found in the CKD group compared to the C group. Also, non-responsive sites in CKD individuals harbored significantly higher levels of pathogenic species (T. forsythia, P. gingivalis, T. denticola, Fusobacterium spp., D. pneumosintes, E. faecalis and S. aureus; p < 0.05) than sites that responded to therapy, as well as non-responsive sites in the C group. The periodontitis-associated subgingival microbiota of CKD and systemically healthy individuals was similar in composition. However, high levels of pathogenic species persisted in the subgingival microbiota of patients with CKD after treatment.

  13. Salivary Microbiome Diversity in Caries-Free and Caries-Affected Children

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    Shan Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries (tooth decay is an infectious disease. Its etiology is not fully understood from the microbiological perspective. This study characterizes the diversity of microbial flora in the saliva of children with and without dental caries. Children (3–4 years old with caries (n = 20 and without caries (n = 20 were recruited. Unstimulated saliva (2 mL was collected from each child and the total microbial genomic DNA was extracted. DNA amplicons of the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were generated and subjected to Illumina Miseq sequencing. A total of 17 phyla, 26 classes, 40 orders, 80 families, 151 genera, and 310 bacterial species were represented in the saliva samples. There was no significant difference in the microbiome diversity between caries-affected and caries-free children (p > 0.05. The relative abundance of several species (Rothia dentocariosa, Actinomyces graevenitzii, Veillonella sp. oral taxon 780, Prevotella salivae, and Streptococcus mutans was higher in the caries-affected group than in the caries-free group (p < 0.05. Fusobacterium periodonticum and Leptotrichia sp. oral clone FP036 were more abundant in caries-free children than in caries-affected children (p < 0.05. The salivary microbiome profiles of caries-free and caries-affected children were similar. Salivary counts of certain bacteria such as R. dentocariosa and F. periodonticum may be useful for screening/assessing children’s risk of developing caries.

  14. Corticotropin-releasing factor secretion from dendritic cells stimulated by commensal bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariko Hojo; Toshifumi Ohkusa; Harumi Tomeoku; Shigeo Koido; Daisuke Asaoka; Akihito Nagahara; Sumio Watanabe

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the production and secretion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) by dendritic cells and the influence of commensal bacteria.METHODS: JAWSⅡ cells (ATCC CRL-11904), a mouse dendritic cell line, were seeded into 24-well culture plates and grown for 3 d. Commensal bacterial strains of Clostridium clostrodiiforme (JCM1291), Bacteroides vulgatus (B. vulgatus) (JCM5856), Escherichia coli (JCM1649), or Fusobacterium varium (F. varium) (ATCC8501) were added to the cells except for the control well, and incubated for 2 h. After incubation, we performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the cultured medium and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the dendritic cells, and compared these values with controls.RESULTS: The level of CRF secretion by control dendritic cells was 40.4 ± 6.2 pg/mL. The CRF levels for cells incubated with F. varium and B. vulgatus were significantly higher than that of the control (P < 0.0001). CRF mRNA was present in the control sample without bacteria, and CRF mRNA levels in all samples treated with bacteria were above that of the control sample.F. varium caused the greatest increase in CRF mRNA expression. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that dendritic cells produce CRF, a process augmented by commensal bacteria.

  15. Microbiota disbiosis is associated with colorectal cancer

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    Zhiguang eGao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The dysbiosis of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC. The present study was designed to investigate the gut microbiota distribution features in CRC patients. We performed pyrosequencing based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to investigate microbiota of the cancerous tissue and adjacent noncancerous normal tissue in proximal and distal CRC samples. The results revealed that the microbial structures of the CRC patients and healthy individuals differed significantly. Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were over-represented whereas Proteobacteria was under-represented in CRC patients. In addition, Lactococcus and Fusobacterium exhibited a relatively higher abundance while Pseudomonas and Escherichia-Shigella was reduced in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues. Meanwhile, the overall microbial structures of proximal and distal colon cancerous tissues were similar; but certain potential pro-oncogenic pathogens were different. These results suggested that the mucosa-associated microbiota is dynamically associated with CRC, which may provide evidences for microbiota-associated diagnostic, prognostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies for CRC.

  16. Microbiota disbiosis is associated with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-01-01

    The dysbiosis of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The present study was designed to investigate the gut microbiota distribution features in CRC patients. We performed pyrosequencing based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to investigate microbiota of the cancerous tissue and adjacent non-cancerous normal tissue in proximal and distal CRC samples. The results revealed that the microbial structures of the CRC patients and healthy individuals differed significantly. Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were over-represented whereas Proteobacteria was under-represented in CRC patients. In addition, Lactococcus and Fusobacterium exhibited a relatively higher abundance while Pseudomonas and Escherichia-Shigella was reduced in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Meanwhile, the overall microbial structures of proximal and distal colon cancerous tissues were similar; but certain potential pro-oncogenic pathogens were different. These results suggested that the mucosa-associated microbiota is dynamically associated with CRC, which may provide evidences for microbiota-associated diagnostic, prognostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for CRC.

  17. A simulation of microbial competition in the human colonic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M E; Dreesen, D W; Wiegert, R G

    1996-10-01

    Many investigations of the interactions of microbial competitors in the gastrointestinal tract used continuous-flow anaerobic cultures. The simulation reported here was a deterministic 11-compartment model coded by using the C programming language and based on parameters from published in vitro studies and assumptions were data were unavailable. The resource compartments were glucose, lactose and sucrose, starch, sorbose, and serine. Six microbial competitors included indigenous nonpathogenic colonizers of the human gastrointestinal tract (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Bacteroids ovatus, Fusobacterium varium, and Enterococcus faecalis) and the potential human enteropathogen Salmonella typhimurium. Flows of carbon from the resources to the microbes were modified by resource and space controls. Partitioning of resources to the competitors that could utilize them was calculated at each iteration on the basis of availability of all resources by feeding preference functions. Resources did not accumulate during iterations of the model. The results of the computer simulation of microbial competition model and for various modifications of the model. The results were based on few measured parameters but may be useful in the design of user-friendly software to aid researchers in defining and manipulating the microbial ecology of colonic ecosystems as relates to food-borne disease.

  18. Salivary Periodontopathic Bacteria in Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Devito, Karina; Ribeiro, Luiz Cláudio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess and compare salivary periodontopathic bacteria between groups of Down syndrome and non-Down syndrome children and adolescents. Materials and Methods This study included a sample of 30 Down syndrome children and adolescents (G-DS) and 30 age- and sex-matched non-Down syndrome subjects (G-ND). Clinical examination determined the gingival bleeding index (GBI) and plaque index. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were collected from all participants. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique identified the presence and density of eight periodontopathic bacteria in saliva. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results In the G-DS group, bleeding on probing was more frequent (p = 0.037) and higher densities of Campylobacter rectus (p = 0.013), Porphyromonas gingivalis (p = 0.025), Treponema denticola (p = 0.026), Fusobacterium nucleatum (p = 0.013), Prevotella intermedia (p = 0.001) and Prevotella nigrescens (p = 0.008) were observed. Besides, in the G-DS, the densities of bacteria from the orange complex were significantly higher in the age group 3–7 years for F. nucleatum (p = 0.029), P. intermedia (p = 0.001) and P. nigrescens (p = 0.006). C. rectus was higher in the age group 8–12 years (p = 0.045). Conclusion The results showed that children and adolescents with Down syndrome have higher susceptibility to periodontal disease and number of periodontopathic bacteria. PMID:27727287

  19. Selective responses of human gingival fibroblasts and bacteria on carbon fiber reinforced polyetheretherketone with multilevel nanostructured TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Lu, Tao; Wen, Jin; Xu, Lianyi; Zeng, Deliang; Wu, Qianju; Cao, Lingyan; Lin, Shuxian; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-03-01

    The long-term success of dental implants relies not only on stable osseointegration but also on the integration of implant surfaces with surrounding soft tissues. In our previous work, titanium plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique was applied to modify the carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRPEEK) surface, constructing a unique multilevel TiO2 nanostructure thus enhancing certain osteogenic properties. However, the interactions between the modified surface and soft-tissue cells are still not clear. Here, we fully investigate the biological behaviors of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and oral pathogens on the structured surface, which determine the early peri-implant soft tissue integration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the formation of nanopores with TiO2 nanoparticles embedded on both the sidewall and bottom. In vitro studies including cell adhesion, viability assay, wound healing assay, real-time PCR, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) disclose improved adhesion, migration, proliferation, and collagen secretion ability of HGFs on the modified CFRPEEK. Moreover, the structured surface exhibits sustainable antibacterial properties towards Streptococcus mutans, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Our results reveal that the multilevel TiO2 nanostructures can selectively enhance soft tissue integration and inhibit bacterial reproduction, which will further support and broaden the adoption of CFRPEEK materials in dental fields.

  20. Microbial dynamics during conversion from supragingival to subgingival biofilms in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurnheer, T; Bostanci, N; Belibasakis, G N

    2016-04-01

    The development of dental caries and periodontal diseases result from distinct shifts in the microbiota of the tooth-associated biofilm. This in vitro study aimed to investigate changes in biofilm composition and structure, during the shift from a 'supragingival' aerobic profile to a 'subgingival' anaerobic profile. Biofilms consisting of Actinomyces oris, Candida albicans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mutans and Veillonella dispar were aerobically grown in saliva-containing medium on hydroxyapatite disks. After 64 h, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia and Streptococcus anginosus were further added along with human serum, while culture conditions were shifted to microaerophilic. After 96 h, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola were finally added and the biofilm was grown anaerobically for another 64 h. At the end of each phase, biofilms were harvested for species-specific quantification and localization. Apart from C. albicans, all other species gradually increased during aerobic and microaerophilic conditions, but remained steady during anaerobic conditions. Biofilm thickness was doubled during the microaerophilic phase, but remained steady throughout the anaerobic phase. Extracellular polysaccharide presence was gradually reduced throughout the growth period. Biofilm viability was reduced during the microaerophilic conversion, but was recovered during the anaerobic phase. This in vitro study has characterized the dynamic structural shifts occurring in an oral biofilm model during the switch from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, potentially modeling the conversion of supragingival to subgingival biofilms. Within the limitations of this experimental model, the findings may provide novel insights into the ecology of oral biofilms.

  1. Methods for optimizing DNA extraction before quantifying oral bacterial numbers by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Mangala A; Martin, F Elizabeth; Hunter, Neil; Jacques, Nicholas A

    2009-07-01

    Methods for the optimal extraction of genomic DNA for real-time PCR enumeration of oral bacteria using the muramidase, mutanolysin, were developed using a simple in vitro oral flora model comprised of the facultative anaerobic gram-positive bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus mutans, the gram-positive anaerobe, Parvimonas micra, and the gram-negative anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella melaninogenica and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Traditional, as well as more elaborate, methods of quantifying bacterial numbers, including colony counting and estimation of DNA content using 4',6-diamino-2-phenylindole were compared in order to validate the real-time PCR approach. Evidence was obtained that P. gingivalis nuclease activity adversely affected the extraction of double-stranded DNA from this bacterium either alone or when it formed part of a consortium with the other bacteria. This nuclease activity could be overcome by treatment of the bacteria with either 20 mM diethyl pyrocarbonate or 70% ethanol at 4 degrees C overnight. A final purification of the DNA to remove any potential PCR inhibitors was added to the protocol in order to accurately quantify the amount of DNA by real-time PCR and hence the number of bacteria in a sample.

  2. The esophageal microbiota in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Freschi, Giancarlo; Ringressi, Maria Novella; Pallecchi, Lucia; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bechi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    The esophageal mucosa is among the sites colonized by human microbiota, the complex microbial ecosystem that colonizes various body surfaces and is increasingly recognized to play roles in several physiological and pathological processes. Our understanding of the composition of the esophageal microbiota in health and disease is challenged by the need for invasive sampling procedures and by the dynamic nature of the esophageal environment and remains limited in comparison with the information available for other body sites. Members of the genus Streptococcus appear to be the major components of the microbiota of the healthy esophagus, although the presence of several other taxa has also been reported. Dysbiosis, consisting of enrichment in some Gram-negative taxa (including Veillonella, Prevotella, Haemophilus, Neisseria, Campylobacter, and Fusobacterium), has been reported in association with gastroesophageal reflux disease and is hypothesized to contribute to the evolution of this condition toward Barrett's esophagus (which is the most common esophageal precancerous lesion) and, eventually, adenocarcinoma. Some Campylobacter species (mostly C. concisus) are also putatively involved in the progression of disease toward adenocarcinoma. However, variable findings have recently been reported in additional studies. Causative relationships between dysbiosis or specific bacterial species and esophageal diseases remain controversial and warrant further investigations. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Pyrosequencing the canine faecal microbiota: breadth and depth of biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hand

    Full Text Available Mammalian intestinal microbiota remain poorly understood despite decades of interest and investigation by culture-based and other long-established methodologies. Using high-throughput sequencing technology we now report a detailed analysis of canine faecal microbiota. The study group of animals comprised eleven healthy adult miniature Schnauzer dogs of mixed sex and age, some closely related and all housed in kennel and pen accommodation on the same premises with similar feeding and exercise regimes. DNA was extracted from faecal specimens and subjected to PCR amplification of 16S rDNA, followed by sequencing of the 5' region that included variable regions V1 and V2. Barcoded amplicons were sequenced by Roche-454 FLX high-throughput pyrosequencing. Sequences were assigned to taxa using the Ribosomal Database Project Bayesian classifier and revealed dominance of Fusobacterium and Bacteroidetes phyla. Differences between animals in the proportions of different taxa, among 10,000 reads per animal, were clear and not supportive of the concept of a "core microbiota". Despite this variability in prominent genera, littermates were shown to have a more similar faecal microbial composition than unrelated dogs. Diversity of the microbiota was also assessed by assignment of sequence reads into operational taxonomic units (OTUs at the level of 97% sequence identity. The OTU data were then subjected to rarefaction analysis and determination of Chao1 richness estimates. The data indicated that faecal microbiota comprised possibly as many as 500 to 1500 OTUs.

  4. Middle ear microbiome differences in indigenous Filipinos with chronic otitis media due to a duplication in the A2ML1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Hutchinson, Diane S; Ajami, Nadim J; Reyes-Quintos, Ma Rina T; Tantoco, Ma Leah C; Labra, Patrick John; Lagrana, Sheryl Mae; Pedro, Melquiadesa; Llanes, Erasmo Gonzalo D V; Gloria-Cruz, Teresa Luisa; Chan, Abner L; Cutiongco-de la Paz, Eva Maria; Belmont, John W; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Abes, Generoso T; Petrosino, Joseph F; Leal, Suzanne M; Chiong, Charlotte M

    2016-11-01

    Previously rare A2ML1 variants were identified to confer otitis media susceptibility in an indigenous Filipino community and in otitis-prone US children. The goal of this study is to describe differences in the middle ear microbiome between carriers and non-carriers of an A2ML1 duplication variant that increases risk for chronic otitis media among indigenous Filipinos with poor health care access. Ear swabs were obtained from 16 indigenous Filipino individuals with chronic otitis media, of whom 11 carry the A2ML1 duplication variant. Ear swabs were submitted for 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Genotype-based differences in microbial richness, structure, and composition were identified, but were not statistically significant. Taxonomic analysis revealed that the relative abundance of the phyla Fusobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and genus Fusobacterium were nominally increased in carriers compared to non-carriers, but were non-significant after correction for multiple testing. We also detected rare bacteria including Oligella that was reported only once in the middle ear. These findings suggest that A2ML1-related otitis media susceptibility may be mediated by changes in the middle ear microbiome. Knowledge of middle ear microbial profiles according to genetic background can be potentially useful for therapeutic and prophylactic interventions for otitis media and can guide public health interventions towards decreasing otitis media prevalence within the indigenous Filipino community.

  5. Dental plaque development on a hydroxyapatite disk in young adults observed by using a barcoded pyrosequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Toru; Yasui, Masaki; Shibata, Yukie; Furuta, Michiko; Saeki, Yoji; Eshima, Nobuoki; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-30

    Dental plaque is a dynamic microbial biofilm ecosystem that comprises hundreds of species including difficult-to-cultivate bacteria. We observed the assembly of a plaque bacterial community through 16S rRNA gene analysis. Plaque samples that accumulated on a hydroxyapatite disk for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 days with saliva on day 0 were collected from 19 young adults using a removable resin splint. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the total bacterial amount gradually increased and reached a plateau on day 4. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis revealed that the microbial richness and diversity particularly increased between days 5 and 7. A principal coordinate analysis plot based on unweighted UniFrac showed the community assembly in a time-related manner, which became increasingly similar to the salivary microbiota. Facultative anaerobic bacteria such as Streptococcus, Neisseria, Abiotrophia, Gemella, and Rothia were predominant in the plaque bacterial community in the earlier days, whereas obligate anaerobes, such as Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, and Capnocytophaga showed increased dominance on later days. UniFrac analysis also demonstrated that dental caries experience had a significant effect on the assembly process. Our results reveal the development pattern of the plaque bacterial community as well as the inter-individual differences associated with dental caries experience.

  6. Assessment of Periodontopathogens in Subgingival Biofilm of Banded and Bonded Molars in Early Phase of Fixed Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mártha, Krisztina; Lőrinczi, Lilla; Bică, Cristina; Gyergyay, Réka; Petcu, Blanka; Lazăr, Luminița

    2016-03-01

    To assess the prevalence and occurrence of eleven periodontopathogens in subgingival biofilm of banded and bonded molars during the first period of fixed orthodontic treatment. Subjects were selected from patients referred to orthodontic treatment and were divided in two groups: group A comprised fifteen patients (14.4±2.45 years of age) who received orthodontic bands on first permanent molars and group B of ten patients (15.7±1.87 years of age) with directly bonded tubes on the labial surface of the same teeth. Subgingival sample collection was performed before bands and tubes application and 4-7 weeks after attachment placement. DNA-strip tehnique was used to assess the presence of eleven putative periodontopathogens at each time point. Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eikenella corrodens and Capnocytophaga spp. were found in a large number of samples, other periodontopathogens were present in a smaller rate. The 4-7 weeks after attachment placement a slight increase of putative species was observed in both groups. The presence of orthodontic tubes and bands influence the accumulation and composition of subgingival microbiota. Higher level of oral hygiene should be achieved before and during orthodontic treatment in order to prevent any side effects on periodontal tissues.

  7. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of asaccharolytic anaerobic pigmented bacterial rods from the oral cavity of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D; Bastin, D

    1992-06-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using isolated high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes of the cat pigmented asaccharolytic Bacteroides/Porphyromonas species was used against both purified high molecular weight DNA and DNA released on membranes from whole cells for the identification of B. salivosus and for its differentiation from the other anaerobic species isolated from normal and diseased mouths of cats and horses. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes (Boehringer-Mannheim). The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. salivosus from a variety of species (including members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. Likewise, asaccharolytic black pigmented Group 2 strains were distinguishable from all strains tested. However, cat strains of P. gingivalis which show 68-76% DNA-DNA homology with human strain P. gingivalis ATCC 33277T, were not distinguishable from each other using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. The minimum amount of pure Bacteroides DNA which could be detected by the 32P-labelled probe was 100-300 pg, while the amount of pure DNA detected by the DIG system was 1-3 mg after room temperature colour development for 1 h and 100-300 pg after 6 h colour development.

  8. Detection of five potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease: A comparison of PCR and real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Tsigaras, Sandra; Rinke, Sven; Kottmann, Tanja; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial analysis methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in terms of detection of five selected potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease. Therefore 45 samples of healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis (n = 15 each) were assessed according to presence of the following bacteria using PCR (DNA-strip technology) and RT-PCR (fluorescent dye SYBR green-system): Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Treponema denticola (Td), Tanerella forsythia (Tf), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). There were no significant correlations between the bacterial and disease patterns, so the benefit of using microbiological tests for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases is questionable. Correlations between the methods were highest for Tf (Kendall's Tau: 0.65, Spearman: 0.78), Fn (0.49, 0.61) and Td (0.49, 0.59). For Aa (0.38, 0.42) and Pg (0.04, 0.04), lower correlation values were detected. Accordingly, conventional semi-quantitative PCR seems to be sufficient for analyzing potentially periodontal pathogenic bacterial species.

  9. Putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in pregnant women: a case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haixia; Zhu, Ce; Li, Fei; Xu, Wei; Tao, Danying; Feng, Xiping

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about herpesvirus and putative periodontopathic bacteria in maternal chronic periodontitis. The present case-control study aimed to explore the potential relationship between putative periodontopathic bacteria and herpesviruses in maternal chronic periodontitis.Saliva samples were collected from 36 pregnant women with chronic periodontitis (cases) and 36 pregnant women with healthy periodontal status (controls). Six putative periodontopathic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis [Pg], Aggregatibacer actinomycetemcomitans [Aa], Fusobacterium nucleatum [Fn], Prevotella intermedia [Pi], Tannerella forsythia [Tf], and Treponema denticola [Td]) and three herpesviruses (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV], human cytomegalovirus [HCMV], and herpes simplex virus [HSV]) were detected. Socio-demographic data and oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels were also collected. The results showed no significant differences in socio-demographic background, oral health related behaviors, and salivary estradiol and progesterone levels between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The detection rates of included periodontopathic microorganisms were not significantly different between the two groups (all P > 0.05), but the coinfection rate of EBV and Pg was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.028). EBV and Pg coinfection may promote the development of chronic periodontitis among pregnant women. PMID:27301874

  10. [Features of adhesion of anaerobic periodontopathogenic bacteria and Candida albicans fungi to experimental samples of basis dental plastic depending on surface roughness and polishing method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarev, V N; Ippolitov, E V; Trefilov, A G; Arutiunov, S D; Pivovarov, A A

    2014-01-01

    Study the main surface parameters of milled polyacrylic materials using atomic force microscopy and primary microbial adhesion of periodontopathogenic group bacteria and Candida albicans fungi taking into consideration the method of sample polishing. Studied samples: mill-treated without polishing (control); ergobox polished; polished in dental laboratory conditions; polished by a rubber brush in dentists' office. Microbial strains belonging to periodontopathogenic species (clinical isolates) that had been isolated from periodontal pockets of periodontitis patients: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus sanguis, C. albicans fungi were used for modelling experiments of primary adhesion of microbes to the material samples. S. sanguis had the highest degree of adhesion to polymer after milling, P. gingivalis, C. albicans--medium, F. nucleatum--low. A significant reduction of adhesion is observed during polishing in dental laboratory conditions or ergobox, less significant--during polishing in dental office. The data obtained allow to make a conclusion that the samples from polymer materials for preparation of prosthesis basis have varying degree of intensity of microbial adhesion of members of periodontopathogenic microflora and C. albicans fungi that depends on the polishing method, that accordingly determined the differences in colonization resistance against formation of microbial biofilm during polymer use in clinical conditions. . ,

  11. Salivary Microbiome Diversity in Caries-Free and Caries-Affected Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Gao, Xiaoli; Jin, Lijian; Lo, Edward C M

    2016-11-25

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is an infectious disease. Its etiology is not fully understood from the microbiological perspective. This study characterizes the diversity of microbial flora in the saliva of children with and without dental caries. Children (3-4 years old) with caries (n = 20) and without caries (n = 20) were recruited. Unstimulated saliva (2 mL) was collected from each child and the total microbial genomic DNA was extracted. DNA amplicons of the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were generated and subjected to Illumina Miseq sequencing. A total of 17 phyla, 26 classes, 40 orders, 80 families, 151 genera, and 310 bacterial species were represented in the saliva samples. There was no significant difference in the microbiome diversity between caries-affected and caries-free children (p > 0.05). The relative abundance of several species (Rothia dentocariosa, Actinomyces graevenitzii, Veillonella sp. oral taxon 780, Prevotella salivae, and Streptococcus mutans) was higher in the caries-affected group than in the caries-free group (p < 0.05). Fusobacterium periodonticum and Leptotrichia sp. oral clone FP036 were more abundant in caries-free children than in caries-affected children (p < 0.05). The salivary microbiome profiles of caries-free and caries-affected children were similar. Salivary counts of certain bacteria such as R. dentocariosa and F. periodonticum may be useful for screening/assessing children's risk of developing caries.

  12. Pyrosequencing of Plaque Microflora In Twin Children with Discordant Caries Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite recent successes in the control of dental caries, the mechanism of caries development remains unclear. To investigate the causes of dental decay, especially in early childhood caries, the supragingival microflora composition of 20 twins with discordant caries phenotypes were analyzed using high-throughput pyrosequencing. In addition, the parents completed a lifestyle questionnaire. A total of 228,789 sequencing reads revealed 10 phyla, 84 genera, and 155 species of microflora, the relative abundances of these strains varied dramatically among the children, Comparative analysis between groups revealed that Veillonella, Corynebacterium and Actinomyces were presumed to be caries-related genera, Fusobacterium, Kingella and Leptotrichia were presumed to be healthy-related genus, yet this six genera were not statistically significant (P>0.05. Moreover, a cluster analysis revealed that the microbial composition of samples in the same group was often dissimilar but that the microbial composition observed in twins was usually similar. Although the genetic and environmental factors that strongly influence the microbial composition of dental caries remains unknown, we speculate that genetic factors primarily influence the individual's susceptibility to dental caries and that environmental factors primarily regulate the microbial composition of the dental plaque and the progression to caries. By using improved twins models and increased sample sizes, our study can be extended to analyze the specific genetic and environmental factors that affect the development of caries.

  13. The influence of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) on adaptive immune responses to endodontic pathogens in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Taia Maria Berto; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino Ribeiro; Oliveira, Ricardo Reis; Taubman, Martin A.; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the influence of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on adaptive immune responses. BALB/c mice were immunized with heat-killed Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn) in MTA or other control adjuvants, and serum IgG responses to Fn were measured. Either Fn- or Peptostreptococcus anaerobius (Pa)-reactive memory T cells (Tm) were pre-incubated in vitro with/without MTA and restimulated with Fn or Pa. Tm proliferation and cytokine production were assessed. Compared to control groups, IgG-antibody responses were upregulated in mice immunized with Fn in MTA in a similar manner to animals immunized with Fn in Freund's adjuvant or aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. While MTA did not affect the upregulated expression of IL-10, TNF-α or RANKL by Tm, it suppressed the proliferation of Pa- or Fn-Tm and inhibited their production of Th1- or Th2-signature cytokines. MTA upregulated the adaptive humoral immune responses, but had little or no effect on pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokine production by Tm. PMID:18718367

  14. Increased bacterial putrescine has no impact on gut morphology and physiology in gnotobiotic adolescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, K; Hanske, L; Loh, G; Blaut, M

    2013-09-01

    Gut bacteria influence host anatomy and physiology. It has been proposed that bacterial metabolites including polyamines are responsible for intestinal maturation and mucosal growth. We have hypothesised that bacterially produced polyamines act as trophic factors and thereby influence large intestinal crypt depth and thickness of the different gut layers. For that purpose, germ-free mice were associated with two different microbial consortia. One group was colonised with a simplified human microbiota (SIHUMI). The second group was associated with SIHUMI + Fusobacterium varium (SIHUMI + Fv), which is known to produce high amounts of polyamines. Polyamine concentrations were measured by HPLC and morphological parameters were determined microscopically. Germ-free and conventional mice served as controls. The caecal putrescine concentration of the SIHUMI + Fv was 61.8 μM (47.6-75.5 μM), whereas that of conventional and SIHUMI mice was 28.8 μM (1.3-41.7 μM) and 24.5 μM (16.8-29.1 μM), respectively. The caecal putrescine concentration of germ-free mice was only 0.6 μM (0-1.0 μM). Caecal crypt depth and thickness of the different caecal layers revealed no significant differences between SIHUMI and SIHUMI + Fv mice. However, the crypt depth in the caeca of conventional, SIHUMI and SIHUMI + Fv mice was increased by 48.6% (Pputrescine concentrations do not influence gut morphology in our gnotobiotic adolescent mice.

  15. Comparative Study on the Characteristics of Weissella cibaria CMU and Probiotic Strains for Oral Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye-Jin; Kang, Mi-Sun; Yi, Sung-Hun; Hong, Ji-Young; Hong, Sang-Pil

    2016-12-20

    Probiotics have been demonstrated as a new paradigm to substitute antibiotic treatment for dental caries, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis. The present work was conducted to compare the characteristics of oral care probiotics: Weissella cibaria CMU (Chonnam Medical University) and four commercial probiotic strains. Survival rates under poor oral conditions, acid production, hydrogen peroxide production, as well as inhibition of biofilm formation, coaggregation, antibacterial activity, and inhibition of volatile sulfur compounds were evaluated. The viability of W. cibaria CMU was not affected by treatment of 100 mg/L lysozyme for 90 min and 1 mM hydrogen peroxide for 6 h. Interestingly, W. cibaria produced less acid and more hydrogen peroxide than the other four probiotics. W. cibaria inhibited biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans at lower concentrations (S. mutans/CMU = 8) and efficiently coaggregated with Fusobacterium nucleatum. W. cibaria CMU and two commercial probiotics, including Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus reuteri, showed high antibacterial activities (>97%) against cariogens (S. mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus), and against periodontopathogens (F. nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis). All of the lactic acid bacterial strains in this study significantly reduced levels of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan produced by F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis (p CMU is applicable as an oral care probiotic.

  16. Effect of metalloporphyrins on red autofluorescence from oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; van der Veen, Monique H; de Soet, Johannes J; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the red autofluorescence from bacterial species related to dental caries and periodontitis in the presence of different nutrients in the growth medium. Bacteria were grown anaerobically on tryptic soy agar (TSA) supplemented with nutrients, including magnesium-porphyrins from spinach and iron-porphyrins from heme. The autofluorescence was then assessed at 405 nm excitation. On the TSA without additives, no autofluorescence was observed from any of the species tested. On the TSA containing sheep blood, red autofluorescence was observed only from Parvimonas micra. When the TSA was supplemented with blood, hemin, and vitamin K, red autofluorescence was observed from Actinomyces naeslundii, Bifidobacterium dentium, and Streptococcus mutans. Finally, on the TSA supplemented with spinach extract, red autofluorescence was observed from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, A. naeslundii, Enterococcus faecalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Lactobacillus salivarius, S. mutans, and Veillonella parvula. We conclude that the bacteria related to dental caries and periodontal disease exhibit red autofluorescence. The autofluorescence characteristics of the tested strains depended on the nutrients present, such as metalloporphyrins, suggesting that the metabolic products of the oral biofilm could be responsible for red autofluorescence. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  17. Preliminary molecular analysis of bacterial composition in periapical lesions with primary endodontic infections of deciduous teeth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Jia-jian; YANG Qiu-bo; ZHAO Huan-ying; CAI Shuang; ZHOU Yan; SUN Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The bacterial composition of periapical lesions in deciduous teeth has not been well documented.This study was designed to explore the bacterial compositions,especially the dominant bacteria in periapical lesions using 16S rRNA sequencing.Methods Tissue samples were collected from 11 periapical lesions in deciduous teeth with primary endodontic infections.DNA was extracted from each sample and analyzed using 16S rRNA cloning and sequencing for the identification of bacteria.Results All DNA samples were positive for 16S rRNA gene PCR.One hundred and fifty-one phylotypes from 810 clones were identified to eight phyla,and each sample contained an average of 25.9 phylotypes.In addition,59 phylotypes were detected in more than two samples,and Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum (8/11),Dialister (D.) invisus (8/11),Campylobacter (C.) gracilis (7/11),Escherichia (E.) coil DH1 (6/11),Aggregatibacter (A.) segnis (6/11),and Streptococcus (S.) mitis (6/11) were the most prevalent species.Furthermore,45 as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes were also identified.Conclusions Chronic periapical lesions in deciduous teeth contained polymicrobial infections.F.nucleatum,D.invisus,C.gracilis,E.coli DH1,A.segnis,and S.mitis were the most prevalent species detected by 16S rRNA sequencing.

  18. CLINICAL USE OF MODERN FLUOROQUINOLONES IN DENTAL IMPLANTATION AND MAXILLARY SINUS LIFTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Novikov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available New fluoroquinolones like levofloxacine, with broad-spectrum of effect which is also active against anaerobic bacteria, is a prospective drug for the prevention of the inflammatory complications in implant dentistry and maxillary sinus augmentation. 34 patients have been selected for this study, including 16 women and 18 men aged 18-65. All the patients have been classified into the main and control groups. Patiens of the first group have been prescribed 500 mg of levofloxacine before and after the operation two times a day for 10 days. Patients of the control group have been treated with amocxicilline. In the control group, which has used amoxicilline, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus salivarius and anaerobic bacteria have been identified. The amount of Prevotella intermedia is insignificant. The same picture has been found with Fusobacterium spp. The rate of Actinomyces spp. was insignificant over the whole period of study. Patients of the experimental group had a slightly different distribution of bacteria. On the 10th day after the operation in the main patient group no periodontal pathogenesis, which may cause inflammatory complications have been identified. During the early post-operative period no significant differences have been observed among the patients of both groups.

  19. 16S rRNA based microarray analysis of ten periodontal bacteria in patients with different forms of periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, Nursen; Kulekci, Guven

    2015-10-01

    DNA microarray analysis is a computer based technology, that a reverse capture, which targets 10 periodontal bacteria (ParoCheck) is available for rapid semi-quantitative determination. The aim of this three-year retrospective study was to display the microarray analysis results for the subgingival biofilm samples taken from patient cases diagnosed with different forms of periodontitis. A total of 84 patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP,n:29), generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP, n:25), peri-implantitis (PI,n:14), localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP,n:8) and refractory chronic periodontitis (RP,n:8) were consecutively selected from the archives of the Oral Microbiological Diagnostic Laboratory. The subgingival biofilm samples were analyzed by the microarray-based identification of 10 selected species. All the tested species were detected in the samples. The red complex bacteria were the most prevalent with very high levels in all groups. Fusobacterium nucleatum was detected in all samples at high levels. The green and blue complex bacteria were less prevalent compared with red and orange complex, except Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitas was detected in all LAP group. Positive correlations were found within all the red complex bacteria and between red and orange complex bacteria especially in GCP and GAP groups. Parocheck enables to monitoring of periodontal pathogens in all forms of periodontal disease and can be alternative to other guiding and reliable microbiologic tests.

  20. Molecular-level evaluation of selected periodontal pathogens from subgingival regions in canines and humans with periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polkowska, Izabela; Bartoszcze-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Sobczyńska-Rak, Aleksandra; Matuszewski, Łukasz

    2017-01-01

    Dogs commonly serve as a model for various human conditions, including periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the anaerobic bacteria that colonize the subgingival areas in dogs and humans by using rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based tests and to compare the results obtained in each species. Bacterial microflora evaluations, both quantitative and qualitative, were performed by applying ready-made tests on twelve dogs and twelve humans. Five samples were collected from each subject's deepest gingival pockets and joined to form a collective sample. The results of the study revealed interspecies similarities in the prevalences of Porphyromonas (P.) gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Red complex bacteria comprised the largest portion of the studied bacterial complexes in all study groups, with P. gingivalis being the most commonly isolated bacterium. The results show similarities in the prevalence of bacterial microflora in dogs and humans. Microbiological analysis of gingival pockets by using rapid real-time PCR-based tests in clinical practice, both veterinary and human, can facilitate the choice of appropriate pharmacological treatment and can provide a basis for subsequent verification of the treatment's effectiveness. PMID:27297417

  1. Prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in sexually active females in Chhattisgarh Institute of Medical Sciences, Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Raman Jogi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: To know the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV in sexually active females presenting with the complaints of Vaginal discharge to the outpatient department. BV also called as non-specific vaginitis, develops when the normally predominant peroxides producing lactobacillus species in the vagina are replaced by mixed predominantly anaerobic flora consisting of Gardinerella vaginalis, Mycoplasm hominis, Mobilunceus species, Bacteroids species, Prevotela Species, Peptostreptococcus Species, Fusobacterium Species and Porphyromonus Species. Methods: Three hundred females attending the OPD with the complaints of vaginal discharge were studied. Diagnosis of BV were made according to Amsle's clinical criteria and Nugents criteria for evaluating Gram stain vaginal smear. The results were compared with the data available from the previous studies. Results: Out of 300 patients 122 (40.66% were suffering from BV. 90 (73.33% patients were having pH between 5-6.9. Among pregnant women 9.83% found positive. IUCD users 19 (29.68% are found suffering from BV. Out of 33 VDRL positive patients 19 (57.51% were positive with BV. Conclusions: The prevalence of BV is on higher side of the available data. There is an association between IUCD use and occurrence of BV. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(4.000: 963-967

  2. Role of anaerobes in acute pelvic inflammatory disease

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    Saini S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pouch of Douglas aspirates were collected from 50 women with history and examination suggestive of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID and 20 healthy women admitted for tubal ligation served as control. A total of 57 microorganisms were isolated from 37 patients out of 50 in study group. Of 37 positive cultures 21(56.7% were monomicrobial and 16(43.2% were polymicrobial. Most common symptom in study group was lower abdominal pain (90%, vaginal discharge (70% and irregular bleeding (40% and 30% patients had history of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD implantation. The predominant aerobic isolates were Escherichia coli, Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (CONS, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae while common anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus spp. Our study shows that cefotaxime, cefuroxime and gentamicin may be used for gram negative aerobic bacilli; cloxacillin, cephaloridine and erythromycin for aerobic gram positive cocci and amikacin and ceftazidime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus for optimum therapy of acute PID it is beneficial to keep in mind major conceptual changes and therapeutic realities that have influenced current understanding of acute PID and have affected the choice of therapy.

  3. Role of anaerobes in acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, S; Gupta, N; Batra, G; Arora, D R

    2003-01-01

    Pouch of Douglas aspirates were collected from 50 women with history and examination suggestive of acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and 20 healthy women admitted for tubal ligation served as control. A total of 57 microorganisms were isolated from 37 patients out of 50 in study group. Of 37 positive cultures 21(56.7%) were monomicrobial and 16(43.2%) were polymicrobial. Most common symptom in study group was lower abdominal pain (90%), vaginal discharge (70%) and irregular bleeding (40%) and 30% patients had history of intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) implantation. The predominant aerobic isolates were Escherichia coli, Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus (CONS), Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae while common anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus spp. Our study shows that cefotaxime, cefuroxime and gentamicin may be used for gram negative aerobic bacilli; cloxacillin, cephaloridine and erythromycin for aerobic gram positive cocci and amikacin and ceftazidime for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Thus for optimum therapy of acute PID it is beneficial to keep in mind major conceptual changes and therapeutic realities that have influenced current understanding of acute PID and have affected the choice of therapy.

  4. Antianaerobe activity of ceftobiprole, a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ednie, Lois; Shapiro, Stuart; Appelbaum, Peter C

    2007-05-01

    Agar dilution testing of 463 anaerobes showed most Gram-positive beta-lactamase-negative strains (other than some Clostridium difficile and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius), as well as both beta-lactamase-positive and beta-lactamase-negative strains of Fusobacterium nucleatum, to have ceftobiprole MIC values of Ceftobiprole was less active against beta-lactamase-positive Gram-negative bacilli, especially the members of the Bacteroides fragilis group. Like ceftobiprole, piperacillin was active mainly against beta-lactamase-negative strains, though MIC values for piperacillin were often 1 to 2 dilutions higher than for ceftobiprole. Carbapenems had MIC values < or =4 microg/L against all except some C. difficile and 2 strains of B. fragilis. All strains were susceptible to metronidazole, and all bacteria, except C. difficile and a single Bacteroides distasonis strain, were susceptible to chloramphenicol. Clindamycin resistance was seen in most anaerobe groups, whereas high moxifloxacin MICs were found mainly among the B. fragilis and Prevotella groups, and a few C. difficile and F. nucleatum strains.

  5. Drug resistance of bacterial dental biofilm and the potential use of natural compounds as alternative for prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouidhi, Bochra; Al Qurashi, Yasir Mohammed A; Chaieb, Kamel

    2015-03-01

    Oral diseases, such as dental caries and periodontal disease are directly linked with the ability of bacteria to form biofilm. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria colonizing the supragingival biofilm (Streptococcus, Lactobacillus and Actinomycetes). Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria forming a subgingival plaque (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium). Cells embedded in biofilm are up to 1000-fold more resistant to antibiotics compared to their planctonic ones. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain biofilms drug resistance. Given the increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics currently used in dentistry, a great importance is given to natural compounds for the prevention of oral bacterial growth, adhesion and colonization. Over the past decade, interest in drugs derived from medicinal plants has markedly increased. It has been well documented that medicinal plants and natural compounds confer considerable antibacterial activity against various microorganisms including cariogenic and periodontal pathogens. This paper provides a review of the literature focusing on the studies on (i) biofilm in the oral cavity, (ii) drug resistance of bacterial biofilm and (iii) the potential use of plant extracts, essential oils and natural compounds as biofilm preventive agents in dentistry, involving their origin and their mechanism of biofilm inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Periodontal microbioma and rheumatoid arthritis: The role of Porhyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzi, L; Rania, S; Vinci, R; Spadari, F; Croveri, F; Scognamiglio, C; Farronato, D; Tettamanti, L; Tagliabue, A; Silvestre-Rangil, J; Bellintani, C

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a disease, which can be described as an autoimmune response after molecular mimicry caused by infective agents. The current study aims at evaluating the correlation between Rhematoid Arthritis (RA) and Periodontal Disease (PD), with special attention to the microbioma detected in the gums. Thirty-four patients with RD were recruited into the current study. Among rheumatic parameters, Rheumatoid Factor (RF), anti-citrullinated protein antibody (CCP), HLA-BDR1 and DAS28 were collected. A dental clinician evaluated the periodontal screening record (PSR). Afterwards, 1 paper cone was inserted for 30 seconds into the gingival sulcus then sent to the laboratory for evaluation. Quantitative PCR of 16S rRNA genes was performed with the hydrolysis probes method to identify and evaluate the amount Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Campylobacter rectus. There were no statistical differences in the composition of oral microbioma between PSR groups. There were no statistical significant differences between bacterial loads and serum values. On the contrary, a positive correlation was found between the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in periodontal pockets on one side and RF and CCP on the other. Therefore, the presence of Porhyromonas gingivalis in periodontal pockets is associated to RA inflammatory indices.

  7. Detection and enumeration of periodontopathogenic bacteria in subgingival biofilm of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fernanda Campos; Cesar, Dionéia Evangelista; Assis, Amanda Vervloet Dutra Agostinho; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo; Ribeiro, Rosangela Almeida

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to test the hypothesis of qualitative and quantitative differences of 8 periodontopathogens between pregnant and non-pregnant women. This cross-sectional study included 20 pregnant women in their second trimester of pregnancy and 20 non-pregnant women. Probing depth, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, and presence of calculus were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected and the FISH technique identified the presence and numbers of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Campylobacter rectus, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. The Mann-Whitney U-test was applied to compare the data between the two groups. The mean age, ethnicity, marital status, education, and economic level in both groups were similar. The clinical parameters showed no significant differences between pregnant and non-pregnant women. The numbers of subgingival periodontopathogens were not found to be significantly different between groups, despite the higher mean counts of P. intermedia in pregnant women. Colonization patterns of the different bacteria most commonly associated with periodontal disease were not different in the subgingival plaque of pregnant and non-pregnant women.

  8. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Zhu

    Full Text Available Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish or non-meat proteins (casein or soy for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  9. The Maturing Development of Gut Microbiota in Commercial Piglets during the Weaning Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Early weaned piglets are vulnerable to diarrhea because of weaning stress and immaturity of intestinal tract. Compelling evidence suggests that gut microbiota is vital to host health. However, it is not well understood on the composition and succession of piglet gut microbiota during the weaning transition. In our two trials, total 17 commercial piglets were studied in a pig farm in Jiangxi Province, China. Fresh feces were collected for four times (10 days before weaned, weaned day, 10 days after weaned, 21 days after weaned by rectal massage. Fecal bacterial composition was assessed by 16S rRNA gene V3–V4 regions sequencing by Illumina Miseq platform. The results showed that the gut microbiota of piglets shifted quickly after weaned and reached relatively stable level in 10 days after weaned. The alpha diversity increased significantly with the age of piglets. The microbiota of suckling piglets was mainly represented by Fusobacterium, Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, Escherichia/Shigella, and Megasphaera. This pattern contrasted with that of Clostridium sensu stricto, Roseburia, Paraprevotella, Clostridium XIVa, and Blautia, which were major representative genera after weaned. In summary, we delineated the development of piglet gut microbiota during the weaning transition. This study helps us understand the maturing development of gut microbiota in commercial piglets.

  10. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies. PMID:26811603

  11. Gut microbiota imbalance and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnière, Johan; Raisch, Jennifer; Veziant, Julie; Barnich, Nicolas; Bonnet, Richard; Buc, Emmanuel; Bringer, Marie-Agnès; Pezet, Denis; Bonnet, Mathilde

    2016-01-14

    The gut microbiota acts as a real organ. The symbiotic interactions between resident micro-organisms and the digestive tract highly contribute to maintain the gut homeostasis. However, alterations to the microbiome caused by environmental changes (e.g., infection, diet and/or lifestyle) can disturb this symbiotic relationship and promote disease, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Colorectal cancer is a complex association of tumoral cells, non-neoplastic cells and a large amount of micro-organisms, and the involvement of the microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis is becoming increasingly clear. Indeed, many changes in the bacterial composition of the gut microbiota have been reported in colorectal cancer, suggesting a major role of dysbiosis in colorectal carcinogenesis. Some bacterial species have been identified and suspected to play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, such as Streptococcus bovis, Helicobacter pylori, Bacteroides fragilis, Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium septicum, Fusobacterium spp. and Escherichia coli. The potential pro-carcinogenic effects of these bacteria are now better understood. In this review, we discuss the possible links between the bacterial microbiota and colorectal carcinogenesis, focusing on dysbiosis and the potential pro-carcinogenic properties of bacteria, such as genotoxicity and other virulence factors, inflammation, host defenses modulation, bacterial-derived metabolism, oxidative stress and anti-oxidative defenses modulation. We lastly describe how bacterial microbiota modifications could represent novel prognosis markers and/or targets for innovative therapeutic strategies.

  12. Identification of Microbial Pathogens in Periodontal disease and Diabetic patients of South Indian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiranjeevi, Tikka; Prasad, Osuru Hari; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Kumar, Avula Kishor; Chakravarthi, Veeraraghavulu Praveen; Rao, Paramala Balaji; Sarma, Potuguchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna; Reddy, Nagi reddy Raveendra; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis have been referred to as the sixth complication of diabetes found in high prevalence among diabetic patients than among healthy controls. The aim of the present study was to examine the periodontal disease status among collected dental plaque samples. Chromosomal DNA was isolated and amplified by universal primers. The DNA was sequenced for bacterial confirmation and phylogenetic analysis performed for the evolutionary relationship with other known pathogens. No amplification products were observed in groups labeled non periodontal and non Diabetes (NP&ND) and non Periodontal and Diabetes (NP&D). But in the case of Periodontal and non Diabetes (P&ND) groups 22 amplified products were observed. In case of Periodontal and Diabetes (P&D), 32 amplified products were positive for microbes. Among the four microbial groups, Treponemadenticola, and Tannerella forsythia were found to be prevalent in P&D. The phylogenetic analysis of 16s rRNA of Treponemadenticola showed the relationship with other Treponema oral pathogen species and with the Spirochaetazuelaera. Tannerella forsythia shows its evolutionary relationship only with four oral pathogens (Macellibacteroidesfermentans, Porphyromadaceae bacterium, Parabacteroidesmeredae and Bacillus fosythus). Prevotellaintermedia also showed its evolutionary relationship only with Prevotella Spcs while Fusobacterium revealed close evolutionary relationship only with Porpiromonasgingivalis. PMID:24966528

  13. [Antimicrobial effects of tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) on oral microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, E; Lenkeit, K; Meyer, J

    2000-01-01

    The essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil) exhibits antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. In this study the bacteriostatic and bacteriocidal/fungicidal activity of a tea tree oil solution, of a new tea tree oil (Tebodont) and the respective placebo-gel, of a chlorhexidindigluconate-solution and of PlakOut was tested in vitro against ten different oral microorganisms. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were in the range from 0.0293% to 1.25% for the tea tree oil solution and from 0.0082% to 1.25% for the tea tree oil gel. The values for minimum bacteriocidal/fungicidal concentrations were in the range from 0.0521% to 2.5% for the tea tree oil solution and from tea tree oil gel. The most susceptible microorganisms were Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, whereas Streptococcus mutans and Prevotella intermedia were the least susceptible ones. Both for the chlorhexidindigluconate solution and for PlakOut the values for the minimal inhibitory concentration and for the minimal cidal concentration were between <0.0002% and 0.0125%.

  14. Coenzyme Recognition and Gene Regulation by a Flavin Mononucleotide Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganov, A.; Huang, L; Patel, D

    2009-01-01

    The biosynthesis of several protein cofactors is subject to feedback regulation by riboswitches. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-specific riboswitches also known as RFN elements, direct expression of bacterial genes involved in the biosynthesis and transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and related compounds. Here we present the crystal structures of the Fusobacterium nucleatum riboswitch bound to FMN, riboflavin and antibiotic roseoflavin. The FMN riboswitch structure, centred on an FMN-bound six-stem junction, does not fold by collinear stacking of adjacent helices, typical for folding of large RNAs. Rather, it adopts a butterfly-like scaffold, stapled together by opposingly directed but nearly identically folded peripheral domains. FMN is positioned asymmetrically within the junctional site and is specifically bound to RNA through interactions with the isoalloxazine ring chromophore and direct and Mg{sup 2+}-mediated contacts with the phosphate moiety. Our structural data, complemented by binding and footprinting experiments, imply a largely pre-folded tertiary RNA architecture and FMN recognition mediated by conformational transitions within the junctional binding pocket. The inherent plasticity of the FMN-binding pocket and the availability of large openings make the riboswitch an attractive target for structure-based design of FMN-like antimicrobial compounds. Our studies also explain the effects of spontaneous and antibiotic-induced deregulatory mutations and provided molecular insights into FMN-based control of gene expression in normal and riboflavin-overproducing bacterial strains.

  15. [Impact of periodontal disease on arterial pressure in diabetic mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Baque, V; Kémoun, P; Loubieres, P; Roumieux, M; Heymes, C; Serino, M; Sixou, M; Burcelin, R

    2012-06-01

    Diabetes-driven cardiovascular diseases represent a high challenge for developed countries. Periodontal disease is strictly linked to the aforementioned diseases, due to its Gram negative-driven inflammation. Thus, we investigated the effects of periodontal disease on arterial pressure during the development of diabetes in mice. To this aim, C57BL/6 female mice were colonized with pathogens of periodontal tissue (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum) for 1month, whereas another group of mice did not undergo the colonization. Subsequently, all mice were fed a high-fat carbohydrate-free diet for 3months. Then, arterial pressure was measured in vivo and a tomodensitometric analysis of mandibles was realized as well. Our results show increased mandibular bone-loss induced by colonization with periopathogens. In addition, periodontal infection augmented glucose-intolerance and systolic and diastolic arterial pressure, parameters already known to be affected by a fat-diet. In conclusion, we show here that periodontal disease amplifies metabolic troubles and deregulates arterial pressure, emerging as a new axis of metabolic investigation.

  16. Molecular diversity of bacteria in commercially available “Spirulina” food supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormas, Konstantinos A.; Katsiapi, Matina; Genitsaris, Savvas; Moustaka-Gouni, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Arthrospira is among the most well-known food supplements worldwide known as “Spirulina.” While it is a widely recognized health-promoting natural product, there are no reports on the molecular diversity of commercially available brands of “Spirulina” supplements and the occurrence of other cyanobacterial and heterotrophic bacterial microorganisms in these products. In this study, 454-pyrosequencing analysis of the total bacterial occurrence in 31 brands of “Spirulina” dietary supplements from the Greek market was applied for the first time. In all samples, operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of Arthrospira platensis were the predominant cyanobacteria. Some products contained additional cyanobacterial OTUs including a few known potentially toxic taxa. Moreover, 469 OTUs were detected in all 31 products collectively, with most of them being related to the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. All samples included heterotrophic bacterial OTUs, ranging from 9–157 per product. Among the most common OTUs were ones closely related to taxa known for causing health issues (i.e., Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Clostridium, Bacillus, Fusobacterium, Enterococcus). The observed high cyanobacterial and heterotrophic bacterial OTUs richness in the final product is a point for further research on the growth and processing of Arthrospira biomass for commercial purposes. PMID:26819852

  17. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-11-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species.

  18. Amphipathic polymers: tools to fold integral membrane proteins to their active form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocanschi, Cosmin L; Dahmane, Tassadite; Gohon, Yann; Rappaport, Fabrice; Apell, Hans-Jürgen; Kleinschmidt, Jörg H; Popot, Jean-Luc

    2006-11-28

    Among the major obstacles to pharmacological and structural studies of integral membrane proteins (MPs) are their natural scarcity and the difficulty in overproducing them in their native form. MPs can be overexpressed in the non-native state as inclusion bodies, but inducing them to achieve their functional three-dimensional structure has proven to be a major challenge. We describe here the use of an amphipathic polymer, amphipol A8-35, as a novel environment that allows both beta-barrel and alpha-helical MPs to fold to their native state, in the absence of detergents or lipids. Amphipols, which are extremely mild surfactants, appear to favor the formation of native intramolecular protein-protein interactions over intermolecular or protein-surfactant ones. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated using as models OmpA and FomA, two outer membrane proteins from the eubacteria Escherichia coli and Fusobacterium nucleatum, respectively, and bacteriorhodopsin, a light-driven proton pump from the plasma membrane of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarium.

  19. Diversity and site-specificity of the oral microflora in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preza, Dorita; Olsen, Ingar; Willumsen, Tiril; Grinde, Bjørn; Paster, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the bacterial diversity in the oral cavity of the elderly without root caries using bacterial microarrays, and to determine the site- and subject-specificity of bacterial colonization. Samples were collected from the tongue dorsum, mucosa of the buccal fold, hard palate, supragingival plaque from sound root surfaces, and subgingival plaque from the same roots. A new 16S rRNA gene based microarray method was used for the simultaneous detection of approximately 300 bacterial species. Overall, 175 species and clusters were detected, representing 8 phyla. Species belonging to the genera Streptococcus, Veillonella and Fusobacterium were common in all sites. The number of species per subject varied from 51 to 81. Statistical analyses revealed about 40 species or clusters with significant associations with at least one of the sites. The bacterial diversity was highest in the cheek and palate regions. Species typically associated with caries and periodontitis were detected rarely or not at all. The oral bacterial flora of the elderly appears to be diverse, and to a large extent site- rather than subject-specific. PMID:19373498

  20. Nanoparticle-encapsulated chlorhexidine against oral bacterial biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaminda Jayampath Seneviratne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chlorhexidine (CHX is a widely used antimicrobial agent in dentistry. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel mesoporous silica nanoparticle-encapsulated pure CHX (Nano-CHX, and its mechanical profile and antimicrobial properties against oral biofilms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The release of CHX from the Nano-CHX was characterized by UV/visible absorption spectroscopy. The antimicrobial properties of Nano-CHX were evaluated in both planktonic and biofilm modes of representative oral pathogenic bacteria. The Nano-CHX demonstrated potent antibacterial effects on planktonic bacteria and mono-species biofilms at the concentrations of 50-200 µg/mL against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococccus faecalis. Moreover, Nano-CHX effectively suppressed multi-species biofilms such as S. mutans, F. nucleatum, A. actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis up to 72 h. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This pioneering study demonstrates the potent antibacterial effects of the Nano-CHX on oral biofilms, and it may be developed as a novel and promising anti-biofilm agent for clinical use.

  1. Tobacco smoking affects bacterial acquisition and colonization in oral biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Purnima S; Matthews, Chad R; Joshi, Vinayak; de Jager, Marko; Aspiras, Marcelo

    2011-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that smoking affects the composition of the disease-associated subgingival biofilm, yet little is known about its effects during the formation of this biofilm. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the contributions of smoking to the composition and proinflammatory characteristics of the biofilm during de novo plaque formation. Marginal and subgingival plaque and gingival crevicular fluid samples were collected from 15 current smokers and from 15 individuals who had never smoked (nonsmokers) following 1, 2, 4, and 7 days of undisturbed plaque formation. 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing were used for bacterial identification, and multiplex bead-based flow cytometry was used to quantify the levels of 27 immune mediators. Smokers demonstrated a highly diverse, relatively unstable initial colonization of both marginal and subgingival biofilms, with lower niche saturation than that seen in nonsmokers. Periodontal pathogens belonging to the genera Fusobacterium, Cardiobacterium, Synergistes, and Selenomonas, as well as respiratory pathogens belonging to the genera Haemophilus and Pseudomonas, colonized the early biofilms of smokers and continued to persist over the observation period, suggesting that smoking favors early acquisition and colonization of pathogens in oral biofilms. Smokers also demonstrated an early proinflammatory response to this colonization, which persisted over 7 days. Further, a positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokine levels and commensal bacteria was observed in smokers but not in nonsmokers. Taken together, the data suggest that smoking influences both the composition of the nascent biofilm and the host response to this colonization.

  2. Oral biofilm architecture on natural teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijnge, Vincent; van Leeuwen, M Barbara M; Degener, John E; Abbas, Frank; Thurnheer, Thomas; Gmür, Rudolf; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2010-02-24

    Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species.

  3. MPC-polymer reduces adherence and biofilm formation by oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, K; Yumoto, H; Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, N; Murakami, K; Hoshino, Y; Matsuo, T; Miyake, Y

    2011-07-01

    Oral biofilms such as dental plaque cause dental caries and periodontitis, as well as aspiration pneumonia and infectious endocarditis by translocation. Hence, the suppression of oral biofilm formation is an issue of considerable importance. Mechanical removal, disinfectants, inhibition of polysaccharide formation, and artificial sugar have been used for the reduction of oral biofilm. From the viewpoint of the inhibition of bacterial adherence, we investigated whether aqueous biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-polymer can reduce streptococcal colonization and biofilm formation. We examined the effects of MPC-polymer on streptococcal adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and oral epithelial cells, and the adherence of Fusobacterium nucleatum to streptococcal biofilm. MPC-polymer application markedly inhibited both the adherence and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and streptococcal adherence to oral epithelial cells, and reduced the adherence of F. nucleatum to streptococcal biofilms. A small-scale clinical trial revealed that mouthrinsing with MPC-polymer inhibited the increase of oral bacterial numbers, especially of S. mutans. These findings suggest that MPC-polymer is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence and biofilm development, and may be useful to prevent dental-plaque-related diseases. (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000003471).

  4. Axenic culture of a candidate division TM7 bacterium from the human oral cavity and biofilm interactions with other oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soro, Valeria; Dutton, Lindsay C; Sprague, Susan V; Nobbs, Angela H; Ireland, Anthony J; Sandy, Jonathan R; Jepson, Mark A; Micaroni, Massimo; Splatt, Peter R; Dymock, David; Jenkinson, Howard F

    2014-10-01

    The diversity of bacterial species in the human oral cavity is well recognized, but a high proportion of them are presently uncultivable. Candidate division TM7 bacteria are almost always detected in metagenomic studies but have not yet been cultivated. In this paper, we identified candidate division TM7 bacterial phylotypes in mature plaque samples from around orthodontic bonds in subjects undergoing orthodontic treatment. Successive rounds of enrichment in laboratory media led to the isolation of a pure culture of one of these candidate division TM7 phylotypes. The bacteria formed filaments of 20 to 200 μm in length within agar plate colonies and in monospecies biofilms on salivary pellicle and exhibited some unusual morphological characteristics by transmission electron microscopy, including a trilaminated cell surface layer and dense cytoplasmic deposits. Proteomic analyses of cell wall protein extracts identified abundant polypeptides predicted from the TM7 partial genomic sequence. Pleiomorphic phenotypes were observed when the candidate division TM7 bacterium was grown in dual-species biofilms with representatives of six different oral bacterial genera. The TM7 bacterium formed long filaments in dual-species biofilm communities with Actinomyces oris or Fusobacterium nucleatum. However, the TM7 isolate grew as short rods or cocci in dual-species biofilms with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra, or Streptococcus gordonii, forming notably robust biofilms with the latter two species. The ability to cultivate TM7 axenically should majorly advance understanding of the physiology, genetics, and virulence properties of this novel candidate division oral bacterium.

  5. Sodium ion pumps and hydrogen production in glutamate fermenting anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiangiu, Clara D; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Brügel, Daniela; Herrmann, Gloria; Kim, Jihoe; Forzi, Lucia; Hedderich, Reiner; Vgenopoulou, Irini; Pierik, Antonio J; Steuber, Julia; Buckel, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria ferment glutamate via two different pathways to ammonia, carbon dioxide, acetate, butyrate and molecular hydrogen. The coenzyme B12-dependent pathway in Clostridium tetanomorphum via 3-methylaspartate involves pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a novel enzyme, a membrane-bound NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase. The flavin- and iron-sulfur-containing enzyme probably uses the energy difference between reduced ferredoxin and NADH to generate an electrochemical Na+ gradient, which drives transport processes. The other pathway via 2-hydroxyglutarate in Acidaminococcus fermentans and Fusobacterium nucleatum involves glutaconyl-CoA decarboxylase, which uses the free energy of decarboxylation to generate also an electrochemical Na+ gradient. In the latter two organisms, similar membrane-bound NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductases have been characterized. We propose that in the hydroxyglutarate pathway these oxidoreductases work in the reverse direction, whereby the reduction of ferredoxin by NADH is driven by the Na+ gradient. The reduced ferredoxin is required for hydrogen production and the activation of radical enzymes. Further examples show that reduced ferredoxin is an agent, whose reducing energy is about 1 ATP 'richer' than that of NADH.

  6. Examination of periodontal pathogens in stenotic valve specimens and in whole blood samples in patients affected by aortic valve stenosis and chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelli, L; Santangelo, R; Falchetti, P; Galluccio, F; Luciani, N; Anselmi, A; Nowzari, H; Verdugo, F; Fadda, G; D'Addona, A

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis may be a risk factor for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The influence of periodontal pathogens in cardiovascular diseases needs further investigation. Therefore, the aims of this clinical study are: to test the presence of periodontal bacteria DNA in aortic valves and to assess the concomitant presence of the same periodontal bacteria DNA in whole blood samples in patients affected by aortic valve stenosis and chronic periodontitis. Nineteen consecutive patients (12 males and 7 females, age: 49-85 years) were enrolled in this study after having been subjected to a complete periodontal evaluation to confirm the diagnosis of chronic periodontitis. All patients were scheduled for aortic valve replacement surgery. After clinical and microbial periodontal examination, the aortic valve tissue specimens were obtained by excision during valve replacement surgery and the patients were subjected to the whole blood sampling before the surgery. The polymerase chain reaction technology was used to detect the putative periodontal pathogens Tannerella forshytia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, Eikenella corrodens and Treponema denticola. Neither the 19 aortic valve specimens nor the blood samples were positive for the genoma of the selected periodontal pathogens. The selected periodontal pathogens did not colonize the aortic valve of patients affected by stenosis and bacterial genoma was not present in whole blood samples. A high blood pressure at the aortic valve may prevent the adhesion and proliferation of bacterial colonies.

  7. Interaction of oral bacteria with gingival epithelial cell multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, B C; Moffatt, C E; Hagerty, D; Whitmore, S E; Brown, T A; Graves, D T; Lamont, R J

    2011-06-01

    Primary gingival epithelial cells were cultured in multilayers as a model for the study of interactions with oral bacteria associated with health and periodontal disease. Multilayers maintained at an air-liquid interface in low-calcium medium displayed differentiation and cytokeratin properties characteristic of junctional epithelium. Multilayers were infected with fluorescently labeled Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum or Streptococcus gordonii, and bacterial association was determined by confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis. Porphyromonas gingivalis invaded intracellularly and spread from cell to cell; A. actinomycetemcomitans and F. nucleatum remained extracellular and showed intercellular movement through the multilayer; whereas S. gordonii remained extracellular and predominantly associated with the superficial cell layer. None of the bacterial species disrupted barrier function as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. P. gingivalis did not elicit secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. However, A. actinomycetemcomitans and S. gordonii induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6 and IL-8 secretion; and F. nucleatum stimulated production of IL-1β and TNF-α. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum and S. gordonii, but not P. gingivalis, increased levels of apoptosis after 24 h infection. The results indicate that the organisms with pathogenic potential were able to traverse the epithelium, whereas the commensal bacteria did not. In addition, distinct host responses characterized the interaction between the junctional epithelium and oral bacteria.

  8. Emerging role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis: a review with special reference to perio-pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Manosha; Al-hebshi, Nezar Noor; Speicher, David J.; Perera, Irosha; Johnson, Newell W.

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer, primarily oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), continues to be a major global health problem with high incidence and low survival rates. While the major risk factors for this malignancy, mostly lifestyle related, have been identified, around 15% of oral cancer cases remain unexplained. In light of evidence implicating bacteria in the aetiology of some cancer types, several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the last decade, employing methodologies ranging from traditional culture techniques to 16S rRNA metagenomics, to assess the possible role of bacteria in OSCC. While these studies have demonstrated differences in microbial composition between cancerous and healthy tissues, they have failed to agree on specific bacteria or patterns of oral microbial dysbiosis to implicate in OSCC. On the contrary, some oral taxa, particularly Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, show strong oral carcinogenic potential in vitro and in animal studies. Bacteria are thought to contribute to oral carcinogenesis via inhibition of apoptosis, activation of cell proliferation, promotion of cellular invasion, induction of chronic inflammation, and production of carcinogens. This narrative review provides a critical analysis of and an update on the association between bacteria and oral carcinogenesis and the possible mechanisms underlying it. PMID:27677454

  9. Preventive Effects of Houttuynia cordata Extract for Oral Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekita, Yasuko; Murakami, Keiji; Amoh, Takashi; Ogata, Shohei; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (HC) (Saururaceae) has been used internally and externally as a traditional medicine and as an herbal tea for healthcare in Japan. Our recent survey showed that HC poultice (HCP) prepared from smothering fresh leaves of HC had been frequently used for the treatment of purulent skin diseases with high effectiveness. Our experimental study also demonstrated that ethanol extract of HCP (eHCP) has antibacterial, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory effects against S. aureus which caused purulent skin diseases. In this study, we focused on novel effects of HCP against oral infectious diseases, such as periodontal disease and dental caries. We determined the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of water solution of HCP ethanol extract (wHCP) against important oral pathogens and investigated its cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory effects on human oral epithelial cells. wHCP had moderate antimicrobial effects against some oral microorganisms and profound antibiofilm effects against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida albicans. In addition, wHCP had no cytotoxic effects and could inhibit interleukin-8 and CCL20 productions by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human oral keratinocytes. Our findings suggested that wHCP may be clinically useful for preventing oral infectious diseases as a mouthwash for oral care. PMID:27413739

  10. Novel bioactive tetracycline-containing electrospun polymer fibers as a potential antibacterial dental implant coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, R G; Albuquerque, M T P; Münchow, E A; Blanchard, S B; Gregory, R L; Bottino, M C

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the ability of tetracycline-containing fibers to inhibit biofilm formation of peri-implantitis-associated pathogens [i.e., Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), Prevotella intermedia (Pi), and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa)]. Tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) was added to a poly(DL-lactide) [PLA], poly(ε-caprolactone) [PCL], and gelatin [GEL] polymer blend solution at distinct concentrations to obtain the following fibers: PLA:PCL/GEL (TCH-free, control), PLA:PCL/GEL + 5 % TCH, PLA:PCL/GEL + 10 % TCH, and PLA:PCL/GEL + 25 % TCH. The inhibitory effect of TCH-containing fibers on biofilm formation was assessed by colony-forming units (CFU/mL). Qualitative analysis of biofilm inhibition was done via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical significance was reported at p < 0.05. Complete inhibition of biofilm formation on the fibers was observed in groups containing TCH at 10 and 25 wt%. Fibers containing TCH at 5 wt% demonstrated complete inhibition of Aa biofilm. Even though a marked reduction in CFU/mL was observed with an increase in TCH concentration, Pi proved to be the most resilient microorganism. SEM images revealed the absence of or a notable decrease in bacterial biofilm on the TCH-containing nanofibers. Collectively, our data suggest that tetracycline-containing fibers hold great potential as an antibacterial dental implant coating.

  11. Targeted Therapies for Inlfammatory Bowel Disease and Colorectal Cancer:An Increasing Need for Microbiota-Intestinal Mutualism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomasello Giovanni; Tralongo Pietro; Jurjus Abdo; Matar Michel; Angelo Leone

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of intestinal microbiota and dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) is a well-established fact to be taken into real consideration when developing targeted therapies. This review aims to depict how advances in our understanding of the role of intestinal lfora in the pathogenesis of IBD and CRC are shaping up the therapeutic protocols of their management. It is demonstrated that there is a circadian regulation of colocyte gene expression in response to microbiota. Dysbiosis leading to a decrease in microbiome biodiversity is also described in IBD patients whereby thick layers of adherent mucosa associated bacteria exist both in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). Probiotics based approaches using lactobacilli and bibidobacteria improved clinical symptoms of IBD’s through the GALT immune modulation. In addition, microbiota transplantation has also been used for IBD treatment. Feacal microbiota transplantation (FMT) consists of transferring gastrointestinal microbiota from a healthy donor to an IBD patient by duodenal infusion of liquid stool suspension to establish microbial homeostasis. The destruction of mucosal integrity facilitates the passage of bacteria in the injured zone to trigger chronic inlfammation, eventually leading to CRC development by creating a carcinogenic environment. Actually, a high level of fusobacterium nucleatun and other bacteria are prevalent in CRC patients, thus suggesting a potential role of these organisms in the initiation and progression due to the production of genotoxic metabolites causing a direct damage to DNA integrity. Besides, regular probiotics intake may actively prevent the whole process.

  12. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Profiling of Moderate and Severe COPD Sputum in Taiwanese Han Males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Wei Lee

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is an inflammatory lung disorder characterized by the progressive obstruction of airflow and is currently the fourth leading cause of death in the world. The pathogenesis of COPD is thought to involve bacterial infections and inflammations. Owing to advancement in sequencing technology, evidence is emerging that supports an association between the lung microbiome and COPD. However, few studies have looked into the expression profile of the bacterial communities in the COPD lungs. In this study, we analyzed the sputum microbiome of four moderate and four severe COPD male patients both at the DNA and RNA level, using next generation sequencing technology. We found that bacterial composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing may not directly translate to the set of actively expressing bacteria as defined by transcriptome sequencing. The two sequencing data agreed on Prevotella, Rothia, Neisseria, Porphyromonas, Veillonella, Fusobacterium and Streptococcus being among the most differentially abundant genera between the moderate and severe COPD samples, supporting their association with COPD severity. However, the two sequencing analyses disagreed on the relative abundance of these bacteria in the two COPD groups, implicating the importance of studying the actively expressing bacteria for enriching our understanding of COPD. Though we have described the metatranscriptome profiles of the lung microbiome in moderate and severe COPD, further investigations are required to determine the functional basis underlying the relationship between the microbial species in the lungs and pathogenesis of COPD.

  13. Salivary Microbiome Diversity in Caries-Free and Caries-Affected Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Gao, Xiaoli; Jin, Lijian; Lo, Edward C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is an infectious disease. Its etiology is not fully understood from the microbiological perspective. This study characterizes the diversity of microbial flora in the saliva of children with and without dental caries. Children (3–4 years old) with caries (n = 20) and without caries (n = 20) were recruited. Unstimulated saliva (2 mL) was collected from each child and the total microbial genomic DNA was extracted. DNA amplicons of the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene were generated and subjected to Illumina Miseq sequencing. A total of 17 phyla, 26 classes, 40 orders, 80 families, 151 genera, and 310 bacterial species were represented in the saliva samples. There was no significant difference in the microbiome diversity between caries-affected and caries-free children (p > 0.05). The relative abundance of several species (Rothia dentocariosa, Actinomyces graevenitzii, Veillonella sp. oral taxon 780, Prevotella salivae, and Streptococcus mutans) was higher in the caries-affected group than in the caries-free group (p < 0.05). Fusobacterium periodonticum and Leptotrichia sp. oral clone FP036 were more abundant in caries-free children than in caries-affected children (p < 0.05). The salivary microbiome profiles of caries-free and caries-affected children were similar. Salivary counts of certain bacteria such as R. dentocariosa and F. periodonticum may be useful for screening/assessing children’s risk of developing caries. PMID:27898021

  14. Eikenella corrodens: Patogénesis y aspectos clínicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Darío Jaramillo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available El ambiente microbiológico oral es único y tiene una dinámica compleja. Se calcula que cerca de 500 especies de bacterias habitan la cavidad oral humana, y alrededor de 22 géneros son los predominantes. Las bacterias que se aíslan con más frecuencia de los sitios infectados de la cavidad oral, y que son también patógenos potenciales, forma un grupo pequeño de microorganismos gramnegativos, entre los que se incluyen los siguientes: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter spp., Capnocytophoga spp., Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia y el grupo-Streptococcus milleri. E. corrodens se reconoce como un microbio patógeno oportunista en la cavidad oral; también, puede causar infecciones extra orales, como un agente infeccioso solo o en combinaciones con diversas bacterias. La presente revisión, con un énfasis en E. corrodens, mostrará varios aspectos de sus características microbiológicas y bioquímicas, también se sistematizan y discuten el conocimiento actual sobre los mecanismos de patogénesis, como los lipopolisacáridos, proteínas externas de membrana, complejo de adesina, pili y otros; infecciones oral y extra oral; factores predisponentes; endocarditis; osteomielitis, infecciones intra-abdominales; diagnóstico y agentes antimicrobianos.

  15. Eikenella corrodens: Patogénesis y aspectos clínicos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Darío Jaramillo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available El ambiente microbiológico oral es único y tiene una dinámica compleja. Se calcula que cerca de 500 especies de bacterias habitan la cavidad oral humana, y alrededor de 22 géneros son los predominantes. Las bacterias que se aíslan con más frecuencia de los sitios infectados de la cavidad oral, y que son también patógenos potenciales, forma un grupo pequeño de microorganismos gramnegativos, entre los que se incluyen los siguientes: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter spp., Capnocytophoga spp., Eikenella corrodens, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia y el grupo-Streptococcus milleri. E. corrodens se reconoce como un microbio patógeno oportunista en la cavidad oral; también, puede causar infecciones extra orales, como un agente infeccioso solo o en combinaciones con diversas bacterias. La presente revisión, con un énfasis en E. corrodens, mostrará varios aspectos de sus características microbiológicas y bioquímicas, también se sistematizan y discuten el conocimiento actual sobre los mecanismos de patogénesis, como los lipopolisacáridos, proteínas externas de membrana, complejo de adesina, pili y otros; infecciones oral y extra oral; factores predisponentes; endocarditis; osteomielitis, infecciones intra-abdominales; diagnóstico y agentes antimicrobianos.

  16. Influence of Biofilm Formation by Gardnerella vaginalis and Other Anaerobes on Bacterial Vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, António; Cerca, Nuno

    2015-12-15

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the worldwide leading vaginal disorder among women of reproductive age. BV is characterized by the replacement of beneficial lactobacilli and the augmentation of anaerobic bacteria. Gardnerella vaginalis is a predominant bacterial species, but BV is also associated with other numerous anaerobes, such as Atopobium vaginae, Mobiluncus mulieris, Prevotella bivia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Peptoniphilus species. Currently, the role of G. vaginalis in the etiology of BV remains a matter of controversy. However, it is known that, in patients with BV, a biofilm is usually formed on the vaginal epithelium and that G. vaginalis is typically the predominant species. So, the current paradigm is that the establishment of a biofilm plays a key role in the pathogenesis of BV. This review provides background on the influence of biofilm formation by G. vaginalis and other anaerobes, from the time of their initial adhesion until biofilm formation, in the polymicrobial etiology of BV and discusses the commensal and synergic interactions established between them to understand the phenotypic shift of G. vaginalis biofilm formation to BV establishment.

  17. The protective effect of recombinant FomA-expressing Lactobacillus acidophilus against periodontal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Ding, Qinfeng; Feng, Xiping; Li, Fei

    2013-10-01

    A number of studies have shown that the outer membrane protein FomA found in Fusobacterium nucleatum demonstrates great potential as an immune target for combating periodontitis. Lactobacillus acidophilus is a useful antigen delivery vehicle for mucosal immunisation, and previous studies by our group have shown that L. acidophilus acts as a protective factor in periodontal health. In this study, making use of the immunogenicity of FomA and the probiotic properties of L. acidophilus, we constructed a recombinant form of L. acidophilus expressing the FomA protein and detected the FomA-specific IgG in the serum and sIgA in the saliva of mice through oral administration with the recombinant strains. When serum containing FomA-specific antibodies was incubated with the F. nucleatum in vitro, the number of Porphyromonas gingivalis cells that coaggregated with the F. nucleatum cells was significantly reduced. Furthermore, a mouse gum abscess model was successfully generated, and the range of gingival abscesses in the immune mice was relatively limited compared with the control group. The level of IL-1β in the serum and local gum tissues of the immune mice was consistently lower than in the control group. Our findings indicated that oral administration of the recombinant L. acidophilus reduced the risk of periodontal infection with P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum.

  18. [Susceptibility of potential periodontopathic bacteria to metronidazole, spiramycin and their combination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, C; Dextraze, L; Mayrand, D

    1984-03-01

    A total of 65 bacterial strains originating mostly from subgingival plaque were tested for their susceptibilities to metronidazole, spiramycin, and their combination, ornidazole, erythromycin and tetracycline by means of an agar dilution technique. All agents were active against all anaerobic Gram-negative rods. Bacteroides gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum showed marked susceptibility to metronidazole (MIC less than or equal to 0.06 microgram/ml) whereas 4-64 micrograms/ml were required to inhibit the capnophilic Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Capnocytophaga. Gram-positive facultatives were resistant to nitro-imidazoles but were inhibited at macrolide concentrations less than or equal to 0.5 microgram/ml. Except for F. nucleatum and Veillonella strains (2 less than or equal to MIC less than or equal to 128 micrograms/ml) macrolides were active against all other anaerobic bacteria tested. At concentrations less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml the combination of spiramycin and metronidazole (2 : 1) was active against virtually all bacteria tested but our results failed to show a synergistic effect.

  19. [In vitro activity of roxithromycin, new semisynthetic macrolide against obligate anaerobes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, L; Devos, J; Romond, C; Bryskier, A

    1986-05-01

    The "in vitro" susceptibility to roxithromycin and three other macrolides of 236 anaerobes isolated from clinical samples in 1984/1985 was determined by an agar-dilution method on Wilkins Chalgren medium. 90% of Gram positive cocci were susceptible to both roxithromycin and josamycin (MIC less than 1 mg/l, whereas 1 mg/l erythromycin and 2 mg/l spiramycin were able to inhibit respectively 46 and 86% of the same tested strains. No resistance to the four macrolides was observed among Eubacterium, propionibacterium and Bifidobacterium. Two C. perfringens strains and one C. difficile strain were resistant to all four macrolides, while 97% of Clostridium sp. strains were inhibited by 4 mg/l erythromycin, josamycin or roxithromycin. Against Gram positive anaerobes, roxithromycin was equal or superior to erythromycin and spiramycin. At a concentration of 4 mg/l, roxithromycin inhibited 82% of B. fragilis strains. Roxithromycin and josamycin were more active against Gram negative bacilli that erythromycin and spiramycin. Macrolides had no effect on Fusobacterium strains. In this study, 4 mg/l roxithromycin inhibited 217 of the 236 anaerobic strains investigated (92%).

  20. A first report on the microbial colonisation of the equine oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Wilfried; Kacza, Johannes; Schnapper, Anke; Verspohl, Jutta; Hornickel, Isabelle; Seeger, Johannes

    2010-02-20

    Based on cryo-SEM, standard and high resolution TEM, glycoconjugate histochemistry, and microbiological differentiation, the present study demonstrates the colonisation of the epithelium of the equine oesophagus with microorganisms. As particularly apparent using cryo-SEM to illustrate natural conditions, the present microbiota were clearly dominated by bacteria, forming a one-layer system, as attached to and embedded in concentrated mannose/mannan substances covering the outer stratum corneal cells. Bacterial numbers ranged from 5600 to 7200 per mm(2) in the central part of the oesophagus, the number of fungi was less than 1% of the amount of bacteria. The compact stratum corneal cells showed numerous short protrusions sometimes as part of desmosomal contacts, but mainly projecting into distinct intercellular spaces, containing a mixture of acid and neutral glycoconjugates. The outermost corneal cells exhibited intact mitochondria and cytoplasmic vesicles, and a number of short cell processes toward the oesophageal lumen; i.e. into the glycoconjugate layers on the surface of the oesophagus. The diverse spectrum of bacteria found indicated a permanent mucosal flora, predominated by facultative and obligate anaerobic species. The genera isolated most frequently and in highest numbers included streptococci, Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium spp. and Actinobacillus equuli. Only two groups of Enterobacteriaceae (Escherichia coli, Pantoea spp.) were regularly found and their abundance was lower than that of the other bacterial groups mentioned above. Yeasts were very rarely identified as the typically present fungi. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization is required to alter the nasal microbiota in cigarette smoke-exposed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Pamela; Whelan, Fiona J; Schenck, L Patrick; McGrath, Joshua J C; Vanderstocken, Gilles; Bowdish, Dawn M E; Surette, Michael G; Stämpfli, Martin R

    2017-07-31

    Smokers have nasal microbiota dysbiosis, with an increased frequency of colonizing bacterial pathogens. It is possible that cigarette smoke increases pathogen acquisition by perturbing the microbiota and decreasing colonization resistance. However, it is difficult to disentangle microbiota dysbiosis due to cigarette smoke exposure from microbiota changes caused by increased pathogen acquisition in human smokers. Utilizing an experimental mouse model, we investigated the impact of cigarette smoke on the nasal microbiota in the absence and presence of nasal pneumococcal colonization. We observed that cigarette smoke exposure alone did not alter nasal microbiota composition. Microbiota composition was also unchanged at 12 hours following low dose nasal pneumococcal inoculation, suggesting the ability of the microbiota to resist initial nasal pneumococcal acquisition was not impaired in smoke-exposed mice. However, nasal microbiota dysbiosis occurred as a consequence of established high dose nasal pneumococcal colonization at day 3 in smoke-exposed mice. Similar to clinical reports in human smokers, we observed an enrichment of potentially pathogenic bacterial genera such as Fusobacterium, Gemella, and Neisseria Our findings suggest that cigarette smoke exposure predisposes to pneumococcal colonization independent of changes to the nasal microbiota, and microbiota dysbiosis observed in smokers may occur as a consequence of established pathogen colonization. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Gram-negative intestinal indigenous microbiota from two Siluriform fishes in a tropical reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Silvana; e Silva, Flávia Cristina de Paula; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Nicoli, Jacques Robert; Araújo, Francisco Gerson

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative intestinal microbiota of Hypostomus auroguttatus and Pimelodus maculatus, a detritivorous and an omnivorous fish species, respectively, were compared between fishes from the reservoir and the stretch of the river below the dam of the Funil hydroelectric plant, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Four selective culture media were used under aerobic and two under anaerobic conditions. The omnivorous species had microbiota with higher population levels compared to the detritivorous species. The number of morphotypes and population levels of total bacteria, vibrio and Bacteroides tended to be higher in summer and autumn in the reservoir, and not different in the river. The number of morphotypes of enterobacteria and total bacteria were higher in the lotic environment compared with the lentic one. The bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila and Plesiomonas shigelloides and the obligate anaerobic Fusobacterium mortiferum were the most frequently identified microorganisms in the intestine of both H. auroguttatus and P. maculatus. Both season and habitat influenced the Gram-negative intestinal microbiota of H. auroguttatus and P. maculatus. Environmental factors influenced the Gram-negative intestinal microbiota of both species with possible impact on the interrelationship between the fishes and their digestive ecosystem, although the gut microbiota composition of fishes may result from host-specific selective pressures within the gut.

  3. Analysis of the airway microbiota of healthy individuals and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by T-RFLP and clone sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetyana Zakharkina

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive, inflammatory lung disease that affects a large number of patients and has significant impact. One hallmark of the disease is the presence of bacteria in the lower airways.The aim of this study was to analyze the detailed structure of microbial communities found in the lungs of healthy individuals and patients with COPD. Nine COPD patients as compared and 9 healthy individuals underwent flexible bronchoscopy and BAL was performed. Bacterial nucleic acids were subjected to terminal restriction fragment (TRF length polymorphism and clone library analysis. Overall, we identified 326 T-RFLP band, 159 in patients and 167 in healthy controls. The results of the TRF analysis correlated partly with the data obtained from clone sequencing. Although the results of the sequencing showed high diversity, the genera Prevotella, Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Fusobacterium, Megasphaera, Veillonella, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus constituted the major part of the core microbiome found in both groups. A TRF band possibly representing Pseudomonas sp. monoinfection was associated with a reduction of the microbial diversity. Non-cultural methods reveal the complexity of the pulmonary microbiome in healthy individuals and in patients with COPD. Alterations of the microbiome in pulmonary diseases are correlated with disease.

  4. Oropharynx microbiota among alcoholics and non-alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Golin

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The oropharynx microbiota plays an important role in the origin of infections, especially among alcoholics whose airway defenses are impaired. OBJECTIVE: To compare the normal oropharingeal flora in heavy alcohol drinker and non-alcoholics. PATIENTS: 117 persons, 58 heavy alcohol drinkers and 59 non-alcoholics. SETTING: Santa Casa de São Paulo Emergency Service. DESIGN: A blind prospective study. MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURES: Prevalence of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and fungi. RESULTS: The study of the oropharynx microbiota among heavy alcohol drinkers demonstrated the presence of anaerobic microorganisms in 84.5% of them, including: Bacteroides sp, Prevotella melaninogenica, Fusobacterium sp, Veilonella sp, Peptostreptococcus sp, Propionibacterium sp, Bifidobacterium sp and Clostridium sp, versus 30.5% (p<0.005 of non-alcoholics. Candida sp was present in 34.5% of heavy alcohol drinkers and 5.1% of non-alcoholics (p<0.005. Enterobacteria predominated among heavy alcohol drinkers (25% compared with non-alcoholics (5.5% only in the age group 14 to 34 years (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Based upon these results, it was possible to conclude that the knowledge of the oropharynx microbiota among heavy drinkers and non-alcoholics has an important predictive value concerning probable etiologic agents of lower airway infections. Infections caused by anaerobic microorganisms and fungi should be taken into consideration during the choice of empirical therapy for heavy alcohol drinkers.

  5. Periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis drives periodontal microbiota dysbiosis and insulin resistance via an impaired adaptive immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Garidou, Lucile; Pomié, Céline; Escoula, Quentin; Loubieres, Pascale; Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Lemaitre, Mathieu; Nicolas, Simon; Klopp, Pascale; Waget, Aurélie; Azalbert, Vincent; Colom, André; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Kemoun, Philippe; Serino, Matteo; Burcelin, Rémy

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify a causal mechanism responsible for the enhancement of insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia following periodontitis in mice fed a fat-enriched diet. Design We set-up a unique animal model of periodontitis in C57Bl/6 female mice by infecting the periodontal tissue with specific and alive pathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia. The mice were then fed with a diabetogenic/non-obesogenic fat-enriched diet for up to 3 months. Alveolar bone loss, periodontal microbiota dysbiosis and features of glucose metabolism were quantified. Eventually, adoptive transfer of cervical (regional) and systemic immune cells was performed to demonstrate the causal role of the cervical immune system. Results Periodontitis induced a periodontal microbiota dysbiosis without mainly affecting gut microbiota. The disease concomitantly impacted on the regional and systemic immune response impairing glucose metabolism. The transfer of cervical lymph-node cells from infected mice to naive recipients guarded against periodontitis-aggravated metabolic disease. A treatment with inactivated Pg prior to the periodontal infection induced specific antibodies against Pg and protected the mouse from periodontitis-induced dysmetabolism. Finally, a 1-month subcutaneous chronic infusion of low rates of lipopolysaccharides from Pg mimicked the impact of periodontitis on immune and metabolic parameters. Conclusions We identified that insulin resistance in the high-fat fed mouse is enhanced by pathogen-induced periodontitis. This is caused by an adaptive immune response specifically directed against pathogens and associated with a periodontal dysbiosis. PMID:26838600

  6. Relationship of clinical and microbiological variables in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and periodontitis.

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    Sakalauskiene, Jurgina; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Ivanauskiene, Egle; Šaferis, Viktoras

    2014-10-08

    The aim of the study was to analyze how metabolic control of type 1 diabetes is related to clinical and microbiological periodontal parameters. The study involved 56 subjects aged from 19 to 50 years divided into 2 groups: healthy subjects (the H group), and diabetic (type 1 diabetes) patients with chronic untreated generalized periodontitis (the DM group). The glycosylated hemoglobin value (HbA1c) was determined using the UniCel DxC 800 SYNCHRON System (Beckman Coulter, USA), and the concentration in blood was measured by the turbidimetric immunoinhibition method. A molecular genetic assay (Micro-IDent plus, Germany) was used to detect periodontopathogenic bacteria in plaque samples. Periodontitis was confirmed by clinical and radiological examination. Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga species, and Eikenella corrodens were the most frequently found bacteria in dental plaque samples (77.8%, 66.7%, and 33.4%, respectively), whereas Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was identified 40.7% less frequently in the DM group than in the H group. The strongest relationship was observed between the presence of 2 periodontal pathogens - F. nucleatum and Capnocytophaga spp. - and poorer metabolic control in type 1 diabetes patients (HbA1c) and all clinical parameters of periodontal pathology. Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetic patients, and the prevalence of periodontitis was greatly increased in subjects with poorer metabolic control.

  7. Characterization of vaginal microbiota of endometritis and healthy sows using high-throughput pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene.

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    Wang, Jun; Li, Changjiu; Nesengani, Lucky T; Gong, Yongsheng; Zhang, Shumin; Lu, Wenfa

    2017-08-31

    Endometritis is one of major challenges in reproduction infections caused by bacteria in sows. Understanding of the vaginal bacterial community between endometritis and healthy sows serves as a critical step to develop more effective ways to improve reproduction ability in pig industry. The aim of the present study is to evaluate and compare the vaginal microbiota of endometritis and healthy sows using high-throughput pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene. The main bacterium found at the phylum level were Firmicutes (60.88% vs. 45.86%), Proteobacteria (20.45% vs. 32.19%) and Bacteroidetes (9.19% vs. 12.99%) for healthy and endometritis sows, respectively. Most notable difference at the phylum level was the Proteobacteria which occupied high abundance in the endometritis sows but less abundance in the healthy sows. At the genus level, the highest abundant were Bacillus (27.13% vs. 16.15%), Paenibacillus (14.78% vs. 8.92%), Alkaliphilus (3.99% vs. 2.87%) and Cronobacter (4.04% vs. 2.37%), in healthy and endometritis sows, respectively. Notable differences were Escherichia-Shigella, Bacteroides, Fusobacterium and Clostridium_sensu_stricto_1 which were more abundant in the endometritis than the healthy sows respectively. The present results for the first time demonstrate vaginal microbial community of sows and indicate that endometritis affected the vaginal microbiota of sow. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Peripheral blood neutrophil cytokine hyper-reactivity in chronic periodontitis.

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    Ling, Martin R; Chapple, Iain L C; Matthews, John B

    2015-10-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokine release (IL-8, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β) by peripheral blood neutrophils, isolated from periodontitis patients (before/after therapy) and matched controls, was determined after 18 h culture in the presence/absence of Escherichia coli LPS, opsonised Staphylococcus aureus, heat-killed Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis. All cultures demonstrated differences in the amounts of each cytokine detected (P IL-6 > TNF-α = IL-1β). Median cytokine release from unstimulated patient neutrophils was consistently, but non-significantly, higher than from control cells. Stimulated cytokine release from untreated patient neutrophils was also consistently higher than from control cells. This hyper-reactivity was significant for all tested cytokines when data for all stimuli were combined (P TNF-α), opsonised S. aureus (IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β) and P. gingivalis (IL-8, IL-1β). Cytokine production by patient neutrophils did not reduce following successful non-surgical periodontal therapy and, except for responses to F. nucleatum, the cytokine hyper-reactivity detected pre-therapy was retained. These data demonstrate that chronic periodontitis is characterised by neutrophils that constitutively exhibit cytokine hyper-reactivity, the effects of which could modulate local and systemic inflammatory-immune responses and influence the risk and severity of periodontitis-associated systemic inflammatory diseases.

  9. Intracanal Antibiotic Medication for Sustained Root Surface Disinfection–A Laboratory Evaluation

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    Zaruba, Markus Tobias Winfried; Filli, Tilla; Rechenberg, Dan-Krister; Thurnheer, Thomas; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick Roger

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the release of an antibiotic mixture of ciprofloxacin, cerfuroxim and metronidazole (TreVitaMix, TVM) through human dentine and to assess the growth inhibition of Fusobacterium nucleatum. Material and Methods: Twenty-four extracted human incisors were scaled and endodontically treated. Root canals were either filled with antibiotic tri-mixture (TVM) or with the carrier material alone (propylene glycol, PG) and were coronally and apically sealed with a flowable composite. Transradicular medicament release was spectrophotometrically measured at 277 nm in simulated body fluid for up to 21 days. In a second part, an agar diffusion assay (F. nucleatum) with representative TVM concentrations as determined in the first part was performed to study the growth inhibition. Samples were anaerobical incubated for 48 h and inhibition zones were measured. Results: TVM was spectrophotometrically detectable in the immersion solution and released in decreasing concentrations up to 21 days (222.5 ± 65.2 mg/ml at day 1 and 35.1 ± 15.6 mg/ml at day 21). In addition, inhibition zones were shown in the agar diffusion assay at representative TVM concentrations. The carrier material showed no antibacterial effect. Conlusion: TVM showed the potential to penetrate through dentine and to inhibit bacterial growth. Therefore, it might have the potential to disinfect the outer root surface in perio-endo lesions, but further research is needed to confirm these observations. PMID:26966464

  10. Inactivating effects of the lactoperoxidase system on bacterial lyases involved in oral malodour production.

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    Nakano, Manabu; Shin, Kouichirou; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Koji; Abe, Fumiaki; Hironaka, Shouji

    2015-10-01

    The main components of oral malodour have been identified as volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), including hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and methyl mercaptan (CH(3)SH). The lactoperoxidase (LPO) system (consisting of LPO, glucose oxidase, glucose and thiocyanate) was previously shown to exhibit antimicrobial activities against some oral bacteria in vitro and suppressive effects on VSCs in mouth air in a clinical trial. Here, we examined the in vitro effects of the LPO system on the activities of the bacterial lyases involved in the production of VSCs by oral anaerobes. The exposure of crude bacterial extracts of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis or purified methionine γ-lyase to the LPO system resulted in the inactivation of their lyase activities through l-cysteine and l-methionine, which was linked to the production of H(2)S and CH(3)SH, respectively. The exposure of living F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis cells to the LPO system resulted in the suppression of cell numbers and lyase activities. The inactivation of the crude bacterial extracts of F. nucleatum and purified methionine γ-lyase by the LPO system was partly recovered by the addition of DTT. Therefore, the LPO system may inactivate bacterial lyases including methionine γ-lyase by reacting with the free cysteine residues of lyases. These results suggested that the LPO system suppresses the production of VSCs not only through its antimicrobial effects, but also by its inactivating effects on the bacterial lyases of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis.

  11. Comparison of the detection of periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia after tooth brushing by culture and molecular techniques

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    Figuero, Elena; González, Itziar; O´Connor, Ana; Diz, Pedro; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence and amounts of periodontal pathogens detected in bacteraemia samples after tooth brushing-induced by means of four diagnostic technique, three based on culture and one in a molecular-based technique, have been compared in this study. Material and Methods Blood samples were collected from thirty-six subjects with different periodontal status (17 were healthy, 10 with gingivitis and 9 with periodontitis) at baseline and 2 minutes after tooth brushing. Each sample was analyzed by three culture-based methods [direct anaerobic culturing (DAC), hemo-culture (BACTEC), and lysis-centrifugation (LC)] and one molecular-based technique [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)]. With culture any bacterial isolate was detected and quantified, while with qPCR only Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected and quantified. Descriptive analyses, ANOVA and Chi-squared tests, were performed. Results Neither BACTEC nor qPCR detected any type of bacteria in the blood samples. Only LC (2.7%) and DAC (8.3%) detected bacteraemia, although not in the same patients. Fusobacterium nucleatum was the most frequently detected bacterial species. Conclusions The disparity in the results when the same samples were analyzed with four different microbiological detection methods highlights the need for a proper validation of the methodology to detect periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia samples, mainly when the presence of periodontal pathogens in blood samples after tooth brushing was very seldom. Key words:Bacteraemia, periodontitis, culture, PCR, tooth brushing. PMID:26946197

  12. Assessing gut microbiota perturbations during the early phase of infectious diarrhea in Vietnamese children.

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    The, Hao Chung; Florez de Sessions, Paola; Jie, Song; Pham Thanh, Duy; Thompson, Corinne N; Nguyen Ngoc Minh, Chau; Chu, Collins Wenhan; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Thomson, Nicholas R; Thwaites, Guy E; Rabaa, Maia A; Hibberd, Martin; Baker, Stephen

    2017-08-02

    Diarrheal diseases remain the second most common cause of mortality in young children in developing countries. Efforts have been made to explore the impact of diarrhea on bacterial communities in the human gut, but a thorough understanding has been impeded by inadequate resolution in bacterial identification and the examination of only few etiological agents. Here, by profiling an extended region of the 16S rRNA gene in the fecal microbiome, we aimed to elucidate the nature of gut microbiome perturbations during the early phase of infectious diarrhea caused by various etiological agents in Vietnamese children. Fecal samples from 145 diarrheal cases with a confirmed infectious etiology before antimicrobial therapy and 54 control subjects were analyzed. We found that the diarrheal fecal microbiota could be robustly categorized into 4 microbial configurations that either generally resembled or were highly divergent from a healthy state. Factors such as age, nutritional status, breastfeeding, and the etiology of the infection were significantly associated with these microbial community structures. We observed a consistent elevation of Fusobacterium mortiferum, Escherichia, and oral microorganisms in all diarrheal fecal microbiome configurations, proposing similar mechanistic interactions, even in the absence of global dysbiosis. We additionally found that Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum was significantly depleted during dysenteric diarrhea regardless of the etiological agent, suggesting that further investigations into the use of this species as a dysentery-orientated probiotic therapy are warranted. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the complex influence of infectious diarrhea on gut microbiome and identify new opportunities for therapeutic interventions.

  13. Toothbrush contamination in family members

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    Adolfo Contreras

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial contamination of toothbrushes in family members. Materials and Methods: One hundred and two healthy subjects were included in this descriptive study. Every individual was examined clinically and microbiologically using the CPITN index and collecting subgingival plaque samples. Each participant received a toothbrush for home use and after one month they returned it to the investigators. All toothbrushes were cultured to determine the presence of periodontopathic bacteria and enteric rods. Wilkoxon signed rank test and t student test (P d"0.05 were used to compare differences in the subgingival microbiota and toothbrush contamination and CPITN index among family members. Results: A high proportion of toothbrushes resulted highly contaminated with enteric rods (P d"0.001 compared to the subgingival environment where periodontopathic bacteria were more prevalent. The most frequent microorganisms found in toothbrushes used by parents and children for one month were Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae species (>50% and Fusobacterium spp (30%. Conclusions: High levels of enteric rods were commonly detected in toothbrushes used for 1 month among members of the families. These opportunistic organisms may have an important role in oral infections including gingivitis and periodontitis. Monthly replacement or disinfection of the toothbrush can reduce the risk of bacterial transmission/translocation and thus diminish the incidence of biofilm associated oral diseases.

  14. Could gut microbiota serve as prognostic biomarker associated with colorectal cancer patients' survival? A pilot study on relevant mechanism

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    Wei, Zhiliang; Cao, Shougen; Liu, Shanglong; Yao, Zengwu; Sun, Teng; Li, Yi; Li, Jiante; Zhang, Dongfeng; Zhou, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Evidences have shown that dysbiosis could promote the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the association of dysbiosis and prognosis of CRC is barely investigated. Therefore, we used 16S rRNA gene sequencing approach to determine differences in microbiota among tumor tissues of different prognosis and found that Fusobacterium nucleatum and Bacteroides fragilis were more abundant in worse prognosis groups, while Faecalibacterium prausnitzii displayed higher abundance in survival group. To further explore the prognostic value of the found bacteria, Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional regression analyses were used and the results exhibited that high abundance of F. nucleatum and B. fragilis were independent indicators of poor patient's survival. Besides, the expression of major inflammatory mediator were analyzed using PCR and western blot methods, and it turned out that high abundance of F. nucleatum was associated with increased expression of TNF-α, β-catenin and NF-κB, while COX-2, MMP-9 and NF-κB were positively related with high B. fragilis level, and high level of F. prausnitzii showed lower expression of β-catenin, MMP-9 and NF-κB. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis indicated that KRAS and BRAF expression were prominent in F. nucleatum and B. fragilis high abundance group, while MLH1 showed lower expression. In conclusion, F. nucleatum, B. fragilis and F. prausnitzii can be identified as useful prognostic biomarkers for CRC, and dysbiosis might worsen the patients' prognosis by up-regulating gut inflammation level. PMID:27323816

  15. The OxyR homologue in Tannerella forsythia regulates expression of oxidative stress responses and biofilm formation.

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    Honma, Kiyonobu; Mishima, Elina; Inagaki, Satoru; Sharma, Ashu

    2009-06-01

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic periodontal pathogen that encounters constant oxidative stress in the human oral cavity due to exposure to air and reactive oxidative species from coexisting dental plaque bacteria as well as leukocytes. In this study, we sought to characterize a T. forsythia ORF with close similarity to bacterial oxidative stress response sensor protein OxyR. To analyse the role of this OxyR homologue, a gene deletion mutant was constructed and characterized. Aerotolerance, survival after hydrogen peroxide challenge and transcription levels of known bacterial antioxidant genes were then determined. Since an association between oxidative stress and biofilm formation has been observed in bacterial systems, we also investigated the role of the OxyR protein in biofilm development by T. forsythia. Our results showed that aerotolerance, sensitivity to peroxide challenge and the expression of oxidative stress response genes were significantly reduced in the mutant as compared with the wild-type strain. Moreover, the results of biofilm analyses showed that, as compared with the wild-type strain, the oxyR mutant showed significantly less autoaggregation and a reduced ability to form mixed biofilms with Fusobacterium nucleatum. In conclusion, a gene annotated in the T. forsythia genome as an oxyR homologue was characterized. Our studies showed that the oxyR homologue in T. forsythia constitutively activates antioxidant genes involved in resistance to peroxides as well as oxygen stress (aerotolerance). In addition, the oxyR deletion attenuates biofilm formation in T. forsythia.

  16. Total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status in saliva of periodontitis patients in relation to bacterial load

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    Taowen eZhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidant status (TOS in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response.

  17. The influence of orthodontic fixed appliances on the oral microbiota: A systematic review

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    Amanda Osório Ayres de Freitas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate whether there is scientific evidence to support the hypothesis that the presence of orthodontic fixed appliances influences the oral microbiota. Methods: The search for articles was conducted in PubMed; ISI Web of Knowledge and Ovid databases, including articles published in English until May 17th, 2012. They should report human observational studies presenting the following keywords: "fixed orthodontic appliance" AND "microbiological colonization"; OR "periodontal pathogens"; OR "Streptococcus"; OR "Lactobacillus"; OR "Candida"; OR "Tannerella forsythia"; OR "Treponema denticola"; OR "Fusobacterium nucleatum"; OR "Actimomyces actinomycetemcomitans"; OR "Prevotella intermedia", OR "Prevotella nigrescens"; OR "Porphyromonas gingivalis". Articles were previously selected by title and abstract. Articles that met the inclusion criteria were analyzed and classified as having low, moderate or high methodology quality. A new detailed checklist for quality assessment was developed based on the information required for applicable data extraction for reviews. The study design, sample, follow-up period, collection and microbial analysis methods, statistical treatment, results and discussion were assessed. Results: The initial search retrieved 305 articles of which 33 articles were selected by title and abstract. After full-text reading, 8 articles met the inclusion criteria, out of which 4 articles were classified as having low and 4 as moderate methodological quality. The moderate methodological quality studies were included in the systematic review. Conclusions: The literature revealed moderate evidence that the presence of fixed appliances influences the quantity and quality of oral microbiota.

  18. The surface layer of Tannerella forsythia contributes to serum resistance and oral bacterial coaggregation.

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    Shimotahira, Naohiro; Oogai, Yuichi; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Yamada, Sakuo; Fukutsuji, Kenji; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Noguchi, Kazuyuki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2013-04-01

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic, Gram-negative bacterium involved in the so-called "red complex," which is associated with severe and chronic periodontitis. The surface layer (S-layer) of T. forsythia is composed of cell surface glycoproteins, such as TfsA and TfsB, and is known to play a role in adhesion/invasion and suppression of proinflammatory cytokine expression. Here we investigated the association of this S-layer with serum resistance and coaggregation with other oral bacteria. The growth of the S-layer-deficient mutant in a bacterial medium containing more than 20% non-heat-inactivated calf serum (CS) or more than 40% non-heat-inactivated human serum was significantly suppressed relative to that of the wild type (WT). Next, we used confocal microscopy to perform quantitative analysis on the effect of serum. The survival ratio of the mutant exposed to 100% non-heat-inactivated CS (76% survival) was significantly lower than that of the WT (97% survival). Furthermore, significant C3b deposition was observed in the mutant but not in the WT. In a coaggregation assay, the mutant showed reduced coaggregation with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus salivarius, and Porphyromonas gingivalis but strong coaggregation with Fusobacterium nucleatum. These results indicated that the S-layer of T. forsythia plays multiple roles in virulence and may be associated with periodontitis.

  19. Detection and enumeration of periodontopathogenic bacteria in subgingival biofilm of pregnant women

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    Fernanda Campos Machado

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique to test the hypothesis of qualitative and quantitative differences of 8 periodontopathogens between pregnant and non-pregnant women. This cross-sectional study included 20 pregnant women in their second trimester of pregnancy and 20 non-pregnant women. Probing depth, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, and presence of calculus were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected and the FISH technique identified the presence and numbers of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, Campylobacter rectus, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. The Mann-Whitney U-test was applied to compare the data between the two groups. The mean age, ethnicity, marital status, education, and economic level in both groups were similar. The clinical parameters showed no significant differences between pregnant and non-pregnant women. The numbers of subgingival periodontopathogens were not found to be significantly different between groups, despite the higher mean counts of P. intermedia in pregnant women. Colonization patterns of the different bacteria most commonly associated with periodontal disease were not different in the subgingival plaque of pregnant and non-pregnant women.

  20. Effects of Hangeshashinto on Growth of Oral Microorganisms

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    Haruka Fukamachi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral mucositis (OM in cancer patients induced by chemotherapy or radiotherapy has a significant impact on quality of life, and causes considerable morbidity. Oral microorganisms are likely to intensify the inflammatory process and aggravate the formation of ulcers. Hangeshashinto (HST, a Japanese kampo medicine, has been reported to be effective when used as a gargle for the treatment of OM. To clarify the effects of HST on oral microorganisms, we assessed its antimicrobial activity against 27 microbial species, including 19 oral bacteria and one fungus. HST extract inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella melaninogenica, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, though inhibitory effects were less pronounced for Gram-positive bacteria and the fungal strain. We then investigated the effects of antibacterial activities on 15 purified ingredients of HST and determined that baicalein, berberine, coptisine, [6]-shogaol, and homogentisic acid actively inhibited the growth of these bacteria. These findings showed that HST inhibits the growth of specific Gram-negative periodontopathogenic bacteria, which are significant pathogens in OM, without disturbing the normal oral flora. Our data suggest that HST may be a useful treatment for OM in patients undergoing anticancer treatment.

  1. Detection and measurement of oral malodor in chronic periodontitis patients and its correlation with levels of select oral anaerobes in subgingival plaque

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    H S Grover

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral malodor is generally ascribable to oral microbial putrefaction generating malodorous volatile sulfur compounds. The aim of the present study is to correlate organoleptic recordings with a small handheld portable volatile sulfide monitor and periodontal clinical parameters and correlate the levels of halitosis causing bacteria in plaque between baseline, 1-week, and 1-month. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 systemically healthy subjects with self-reported halitosis were subjected to organoleptic examination and FitScan®. Subgingival plaque samples for anaerobic culturing were harvested followed by an assessment of plaque index (PI, gingival bleeding index (GBI, and pocket probing depth. Data derived were subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Spearman's rank test (P < 0.05. Results: No correlation was seen between organoleptic measurements and portable volatile sulfide monitor at any time interval. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.05 correlation between the scores of PI, gingival index, GBI, and myeloproliferative disease with organoleptic readings at all-time intervals. Anaerobic culture has shown to identify Fusobacterium species, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia. However, no correlation could be established in between total microbial load with organoleptic and FitScan®reading at any time interval (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Significant correlation could be established between organoleptic readings and periodontal parameters.

  2. Longitudinal study on clinical and microbial analysis of periodontal status in pregnancy

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    Fernanda Campos MACHADO

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was aimed to provide a longitudinal overview of the subgingival bacterial microbiome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique, in women in the second trimester of pregnancy (between 14 and 24 weeks, and 48 h and 8 weeks postpartum. Of 31 women evaluated during pregnancy, 24 returned for the 48-h and 18 for their 8-week exams postpartum. Probing depth (PD, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, and presence of calculus were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected, and FISH was used to identify the numbers of eight periodontal pathogens. Friedman test was used to compare differences between follow-up examinations, followed by a multiple comparison test for a post hoc pairwise comparison. Clinically, a significantly greater number of teeth with PD = 4–5 mm were found during pregnancy than on postpartum examinations. Microbial analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in cell count over the study period for Prevotella nigrescens. P. intermedia, Campylobacter rectus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis also decrease, although not significantly, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans increased. No significant changes were found for Fusobacterium nucleatum, Treponema denticola, or Tannerella forsythia. Our data demonstrate a change in the subgingival microbiota during pregnancy, at least for P. nigrescens.

  3. Influence of glycemic control on the levels of subgingival periodontal pathogens in patients with generalized chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes

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    MIRANDA, Tamires Szeremeske; FERES, Magda; RETAMAL-VALDÉS, Belén; PEREZ-CHAPARRO, Paula Juliana; MACIEL, Suellen Silva; DUARTE, Poliana Mendes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study evaluated the influence of glycemic control on the levels and frequency of subgingival periodontal pathogens in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and generalized chronic periodontitis (ChP). Material and Methods Fifty-six patients with generalized ChP and type 2 DM were assigned according to the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) into one of the following groups: HbA1cTannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Eubacterium nodatum, Parvimona micra, Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. and Prevotella intermedia. Results The mean counts of F. nucleatum ssp. were statistically significantly higher in the sites with PD≥5 mm of the HbA1c≥8% group (p<0.05). Frequencies of detection of T. forsythia, E. nodatum, P. micra and F. nucleatum ssp. were all higher in the sites with PD≥5 mm of the patients with HbA1c≥8%, compared with those of patients with HbA1c<8% (p<0.05). Frequency of detection of P. intermedia was higher in the sites with PD<5 mm of the patients with HbA1c≥8% than those of the patients with HbA1c<8% (p<0.05). Conclusions Poor glycemic control, as indicated by HbA1c≥8%, is associated with increased levels and frequencies of periodontal pathogens in the subgingival biofilm of subjects with type 2 DM and ChP. PMID:28198980

  4. Oral biofilm architecture on natural teeth.

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    Vincent Zijnge

    Full Text Available Periodontitis and caries are infectious diseases of the oral cavity in which oral biofilms play a causative role. Moreover, oral biofilms are widely studied as model systems for bacterial adhesion, biofilm development, and biofilm resistance to antibiotics, due to their widespread presence and accessibility. Despite descriptions of initial plaque formation on the tooth surface, studies on mature plaque and plaque structure below the gum are limited to landmark studies from the 1970s, without appreciating the breadth of microbial diversity in the plaque. We used fluorescent in situ hybridization to localize in vivo the most abundant species from different phyla and species associated with periodontitis on seven embedded teeth obtained from four different subjects. The data showed convincingly the dominance of Actinomyces sp., Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Spirochaetes, and Synergistetes in subgingival plaque. The latter proved to be new with a possibly important role in host-pathogen interaction due to its localization in close proximity to immune cells. The present study identified for the first time in vivo that Lactobacillus sp. are the central cells of bacterial aggregates in subgingival plaque, and that Streptococcus sp. and the yeast Candida albicans form corncob structures in supragingival plaque. Finally, periodontal pathogens colonize already formed biofilms and form microcolonies therein. These in vivo observations on oral biofilms provide a clear vision on biofilm architecture and the spatial distribution of predominant species.

  5. Randomized in vivo evaluation of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy on deciduous carious dentin

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    Steiner-Oliveira, Carolina; Longo, Priscila Larcher; Aranha, Ana Cecília Corrêa; Ramalho, Karen Müller; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this randomized in vivo study was to compare antimicrobial chemotherapies in primary carious dentin. Thirty-two participants ages 5 to 7 years underwent partial caries removal from deep carious dentin lesions in primary molars and were subsequently divided into three groups: control [chlorhexidine and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC)], LEDTB [photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) with light-emitting diode associated with toluidine blue solution and RMGIC], and LMB [PACT with laser associated with methylene blue solution and RMGIC]. The participants were submitted to initial clinical and radiographic examinations. Demographic features and biofilm, gingival, and DMFT/DMFS indexes were evaluated, in addition to clinical and radiographic followups at 6 and 12 months after treatments. Carious dentin was collected before and after each treatment, and the number of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus casei, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Atopobium rimae, and total bacteria was established by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. No signs of pain or restoration failure were observed. All therapies were effective in reducing the number of microorganisms, except for S. sobrinus. No statistical differences were observed among the protocols used. All therapies may be considered as effective modern approaches to minimal intervention for the management of deep primary caries treatment.

  6. In vitro effect of intracanal medicaments on strict anaerobes by means of the broth dilution method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSA Odila Pereira da Silva

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of bacterial susceptibility to intracanal medicaments is a necessity. Nevertheless, few studies utilize the proper methodology to carry out that evaluation with anaerobes. In this study, the steps of a broth dilution method, carried out in microplates (microdilution and tubes (macrodilution, to test the effect of traditional intracanal medicaments on anaerobic bacteria are described. The results are presented as values of minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC. Standardized inocula of the anaerobic bacteria Prevotella nigrescens (ATCC 33563, Fusobacterium nucleatum (ATCC 25586 and Clostridium perfringens (ATCC 13124, in reinforced Clostridium medium (RCM and supplemented Brucella broth, were submitted to different concentrations of calcium hydroxide, chlorhexidine digluconate, camphorated paramonochlorophenol and formocresol solutions. The drugs were diluted in the same culture broths, in microplates and tubes, and were then incubated in anaerobiosis jars at 37ºC for 48 or 96 hours. The determination of MICs was carried out through visual and spectrophotometric readings, and the determination of MBCs, through the plating of aliquots on RCM-blood agar. For that kind of study, the macromethod with spectrophotometric reading should be the natural choice. MICs and MBCs obtained with the macromethod were compatible with the known clinical performance of the studied medications, and the values varied according to the bacteria and culture media employed. RCM was the most effective medium and C. perfringens, the most resistant microorganism.

  7. Characterization of the gut microbiota of three commercially valuable warmwater fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, A M; Mohammed, H H; Arias, C R

    2014-06-01

    Due to the strong influence of the gut microbiota on fish health, dominant bacterial species in the gut are strong candidates for probiotics. This study aimed to characterize the gut microbiota of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides and bluegill Lepomis macrochirus to provide a baseline for future probiotic studies. The gut microbiota of five pooled individuals from each fish species was identified using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Microbiota differed significantly between fish species in terms of bacterial species evenness. However, all gut communities analysed were dominated by the phylum Fusobacteria, specifically the species Cetobacterium somerae. Relatively high abundances of the human pathogens Plesiomonas shigelloides and Fusobacterium mortiferum, as well as members of the genus Aeromonas, suggest these species are normal inhabitants of the gut. The overwhelming dominance of the genus Cetobacterium in all species warrants further investigation into its role in the fish gut microbiota. This study provides the first characterization of the gut microbiota of three economically significant fishes and establishes a baseline for future probiotic trials. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Microbiologic picture of microflora offemale urogenital organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyudyun A.D.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this report authors give a detailed analysis of microorganisms that can contaminate mucous membranes of female urogenital system in normal range and in the formation of certain dysbiotic position. The composition of microorganisms that colonize the mucous membrane of the urogenital tract depends on many exogenous and endogenous factors. The main microorganisms that provide colonizing resistance of vaginal biotop (VB are lactobacilli and lactobacteria. The protective properties of lactobacillus are implemented by antagonistic activity and ability to produce lysozyme and hydrogen peroxide. L. acidophilus, L. spp.; Propionbacterium spp.; Fusobacterium spp.; Porphyromonas spp.; Prevotella spp.; S. epidermidis and S. Saprophyticus novobionrezistentni and Streptococcus spp. and others are of definite importance in supporting normobiots of mucous membranes of urogenital system of women. Decreasing number of lactobacilli and other microorganisms of normobiota leads to colonization of mucous membranes of the vagina with G.vaginalis, B.bivies, B.disiens, B.melaninigenius, Mobiluncus, E.coli, E.fecalis, S.epidermidis and development of clinical manifestation of VB. The authors show microscopic and bacteriological characteristics of microorganisms that form normal microbiota and pathological states. The development of basic subjects promotes increasing number of the known microorganisms, important in the development of VB.

  9. Gingival Epithelial Cell Transcriptional Responses to Commensal and Opportunistic Oral Microbial Species▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Mans, Jeffrey J.; Mao, Song; Lopez, M. Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Handfield, Martin; Lamont, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling and ontology tools were utilized to define the biological pathways of gingival epithelial cells modulated by coculture with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii and the opportunistic commensal Fusobacterium nucleatum. Overall, F. nucleatum and S. gordonii perturbed the gingival epithelial cell transcriptome much less significantly than the oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans perturbed the transcriptome, indicating that there was a greater degree of host adaptation by the commensal species (M. Handfield, J. J. Mans, G. Zheng, M. C. Lopez, S. Mao, A. Progulske-Fox, G. Narasimhan, H. V. Baker, and R. J. Lamont, Cell. Microbiol. 7:811-823, 2005). The biological pathways significantly impacted by F. nucleatum and S. gordonii included the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Differential regulation of GADD45 and DUSP4, key components of the MAPK pathway, was confirmed at the protein level by Western blotting. Modulation of the MAPK pathway is likely to affect host cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, both the MAPK and Toll-like receptor pathways ultimately converge on cytokine gene expression. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of secreted interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 demonstrated that F. nucleatum induced production of these cytokines, whereas S. gordonii inhibited secretion from the epithelial cells. Stimulation of secretion of proinflammatory cytokines from epithelial cells may reflect the invasive phenotype of F. nucleatum and contribute to the greater pathogenic potential of F. nucleatum than of S. gordonii. PMID:17307939

  10. Role of Porphyromonas gingivalis SerB in Gingival Epithelial Cell Cytoskeletal Remodeling and Cytokine Production▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Tribble, Gena D.; Baker, Henry V.; Mans, Jeffrey J.; Handfield, Martin; Lamont, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The SerB protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis is a HAD family serine phosphatase that plays a critical role in entry and survival of the organism in gingival epithelial cells. SerB is secreted by P. gingivalis upon contact with epithelial cells. Here it is shown by microarray analysis that SerB impacts the transcriptional profile of gingival epithelial cells, with pathways involving the actin cytoskeleton and cytokine production among those significantly overpopulated with differentially regulated genes. Consistent with the transcriptional profile, a SerB mutant of P. gingivalis exhibited defective remodeling of actin in epithelial cells. Interaction between gingival epithelial cells and isolated SerB protein resulted in actin rearrangement and an increase in the F/G actin ratio. SerB protein was also required for P. gingivalis to antagonize interleukin-8 accumulation following stimulation of epithelial cells with Fusobacterium nucleatum. SerB is thus capable of modulating host cell signal transduction that impacts the actin cytoskeleton and cytokine production. PMID:18391005

  11. Gingival epithelial cell transcriptional responses to commensal and opportunistic oral microbial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Mans, Jeffrey J; Mao, Song; Lopez, M Cecilia; Baker, Henry V; Handfield, Martin; Lamont, Richard J

    2007-05-01

    Transcriptional profiling and ontology tools were utilized to define the biological pathways of gingival epithelial cells modulated by coculture with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii and the opportunistic commensal Fusobacterium nucleatum. Overall, F. nucleatum and S. gordonii perturbed the gingival epithelial cell transcriptome much less significantly than the oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans perturbed the transcriptome, indicating that there was a greater degree of host adaptation by the commensal species (M. Handfield, J. J. Mans, G. Zheng, M. C. Lopez, S. Mao, A. Progulske-Fox, G. Narasimhan, H. V. Baker, and R. J. Lamont, Cell. Microbiol. 7:811-823, 2005). The biological pathways significantly impacted by F. nucleatum and S. gordonii included the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Differential regulation of GADD45 and DUSP4, key components of the MAPK pathway, was confirmed at the protein level by Western blotting. Modulation of the MAPK pathway is likely to affect host cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, both the MAPK and Toll-like receptor pathways ultimately converge on cytokine gene expression. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of secreted interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 demonstrated that F. nucleatum induced production of these cytokines, whereas S. gordonii inhibited secretion from the epithelial cells. Stimulation of secretion of proinflammatory cytokines from epithelial cells may reflect the invasive phenotype of F. nucleatum and contribute to the greater pathogenic potential of F. nucleatum than of S. gordonii.

  12. Role of Porphyromonas gingivalis SerB in gingival epithelial cell cytoskeletal remodeling and cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Tribble, Gena D; Baker, Henry V; Mans, Jeffrey J; Handfield, Martin; Lamont, Richard J

    2008-06-01

    The SerB protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis is a HAD family serine phosphatase that plays a critical role in entry and survival of the organism in gingival epithelial cells. SerB is secreted by P. gingivalis upon contact with epithelial cells. Here it is shown by microarray analysis that SerB impacts the transcriptional profile of gingival epithelial cells, with pathways involving the actin cytoskeleton and cytokine production among those significantly overpopulated with differentially regulated genes. Consistent with the transcriptional profile, a SerB mutant of P. gingivalis exhibited defective remodeling of actin in epithelial cells. Interaction between gingival epithelial cells and isolated SerB protein resulted in actin rearrangement and an increase in the F/G actin ratio. SerB protein was also required for P. gingivalis to antagonize interleukin-8 accumulation following stimulation of epithelial cells with Fusobacterium nucleatum. SerB is thus capable of modulating host cell signal transduction that impacts the actin cytoskeleton and cytokine production.

  13. Effect of Intestinal Flora of Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Dampness-heat Syndrome Treated with Gegen Qinlian Decoction%葛根芩连汤治疗对2型糖尿病湿热证肠道菌群影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾艺鹏; 冯新格; 谷成英; 郭亚芳; 许迎烈

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of Gegen Qinlian Decoction in treating type 2 diabetes pa-tients with dampness-heat syndrome and the effect of intestinal flora. Methods:Forty-two type 2 diabetes pa-tients with damp-heat syndrome were randomly divided into 2 groups:the control group was treated with West-ern medicine alone, and the experimental group was treated with integrated Traditional and Western medicine. The fecal samples were collected to extract bacterial genome DNA, and the composition was investigated by Il-lumina Miseq high-throughput sequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Species in feces were also measured by real-time quantitative PCR. The relationship between effectiveness and gut microbiota was ob-served after treatment. Results: The total effectiveness of experimental group was higher than that of control group. Bacteroides correlated negatively with the reduction rate of dampness-heat syndrome, while Fusobacte-rium correlated positively with the reduction rate of dampness-heat syndrome. Conclusion:The combination of Gegen Qinlian Decoction with Western medicine has the effective treatment among type 2 diabetes patients with dampness-heat syndrome, and Bacteroides and Fusobacterium could be the markers of effectiveness.%目的::观察葛根芩连汤治疗2型糖尿病湿热证的疗效及对患者肠道菌群的影响。方法:将42例2型糖尿病湿热证患者随机分两组,对照组使用单纯西药治疗,中药组在西药治疗的基础上联用葛根芩连汤。采用Illumina Miseq高通量测序技术对患者粪便样本中所有细菌的16S rRNA-V3区进行DNA测序,通过实时定量PCR对肠道菌群进行定量分析。对比观察两组患者治疗前后疗效与肠道菌群的关系。结果:中药组总有效率高于对照组,差异具有统计学意义( p=0.02)。湿热证减分率和Bacteroides含量成负相关;湿热证减分率和Fusobacterium含量呈正相关。结论:葛根芩连汤联

  14. Efecto bactericida del láser Nd: YAP. Estudio in vitro Bactericidal effects of Nd: YAP. An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Caccianiga

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available La utilización del láser en el ambiente odontológico está teniendo cada vez más difusión gracias al hecho que éste puede conciliar un elevado standard de confort para el paciente con la eficacia terapéutica. El presente estudio ha evaluado la eficacia bactericida de la radiación láser asociada al empleo del agua oxigenada respecto a cinco cepas bacterianas comúnmente presentes en las bolsas periodontales activas y resistentes al empleo separado del láser y del agua oxigenada. Las cinco bacterias estudiadas son: Haemophilus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides forsytus, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Micromonas micron y Fusobacterium nucleatum. La metodología de laboratorio utilizada preveía el siguiente protocolo: 30 ml de cada suspensión bacterianas, expuestas o no al agua oxigenada a distintas concentraciones del 0,5% o del 3%, han sido irradiadas separadamente con el láser por 5 o 10 segundos, utilizando tubos estériles "Eppendorf" de 1,5 ml. Por lo tanto ha sido comparada la actividad bactericida de solo agua oxigenada a concentraciones del 0,5% y del 3%, de solo irradiación láser y de los dos tratamientos asociados. En todos los cultivos bacterianos en examen, el empleo del agua oxigenada en concentración del 3% asociada a la exposición de la irradiación láser por 10 segundos ha llevado a la ausencia o a una marcada disminución del número de colonias bacterianas, mientras que la disminución ha sido menos evidente, o ausente, en el caso de los tratamientos utilizados separadamente. Los resultados confirman la mayor eficacia bactericida de la acción combinada de agua oxigenada y láser.The use of laser in the odontological field is every day more spread thanks to the fact that it manages to reach a high standard of comfort for the patient in the therapeutic efficiency. The goal of this study is to test the efficiency of a protocol that foresees the associated use of laser irradiation and hydrogen peroxide to reduce the

  15. Study on Microbial Infection Periodontal-originated Combined Periodontal-endodontic Lesions and Ralated Risk Factors%牙周源性牙周牙髓联合病变患牙微生物感染与影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶菲; 戴方毅; 刘敏

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨牙周源性牙周牙髓联合病变患牙微生物感染的菌种及影响因素。方法选择2012年1月至2013年12月来武汉市汉口医院就诊的牙周源性牙周牙髓联合病变患者和正常正畸拔除者各32例(32颗)为研究对象,采集样本的牙周袋、根管标本,检测标本中微生物的感染情况及其牙周源性牙周牙髓联合病变发病的影响因素。结果32例牙周源性牙周牙髓联合病变样本中微生物感染的检出率为46.9%,以奈瑟菌属、棒状杆菌属、放线菌属、弯曲菌属、梭杆菌属以及嗜血杆菌属为主。32例正常对照样本中微生物感染的检出率为18.8%,主要为奈瑟菌属、放线菌属和弯曲菌属。奈瑟菌属、棒状杆菌属、放线菌属、梭杆菌属和嗜血杆菌属感染为牙周源性牙周牙髓联合病变发生的主要影响因素。结论微生物感染的种类与牙周源性牙周牙髓联合病变的发生密切相关,临床应采取不同的治疗方案以提高联合病变的治愈率、降低患者失牙率。%Objective To explore the correlation between microbial strains and infection situation of periodontal-origianted periodontal-endodontic combined lesions and related risk factors.Methods A total of 32 cases of periodontal-origianted periodontal-endodontic combined lesions and another 32 cases of normal orthodontic pulling teeth treated in Hankou Hospital from Jan.2012 to Dec.2013 were selected as research objects.Samples of periodontal pocket and root tube were collected for microbial testing,and correlation be-tween microbial contamination and the development of disease was analyzed.Results The detection rate of microbial infection in 32 cases of periodontal-origianted periodontal-endodontic combined lesions was 46.9%,the main microorganisms infected were Neisseria, Corynebacterium, Actinomyces, Campylobacter, Fusobacterium and Haemophilus.The detection rate of microbial infection in 32 cases of

  16. Detection of five periodontal pathogens in coronary atherosclerotic plaque%牙周致病菌在动脉粥样硬化斑块中的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯秀丽; 梁平; 张源明; 木拉提; 艾斯卡尔; 艾克拜尔; 闰跃斌

    2011-01-01

    目的 检测冠状动脉粥样硬化斑块中的5种特异性牙周致病菌.方法 收集101例行冠状动脉搭桥手术患者的动脉粥样硬化斑块标本,采用Chelex-100法提取冠状动脉粥样硬化斑块中的DNA,并通过PCR分别检测动脉粥样硬化斑块中的牙龈卟啉单胞菌(Porphyromonas gingivalis,Pg)、伴放线放线杆菌(Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans,Aa)、具核梭杆菌(Fusobacterium nucleatum,Fn)、中间普氏菌(Prevotella intermedia,Pi)、福赛斯坦纳菌(Tannerella forsythensis,Tf)5种牙周特异性致病菌.结果 101例患者动脉粥样硬化斑块中牙龈卟啉单胞菌(Pg)的检出率为31%,福赛斯坦纳菌(Tf)为42%,中间普氏菌(Pi)为26%,具核梭杆菌(Fn)为21%,伴放线放线杆菌(Aa)为23%.这几种细菌的PCR产物通过测序,结果与GenBank数据库中的序列进行比对同源性达99%~100%.结论 牙周致病菌在冠心病的发生、发展中可能发挥着一定作用,考虑慢性牙周炎与冠心病之间有一定的相关性.%Objective To detect five periodontal pathogenic bacteria in coronary atherosclerotic plaques.Methods Atherosclerotic plaque specimens were obtained from 101 patients who scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft surgery.The bacteria DNA was obtained from coronary atherosclerotic plaques using the chelex-100 method.The extracted DNA were examined by PCR.Results Within the 101 pieces of atherosclerotic plaque samples Porphyromonas gingivalis( Pg,31% ),Tannerella forsythensis(Tf,42% ),Prevotella intermedia( Pi,26% ),Fusobacterium nucleatum( Fn,21% ),Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans( Aa,23% ).PCR products were sequenced and were compared with GenBank sequences,the homology was 99%-100%.Conclusion Periodontitis might affect the development of atherosclerosis and there is a correlation between coronary heart disease and chronic periodontitis.

  17. Partial characterization of antagonistic substance produced by a Clostridium butyricum strain Caracterização parcial de substância antagonista produzida por uma amostra de Clostridium butyricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nely Cristina Medeiros Caires

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of antagonistic substance by bacterium present in the infected root canal system (RCS probably is an important ecological factor for its successful colonization of the local. The objective of this study was to partially characterize an antagonistic substance produced by a Clostridium butyricum isolated from infected RCS.Production of inhibitory compound was evaluated by the agar double layer diffusion technique using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Bifidobacterium adolescentis as indicator bacteria. The physicochemical and biochemical factors tested for the partial characterization were influence of pH and temperature and susceptibility to the action of some proteolytic enzymes. An inhibition zone was observed against the two indicator strains and acidity and bacteriophage were rejected as responsible for this phenomenon. The inhibitory activity showed to be decreasing in a pH range from 3.5 to 6.5 and being stable at temperatures of 60º, 70º and 100ºC, but completely inactivated when exposed at 121ºC. The antagonistic activity was resistant to the proteolytic action of trypsin, a-chymotrypsin and papain. An antagonistic substance was produced by C. butyricum, which was thermo-resistant and probably of non-protein nature.A produção de substâncias antagonistas por espécies bacterianas presentes em sistema de canais radiculares (SCR infectados, tem um papel importante na colonização deste sítio. O objetivo deste estudo foi caracterizar parcialmente a substância antagonista produzida por amostra de Clostridium butyricum isolado de SCR infectados.A produção de substância antagonista foi avaliada pela técnica de difusão em ágar utilizando como bactérias indicadoras Fusobacterium nucleatum e Bifidobacterium adolescentis. Os parâmetros físico-químicos utilizados durante a caracterização parcial foram: pH, estabilidade térmica, susceptibilidade à ação das enzimas tripsina, a-quimiotripsina e papaína. Foi observada

  18. The pathogenic potential of oral anaerobic microorganisms in rat periapical lesions%感染根管优势菌致病能力的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王变红; 葛丽华; 侯本祥

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the pathological effect of three oral anaerobic bacterial species on periapical lesions. Methods Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were inoculated into the first molars' pulp of SD rats respectively, and saline inoculated as control. Another group of molars' pulp was open to the oral cavity without any inoculation. The maxillary and mandibular bone was harvested at 1, 2, 4, 8 weeks, and periapical X-ray was taken and the absorption area of the periapical bone measured and analyzed. The periapical lesions were sliced and their pathology was observed. Results The periapical bone absorption area was increased with time and became biggest at 8 weeks. There were no significant difference in area of periapical lesions and in inflammation degree between the P. e group, P. g group and saline group at 1,2, 4, 8 weeks( P >0. 05 ). At 4 weeks, the bone absorption area of F. n group was bigger than that of P. e group and P. g group ( P < 0. 01 ). The inflammation degree in F. n group was severer than that in P. e or P. g group. Conclusion Compared with P. g and P. e, the F. n plays an more important role in the progress of apical periodontitis. Mixed infection of several kinds of bacteria was the main cause of periapical diseases.%目的 研究感染根管优势菌在根尖周炎发病过程中的作用,探讨不同细菌致病能力的差异.方法 选择牙髓卟啉单胞菌(Porphyromonas endodontalis,P.e)、牙龈卟啉单胞菌(Porphyromonas gingivalis,P.g)、具核梭杆菌(Fusobacterium nudeatum,F.n)分别接种于SD大鼠第一磨牙髓腔内,以生理盐水和髓腔开放作为对照.术后1、2、4、8周处死大鼠,取上、下颌骨拍摄X线片,测量并比较各组第一磨牙根尖周透射影面积;组织学切片观察各组根尖周组织病理变化,评价根尖周组织炎症程度.结果 X线片测量结果显示根尖阴影面积在术后8周最大,组织学评价结果为术后4周

  19. Co-detección de Patógenos Periodontales en Pacientes Chilenos con Periodontitis Crónica Co-detection of Periodontal Pathogens in Chilean Patients with Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mujica Troncoso

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades periodontales asociadas a la placa dental son un importante problema de salud pública. La etiología de estas patologías es de origen multifactorial e involucra factores del hospedero, medio ambiente y de carácter infeccioso asociados a bacterias embebidas en la placa dental. Las principales bacterias asociadas a la periodontitis crónica son Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola y Tannerella forsythia, mientras que Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans se ha asociado principalmente a la periodontitis agresiva. Otro microorganismo clave en el desarrollo de la enfermedad es Fusobacterium nucleatum, el cual tiene la capacidad de co-agregarse con los patógenos periodontales y así facilitar su colonización. Para demostrar la prevalencia de estas bacterias, la co-detección y la asociación entre pacientes chilenos fumadores y no fumadores, se analizaron 67 muestras mediante PCR convencional. Los resultados mostraron que un 90% de las muestras fueron positivas para F. nucleatum, siendo la bacteria más detectada. Al analizar la co-detección entre las distintas bacterias se observa que F nucleatum está presente en más de un 80% de los casos cuando se detecta cualquiera de las cuatro bacterias restantes, mientas que A. actinomycetemcomitans se detecta en no más de un 20% al amplificar cualquiera de las bacterias restantes. Por otra parte, los resultados por género indican que existen diferencias significativas en la detección de T. forsythia, F. nucleatum y A. actinomycetemcomitans. Al considerar el factor de tabaquismo se observó que ninguna de las muestras de pacientes fumadores resultó ser positiva para A. actinomycetemcomitans.Periodontal disease associated with dental plaque is a major public health problem. The etiology of these disorders is multifactorial involved seeing host factors, environmental factors and infectious nature associated with the presence of bacteria belonging to the plaque. The main

  20. Effects of Protease Addition and Replacement of Soybean Meal by Corn Gluten Meal on the Growth of Broilers and on the Environmental Performances of a Broiler Production System in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannenas, Ilias; Bonos, Eleftherios; Anestis, Vasileios; Filioussis, Georgios; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Bartzanas, Thomas; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Tzora, Athina; Skoufos, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the combined effects of adding a dietary protease, reducing the levels of soybean meal (SBM) and introducing corn gluten meal (CGM) in the ration of a group of broilers reared on a commercial Greek farm. Five hundred forty chicks were divided into three dietary treatments with six replicates of thirty birds each. The first group (Control) was fed a conventional diet based on corn and soybean meal, containing 21% w/w crude protein (CP). The second group (Soy-Prot) was supplied a corn and SBM-based diet containing a lower level of CP (20% w/w) and 200 mg of the protease RONOZYME® Proact per kg of feed. The third group (Gluten-Prot) was fed a diet without soybean-related constituents which was based on corn and CGM and with CP and protease contents identical to those of the diet of the Soy-Prot group. Body weight, feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), intestinal microbiota populations and morphology, meat quality and cost were evaluated. Furthermore, a partial life cycle assessment (LCA) was performed in order to assess the potential environmental performance of the systems defined by these three dietary treatments and identify their environmental hot-spots. The growth performance of the broilers supplied the Soy-Prot diet was similar to the broilers supplied the Control diet. However, the broilers which were fed the Gluten-Prot diet at the end of the trial showed a tendency (P≤0.010) for lower weight gain and feed intake compared to those of the Control diet. When compared to the Control group, lower counts of C. perfringens (P≤0.05) were detected in the ileum and cecum parts, and lower counts of F. necrophorum (P≤0.001) were detected in the cecum part of the birds from the Gluten-Prot group. The evaluation of intestinal morphometry showed that the villus height and crypt depth values were not significantly different (P>0.05) among the experimental groups for the duodenum, jejunum and ileum parts. No

  1. Effects of Protease Addition and Replacement of Soybean Meal by Corn Gluten Meal on the Growth of Broilers and on the Environmental Performances of a Broiler Production System in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonos, Eleftherios; Anestis, Vasileios; Filioussis, Georgios; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Bartzanas, Thomas; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Tzora, Athina; Skoufos, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the combined effects of adding a dietary protease, reducing the levels of soybean meal (SBM) and introducing corn gluten meal (CGM) in the ration of a group of broilers reared on a commercial Greek farm. Five hundred forty chicks were divided into three dietary treatments with six replicates of thirty birds each. The first group (Control) was fed a conventional diet based on corn and soybean meal, containing 21% w/w crude protein (CP). The second group (Soy-Prot) was supplied a corn and SBM-based diet containing a lower level of CP (20% w/w) and 200 mg of the protease RONOZYME® Proact per kg of feed. The third group (Gluten-Prot) was fed a diet without soybean-related constituents which was based on corn and CGM and with CP and protease contents identical to those of the diet of the Soy-Prot group. Body weight, feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), intestinal microbiota populations and morphology, meat quality and cost were evaluated. Furthermore, a partial life cycle assessment (LCA) was performed in order to assess the potential environmental performance of the systems defined by these three dietary treatments and identify their environmental hot-spots. The growth performance of the broilers supplied the Soy-Prot diet was similar to the broilers supplied the Control diet. However, the broilers which were fed the Gluten-Prot diet at the end of the trial showed a tendency (P≤0.010) for lower weight gain and feed intake compared to those of the Control diet. When compared to the Control group, lower counts of C. perfringens (P≤0.05) were detected in the ileum and cecum parts, and lower counts of F. necrophorum (P≤0.001) were detected in the cecum part of the birds from the Gluten-Prot group. The evaluation of intestinal morphometry showed that the villus height and crypt depth values were not significantly different (P>0.05) among the experimental groups for the duodenum, jejunum and ileum parts. No

  2. Tropical ulcer plant treatments used by Papua New Guinea's Apsokok nomads.

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    Prescott, Thomas A K; Homot, Peter; Lundy, Fionnuala T; Fang, Rui; Patrick, Sheila; Cámara-Leret, Rodrigo; Kiapranis, Robert

    2017-06-09

    The tropical ulcer is a debilitating bacterial infection that is common in Papua New Guinea. Deploying healthcare infrastructure to remote and inaccessible rainforest locations is not practical, therefore local plants may be the best treatment option. Here we present an ethnobotanical survey of the tropical ulcer plant medicines used by the semi-nomadic Apsokok who roam the remote central mountains of Papua New Guinea's West New Britain Province. In vitro biological activity in assays relevant to tropical ulcer wound healing is also presented. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews were used to acquire information on the uses of plants, vouchers of which were identified by comparison with authentic herbarium specimens. Antibacterial disc diffusion assays with Staphylococcus aureus and Fusobacterium ulcerans, MMP-9 enzyme inhibition and dermal fibroblast stimulation assays were carried out on plant saps and aqueous extracts of plant material. LC-MS was used to identify known plant metabolites. The ethnobotanical survey identified sixteen species that were used to treat tropical ulcers, all of which were applied topically. A subset of twelve species were investigated further in vitro. Four species produced zones of inhibition with S. aureus, all 12 species provided low level inhibition of MMP-9 and 8 species stimulated dermal fibroblast proliferation, although cytotoxicity occurred at higher concentrations. The extract of Homalium foetidum Benth. inhibited S. aureus and MMP-9 while at lower sub-cytotoxic concentrations stimulated fibroblast proliferation. Trans-3-O-p-coumaroylquinic acid cis-3-O-p-coumaroylquinic acid were detected in the aqueous extract of H. foetidum. Topical application of plant saps to wounds results in very high localised concentrations of plant metabolites which is likely to result in inhibition of MMP proteases. H. foetidum is a candidate plant for tropical ulcer treatment in remote areas. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B

  3. Odontogenic bacteria in periodontal disease and resistance patterns to common antibiotics used as treatment and prophylaxis in odontology in Spain.

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    Maestre, J R; Bascones, A; Sánchez, P; Matesanz, P; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Giménez, M J; Pérez-Balcabao, I; Granizo, J J; Prieto, J

    2007-03-01

    Resistance in streptococci or Gram-negative bacteria is associated with antibiotic consumption. Scarce information exists on the antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from patients with periodontitis in countries with high antibiotic consumption, as this is an area in which microbiological testing is not performed in daily practice. The present study was undertaken to explore the susceptibility of bacterial isolates in periodontitis to antibiotics prescribed in odontology in Spain as treatment for local infections or prophylaxis for distant focal infections. Periodontal samples were prospectively collected in 48 patients classified by pocket depth of or=4 mm. Species were identified by culture, selecting the five most frequent morphotypes per sample, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Susceptibility was determined by E-test. A total of 261 isolates were identified: 72.9% patients had Streptococcus oralis; 70.8% Streptococcus mitis; 60.4% Prevotella buccae; 39.6% Prevotella denticola; 37.5% Fusobacterium nucleatum; 35.4% Prevotella intermedia; 25% Capnocytophaga spp.; 23% Veillonella spp.; 22.9% Prevotella melaninogenica and Streptococcus sanguis; and resistance rates were 0% for amoxicillin, approximately 10% for clindamycin, 9-22% for tetracycline, and for azithromycin ranged from 18.2% for S. sanguis to 47.7% for S. mitis. Prevotella isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, with amoxicillin resistance ranging from 17.1% in P. buccae to 26.3% in P. denticola. Metronidazole resistance was resistance ranged from 0 to 21.1%. beta-Lactamase production was positive in 54.1% Prevotella spp., 38.9% F. nucleatum, 30% Capnocytophaga spp., and 10% Veillonella spp. In this study, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was the most active antibiotic against all species tested, followed by metronidazole in the case of anaerobes.

  4. High-fat diet induces periodontitis in mice through lipopolysaccharides (LPS receptor signaling: protective action of estrogens.

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    Vincent Blasco-Baque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A fat-enriched diet favors the development of gram negative bacteria in the intestine which is linked to the occurrence of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Interestingly, some pathogenic gram negative bacteria are commonly associated with the development of periodontitis which, like T2D, is characterized by a chronic low-grade inflammation. Moreover, estrogens have been shown to regulate glucose homeostasis via an LPS receptor dependent immune-modulation. In this study, we evaluated whether diet-induced metabolic disease would favor the development of periodontitis in mice. In addition, the regulatory role of estrogens in this process was assessed. METHODS: Four-week-old C57BL6/J WT and CD14 (part of the TLR-4 machinery for LPS-recognition knock-out female mice were ovariectomised and subcutaneously implanted with pellets releasing either placebo or 17β-estradiol (E2. Mice were then fed with either a normal chow or a high-fat diet for four weeks. The development of diabetes was monitored by an intraperitoneal glucose-tolerance test and plasma insulin concentration while periodontitis was assessed by identification of pathogens, quantification of periodontal soft tissue inflammation and alveolar bone loss. RESULTS: The fat-enriched diet increased the prevalence of periodontal pathogenic microbiota like Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia, gingival inflammation and alveolar bone loss. E2 treatment prevented this effect and CD14 knock-out mice resisted high-fat diet-induced periodontal defects. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data show that mice fed with a diabetogenic diet developed defects and microflora of tooth supporting-tissues typically associated with periodontitis. Moreover, our results suggest a causal link between the activation of the LPS pathway on innate immunity by periodontal microbiota and HFD-induced periodontitis, a pathophysiological mechanism that could be targeted by estrogens.

  5. The Composition of Microbiome in Larynx and the Throat Biodiversity between Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients and Control Population.

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    Hong-Li Gong

    Full Text Available The throat is an ecological assemblage involved human cells and microbiota, and the colonizing bacteria are important factors in balancing this environment. However, this bacterial community profile has thus been poorly investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the microbial biology of the larynx and to analyze the throat biodiversity in laryngeal carcinoma patients compared to a control population in a case-control study. Barcoded pyrosequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene was used. We collected tissue samples from 29 patients with laryngeal carcinoma and 31 control patients with vocal cord polyps. The findings of high-quality sequence datasets revealed 218 genera from 13 phyla in the laryngeal mucosa. The predominant communities of phyla in the larynx were Firmicutes (54%, Fusobacteria (17%, Bacteroidetes (15%, Proteobacteria (11%, and Actinobacteria (3%. The leading genera were Streptococcus (36%, Fusobacterium (15%, Prevotella (12%, Neisseria (6%, and Gemella (4%. The throat bacterial compositions were highly different between laryngeal carcinoma subjects and control population (p = 0.006. The abundance of the 26 genera was significantly different between the laryngeal cancer and control groups by metastats analysis (p<0.05. Fifteen genera may be associated with laryngeal carcinoma by partial least squares discriminant analysis (p<0.001. In summary, this study revealed the microbiota profiles in laryngeal mucosa from tissue specimens. The compositions of bacteria community in throat were different between laryngeal cancer patients and controls, and probably were related with this carcinoma. The disruption of this bio-ecological niche might be a risk factor for laryngeal carcinoma.

  6. Setup of an in vitro test system for basic studies on biofilm behavior of mixed-species cultures with dental and periodontal pathogens.

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    Kerstin Standar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caries and periodontitis are important human diseases associated with formation of multi-species biofilms. The involved bacteria are intensively studied to understand the molecular basis of the interactions in such biofilms. This study established a basic in vitro single and mixed-species culture model for oral bacteria combining three complimentary methods. The setup allows a rapid screening for effects in the mutual species interaction. Furthermore, it is easy to handle, inexpensive, and reproducible. METHODS: Streptococcus mitis, S. salivarius and S. sanguinis, typical inhabitants of the healthy oral cavity, S. mutans as main carriogenic species, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, S. intermedius and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans as periodontitis-associated bacteria, were investigated for their biofilm forming ability. Different liquid growth media were evaluated. Safranin-staining allowed monitoring of biofilm formation under the chosen conditions. Viable counts and microscopy permitted investigation of biofilm behavior in mixed-species and transwell setups. FINDINGS: S. mitis, F. nucleatum, P. gingivalis and P. micra failed to form biofilm structures. S. mutans, S. sanguinis, S. intermedius and S. salivarius established abundant biofilm masses in CDM/sucrose. A. actinomycetemcomitans formed patchy monolayers. For in depth analysis S. mitis, S. mutans and A. actinomycetemcomitans were chosen, because i they are representatives of the physiological-, cariogenic and periodontitis-associated bacterial flora, respectively and ii their difference in their biofilm forming ability. Microscopic analysis confirmed the results of safranin staining. Investigation of two species combinations of S. mitis with either S. mutans or A. actinomycetemcomitans revealed bacterial interactions influencing biofilm mass, biofilm structure and cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: This setup shows safranin staining

  7. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is characterised by intestinal dysbiosis independent from IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, João; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Machiels, Kathleen; Joossens, Marie; Falony, Gwen; Ballet, Vera; Ferrante, Marc; Van Assche, Gert; Van der Merwe, Schalk; Vermeire, Severine; Raes, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease often leading to end-stage liver disease. Its pathogenesis remains largely unknown, although frequent concomitant IBD hints towards common factors underlying gut and bile duct inflammation. Considering the mounting evidence on the involvement of the intestinal microbiota in initiating and determining IBD phenotype, we investigated intestinal microbiota composition in patients with PSC. Design Stool samples were collected from 147 individuals (52 patients with PSC, 52 age, gender and body mass index-matched healthy volunteers, 13 UC and 30 patients with Crohn's disease). An independent validation cohort of 14 PSC and 14 matched controls was recruited. 16S rDNA sequencing of faecal DNA was performed (Illumina MiSeq). Results The microbiota of patients with PSC was characterised by decreased microbiota diversity, and a significant overrepresentation of Enterococcus (p=3.76e-05), Fusobacterium (p=3.76e-05) and Lactobacillus (p=0.0002) genera. This dysbiosis was present in patients with PSC with and without concomitant IBD and was distinct from IBD, and independent of treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid. A decision tree based on abundances of these three genera allowed reliable classification in the validation cohort. In particular, one operational taxonomic unit belonging to the Enterococcus genus was associated with increased levels of serum alkaline phosphatase (p=0.048), a marker of disease severity. Conclusions We here present the first report of PSC-associated faecal dysbiosis, independent from IBD signatures, suggesting the intestinal microbiota could be a contributing factor in PSC pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and assess causality. PMID:27207975

  8. Subgingival bacteria in Ghanaian adolescents with or without progression of attachment loss

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    Gunnar Dahlén

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study describes subgingival bacterial profiles associated with clinical periodontal status in Ghanaian adolescents with or without progression of attachment loss. Materials and methods: Among 500 adolescents included in a cohort study, 397 returned 2 years later for a periodontal re-examination, including full-mouth CAL measurements. At follow-up, a subgroup of 98 adolescents was also subjected to bacterial sampling with paper points at four periodontal sites (mesial aspect of 11, 26, 31, and 46 and analyzed with the checkerboard DNA–DNA hybridization technique against DNA-probes from nine periodontitis-associated bacterial species. Results: The 98 Ghanaian adolescents examined in the present study were similar to the entire group examined at the 2-year follow-up with respect to age, gender, and CAL ≥3 mm. A high detection frequency of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia (>99% using checkerboard analysis was found, while for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans the detection frequency was <50%. A strong correlation was found at the individual level between the presence of P. intermedia and the total CAL change, and P. intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis were strongly correlated with a change in CAL and probing pocket depth (PPD at the sampled sites. In a linear regression model, a significant discriminating factor for the total CAL change in the dentition during the 2-year follow-up period was obtained for P. intermedia and public school. Conclusion: This study indicates that subgingival bacterial species other than A. actinomycetemcomitans, for example, P. intermedia, have a significant association with periodontal breakdown (change in CAL in Ghanaian adolescents with progression of periodontal attachment loss.

  9. Shifts in Campylobacter species abundance may reflect general microbial community shifts in periodontitis progression

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    Karsten Henne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral Campylobacter species have been found to be associated with periodontitis progression. While the etiological significance of Campylobacter rectus is quite established, the association of C. gracilis, C. concisus, and C. curvus with health or disease remains contradictory. Objectives: This study hypothesizes that the proportion of species within the Campylobacter genus rather than the absolute abundance of a single species is a suitable indicator for periodontitis progression. Design: Subgingival plaque from 90 periodontitis patients and gingival sulcus fluid of 32 healthy individuals were subjected to a newly developed nested PCR approach, in which all Campylobacter spp. were amplified simultaneously. The resulting mixture of 16S-rRNA-gene-amplicons were separated by single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP gel electrophoresis, followed by sequencing and identification of excised bands and relative quantification of band intensities. In all samples, the abundance of selected periodontitis marker species was determined based on DNA hybridization on a microarray. Results: The highly prevalent Campylobacter community was composed of varying proportions of C. rectus, C. gracilis, C. concisus, and C. curvus. Cluster analysis based on SSCP-banding pattern resulted in distinct groups which in turn coincided with significant differences in abundance of established periodontitis marker species (Tannerella forsythia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum and progression. Conclusions: The shift in the Campylobacter community composition seems to display the general microbial community shift during clinical progression in a simplified manner. The focus on members of the Campylobacter in this study suggests that this genus can be an indicator of ecological changes in the subgingival oral microflora.

  10. High-Level Antimicrobial Efficacy of Representative Mediterranean Natural Plant Extracts against Oral Microorganisms

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    Lamprini Karygianni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nature is an unexplored reservoir of novel phytopharmaceuticals. Since biofilm-related oral diseases often correlate with antibiotic resistance, plant-derived antimicrobial agents could enhance existing treatment options. Therefore, the rationale of the present report was to examine the antimicrobial impact of Mediterranean natural extracts on oral microorganisms. Five different extracts from Olea europaea, mastic gum, and Inula viscosa were tested against ten bacteria and one Candida albicans strain. The extraction protocols were conducted according to established experimental procedures. Two antimicrobial assays—the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC assay and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC assay—were applied. The screened extracts were found to be active against each of the tested microorganisms. O. europaea presented MIC and MBC ranges of 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.60–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. The mean MBC values for mastic gum and I. viscosa were 0.07–10.00 mg mL−1 and 0.15–10.00 mg mL−1, respectively. Extracts were less effective against C. albicans and exerted bactericidal effects at a concentration range of 0.07–5.00 mg mL−1 on strict anaerobic bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Parvimonas micra. Ethyl acetate I. viscosa extract and total mastic extract showed considerable antimicrobial activity against oral microorganisms and could therefore be considered as alternative natural anti-infectious agents.

  11. Bactericidal properties of pradofloxacin against veterinary pathogens.

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    Silley, Peter; Stephan, Bernd; Greife, Heinrich A; Pridmore, Andrew

    2012-05-25

    Pradofloxacin is a new veterinary 8-cyano-fluoroquinolone developed for use against bacterial infections in dogs and cats involving both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The minimal bactericidal concentrations have been determined against clinical isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella multocida, Streptococcus canis, Proteus spp., Fusobacterium spp., Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella species. A subset of these species was selected, and the in vitro rate of kill by pradofloxacin was determined. For 27 of the 30 tested aerobic strains the pradofloxacin MBC was within two doubling dilutions of the MIC. For the remaining strains, the MIC and MBC were within three to four doubling dilutions. Pradofloxacin also demonstrated bactericidal activity against all anaerobic strains, and the MBC was equal to the MIC for four of the strains, within 1 doubling dilution for three strains, within 2 dilutions for a further 3 strains and within 3 dilutions for the remaining five strains. As pradofloxacin concentration was increased, a faster rate of killing was observed; bactericidal effects were seen in all cases at concentrations ≤ 0.25 μg/mL. The bactericidal activity against the anaerobic strains was marked, of particular relevance was the complete absence of regrowth even at 48 h at concentrations as low as 0.125 μg/mL. In conclusion, pradofloxacin exhibits clear bactericidal activity in terms of MBC and kill kinetics against aerobic and anaerobic clinical isolates from dogs and cats at concentrations that are greatly exceeded within the systemic circulation after administration of the recommended therapeutic doses to the target animals. It is expected that such a rapid rate of kill will play a significant role in clinical efficacy. These data demonstrate the complete and rapid killing of anaerobic bacteria by a veterinary 8-cyano-fluoroquinolone.

  12. Isolation and identification of Porphyromonas spp. and other putative pathogens from cats with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Salcedo, L; Herrera, D; Esteban-Saltiveri, D; León, R; Jeusette, I; Torre, C; O'Connor, A; González, I; González, I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the subgingival microbiota and determine the most prevalent periodontal pathogens implicated in feline periodontal disease and to correlate these findings with the clinical periodontal status. Subgingival microbiological samples were taken under sedation from 50 cats with clinical signs of periodontal disease. Pooled paper point samples from 4 selected subgingival sites were cultured on blood agar and on Dentaid-1 medium. Suspected pathogens were identified, subcultured, and preserved. The association between the microbiological findings and the clinical status was studied using correlation coefficients (CC). In addition, cats were stratified in subgroups according to presence of putative pathogens, and comparisons were carried out using unpaired t-test. Three bacterial species were frequently detected including Porphyromonas gulae (86%), Porphyromonas circumdentaria (70%) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (90%). The mean proportion of total flora was high for P. gulae (32.54%), moderate for P. circundentaria (8.82%), and low for F. nucleatum (3.96%). Among the clinical variables, tooth mobility was correlated (CC > 0.50, p < 0.001) with recession, pocket depth, attachment level, gingival index, and calculus index (CC = 0.29, p = 0.04) as well as with total bacterial counts (CC = 0.38, p = 0.006). Cats with more than 10% of P. gulae showed significantly more mobility (p = 0.014) and recession (p = 0.038), and a tendency for deeper probing pocket depths (p = 0.084) and attachment loss (p = 0.087). The results from this cross-sectional study confirmed that P. gulae is the most relevant pathogen in periodontal disease in cats.

  13. O tabagismo como fator de risco para as doenças periodontais: aspectos microbiológicos

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    GAETTI-JARDIM JÚNIOR Elerson

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available O fumo é considerado importante fator predisponente para muitas doenças, incluindo-se as periodontopatias. Desde que as doenças periodontais representam a inter-relação entre os fatores de virulência da microbiota subgengival sobre um hospedeiro susceptível, foi objetivo avaliar a freqüência de isolamento de três periodontopatógenos em indivíduos sadios e pacientes com doença periodontal, fumantes ou não, com níveis variados de higiene bucal; verificar a relação entre o número de microrganismos produtores de sulfeto de hidrogênio na placa subgengival de fumantes e não fumantes e sua condição clínica. Foram examinados 189 pacientes e indivíduos sadios, dos quais 60 foram selecionados para análise microbiológica. O índice de placa foi registrado de acordo com o índice de O'Leary e os espécimes de placa subgengival coletados e processados de acordo com SLOTS35 (1982. A identificação dos isolados foi obtida pelas suas características morfocelulares, morfocoloniais e bioquímico-fisiológicas. Verificou-se que a freqüência de isolamento dos bastonetes anaeróbios produtores de pigmento negro, Fusobacterium nucleatum e bactérias produtoras de sulfeto de hidrogênio foi similar entre fumantes e não fumantes, sendo mais elevada nos pacientes com doença periodontal. Já Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans foi isolado mais freqüentemente em sadios fumantes do que sadios não fumantes.

  14. Combined antioxidant effects of Neem extract, bacteria, red blood cells and Lysozyme: possible relation to periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Leali; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Heyman, Samuel N; Ginsburg, Isaac; Gleitman, Yossi; Feuerstein, Osnat

    2017-08-10

    The common usage of chewing sticks prepared from Neem tree (Azadirachta indica) in India suggests its potential efficacy in periodontal diseases. The objective of this study is to explore the antibacterial effects of Neem leaf extract on the periodontophatic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, and its antioxidant capacities alone and in combination with bacteria and polycationic peptides that may be at the site of inflammation. Neem leaf extract was prepared by ethanol extraction. The growth kinetics of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum under anaerobic conditions in the presence of Neem leaf extract were measured. Broth microdilution test was used to determine the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of Neem leaf extract against each bacterial strain. The effect of Neem leaf extract on the coaggregation of the bacteria was assessed by a visual semi-quantitative assay. The antioxidant capacities of Neem leaf extract alone and in combination with bacteria, with the addition of red blood cells or the polycationic peptides chlorhexidine and lisozyme, were determined using a chemiluminescence assay. Neem leaf extract showed prominent dose-dependent antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis, however, had no effect on the growth of F. nucleatum nor on the coaggregation of the two bacteria. Yet, it showed intense antioxidant activity, which was amplified following adherence to bacteria and with the addition of red blood cells or the polycationic peptides. Neem leaf extract, containing polyphenols that adhere to oral surfaces, have the potential to provide long-lasting antibacterial as well as synergic antioxidant activities when in complex with bacteria, red blood cells and lisozyme. Thus, it might be especially effective in periodontal diseases.

  15. Microbiología pulpar de dientes íntegros con lesiones apicales de origen idiopático

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    Patricia Rodríguez

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Los cambios periapicales denominados lesiones, en dientes con integridad coronal completa y sin antecedentes de trauma, no presentan una etiología clara. Objetivo: Determinar la presencia de microorganismos en el tejido pulpar clarifica las causas de su muerte y el consiguiente daño a los tejidos periodontalesMateriales y métodos: Se seleccionaron 23 dientes, en personas con rangos de edad entre 10 y 39 años. Las muestras se tomaron con puntas de papel y limas Nº 0.8 (estériles, se transportaron en VMGA III, se procesaron en las siguientes 24 horas de tomada la muestra y se sembraron en agar brucella. Resultados: Los dientes más afectados fueron los centrales superiores 43.8%. De los 23 dientes estudiados, en 20 se observó crecimiento microbiológico. Se identificaron los siguientes microorganismos: Fusobacterium spp., 25%; Eubacte-rium spp., 15%; Peptostreptococcus spp., 10%; Campylobacter spp., 10%; bacilos entéricos gram negativos, 10%; Porphyromonas gingivalis, 10%; Prevotella intermedia, 5%; Eikenellia corrodens, 5%; Dialister pneumosintes, 5%; y levaduras en 5%. No hubo evidencias de crecimiento de Actinomyces actinomycetemcomitans, Tanerella forsythensis ni de estreptococo b hemolítico.Discusión y conclusiones: El tejido pulpar sano es estéril, la lesión sobre él causa inflamación degeneración, muerte pulpar y contaminación bacteriana. Los resultados en el presente estudio determinaron claramente la presencia de micro-organismos en lesiones apicales cerradas de origen endodóntico. De igual forma se evidencia que gran parte de los microorganismos que se encontraron son considerados periodontopatógenos lo que puede igualmente sugerir manejo compartido entre tratamiento endodóntico, periodontal y farmacológico.

  16. COAGGREGATION AND COAGGREGATION INHIBITION BETWEEN PERIO-PATHOGENIC AND CARIOGENIC BACTERIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Rao; LI De-yi

    2005-01-01

    Objective To screen the coaggregating pairs between perio-pathogenic and cariogenic bacteria and to investigate the susceptibility of these coaggregations to inhibitors. Methods 4 strains of perio-pathogenic bacteria, Fusobacterium nuleatum (Fn) ATCC 10953, Actinobacilllus actinomycetem comitans (Aa) Y4, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) ATCC 33277,Prevotella intermedia (Pi) ATCC 25261 and 4 strains of cariogenic bacteria, Streptococcus mutans (Sm) Ingbritt, Streptococcus sanguis (Ss) 34, Actinomyces viscosus (Av) 19246 and Lactobacillus acidophilus (La) ATCC 4356 were used to determine the coaggregating degrees of various combinations of the above bacteria by a visual assay and a turbidimetric assay. Then more than +2(or 20%) coaggregation degrees' pairs were used to investigate the inhibitory effect of lactose and arginine and to identify the minimum of their coaggregation-inhibitory concentration. Results The coaggregation degrees of Fn-Av, Pg-Av, Fn-Sm, Fn-Ss, Fn-La and Pg-Ss pairs were higher than +2(20%). 3.0 ~ 6.0mmol/L of arginine were considerably effective to the above pairs except Fn-Av pair and the disaggregation degrees were 49% ~ 92%. The maximum of their disaggregation degree to Fn-Av pair was just 18%. 120 ~ 300mmol/L of lactose were significantly effective to Pg-Ss pair, the disaggregation degrees were 57% ~ 91%. They partially inhibited Pg-Av pair and were almost ineffective to Fn-G + pairs. Conclusion The coaggregations between perio-pathogenic and cariogenic bacteria are highly specific. Most of them are relatively sensitive to arginine.

  17. Periodontitis induced by Porphyromonas gingivalis drives periodontal microbiota dysbiosis and insulin resistance via an impaired adaptive immune response.

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    Blasco-Baque, Vincent; Garidou, Lucile; Pomié, Céline; Escoula, Quentin; Loubieres, Pascale; Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Lemaitre, Mathieu; Nicolas, Simon; Klopp, Pascale; Waget, Aurélie; Azalbert, Vincent; Colom, André; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine; Kemoun, Philippe; Serino, Matteo; Burcelin, Rémy

    2017-05-01

    To identify a causal mechanism responsible for the enhancement of insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia following periodontitis in mice fed a fat-enriched diet. We set-up a unique animal model of periodontitis in C57Bl/6 female mice by infecting the periodontal tissue with specific and alive pathogens like Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia. The mice were then fed with a diabetogenic/non-obesogenic fat-enriched diet for up to 3 months. Alveolar bone loss, periodontal microbiota dysbiosis and features of glucose metabolism were quantified. Eventually, adoptive transfer of cervical (regional) and systemic immune cells was performed to demonstrate the causal role of the cervical immune system. Periodontitis induced a periodontal microbiota dysbiosis without mainly affecting gut microbiota. The disease concomitantly impacted on the regional and systemic immune response impairing glucose metabolism. The transfer of cervical lymph-node cells from infected mice to naive recipients guarded against periodontitis-aggravated metabolic disease. A treatment with inactivated Pg prior to the periodontal infection induced specific antibodies against Pg and protected the mouse from periodontitis-induced dysmetabolism. Finally, a 1-month subcutaneous chronic infusion of low rates of lipopolysaccharides from Pg mimicked the impact of periodontitis on immune and metabolic parameters. We identified that insulin resistance in the high-fat fed mouse is enhanced by pathogen-induced periodontitis. This is caused by an adaptive immune response specifically directed against pathogens and associated with a periodontal dysbiosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Impact of supragingival therapy on subgingival microbial profile in smokers versus non-smokers with severe chronic periodontitis

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    Tatiana Meulman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess subgingival microbiological changes in smokers versus non-smokers presenting severe chronic periodontitis after supragingival periodontal therapy (ST.Non-smokers (n=10 and smokers (n=10 presenting at least nine teeth with probing pocket depth (PPD (≥5 mm, bleeding on probing (BoP, and no history of periodontal treatment in the last 6 months were selected. Clinical parameters assessed were plaque index (PI, BoP, PPD, relative gingival margin position (rGMP and relative clinical attachment level (rCAL. Subgingival biofilm was collected before and 21 days after ST. DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified with the universal primer pair, 27F and 1492R. Amplified genes were cloned, sequenced, and identified by comparison with known 16S rRNA sequences. Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t and Chi-Square tests (α=5%.Clinically, ST promoted a significant reduction in PI and PPD, and gain of rCAL for both groups, with no significant intergroup difference. Microbiologically, at baseline, data analysis demonstrated that smokers harbored a higher proportion of Porphyromonas endodontalis, Bacteroidetes sp., Fusobacterium sp. and Tannerella forsythia and a lower number of cultivated phylotypes (p<0.05. Furthermore, non-smokers featured significant reductions in key phylotypes associated with periodontitis, whereas smokers presented more modest changes.Within the limits of the present study, ST promoted comparable clinical improvements in smokers and non-smokers with severe chronic periodontitis. However, in smokers, ST only slightly affected the subgingival biofilm biodiversity, as compared with non-smokers.

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of the gingiva with periodontitis of type I plasminogen deficiency compared to gingiva with gingivitis and periodontitis and healthy gingiva.

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    Kurtulus Waschulewski, Idil; Gökbuget, Aslan Y; Christiansen, Nina M; Ziegler, Maike; Schuster, Volker; Wahl, Gerhard; Götz, Werner

    2016-12-01

    Type I plasminogen deficiency (Plgdef) is an uncommon chronic inflammation of mucous membranes. Gingival enlargements usually proceed with progressive periodontal destruction and tooth-loss. Plasmin(ogen)-independent enzymatic mechanisms for fibrin clearance have already been discussed in the literature. Our primary objective was to verify, immunohistochemically, the occurrence of different enzymatic factors involved in tissue breakdown of inflamed compared to healthy gingiva. Secondly, we tried to find out, if these patients have a similar microbiological profile to the patients with known gingivitis and periodontitis. Immunohistochemical analysis of enzymes elastase, plasminogen (plg), cathepsin G, matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 and MMP-7 and of glycoprotein fibrinogen were performed with gingival tissues from 3 healthy controls, 8 patients with Plgdef and 3 patients with gingivitis and periodontitis. Furthermore, plaque from 5 patients with plasminogen deficiency were also obtained to determine the microbiological profile. Significantly high numbers of elastase positive leukocytes were detected in all samples. Staining for MMP-3 and MMP-7 was seen in samples with gingivitis and periodontitis with a stronger staining in samples with periodontitis by Plgdef. Fibrinogen was detectable in all samples. Staining for plg was stronger in samples with periodontitis than in other samples. Staining for cathepsin G was weak in gingivitis and periodontitis. Subgingival microbial flora showed elevated colony forming units of Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens, Fusobacterium spp., Eikenella corrodens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and viridans streptococci. Strong staining of elastase, MMP-3 and MMP-7 and weak staining of plg in Plgdef samples supports the plasmin(ogen) - independent fibrin clearance. Similar subgingival microbiological flora was observed in periodontitis with Plgdef as in other periodontal diseases. Further investigations should determine the exact pathomechanism

  20. Periowave demonstrates bactericidal activity against periopathogens and leads to improved clinical outcomes in the treatment of adult periodontitis

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    Street, Cale N.; Andersen, Roger; Loebel, Nicolas G.

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis affects half of the U.S. population over 50, and is the leading cause of tooth loss after 35. It is believed to be caused by growth of complex bacterial biofilms on the tooth surface below the gumline. Photodynamic therapy, a technology used commonly in antitumor applications, has more recently been shown to exhibit antimicrobial efficacy. We have demonstrated eradication of the periopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro using PeriowaveTM; a commercial photodisinfection system. In addition, several clinical studies have now demonstrated the efficacy of this treatment. A pilot study in the U.S. showed that 68% of patients treated with PeriowaveTM adjunctively to scaling and root planing (SRP) showed clinical attachment level increase of >1 mm, as opposed to 30% with SRP alone. In a subsequent larger study, a second PeriowaveTM treatment 6 weeks after initial treatment led to pocket depth improvements of >1.5 mm in 89% of patients. Finally, in the most recent multicenter, randomized, examiner-blinded study conducted on 121 subjects in Canada, PeriowaveTM treatment produced highly significant gains in attachment level (0.88 mm vs. 0.57 mm; p=0.003) and pocket depth (0.87 mm vs. 0.63 mm; p=0.01) as compared to SRP alone. In summary, PeriowaveTM demonstrated strong bactericidal activity against known periopathogens, and treatment of periodontitis using this system produced significantly better clinical outcomes than SRP alone. This, along with the absence of any adverse events in patients treated to date demonstrates that PDT is a safe and effective treatment for adult chronic periodontitis.

  1. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Halitosis

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    Mehmet Mustafa Kılıçkaya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Halitosis or oral malodor is not a diagnosis, but is symptom. Halitosis, that we frequently encounter in ear, nose and throat practice can be the harbinger of some serious underlying disease. Therefore, diagnosis and to find the cause of the halitosis are important. Also halitosis treatment is necessary due to the social and psychological effects. Breath contains hundreds of volatile organic compounds that are by-products of our metabolism. Certain diseases such as nasopharynx cancer, larynx cancer ve lung cancer alter the mix of gases. Thus, the analysis of exhaled air has gained importance. New technologies lead to the development of new devices. And with these called electronic noses the analysis of exhaled air has becomes an important non-invasive diagnostic method. In the literature, halitosis and bad breath which is used as synonymus with oral malodor is the emission of unpleasant odor from mouth and nasal passage. It occurs in 25% of the population, approximately and it has a significant social and economic impact. Halitosis is classified as true halitosis (physiologic halitosis and pathologic halitosis, pseudohalitosis and halitophobia. The most common cause is intra-oral diseases. Among all these factors, the most important etiologic factor are the coating tongue. Other ear, nose and throat diseases such as rhinitis and sinusitis are seen among the most common extraoral causes. Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tanneralla forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Actinobacilli and Solobacterium moorei are the bacteria which are commonly isolated from patients with halitosis and they are volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs producing ones as well. The treatment of halitosis should be carried out according to the etiology. In the physiologic halitosis tooth brushing, use of dental floss, tongue cleaning and chlorhexidine, cetylpyridinium chloride and zinc containing antimicrobial mouthwashes

  2. 24-hour evaluation of dental plaque bacteria and halitosis after consumption of a single placebo or dental treat by dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeusette, Isabelle C; Román, Aurora Mateo; Torre, Celina; Crusafont, Josep; Sánchez, Nuria; Sánchez, Maria C; Pérez-Salcedo, Leire; Herrera, David

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether consumption of a single dental treat with specific mechanical properties and active ingredients would provide a 24-hour effect on dental plaque bacteria and halitosis in dogs. ANIMALS 10 dogs of various breeds from a privately owned colony that had received routine dental scaling and polishing 4 weeks before the study began. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to receive 1 placebo or dental treat first. A 4-week washout period was provided, and then dogs received the opposite treatment. Oral plaque and breath samples were collected before and 0.5, 3, 12, and 24 hours after treat consumption. Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) concentration was measured in breath samples. Total aerobic, total anaerobic, Porphyromonas gulae, Prevotella intermedia-like, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum bacterial counts (measured via bacterial culture) and total live bacterial counts, total live and dead bacterial counts, and bacterial vitality (measured via quantitative real-time PCR assay) were assessed in plaque samples. RESULTS Compared with placebo treat consumption, dental treat consumption resulted in a significant decrease in breath VSCs concentration and all plaque bacterial counts, without an effect on bacterial vitality. Effects of the dental treat versus the placebo treat persisted for 12 hours for several bacterial counts and for 24 hours for breath VSCs concentration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Although clinical benefits should be investigated in larger scale, longer-term studies, results of this study suggested that feeding the evaluated dental treat may help to decrease oral bacterial growth in dogs for 12 hours and oral malodor for 24 hours. A feeding interval of 12 hours is therefore recommended.

  3. Halitosis vaccines targeting FomA, a biofilm-bridging protein of fusobacteria nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P-F; Huang, I-F; Shu, C-W; Huang, C-M

    2013-09-01

    Halitosis (bad breath) is estimated to influence more than half of the world's population with varying degree of intensity. More than 85% of halitosis originates from oral bacterial infections. Foul-smelling breath mainly results from bacterial production of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) such as hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. To date, major treatments for elimination of oral malodor include periodontal therapy combined with antibiotics or antimicrobial agents, and mechanical approaches including tooth and tongue cleaning. These treatments may transiently reduce VSCs but carry risks of generating toxicity, increasing resistant strains and misbalancing the resident human flora. Therefore, there is a need to develop alternative therapeutic modalities for halitosis. Plaque biofilms are the principal source for generating VSCs which are originally metabolized from amino acids during co-aggregation of oral bacteria. Blocking the bacterial coaggregation, therefore, may prevent various biofilm-associated oral diseases such as periodontitis and halitosis. Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), a Gram-negative anaerobe oral bacterium, is a main bacterial strain related to halitosis. Aggregation of F. nucleatum with other bacteria to form plaque biofilms in oral cavity causes bad breath. FomA, the major outer membrane protein of F. nucleatum, recruits other oral pathogenic bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) in the periodontal pockets. A halitosis vaccine targeting F. bacterium FomA significantly abrogates the enhancement of bacterial co-aggregation, biofilms, production of VSCs, and gum inflammation mediated by an inter-species interaction of F. nucleatum with P. gingivalis, which suggests FomA of F. nucleatum to be a potential target for development of vaccines or drugs against bacterial biofilm formation and its associated pathogenicities.

  4. Noma affected children from Niger have distinct oral microbial communities based on high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments.

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    Katrine L Whiteson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We aim to understand the microbial ecology of noma (cancrum oris, a devastating ancient illness which causes severe facial disfigurement in>140,000 malnourished children every year. The cause of noma is still elusive. A chaotic mix of microbial infection, oral hygiene and weakened immune system likely contribute to the development of oral lesions. These lesions are a plausible entry point for unidentified microorganisms that trigger gangrenous facial infections. To catalog bacteria present in noma lesions and identify candidate noma-triggering organisms, we performed a cross-sectional sequencing study of 16S rRNA gene amplicons from sixty samples of gingival fluid from twelve healthy children, twelve children suffering from noma (lesion and healthy sites, and twelve children suffering from Acute Necrotizing Gingivitis (ANG (lesion and healthy sites. Relative to healthy individuals, samples taken from lesions in diseased mouths were enriched with Spirochaetes and depleted for Proteobacteria. Samples taken from healthy sites of diseased mouths had proportions of Spirochaetes and Proteobacteria that were similar to healthy control individuals. Samples from noma mouths did not have a higher abundance of Fusobacterium, casting doubt on its role as a causative agent of noma. Microbial communities sampled from noma and ANG lesions were dominated by the same Prevotella intermedia OTU, which was much less abundant in healthy sites sampled from the same mouths. Multivariate analysis confirmed that bacterial communities in healthy and lesion sites were significantly different. Several OTUs in the Orders Erysipelotrichales, Clostridiales, Bacteroidales, and Spirochaetales were identified as indicators of noma, suggesting that one or more microbes within these Orders is associated with the development of noma lesions. Future studies should include longitudinal sampling of viral and microbial components of this community, before and early in noma lesion

  5. Active invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis and infection-induced complement activation in ApoE-/- mice brains.

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    Poole, Sophie; Singhrao, Sim K; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera, Mercedes; Velsko, Irina; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Crean, StJohn

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a polymicrobial inflammatory disease that leads to chronic systemic inflammation and direct infiltration of bacteria/bacterial components, which may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease. ApoE-/- mice were orally infected (n = 12) with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum as mono- and polymicrobial infections. ApoE-/- mice were sacrificed following 12 and 24 weeks of chronic infection. Bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from all brain tissues except for the F. nucleatum mono-infected group. Polymerase chain reaction was performed using universal 16 s rDNA primers and species-specific primer sets for each organism to determine whether the infecting pathogens accessed the brain. Sequencing amplification products confirmed the invasion of bacteria into the brain during infection. The innate immune responses were detected using antibodies against complement activation products of C3 convertase stage and the membrane attack complex. Molecular methods demonstrated that 6 out of 12 ApoE-/- mice brains contained P. gingivalis genomic DNA at 12 weeks (p = 0.006), and 9 out of 12 at 24 weeks of infection (p = 0.0001). Microglia in both infected and control groups demonstrated strong intracellular labeling with C3 and C9, due to on-going biosynthesis. The pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus in 4 out of 12 infected mice brains demonstrated characteristic opsonization with C3 activation fragments (p = 0.032). These results show that the oral pathogen P. gingivalis was able to access the ApoE-/- mice brain and thereby contributed to complement activation with bystander neuronal injury.

  6. The role of acidification in the inhibition of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by vaginal lactobacilli during anaerobic growth

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    Wade Jeremy J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaginal lactobacilli protect the female genital tract by producing lactic acid, bacteriocins, hydrogen peroxide or a local immune response. In bacterial vaginosis, normal lactobacilli are replaced by an anaerobic flora and this may increase susceptibility to Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a facultative anaerobe. Bacterial interference between vaginal lactobacilli and N. gonorrhoeae has not been studied in liquid medium under anaerobic conditions. By co-cultivating N. gonorrhoeae in the presence of lactobacilli we sought to identify the relative contributions of acidification and hydrogen peroxide production to any growth inhibition of N. gonorrhoeae. Methods Three strains of N. gonorrhoeae distinguishable by auxotyping were grown in the presence of high concentrations (107-108 cfu/mL of three vaginal lactobacilli (L. crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii in an anerobic liquid medium with and without 2-(N-morpholino-ethanesulfonic (MES buffer. Fusobacterium nucleatum was used as an indicator of anaerobiosis. Bacterial counts were performed at 15, 20 and 25 h; at 25 h pH and hydrogen peroxide concentrations were measured. Results Growth of F. nucleatum to >108 cfu/mL at 25 h confirmed anaerobiosis. All bacteria grew in the anaerobic liquid medium and the addition of MES buffer had negligible effect on growth. L. crispatus and L. gasseri produced significant acidification and a corresponding reduction in growth of N. gonorrhoeae. This inhibition was abrogated by the addition of MES. L. jensenii produced less acidification and did not inhibit N. gonorrhoeae. Hydrogen peroxide was not detected in any experiment. Conclusions During anaerobic growth, inhibition of N. gonorrhoeae by the vaginal lactobacilli tested was primarily due to acidification and abrogated by the presence of a buffer. There was no evidence of a specific mechanism of inhibition other than acid production under these conditions and, in particular, hydrogen peroxide was

  7. Long-term alteration of intestinal microbiota in patients with ulcerative colitis by antibiotic combination therapy.

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    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Kajiura, Takayuki; Shinozaki, Junko; Suzuki, Manabu; Saito, Keisuke; Takakura, Kazuki; Tsukinaga, Shintaro; Odahara, Shunichi; Yukawa, Toyokazu; Mitobe, Jimi; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Tajiri, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that intestinal bacteria, such as Fusobacterium varium (F. varium), contribute to the clinical activity in ulcerative colitis (UC); thus, an antibiotic combination therapy (amoxicillin, tetracycline, and metronidazole (ATM)) against F. varium can induce and maintain UC remission. Therefore, we investigated whether ATM therapy induces a long-term alteration of intestinal microbiota in patients with UC. Patients with UC were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Biopsy samples at the beginning of the trial and again at 3 months after treatment completion were randomly obtained from 20 patients. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) in mucosa-associated bacterial components was examined to assess the alteration of the intestinal microbiota. Profile changes of T-RFLP in mucosa-associated bacterial components were found in 10 of 12 patients in the treatment group and in none of 8 in the placebo group. Dice similarity coefficients using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averages (Dice-UPGMA) confirmed that the similarity of mucosal microbiota from the descending colon was significantly decreased after the ATM therapy, and this change was maintained for at least 3 months. Moreover, at 3 months after treatment completion, the F. varium/β-actin ratio, examined by real-time PCR using nested PCR products from biopsy samples, was reduced less than 40% in 8 of 12 treated patients, which was higher, but not significantly, than in 4 of 8 patients in the placebo group. Together, these results suggest that ATM therapy induces long-term alterations in the intestinal microbiota of patients with UC, which may be associated, at least in part, with clinical effects of the therapy.

  8. The potential of metatranscriptomics for identifying screening targets for bacterial vaginosis.

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    Jimmy Twin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ribosomal RNA content of a sample collected from a woman with bacterial vaginosis (BV was analysed to determine the active microbial community, and to identify potential targets for further screening. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The sample from the BV patient underwent total RNA extraction, followed by physical subtraction of human rRNA and whole transcriptome amplification. The metatranscriptome was sequenced using Roche 454 titanium chemistry. The bioinformatics pipeline MG-RAST and desktop DNA analysis platforms were utilised to analyse results. Bacteria of the genus Prevotella (predominately P. amnii constituted 36% of the 16S rRNA reads, followed by Megasphaera (19%, Leptotrichia/Sneathia (8% and Fusobacterium (8%. Comparison of the abundances of several bacteria to quantitative PCR (qPCR screening of extracted DNA revealed comparable relative abundances. This suggests a correlation between what was present and transcriptionally active in this sample: however distinct differences were seen when compared to the microbiome determined by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. To assess the presence of P. amnii in a larger pool of samples, 90 sexually active women were screened using qPCR. This bacterium was found to be strongly associated with BV (P<0.001, OR 23.3 (95%CI:2.9-190.7 among the 90 women. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study highlighted the potential of metatranscriptomics as a tool for characterising metabolically active microbiota and identifying targets for further screening. Prevotella amnii was chosen as an example target, being the most metabolically active species present in the single patient with BV, and was found to be detected at a high concentration by qPCR in 31% of cohort with BV, with an association with both oral and penile-vaginal sex.

  9. Microbiota present in cystic fibrosis lungs as revealed by whole genome sequencing.

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    Philippe M Hauser

    Full Text Available Determination of the precise composition and variation of microbiota in cystic fibrosis lungs is crucial since chronic inflammation due to microorganisms leads to lung damage and ultimately, death. However, this constitutes a major technical challenge. Culturing of microorganisms does not provide a complete representation of a microbiota, even when using culturomics (high-throughput culture. So far, only PCR-based metagenomics have been investigated. However, these methods are biased towards certain microbial groups, and suffer from uncertain quantification of the different microbial domains. We have explored whole genome sequencing (WGS using the Illumina high-throughput technology applied directly to DNA extracted from sputa obtained from two cystic fibrosis patients. To detect all microorganism groups, we used four procedures for DNA extraction, each with a different lysis protocol. We avoided biases due to whole DNA amplification thanks to the high efficiency of current Illumina technology. Phylogenomic classification of the reads by three different methods produced similar results. Our results suggest that WGS provides, in a single analysis, a better qualitative and quantitative assessment of microbiota compositions than cultures and PCRs. WGS identified a high quantity of Haemophilus spp. (patient 1 or Staphylococcus spp. plus Streptococcus spp. (patient 2 together with low amounts of anaerobic (Veillonella, Prevotella, Fusobacterium and aerobic bacteria (Gemella, Moraxella, Granulicatella. WGS suggested that fungal members represented very low proportions of the microbiota, which were detected by cultures and PCRs because of their selectivity. The future increase of reads' sizes and decrease in cost should ensure the usefulness of WGS for the characterisation of microbiota.

  10. Resilience of coral-associated bacterial communities exposed to fish farm effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garren, Melissa; Raymundo, Laurie; Guest, James; Harvell, C Drew; Azam, Farooq

    2009-10-06

    The coral holobiont includes the coral animal, algal symbionts, and associated microbial community. These microbes help maintain the holobiont homeostasis; thus, sustaining robust mutualistic microbial communities is a fundamental part of long-term coral reef survival. Coastal pollution is one major threat to reefs, and intensive fish farming is a rapidly growing source of this pollution. We investigated the susceptibility and resilience of the bacterial communities associated with a common reef-building coral, Porites cylindrica, to coastal pollution by performing a clonally replicated transplantation experiment in Bolinao, Philippines adjacent to intensive fish farming. Ten fragments from each of four colonies (total of 40 fragments) were followed for 22 days across five sites: a well-flushed reference site (the original fragment source); two sites with low exposure to milkfish (Chanos chanos) aquaculture effluent; and two sites with high exposure. Elevated levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorophyll a, total heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria abundance, virus like particle (VLP) abundances, and culturable Vibrio abundance characterized the high effluent sites. Based on 16S rRNA clone libraries and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, we observed rapid, dramatic changes in the coral-associated bacterial communities within five days of high effluent exposure. The community composition on fragments at these high effluent sites shifted towards known human and coral pathogens (i.e. Arcobacter, Fusobacterium, and Desulfovibrio) without the host corals showing signs of disease. The communities shifted back towards their original composition by day 22 without reduction in effluent levels. This study reveals fish farms as a likely source of pathogens with the potential to proliferate on corals and an unexpected short-term resilience of coral-associated bacterial communities to eutrophication pressure. These data highlight a need for

  11. Effect of ozone on periodontopathogenic species--an in vitro study.

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    Eick, Sigrun; Tigan, Marius; Sculean, Anton

    2012-04-01

    The in vitro study was aimed to determine the effect of ozone on periodontopathogenic microorganisms. Ozone was generated for 6 s-2 × 24 s (corresponding to 0.56 mg-2 × 2.24 mg of ozone) against 23 mainly anaerobic periodontopathogenic species. Agar diffusion test was used as a screening method. Then, the killing activity was tested in a serum-free environment and with 25% v/v inactivated serum. Further, the effect of ozone on bactericidal activity of native serum was analyzed against Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Agar diffusion test showed a high efficacy of ozone against microorganisms, especially against Porphyromonas gingivalis. This result was confirmed by the killing tests; most of the strains in a concentration of 10(5) were completely eliminated after twofold 18-s application of ozone. Only four of the six potentially "superinfecting" species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterobacter cloacae, Candida albicans) survived in part. Addition of heat-inactivated serum reduced the killing rate of ozone by 78% after 6-s and by 47% after twofold 18-s exposures; no strain was completely eradicated after any application of ozone. The bactericidal effect of native serum was enhanced after application of ozone; no effect was visible on the included A. actinomycetemcomitans strain which was found to be completely resistant to the bactericidal action of serum. In conclusion, (a) ozone has a strong antibacterial activity against putative periodontopathogenic microorganisms, and (b) the bactericidal effect is reduced in the presence of serum. Ozone may have potential as an adjunctive application to mechanical treatment in periodontitis patients.

  12. Microbiota studies in the bile duct strongly suggest a role for Helicobacter pylori in extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés-Jiménez, F; Guitron, A; Segura-López, F; Méndez-Tenorio, A; Iwai, S; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Torres, J

    2016-02-01

    Biliary tract cancer or extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ECCA) represents the sixth commonest cause of cancer in the gastrointestinal tract in western countries. We aimed to characterize the microbiota and its predicted associated functions in the biliary tract of ECCA and benign biliary pathology (BBP). Samples were taken from 100 patients with ECCA and 100 patients with BBP by endoscopic cholangio-pancreatography for DNA extraction. Ten patients with ECCA and ten with BBP were selected for microbiota studies using the V4-16S rRNA gene and sequenced in Illumina platform. Microbiota analyses included sample-to-sample distance metrics, ordination/clustering and prediction of functions. Presence of Nesterenkonia sp. and Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genes were tested in the 100 ECCA and 100 BBP samples. Phylum Proteobacteria dominated all samples (60.4% average). Ordination multicomponent analyses showed significant microbiota separation between ECCA and BBP (p 0.010). Analyses of 4002 operational taxonomic units with presence variation in at least one category probed a separation of ECCA from BBP. Among these, Nesterenkonia decreased, whereas Methylophilaceae, Fusobacterium, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Novosphingobium and H. pylori increased in ECCA. Predicted associated functions showed increased abundance of H. pylori virulence genes in ECCA. cagA and vacA genes were confirmed by PCR in ECCA and BBP samples. This is the first microbiota report in ECCA and BBP to show significant changes in microbial composition. Bacterial species unusual for human flora were found: Methylophilaceae and Nesterenkonia are reported in hypersaline soils, and Mesorhizobium is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium. Enrichment of virulence genes confirms previous studies suggesting that H. pylori might be associated with ECCA.

  13. Detection of periodontopathogenic bacteria in pregnant women by traditional anaerobic culture method and by a commercial molecular genetic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbán, Edit; Terhes, Gabriella; Radnai, Márta; Gorzó, István; Nagy, Elisabeth

    2010-06-01

    To culture facultative and strict anaerobic bacteria is a well-established method for analyzing subgingival plaque samples. Micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus (HAIN Lifescience GmbH, Nehren, Germany) tests are two commercially available rapid PCR-based methods for the identification and quantification of putative periodontopathogen bacteria. In this study, we compared these commercial PCR-based hybridization methods with conventional anaerobic culture technique. A total of 36 subgingival plaque samples were collected from periodontal pockets of pregnant women with chronic localized periodontitis. Aliquots of these samples were evaluated with species-specific probes provided by micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus tests simultaneously, and from the same samples anaerobic and capnophylic bacteria were cultured on selective media. The overall agreement between both methods was excellent for Eubacterium nodatum, Tannerella forsythia and Porphyromonas gingivalis (97-92%), fair for Capnocytophaga sp, Eikenella corrodens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Prevotella intermedia (91-89%) and poor for Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra (Micromonas micros), and Campylobacter rectus (86-78%). Discrepancies in the results may be explained by inability of culture method to distinguish between closely related taxa (e.i P. intermedia/Prevotella. nigrescens), and problems of keeping periodontopathogen bacteria viable, which is required for successful detection by standard culture method. Nucleic acid-based methods may replace cultivation method as frequently used methods in microbiological diagnosis of progressive periodontitis, thus micro-IDent and micro-IDent Plus tests can be recommended where culture of periodontopathogenic bacteria is not performed in routine microbiology laboratories to analyze subgingival plaque samples.

  14. Effect of controlled-release PeriochipTM on clinical and microbiological parameters in patients of chronic periodontitis

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    Komal Puri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the clinical and microbiological effectiveness of Periochip TM as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP with SRP alone in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: This randomized, split mouth, 3-month clinical and microbiological trial included 30 sites in 15 patients aged 30-50 years diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. In each patient, two bilateral pockets probing 5-7 mm were randomly assigned to test and control groups. The test group received SRP plus Periochip TM , whereas the control group received SRP alone. Clinical indices and anaerobic culture analysis was done at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months interval. Total bacterial count and analysis of four major periodontopathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, Prevotella intermedia (Pi, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa, and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn was done. Results: Significant improvement was obtained in all clinical variables in the test group as compared to the control group over the study period. Total colony counts were significantly reduced in the test group as compared to control over the period of time. At baseline Aa was recovered from 4 test group sites and 5 control group sites, Pg from 15 test group and 14 control group sites, Pi from 5 test group and 2 control group sites, Fn from 7 test and 7 control group sites. At 3 months, Aa was recovered from 1 test group and 4 control group sites, Pg from 4 test group and 8 control group sites, Pi from 1 test group and 1 control group site, Fn from 3 test and 4 control group sites. Conclusion: Periochip TM placement as an adjunct to SRP, showed promising results, when compared to SRP alone. Healthy microflora can be maintained for a longer period of time and delay in the repopulation by periodontopathic microorganisms was observed.

  15. Microbiome in the Apical Root Canal System of Teeth with Post-Treatment Apical Periodontitis

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    Siqueira, José F.; Antunes, Henrique S.; Rôças, Isabela N.; Rachid, Caio T. C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bacteria present in the apical root canal system are directly involved with the pathogenesis of post-treatment apical periodontitis. This study used a next-generation sequencing approach to identify the bacterial taxa occurring in cryopulverized apical root samples from root canal-treated teeth with post-treatment disease. Methods Apical root specimens obtained during periradicular surgery of ten adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis were cryogenically ground. DNA was extracted from the powder and the microbiome was characterized on the basis of the V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene by using paired-end sequencing on Illumina MiSeq device. Results All samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA. Bacterial taxa were mapped to 11 phyla and 103 genera composed by 538 distinct operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 3% of dissimilarity. Over 85% of the sequences belonged to 4 phyla: Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Actinobacteria. In general, these 4 phyla accounted for approximately 80% of the distinct OTUs found in the apical root samples. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in 6/10 samples. Fourteen genera had representatives identified in all cases. Overall, the genera Fusobacterium and Pseudomonas were the most dominant. Enterococcus was found in 4 cases, always in relatively low abundance. Conclusions This study showed a highly complex bacterial community in the apical root canal system of adequately treated teeth with persistent apical periodontitis. This suggests that this disease is characterized by multispecies bacterial communities and has a heterogeneous etiology, because the community composition largely varied from case to case. PMID:27689802

  16. Comparison of oral microbial diversity between periodontitis patients and healthy people by 16S rRNA gene clone library%16S rRNA基因克隆文库分析比较牙周炎患者和健康人口腔唾液微生物多样性

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    吴芳; 李俊平; 汪珍珍; 王译彬; 焦康礼; 周建业; 李志强; 余占海

    2016-01-01

    [目的]通过对同一地区、同一民族牙周炎患者和健康人的唾液微生物群落结构的分析,探寻牙周炎患者口腔微生物的多样性.[方法]采集甘肃东乡族自治县的东乡族牙周炎患者和健康人唾液各5例,分别记作DP(东乡牙周)和DH(东乡健康),提取细菌总DNA,构建16S rRNA基因克隆文库,测序后利用MOTHUR、MEGA 4.0、ClustalX 3.0等软件对测序结果进行分析.[结果]所有样本共检测出115个OTUs (DP 60,DH 75),归属于6个门,27个属.TM7是DP组特有的优势菌门.仅在DP组中检测到的优势菌属是梭菌属(Fusobacterium)、卟啉单胞菌属(Porphyromonas)、消化链球菌属(Peptostreptococcus)和TM7_genera.[结论]发现牙周炎患者与健康人口腔唾液微生物存在一定差异.其中,TM7、梭菌属和消化链球菌属在牙周病中的作用值得进一步研究.

  17. The same microbiota and a potentially discriminant metabolome in the saliva of omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and Vegan individuals.

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    De Filippis, Francesca; Vannini, Lucia; La Storia, Antonietta; Laghi, Luca; Piombino, Paola; Stellato, Giuseppina; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Gozzi, Giorgia; Turroni, Silvia; Ferrocino, Ilario; Lazzi, Camilla; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    The salivary microbiota has been linked to both oral and non-oral diseases. Scant knowledge is available on the effect of environmental factors such as long-term dietary choices on the salivary microbiota and metabolome. This study analyzed the microbial diversity and metabolomic profiles of the saliva of 161 healthy individuals who followed an omnivore or ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet. A large core microbiota was identified, including 12 bacterial genera, found in >98% of the individuals. The subjects could be stratified into three "salivary types" that differed on the basis of the relative abundance of the core genera Prevotella, Streptococcus/Gemella and Fusobacterium/Neisseria. Statistical analysis indicated no effect of dietary habit on the salivary microbiota. Phylogenetic beta-diversity analysis consistently showed no differences between omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan individuals. Metabolomic profiling of saliva using (1)H-NMR and GC-MS/SPME identified diet-related biomarkers that enabled a significant discrimination between the 3 groups of individuals on the basis of their diet. Formate, urea, uridine and 5-methyl-3-hexanone could discriminate samples from omnivores, whereas 1-propanol, hexanoic acid and proline were characteristic of non-omnivore diets. Although the salivary metabolome can be discriminating for diet, the microbiota has a remarkable inter-individual stability and did not vary with dietary habits. Microbial homeostasis might be perturbed with sub-standard oral hygiene or other environmental factors, but there is no current indication that a choice of an omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet can lead to a specific composition of the oral microbiota with consequences on the oral homeostasis.

  18. 5-Fluorouracil sensitivity varies among oral micro-organisms.

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    Vanlancker, Eline; Vanhoecke, Barbara; Smet, Rozel; Props, Ruben; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2016-08-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, often causes oral mucositis, an inflammation and ulceration of the oral mucosa. Micro-organisms in the oral cavity are thought to play an important role in the aggravation and severity of mucositis, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Although 5-FU has been shown to elicit antibacterial effects at high concentrations (>100 µM), its antibacterial effect at physiologically relevant concentrations in the oral cavity is unknown. This study reports the effect of different concentrations of 5-FU (range 0.1-50 µM) on the growth and viability of bacterial monocultures that are present in the oral cavity and the possible role in the activity of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), an enzyme involved in 5-FU resistance. Our data showed a differential sensitivity among the tested oral species towards physiological concentrations of 5-FU. Klebsiellaoxytoca, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Lactobacillus salivarius appeared to be highly resistant to all tested concentrations. In contrast, Lactobacillusoris, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus pyogenes, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Neisseria mucosa showed a significant reduction in growth and viability starting from very low concentrations (0.2-3.1 µM). We can also provide evidence that DPD is not involved in the 5-FU resistance of the selected species. The observed variability in response to physiological 5-FU concentrations may explain why certain microbiota lead to a community dysbiosis and/or an overgrowth of certain resistant micro-organisms in the oral cavity following cancer treatment.

  19. Analysis of the intestinal lumen microbiota in an animal model of colorectal cancer.

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    Qingchao Zhu

    Full Text Available Recent reports have suggested that multiple factors such as host genetics, environment and diet can promote the progression of healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinoma. Accumulating evidence has additionally associated intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. In order to examine and analyze the composition of gut microbiota in the absence of confounding influences, we have established an animal model of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH-induced colon cancer. Using this model, we have performed pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes in this study to determine the diversity and breadth of the intestinal microbial species. Our findings indicate that the microbial composition of the intestinal lumen differs significantly between control and tumor groups. The abundance of Firmicutes was elevated whereas the abundance of Bacteroidetes and Spirochetes was reduced in the lumen of CRC rats. Fusobacteria was not detected in any of the healthy rats and there was no significant difference in observed Proteobacteria species when comparing the bacterial communities between our two groups. Interestingly, the abundance of Proteobacteria was higher in CRC rats. At the genus level, Bacteroides exhibited a relatively higher abundance in CRC rats compared to controls (14.92% vs. 9.22%, p<0.001. Meanwhile, Prevotella (55.22% vs. 26.19%, Lactobacillus (3.71% vs. 2.32% and Treponema (3.04% vs. 2.43%, were found to be significantly more abundant in healthy rats than CRC rats (p<0.001, respectively. We also demonstrate a significant reduction of butyrate-producing bacteria such as Roseburia and Eubacterium in the gut microbiota of CRC rats. Furthermore, a significant increase in Desulfovibrio, Erysipelotrichaceae and Fusobacterium was also observed in the tumor group. A decrease in probiotic species such as Ruminococcus and Lactobacillus was likewise observed in the tumor group. Collectively, we can conclude that a significant

  20. Minimum inhibitory concentration of the plant extracts′ combinations against dental caries and plaque microorganisms: An in vitro study

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    B R Chandra Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral health status has witnessed marked advances in many industrialized countries. However, dental caries is consistently increasing in developing countries, and periodontal diseases are among most common afflictions to humankind. Approach best suited for developing countries is to focus on the prevention with innovative strategies. Hence, evolution of novel, innovative strategies to prevent dental caries and periodontal diseases is need of hour. Objective: To determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of combinations of Acacia nilotica, Murraya koenigii L. Sprengel, Eucalyptus hybrid, and Psidium guajava against dental caries and plaque microorganisms and to qualitatively identify various phytochemical constituents in individual plant extracts and their quadruple combinations. Materials and Methods: MIC of the combinations of A. nilotica, M. koenigii L. Sprengel, Eucalyptus hybrid, and P. guajava on Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus (dental caries bacteria, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus salivarius (primary plaque colonizers, Fusobacterium nucleatum (secondary plaque colonizer, and Porphyromonas gingivalis (tertiary plaque colonizer was determined using broth dilution method. Series of dilutions of quadruple combinations ranging from 0.05% to 1.5% were prepared. 100 μL of each serial dilution of quadruple combinations was added to each tube containing bacterial culture. The optical density was noted after incubation in each tube to estimate the MIC for each bacterium. Results: MIC of the polyherbal combinations on S. mutans, S. sanguis, S. salivarius, L. acidophilus, F. nucleatum, and P. gingivalis was found to be 0.25%, 0.05%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, and 0.25%, respectively. Conclusion: The quadruple combinations of these four plant extracts could be considered in the evolution of an indigenous polyherbal mouth rinse as the formulation inhibited all the bacteria tested in the present study at low

  1. Key bacterial families (Clostridiaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae and Bacteroidaceae are related to the digestion of protein and energy in dogs

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    Emma N. Bermingham

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Much of the recent research in companion animal nutrition has focussed on understanding the role of diet on faecal microbiota composition. To date, diet-induced changes in faecal microbiota observed in humans and rodents have been extrapolated to pets in spite of their very different dietary and metabolic requirements. This lack of direct evidence means that the mechanisms by which microbiota influences health in dogs are poorly understood. We hypothesised that changes in faecal microbiota correlate with physiological parameters including apparent macronutrient digestibility. Methods Fifteen adult dogs were assigned to two diet groups, exclusively fed either a premium kibbled diet (kibble; K; n = 8 or a raw red meat diet (meat; M; n = 7 for nine weeks. Apparent digestibility of macronutrients (protein, fat, gross energy and dry matter, faecal weight, faecal health scores, faecal VFA concentrations and faecal microbial composition were determined. Datasets were integrated using mixOmics in R. Results Faecal weight and VFA levels were lower and the apparent digestibility of protein and energy were higher in dogs on the meat diet. Diet significantly affected 27 microbial families and 53 genera in the faeces. In particular, the abundances of Bacteriodes, Prevotella, Peptostreptococcus and Faecalibacterium were lower in dogs fed the meat diet, whereas Fusobacterium, Lactobacillus and Clostridium were all more abundant. Discussion Our results show clear associations of specific microbial taxa with diet composition. For example, Clostridiaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae and Bacteroidaceae were highly correlated to parameters such as protein and fat digestibility in the dog. By understanding the relationship between faecal microbiota and physiological parameters we will gain better insights into the effects of diet on the nutrition of our pets.

  2. Chronic Opisthorchis viverrini Infection Changes the Liver Microbiome and Promotes Helicobacter Growth

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    Itthitaetrakool, Upsornsawan; Pinlaor, Porntip; Pinlaor, Somchai; Chomvarin, Chariya; Dangtakot, Rungtiwa; Chaidee, Apisit; Wilailuckana, Chotechana; Sangka, Arunnee; Lulitanond, Aroonlug; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2016-01-01

    Adults of Opisthorchis viverrini reside in the biliary system, inducing inflammation of bile ducts and cholangitis, leading to hepatobiliary disease (HBD) including cholangiocarcinoma. O. viverrini infection also has major implications for the bacterial community in bile ducts and liver. To investigate this in chronic O. viverrini infection (≥ 8 months p.i.), bacterial genomic DNA from livers of hamsters and from worms was investigated using culture techniques, PCR for Helicobacter spp. and high-throughput next-generation sequencing targeting the V3-V4 hypervariable regions of prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene. Of a total of 855,046 DNA sequence reads, 417,953 were useable after filtering. Metagenomic analyses assigned these to 93 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) consisting of 80 OTUs of bacteria, including 6 phyla and 42 genera. In the chronic O. viverrini-infected group, bacterial community composition and diversity were significantly increased compared to controls. Sequences of Fusobacterium spp. were the most common (13.81%), followed by Streptococcus luteciae (10.76%), Escherichia coli (10.18%), and Bifidobacterium spp. (0.58%). In addition, Helicobacter pylori (0.17% of sequences) was also identified in the liver of chronic O. viverrini infections, but not in normal liver. The presence of H. pylori was confirmed by PCR and by use of an antibody against bacterial antigen, supporting the metagenomics data. The identities of bacteria cultured for enrichment suggested that chronic O. viverrini infection changes the liver microbiome and promotes Helicobacter spp. growth. There may be synergy between O. viverrini and the liver microbiome in enhancing immune response-mediated hepatobiliary diseases. PMID:27806126

  3. Effect of smoking on subgingival microflora of patients with periodontitis in Japan

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    Yamada Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking is a risk factor for periodontitis. To clarify the contribution of smoking to periodontitis, it is essential to assess the relationship between smoking and the subgingival microflora. The aim of this study was to gain an insight into the influence of smoking on the microflora of Japanese patients with periodontitis. Methods Sixty-seven Japanese patients with chronic periodontitis (19 to 83 years old, 23 women and 44 men were enrolled in the present study. They consisted of 30 smokers and 37 non-smokers. Periodontal parameters including probing pocket depth (PPD and bleeding on probing (BOP and oral hygiene status were recorded. Detection of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum, Treponema denticola and Campylobacter rectus in subgingival plaque samples was performed by polymerase chain reaction. Association between the detection of periodontopathic bacteria and smoking status was analyzed by multiple logistic regression analysis and chi-square test. Results A statistically significant association was found between having a PPD ≥ 4 mm and detection of T. denticola, P. intermedia, T. forsythia, or C. rectus, with odds ratios ranging from 2.17 to 3.54. A significant association was noted between BOP and the detection of C. rectus or P. intermedia, and smoking, with odds ratios ranging from 1.99 to 5.62. Prevalence of C. rectus was higher in smokers than non-smokers, whereas that of A. actinomycetemcomitans was lower in smokers. Conclusions Within limits, the analysis of the subgingival microbial flora in smokers and non-smokers with chronic periodontitis suggests a relevant association between smoking and colonization by the specific periodontal pathogens including C. rectus.

  4. Detection and measurement of oral malodour in periodontitis patients

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    John Mathew

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND &OBJECTIVES : Malodour has been correlated with the concentration of volatile sulphur compounds produced in the oral cavity by metabolic activity of bacteria colonizing the periodontal sites and the dorsum of the tongue. The aim of this study was to detect malodour in mouth air organoleptically and using a portable sulphide monitor and to correlate it with the clinical parameters, halitosis linked toxins and BANA, using tongue and subgingival plaque samples. The halitosis grading is also correlated with the microbial colonies of the subgingival plaque sample. METHODS : 20 patients with chronic periodontitis with 5-7 mm pocket depth, radiographic evidence of bone loss and presence of oral malodour participated in this study. Assessment of mouth air was done organoleptically and by using a portable sulphide monitor. The clinical parameter, plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, gingival bleeding index (BI, were obtained from all the areas. Samples for BANA and to detect halitosis linked toxins were taken from the dorsal surface of the tongue and periodontal pockets ranging 5-7 mm. Halitosis related microbial colonies were identified using anaerobic culturing from the subgingival plaque. RESULTS : The scores of PI, GI, BI and sample that tested positive for halitosis linked toxins and with the halitosis grading were not significant. The presence of tongue coating and the halitosis grading and toxin levels were significant. BANA has shown to be non contributory due to technical problems. Anaerobic culture has shown to identify Streptococcus, Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas and Prevotella colonies. INTERPRETATION &CONCLUSION : The results confirmed that there was no correlation between the clinical parameters, halitosis linked toxins and halitosis grading. The microbial colonies have shown to correlate with the presence of oral malodour.

  5. Microbial diversity of genital ulcer disease in men enrolled in a randomized trial of male circumcision in Kisumu, Kenya.

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    Supriya D Mehta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medical male circumcision (MMC reduces the risk of genital ulcer disease (GUD in men by 50%. In Ugandan and Kenyan trials, a sexually transmissible agent was not identified in 50-60% of GUD specimens by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. We sought to better define the etiology of GUD in men participating in the Kenyan trial and examine how MMC affects GUD etiology. METHODS: We defined GUD of unknown etiology as negative for HSV (type 1 and type 2, T. pallidum, and H. ducreyi by PCR, and negative for HSV-2 and T. pallidum by serology. We identified bacterial microbiota in a subset of 59 GUD specimens using multitag pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and compared results by unknown vs. STI-associated etiology. Statistical analysis employed Bray-Curtis similarity measure of bacterial community by etiology, hierarchical clustering and logistic regression. RESULTS: In 59 GUD specimens from 59 men, 23 (39% had unknown etiology. Bacterial diversity was greater in GUD of unknown than STI etiology (p = 0.01. Fusobacteria (Fusobacterium spp. and Sneathia spp. were more commonly detected in men with GUD of unknown etiology [adjusted OR = 5.67; 95% CI: 1.63-19.8] as were Oxobacter spp. and Anaerovorax spp. [adjusted OR = 3.12; 95% CI: 0.83-11.7]. Sequences from these four anaerobic bacterial taxa were more often detected in uncircumcised men than circumcised men (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Anaerobic bacteria are more common in genital ulcers of uncircumcised men. The specific anaerobic bacteria associated with GUD of unknown etiology have cytotoxic properties that can exacerbate epithelial disruptions leading to ulcer-like appearance. MMC may reduce GUD through a reduction in these anaerobic bacteria.

  6. Transcriptional responses of Treponema denticola to other oral bacterial species.

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    Sarkar, Juni; McHardy, Ian H; Simanian, Emil J; Shi, Wenyuan; Lux, Renate

    2014-01-01

    The classic organization by Socransky and coworkers categorized the oral bacteria of the subgingival plaque into different complexes. Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are grouped into the red complex that is highly correlated with periodontal disease. Socransky's work closely associates red with orange complex species such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Prevotella intermedia but not with members of the other complexes. While the relationship between species contained by these complexes is in part supported by their ability to physically attach to each other, the physiological consequences of these interactions and associations are less clear. In this study, we employed T. denticola as a model organism to analyze contact-dependent responses to interactions with species belonging to the same complex (P. gingivalis and T. forsythia), the closely associated orange complex (using F. nucleatum and P. intermedia as representatives) and the unconnected yellow complex (using Streptococcus sanguinis and S. gordonii as representatives). RNA was extracted from T. denticola alone as well as after pairwise co-incubation for 5 hrs with representatives of the different complexes, and the respective gene expression profiles were determined using microarrays. Numerous genes related to motility, metabolism, transport, outer membrane and hypothetical proteins were differentially regulated in T. denticola in the presence of the tested partner species. Further analysis revealed a significant overlap in the affected genes and we identified a general response to the presence of other species, those specific to two of the three complexes as well as individual complexes. Most interestingly, many predicted major antigens (e.g. flagella, Msp, CTLP) were suppressed in responses that included red complex species indicating that the presence of the most closely associated species induces immune-evasive strategies. In summary, the data presented here provide

  7. In vitro method for prediction of plaque reduction by dentifrice.

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    Tepper, Bruce; Howard, Brian; Schnell, Daniel; Mills, Lisa; Xu, Jian

    2015-11-01

    An in vitro Particle Based Biofilm (PBB) model was developed to enable high throughput screening tests to predict clinical plaque reduction. Multi-species oral biofilms were cultured from pooled stimulated human saliva on continuously-colliding hydroxyapatite particles. After three days PBBs were saline washed prior to use in screening tests. Testing involved dosing PBBs for 1min followed by neutralization of test materials and rinsing. PBBs were then assayed for intact biofilm activity measured as ATP. The ranking of commercial dentifrices from most to least reduction of intact biofilm activity was Crest ProHealth Clinical Gum Protection, Crest ProHealth, Colgate Total and Crest Cavity Protection. We demonstrated five advantages of the PBB model: 1) the ATP metric had a linear response over ≥1000-fold dynamic range, 2) potential interference with the ATP assay by treatments was easily eliminated by rinsing PBBs with saline, 3) discriminating power was statistically excellent between all treatment comparisons with the negative controls, 4) screening test results were reproducible across four tests, and 5) the screening test produced the same rank order for dentifrices as clinical studies that measured plaque reduction. In addition, 454 pyrosequencing of the PBBs indicated an oral microbial consortium was present. The most prevalent genera were Neisseria, Rothia, Streptococcus, Porphyromonas, Prevotella, Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, Veillonella and Haemophilus. We conclude these in vitro methods offer an efficient, effective and relevant screening tool for reduction of intact biofilm activity by dentifrices. Moreover, dentifrice rankings by the in vitro test method are expected to predict clinical results for plaque reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. D-Galactose as an autoinducer 2 inhibitor to control the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Eun-Ju; Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Lee, Julian; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is a quorum sensing molecule to which bacteria respond to regulate various phenotypes, including virulence and biofilm formation. AI-2 plays an important role in the formation of a subgingival biofilm composed mostly of Gram-negative anaerobes, by which periodontitis is initiated. The aim of this study was to evaluate D-galactose as an inhibitor of AI-2 activity and thus of the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens. In a search for an AI-2 receptor of Fusobacterium nucleatum, D-galactose binding protein (Gbp, Gene ID FN1165) showed high sequence similarity with the ribose binding protein (RbsB), a known AI-2 receptor of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. D-Galactose was evaluated for its inhibitory effect on the AI-2 activity of Vibrio harveyi BB152 and F. nucleatum, the major coaggregation bridge organism, which connects early colonizing commensals and late pathogenic colonizers in dental biofilms. The inhibitory effect of D-galactose on the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens was assessed by crystal violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy in the absence or presence of AI-2 and secreted molecules of F. nucleatum. D-Galactose significantly inhibited the AI-2 activity of V. harveyi and F. nucleatum. In addition, D-galactose markedly inhibited the biofilm formation of F. nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Tannerella forsythia induced by the AI-2 of F. nucleatum without affecting bacterial growth. Our results demonstrate that the Gbp may function as an AI-2 receptor and that galactose may be used for prevention of the biofilm formation of periodontopathogens by targeting AI-2 activity.

  9. Salivary microbiomes of indigenous Tsimane mothers and infants are distinct despite frequent premastication

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    Dichosa, Armand E.K.; Daughton, Ashlynn R.; Frietze, Seth; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Premastication, the transfer of pre-chewed food, is a common infant and young child feeding practice among the Tsimane, forager-horticulturalists living in the Bolivian Amazon. Research conducted primarily with Western populations has shown that infants harbor distinct oral microbiota from their mothers. Premastication, which is less common in these populations, may influence the colonization and maturation of infant oral microbiota, including via transmission of oral pathogens. We collected premasticated food and saliva samples from Tsimane mothers and infants (9–24 months of age) to test for evidence of bacterial transmission in premasticated foods and overlap in maternal and infant salivary microbiota. We extracted bacterial DNA from two premasticated food samples and 12 matched salivary samples from maternal-infant pairs. DNA sequencing was performed with MiSeq (Illumina). We evaluated maternal and infant microbial composition in terms of relative abundance of specific taxa, alpha and beta diversity, and dissimilarity distances. Results The bacteria in saliva and premasticated food were mapped to 19 phyla and 400 genera and were dominated by Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. The oral microbial communities of Tsimane mothers and infants who frequently share premasticated food were well-separated in a non-metric multi-dimensional scaling ordination (NMDS) plot. Infant microbiotas clustered together, with weighted Unifrac distances significantly differing between mothers and infants. Infant saliva contained more Firmicutes (p saliva. Many genera previously associated with dental and periodontal infections, e.g. Neisseria, Gemella, Rothia, Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, and Leptotrichia, were more abundant in mothers than in infants. Conclusions Salivary microbiota of Tsimane infants and young children up to two years of age do not appear closely related to those of their mothers, despite frequent premastication and

  10. Synergistic Antibacterial Effects of Nanoparticles Encapsulated with Scutellaria baicalensis and Pure Chlorhexidine on Oral Bacterial Biofilms

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    Ken Cham-Fai Leung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Scutellaria baicalensis (SB is a traditional Chinese medicine for treating infectious and inflammatory diseases. Our recent study shows potent antibacterial effects of nanoparticle-encapsulated chlorhexidine (Nano-CHX. Herein, we explored the synergistic effects of the nanoparticle-encapsulated SB (Nano-SB and Nano-CHX on oral bacterial biofilms. Loading efficiency of Nano-SB was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, and its releasing profile was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatographyusing baicalin (a flavonoid compound of SB as the marker. The mucosal diffusion assay on Nano-SB was undertaken in a porcine model. The antibacterial effects of the mixed nanoparticles (Nano-MIX of Nano-SB and Nano-CHX at 9:1 (w/w ratio were analyzed in both planktonic and biofilm modes of representative oral bacteria. The Nano-MIX was effective on the mono-species biofilms of Streptococcus (S. mutans, S. sobrinus, Fusobacterium (F. nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter (A. actinomycetemcomitans (MIC 50 μg/mL at 24 h, and exhibited an enhanced effect against the multi-species biofilms such as S. mutans, F. nucleatum, A. actinomycetemcomitans, and Porphyromonas (P. gingivalis (MIC 12.5 μg/mL at 24 h that was supported by the findings of both scanning electron microscopy (SEM and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CLSM. This study shows enhanced synergistic antibacterial effects of the Nano-MIX on common oral bacterial biofilms, which could be potentially developed as a novel antimicrobial agent for clinical oral/periodontal care.

  11. The same microbiota and a potentially discriminant metabolome in the saliva of omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and Vegan individuals.

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    Francesca De Filippis

    Full Text Available The salivary microbiota has been linked to both oral and non-oral diseases. Scant knowledge is available on the effect of environmental factors such as long-term dietary choices on the salivary microbiota and metabolome. This study analyzed the microbial diversity and metabolomic profiles of the saliva of 161 healthy individuals who followed an omnivore or ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet. A large core microbiota was identified, including 12 bacterial genera, found in >98% of the individuals. The subjects could be stratified into three "salivary types" that differed on the basis of the relative abundance of the core genera Prevotella, Streptococcus/Gemella and Fusobacterium/Neisseria. Statistical analysis indicated no effect of dietary habit on the salivary microbiota. Phylogenetic beta-diversity analysis consistently showed no differences between omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan individuals. Metabolomic profiling of saliva using (1H-NMR and GC-MS/SPME identified diet-related biomarkers that enabled a significant discrimination between the 3 groups of individuals on the basis of their diet. Formate, urea, uridine and 5-methyl-3-hexanone could discriminate samples from omnivores, whereas 1-propanol, hexanoic acid and proline were characteristic of non-omnivore diets. Although the salivary metabolome can be discriminating for diet, the microbiota has a remarkable inter-individual stability and did not vary with dietary habits. Microbial homeostasis might be perturbed with sub-standard oral hygiene or other environmental factors, but there is no current indication that a choice of an omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian or vegan diet can lead to a specific composition of the oral microbiota with consequences on the oral homeostasis.

  12. Microbial colonization at the implant-abutment interface and its possible influence on periimplantitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Tallarico, Marco; Canullo, Luigi; Caneva, Martina; Özcan, Mutlu

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the microbial colonization at the implant-abutment interfaces (IAI) on bone-level implants and to identify possible association with peri-implant conditions. The focus question aimed to answer whether two-piece osseointegrated implants, in function for at least 1 year, in human, relate to higher bacterial count and the onset of periimplantitis, compared to healthy peri-implant conditions. Search strategy encompassed the on-line (MedLine, Google scholar, Cochrane library) literature from 1990 up to March 2015 published in English using combinations of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and search terms. Quality assessment of selected full-text articles was performed according to the ARRIVE and CONSORT statement guidelines. For data analysis, the total bacterial count of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Prevotella intermedia, and Fusobacterium nucleatum was calculated and compared to IAI with or without peri-implant pathology. A total of 14 articles, reporting data from 1126 implants, fulfilled the inclusion criteria and subjected to quality assessment. The selected studies revealed contamination of the IAI, in patients who received two-piece implant systems. Meta-analysis indicated significant difference in total bacterial count between implants affected by periimplantitis versus healthy peri-implant tissues (0.387±0.055; 95% CI 0.279-0.496). Less bacterial counts were identified in the healthy IAI for all the investigated gram-negative bacteria except for T. forsythia. Significantly higher bacterial counts were found for periodontal pathogenic bacteria within the IAI of implants in patients with periimplantitis compared to those implants surrounded by healthy peri-implant tissues. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of the lung microbiome in the "healthy" smoker and in COPD.

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    John R Erb-Downward

    Full Text Available Although culture-independent techniques have shown that the lungs are not sterile, little is known about the lung microbiome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. We used pyrosequencing of 16S amplicons to analyze the lung microbiome in two ways: first, using bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL to sample the distal bronchi and air-spaces; and second, by examining multiple discrete tissue sites in the lungs of six subjects removed at the time of transplantation. We performed BAL on three never-smokers (NS with normal spirometry, seven smokers with normal spirometry ("healthy smokers", HS, and four subjects with COPD (CS. Bacterial 16 s sequences were found in all subjects, without significant quantitative differences between groups. Both taxonomy-based and taxonomy-independent approaches disclosed heterogeneity in the bacterial communities between HS subjects that was similar to that seen in healthy NS and two mild COPD patients. The moderate and severe COPD patients had very limited community diversity, which was also noted in 28% of the healthy subjects. Both approaches revealed extensive membership overlap between the bacterial communities of the three study groups. No genera were common within a group but unique across groups. Our data suggests the existence of a core pulmonary bacterial microbiome that includes Pseudomonas, Streptococcus, Prevotella, Fusobacterium, Haemophilus, Veillonella, and Porphyromonas. Most strikingly, there were significant micro-anatomic differences in bacterial communities within the same lung of subjects with advanced COPD. These studies are further demonstration of the pulmonary microbiome and highlight global and micro-anatomic changes in these bacterial communities in severe COPD patients.

  14. Antimicrobial effect of acidified nitrate and nitrite on six common oral pathogens in vitro

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    XIA Deng-sheng; LIU Yin; ZHANG Chun-mei; YANG Sheng-hui; WANG Song-lin

    2006-01-01

    Background Salivary nitrate is positively correlated with plasma nitrate and its level is 9 times the plasma level after nitrate loading. Nitrate in saliva is known to be reduced to nitrite by oral bacteria. Nitrate and nitrite levels in saliva are 3-5 times those in serum in physiological conditions respectively in our previous study. The biological functions of high salivary nitrate and nitrite are still not well understood. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of nitrate and nitrite on main oral pathogens under acidic conditions.Methods Six common oral pathogens including Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4646, Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277, Capnocytophaga gingivalis ATCC 33624, Fusobacterium nucleatum ATCC 10953, and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were cultured in liquid medium. Sodium nitrate or sodium nitrite was added to the medium to final concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 10 mmol/L. All of the microorganisms were incubated for 24 to 48 hours. The optical densities (OD) of cell suspensions were determined and the cultures were transferred to solid nutrient broth medium to observe the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration for the six tested pathogens.Results Nitrite at concentrations of 0.5 to 10 mmol/L had an inhibitory effect on all tested organisms at low pH values. The antimicrobial effect of nitrite increased with the acidity of the medium. Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 was highly sensitive to nitrite at low pH values. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4646 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were relatively resistant to acidified nitrite. Nitrate at the given concentrations and under acidic conditions had no inhibitory effect on the growth of any of the tested pathogens.Conclusion Nitrite, at a concentration equal to that in human saliva, is both cytocidal and cytostatic to six principal oral pathogens in vitro, whereas nitrate at a similar

  15. Comparison of the Microflex LT and Vitek MS systems for routine identification of bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

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    Martiny, Delphine; Busson, Laurent; Wybo, Ingrid; El Haj, Rachid Ait; Dediste, Anne; Vandenberg, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    This study compared the performance of three matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry systems: Microflex LT (Bruker Daltonics, Bremen, Germany), Vitek MS RUO (Axima Assurance-Saramis database; bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France), and Vitek MS IVD (bioMérieux). A total of 1,129 isolates, including 1,003 routine isolates, 73 anaerobes, and 53 bacterial enteropathogens, were tested on the Microflex LT and Axima Assurance devices. The spectra were analyzed using three databases: Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics), Saramis, and Vitek MS (bioMérieux). Among the routine isolates requiring identification to the species level (n = 986), 92.7% and 93.2% were correctly identified by the Biotyper and Vitek MS databases, respectively. The Vitek MS database is more specific for the identification of Streptococcus viridans. For the anaerobes, the Biotyper database often identified Fusobacterium isolates to only the genus level, which is of low clinical significance, whereas 20% of the Bacteroides species were not identified or were misidentified by the Vitek MS database. For the enteropathogens, the poor discrimination between Escherichia coli and Shigella explains the high proportion of unidentified organisms. In contrast to the Biotyper database, the Vitek MS database properly discriminated all of the Salmonella entrica serovar Typhi isolates (n = 5). The performance of the Saramis database was globally poorer. In conclusion, for routine procedures, the Microflex LT and Vitek-MS systems are equally good choices in terms of analytical efficiency. Other factors, including price, work flow, and lab activity, will affect the choice of a system.

  16. An investigation of the presence of specific anaerobic species in necrotic primary teeth

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    Genara Brum Gomes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Different microbial identification methods have shown that the microbial community profiles in endodontic infections are diverse and assorted. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of selected endodontic pathogens in the pulp chambers (PCs and root canals (RCs of infected primary teeth using PCR methods. Paired PC and RC samples were collected from 15 subjects and analyzed by PCR for the presence of Filifactor alocis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Prevotella nigrescens, Prevotella tannerae, Tanerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Treponema socranskii. The frequency of each species was determined in the PC and RC of each case. The species most frequently detected in PCs were P. nigrescens (86.7%, P. gingivalis (73.3%, and F. alocis (73.3%. Of the PC samples, 13.3% contained P. micra and T. denticola, and 6.7% contained T. forsythia. The species most frequently detected in RCs were P. gingivalis (100% and P. nigrescens (93.3%. P. tannerae, P. micra, and T. denticola were found in 40% of the RC samples; T. forsythia was found in 26.7% of the RC samples. The “red complex”, which comprises P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia, was not found in the PC of any tooth but was found in 30% of the RC samples. The detection of P. nigrescens in the PC was statistically associated with the presence of P. nigrescens in the RC (p = 0.04. The results suggest high heterogeneity among the samples, even among those from the same subject.

  17. Biofilm formation on titanium alloy and anatase-Bactercline® coated titanium healing screws: an in vivo human study

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    Antonio Scarano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Bacterial adherence to implants is considered to be an important event in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In fact, this infection process is a first stage of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, and a positive correlation has been found between oral hygiene and marginal bone loss around implants in the edentulous mandible. Surface properties of transgingival implant components are important determinants in bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biofilm formation, in vivo, on healing screws made of titanium alloy or coated with a combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and methods Twenty-five patients, between 21- 37 years, in excellent systemic health, participated in this study. In each of the 25 participants, one anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screw (Test and one titanium alloy (TI6Al4V healing screw (Control were adapted to two different implants. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm formation on healing abutments was analyzed by culture method.Results Bacterial adherence to the two different healing screws used in this study were compared. Statistically significant differences were found between the Control and the Test group for both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (p<0,05. The microflora consisted both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and displayed a high variability. The anaerobic S. intermedius, potentially “pathogenic”, was isolated only from the Control group. Both healing screws harbored primarily Gram-positive rods as Actinomyces spp, A. naeslundii, A. viscosus and the Gram-negative rods (Fusobacterium spp, Prevotella spp, Capnocythophaga spp were mostly found on the Control healing screws.Conclusion Anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screws reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria, formed mainly of Gram-positive microorgnisms, while, on the contrary, the microflora covering the titanium alloy healing screws was, for the

  18. Plaque bacterial microbiome diversity in children younger than 30 months with or without caries prior to eruption of second primary molars.

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    Xu, He; Hao, Wenjing; Zhou, Qiong; Wang, Wenhong; Xia, Zhongkui; Liu, Chuan; Chen, Xiaochi; Qin, Man; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Our primary objective is to phylogenetically characterize the supragingival plaque bacterial microbiome of children prior to eruption of second primary molars by pyrosequencing method for studying etiology of early childhood caries. Supragingival plaque samples were collected from 10 caries children and 9 caries-free children. Plaque DNA was extracted, used to generate DNA amplicons of the V1-V3 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene, and subjected to 454-pyrosequencing. On average, over 22,000 sequences per sample were generated. High bacterial diversity was noted in the plaque of children with caries [170 operational taxonomical units (OTU) at 3% divergence] and caries-free children (201 OTU at 3% divergence) with no significant difference. A total of 8 phyla, 15 classes, 21 orders, 30 families, 41 genera and 99 species were represented. In addition, five predominant phyla (Firmicute, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria) and seven genera (Leptotrichia, Streptococcus, Actinomyces, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Neisseria, and Veillonella) constituted a majority of contents of the total microbiota, independent of the presence or absence of caries. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) presented that caries-related genera included Streptococcus and Veillonella; while Leptotrichia, Selenomonas, Fusobacterium, Capnocytophaga and Porphyromonas were more related to the caries-free samples. Neisseria and Prevotella presented approximately in between. In both groups, the degree of shared organism lineages (as defined by species-level OTUs) among individual supragingival plaque microbiomes was minimal. Our study represented for the first time using pyrosequencing to elucidate and monitor supragingival plaque bacterial diversity at such young age with second primary molar unerrupted. Distinctions were revealed between caries and caries-free microbiomes in terms of microbial community structure. We observed differences in abundance for

  19. HIV Infection and Microbial Diversity in Saliva

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    Saxena, Deepak; Chen, Zhou; Liu, Gaoxia; Abrams, Willam R.; Phelan, Joan A.; Norman, Robert G.; Fisch, Gene S.; Corby, Patricia M.; Dewhirst, Floyd; Paster, Bruce J.; Kokaras, Alexis S.; Malamud, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Limited information is available about the effects of HIV and subsequent antiretroviral treatment on host-microbe interactions. This study aimed to determine the salivary microbial composition for 10 HIV-seropositive subjects, before and 6 months after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), compared with that for 10 HIV-seronegative subjects. A conventional culture and two culture-independent analyses were used and consistently demonstrated differences in microbial composition among the three sets of samples. HIV-positive subjects had higher levels of total cultivable microbes, including oral streptococci, lactobacilli, Streptococcus mutans, and Candida, in saliva than did HIV-negative subjects. The total cultivable microbial levels were significantly correlated with CD4+ T cell counts. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), which compared the overall microbial profiles, showed distinct fingerprinting profiles for each group. The human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) assay, which compared the 16S rRNA genes, showed clear separation among the three sample groups. Veillonella, Synergistetes, and Streptococcus were present in all 30 saliva samples. Only minor changes or no changes in the prevalence of Neisseria, Haemophilus, Gemella, Leptotrichia, Solobacterium, Parvimonas, and Rothia were observed. Seven genera, Capnocytophaga, Slackia, Porphyromonas, Kingella, Peptostreptococcaceae, Lactobacillus, and Atopobium, were detected only in HIV-negative samples. The prevalences of Fusobacterium, Campylobacter, Prevotella, Capnocytophaga, Selenomonas, Actinomyces, Granulicatella, and Atopobium were increased after HAART. In contrast, the prevalence of Aggregatibacter was significantly decreased after HAART. The findings of this study suggest that HIV infection and HAART can have significant effects on salivary microbial colonization and composition. PMID:24523469

  20. Proteomics of Porphyromonas gingivalis within a model oral microbial community

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    Wang Tiansong

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen that resides in a complex multispecies microbial biofilm community known as dental plaque. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that P. gingivalis can assemble into communities in vitro with Streptococcus gordonii and Fusobacterium nucleatum, common constituents of dental plaque. Whole cell quantitative proteomics, along with mutant construction and analysis, were conducted to investigate how P. gingivalis adapts to this three species community. Results 1156 P. gingivalis proteins were detected qualitatively during comparison of the three species model community with P. gingivalis incubated alone under the same conditions. Integration of spectral counting and summed signal intensity analyses of the dataset showed that 403 proteins were down-regulated and 89 proteins up-regulated. The proteomics results were inspected manually and an ontology analysis conducted using DAVID. Significant decreases were seen in proteins involved in cell shape and the formation of the cell envelope, as well as thiamine, cobalamin, and pyrimidine synthesis and DNA repair. An overall increase was seen in proteins involved in protein synthesis. HmuR, a TonB dependent outer membrane receptor, was up-regulated in the community and an hmuR deficient mutant was deficient in three species community formation, but was unimpaired in its ability to form mono- or dual-species biofilms. Conclusion Collectively, these results indicate that P. gingivalis can assemble into a heterotypic community with F. nucleatum and S. gordonii, and that a community lifestyle provides physiologic support for P. gingivalis. Proteins such as HmuR, that are up-regulated, can be necessary for community structure.

  1. Microbial diversity in failed endodontic root-filled teeth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chen; HOU Ben-xiang; ZHAO Huan-ying; SUN Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Persistent/secondary infections of human root canals play an important role in the failure of endodontic treatment.This study used 16S rRNA sequencing to assess microbial diversity in root-filled teeth associated with failed endodontic treatment.Methods DNA was extracted from 15 teeth with persistent intraradicular infections,and the 16S rRNA of all present bacteria were amplified by PCR,followed by cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA amplicons.Results All sample extracts were positive for PCR amplification using the universal 16S rRNA gene primers.Negative control reactions yielded no amplicons.Sixty-five phylotypes belonging to seven phyla were identified from 760 clones; a mean of 9.4 phylotypes were detected in each sample (range 3-15).Twenty-eight phylotypes were detected in more than one sample,revealing a high inter-sample variability.Parvimonas micra (60%,9/15),Solobacterium moore (47%,7/15),Dialister invisus (33%,5/15),Enterococcus faecalis (33%,5/15),Filifactor alocis (27%,4/15),and Fusobacterium nucleatum (27%,4/15) were the prevalent species.Nineteen as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes were identified,comprising a substantial proportion of the bacteria in many cases.Conclusions Persistent intraradicular infections were present in all root-filled teeth associated with failed endodontic treatment.The current observations reveal new candidate endodontic pathogens,including as-yet-uncultivated bacteria and phylotypes that may participate in the mixed infections associated with post-treatment apical periodontitis.

  2. Pulp microbiology of complete teeth with idiopathic apical lesions.

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    Patricia Rodríguez

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periapical changes named as lesions, in teeth with full crown integrity and without history of trauma, do not show a clear aetiology. Objective: To determine the presence of microorganisms in pulp dental tissue will clarify the cause of its death and therefore the damage to periodontal tissues. Materials and methods: From people between 10 and 39 years old, 23 teeth were selected. The samples were taken with paper points and 0.8 sterile files, and were transported in VMGA III medium, to be processed in the following 24 hours after they were taken and sowed in Brucella-agar. Results: The most affected teeth were upper central incisors, 43.8%. From the 23 studied teeth, microbiological grow was seen on 20 teeth. The following microorganisms species were identified: Fusobacterium spp., 25%, Eubacterium spp., 15%; Peptostreptococcus spp., 10%; Campylobacter spp., 10%; gram negative enteric bacteria, 10%; Porphyromonas gingivalis, 10%; Prevotella intermedia, 5%; Eikenellia corrodens, 5%; Dialister pneumosintes, 5%; and yeasts, 5%. There was no growing evidence of Actinomyces actinomycetemcomitans, Tanerella forsythensis and Streptococcus β  hemolytic. Discussion and conclusions: Sound pulp dental tissue is sterile; an injury over it will cause its inflammation, degeneration, death and bacterial contamination. Results in the present study clearly show the presence of microorganisms in closed apical dental lesions of endodontic origin. In same manner, it was seen that a great part of microorganisms species found can be regarded as periodontal pathogens. This could suggest a management with an endodontic, a periodontic and a pharmacological combined treatment.

  3. Oral bacterial DNA findings in pericardial fluid

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    Anne-Mari Louhelainen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We recently reported that large amounts of oral bacterial DNA can be found in thrombus aspirates of myocardial infarction patients. Some case reports describe bacterial findings in pericardial fluid, mostly done with conventional culturing and a few with PCR; in purulent pericarditis, nevertheless, bacterial PCR has not been used as a diagnostic method before. Objective: To find out whether bacterial DNA can be measured in the pericardial fluid and if it correlates with pathologic–anatomic findings linked to cardiovascular diseases. Methods: Twenty-two pericardial aspirates were collected aseptically prior to forensic autopsy at Tampere University Hospital during 2009–2010. Of the autopsies, 10 (45.5% were free of coronary artery disease (CAD, 7 (31.8% had mild and 5 (22.7% had severe CAD. Bacterial DNA amounts were determined using real-time quantitative PCR with specific primers and probes for all bacterial strains associated with endodontic disease (Streptococcus mitis group, Streptococcus anginosus group, Staphylococcus aureus/Staphylococcus epidermidis, Prevotella intermedia, Parvimonas micra and periodontal disease (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Fusobacterium nucleatus, and Dialister pneumosintes. Results: Of 22 cases, 14 (63.6% were positive for endodontic and 8 (36.4% for periodontal-disease-associated bacteria. Only one case was positive for bacterial culturing. There was a statistically significant association between the relative amount of bacterial DNA in the pericardial fluid and the severity of CAD (p=0.035. Conclusions: Oral bacterial DNA was detectable in pericardial fluid and an association between the severity of CAD and the total amount of bacterial DNA in pericardial fluid was found, suggesting that this kind of measurement might be useful for clinical purposes.

  4. A new type of Na(+-driven ATP synthase membrane rotor with a two-carboxylate ion-coupling motif.

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    Sarah Schulz

    Full Text Available The anaerobic bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum uses glutamate decarboxylation to generate a transmembrane gradient of Na⁺. Here, we demonstrate that this ion-motive force is directly coupled to ATP synthesis, via an F₁F₀-ATP synthase with a novel Na⁺ recognition motif, shared by other human pathogens. Molecular modeling and free-energy simulations of the rotary element of the enzyme, the c-ring, indicate Na⁺ specificity in physiological settings. Consistently, activity measurements showed Na⁺ stimulation of the enzyme, either membrane-embedded or isolated, and ATP synthesis was sensitive to the Na⁺ ionophore monensin. Furthermore, Na⁺ has a protective effect against inhibitors targeting the ion-binding sites, both in the complete ATP synthase and the isolated c-ring. Definitive evidence of Na⁺ coupling is provided by two identical crystal structures of the c₁₁ ring, solved by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 and 2.6 Å resolution, at pH 5.3 and 8.7, respectively. Na⁺ ions occupy all binding sites, each coordinated by four amino acids and a water molecule. Intriguingly, two carboxylates instead of one mediate ion binding. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that this motif implies that a proton is concurrently bound to all sites, although Na⁺ alone drives the rotary mechanism. The structure thus reveals a new mode of ion coupling in ATP synthases and provides a basis for drug-design efforts against this opportunistic pathogen.

  5. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

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    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP) scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new therapeutic approaches

  6. The bovine colostrum microbiome and its association with clinical mastitis.

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    Lima, Svetlana F; Teixeira, Andre G V; Lima, Fabio S; Ganda, Erika K; Higgins, Catherine H; Oikonomou, Georgios; Bicalho, Rodrigo C

    2017-04-01

    In an effort to characterize colostrum microbial diversity and its potential associations with early-lactation clinical mastitis, we used high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene to investigate the bovine colostrum microbiome. A prospective observational study was conducted that included 70 Holstein cows; colostrum samples were collected from all 4 mammary gland quarters. Colostrum samples were categorized according to whether the quarter was diagnosed (CMC) or not diagnosed (NCMC) with clinical mastitis during the first 30 d postpartum. Colostrum samples were dominated by Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Fusobacteria, and Tenericutes phyla, with the 6 most common taxa [order (o), family (f), and genus (g)] being g_Staphylococcus, g_Prevotella, f_Ruminococcaceae, o_Bacteroidales, o_Clostridiales, and g_Pseudomonas. The colostrum microbiota of primiparous cows was significantly richer (higher number of bacterial species) than that of multiparous cows, and differences in colostrum taxonomic structure between parities were also observed. The microbial community of NCMC samples of primiparous cows was significantly more diverse than that of CMC samples, and the relative abundances of the Tenericutes and Fusobacteria phyla as well as the Mycoplasma and Fusobacterium genera were significantly higher in NCMC than in CMC samples of primiparous cows. The colostrum core microbiome, defined as the bacterial taxa common to all colostrum samples examined, was composed of 20 taxa and included bacterial genera already known to be associated with mastitis (e.g., Staphylococcus, Mycoplasma, and Streptococcus spp.). Our results indicate that the colostrum microbiome of primiparous cows differs from that of multiparous cows, and it harbors some diversity and taxonomic markers of mammary gland health specific to primiparous cows only. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Traditional Medicinal Plant Extracts and Natural Products with Activity against Oral Bacteria: Potential Application in the Prevention and Treatment of Oral Diseases

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    Enzo A. Palombo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are major health problems with dental caries and periodontal diseases among the most important preventable global infectious diseases. Oral health influences the general quality of life and poor oral health is linked to chronic conditions and systemic diseases. The association between oral diseases and the oral microbiota is well established. Of the more than 750 species of bacteria that inhabit the oral cavity, a number are implicated in oral diseases. The development of dental caries involves acidogenic and aciduric Gram-positive bacteria (mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and actinomycetes. Periodontal diseases have been linked to anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinobacillus, Prevotella and Fusobacterium. Given the incidence of oral disease, increased resistance by bacteria to antibiotics, adverse affects of some antibacterial agents currently used in dentistry and financial considerations in developing countries, there is a need for alternative prevention and treatment options that are safe, effective and economical. While several agents are commercially available, these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicines are considered as good alternatives. In this review, plant extracts or phytochemicals that inhibit the growth of oral pathogens, reduce the development of biofilms and dental plaque, influence the adhesion of bacteria to surfaces and reduce the symptoms of oral diseases will be discussed further. Clinical studies that have investigated the safety and efficacy of such plant-derived medicines will also be described.

  8. Clinical periodontal and microbiologic parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebolz, Dirk; Pabel, Sven O; Lange, Katharina; Krohn-Grimberghe, Berndt; Hornecker, Else; Mausberg, Rainer F

    2011-10-01

    A limited number of studies suggest a prevalence of periodontal pathogens in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, results are inconsistent. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical periodontal and microbiologic parameters in patients with RA. Sixty-six patients with RA, aged 49.5 ± 8.4 years, participated in the study. The periodontal classification was assessed with the periodontal screening index (PSR/PSI) allocated to the following parameters: 1) healthy; 2) gingivitis (PSR/PSI score 0 to 2, maximum one sextant score; 3) moderate periodontitis (>1 sextant PSR/PSI score 3, maximum one sextant score; or, 4) severe periodontitis (>1 sextant PSR/PSI score 4). Pool samples were taken for microbiologic (polymerase chain reaction) analysis for the presence of 11 periodontal pathogens. Statistical analysis was by non-parametric analysis of covariance. No patients were periodontally healthy: 24 patients were classified as having gingivitis; 18 patients had moderate periodontitis; 23 patients had severe periodontitis; and one patient was toothless. For most patients, Fusobacterium nucleatum (98%), Eikenella corrodens (91%), and Parvimonas micra (previously Peptostreptococcus micros; 88%) were above the detection threshold. Strong periodontal pathogens were less frequently detected: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, 16%); Porphyromonas gingivalis (58%); and Tannerella forsythia (previously T. forsythensis, 78%). Statistical analysis showed no significant influence of rheumatic factor (P = 0.33) on periodontal classification and on microbiologic parameters (P >0.05). Only smoking showed a significant influence (P = 0.0004) on the periodontal classification and in the case of E. corrodens (P = 0.02). Most patients with RA in this study showed moderate-to-severe periodontitis and the presence of periodontal pathogens. No association was found between rheumatic factor on periodontal classification and

  9. Cross-Sectional Evaluation of Periodontal Status and Microbiologic and Rheumatoid Parameters in a Large Cohort of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

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    Schmickler, Jan; Rupprecht, Annegret; Patschan, Susann; Patschan, Daniel; Müller, Gerhard A; Haak, Rainer; Mausberg, Rainer F; Schmalz, Gerhard; Kottmann, Tanja; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluates periodontal conditions and microbiologic findings and their influence on rheumatologic disease parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). One hundred and sixty-eight patients with RA were included. A healthy control group (HC, n = 168) was composed according to age, sex, and smoking habits. Rheumatologic data (duration of illness, Disease Activity Score 28, rheumatic factor [RF], anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide [aCCP], medications) were extracted from patients' records. Dental examination included: 1) dental findings (decayed, missing, and/or filled adult teeth [DMF-T] index); 2) gingival inflammation (papillary bleeding index [PBI]); and 3) periodontal status (probing depth [PD], attachment loss [AL]). Periodontal condition was classified as healthy/mild, moderate, or severe periodontitis. Subgingival biofilm was analyzed regarding 11 periodontopathogenic bacteria. Statistical analyses included: 1) Kolmogorov-Smirnov test; 2) Mann-Whitney U test; 3) Pearson χ(2) test; 4) Kruskal-Wallis test; and 5) regression analysis; level of significance α = 5%. Mean DMF-T was significantly higher in patients with RA (19.3 ± 4.8) than in HC group (16.9 ± 5.8), especially owing to number of missing teeth (RA = 6.0 ± 5.4, HC = 3.1 ± 3.3; P periodontitis was noted in 98% of patients with RA and 82% of the HC group (P periodontal conditions than RF-negative patients (P = 0.01). Age, PBI, and presence of Treponema denticola (P periodontal condition in patients with RA. Although not statistically significant, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum occur in higher concentrations more often in aCCP-positive patients with RA (P = 0.06). Patients with RA had worse periodontal conditions than HC participants. Although a trend for higher F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis concentrations in aCCP-positive patients with RA was found, importance of periodontal pathogenic bacteria and rheumatoid parameters in the interrelationship between

  10. Analysis of the intestinal lumen microbiota in an animal model of colorectal cancer.

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    Zhu, Qingchao; Jin, Zhiming; Wu, Wen; Gao, Renyuan; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Zhiguang; Yang, Yongzhi; Qin, Huanlong

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that multiple factors such as host genetics, environment and diet can promote the progression of healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinoma. Accumulating evidence has additionally associated intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. In order to examine and analyze the composition of gut microbiota in the absence of confounding influences, we have established an animal model of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon cancer. Using this model, we have performed pyrosequencing of the V3 region of the 16S rRNA genes in this study to determine the diversity and breadth of the intestinal microbial species. Our findings indicate that the microbial composition of the intestinal lumen differs significantly between control and tumor groups. The abundance of Firmicutes was elevated whereas the abundance of Bacteroidetes and Spirochetes was reduced in the lumen of CRC rats. Fusobacteria was not detected in any of the healthy rats and there was no significant difference in observed Proteobacteria species when comparing the bacterial communities between our two groups. Interestingly, the abundance of Proteobacteria was higher in CRC rats. At the genus level, Bacteroides exhibited a relatively higher abundance in CRC rats compared to controls (14.92% vs. 9.22%, pmicrobiota of CRC rats. Furthermore, a significant increase in Desulfovibrio, Erysipelotrichaceae and Fusobacterium was also observed in the tumor group. A decrease in probiotic species such as Ruminococcus and Lactobacillus was likewise observed in the tumor group. Collectively, we can conclude that a significant difference in intestinal bacterial flora exists between healthy rats and CRC rats.

  11. Extensive Identification of Bacterial Riboflavin Transporters and Their Distribution across Bacterial Species.

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    Ana Gutiérrez-Preciado

    Full Text Available Riboflavin, the precursor for the cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN and flavin adenine dinucleotide, is an essential metabolite in all organisms. While the functions for de novo riboflavin biosynthesis and riboflavin import may coexist in bacteria, the extent of this co-occurrence is undetermined. The RibM, RibN, RfuABCD and the energy-coupling factor-RibU bacterial riboflavin transporters have been experimentally characterized. In addition, ImpX, RfnT and RibXY are proposed as riboflavin transporters based on positional clustering with riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RBP genes or conservation of the FMN riboswitch regulatory element. Here, we searched for the FMN riboswitch in bacterial genomes to identify genes encoding riboflavin transporters and assessed their distribution among bacteria. Two new putative riboflavin transporters were identified: RibZ in Clostridium and RibV in Mesoplasma florum. Trans-complementation of an Escherichia coli riboflavin auxotroph strain confirmed the riboflavin transport activity of RibZ from Clostridium difficile, RibXY from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, ImpX from Fusobacterium nucleatum and RfnT from Ochrobactrum anthropi. The analysis of the genomic distribution of all known bacterial riboflavin transporters revealed that most occur in species possessing the RBP and that some bacteria may even encode functional riboflavin transporters from two different families. Our results indicate that some species possess ancestral riboflavin transporters, while others possess transporters that appear to have evolved recently. Moreover, our data suggest that unidentified riboflavin transporters also exist. The present study doubles the number of experimentally characterized riboflavin transporters and suggests a specific, non-accessory role for these proteins in riboflavin-prototrophic bacteria.

  12. The oral microbiome and adverse pregnancy outcomes

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    Cobb CM

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Charles M Cobb,1 Patricia J Kelly,2 Karen B Williams,3 Shilpa Babbar,4 Mubashir Angolkar,5 Richard J Derman6 1Department of Periodontics, School of Dentistry, 2Department of Public Health Nursing, School of Nursing and Health Studies, 3Department of Biomedical & Health Informatics, School of Medicine, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO, 4Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women’s Health, Division of Maternal & Fetal Medicine, School of Medicine, Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO, USA; 5Department of Public Health, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College (JNMC, KLE University, Karnataka, India; 6Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Significant evidence supports an association between periodontal pathogenic bacteria and preterm birth and preeclampsia. The virulence properties assigned to specific oral pathogenic bacteria, for example, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Filifactor alocis, Campylobacter rectus, and others, render them as potential collaborators in adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Several pathways have been suggested for this association: 1 hematogenous spread (bacteremia of periodontal pathogens; 2 hematogenous spread of multiple mediators of inflammation that are generated by the host and/or fetal immune response to pathogenic bacteria; and 3 the possibility of oral microbial pathogen transmission, with subsequent colonization, in the vaginal microbiome resulting from sexual practices. As periodontal disease is, for the most part, preventable, the medical and dental public health communities can address intervention strategies to control oral inflammatory disease, lessen the systemic inflammatory burden, and ultimately reduce the potential for adverse pregnancy outcomes. This article reviews the oral, vaginal, and placental microbiomes, considers their potential impact on preterm labor, and the future

  13. Bacterial profiles of root caries in elderly patients.

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    Preza, Dorita; Olsen, Ingar; Aas, Jørn A; Willumsen, Tiril; Grinde, Bjørn; Paster, Bruce J

    2008-06-01

    Culture-based studies have shown that Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli are associated with root caries (RC). The purpose of the present study was to assess the bacterial diversity of RC in elderly patients by use of culture-independent molecular techniques and to determine the associations of specific bacterial species or bacterial communities with healthy and carious roots. Plaque was collected from root surfaces of 10 control subjects with no RC and from 11 subjects with RC. The bacterial 16S rRNA genes from extracted DNA were PCR amplified, cloned, and sequenced to determine species identity. From a total of 3,544 clones, 245 predominant species or phylotypes were observed, representing eight bacterial phyla. The majority (54%) of the species detected have not yet been cultivated. Species of Selenomonas and Veillonella were common in all samples. The healthy microbiota included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Leptotrichia spp., Selenomonas noxia, Streptococcus cristatus, and Kingella oralis. Lactobacilli were absent, S. mutans was present in one, and Actinomyces spp. were present in 50% of the controls. In contrast, the microbiota of the RC subjects was dominated by Actinomyces spp., lactobacilli, S. mutans, Enterococcus faecalis, Selenomonas sp. clone CS002, Atopobium and Olsenella spp., Prevotella multisaccharivorax, Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus, and Propionibacterium sp. strain FMA5. The bacterial profiles of RC showed considerable subject-to-subject variation, indicating that the microbial communities are more complex than previously presumed. The data suggest that putative etiological agents of RC include not only S. mutans, lactobacilli, and Actinomyces but also species of Atopobium, Olsenella, Pseudoramibacter, Propionibacterium, and Selenomonas.

  14. Microscope-based imaging platform for large-scale analysis of oral biofilms.

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    Karygianni, L; Follo, M; Hellwig, E; Burghardt, D; Wolkewitz, M; Anderson, A; Al-Ahmad, A

    2012-12-01

    A microscopic method for noninvasively monitoring oral biofilms at the macroscale was developed to describe the spatial distribution of biofilms of different bacterial composition on bovine enamel surfaces (BES). For this purpose, oral biofilm was grown in situ on BES that were fixed at approximal sites of individual upper jaw acrylic devices worn by a volunteer for 3 or 5 days. Eubacteria, Streptococcus spp., and Fusobacterium nucleatum were stained using specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The resulting fluorescence signals were subsequently tested by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and monitored by an automated wide-field microscope-based imaging platform (Scan∧R). Automated image processing and data analysis were conducted by microscope-associated software and followed by statistical evaluation of the results. The full segmentation of biofilm images revealed a random distribution of bacteria across the entire area of the enamel surfaces examined. Significant differences in the composition of the microflora were recorded across individual as well as between different enamel surfaces varying from sparsely colonized (47.26%) after 3 days to almost full surface coverage (84.45%) after 5 days. The enamel plates that were positioned at the back or in the middle of the oral cavity were found to be more suitable for the examination of biofilms up to 3 days old. In conclusion, automated microscopy combined with the use of FISH can enable the efficient visualization and meaningful quantification of bacterial composition over the entire sample surface. Due to the possibility of automation, Scan∧R overcomes the technical limitations of conventional CLSM.

  15. Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, Karen F; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfection biofilms were developed with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. Biofilms, as well as planktonic cultures of these same bacterial species, were incubated under anaerobic conditions with a human oral epithelial cell line, OKF4, for up to 24h. Gro-1α, IL1α, IL-6, IL-8, TGFα, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, and IP-10 were shown to be produced in response to a range of the planktonic or biofilm forms of these species. P. gingivalis biofilms significantly inhibited the production of all of these cytokines and chemokines, except MIP-1α. Generally, the biofilms of all species inhibited Gro-1α, TGFα, and Fractalkine production, while F. nucleatum biofilms stimulated significant increases in IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10. A. naeslundii biofilms induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. The oral streptococcal species in biofilms or planktonic forms were poor stimulants for any of these mediators from the epithelial cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that oral bacteria in biofilms elicit a substantially different profile of responses compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Moreover, certain oral species are highly stimulatory when in biofilms and interact with host cell receptors to trigger pathways of responses that appear quite divergent from individual bacteria.