WorldWideScience

Sample records for fusion studies technical

  1. Inertial fusion research: Annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.T.; Terry, N.C.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research activities undertaken at KMS Fusion (KMSF) during 1985. It is organized into three main technical sections; the first covers fusion experiments and theoretical physics, the second is devoted to progress in materials development and target fabrication, and the third describes laser technology research. These three individual sections have been cataloged separately

  2. Applications of technical fusion in uroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, F.; Zordo, T. de; Junker, D.; Pallwein-Prettner, L.

    2015-01-01

    Technical fusion is defined as the ultrasound-guided navigation through a previously generated 3 D imaging dataset such as a computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This technique allows for moving the fused CT/MRI datasets synchroneously with the real-time ultrasound in the same plane. Established and furthermore not yet described applications, the technical principles and the limitations of this promising technique will be introduced.

  3. Controlled nuclear fusion. Theoretical and technical-physical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, T.; Oomens, N.

    1995-01-01

    It is stated that the realization of controlled fusion is not only a matter of solving technical problems. Also theoretical research in the field of plasma physics is required. A brief state-of-the-art is given of theoretical and technical-physical aspects of nuclear fusion. Attention is paid to magnetic confinement, the importance of theoretical research, plasma heating, plasma diagnostics, and the control of plasma transport. Throughout the article special attention is paid to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. 5 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs

  4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described

  5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  6. A Technical Analysis Information Fusion Approach for Stock Price Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    In this paper, we address the problem of technical analysis information fusion in improving stock market index-level prediction. We present an approach for analyzing stock market price behavior based on different categories of technical analysis metrics and a multiple predictive system. Each category of technical analysis measures is used to characterize stock market price movements. The presented predictive system is based on an ensemble of neural networks (NN) coupled with particle swarm intelligence for parameter optimization where each single neural network is trained with a specific category of technical analysis measures. The experimental evaluation on three international stock market indices and three individual stocks show that the presented ensemble-based technical indicators fusion system significantly improves forecasting accuracy in comparison with single NN. Also, it outperforms the classical neural network trained with index-level lagged values and NN trained with stationary wavelet transform details and approximation coefficients. As a result, technical information fusion in NN ensemble architecture helps improving prediction accuracy.

  7. Applications of technical fusion in uroradiology; Einsatzmoeglichkeiten der technischen Fusion in der Uroradiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, F.; Zordo, T. de; Junker, D. [Medical University Innsbruck (Austria). Radiology; Pallwein-Prettner, L. [Sisters of Charity Hospital, Linz (Austria). Radiology

    2015-05-15

    Technical fusion is defined as the ultrasound-guided navigation through a previously generated 3 D imaging dataset such as a computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This technique allows for moving the fused CT/MRI datasets synchroneously with the real-time ultrasound in the same plane. Established and furthermore not yet described applications, the technical principles and the limitations of this promising technique will be introduced.

  8. Materials studies for magnetic fusion energy applications at low temperatures. VIII. Technical reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    This report contains results of a research progam to produce material property data that will facilitte design and development of cryogenic structures for the superconducting magnets of magnetic fusion energy power plants and prototypes. Research results for 1984 are summarized in an initial ''Highlights of Results'' section and reported in detail in the technical papers that form the main body of this report. The technical papers are presented under four headings reflecting the main program areas: Welding, Nonmetallics, Structural Alloys, and Technology Transfer. Objectives, approaches, and achievements are summarized in an introduction to each program area

  9. Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.; Navratil, G.; Bangerter, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE [Department of Energy] and the FESAC [Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report

  10. Snowmass 2002: The Fusion Energy Sciences Summer Study; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N. Sauthoff; G. Navratil; R. Bangerter

    2002-01-01

    The Fusion Summer Study 2002 will be a forum for the critical technical assessment of major next-steps in the fusion energy sciences program, and will provide crucial community input to the long-range planning activities undertaken by the DOE[Department of Energy] and the FESAC[Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee]. It will be an ideal place for a broad community of scientists to examine goals and proposed initiatives in burning plasma science in magnetic fusion energy and integrated research experiments in inertial fusion energy. This meeting is open to every member of the fusion energy science community and significant international participation is encouraged. The objectives of the Fusion Summer Study are three: (1) Review scientific issues in burning plasmas to establish the basis for the following two objectives and to address the relations of burning plasma in tokamaks to innovative magnetic fusion energy (MFE) confinement concepts and of ignition in inertial fusion energy (IFE) to integrated research facilities. (2) Provide a forum for critical discussion and review of proposed MFE burning plasma experiments (e.g., IGNITOR, FIRE, and ITER) and assess the scientific and technological research opportunities and prospective benefits of these approaches to the study of burning plasmas. (3) Provide a forum for the IFE community to present plans for prospective integrated research facilities, assess present status of the technical base for each, and establish a timetable and technical progress necessary to proceed for each. Based on significant preparatory work by the fusion community prior to the July Snowmass meeting, the Snowmass working groups will prepare a draft report that documents the scientific and technological benefits of studies of burning plasmas. The report will also include criteria by which the benefits of each approach to fusion science, fusion engineering/technology, and the fusion development path can be assessed. Finally, the report will

  11. Fusion reactor safety studies, FY 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darby, J.B. Jr.

    1978-04-01

    This report reviews the technical progress in the fusion reactor safety studies performed during FY 1977 in the Fusion Power Program at the Argonne National Laboratory. The subjects reported on include safety considerations of the vacuum vessel and first-wall design for the ANL/EPR, the thermal responses of a tokamak reactor first wall, the vacuum wall electrical resistive requirements in relationship to magnet safety, and a major effort is reported on considerations and experiments on air detritiation

  12. Physics and technology of inertial fusion energy targets chambers and drivers. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    The third IAEA Technical Meeting on Physics and Technology of Inertial Fusion Energy Targets and Chambers took place 11-13 October 2004 in the Yousung Hotel Daejon, Republic of Korea. The first meeting was held in Madrid, Spain, 7-9 June 2000, and the second one in San Diego, California, 17-19 June 2002. Nuclear fusion has the promise of becoming an abundant energy source with good environmental compatibility. Excellent progress has been made in controlled nuclear fusion research on both magnetic and inertial approaches for plasma confinement. The IAEA plays a pro-active role to catalyze innovation and enhance worldwide commitment to fusion. This is done by creating awareness of the different concepts of magnetic as well as inertial confinement. The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) supports the IAEA in the development of strategies to enhance fusion research in Member States. As part of the recommendations, a technical meeting on the physics and technology of inertial fusion energy (IFE) was proposed in one of the council meetings. The objective of the technical meeting was to contribute to advancing the understanding of targets and chambers for all proposed inertial fusion energy power plant designs. The topics to be covered were: Target design and physics, chamber design and physics, target fabrication injection and Tritium handling, assessment of safety, environment and economy aspect of IFE. It was recognized by the International Advisory Committee that the scope of the meeting should also include fusion drivers. The presentations of the meeting included target and chamber physics and technology for all proposed IFE plant concepts (laser driven, heavy-ion driven, Z-pinches, etc.). The final Research Coordination Meeting of the Coordinated Research Project on Elements of Power Plant Design for Inertial Fusion Energy, including further new results and achievements, followed the technical meeting. Twenty-nine participants from 12 countries participated

  13. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m 2 and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m 2 ; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings

  14. Review of Battelle-Northwest technical studies on fusion--fission (hybrid) energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liikala, R.C.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Wolkenhauer, W.C.; Aase, D.T.

    1974-01-01

    A variety of studies conducted over the past few years and the principal results of these studies are summarized. Studies of power producing hybrids, the use of fusion neutrons for transmutation of radioactive wastes, and the evaluation of the most likely combinations of fusion and fission technologies are discussed. (U.S.)

  15. Critical technical issues and evaluation and comparison studies for inertial fusion energy reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Ying, A.Y.; Tillack, M.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Linford, G.J.; Drake, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The critical issues, evaluation and comparison of two inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor design concepts developed in the Prometheus studies are presented. The objectives were (1) to identify and characterize the critical issues and the R and D required to solve them, and (2) to establish a sound basis for future IFE technical and programmatic decisions by evaluating and comparing the different design concepts. Quantitative evaluation and comparison of the two design options have been made with special focus on physics feasibility, engineering feasibility, economics, safety and environment, and research and development (R and D) requirements. Two key conclusions are made based on the overall evaluation analysis: (1) The heavy-ion driven reactors appear to have an overall advantage over laser-driven reactors; and: (2) The differences in scores are not large and future results of R and D could change the overall ranking of the two IFE concepts

  16. Local bone graft harvesting and volumes in posterolateral lumbar fusion: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragee, Eugene J; Comer, Garet C; Smith, Micah W

    2011-06-01

    In lumbar surgery, local bone graft is often harvested and used in posterolateral fusion procedures. The volume of local bone graft available for posterolateral fusion has not been determined in North American patients. Some authors have described this as minimal, but others have suggested the volume was sufficient to be reliably used as a stand-alone bone graft substitute for single-level fusion. To describe the technique used and determine the volume of local bone graft available in a cohort of patients undergoing single-level primary posterolateral fusion by the authors harvesting technique. Technical description and cohort report. Consecutive patients undergoing lumbar posterolateral fusion with or without instrumentation for degenerative processes. Local bone graft volume. Consecutive patients undergoing lumbar posterolateral fusion with or without instrumentation for degenerative processes of were studied. Local bone graft was harvested by a standard method in each patient and the volume measured by a standard procedure. Twenty-five patients were studied, and of these 11 (44%) had a previous decompression. The mean volume of local bone graft harvested was measured to be 25 cc (range, 12-36 cc). Local bone graft was augmented by iliac crest bone in six of 25 patients (24%) if the posterolateral fusion bed was not well packed with local bone alone. There was a trend to greater local bone graft volumes in men and in patients without previous decompression. Large volumes of local bone can be harvested during posterolateral lumbar fusion surgery. Even in patients with previous decompression the volume harvested is similar to that reported harvested from the posterior iliac crest for single-level fusion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fusion--fission hybrid concepts for laser-induced fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid concepts are viewed as subcritical fission reactors driven and controlled by high-energy neutrons from a laser-induced fusion reactor. Blanket designs encompassing a substantial portion of the spectrum of different fission reactor technologies are analyzed and compared by calculating their fissile-breeding and fusion-energy-multiplying characteristics. With a large number of different fission technologies to choose from, it is essential to identify more promising hybrid concepts that can then be subjected to in-depth studies that treat the engineering safety, and economic requirements as well as the neutronic aspects. In the course of neutronically analyzing and comparing several fission blanket concepts, this work has demonstrated that fusion-fission hybrids can be designed to meet a broad spectrum of fissile-breeding and fusion-energy-multiplying requirements. The neutronic results should prove to be extremely useful in formulating the technical scope of future studies concerned with evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of hybrid concepts for laser-induced fusion

  18. Technical requirement of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.; Tillak, M.; Gierszwski, P.; Grover, J.; Puigh, R.; Sze, D.K.; Berwald, D.

    1986-06-01

    The technical issues and requirements of experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology (FNT) have been investigated. The nuclear subsystems addressed are: a) blanket, b) radiation shield, c) tritium processing system, and d) plasma interactive components. Emphasis has been placed on the important and complex development problems of the blanket. A technical planning process for FNT has been developed and applied, including four major elements: 1) characterization of issues, 2) quantification of testing requirements, 3) evaluation of facilities, and 4) development of a test plan to identify the role, timing, characteristics and costs of major experiments and facilities

  19. IAEA technical committee meeting on research using small fusion devices (abstracts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    The thirteenth IAEA technical committee meeting on research using small fusion devices are held in Chengdu, P. R. China on 18-20 Oct. , 1999. 41 articles are received and the content includes toroidal systems, helical systems, plasma focus, diagnostic systems, theory and modeling, improving confinement, numerical simulation, innovative concepts and others

  20. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1992-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a center for information exchange, nationally and internationally, by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results that are obtained by the Institute contribute mainly to the progress of national and international efforts in nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power.as a basic energy source. In addition to its primary focus on fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in related fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, plasma astrophysics, and accelerator physics. The work of EFS scientists continued to receive national and international recognition. Numerous invited papers were given during the past year at workshops, conferences, and scientific meetings. Last year IFS scientists published 95 scientific articles in technical journals and monographs

  1. Laser fusion program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmett, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    This program is structured to proceed through a series of well defined fusion milestones to proof of the scientific feasibility, of laser fusion with the Shiva Nova system. Concurrently, those key technical areas, such as advanced lasers, which are required to progress beyond proof of feasibility, are being studied. We have identified and quantified the opportunities and key technical issues in military applications, such as weapons effects simulations, and in civilian applications, such as central-station electric power production. We summarize the current status and future plans for the laser fusion program at LLL, emphasizing the civilian applications of laser fusion

  2. Initial trade and design studies for the fusion engineering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-06-01

    The Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), initiated a program of trade and design studies in October 1980 to support the selection of the FED concept. This document presents the results of these initial trade and design studies. Based on these results, a baseline configuration has been identified and the Design Center effort for the remainder of the fiscal year will be devoted to the development of a self-consistent FED design description

  3. Scientific and technical challenges on the road towards fusion electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donné, A. J. H.; Federici, G.; Litaudon, X.; McDonald, D. C.

    2017-10-01

    The goal of the European Fusion Roadmap is to deliver fusion electricity to the grid early in the second half of this century. It breaks the quest for fusion energy into eight missions, and for each of them it describes a research and development programme to address all the open technical gaps in physics and technology and estimates the required resources. It points out the needs to intensify industrial involvement and to seek all opportunities for collaboration outside Europe. The roadmap covers three periods: the short term, which runs parallel to the European Research Framework Programme Horizon 2020, the medium term and the long term. ITER is the key facility of the roadmap as it is expected to achieve most of the important milestones on the path to fusion power. Thus, the vast majority of present resources are dedicated to ITER and its accompanying experiments. The medium term is focussed on taking ITER into operation and bringing it to full power, as well as on preparing the construction of a demonstration power plant DEMO, which will for the first time demonstrate fusion electricity to the grid around the middle of this century. Building and operating DEMO is the subject of the last roadmap phase: the long term. Clearly, the Fusion Roadmap is tightly connected to the ITER schedule. Three key milestones are the first operation of ITER, the start of the DT operation in ITER and reaching the full performance at which the thermal fusion power is 10 times the power put in to the plasma. The Engineering Design Activity of DEMO needs to start a few years after the first ITER plasma, while the start of the construction phase will be a few years after ITER reaches full performance. In this way ITER can give viable input to the design and development of DEMO. Because the neutron fluence in DEMO will be much higher than in ITER, it is important to develop and validate materials that can handle these very high neutron loads. For the testing of the materials, a

  4. Technical issues in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohatgi, V.K.; Vijayan, T.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the issues in fusion reactor technology are examined. Rapid progress in fusion technology research in recent years can be attributed to the advances in various technologies. The commercial generation of fusion power greatly depends on the evolution and improvements in these technologies. With better understanding of plasma physics, fusion reactor designs are becoming more and more realistic and comprehensive. It is now possible to compare various concepts within the framework of established technologies. The technological issues needing better understanding and solutions to problem areas are identified. Various instabilities and energy losses are major problem areas. Extensive developments in reactor-relevant advanced materials, compact and powerful superconducting magnets, high-power systems, and plasma heating drivers need to be undertaken and emphasized

  5. IAEA technical meeting on atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion science technology. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.

    2003-10-01

    The proceedings and conclusions of the Technical Meeting on 'Atomic and Plasma- Material Interaction Data for Fusion Science Technology' held in Juelich, Germany on October 28-31 are summarized. During the course of the meetings working groups were formed to review the status of specific areas of atomic, molecular and material physics of relevance to fusion and to make recommendations on data needs in fusion from these areas. The reports of those working groups are summarized and the complete reports included as appendices. This meeting brought together over fifty leading scientists in fusion related data. Results of research in a number of topics were presented and very useful discussions were held. The meeting was extremely successful. (author)

  6. Study on Fusion Safety Infrastructure using ISAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myungsuk; Heo, Gyunyoung; Kim, Hyoungchan

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of nuclear facilities have checked and managed safety throughout the entire process from design, construction, operation and decommissioning. Also, the same meaning as the regulatory requirements and design requirements, it will be important indicators for detailed design of K-DEMO. K-DEMO has many uncertainties because it is in conceptual design phase. Also, there is no reference material because demonstration scale fusion power plants were not operated yet in overseas. So, hazard that threaten the integrity of K-DEMO have to be defined preferentially to define regulatory or design requirements. This study proposed method that educe regulatory or design requirements and introduce web-based cloud infrastructure to perform renewal and sharing of information related with safety that is required in the study rapidly as a part of the R and D program funded by National Fusion Research Institute of Korea (NFRI). We have been performing QSR and PIRT in accordance with development of fusion DEMO plant, and preparing OPT, PSA and DPA for regulation requirements. This study introduces our recent research activities about ISAM for fusion and CCI built for expert and extant safety related information. Unlike fission, nuclear fusion's safety goal is non-evacuation of the public during an accident. To satisfy this goal not only various safety issues should be analyzed, but safety objectives, regulatory requirements, and design variables should also be established in detailed design phase. The web-based cloud infrastructure proposed in this paper will be able to offer input data of future studies and, it is expected to contribute on general and technical safety principles for national fusion power plant technology plan

  7. Fusion safety program Annual report, Fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Carmack, W.J.

    1995-12-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY-95. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions. Among the technical areas covered in this report are tritium safety, beryllium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, safety aspects of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed by the Fusion Safety Program for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the technical support for commercial fusion facility conceptual design studies. A final activity described is work to develop DOE Technical Standards for Safety of Fusion Test Facilities

  8. Fusion reactor systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Fusion Technology Institute personnel actively participated in the ARIES/PULSAR project during the present contract period. Numerous presentations were made at PULSAR project meetings, major contributions were written for the ARIES-II/IV Final Report presentations and papers were given at technical conferences contributions were written for the ARIES Lessons Learned report and a very large number of electronic-mail and regular-mail communications were sent. The remaining sections of this progress report win summarize the work accomplished and in progress for the PULSAR project during the contract period. The main areas of effort are: PULSAR Research; ARIES-II/IV Report Contributions; ARIES Lessons Learned Report Contributions; and Stellarator Study

  9. Assessment of technical risks and R and D requirements for a magnetic confinement fusion fuel system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFreece, D.A.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents a specific use and results of a novel technique for assessing the technical risks associated with the hardware development of a possible future commercial fusion power plant fuel system. Technical risk is defined as the risk that a particular technology or component which is currently under development will not achieve a set of required technical specifications. A technical risk assessment is the quantification of this risk. This Technical Risk Assessment (TRA) methodology was applied to a deuterium-tritium fuel system for a magnetic-confinement fusion power plant. The fuel system is defined to support a generic commercial reactor with at least two viable options for each critical subsystem. Each subsystem option is defined in detail including nominal performance requirements and subsystem interfaces. Subsystem experts were canvassed to obtain values for past, present and future technical performance parameters for each of the subsystem options. These forecasts are presented as probabilities of achieving given levels of performance in specific time periods for assumed funding scenarios. Several funding scenarios were examined to discern whether performance limitations are caused by funding or technology. A computerized Fuel System simulation is described which uses these subsystem performance parameter forecasts as inputs

  10. A conceptual design study of a reversed field pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, S.; Tanaka, S.; Terai, T.; Hashizume, H.

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design of a Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor with a solid breeder blanket REPUTER-1 has been studied through parametric system studies and detailed design and analysis in order to clarify the technical feasibility of a compact fusion reactor. F-θ pumping is used for driving the plasma current necessary for steady state operation. A maintenance policy of replacing a whole fusion power core including TF coils is proposed to cope with the requirements of high wall loading and high mass power density. For the same reason a normal conductor is selected for most of the coils. The first wall is structurally independent of the blanket. The blanket module is composed of SiC reinforced blocks which form a stable arch so as to keep the stresses in SiC basically compressive. The coolant for the first wall and the limiter is pressurized water, while the coolant for the blanket is helium gas. A number of thin Li 2 O and thick beryllium tiles are packed into the blanket block so as to obtain a proper tritium breeding ratio. A pumped limiter is chosen for the plasma exhaust system. The study has shown the technical feasibility of a high power density fusion power reactor (330 kWe/tonne) with solid breeder blanket and many key physics and engineering issues are also clarified. (orig.)

  11. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, 1 November 1993--31 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are: (1) to conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) to serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; (3) and to train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. The theoretical research results obtained by the Institute contribute to the progress of nuclear fusion research, whose goal is the development of fusion power as a basic energy source. Close collaborative relationships have been developed with other university and national laboratory fusion groups, both in the US and abroad. In addition to its primary focus on mainstream fusion physics, the Institute is also involved with research in fusion-sidestream fields, such as advanced computing techniques, nonlinear dynamics, space plasmas and astrophysics, statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and accelerator physics. Important research discoveries are briefly described

  12. Gap study on technical standards and quality assurance between ITER and Korean regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Myoung-suk [Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si 446-701, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangil; Lee, Hyoen Gon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon-si 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung, E-mail: gheo@khu.ac.kr [Kyung Hee University, Yongin-si 446-701, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • This paper is to secure knowledge and expand domestic specialists for license and regulation of future fusion facilities including K-DEMO. - Abstract: Currently, Korea Domestic Agency (KODA) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project or the ITER Korea has been conducting follow-up surveys and development researches for the core technologies of its non-procurement items. This eventually aims to secure implicit as well as explicit knowledge and expand domestic specialists for future fusion facilities including K-DEMO. As a part of the project, the comparative analysis and gap study of technical standards and Quality Assurance (QA) system between ITER and Korean nuclear facilities are being performed. The goal of this study is to present a roadmap re-systematizing current safety-related standards for the fission-based facilities into fusion-based facilities in Republic of Korea. The research is considering two different tracks. First one is to secure the state-of-the-art of the fusion technical standards continually updated. For its investigation, we organized the Korean fusion safety advisory group that consists of experts from institutes, industries, and universities. The latest information of technical standards have been gathered and updated from each area of expert in periodic manner. The information is classified into Product Breakdown Structure (PBS) including safety classification, major safety issues, analysis computer codes, etc. This task will be re-organized this year such that the technical standards for procurement as well as non-procurement items can be accumulated in systematic and sustainable manner. Second one, called “Gap Study,” is to compare the requirements for domestic nuclear facilities and the results from the first track on the basis of experts’ opinion from the national and private sectors and to recommend the approaches to overcome technical and administrative barriers. The result is

  13. Gap study on technical standards and quality assurance between ITER and Korean regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Myoung-suk; Lee, Sangil; Lee, Hyoen Gon; Heo, Gyunyoung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper is to secure knowledge and expand domestic specialists for license and regulation of future fusion facilities including K-DEMO. - Abstract: Currently, Korea Domestic Agency (KODA) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project or the ITER Korea has been conducting follow-up surveys and development researches for the core technologies of its non-procurement items. This eventually aims to secure implicit as well as explicit knowledge and expand domestic specialists for future fusion facilities including K-DEMO. As a part of the project, the comparative analysis and gap study of technical standards and Quality Assurance (QA) system between ITER and Korean nuclear facilities are being performed. The goal of this study is to present a roadmap re-systematizing current safety-related standards for the fission-based facilities into fusion-based facilities in Republic of Korea. The research is considering two different tracks. First one is to secure the state-of-the-art of the fusion technical standards continually updated. For its investigation, we organized the Korean fusion safety advisory group that consists of experts from institutes, industries, and universities. The latest information of technical standards have been gathered and updated from each area of expert in periodic manner. The information is classified into Product Breakdown Structure (PBS) including safety classification, major safety issues, analysis computer codes, etc. This task will be re-organized this year such that the technical standards for procurement as well as non-procurement items can be accumulated in systematic and sustainable manner. Second one, called “Gap Study,” is to compare the requirements for domestic nuclear facilities and the results from the first track on the basis of experts’ opinion from the national and private sectors and to recommend the approaches to overcome technical and administrative barriers. The result is

  14. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Motloch, C.G.; Petti, D.A.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in fiscal year 1994. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions, including the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in this report include tritium safety, beryllium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, safety aspects of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate data base development, and thermalhydraulics code development and their application to fusion safety issues. Much of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed by the Fusion Safety Program for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and of the technical support for commercial fusion facility conceptual design studies. A major activity this year has been work to develop a DOE Technical Standard for the safety of fusion test facilities

  15. Technical review of the Sandia Laboratories' Particle Beam Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report considers the technical aspects of Sandia Laboratories' Particle Beam Fusion Program and examines the program's initial goals, the progress made to date towards reaching those goals, and the future plans or methods of reaching those original or modified goals. A summary of Sandia Laboratories' effort, which seeks to demonstrate that high voltage pulsed power generated high-current electron or light ion beams can be used to ignite a deuterium or tritium pellet, is provided. A brief review and assessment of the Sandia Pulse Power Program is given. Several critical issues and summaries of the committee members' opinions are discussed

  16. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee', S.S.; Dowker, C.L.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  17. Fusion driver study. Final technical report, April 1, 1978-March 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, H.W.

    1980-04-01

    A conceptual design of a multi-megajoule, repetitively pulsed CO 2 laser system for Inertial Confinement Fusion is presented. System configurations consisting of 50 to 100 kJ modules operating at subatmospheric pressures with multiple pass optical extraction appear feasible with present or near term technology. Overall laser system efficiencies of greater than 10% at repetition rates in excess of 10 Hz are possible with the state-of-the-art pulsed power technology. The synthesis of all the laser subsystems into a specific configuration for a Laser Fusion Driver depends upon the reactor chamber(s) layout, subsystem reliability and restrictions on overall dimensions of the fusion driver. A design is presented which stacks power amplifier modules in series in a large torus with centrally located reactor chamber. Cost estimates of the overall Laser Fusion Driver are also presented

  18. Funding for the 2ND IAEA technical meeting on fusion data processing, validation and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2017-06-02

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will organize the second Technical Meeting on Fusion Da Processing, Validation and Analysis from 30 May to 02 June, 2017, in Cambridge, MA USA. The meeting w be hosted by the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC). The objective of the meeting is to provide a platform where a set of topics relevant to fusion data processing, validation and analysis are discussed with the view of extrapolation needs to next step fusion devices such as ITER. The validation and analysis of experimental data obtained from diagnostics used to characterize fusion plasmas are crucial for a knowledge based understanding of the physical processes governing the dynamics of these plasmas. The meeting will aim at fostering, in particular, discussions of research and development results that set out or underline trends observed in the current major fusion confinement devices. General information on the IAEA, including its mission and organization, can be found at the IAEA websit Uncertainty quantification (UQ) Model selection, validation, and verification (V&V) Probability theory and statistical analysis Inverse problems & equilibrium reconstru ction Integrated data analysis Real time data analysis Machine learning Signal/image proc essing & pattern recognition Experimental design and synthetic diagnostics Data management

  19. Establishment of an Institute for Fusion Studies. Technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The Institute for Fusion Studies is a national center for theoretical fusion plasma physics research. Its purposes are to (1) conduct research on theoretical questions concerning the achievement of controlled fusion energy by means of magnetic confinement--including both fundamental problems of long-range significance, as well as shorter-term issues; (2) serve as a national and international center for information exchange by hosting exchange visits, conferences, and workshops; and (3) train students and postdoctoral research personnel for the fusion energy program and plasma physics research areas. During FY 1995, a number of significant scientific advances were achieved at the IFS, both in long-range fundamental problems as well as in near-term strategic issues, consistent with the Institute's mandate. Examples of these achievements include, for example, tokamak edge physics, analytical and computational studies of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulent transport, alpha-particle-excited toroidal Alfven eigenmode nonlinear behavior, sophisticated simulations for the Numerical Tokamak Project, and a variety of non-tokamak and non-fusion basic plasma physics applications. Many of these projects were done in collaboration with scientists from other institutions. Research discoveries are briefly described in this report

  20. Public acceptance of fusion energy and scientific feasibility of a fusion reactor. Spin-off effects of fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morino, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    It is observed that new and sophisticated technologies developed through research and development in relation to magnetic confinement fusion have been transferred to other industrial and scientific fields with remarkable spin-off effects. Approximately 10 years ago, the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) has investigated technical transfer and spin-off effects of fusion technologies developed in Japan. The essence of the results of this investigation as well as high technologies developed in the last decade, some of which are in the early stage of technical spin-off, are described. It is additionally explained that independent technical development conducted by our country as well as by engineers themselves is important in achieving effective spin-off. An outline of scientific spin-off effects is also described, including utilization technologies of fusion reactions besides those for energy production purposes, the progress of scientific understanding in the course of fusion research, and scientific information transfer and communication with other fields. (author)

  1. IAEA technical meeting on nuclear data library for advanced systems - Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Mengoni, A.

    2008-04-01

    A Technical Meeting on 'Nuclear Data Library for Advanced Systems - Fusion Devices' was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 31 October to 2 November 2007. The main objective of the initiative has been to define a proposal and detailed plan of activities for a Co-ordinated Research Project on this subject. Details of the discussions which took place at the meeting, including a review of the current activities in the field, a list of recommendations and a proposed timeline schedule for the CRP are summarized in this report. (author)

  2. Applications of Research Reactors Towards Research on Materials for Nuclear Fusion Technology. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    of materials under development for Generation IV concepts. International collaboration among MTRs and specialized facilities has been identified as integral to progress in fusion development as well as enhancing reactor utilization. This publication specifies which areas of research remain in the qualification of structural materials and components, and has detailed the characteristics of many research reactors and devices that can accomplish an important portion of these necessary studies. This publication is the outcome of two recent IAEA sponsored meetings under its programme to enhance the utilization and collaboration of research reactor and material test facilities: - Consultancy meeting on Role of Research Reactors in Materials Research for Nuclear Fusion Technology, 13-15 December 2010, IAEA, Vienna; - Technical meeting on Materials under High Energy and High Intensity Neutron Fluxes for Nuclear Fusion Technology, 27-29 June 2011, IAEA, Vienna. These meetings brought together representatives from MTRs, spallation neutron sources, multiple beam irradiation facilities, material scientists as well as fusion community representatives to discuss the current state of fusion research and to plot necessary studies and modes of research collaboration

  3. Incomplete fusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the incomplete fusion reaction dynamics at energies ≅ 4-7 MeV/nucleon, several experiments have been carried out using accelerator facilities available in India. The measurements presented here cover a wide range of projectile-target combinations and enhance significantly our knowledge about incomplete fusion reaction dynamics. Here, the three sets of measurements have been presented; (i) excitation functions, (ii) forward recoil range distributions and (iii) the spin distributions. The first evidence of these reactions has been obtained from the measurement and analysis of excitation functions for xn/αxn/2αxn-channels. The measured excitation functions have been analyzed within the framework of compound nucleus model. The results obtained indicate the occurrence of fusion incompleteness at low beam energies. However, in order to determine the relative contribution of complete and incomplete fusion reaction processes, the recoil range distributions of the heavy residues have also been measured and analyzed within the framework of breakup fusion model which confirmed the fusion incompleteness in several heavy ion reactions involving α-emitting reaction channels. Further, in order to study the role of l-values in these reactions the spin distributions of the residues populated in case of complete and incomplete channels have been measured and are found to be distinctly different. The analysis of the data on spin distribution measurements indicate that the mean values of driving input angular momenta associated with direct-α-emitting (incomplete fusion) channels are higher than that observed for fusion-evaporation xn or α-emitting (complete fusion) channels, and is found to increase with direct α-multiplicity in the forward cone. One of the important conclusions drawn in the present work is that, there is significant incomplete fusion contribution even at energies slightly above the barrier. Further, the projectile structure has been found to

  4. Condylar Joint Fusion and Stabilization (by Screws and Plates) in Nontraumatic Atlanto-Occipital Dislocation: Technical Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Forhad H; Haque, Mohammod Raziul; Alam, Sarwar Murshed; Khaled Chowdhury, S M Noman; Khan, Shamsul Islam; Goel, Atul

    2017-11-01

    Nontraumatic spontaneous atlanto-occipital dislocation (AOD) is rare. In this report, we discuss the technical steps of condylar joint fusion and stabilization (by screws and plates) in nontraumatic AOD. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report of such techniques. A young girl and a young man with progressive quadriparesis due to nontraumatic spontaneous atlanto-occipital dislocation were managed by microsurgical reduction, fusion, and stabilization of the joint by occipital condylar and C1 lateral mass screw and plate fixation after mobilization of vertebral artery. In both cases, condylar joints fixation and fusion were done successfully. Condylar joint stabilization and fusion may be a good or alternative option for AOD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Introduction to the special issue on the technical status of materials for a fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, D.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2017-09-01

    Materials determine in a fundamental way the performance and environmental attractiveness of a fusion reactor: through the size (power fluxes to the divertor, neutron fluxes to the first wall); economics (replacement lifetime of critical in-vessel components, thermodynamic efficiency through operating temperature etc); plasma performance (erosion by plasma fluxes to the divertor surfaces); robustness against off-normal accidents (safety); and the effects of post-operation radioactivity on waste disposal and maintenance. The major philosophies and methodologies used to formulate programmes for the development of fusion materials are outlined, as the basis for other articles in this special issue, which deal with the fundamental understanding of the issues regarding these materials and their technical status and prospects for development.

  6. Technical planning activity: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements.

  7. Technical planning activity: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements

  8. Critical technical issues and evaluation and comparison studies for inertial fusion energy reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.A. (Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Ying, A.Y. (Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Tillack, M.S. (Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Ghoniem, N.M. (Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Waganer, L.M. (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, MI (United States)); Driemeyer, D.E. (McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, St. Louis, MI (United States)); Linford, G.J. (TRW Space and Electronics Div., Redondo Beach, CA (United States)); Drake, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Two inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor design concepts developed in the Prometheus studies were evaluated. Objectives were to identify and characterize critical issues and the R and D required to resolve them, and to establish a sound basis for future IFE technical and programmatic decisions. Each critical issue contains several key physics and engineering issues associated with major reactor components and impacts key aspects of feasibility, safety, and economic potential of IFE reactors. Generic critical issues center around: demonstration of moderate gain at low driver energy, feasibility of direct drive targets, feasibility of indirect drive targets for heavy ions, feasibility of indirect drive targets for lasers, cost reduction strategies for heavy ion drivers, demonstration of higher overall laser driver efficiency, tritium self-sufficiency in IFE reactors, cavity clearing at IFE pulse repetition rates, performance/reliability/lifetime of final laser optics, viability of liquid metal film for first wall protection, fabricability/reliability/lifetime of SiC composite structures, validation of radiation shielding requirements, design tools, and nuclear data, reliability and lifetime of laser and heavy ion drivers, demonstration of large-scale non-linear optical laser driver architecture, demonstration of cost effective KrF amplifiers, and demonstration of low cost, high volume target production techniques. Quantitative evaluation and comparison of the two design options have been made with special focus on physics feasibility, engineering feasibility, economics, safety and environment, and research and development (R and D) requirements. Two key conclusions are made based on the overall evaluation analysis. The heavy-ion driven reactors appear to have an overall advantage over laser-driven reactors.

  9. Fluid mechanics of fusion lasers. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shwartx, J.; Golik, R.J.; Merkle, C.L.; Ausherman, D.R.; Fishman, E.

    1978-04-01

    The primary objective of this study is to define the fluid mechanical requirements for a repetitively-pulsed high energy laser that may be used as a driver in an inertial confinement fusion system designed for electric power generation. Emphasis was placed on defining conceptual designs of efficient laser flow systems that are capable of conserving gas and minimizing operating power requirements. The development of effective pressure wave suppression concepts to produce acceptable beam quality for fusion applications was also considered

  10. 7. IAEA Technical Meeting on Steady State Operation of Magnetic Fusion Devices - Booklet of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This meeting has provided an appropriate forum to discuss current issues covering a wide range of technical topics related to the steady state operation issues and also to encourage forecast of the ITER performances. The technical meeting includes invited and contributed papers. The topics that have been dealt with are: 1) Superconducting devices (ITER, KSTAR, Tore-Supra, HT-7U, EAST, LHD, Wendelstein-7-X,...); 2) Long-pulse operation and advanced tokamak physics; 3) steady state fusion technologies; 4) Long pulse heating and current drive; 5) Particle control and power exhaust, and 6) ITER-related research and development issues. This document gathers the abstracts

  11. West European magnetic confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, B.L.; McGrain, M.; Hogan, J.T.; Porkolab, M.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a technical assessment and review of the West European program in magnetic confinement fusion by a panel of US scientists and engineers active in fusion research. Findings are based on the scientific and technical literature, on laboratory reports and preprints, and on the personal experiences and collaborations of the panel members. Concerned primarily with developments during the past 10 years, from 1979 to 1989, the report assesses West European fusion research in seven technical areas: tokamak experiments; magnetic confinement technology and engineering; fusion nuclear technology; alternate concepts; theory; fusion computations; and program organization. The main conclusion emerging from the analysis is that West European fusion research has attained a position of leadership in the international fusion program. This distinction reflects in large measure the remarkable achievements of the Joint European Torus (JET). However, West European fusion prominence extends beyond tokamak experimental physics: the program has demonstrated a breadth of skill in fusion science and technology that is not excelled in the international effort. It is expected that the West European primacy in central areas of confinement physics will be maintained or even increased during the early 1990s. The program's maturity and commitment kindle expectations of dramatic West European advances toward the fusion energy goal. For example, achievement of fusion breakeven is expected first in JET, before 1995

  12. Extraforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion at the L5-S1 Level: Technical Considerations and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzbuch, Arthur Robert; Kaech, Denis; Baranowski, Pawel; Baranowska, Alicja; Recoules-Arche, Didier

    2017-09-01

    Background  Extraforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (ELIF) surgery is a muscle-sparing approach that allows the treatment of various degenerative spinal diseases. It is technical challenging to perform the ELIF approach at the L5-S1 level because the sacral ala obstructs the view of the intervertebral disk space. Methods  We reported earlier on the ELIF technique in which the intervertebral disk is targeted at an angle of 45 degrees relative to the midline. In this article we describe the technical process we developed to overcome the anatomic relation between the sacral ala and the intervertebral disk space L5-S1 that hinders the ELIF approach at this level. We then report in a retrospective analysis on the short-term clinical and radiologic outcome of 100 consecutive patients with degenerative L5-S1 pathologies who underwent ELIF surgery. Results  The L5-S1 ELIF approach could be realized in all patients. The short-term clinical outcome was evaluated 5 months after surgery: 92% of the patients were satisfied with their postoperative result; 8% had a poor result. Overall, 17% of the patients presented light radicular or low back pain not influencing their daily activity, and 82% of the patients working before surgery returned to work 3 to 7 months after surgery. The radiologic outcome was documented by computed tomography at 5 months after surgery and showed fusion in 99% of the patients. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging performed in 5 patients at 6 months after surgery revealed the integrity of the paraspinal muscles. Conclusions  ELIF surgery at the L5-S1 level is technically feasible for various degenerative spinal diseases. Analysis of the clinical and radiologic data in a consecutive retrospective cohort of patients who underwent this surgical procedure showed a good short-term clinical outcome and fusion rate. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  14. Progress in fusion technology in the U.S. magnetic fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, R.J.; Beard, D.S.; Haas, G.M.; Stone, P.M.; George, T.V.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the major technological achievements that have taken place during the past few years in the U.S. magnetic fusion program which have contributed to the global efforts. The goal has been to establish the scientific and technological base required for fusion energy. To reach this goal the fusion RandD program is focused on four key technical issues: determine the optimum configuration of magnetic confinement systems; determine the properties of burning plasmas; develop materials for fusion systems; and establish the nuclear technology of fusion systems. The objective of the fusion technology efforts has been to develop advanced technologies and provide the necessary support for research of these four issues. This support is provided in a variety of areas such as: high vacuum technology, large magnetic field generation by superconducting and copper coils, high voltage and high current power supplies, electromagnetic wave and particle beam heating systems, plasma fueling, tritium breeding and handling, remote maintenance, energy recovery. The U.S. Fusion Technology Program provides major support or has the primary responsibility in each of the four key technical issues of fusion, as described in the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan of February 1985. This paper has summarized the Technology Program in terms of its activities and progress since the Proceedings of the SOFT Conference in 1984

  15. Prospect of laser fusion power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Sadao

    1998-01-01

    Inertial fusion ignition, burn and energy gain are expected to be achieved within the first decade of next century with new Megajoule laser facilities which are under construction in the USA and France. Fusion reactor design studies indicate that Inertial Fusion Energy(IFE) power plants are technically feasible and have attractive safety and environmental features. The recent progress on implosion physics and relevant technologies require us to consider a strategic approach toward IFE development. The design study for a laser fusion power plant KOYO has been conducted as a joint program of universities, national laboratories and industries in Japan and also with international collaborations. The progress of high power laser technology gives us feasible project toward a laser driven IFE Power Plant. The technical breakthrough in the field of diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) has opened wide application of power laser to industrial technologies. Laser fusion energy development will be proceeded jointly with industrial photonics research and development. International collaborations are also promoted for efficient progress and activation of R and D on advanced technologies which are required for IFE and also useful for modern industries. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs

  16. Fusion safety studies in Russia from 1996 to 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbasov, B.N. E-mail: kolbasov@nfi.kiae.ru; Biryukov, A.Yu.; Davydov, D.A.; Guseva, M.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Korshunov, S.N.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Romanov, P.V.; Vasiliev, V.I

    2001-04-01

    The paper is a review of results of some fusion safety studies performed in Russia during 1996-2000 (after the 6th IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on 'Developments in Fusion Safety'). In particular, changes of hydrogen isotope inventory in co-deposited layers on tungsten and graphite under simulation of normal tokamak operation and plasma disruptions are reported. Size distribution of graphite and W-Be-dust under the experiments at issue revealed two maximums. Erosion products were collected within tokamak T-10. Their microstructure and chemical composition were studied and are reported in the paper. Chemical interaction of beryllium powder with steam (in temperature range of 400-600 deg. C) and air (at 500-1000 deg. C) was investigated. Mathematical models describing it were developed. Chemical interaction of Be-powder with carbon was studied too. A dependence of beryllium carbide layer thickness growth versus time at 950 deg. C was found on the basis of the experiments.

  17. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume II. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in high heat flux materials and component development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Easor, J.R.

    1984-06-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas for high heat flux materials and components (HHFMC) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be of critical importance for the successful operation of near-term fusion experiments and for the feasibility and attractiveness of long-term fusion reactors. A number of subgroups were formed to assess the critical HHFMC issues along the following major lines: (1) source conditions, (2) systems integration, (3) materials and processes, (4) thermal hydraulics, (5) thermomechanical response, (6) electromagnetic response, (7) instrumentation and control, and (8) test facilities. The details of the technical assessment are presented in eight chapters. The primary technical issues and needs for each area are highlighted

  18. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume II. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in high heat flux materials and component development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Easor, J.R.; Gauster, W.B.; Gordon, J.D.; Mattas, R.F.; Morgan, G.D.; Ulrickson, M.A,; Watson, R.D.; Wolfer, W.G,

    1984-06-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas for high heat flux materials and components (HHFMC) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be of critical importance for the successful operation of near-term fusion experiments and for the feasibility and attractiveness of long-term fusion reactors. A number of subgroups were formed to assess the critical HHFMC issues along the following major lines: (1) source conditions, (2) systems integration, (3) materials and processes, (4) thermal hydraulics, (5) thermomechanical response, (6) electromagnetic response, (7) instrumentation and control, and (8) test facilities. The details of the technical assessment are presented in eight chapters. The primary technical issues and needs for each area are highlighted.

  19. Utilization of fission reactors for fusion engineering testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fission reactors can be used to conduct some of the fusion nuclear engineering tests identified in the FINESSE study. To further define the advantages and disadvantages of fission testing, the technical and programmatic constraints on this type of testing are discussed here. This paper presents and discusses eight key issues affecting fission utilization. Quantitative comparisons with projected fusion operation are made to determine the technical assets and limitations of fission testing. Capabilities of existing fission reactors are summarized and compared with technical needs. Conclusions are then presented on the areas where fission testing can be most useful

  20. Evaluation of fusion study from socio-economic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, S.; Okano, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Nagumo, S.; Tokimatsu, K.; Tobita, K.

    2005-01-01

    A fusion research project was evaluated from the aspects of socio-economics and its possible economic benefit. Research project itself has large economic impacts and it appears in a different way in different time. Four categories were identified as such mechanisms; direct economic effect by purchase and employment, the growth of local community and its economy, an improvement of technical capability of the industry stimulated by the development, and fusion energy supply under environmental constraints. Industrial effects were analysed from actual R and D program and found to yield considerable economic outcome, although contribution by the research itself is far smaller than that required for industry before actual commercial products can be produced. Economic value of fusion energy could be huge, but appears several decades future, and should be reduced by discount rate and success probability. Its value is more important as a part of environmental policy. Value of the fusion research at present age cannot be estimated as actual benefit, but as the effectiveness in the policy, or benefit for public that is now regarded as a kind of Externality

  1. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Suk Yong; You, Jae Jun

    1996-01-01

    Nearly every technical information is chased in the world. All of them are reviewed and analyzed. Some of them are chosen to study further more to review every related documents. And a probable suggestion about the excitonic process in deuteron absorbed condensed matter is proposed a way to cold fusion. 8 refs. (Author)

  2. Institute for Fusion Studies, Final Technical Report, December 1, 1995 - February 29, 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. James Van Dam

    2005-02-14

    During the 2001-2003 grant period, Institute for Fusion Studies (IFS) scientist made notable progress in a number of research areas. This report summarizes the work that has been accomplished in the following areas: (1) Magnetohydrodynamics; (2) Burning plasma and energetic particle physics; (3) Turbulent transport; (4) Computational physics; (5) Fundamental Theory; (6) Innovative confinement concepts; and (7) Plasma applications.

  3. Institute for Fusion Studies, Final Technical Report, December 1, 1995 - February 29, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. James Van Dam

    2005-01-01

    During the 2001-2003 grant period, Institute for Fusion Studies (IFS) scientist made notable progress in a number of research areas. This report summarizes the work that has been accomplished in the following areas: (1) Magnetohydrodynamics; (2) Burning plasma and energetic particle physics; (3) Turbulent transport; (4) Computational physics; (5) Fundamental Theory; (6) Innovative confinement concepts; and (7) Plasma applications

  4. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  5. Inertial thermonuclear fusion by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watteau, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The principles of deuterium tritium (DT) magnetic or inertial thermonuclear fusion are given. Even if results would be better with heavy ions beams, most of the results on fusion are obtained with laser beams. Technical and theoretical aspects of the laser fusion are presented with an extrapolation to the future fusion reactor. (A.B.). 34 refs., 17 figs

  6. Reactor concepts for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-07-01

    Scoping studies were initiated to identify attractive reactor concepts for producing electric power with laser fusion. Several exploratory reactor concepts were developed and are being subjected to our criteria for comparing long-range sources of electrical energy: abundance, social costs, technical feasibility, and economic competitiveness. The exploratory concepts include: a liquid-lithium-cooled stainless steel manifold, a gas-cooled graphite manifold, and fluidized wall concepts, such as a liquid lithium ''waterfall'', and a ceramic-lithium pellet ''waterfall''. Two of the major reactor vessel problems affecting the technical feasibility of a laser fusion power plant are: the effects of high-energy neutrons and cyclical stresses on the blanket structure and the effects of x-rays and debris from the fusion microexplosion on the first-wall. The liquid lithium ''waterfall'' concept is presented here in more detail as an approach which effectively deals with these damaging effects

  7. Fusion reactors - types - problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitter, K.H.

    1979-07-01

    A short account is given of the principles of fusion reactions and of the expected advantages of fusion reactors. Descriptions are presented of various Tokamak experimental devices being developed in a number of countries and of some mirror machines. The technical obstacles to be overcome before a fusion reactor could be self-supporting are discussed. (U.K.)

  8. Fusion Safety Program annual report, Fiscal Year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Motloch, C.G.; Petti, D.A.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in Fiscal Year 1993. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been designated by DOE as the lead laboratory for fusion safety, and EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for INEL operations. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations, including universities and private companies. Technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, beryllium safety, activation product release, reactions involving potential plasma-facing materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions and edge physics modeling, risk assessment failure rates, computer codes for reactor transient analysis, and regulatory support. These areas include work completed in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Also included in the report are summaries of the safety and environmental studies performed at the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiment and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor projects at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and a summary of the technical support for the ARIES/PULSAR commercial reactor design studies

  9. Perspectives of fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, V.O.

    1984-01-01

    New and practically inexhaustible sources of energy must be developed for the period when oil, coal and uranium will become scarce and expensive. Nuclear fusion holds great promise as one of these practically inexhaustible energy sources. Based on the deuteriumtritium reaction with tritium obtained from naturally occuring lithium, which is also widely available in Europe, the accessible energy resources in the world are 3.10 12 to 3.10 16 toe; based on the deuterium-deuterium reaction, the deuterium content of the oceans corresponds to 10 20 toe. It is presently envisaged that in order to establish fusion as a large-scale energy source, three major thresholds must be reached: - Scientific feasibility, - Technical feasibility, i.e. the proof that the basic technical problems of the fusion reactor can be solved. - Commercial feasibility, i.e. proof that fusion power reactors can be built on an industrial scale, can be operated reliably and produce usable energy at prices competitive with other energy sources. From the above it is clear that the route to commercial fusion will be long and costly and involve the solution of extremely difficult technical problems. In view of the many steps which have to be taken, it appears unlikely that commercial fusion power will be in general use within the next 50 years and by that time world-wide expenditure on research, development and demonstration may well have exceeded 100 Bio ECU. (author)

  10. Fusion Canada issue 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a funding report for CFFTP, a technical update for Tokamak de Varennes and a network for university research by the National Fusion Program. 4 figs

  11. Laser fusion overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.

    1976-01-01

    Because of recent breakthroughs in the target area, and in the glass laser area, the scientific feasibility of laser fusion--and of inertial fusion--may be demonstrated in the early 1980's. Then the development in that time period of a suitable laser (or storage ring or other driving source) would make possible an operational inertial fusion reactor in this century. These are roughly the same time scales as projected by the Tokamak magnetic confinement approach. It thus appears that the 15-20 year earlier start by magnetic confinement fusion may be overcome. Because inertial confinement has been demonstrated, and inertial fusion reactors may operate on smaller scales than Tokamaks, laser fusion may have important technical and economic advantages

  12. Magneto-inertial Fusion: An Emerging Concept for Inertial Fusion and Dense Plasmas in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thio, Francis Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is given in terms of its technical rationale, scientific goals, vision, research plans, needs, and the research facilities currently available in support of the program. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. A vigorous program in magnetized high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP) addressing the scientific basis of magneto-inertial fusion has been initiated by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy involving a number of universities, government laboratories and private institutions.

  13. Fusion Energy Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    Fusion Energy Update (CFU) provides monthly abstracting and indexing coverage of current scientific and technical reports, journal articles, conference papers and proceedings, books, patents, theses, and monographs for all sources on fusion energy. All information announced in CFU, plus additional backup information, is included in the energy information data base of the Department of Energy's Technical Information Center. The subject matter covered by CFU includes plasma physics, the physics and engineering of blankets, magnet coils and fields, power supplies and circuitry, cooling systems, fuel systems, radiation hazards, power conversion systems, inertial confinement systems, and component development and testing

  14. The U.S. program for fusion nuclear technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.; Haas, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Technology (FNT) research and development program in the United States is shaped by a hierarchy of documents and by the environment for nuclear energy existing in the United States. The fission nuclear industry in the United States has suffered problems with public perception of safety, waste disposal issues, and economics as influenced by safety and environmental issues. For fusion to be a viable energy alternative, it must offer significant improvements in these areas. The hierarchy of documents defining objectives, plans, and strategy of the U.S. FNT program consists of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan (MFPP) (February 1985), the Technical Planning Activity Final Report (January 1987), the Finesse Program Report (January 1987), and the Blanket Comparison and Selection Study Final Report (September 1984). In addition, two other documents are also significant in shaping FNT policy. These are the IEA report on Material for Fusion (December 1986) and the Summary of the Report of the Senior Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (September 1987). The U.S. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan defines four key technical issues (magnetic confinement systems, properties of burning plasmas, fusion nuclear technology, and fusion materials). (orig./KP)

  15. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study: Scoping phase report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN research program is a multi-institutional effort to determine the potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion concept as a compact, high-power-density, and ''attractive'' fusion energy system from economic (cost of electricity, COE), environmental, and operational viewpoints. In particular, a high neutron wall loading design (18 MW/m 2 ) has been chosen as the reference case in order to quantify the issue of engineering practicality, to determine the physics requirements and plasma operating mode, to assess significant benefits of compact systems, and to illuminate the main drawbacks. The program has been divided into two phases, each roughly one year in length: the Scoping Phase and the Design Phase. During the scoping phase, the TITAN design team has defined the parameter space for a high mass power density (MPD) RFP reactor, and explored a variety of approaches to the design of major subsystems. Two major design approaches consistent with high MPD and low COE, the lithium-vanadium blanket design and aqueous loop-in-pool design, have been selected for more detailed engineering evaluation in the design phase. The program has retained a balance in its approach to investigating high MPD systems. On the one hand, parametric investigations of both subsystems and overall system performance are carried out. On the other hand, more detailed analysis and engineering design and integration are performed, appropriate to determining the technical feasibility of the high MPD approach to RFP fusion reactors. This report describes the work of the scoping phase activities of the TITAN program. A synopsis of the principal technical findings and a brief description of the TITAN multiple-design approach is given. The individual chapters on Plasma Physics and Engineering, Parameter Systems Studies, Divertor, Reactor Engineering, and Fusion Power Core Engineering have been cataloged separately

  16. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study: Scoping phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    The TITAN research program is a multi-institutional effort to determine the potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion concept as a compact, high-power-density, and ''attractive'' fusion energy system from economic (cost of electricity, COE), environmental, and operational viewpoints. In particular, a high neutron wall loading design (18 MW/m/sup 2/) has been chosen as the reference case in order to quantify the issue of engineering practicality, to determine the physics requirements and plasma operating mode, to assess significant benefits of compact systems, and to illuminate the main drawbacks. The program has been divided into two phases, each roughly one year in length: the Scoping Phase and the Design Phase. During the scoping phase, the TITAN design team has defined the parameter space for a high mass power density (MPD) RFP reactor, and explored a variety of approaches to the design of major subsystems. Two major design approaches consistent with high MPD and low COE, the lithium-vanadium blanket design and aqueous loop-in-pool design, have been selected for more detailed engineering evaluation in the design phase. The program has retained a balance in its approach to investigating high MPD systems. On the one hand, parametric investigations of both subsystems and overall system performance are carried out. On the other hand, more detailed analysis and engineering design and integration are performed, appropriate to determining the technical feasibility of the high MPD approach to RFP fusion reactors. This report describes the work of the scoping phase activities of the TITAN program. A synopsis of the principal technical findings and a brief description of the TITAN multiple-design approach is given. The individual chapters on Plasma Physics and Engineering, Parameter Systems Studies, Divertor, Reactor Engineering, and Fusion Power Core Engineering have been cataloged separately.

  17. Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma Material Interaction Processes in Fusion. Summary Report of a Joint IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the Joint IAEA-NFRI Technical Meeting on 'Data Evaluation for Atomic, Molecular and Plasma Material Interaction Processes in Fusion' on 4-7 September 2012. Twenty five participants from 10 Member States and two from the IAEA attended the four-day meeting held at the Daejeon Convention Center in Daejeon, Republic of Korea hosted by the National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) in conjunction with the 8th International Symposium on Standard Reference Data. The report includes discussions on the issues of the critical assessment of fundamental data required for fusion and plasma applications, meeting conclusions and recommendations. The abstracts of presentations presented in the meeting are attached in the Appendix. (author)

  18. Technical issues for beryllium use in fusion blanket applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarville, T.J.; Berwald, D.H.; Wolfer, W.; Fulton, F.J.; Lee, J.D.; Maninger, R.C.; Moir, R.W.; Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Beryllium is an excellent non-fissioning neutron multiplier for fusion breeder and fusion electric blanket applications. This report is a compilation of information related to the use of beryllium with primary emphasis on the fusion breeder application. Beryllium resources, production, fabrication, properties, radiation damage and activation are discussed. A new theoretical model for beryllium swelling is presented

  19. Particle beam fusion progress report, January-June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    An overview and technical summaries are given for research progress in each of the following general areas: (1) fusion target studies; (2) target experiments; (3) particle beam source theory; (4) diagnostics development; (5) particle beam experiments; (6) pulsed power research and development; (7) pulse power application; and (8) Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator project

  20. TMX: a new fusion plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The primary goal of the magnetic fusion energy program at LLL is the development of a technically and economically feasible approach to the generation of fusion energy. Results from our earlier 2XIIB experiment lead us to believe that a fusion power plant based on a mirror system is technically feasible, assuming a favorable extrapolation to plasmas of reactor size. Achieving economic feasibility is more difficult. For power-producing applications, a reactor needs a large Q, the ratio of fusion power output to the power injected to sustain the system. In a conventional mirror reactor, the fusion power is only about equal to the power injected by the neutral beams--that is, Q is only about unity. A new idea, the tandem mirror concept described in this article, promises to increase this gain, enhancing Q by at least a factor of 5

  1. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1984-04-01

    KfK participates to the Fusion Technology Programme of the European Community. Most of the work in progress addresses the Next European Torus (NET) and the long term technology aspects as defined in the 82/86 programme. A minor part serves to preparation of future contributions and to design studies on fusion concepts in a wider perspective. The Fusion Technology Programme of Euratom covers mainly aspects of nuclear engineering. Plasma engineering, heating, refueling and vacuum technology are at present part of the Physics Programme. In view of NET, integration of the different areas of work will be mandatory. KfK is therefore prepared to address technical aspects beyond the actual scope of the physics experiments. The technology tasks are reported project wise under title and code of the Euratom programme. Most of the projects described here are shared with other European fusion laboratories as indicated in the table annexed to this report. (orig./GG)

  2. Research into thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, U.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical studies carried out in close international cooperation in the field of thermonuclear fusion by magnetic plasma confinement have achieved such progress towards higher plasma temperatures and densities, longer confinement times and, thus, increased fusion product, that emphasis now begins to be shifted from problems of physics to those of technology as a next major step is being prepared towards a large international project (ITER) to achieve thermonuclear burning. The generation and maintenance of a burning fusion plasma in an experimental physics phase will be followed by a phase of technical materials studies at high fluxes of fusion neutrons. These goals have been pursued since 1983 by an international study group at Garching working on the design of a Next European Torus (NET). Since May 1988, an international study group comprising ten experts each from the USSR, USA, Japan, and the European Community has begun to work on a design draft of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Garching under the auspices of IAEA. (orig.) [de

  3. Fusion Engineering Device design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein

  4. Fusion engineering device design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  5. Fusion engineering device design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein

  6. Fusion Safety Program annual report, fiscal year 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Cadwallader, L.C.; Herring, J.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in fiscal year 1992. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory and EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating organizations including the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving beryllium, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment failure rate data base, and computer code development for reactor transients. Also included in the report is a summary of the safety and environmental studies performed by the INEL for the Tokamak Physics Experiments and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, the safety analysis for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design, and the technical support for the ARIES commercial reactor design study

  7. Peaceful fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englert, Matthias [IANUS, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Like other intense neutron sources fusion reactors have in principle a potential to be used for military purposes. Although the use of fissile material is usually not considered when thinking of fusion reactors (except in fusion-fission hybrid concepts) quantitative estimates about the possible production potential of future commercial fusion reactor concepts show that significant amounts of weapon grade fissile materials could be produced even with very limited amounts of source materials. In this talk detailed burnup calculations with VESTA and MCMATH using an MCNP model of the PPCS-A will be presented. We compare different irradiation positions and the isotopic vectors of the plutonium bred in different blankets of the reactor wall with the liquid lead-lithium alloy replaced by uranium. The technical, regulatory and policy challenges to manage the proliferation risks of fusion power will be addressed as well. Some of these challenges would benefit if addressed at an early stage of the research and development process. Hence, research on fusion reactor safeguards should start as early as possible and accompany the current research on experimental fusion reactors.

  8. Protein-induced fusion can be modulated by target membrane lipids through a structural switch at the level of the fusion peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pecheur, EI; Martin, [No Value; Bienvenue, A; Ruysschaert, JM; Hoekstra, D

    2000-01-01

    Regulatory features of protein-induced membrane fusion are largely unclear, particularly at the level of the fusion peptide. Fusion peptides being part of larger protein complexes, such investigations are met with technical limitations. Here, we show that the fusion activity of influenza virus or

  9. Evaluations of fusion-fission (hybrid) concepts: market penetration analysis for fusion-fission hybrids. Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, R.L.; Deonigi, D.E.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes findings of the fusion-fission studies conducted for the Electric Power Research Institute by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. This particular study focused on the evaluation of fissile material producing hybrids. Technical results of the evaluation of actinide burning are presented in a companion volume, Part B

  10. Fusion Canada issue 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a technical update on Tokamak de Varennes, a report on the Beatrix II Breeding Materials Test Program, the Tritium glovebox system for UPM, Saudi Arabia, a broad update of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project is also included. 1 fig

  11. Fusion Canada issue 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a technical update on Tokamak de Varennes, a report on the Beatrix II Breeding Materials Test Program, the Tritium glovebox system for UPM, Saudi Arabia, a broad update of the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project is also included. 1 fig.

  12. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudziak, D.J.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1986-07-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Systems Assessment (HIFSA) study was conducted with the specific objective of evaluating the prospects of using induction linac drivers to generate economical electrical power from inertial confinement fusion. The study used algorithmic models of representative components of a fusion system to identify favored areas in the multidimensional parameter space. The resulting cost-of-electricity (COE) projections are comparable to those from other (magnetic) fusion scenarios, at a plant size of 100 MWe

  14. Prospects for alternative Fusion Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glancy, J.

    1986-01-01

    The author has worked on three different magnetic confinement concepts for alternate fusion fueled reactors: tokamaks; tanden mirrors, and reversed field pinches. The focus of this article is on prospects for alternate fusion fuels as the author sees them relative to the other choices: increased numbers of coal plants, fission reactors, renewables, and D-T fusion. Discussion is limited on the consideration of alternate fusion fuels to the catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fuel cycle. Reasons for seeking an alternate energy source are cost, a more secure fuel supply, environmental impact and safety. The technical risks associated with development of fusion are examined briefly

  15. Occipitocervical fusions in children. Retrospective analysis and technical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, W B; Coran, D L; Emans, J B; Hresko, M T; Hall, J E

    1999-07-01

    This report presents a retrospective analysis of the authors' experience with occipitocervical fusions in children and adolescents during the last 2 decades. A description of an operative technique devised by the senior author (JEH), and a comparison of the results using this and other methods of fusion are given. Twenty-three patients underwent occipitocervical fusion. Fifteen of the patients were operated on using the authors' technique. To achieve stable fixation of the distal cervical vertebra a threaded Kirschner wire was passed transversely through the spinous process; occipital fixation was achieved by the traditional method of wiring corticocancellous bone graft to the skull through burr holes. The occipital wires then were wrapped around the Kirschner wire and the graft was cradled in the resulting nest. Halo immobilization was used in 10 patients for an average of 12.5 weeks (range, 6-24 weeks). Twenty-two patients achieved successful fusion at an average followup of 5.8 years (range, 1-14.33 years). Several complications, including transient quadriplegia in one patient, pseudarthrosis in two (one of which persists), hardware fixation failure in one, unintended distal extension of the fusion, pneumonia, wound infection, halo pin infection, skin breakdown under the halo vest, hydrocephalus, cerebrospinal fluid leak, and traumatic fusion fracture were encountered. Results using the technique described herein are comparable with or better than the results reported in the previous literature, and the results of the patients in this series in whom the technique was not used.

  16. What have fusion reactor studies done for you today?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulchinski, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin examines the fusion program and puts into perspective what return is being made on investments in fusion reactor studies. Illustations show financial support for fusion research from the four major programs, FY'82 expenditures on fusion research, and the total expenditures on fusion research since 1951. Topics discussed include the estimated number of scientists conducting fusion research, the conceptual design study of a fusion reactor, scoping study of a reactor, the chronology of fusion reactor design studies, published fusion reactor studies 1967-1983, conceptual fusion reactor design studies, STARFIRE reference design, MARS central cell, HYLIFE reaction chamber, and selected contributions of reactor design studies to base programs

  17. 50 years of fusion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Fusion energy research began in the early 1950s as scientists worked to harness the awesome power of the atom for peaceful purposes. There was early optimism for a quick solution for fusion energy as there had been for fission. However, this was soon tempered by reality as the difficulty of producing and confining fusion fuel at temperatures of 100 million °C in the laboratory was appreciated. Fusion research has followed two main paths—inertial confinement fusion and magnetic confinement fusion. Over the past 50 years, there has been remarkable progress with both approaches, and now each has a solid technical foundation that has led to the construction of major facilities that are aimed at demonstrating fusion energy producing plasmas.

  18. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This Plan reflects the present conditions of the energy situation and is consistent with national priorities for the support of basic and applied research. It is realistic in taking advantage of the technical position that the United States has already established in fusion research to make cost-effective progress toward the development of fusion power as a future energy option

  19. Final Technical Report for "Nuclear Technologies for Near Term Fusion Devices"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul P.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sawan, Mohamed E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Davis, Andrew [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Bohm, Tim D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-09-05

    Over approximately 18 years, this project evolved to focus on a number of related topics, all tied to the nuclear analysis of fusion energy systems. For the earliest years, the University of Wisconsin (UW)’s effort was in support of the Advanced Power Extraction (APEX) study to investigate high power density first wall and blanket systems. A variety of design concepts were studied before this study gave way to a design effort for a US Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be installed in ITER. Simultaneous to this TBM project, nuclear analysis supported the conceptual design of a number of fusion nuclear science facilities that might fill a role in the path to fusion energy. Beginning in approximately 2005, this project added a component focused on the development of novel radiation transport software capability in support of the above nuclear analysis needs. Specifically, a clear need was identified to support neutron and photon transport on the complex geometries associated with Computer-Aided Design (CAD). Following the initial development of the Direct Accelerated Geoemtry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) capability, additional features were added, including unstructured mesh tallies and multi-physics analysis such as the Rigorous 2-Step (R2S) methodology for Shutdown Dose Rate (SDR) prediction. Throughout the project, there were also smaller tasks in support of the fusion materials community and for the testing of changes to the nuclear data that is fundamental to this kind of nuclear analysis.

  20. Outline of cold nuclear fusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Enzo

    1991-01-01

    In 2010, as the total supply capacity of primary energy, 666 million liter is anticipated under the measures of thorough energy conservation. The development of energy sources along the energy policy based on environment preservation, safety, the quantity of resources and economy is strongly demanded. The nuclear power generation utilizing nuclear fission has been successfully carried out. As the third means of energy production, the basic research and technical development have been actively advanced on the energy production utilizing nuclear fusion reaction. The main object of the nuclear fusion research being advanced now is D-D reaction and D-T reaction. In order to realize low temperature nuclear fusion reaction, muon nuclear fusion has been studied so far. The cold nuclear fusion reaction by the electrolysis of heavy water has been reported in 1989, and its outline is ixplained in this report. The trend of the research on cold nuclear fusion is described. But the possibility of cold nuclear fusion as an energy source is almost denied. (K.I.)

  1. Nuclear fusion: The issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    The taming of fusion energy, has proved one of the most elusive quests of modern science. For four decades, the United States has doggedly pursued energy's holy grail, pumping more than $9 billion into research and reactor prototypes. This year, the federal government is slated to spend $339 million on fusion, more than the combined amount the government will spend for research on oil, natural gas, solar power, wind power, geothermal energy, biofuels and conservation. This article summarizes the technical, political in terms of international cooperation, economic, planning, etc. issues surrounding the continued development of fusion as a possible power source for the next century. Brief descriptions of how fusion works and of the design of a tokamak fusion machine are included

  2. Anato-metabolic fusion of PET, CT and MRI images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przetak, C.; Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A.; Slomka, P.; Proeschild, A.; Leonhardi, J.

    2000-01-01

    The fusion of cross-sectional images - especially in oncology - appears to be a very helpful tool to improve the diagnostic and therapeutic accuracy. Though many advantages exist, image fusion is applied routinely only in a few hospitals. To introduce image fusion as a common procedure, technical and logistical conditions have to be fulfilled which are related to long term archiving of digital data, data transfer and improvement of the available software in terms of usefulness and documentation. The accuracy of coregistration and the quality of image fusion has to be validated by further controlled studies. (orig.) [de

  3. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume 1. Mission and program summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This volume presents, in summary form, a recommended approach to implementing the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980. These recommendations constitute the findings of the FED Technical Management Board (TMB). The TMB and the affiliated technical managers gave particular scrutiny to elucidating the role of FED in fusion development and to defining the device mission

  4. The US fusion materials program: Status and directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1987-05-01

    The general long term objective of the Fusion Materials Program of the Office of Fusion Energy is the development of new or improved materials that will enhance the economic and environmental attractiveness of fusion as an energy source. The US Magnetic Fusion Program Plan, as augmented by the Technical Planning Activity (TPA), calls for information to be developed on critical issues such that a decision can be made by about 2005 on whether to pursue fusion as a viable energy source. Viability will be evaluated in at least four areas: technical, economic, environmental, and safety. The Fusion Materials Program addresses directly only the magnetic confinement option, although some of the information gained is applicable to the alternative approach of inertial confinement. The scope of this paper is limited to programs in which a primary concern is bulk neutron radiation effects, as opposed to those in which the primary concern is interaction of the materials with the plasma. 14 refs

  5. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  6. Fusion reactor materials: Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This is the third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performances; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  7. Study on fission blanket fuel cycling of a fusion-fission hybrid energy generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on neutron physics characteristics of a light water cooled fission blanket for a new type subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor aiming at electric power generation with low technical limits of fission fuel. The major objective is to study the fission fuel cycling performance in the blanket, which may possess significant impacts on the feasibility of the new concept of fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a high energy gain (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The COUPLE2 code developed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University is employed to simulate the neutronic behaviour in the blanket. COUPLE2 combines the particle transport code MCNPX with the fuel depletion code ORIGEN2. The code calculation results show that soft neutron spectrum can yield M > 20 while maintaining TBR >1.15 and the conversion ratio of fissile materials CR > 1 in a reasonably long refuelling cycle (>five years). The preliminary results also indicate that it is rather promising to design a high-performance light water cooled fission blanket of fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation by directly loading natural or depleted uranium if an ITER-scale tokamak fusion neutron source is achievable.

  8. Revised assessments of the economics of fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, W.E.; Ward, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Although fusion power is being developed because of its large resource base, low environmental impact and high levels of intrinsic safety, it is also important to investigate the economics of a future fusion power plant in order to assess the potential market for the electricity produced. As part of the PPCS (Power Plant Conceptual Study) in Europe, published in 2005, an assessment was made of the likely economic performance of the range of fusion power plant concepts studied. Since that time, new work has been carried out, within the fusion programme, and particularly in the EU DEMO study, that changes a number of the important assumptions made in the PPCS. These changes allow either reduced cost versions of the PPCS plant models or, alternatively, plants with less ambitious technical assumptions at constant cost. The impact of the new results, emerging from the EU DEMO studies, on the role of fusion in the future energy market is described. A new energy economics model is employed to analyse the potential market performance of fusion power in a range of future energy scenarios and this shows that there can be a significant role for fusion in a future energy market.

  9. Addressing Common Technical challenges in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Donald A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-22

    The implosion phase for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) occurs from initiation of the drive until just before stagnation. Evolution of the shell and fusion fuel during the implosion phase is affected by the initial conditions of the target, the drive history. Poor performing implosions are a result of the behavior that occurs during the implosion phase such as low mode asymmetries, mixing of the ablator into the fuel, and the hydrodynamic evolution of initial target features and defects such as the shell mounting hardware. The ultimate results of these effects can only be measured at stagnation. However, studying the implosion phase can be effective for understanding and mitigating these effects and for of ultimately improving the performance of ICF implosions. As the ICF program moves towards the 2020 milestone to “determine the efficacy of ignition”, it will be important to understand the physics that occurs during the implosion phase. This will require both focused and integrated experiments. Focused experiments will provide the understanding and the evidence needed to support any determination concerning the efficacy of ignition.

  10. Addressing Common Technical challenges in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    The implosion phase for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) occurs from initiation of the drive until just before stagnation. Evolution of the shell and fusion fuel during the implosion phase is affected by the initial conditions of the target, the drive history. Poor performing implosions are a result of the behavior that occurs during the implosion phase such as low mode asymmetries, mixing of the ablator into the fuel, and the hydrodynamic evolution of initial target features and defects such as the shell mounting hardware. The ultimate results of these effects can only be measured at stagnation. However, studying the implosion phase can be effective for understanding and mitigating these effects and for of ultimately improving the performance of ICF implosions. As the ICF program moves towards the 2020 milestone to ''determine the efficacy of ignition'', it will be important to understand the physics that occurs during the implosion phase. This will require both focused and integrated experiments. Focused experiments will provide the understanding and the evidence needed to support any determination concerning the efficacy of ignition.

  11. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  12. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial fusion power plant designs - summary, conclusions, and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, Wayne R.

    1994-01-01

    An 18 month study to evaluate the potential of inertial fusion energy (IFE) for electric power production has been completed. The primary objective of the study was to provide the US Department of Energy with an evaluation of the potential of inertial fusion for electric power production. The study included the conceptual design of two inertial fusion power plants. Osiris uses an induction linac heavy ion beam driver, and SOMBRERO uses a krypton fluoride laser driver. Conceptual designs were completed for the reactors, power conversion and plant facilities, and drivers. Environmental and safety aspects, technical issues, technology development needs, and economics of the final point designs were assessed and compared. This paper summarizes the results and conclusions of the conceptual designs and results of the assessment studies. We conclude that IFE has the potential of producing technically credible designs with environmental, safety, and economics characteristics that are just as attractive as magnetic fusion. Realizing this potential will require additional research and development on target physics, chamber design, target production and injection systems, and drivers. ((orig.))

  13. Snowmass Fusion Summer Study Group workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Snowmass Fusion Summer Study Group workshop, has taken place at Snowmass, Colorado, 11-23 July 1999. Its purpose was to discuss opportunities and directions in fusion energy science for the next decade. About 300 experts from all fields in the magnetic and inertial fusion communities attended, coming mostly from the US, but with some foreign participation

  14. Repair welding of fusion reactor components. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, B.A.; Wang, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure of metallic materials, such as structural components of the first wall and blanket of a fusion reactor, to neutron irradiation will induce changes in both the material composition and microstructure. Along with these changes can come a corresponding deterioration in mechanical properties resulting in premature failure. It is, therefore, essential to expect that the repair and replacement of the degraded components will be necessary. Such repairs may require the joining of irradiated materials through the use of fusion welding processes. The present ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) conceptual design is anticipated to have about 5 km of longitudinal welds and ten thousand pipe butt welds in the blanket structure. A recent study by Buende et al. predict that a failure is most likely to occur in a weld. The study is based on data from other large structures, particularly nuclear reactors. The data used also appear to be consistent with the operating experience of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This reactor has a fuel pin area comparable with the area of the ITER first wall and has experienced one unanticipated fuel pin failure after two years of operation. The repair of irradiated structures using fusion welding will be difficult due to the entrapped helium. Due to its extremely low solubility in metals, helium will diffuse and agglomerate to form helium bubbles after being trapped at point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Welding of neutron-irradiated type 304 stainless steels has been reported with varying degree of heat-affected zone cracking (HAZ). The objectives of this study were to determine the threshold helium concentrations required to cause HAZ cracking and to investigate techniques that might be used to eliminate the HAZ cracking in welding of helium-containing materials

  15. An exploratory study on the gaps and pathways to the Korean fusion DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyuck Jong; Heo, Gyunyoung; Kim, Hyung Chan; Yeom, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung; Lee, Young-seok; Kwon, Myeun; Lee, Gyung-Su; Kim, Yong-soo; Kim, Eunbae; Lee, Chul-sik

    2012-01-01

    With the vision of being an early demonstrator of fusion energy, the strategic plans for the Fusion DEMO program of Korea (K-DEMO program) has been developed. A staged development of the K-DEMO plant was considered in the strategic plans as to verify technical feasibility in the first stage and economic feasibility in the second stage. The top-tier design requirements and assumptions of the first stage K-DEMO plant are defined and postulated. With these requirements and assumptions, the desired and current status of nuclear fusion technologies are compared to identify the gaps to be filled to design, fabricate, construct, and operate it. The pathways from KSTAR, ITER to K-DEMO plant have also been studied to identify R and D activities for K-DEMO program that are to go in parallel with KSTAR and ITER are extracted from the pathways. Cross-cutting with the fusion R and D activities of the other countries and utilizing the commonalities with the existing systems are discussed with the provision of open-innovation strategy that is one of the key strategies of K-DEMO program. The priority of the R and D activities of K-DEMO program is qualitatively determined in consideration of the gaps, cross-cutting, and risks associated with the R and D investments.

  16. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FY86 FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yamada, Masao; Mizoguchi, Tadanori

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the results of the reactor configuration/structure design for the fusion experimental reactor (FER) performed in FY 1986. The design was intended to meet the physical and engineering mission of the next step device which was decided by the subcommittee on the next step device of the nuclear fusion council. The objectives of the design study in FY 1986 are to advance and optimize the design concept of the last year because the recommendation of the subcommittee was basically the same as the design philosophy of the last year. Six candidate reactor configurations which correspond to options C ∼ D presented by the subcommittee were extensively examined. Consequently, ACS reactor (Advanced Option-C with Single Null Divertor) was selected as the reference configuration from viewpoints of technical risks and cost performance. Regarding the reactor structure, the following items were investigated intensively: minimization of reactor size, protection of first wall against plasma disruption, simplification of shield structure, reactor configuration which enables optimum arrangement of poloidal field coils. (author)

  17. The status of beryllium technology for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R. E-mail: gx1@inel.gov; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H

    2000-12-01

    Beryllium was used for a number of years in the Joint European Torus (JET), and it is planned to be used extensively on the lower heat-flux surfaces of the reduced technical objective/reduced cost international thermonuclear experimental reactor (RTO/RC ITER). It has been included in various forms in a number of tritium breeding blanket designs. There are technical advantages but also a number of safety issues associated with the use of beryllium. Research in a variety of technical areas in recent years has revealed interesting issues concerning the use of beryllium in fusion. Progress in this research has been presented at a series of International Workshops on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The most recent workshop was held in Karlsruhe, Germany on 15-17 September 1999. In this paper, a summary of findings presented there and their implications for the use of beryllium in the development of fusion reactors are presented.

  18. The status of beryllium technology for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R.; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Beryllium was used for a number of years in the Joint European Torus (JET), and it is planned to be used extensively on the lower heat-flux surfaces of the reduced technical objective/reduced cost international thermonuclear experimental reactor (RTO/RC ITER). It has been included in various forms in a number of tritium breeding blanket designs. There are technical advantages but also a number of safety issues associated with the use of beryllium. Research in a variety of technical areas in recent years has revealed interesting issues concerning the use of beryllium in fusion. Progress in this research has been presented at a series of International Workshops on Beryllium Technology for Fusion. The most recent workshop was held in Karlsruhe, Germany on 15-17 September 1999. In this paper, a summary of findings presented there and their implications for the use of beryllium in the development of fusion reactors are presented

  19. Microscopic study on dynamic barrier in fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xizhen; Tian Junlong; Zhao Kai; Li Zhuxia; Wang Ning

    2004-01-01

    The authors briefly review the fusion process of very heavy nuclear systems and some theoretical models. The authors propose a microscopic transport dynamic model, i.e. the Improved Quantum Molecular Dynamic model, for describing fusion reactions of heavy systems, in which the dynamical behavior of the fusion barrier in heavy fusion systems has been studied firstly. The authors find that with the incident energy decreasing the lowest dynamic barrier is obtained which approaches to the adiabatic static barrier and with increase of the incident energy the dynamic barrier goes up to the diabatic static barrier. The authors also indicate that how the dynamical fusion barrier is correlated with the development of the configuration of fusion partners along the fusion path. Associating the single-particle potentials obtained at different stages of fusion with the Two Center Shell Model, authors can study the time evolution of the single particle states of fusion system in configuration space of single particle orbits along the fusion path. (author)

  20. 1983 Annual technical report on inertial fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, D.E.; Monsler, M.J.; Terry, N.C.

    1984-03-01

    An overview of the laser fusion program at KMS Fusion is presented. A two-beam laser (1053 nm and 527 nm) system is used for the implosion physics. Stimulated Raman scattering is used to examine the implosion region for high-energy electrons. Holographic and fringe analysis techniques are also used in the diagnostics of the plasma. Computational techniques based on two-plasmon decay are shock-fitting techniques in Lagrangian hydrocodes are also described. Glass shell technology for laser targets is given. The design of the Chemically Pumped Iodine Laser (CPIL) is also presented. 86 refs., 46 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Fusion advanced studies Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The successful development of ITER and DEMO scenarios requires preparatory activities on devices that are smaller than ITER, sufficiently flexible and capable of investigating the peculiar physics of burning plasma conditions. The aim of the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST) proposal [2.1] (formerly FT3 [2.2]) is to show that the preparation of ITER scenarios and the development of new expertise for the DEMO design and RD can be effectively implemented on a new facility. FAST will a) operate with deuterium plasmas, thereby avoiding problems associated with tritium, and allow investigation of nonlinear dynamics (which are important for understanding alpha particle behaviour in burning plasmas) by using fast ions accelerated by heating and current drive systems; b) work in a dimensionless parameter range close to that of ITER; c) test technical innovative solutions, such as full-tungsten plasma-facing components and an advanced liquid metal divertor target for the first wall/divertor, directly relevant for ITER and DEMO; d) exploit advanced regimes with a much longer pulse duration than the current diffusion time; e) provide a test bed for ITER and DEMO diagnostics; f) provide an ideal framework for model and numerical code benchmarks, their verification and validation in ITER/ DEMO-relevant plasma conditions

  2. Research and development plan of fusion technologies in JAERI toward DEMO reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Hayashi, Takumi; Abe, Tetsuya; Akiba, Masato; Isono, Takaaki; Inoue, Takashi; Enoeda, Mikio; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Sakamoto, Keishi; Sato, Satoshi; Jitsukawa, Shiro; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Seki, Shogo; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Tanzawa, Sadamitsu; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Nishi, Masataka; Hayashi, Kimio; Matsui, Hideki; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2005-03-01

    In accordance with the 'Third Phase Basic Program on Fusion Research and Development' established by the Fusion Council of the Japan Atomic Energy Commission, research and development (R and D) of fusion technologies aim at realization of two elements: development of ITER key components and their improvement for higher performances; and construction of sound technical basis of fusion nuclear technologies essential for fusion energy utilization. JAERI has been assigned in the Third Phase Basic Program as a responsible institute for developing the above two elements, and accordingly has been implementing technology R and Ds categorized in the following three areas: R and D for ITER construction and operation; R and D for ITER utilization (blanket testing in ITER) and toward DEMO; and R and D on basic fusion technologies. The present report reviews the status and the plan of fusion technology R and Ds in the latter two areas, and presents the technical objectives, technical issues, status of R and D and near-term R and D plans for: breeding blankets; structural materials; the IFMIF program; improvements of the key ITER components for higher performances toward DEMO; and basic fusion technologies. (author)

  3. Magnetic fusion program in the United States: an overview and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    Continuing technical progress in magnetic fusion energy research and a coherent national program involving national laboratories, industry and universities has won strong support from the new Department of Energy. This review presents recent technical progress and examines fusion in relation to other long term energy supply options. Fusion is seen as a technology which, because of its apparently minimal environmental impacts and promise of reasonable cost, has a good chance of competing successfully with the other inexhaustible energy sources

  4. Vacuum fusion of uranium; Fusion de l'uranium sous vide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J. A.

    1957-06-04

    After having outlined that vacuum fusion and moulding of uranium and of its alloys have some technical and economic benefits (vacuum operations avoid uranium oxidation and result in some purification; precision moulding avoids machining, chip production and chemical reprocessing of these chips; direct production of the desired shape is possible by precision moulding), this report presents the uranium fusion unit (its low pressure enclosure and pumping device, the crucible-mould assembly, and the MF supply device). The author describes the different steps of cast production, and briefly comments the obtained results.

  5. Design study of laser fusion rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Shoyama, Hidetoshi; Kanda, Yukinori

    1991-01-01

    A design study was made on a rocket powered by laser fusion. Dependence of its flight performance on target gain, driver repetition rate and fuel composition was analyzed to obtain optimal design parameters of the laser fusion rocket. The results indicate that the laser fusion rocket fueled with DT or D 3 He has the potential advantages over other propulsion systems such as fission rocket for interplanetary travel. (author)

  6. ITER: Fusion research at the dawn of a new era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.

    2002-01-01

    Given the expected success of on-going negotiations on the Joint Implementing Agreement for ITER construction and operation, a new era is opening in which fusion laboratories will have more dependable external support where they follow programmes supporting fusion as an energy source. The ITER design, cost estimate and safety analysis are supported by a large body of validating physics and technology R and D. The main features of the design, and analysis of its performance, give confidence that it will fulfil its technical objectives and demonstrate the environmental attractiveness of fusion. This paper gives illustrative confirmation of these expectations and an update on the technical preparations for construction, as well as the status of negotiations. These show that ITER is the right next step, integrating the appropriate physics and technology, making the proper technical and financial compromise and being conducted within an international framework, to advance fusion towards the objective of becoming an energy source in the foreseeable future. (author)

  7. Fusion energy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are considered: (1) cryosorption vacuum pumping for fusion reactors, (2) TNS support studies, (3) tritium recovery from irradiated Li-Al and SAP, (4) actinide oxides, nitrides, and carbides, and (5) transition metal-actinide-C phase equilibria

  8. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, Hutch

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear fusion — the process that powers the sun — offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITER fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world’s population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW’s task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.)

  9. Methodology for technical risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waganer, L.M.; Zuckerman, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for and applied to the assessment of the technical risks associated with an evolving technology. This methodology, originally developed for fusion by K. W. Billman and F. R. Scott at EPRI, has been applied to assess the technical risk of a fuel system for a fusion reactor. Technical risk is defined as the risk that a particular technology or component which is currently under development will not achieve a set of required technical specifications (i.e. probability of failure). The individual steps in the technical risk assessment are summarized. The first step in this methodology is to clearly and completely quantify the technical requirements for the particular system being examined. The next step is to identify and define subsystems and various options which appear capable of achieving the required technical performance. The subsystem options are then characterized regarding subsystem functions, interface requirements with the subsystems and systems, important components, developmental obstacles and technical limitations. Key technical subsystem performance parameters are identified which directly or indirectly relate to the system technical specifications. Past, existing and future technical performance data from subsystem experts are obtained by using a Bayesian Interrogation technique. The input data is solicited in the form of probability functions. Thus the output performance of the system is expressed as probability functions

  10. Technic and economic viability study on exploitation of lunar 3He resource

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan

    1995-01-01

    From the energetics point of view, the technic and economic viability study on exploitation of lunar 3 He for fuelling the fusion reactor burning D- 3 He has been carried out. This study is divided into the following sections: analysis of solar wind parameters and estimation of potential quantity 3 He in the lunar regolith, the cost evaluation of mining He of lunar soil; the energy cost calculation of He extraction by vacuum heating degassing during lunar day, the cost calculation of cryogenic isotopic separation 3 He/ 4 He during the lunar night, the energy cost for earth/moon transportation of liquid 3 He, the energy payback calculation of fusion power burning 3 He based lunar source, and finally the comparison of the energy multiplication with that for 235 U production of nuclear fuel and for coal mining. The comparisons of cost of electricity between D- 3 He and D-T fuel cycle for different reactor types have been discussed

  11. Review projects for the US Fusion Program: Progress report, December 1, 1984-February 28, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribe, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews projects at the University of Washington on the following topics: Magnetic Fusion Energy Program Plan (Feb. 1985); High Density Power Systems; Fusion Systems Studies; Burning Plasmas and Compact Ignition Tokamak; US Magnetic Mirror Program; and Technical Planning Activity (Jan. 1987)

  12. Fusion reactor materials. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee`, S.S.; Dowker, C.L. [comps.

    1994-02-01

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  13. Discussion on Safety Analysis and Regulatory Framework for the Future Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Myoung-suk; Oh, Kyemin; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This study aims to secure the core original technologies and expand the base of domestic specialist at a fusion area by pursuing and developing nonprocurement technologies for ITER. From this project, the latest technical data and experiences have been recorded for the development of the safety regulation and safety-related design criteria of the future fusion reactors in Korea. In this context, this paper discusses on the progress of surveying the ITER licensing process and regulatory issues revealed. The regulation and licensing process for a fusion power plant has been expected to be quite different due to unique and unforeseen properties differently from the conventional nuclear facilities. To overcome this, not only various safety issues should be analyzed, but safety objectives, regulatory requirements, and design variables should also be established in detailed design phase. We expect our survey will contribute on the discussion to establish general and technical safety principles for national fusion power plant technology plans.

  14. HFR irradiation testing of fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; von der Hardt, P.; Loelgen, R.; Scheurer, H.; Zeisser, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present and future role of the High Flux Reactor Petten for fusion materials testing has been assessed. For practical purposes the Tokamak-based fusion reactor is chosen as a point of departure to identify material problems and materials data needs. The identification is largely based on the INTOR and NET design studies, the reported programme strategies of Japan, the U.S.A. and the European Communities for technical development of thermonuclear fusion reactors and on interviews with several experts. Existing and planned irradiation facilities, their capabilities and limitations concerning materials testing have been surveyed and discussed. It is concluded that fission reactors can supply important contributions for fusion materials testing. From the point of view of future availability of fission testing reactors and their performance it appears that the HFR is a useful tool for materials testing for a large variety of materials. Prospects and recommendations for future developments are given

  15. Code of a Tokamak Fusion Energy Facility ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhide Asada; Kenzo Miya; Kazuhiko Hada; Eisuke Tada

    2002-01-01

    The technical structural code for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Fusion Reactor) and, as more generic applications, for D-T burning fusion power facilities (hereafter, Fusion Code) should be innovative because of their quite different features of safety and mechanical components from nuclear fission reactors, and the necessity of introducing several new fabrication and examination technologies. Introduction of such newly developed technologies as inspection-free automatic welding into the Fusion Code is rationalized by a pilot application of a new code concept of s ystem-based code for integrity . The code concept means an integration of element technical items necessary for construction, operation and maintenance of mechanical components of fusion power facilities into a single system to attain an optimization of the total margin of these components. Unique and innovative items of the Fusion Code are typically as follows: - Use of non-metals; - Cryogenic application; - New design margins on allowable stresses, and other new design rules; - Use of inspection-free automatic welding, and other newly developed fabrication technologies; - Graded approach of quality assurance standard to cover radiological safety-system components as well as non-safety-system components; - Consideration on replacement components. (authors)

  16. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, technical research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    Research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature fusion plasmas (plasma theory, RF heating, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator A and C tokamaks, including pioneering investigations of the equilibrium, stability, transport and radiation properties of fusion plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of a new and innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experimental facility scheduled for 1983; and (4) a broadly based program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas

  17. Fusion power plant availability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladra, D.; Sanguinetti, G.P.; Stube, E.

    2001-01-01

    The consideration of fusion as an alternative energy source will need to demonstrate that Fusion Power Plant (FPP) design, operating and maintenance characteristics meet the electrical market requirements forecast for the second half of this century. Until now, fusion has been developed in the framework of research and development programmes following natural technological trends. To bring a greater sense of realism to commercial viability and to guarantee that technology-driven fusion development responds to the demands of the market, a conceptual study of future commercial FPPs has been performed with a Power Plant Availability (PPA) study aimed at identifying the aspects affecting the availability and generating costs of FPPs. EFET, who has also been involved in the study, can visualise it from two different points of view; that of the industry (ANSALDO, IBERTEF, SIEMENS, NNC) and that of the utilities (BELGATOM, FRAMATOME, FORTUM). The work carried out covered the following points: socio-economic forecasting; safety and licensing; operation and maintenance; waste and decommissioning; availability and reliability. The following are the most relevant findings, conclusions and recommendations for all these aspects: Demonstrate definitively that the physical principles of nuclear fusion have been validated by means of experiments; Establish a European Industrial Group to support the demonstration phases; Create the financial and contracting framework required to construct these installations. Secure the necessary budgets for the European Union's 5th and 6th Research Programmes. Look for supplementary long term financing sources; The existing Regulatory Bodies should combine to form a single Working Group with responsibility for fusion reactor safety and licensing activities, working on the harmonisation of the regulatory processes, developing FPP safety criteria and guidelines and reviewing industry standards; To be competitive, FPPs should have high availability

  18. Fusion Safety Program Annual Report, Fiscal Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY 1996. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in 1979. The objective is to perform research and develop data needed to ensure safety in fusion facilities. Activities include experiments, analysis, code development and application, and other forms of research. These activities are conducted at the INEL, at other DOE laboratories, and at other institutions. Among the technical areas covered in this report are tritium safety, chemical reactions and activation product release, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Work done for ITER this year has focused on developing the needed information for the Non- Site- Specific Safety Report (NSSR-1). A final area of activity described is development of the new DOE Technical Standards for Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities

  19. Safety considerations in next step fusion design and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Recent U.S. and international design studies provide insights into the potential safety and environmental advantages of fusion as well as the development needed to realize this potential. We in the Fusion Safety Program at EG ampersand G Idaho have analyzed the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER), and the Advanced Reactor Innovative Engineering Study (ARIES). I have reviewed these three designs to determine issues related to meeting the safety and the environmental goals that guide fusion development in the U.S. The paper lists safety and environmental issues that are generic to fusion and approaches to favorably resolve each issue. The technical developments that have the highest potential of contributing to improving the safety and environmental attractiveness of fusion are identified and discussed. These developments are in the areas of low-activation materials, plasma- facing components, and plasma physics relating to off-normal plasma events and tritium burn-up. 8 refs., 7 tabs

  20. FUSION technology programme 2003-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karttunen, S.; Rantamaeki, K.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarises the results of the FUSION technology programme during the period between 2003-2006. FUSION is a continuation of the previous FFusion and FFusion2 technology programmes that took place from 1993 to 2002. The FUSION technology programme was fully integrated into the European Fusion Programme in the sixth Framework Programme (Euratom), through the bilateral Contract of Association between Euratom and Tekes and the multilateral European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA). The Association Euratom-Tekes was established in 1995. At the moment, there are 26 Euratom Fusion associations working together as an European Research Area. There are four research areas in the FUSION technology programme: (1) fusion physics and plasma engineering, (2) vessel/in-vessel materials, joints and components, (3) in-vessel remote handling systems, and (4) system studies. The FUSION team consists of research groups from the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT), the Helsinki, Tampere and Lappeenranta Universities of Technology and the University of Helsinki. The co-ordinating unit is VTT. A key element of the FUSION programme is the close collaboration between VTT, the universities and the industry, which has resulted in dynamic and sufficiently large research teams to tackle challenging research and development projects. The distribution of work between research institutes and industry has also been clear. Industrial activities related to the FUSION programme are co-ordinated through the 'Big Science' Project by Finpro and Prizztech. The total expenditure of the FUSION technology programme for 2003-2006 amounted to euro 14,9 million in research work at VTT and the universities with an additional euro 3,5 million for projects by the Finnish companies including the industry co-ordination. The funding of the FUSION programme and related industrial projects was mainly provided by Tekes (37%), Euratom (38%) and the participating institutes and industry (24%). The

  1. Review of fusion DEMO reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yasushi

    1996-01-01

    Fusion DEMO Reactor is defined and the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept is introduced as a typical example of a DEMO reactor. Recent DEMO reactor studies in Japan and abroad are introduced. The DREAM Reactor concept is introduced as an ultimate target of fusion research. (author)

  2. Cold fusion reactors and new modern physics

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    The author of the "modern physics classical particle quantization orbital motion model general solution", referred to as the “new modern physics” a book. “The nuclear force constraint inertial guidance cold nuclear fusion collides” patent of invention referred to as the “cold nuclear fusion reactor” detailed technical data. Now provide to you, hope you help spread and the mainstream of modern physics of academic and fusion engineering academic communication. We work together to promote the c...

  3. Status report on controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The International Fusion Research Council has prepared this report on the current status of fusion, an update of its 1978 report, at the request of the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The report consists of an introductory note by the Director General, an Executive Summary and General Overview published in this document, and a series of technical reports. The background of fusion as an energy source is documented and compared with fission. The two approaches to thermonuclear fusion, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement, are discussed. The viability with respect to economic, environmental, and safety aspects is discussed. Fusion programs in the European Community, Japan, the USSR, the USA, as well as smaller programs in other countries are described. The status of fusion physics and technology is elucidated, and future directions and plans are indicated. 5 refs, 6 figs

  4. Safety analysis and environmental effects of fusion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion reactor concepts have been analyzed to determine the probable interactions with the environment and the resultant environmental effects. Two research projects on tritium oxidation in the atmosphere and carbon-14 formation in fusion reactors are briefly described. A study and report were completed, investigating the potential public safety impact of accidents in fusion power plants. After reviewing the existing information on conceptual fusion reactor designs, PNL identified areas of safety concern, making recommendations on how development of safety information might be best accomplished. Inventories of potentially dispersible toxic materials were classified, and general conclusions were made about their relative importance. The report specifies energy sources with a potential to initiate or propagate an accident. An important product of the study was an assessment logic developed to identify potential accident scenarios that could lead to the release of contaminants to the environment. Though the limited amount of fusion design information allows only a general assessment of accident-initiating events, the logic provides a method for making more detailed safety analyses as more design information becomes available. The same logic was used to identify technological areas where an R and D investment would enhance the technical bases for fusion designs as well as the understanding of safety implications in fusion systems

  5. Advanced fusion concepts program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    While the prospects for the eventual development of a tokamak-based fusion reactor appear promising at the present time, the Department of Energy maintains a vigorous program in alternate magnetic fusion concepts. Several of the concepts presently supported include the toroidal reversed field pinch, Tormac, Elmo Bumpy Torus, and various linear options. Recent technical accomplishments and program evaluations indicate that the possibility now exists for undertaking the next development stage, a proof-of-principle experiment, for a few of the most promising alternate concepts

  6. World progress toward fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, N.A.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses international progress in fusion research during the last three years. Much of the technical progress has been achieved through international collaboration in magnetic fusion research. This progress has stimulated political interest in a multinational effort, aimed at designing and possibly constructing the world's first experimental fusion reactor. This interest was reflected in recent summit-level discussions involving President Mitterand, General Secretary Gorbachev, and President Reagan. Most recently, the European Community (EC), Japan, the United States, and the U.S.S.R. have decided to begin serious preparation for taking the next step toward practical fusion energy. These parties have agreed to begin the design and supporting R and D for an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The initiation of this international program to prepare for a fusion test reactor is discussed

  7. Fusion power plant studies in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisonnier, D.

    2007-01-01

    The European fusion programme is reactor oriented and it is aimed at the successive demonstration of the scientific, the technological and the economic feasibility of fusion power. For a reactor-oriented fusion development programme, it is essential to have a clear idea of the ultimate goal of the programme, namely a series of models of fusion power plants, in order to define the correct strategy and to assess the pertinence of the on-going activities. The European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) has been a study of conceptual designs for commercial fusion power plants. It focused on five power plant models, named PPCS A, B, AB, C and D, which are illustrative of a wider spectrum of possibilities. They are all based on the tokamak concept and they have approximately the same net electrical power output, 1500 MWe. These span a range from relatively near-term, based on limited technology and plasma physics extrapolations, to an advanced conception. All five PPCS plant models differ substantially from the models that formed the basis of earlier European studies. They also differ from one another, which lead to differences in economic performance and in the details of safety and environmental impacts. The main emphasis of the PPCS was on system integration. Systems analyses were used to produce self-consistent plant parameter sets with approximately optimal economic characteristics for all models. In the PPCS models, the favourable, inherent, features of fusion have been exploited to provide substantial safety and environmental advantages. The broad features of the safety and environmental conclusions of previous studies have been confirmed and demonstrated with increased confidence. The PPCS study highlighted the need for specific design and R and D activities, in addition to those already underway within the European long term R and D programme, as well as the need to clarify the concept of DEMO, the device that will bridge the gap between ITER and the first

  8. A design study of superconducting energy storage system for a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    A design study of a superconducting inductive energy storage system (SC-IES) has been carried out in commission with JAERI. The SC-IES is to be applied to the power supply system for a tokamak experimental fusion reactor. The study was initiated with the definition of the requirement for the SC-IES and selection of the coil shape. The design of the coil and the cryostat has been followed. The design parameters are: stored energy 10 GJ, B max 8 T, conductor Nb-Ti, overall size 18 m (diameter) x 10 m (height). Technical problems and usefullness of SC-IES are discussed also. (author)

  9. Industry perspectives on future directions in the fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Bell, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Industry is the ultimate recipient of the product of the fusion development program. However, budget trends are causing the program to lose it's focus on the energy goal, thus diminishing opportunities for a meaningful industrial role at a time when technical progress has been remarkable and scientific feasibility is being demonstrated. The findings of the Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee Panel charged to report on industrial participation in fusion energy development are summarized. A recommendation of this panel was to increase intellectual involvement of industry in the development of fusion. Opportunities to achieve this include forming partnerships with national laboratories and universities, assigning industry responsibility for a complete scope of work, and assigning industry a major role in system studies and reactor design. These opportunities can be implemented without requiring large budget increases. Increasing the involvement of industry in the fusion program will provide both long and short-term benefits

  10. Proceedings of the Second Fusion-Fission Energy Systems Review Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-11-02

    The agenda of the meeting was developed to address, in turn, the following major areas: specific problem areas in nuclear energy systems for application of fusion-fission concepts; current and proposed fusion-fission programs in response to the identified problem areas; target costs and projected benefits associated with fusion-fission energy systems; and technical problems associated with the development of fusion-fission concepts. The greatest emphasis was placed on the characteristics of and problems, associated with fuel producing fusion-fission hybrid reactors.

  11. Canadian fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.S.

    1982-06-01

    The National Research Council of Canada is establishing a coordinated national program of fusion research and development that is planned to grow to a total annual operating level of about $20 million in 1985. The long-term objective of the program is to put Canadian industry in a position to manufacture sub-systems and components of fusion power reactors. In the near term the program is designed to establish a minimum base of scientific and technical expertise sufficient to make recognized contributions and thereby gain access to the international effort. The Canadian program must be narrowly focussed on a few specializations where Canada has special indigenous skills or technologies. The programs being funded are the Tokamak de Varennes, the Fusion Fuels Technology Project centered on tritium management, and high-power gas laser technology and associated diagnostic instrumentation

  12. HIFSA: Heavy-Ion Fusion Systems Assessment Project: Volume 2, Technical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudziak, D.J.

    1987-12-01

    A two-year project was undertaken to assess the commercial potential of heavy-ion fusion (HIF) as an economical electric power production technology. Because the US HIF development program is oriented toward the use of multiple-beam induction linacs, the study was confined to this particular driver technology. The HIF systems assessment (HIFSA) study involved several subsystem design, performance, and cost studies (e.g., the induction linac, final beam transport, beam transport in reactor cavity environments, cavity clearing, target manufacturing, and reactor plant). In addition, overall power plant systems integration, parametric analyses, and tradeoff studies were performed using a systems code developed specifically for the HIFSA project. Systems analysis results show values for cost of electricity (COE) comparable to those from other inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion plant studies; viz., 50 to 60 mills/kWh (1985 dollars) for 1-GWe plant sizes. Also, significant COE insensitivity to major accelerator, target, and reactor parameters near the minima was demonstrated. Conclusions from the HIFSA study have already led to substantial modifications of the US HIF research and development program. Separate abstracts were prepared for 17 papers in these analyses

  13. Fusion reactor design and technology 1986. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The first volume of the Proceedings of the Fourth Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on Fusion Reactor Design and Technology organized by the IAEA (Yalta, 26 May - 6 June 1986) includes 36 papers devoted to the following topics: fusion programmes (3 papers), tokamaks (15 papers), non-tokamak reactors and open systems (9 papers), inertial confinement concepts (5 papers), fission-fusion hybrids (4 papers). Each of these papers has a separate abstract. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Present status of nuclear fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discussions are included on the following topics: (1) plasma confinement theoretical research, (2) torus plasma research, (3) plasma measurement research, (4) technical development of equipment, (5) plasma heating, (6) vacuum wall surface phenomena, (7) critical plasma test equipment design, (8) noncircular cross-sectional torus test equipment design, (9) nuclear fusion reactor design, (10) nuclear fusion reactor engineering, (11) summary of nuclear fusion research in foreign countries, and (12) long range plan in Japan

  15. The European Fusion Energy Research Programme towards the realization of a fusion demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparotto, M.; Laesser, R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its inception, the European Fusion Programme has been orientated towards the establishment of the knowledge base needed for the definition of a reactor to be used for power production. Its ultimate goal is then to demonstrate the scientific and the technological feasibility of fusion power while incorporating the assessment of the safety, environmental, social and economic features of this type of energy source. At present, the JET device, the largest tokamak in the world, and the other medium-sized experimental machines are contributing essentially to the basic scientific phase of this development path. Their successful operation greatly contributed to support the design basis of ITER, the next step in fusion, which will aim to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of fusion power production by achieving extended D-T burning plasma operation. Following ITER, the conception and construction of the DEMO device is planned. DEMO will be a demonstration power plant which will be the first fusion device to generate a significant amount of electrical power from fusion. This paper describes the status of fusion research and the European strategy for achievement of the ultimate goal of construction of a prototype reactor. (author)

  16. Vacuum fusion of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohr, J.A.

    1957-01-01

    After having outlined that vacuum fusion and moulding of uranium and of its alloys have some technical and economic benefits (vacuum operations avoid uranium oxidation and result in some purification; precision moulding avoids machining, chip production and chemical reprocessing of these chips; direct production of the desired shape is possible by precision moulding), this report presents the uranium fusion unit (its low pressure enclosure and pumping device, the crucible-mould assembly, and the MF supply device). The author describes the different steps of cast production, and briefly comments the obtained results

  17. Report of the heavy-ion fusion task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, G.A.; Booth, L.A.; Henderson, D.B.; Jameson, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.; Knapp, E.A.; Pollock, R.; Talbert, W.L.; Thode, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1980-02-01

    An assessment of heavy-ion fusion has been completed. Energetic heavy ions, for example 10-GeV uranium, provided by an rf linac or an induction linac, are used as alternatives to laser light to drive inertial confinement fusion pellets. The assessment has covered accelerator technology, transport of heavy-ion beams, target interaction physics, civilian power issues, and military applications. It is concluded that particle accelerators promise to be efficient pellet drivers, but that there are formidable technical problems to be solved. It is recommended that a moderate level research program on heavy-ion fusion be pursued and that LASL should continue to work on critical issues in accelerator development, beam transport, reactor systems studies, and target physics over the next few years

  18. Fusion Canada issue 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are CFFTP highlights on the Karlsruhe Isotope Separation System, a report on ITER tritium process systems, an experimental update on Tokamak de Varennes and Canada-U.S. bilateral technical collaboration topics. 2 figs

  19. Fusion Canada issue 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are CFFTP highlights on the Karlsruhe Isotope Separation System, a report on ITER tritium process systems, an experimental update on Tokamak de Varennes and Canada-U.S. bilateral technical collaboration topics. 2 figs.

  20. Status report on controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC), an advisory body to the International Atomic Energy Agency, reports on the current status of fusion; this report updates its 1978 status report. This report contains a General Overview and Executive Summary, and reports on all current approaches to fusion throughout the world; a series of technical reports is to be published elsewhere. This report is timely in that it not only shows progress which has occurred over the past, but interfaces with possible future devices, in particular the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), whose conceptual design phase is nearing completion. 5 refs, 6 figs

  1. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Korsholm, Søren Bang; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the pla......The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction...... phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007....

  2. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: sm-bullet Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. sm-bullet Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. sm-bullet Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged

  3. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Safety studies on Korean fusion DEMO plant using integrated safety assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myoung-suk; Heo, Gyunyoung; Kim, Hyoung-chan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant. •The concepts of integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM) that can be applied in addressing regulatory requirements and recognizing safety issues for K-DEMO were emphasized. •Phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) was proposed. It can recognize vulnerabilities of systems and identify the gaps in technical areas requiring additional researches. •This work is expected to contribute on the conceptual design of safety features for K-DEMO to design engineers and the guidance for regulatory requirements to licensers. -- Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant (K-DEMO) as a part of R and D program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea. Even though nuclear regulation and licensing framework is well setup due to the operating and design experience of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) since 1970s, the regulatory authority of South Korea has concerns on the challenge of facing new nuclear facilities including K-DEMO due to the differences in systems, materials, and inherent safety feature from conventional PWRs. Even though the follow-up of the ITER license process facilitates to deal with significant safety issues of fusion facilities, a licensee as well as a licenser should identify the gaps between ITER and DEMO in terms of safety issues. First we reviewed the methods of conducting safety analysis for unprecedented nuclear facilities such as Generation IV reactors, particularly very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is called as integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM). Second, the analysis for the conceptual design of K-DEMO on the basis of ISAM was conducted. The ISAM consists of five analytical tools to develop the safety requirements from licensee

  5. Safety studies on Korean fusion DEMO plant using integrated safety assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myoung-suk [Kyung Hee University, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung, E-mail: gheo@khu.ac.kr [Kyung Hee University, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon-si 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant. •The concepts of integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM) that can be applied in addressing regulatory requirements and recognizing safety issues for K-DEMO were emphasized. •Phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) was proposed. It can recognize vulnerabilities of systems and identify the gaps in technical areas requiring additional researches. •This work is expected to contribute on the conceptual design of safety features for K-DEMO to design engineers and the guidance for regulatory requirements to licensers. -- Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant (K-DEMO) as a part of R and D program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea. Even though nuclear regulation and licensing framework is well setup due to the operating and design experience of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) since 1970s, the regulatory authority of South Korea has concerns on the challenge of facing new nuclear facilities including K-DEMO due to the differences in systems, materials, and inherent safety feature from conventional PWRs. Even though the follow-up of the ITER license process facilitates to deal with significant safety issues of fusion facilities, a licensee as well as a licenser should identify the gaps between ITER and DEMO in terms of safety issues. First we reviewed the methods of conducting safety analysis for unprecedented nuclear facilities such as Generation IV reactors, particularly very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is called as integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM). Second, the analysis for the conceptual design of K-DEMO on the basis of ISAM was conducted. The ISAM consists of five analytical tools to develop the safety requirements from licensee

  6. Fusion - 2050 perspective (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The results of strongly exothermic reaction of thermonuclear fusion between nuclei of deuterium and tritium are: helium nuclei and neutrons, plus considerable kinetic energy of neutrons of over 14 MeV. DT nuclides synthesis reaction is probably not the most favorable one for energy production, but is the most advanced technologically. More efficient would be possibly aneutronic fusion. The EU by its EURATOM agenda prepared a Road Map for research and implementation of Fusion as a commercial method of thermonuclear energy generation in the time horizon of 2050.The milestones on this road are tokomak experiments JET, ITER and DEMO, and neutron experiment IFMIF. There is a hope, that by engagement of the national government, and all research and technical fusion communities, part of this Road Map may be realized in Poland. The infrastructure build for fusion experiments may be also used for material engineering research, chemistry, biomedical, associated with environment protection, power engineering, security, ...

  7. An Indispensable Truth How Fusion Power Can Save the Planet

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    2011-01-01

    Both global warming and oil shortage can be solved by controlled fusion, a clean power source that will serve mankind for millennia.� The idea of hydrogen fusion as well as its difficulties are presented in non-technical language to dispel the notion that fusion is always 50 years away.� This book also summarizes the evidence for climate change and explains the principles of both fossil and "green" energy sources to show that fusion is the best alternative for central-station power in the near term as well as the far future. Praise for An Indispensable Truth: How Fusion Power Can Save the Planet: "In this study Professor Chen outlines the underlying physics, recent progress in achieving advanced plasmas and magnetic confinement, and hopes for the future. He recognizes the difficulties that remain in engineering a fusion reactor, but he remains optimistic regarding ultimate success, yet fearful of the consequences were we to fail."- James R. Schlesinger, former Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission; Director,...

  8. Goals, challenges, and successes of managing fusion activated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.; Massaut, V.; Zucchetti, M.; Tobita, K.; Cadwallader, L.

    2007-01-01

    After decades of designing magnetic and inertial fusion power plants, it is timely to develop a new framework for managing the activated materials generated during plant operation and after decommissioning - a framework that takes into account the lessons learned from numerous international fusion and fission studies and the environmental, political, and present reality in the U.S., EU, and Japan. Since the inception of the fusion projects in the early 1970s, the majority of power plant designs have focused on the disposal of active materials in geological repositories as the main option for handling the replaceable and life-of-plant components, adopting the preferred fission waste management approach. It is becoming evident that future regulations for geological burial will be upgraded to assure tighter environmental controls. Along with the political difficulty of constructing new repositories worldwide, the current reality suggests reshaping all aspects of handling the continual stream of fusion active materials. There is a growing international effort in support of this new trend. Beginning in the mid 1990s and continuing to the present, fusion designs developed in Europe, U.S., and Japan have examined replacing the disposal option with more environmentally attractive approaches, redirecting their attention to recycling and clearance while continuing the development of materials with low activation potential. These options became more technically feasible in recent years with the development of radiation-hardened remote handling (RH) tools and the introduction of the clearance category for slightly radioactive materials by national and international nuclear agencies. We applied all scenarios to selected fusion studies. While recycling and clearance appeared technically attractive and judged, in some cases, a must requirement to control the radwaste stream, the disposal scheme emerged as the preferred option for specific components for several reasons, including

  9. Fusion through the NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, B.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the next generation of fusion machines which are intended to demonstrate the technical viability of fusion. In Europe, the device that will follow on from JET is known as NET - the Next European Torus. If the design programme for NET proceeds, Europe could start to build the machine in 1994. The present JET programme hopes to achieve breakeven in the early 1990's. NET hopes to reach ignition in the next century, and so lay the foundation for a demonstration reactor. A description is given of the technical specifications of the components of NET, including: the first wall, the divertors to protect the wall, the array of magnets that provide the fields containing the plasma, the superconducting magnets, and the shield of the machine. NET's research programme is briefly outlined, including the testing programme to optimise conditions in the machine to achieve ignition, and its safety work. (U.K.)

  10. Feasibility study on sensor data fusion for the CP-140 aircraft: fusion architecture analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazian, Elisa

    1995-09-01

    Loral Canada completed (May 1995) a Department of National Defense (DND) Chief of Research and Development (CRAD) contract, to study the feasibility of implementing a multi- sensor data fusion (MSDF) system onboard the CP-140 Aurora aircraft. This system is expected to fuse data from: (a) attributed measurement oriented sensors (ESM, IFF, etc.); (b) imaging sensors (FLIR, SAR, etc.); (c) tracking sensors (radar, acoustics, etc.); (d) data from remote platforms (data links); and (e) non-sensor data (intelligence reports, environmental data, visual sightings, encyclopedic data, etc.). Based on purely theoretical considerations a central-level fusion architecture will lead to a higher performance fusion system. However, there are a number of systems and fusion architecture issues involving fusion of such dissimilar data: (1) the currently existing sensors are not designed to provide the type of data required by a fusion system; (2) the different types (attribute, imaging, tracking, etc.) of data may require different degree of processing, before they can be used within a fusion system efficiently; (3) the data quality from different sensors, and more importantly from remote platforms via the data links must be taken into account before fusing; and (4) the non-sensor data may impose specific requirements on the fusion architecture (e.g. variable weight/priority for the data from different sensors). This paper presents the analyses performed for the selection of the fusion architecture for the enhanced sensor suite planned for the CP-140 aircraft in the context of the mission requirements and environmental conditions.

  11. 1981 inertial fusion research annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, D.E.; Wei, J.L.; Greacen, N.T.

    1981-01-01

    This annual report consists of the following two topics: (1) target fabrication technology, and (2) fusion experiments. The first section is reported by the following seven areas: (1) characterization, (2) fuel shell technology, (3) polymer technology, (4) lithium foil development, (5) precision etch technology, (6) analytical instrumentation, and (7) target fabrication. The second area is reported by the following topics: (1) experiments, (2) plasma theory, (3) code development and simulation, and (4) lasers and optics

  12. US-DOE Fusion-Breeder Program: blanket design and system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual design studies are being used to assess the technical and economic feasibility of fusion's potential to produce fissile fuel. A reference design of a fission-suppressed blanket using conventional materials is under development. Theoretically, a fusion breeder that incorporates this fusion-suppressed blanket surrounding a 3000-MW tandem mirror fusion core produces its own tritium plus 5600 kg of 233 U per year. The 233 U could then provide fissile makeup for 21 GWe of light-water reactor (LWR) power using a denatured thorium fuel cycle with full recycle. This is 16 times the net electric power produced by the fusion breeder (1.3 GWe). The cost of electricity from this fusion-fission system is estimated to be only 23% higher than the cost from LWRs that have makeup from U 3 O 8 at present costs (55 $/kg). Nuclear performance, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), radiation effects, and other issues concerning the fission-suppressed blanket are summarized, as are some of the present and future objectives of the fusion breeder program

  13. Physics of thermo-nuclear fusion and the ITER project; La physique de la fusion thermonucleaire et le projet ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garin, P [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee - DRFC, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-01-01

    This document gathers the slides of the 6 contributions to the workshop 'the physics of thermo-nuclear fusion and the ITER project': 1) the feasibility of magnetic confinement and the issue of heat recovery, 2) heating and current generation in tokamaks, 3) the physics of wall-plasma interaction, 4) recent results at JET, 5) inertial confinement and fast ignition, and 6) the technology of fusion machines based on magnetic confinement. This document presents the principles of thermo-nuclear fusion machines and gives a lot of technical information about JET, Tore-Supra and ITER.

  14. The fusion applications study - FAME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.; Engholm, B.A.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Schaffer, M.J.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1986-01-01

    The Fusion Applications and Market Evaluation (''FAME'') study, being conducted by GA Technologies for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, (US DOE) is described. This two-year program has a FY86 objective of Evaluating Alternative Applications of Fusion, and a FY87 goal of Exploring Innovative Applications. Applications are being reviewed and categorized into Baseline, Nuclear, Chemical, Electromagnetic, and Thermal application categories. The ''traditional'' applications of electricity generation, fissile fuel and tritium production, and hydrogen production continue to look attractive. Particularly promising new applications to date, with potential for near-term markets, are isotope production and radiation processing, especially when allied with the traditional application of electricity production. The economics of separate applications as well as coproduction are discussed. The combination of electricity and /sup 60/Co production appears to be one of the most attractive

  15. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  16. Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  17. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1991-07-01

    This is the tenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance; damage analysis and fundamental studies; special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the test of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

  18. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This is the tenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: alloy development for irradiation performance; damage analysis and fundamental studies; special purpose materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the test of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  19. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  20. Implications of fusion power plant studies for materials requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Ian; Ward, David; Dudarev, Sergei

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the key requirements for fusion materials, as these have emerged from studies of commercial fusion power plants. The objective of the international fusion programme is the creation of power stations that will have very attractive safety and environmental features and viable economics. Fusion power plant studies have shown that these objectives may be achieved without requiring extreme advances in materials. But it is required that existing candidate materials perform at least as well as envisaged in the environment of fusion neutrons, heat fluxes and particle fluxes. The development of advanced materials would bring further benefits. The work required entails the investigation of many intellectually exciting physics issues of great scientific interest, and of wider application than fusion. In addition to giving an overview, selected aspects of the science, of particular physics interest, are illustrated

  1. Energy by nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buende, R.; Daenner, W.; Herold, H.; Raeder, J.

    1976-12-01

    This report reviews the state of knowledge in a number of fields of fusion research up to autumn 1976. Section 1 gives a very brief presentation of the elementary fusion reactions, the energies delivered by them and the most basic energy balances leading to Lawson-type diagrams. Section 2 outlines the reserves and cost of lithium and deuterium, gives estimates of the total energy available from DT fusion and comments on production technology, availlability and handling of the fuels. In section 3 a survey is given of the different concepts of magnetic confinement (stellarators, tokamaks, toroidal pinches, mirror machines, two-component plasmas), of confinement by walls, gas blankets and imploding liners and, finally, of the concepts of interial confinement (laser fusion, beam fusion). The reactors designed or outlined on the basis of the tokamak, high-β, mirror, and laser fusion concepts are presented in section 4, which is followed in section 5 by a discussion of the key problems of fusion power plants. The present-day knowledge of the cost structure of fusion power plants and the sensitivity of this structure with respect to the physical and technical assumptions made is analysed in section 6. Section 7 and 8 treat the aspects of safety and environment. The problems discussed include the hazard potentials of different designs (radiological, toxicological, and with respect to stored energies), release of radioactivity, possible kinds of malfunctioning, and the environmental impact of waste heat, radiation and radioactive waste (orig.) [de

  2. Preliminary neutronics calculation of fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xubo; Chen Yixue; Gao Bin

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of using the fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel in PWR was preliminarily studied in this paper. According to the fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel characteristics, PWR assembly including fusion-fission hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel was designed. The parameters such as fuel temperature coefficient, moderator temperature coefficient and their variation were investigated. Results show that the neutron properties of uranium-based assembly and hybrid reactor breeding spent fuel assembly are similar. The design of this paper has a smaller uniformity coefficient of power at the same fissile isotope mass percentage. The results will provide technical support for the future fusion-fission hybrid reactor and PWR combined with cycle system. (authors)

  3. Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, R.B.; Denney, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department Technical Review is published to inform readers of various technical activities within the Department, promote exchange of ideas, and give credit to personnel who are achieving the results. The report is presented in two parts: technical achievements and publication abstracts. The first is divided into seven sections, each of which reports on an engineering division and its specific activities related to nuclear tests, nuclear explosives, weapons, energy systems, engineering sciences, magnetic fusion, and materials fabrication

  4. Contributions to the 20. EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-15

    The Conference covers research on different aspects of plasma physics and fusion technology, like technical aspects of Tokamak devices; plasma instabilities and impurities, development and testing of materials for fusion reactors etc.

  5. Final technical report. 1998 HU CFRT summer fusion high school workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh

    1999-01-01

    The center conducted its third High School Summer Fusion Science Workshop in Summer 1998. The center had only three faculty mentors available only for a part of Summer 1998, The center accepted four scholars in this workshop, Prof. Halima Ali coordinated this workshop. Each student was assigned to a research mentor according to the student's interest in a specific research area and problem. In the workshop in the center, the students received instructions and training in the basics of energy, plasma and fusion sciences. They also received one-on-one instructions and training by their mentors to further their understanding of the subject and to introduce to relevant concepts such as magnetic confinement fusion, tokamaks, diverters and area-preserving maps

  6. Fusion technology annual report of the association EURATOM/CEA 1998; Technologie de la fusion Rapport annuel 1998 Association EURATOM/CEA 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaud, P; Le vagueres, F

    1998-07-01

    In this book are found technical and scientific papers on the main works carried out in the frame of the european program of fusion technology, during 1998. The presented activities are: plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety (short and long term), european blanket project (long term) with water cooled lithium lead and helium cooled pebble bed blanket, materials for fusion power plant, socio-economic research on fusion, plasma facing components, fuel cycle, inertial confinement. (A.L.B.)

  7. The development of controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    The high temperature conditions needed in a controlled nuclear fusion reactor are now being approached in experiments using magnetic fields to confine and isolate the plasma, especially in systems of the tokamak type. The underlying reasons for the successes are discussed and it is concluded that the remaining advances needed in temperature and thermal insulation may well be achieved in new large tokamak experiments now under construction. Comparable progress is being made also in inertial confinement systems; key experiments on achieving the required super-high densities with high-powered pulsed laser systems are about to commence. To achieve fusion reactors will require the combination of three major disciplines: plasma physics, electromechanical engineering and nuclear engineering. Proposals have been made for an international study group to be set up under the IAEA auspices to consider technical objectives and the nature of the next large fusion device which could be constructed internationally, and in which this synthesis could be attempted. (author)

  8. Belgian research on fusion beryllium waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Mallants, D.; Sillen, X.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    Future fusion power plants will generate important quantities of neutron irradiated beryllium. Although recycling is the preferred management option for this waste, this may not be technically feasible for all of the beryllium, because of its radiological characteristics. Therefore, at SCK·CEN, we initiated a research programme aimed at studying aspects of the disposal of fusion beryllium, including waste characterisation, waste acceptance criteria, conditioning methods, and performance assessment. One of the main issues to be resolved is the development of fusion-specific waste acceptance criteria for surface or deep geological disposal, in particular with regard to the tritium content. In case disposal is the only solution, critical nuclides can be immobilised by conditioning the waste. As a first approach to immobilising beryllium waste, we investigated the vitrification of beryllium. Corrosion tests were performed on both metallic and vitrified beryllium to provide source data for performance assessment. Finally, a first step in performance assessment was undertaken. (author)

  9. Fusion Safety Program annual report: Fiscal year 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Merrill, B.J.; Herring, J.S.; Piet, S.J.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1987-06-01

    This report summarizes the Fusion Safety Program's (FSP) major activities in fiscal year 1986. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and EG and G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for FSP, which was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating facilities, including the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in this report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruption, risk assessment methodology, and computer code development for reactor transients. Contributions to the Technical Planning Activity (TPA) and the ''white paper'' study by the Environmental, Safety,and Economics Committee (ESECOM) are summarized. The report also includes a summary of the safety and environmental analysis and documentation performed by the INEL for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) design project

  10. Materials program for magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwilsky, K.M.; Cohen, M.M.; Finfgeld, C.R.; Reuther, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Magnetic Fusion Reactor Materials Program is currently operating at a level of $7.8M. The program is divided into four technical areas which cover both short and long term problems. These are: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance, Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies, Plasma-Materials Interaction, and Special Purpose Materials. A description of the program planning process, the continuing management structure, and the resulting documents is presented

  11. Development of fusion safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Petti, D.A.; Dinneen, G.A.; Herring, J.S.; DeLooper, J.; Levine, J.D.; Gouge, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Two new U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) standards have been prepared to assist in the design and regulation of magnetic fusion facilities. They are DOE-STD-6002-96, 'Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities - Requirements,' and DOE-STD-6003-96 'Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities - Guidance.' The first standard sets forth requirements, mostly based on the Code of Federal Regulations, deemed necessary for the safe design and operation of fusion facilities and a set of safety principles to use in the design. The second standard provides guidance on how to meet the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96. It is written specifically for a facility such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in the DOE regulatory environment. As technical standards, they are applicable only to the extent that compliance with these standards is included in the contracts of the developers. 7 refs., 1 fig

  12. Standard mirror fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the work of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Division's reactor study group during FY 1976 on the standard mirror reactor. The ''standard'' mirror reactor is characterized as a steady state, neutral beam sustained, D-T fusioning plasma confined by a Yin-Yang magnetic mirror field. The physics parameters are obtained from the same physics model that explains the 2XIIB experiment. The model assumes that the drift cyclotron loss cone mode occurs on the boundary of the plasma, and that it is stabilized by warm plasma with negligible energy investment. The result of the study was a workable mirror fusion power plant, steady-state blanket removal made relatively simple by open-ended geometry, and no impurity problem due to the positive plasma potential. The Q (fusion power/injected beam power) turns out to be only 1.1 because of loss out the ends from Coulomb collisions, i.e., classical losses. This low Q resulted in 77% of the gross electrical power being used to power the injectors, thereby causing the net power cost to be high. The low Q stimulated an intensive search for Q-enhancement concepts, resulting in the LLL reactor design effort turning to the field reversal mirror and the tandem mirror, each having Q of order 5

  13. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This is the sixteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following Progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. The individual papers in this paper have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  14. Benefits to US industry from involvement in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waganer, L.M.; Davis, J.W.; Schultz, K.R.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decades, fusion has created a cooperative relationship between the DOE national laboratories, leading universities, and high technology industries. This relationship in the fusion community has helped to solve difficult technical problems, which will hopefully lead toward the commercialization of fusion. The US industry, with high technology skills, provides relevant cutting-edge designs, tools, and processes to help solve unique and technically challenging problems associated with fusion energy development. Together, these relationships have developed new and improved technologies and processes to achieve and demonstrate solutions to help advance fusion toward its ultimate goal. The benefits to industry, in terms of commercial applications to their product lines, are subjective. The involvement of US industry has been limited to a few high technology firms, with Boeing and General Atomics being the longest lasting and most involved. Widespread industrial involvement has been constrained with limited funding for the fusion budgets. Even with the funding constraints, industry has contributed to all aspects and systems for MFE and IFE experiments, demonstration reactors, and commercial power plant designs. While several technology and product spin-offs are identified and examined, the more prevalent transfer of information arises from subtle two-way transition of technologies between the fusion related efforts and those of the parent industrial firms. Examples of this transfer include CAD/CAM, independent product team structures, computer simulation/modeling/assessment, extended material property databases, tailored material processing, improved and lower cost fabrication processes, and component designs/applications. Specific examples of transitioned components or technologies involve superconducting magnets, neutral beam components, laser machining, and microwave/RF technologies

  15. Report of results on the research and development work 1979 of the Institute for Technical Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    The results report on the research and development work in 1979 carried out at the Institute for Technical Physics of the Nuclear Research Centre, Karlsruhe is concerned here. The main field of this development work is the research into superconducting magnets for fusion reactors. Studies are published on the material, processing and shape of these magnets. Furthermore, a report is given on fusion magnet technology, superconducting fundamentals and technical superconductors, as well as an cryonergy technique and cryotechnique. (KBI) [de

  16. 21. IAEA fusion energy conference. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Recognizing the prominent role that nuclear energy plays in the world, and based on the expectation that nuclear fusion will be able to provide an abundant source of energy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supports the exchange of scientific and technical information on fusion research through conferences, meetings and projects. The 21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (FEC 2006) provided a forum for presenting and discussing the progress that is being made in fusion experiments, theory and technological developments. It is expected that the progress in the establishment of ITER since the last Fusion Energy Conference will put more emphasis on the physics and technology R and D aspects in the realization of fusion as a clean and lasting energy source. FEC 2006 covered the following topics: OV Overviews; EX Magnetic Confinement Experiments; TH Magnetic Confinement Theory and Modelling; IT ITER Activities; IF Inertial Fusion Experiments and Theory; IC Innovative Concepts; FT Fusion Technology and Power Plant Design; SE Safety, Environmental and Economic Aspects of Fusion. At the same time, a series of satellite meetings and fusion related exhibitions took place.

  17. IAEA and IEA roles in international fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.; Nakamura, K.

    2000-01-01

    The article describes the IAEA's and the IEA's complementary roles in facilitating international fusion research cooperation. These roles represent highly desirable contributions to fusion research through pooling of limited human and financial resources. The two Agencies both coordinate research and organize technical meeting, but in different ways. They each have unique strengths and different modes of operation. In order to deal with potential overlaps and serve the fusion research community optimally, they are coordinating their activities

  18. Criteria for the assessment of fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, Colin.

    1989-01-01

    Fusion power requires an exceptionally long development time and its future depends on the changing perspectives society uses to evaluate resources in the long term. For 40 years fusion technology developed within a decision making context dominated by technical-political interests, and characterized by a bias towards overoptimism about the future. That is now changing. This article contends that we are still a long way from making rational assessments of large technological projects. However, feasibility for fusion will have to be tested by social criteria at least as important as those used for scientific feasibility. (author)

  19. Fusion power: massive research program aims at formidable problems, almost limitless potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingee, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    This article surveys extensively fusion development under the following topics: US research directions; inertial confinement fusion; foreign fusion efforts; fusion issues; fusion applications; and arguments for fusion development. Dr. Dingee points out that, despite persuasive arguments for development, fusion has as yet attracted no substantial constituency; and that winning greater support for fusion may thus require a considerable technical breakthrough (namely, proof of scientific feasibility or achievement of energy breakeven) - or a new focus on an energy source such as hybrids, which offer a nearer-term payoff than pure fusion. Dr. Dingee says the next major facility for magnetic confinement research (to be built in late 1980s) has not yet been selected, but will probably be an engineering test facility; there are similar plans for inertial confinement. Whichever type is chosen, the first experimental power reactor is scheduled for the first few years of the 2000's, this to be followed by commercial demonstration of fusion power in the 2010 to 2020 time frame. He points out, finally, that the complex technical and institutional issues are being considered in a climate in which the benefits of nuclear energy itself are being questioned; and that there is little doubt that future development is tied to overall decisions the nation will make regarding the value of nuclear energy

  20. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum......This dissertation investigates fusion rings, which are Grothendieck groups of rigid, monoidal, semisimple, abelian categories. Special interest is in rational fusion rings, i.e., fusion rings which admit a finite basis, for as commutative rings they may be presented as quotients of polynomial rings...

  1. The ORNL fusion power demonstration study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, T.E.; Steiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, we review the design approach developed in the ORNL Fusion Power Demonstration Study [1]. The major emphasis of this study is in the application of current and near-term technology as the most logical path to near-term demonstration of tokamak fusion power. In addition we are pursuing a number of concepts to simplify the tokamak reactor to be more acceptable to the utility industry as a future source of energy. The discussion will focus on the areas having the greatest overall impact on reactor feasibility: 1) overall size and power output, 2) remote maintenance considerations, 3) electrical power supplies, 4) blanket design; and 5) economics. The tokamak device, by nature of its configuration and pulsed operation, is an exceptionally complex engineering design problem. We have concluded that innovative design concepts are essential to cope with this basic complexity. We feel that the feasibility of tokamak fusion power has been significantly improved by these design approaches. (author)

  2. FRESCO: fusion reactor simulation code for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    The study of the dynamics of tokamak fusion reactors, a zero-dimensional particle and power balance code FRESCO (Fusion Reactor Simulation Code) has been developed at the Department of Technical Physics of Helsinki University of Technology. The FRESCO code is based on zero-dimensional particle and power balance equations averaged over prescribed plasma profiles. In the report the data structure of the FRESCO code is described, including the description of the COMMON statements, program input, and program output. The general structure of the code is described, including the description of subprograms and functions. The physical model used and examples of the code performance are also included in the report. (121 tabs.) (author)

  3. [Mechanical studies of lumbar interbody fusion implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, R J; Steinhauser, E; Rechl, H; Mittelmeier, W; Bertagnoli, R; Gradinger, R

    2002-05-01

    In addition to autogenous or allogeneic bone grafts, fusion cages composed of metal or plastic are being used increasingly as spacers for interbody fusion of spinal segments. The goal of this study was the mechanical testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) fusion cages used for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. With a special testing device according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, the mechanical properties of the implants were determined under four different loading conditions. The implants (UNION cages, Medtronic Sofamor Danek) provide sufficient axial compression, shear, and torsional strength of the implant body. Ultimate axial compression load of the fins is less than the physiological compression loads at the lumbar spine. Therefore by means of an appropriate surgical technique parallel grooves have to be reamed into the endplates of the vertebral bodies according to the fin geometry. Thereby axial compression forces affect the implants body and the fins are protected from damaging loading. Using a supplementary anterior or posterior instrumentation, in vivo failure of the fins as a result of physiological shear and torsional spinal loads is unlikely. Due to specific complications related to autogenous or allogeneic bone grafts, fusion cages made of metal or carbon fiber reinforced plastic are an important alternative implant in interbody fusion.

  4. EDITORIAL: Safety aspects of fusion power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbasov, B. N.

    2007-07-01

    importance for the fusion power plant research programmes. The objective of this Technical Meeting was to examine in an integrated way all the safety aspects anticipated to be relevant to the first fusion power plant prototype expected to become operational by the middle of the century, leading to the first generation of economically viable fusion power plants with attractive S&E features. After screening by guest editors and consideration by referees, 13 (out of 28) papers were accepted for publication. They are devoted to the following safety topics: power plant safety; fusion specific operational safety approaches; test blanket modules; accident analysis; tritium safety and inventories; decommissioning and waste. The paper `Main safety issues at the transition from ITER to fusion power plants' by W. Gulden et al (EU) highlights the differences between ITER and future fusion power plants with magnetic confinement (off-site dose acceptance criteria, consequences of accidents inside and outside the design basis, occupational radiation exposure, and waste management, including recycling and/or final disposal in repositories) on the basis of the most recent European fusion power plant conceptual study. Ongoing S&E studies within the US inertial fusion energy (IFE) community are focusing on two design concepts. These are the high average power laser (HAPL) programme for development of a dry-wall, laser-driven IFE power plant, and the Z-pinch IFE programme for the production of an economically-attractive power plant using high-yield Z-pinch-driven targets. The main safety issues related to these programmes are reviewed in the paper `Status of IFE safety and environmental activities in the US' by S. Reyes et al (USA). The authors propose future directions of research in the IFE S&E area. In the paper `Recent accomplishments and future directions in the US Fusion Safety & Environmental Program' D. Petti et al (USA) state that the US fusion programme has long recognized that the S

  5. Advanced lasers for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupke, W.F.; George, E.V.; Haas, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Laser drive systems' performance requirements for fusion reactors are developed following a review of the principles of inertial confinement fusion and of the technical status of fusion research lasers (Nd:glass; CO 2 , iodine). These requirements are analyzed in the context of energy-storing laser media with respect to laser systems design issues: optical damage and breakdown, medium excitation, parasitics and superfluorescence depumping, energy extraction physics, medium optical quality, and gas flow. Three types of energy-storing laser media of potential utility are identified and singled out for detailed review: (1) Group VI atomic lasers, (2) rare earth solid state hybrid lasers, and (3) rare earth molecular vapor lasers. The use of highly-radiative laser media, particularly the rare-gas monohalide excimers, are discussed in the context of short pulse fusion applications. The concept of backward wave Raman pulse compression is considered as an attractive technique for this purpose. The basic physics and device parameters of these four laser systems are reviewed and conceptual designs for high energy laser systems are presented. Preliminary estimates for systems efficiencies are given. (Auth.)

  6. Intense neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio; Kato, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Technical R and D of d-Li stripping type neutron irradiation facilities for development of fusion reactor materials was carried out in Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) project and Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test Facility (ESNIT) program. Conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), of which concept is an advanced version of FMIT and ESNIT concepts, are being performed. Progress of users` requirements and characteristics of irradiation fields in such neutron irradiation facilities, and outline of baseline conceptual design of IFMIF were described. (author)

  7. Proceedings of the LLNL Technical Women`s Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Holtz, E. [ed.

    1993-12-31

    This report documents events of the LLNL Technical Women`s Symposium. Topics include; future of computer systems, environmental technology, defense and space, Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Physics, technical communication, tools and techniques for biology in the 1990s, automation and robotics, software applications, materials science, atomic vapor laser isotope separation, technical communication, technology transfer, and professional development workshops.

  8. Extension of the technical scope of the Paris and Vienna Conventions: fusion reactors and reactors in means of transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reye, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the possibility of extending the technical scope of the Vienna and Paris Conventions to two types of nuclear installation presently excluded. Industrial use of fusion reactors is not expected for several decades, but the present revision of the liability regime provides a useful opportunity to ensure in advance that future industrial reactors will be covered, as well as covering risks arising from existing research reactors. Inclusion of nuclear reactors comprised in means of transport (in practice, in ships) in the liability regime would have certain advantages, but given their almost exclusively military use, such a proposal would be politically controversial. 18 refs

  9. The European programme for controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This illustrated document is intended for information only and should not be used as a technical reference. The nuclear fusion reactors are presented with the two approaches: magnetic confinement and inertial confinement; are described: the place of fusion in the world energy scene and its importance for Europe, how research is at present organized, and the European programme with this next stage: the JET (Joint European Torus), the largest tokamak machine in Europe

  10. International research co-operation in the field of controlled thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This 26th report by the Swiss Federal Office for Education and Science presents a review of work done in Swiss institutes in 2003 as part of international research into thermonuclear fusion. A broad outline of the project and of its significance within the wider field of thermonuclear fusion research is given. This is followed by a review of the significant events in the world of fusion research, with emphasis placed on ITER and on the EURATOM fusion programme. A further chapter summarises events in Switzerland in 2003 and the report closes with a list of contacts for more information. Three annexes provide information on the current situation in fusion research, as well as scientific and technical highlights of the work performed in 2003 at the Plasma Physics Research Centre CRPP at the Federal Institute of Technology EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland. Annex 3 reports on results obtained at the Physics Institute of the University of Basle. The annexes are for the benefit of the technically and scientifically versed reader, and brief summaries of them are given in the main body of the report

  11. The international magnetic fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    In May of 1988, the long tradition of international cooperation in magnetic fusion energy research culminated in the initiation of design work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). If eventually constructed in the 1990s, ITER would be the world's first magnetic fusion reactor. This paper discusses the background events that led to ITER and the present status of the ITER activity. This paper presents a brief summary of the technical, political, and organizational activities that have led to the creation of the ITER design activity. The ITER activity is now the main focus of international cooperation in magnetic fusion research and one of the largest international cooperative efforts in all of science. 2 refs., 12 figs

  12. Fuel cycle problems in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Fuel cycle problems of fusion reactors evolve around the breeding, recovery, containment, and recycling of tritium. These processes are described, and their implications and alternatives are discussed. Technically, fuel cycle problems are solvable; economically, their feasibility is not yet known

  13. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Jeffrey A. [Rockfield Research Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-11-08

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration.

  14. Improved Controls for Fusion RF Systems. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    We have addressed the specific requirements for the integrated systems controlling an array of klystrons used for Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). The immediate goal for our design was to modernize the transmitter protection system (TPS) for LHCD on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (MIT-PSFC). Working with the Alcator C-Mod team, we have upgraded the design of these controls to retrofit for improvements in performance and safety, as well as to facilitate the upcoming expansion from 12 to 16 klystrons. The longer range goals to generalize the designs in such a way that they will be of benefit to other programs within the international fusion effort was met by designing a system which was flexible enough to address all the MIT system requirements, and modular enough to adapt to a large variety of other requirements with minimal reconfiguration

  15. Cost Accounting System for fusion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, W.R.; Keeton, D.C.; Thomson, S.L.

    1985-12-01

    A Cost Accounting System that is applicable to all magnetic fusion reactor design studies has been developed. This system provides: (1) definitions of the elements of cost and methods for the combination of these elements to form a cost estimate; (2) a Code of Accounts that uses a functional arrangement for identification of the plant components; and (3) definitions and methods to analyze actual cost data so that the data can be directly reported into this Cost Accounting System. The purpose of the Cost Accounting System is to provide the structure for the development of a fusion cost data base and for the development of validated cost estimating procedures. This system has been developed through use at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) and has been applied to different confinement concepts (tokamaks and tandem mirrors) and to different types of projects (experimental devices and commercial power plants). The use of this Cost Accounting System by all magnetic fusion projects will promote the development of a common cost data base, allow the direct comparison of cost estimates, and ultimately establish the cost credibility of the program

  16. Cost Accounting System for fusion studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, W.R.; Keeton, D.C.; Thomson, S.L.

    1985-12-01

    A Cost Accounting System that is applicable to all magnetic fusion reactor design studies has been developed. This system provides: (1) definitions of the elements of cost and methods for the combination of these elements to form a cost estimate; (2) a Code of Accounts that uses a functional arrangement for identification of the plant components; and (3) definitions and methods to analyze actual cost data so that the data can be directly reported into this Cost Accounting System. The purpose of the Cost Accounting System is to provide the structure for the development of a fusion cost data base and for the development of validated cost estimating procedures. This system has been developed through use at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) and has been applied to different confinement concepts (tokamaks and tandem mirrors) and to different types of projects (experimental devices and commercial power plants). The use of this Cost Accounting System by all magnetic fusion projects will promote the development of a common cost data base, allow the direct comparison of cost estimates, and ultimately establish the cost credibility of the program.

  17. The 22nd symposium on fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taehtinen, S.; Rintamaa, R.; Asikainen, M.; Tuomisto, H.

    2002-01-01

    The Symposium on Fusion Technology (SOFT) was held at the Marina Congress Center, Helsinki, Finland, from 9th to 13th September 2002. It was organized by the Association Euratom-Tekes and hosted by the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Fortum Nuclear Services Ltd. and PrizzTech Oy. The sympoisum included invited and contributed papers as well as poster presentations and an industrial and R and D exhibition. The main topics included all aspects of fusion technology: current and future devices, plasma facing components, plasma heating and current drive, plasma engineering and control, diagnostics, data acquisition and remote participation, magnets and power supplies, fuel cycle, remote handling, vessel, blanket and shield, safety and environment, power plant and socio-economic studies, inertial fusion energy, and transfer of technology. The number of invited speakers was 15, selected presentations 22 and poster presentations 404. The abstracts of the presentations and posters are included in this book. (orig.)

  18. Fusion Energy: Contextual Analysis of the Information Panels Developed by the Scientific Community versus Citizen Discourse; Fusion Nuclear: Analisis Contextual de Paneles Informativos Elaborados por la Comunidad Cientifica versus Discurso Ciudadano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferri Anglada, S.; Cornejo Alvarez, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    The report presents an exploratory study on the impact of scientific dissemination, particularly a comparative analysis of two discourses on fusion energy as an alternative energy future. The report introduces a comparative analysis of the institutional discourse, as portrayed by the scientific jargon used in a European travelling exhibition on nuclear fusion Fusion Expo, and the social discourse, as illustrated by a citizen deliberation on this very same exhibition. Through textual analysis, the scientific discourse as deployed in the informative panels at the Fusion Expo is compared with the citizen discourse as developed in the discussions within the citizen groups. The ConText software was applied for such analysis. The purpose is to analyze how visitors assimilate, capture and understand highly technical information. Results suggest that, in despite of convergence points, the two discourses present certain differences, showing diverse levels of communication. The scientific discourse shows a great profusion of formalisms and technicalities of scientific jargon. The citizen discourse shows abundance of words associated with daily life and the more practical aspects (economy, efficiency), concerning institutional and evaluative references. In sum, the study shows that although there are a few common communicative spaces, there are still very few turning points. These data indicate that although exhibitions can be a good tool to disseminate advances in fusion energy in informal learning contexts, public feedback is a powerful tool for improving the quality of social dialogue. (Author)

  19. Fusion program research materials inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, T.K.; Wiffen, F.W.; Davis, J.W.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory maintains a central inventory of research materials to provide a common supply of materials for the Fusion Reactor Materials Program. This will minimize unintended material variations and provide for economy in procurement and for centralized record keeping. Initially this inventory is to focus on materials related to first-wall and structural applications and related research, but various special purpose materials may be added in the future. The use of materials from this inventory for research that is coordinated with or otherwise related technically to the Fusion Reactor Materials Program of DOE is encouraged

  20. Progress of research and development of nuclear fusion and development of large nuclear fusion device technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In the last several years, the results of tokamak experiments were conspicuous, and the progress of plasma confinement performance, transport mechanism, divertors and impurities, helium transport and exhaust, electric current drive, magnetic field ripple effect and high speed particle transport and DT experiment are reported. The other confinement methods than tokamak, the related theories and reactor technology are described. The conceptual design of ITER was carried out by the cooperation of Japan, USA, EC and the former USSR. The projects of developing nuclear fusion in various countries, the design and the required research and development of ITER, the reconstruction and the required research and development of JT-60, JET and TFTR, the design and the required research and development of large helical device, the state of research and development of laser nuclear fusion and inversion magnetic field pinch nuclear fusion, the activities and roles of industrial circles in large nuclear fusion device technology, and the long term perspective of the technical development of nuclear fusion are described. (K.I.)

  1. Prospects for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Ideally, a new energy source must be capable of displacing old energy sources while providing both economic opportunities and enhanced environmental benefits. The attraction of an essentially unlimited fuel supply has generated a strong impetus to develop advanced fission breeders and, even more strongly, the exploitation of nuclear fusion. Both fission and fusion systems trade a reduced fuel charge for a more capital-intensive plant needed to utilize a cheaper and more abundant fuel. Results from early conceptual designs of fusion power plants, however, indicated a capital intensiveness that could override cost savings promised by an inexpensive fuel cycle. Early warnings of these problems appeared, and generalized routes to more economically attractive systems have been suggested; specific examples have also recently been given. Although a direct reduction in the cost (and mass) of the fusion power core (FPC, i.e., plasma chamber, first wall, blanket, shield, coils, and primary structure) most directly reduces the overall cost of fusion power, with the mass power density (MPD, ratio of net electric power to FPC mass, kWe/tonne) being suggested as a figure-of-merit in this respect, other technical, safety/environmental, and institutional issues also enter into the definition of and direction for improved fusion concepts. These latter issues and related tradeoffs are discussed

  2. Heavy-ion fusion: future promise and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudziak, D.J.; Saylor, W.W.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The previous papers in this heavy-ion fusion special session have described work performed as part of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Systems Assessment (HIFSA) Project. Key technical issues in the design and costing of targets, induction linacs, beam transport, reactor, balance of plant, and systems integration have been identified and described. The HIFSA systems model was used to measure the relative value of improvements in physics understanding and technology developments in many different areas. Within the limits of our 1986 knowledge and imagination, this study defines the most attractive heavy-ion fusion (HIF) power plant concepts. The project has deliberately avoided narrowing the focus to a point facility design; thus, the generic systems modeling capability developed in the process allows for relative comparisons among design options. We will describe what are thought to be achievable breakthroughs and what the relative significance of the breakthroughs will be, although the specific mechanism for achieving some breakthroughs may not be clear at this point. This degree of optimism concerning such breakthroughs is probably at least as conservative as that used in other fusion assessments

  3. Nuclear fusion and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Taijiro

    1987-01-01

    Work for design, research and development is expected to start in 1988 for a new nuclear fusion reactor called ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor), which is to be constructed and operated through cooperation among Japan, U.S., Soviet Union and EC. Many talks and discussions concerning the work have been made on various occasions, including the Reagan-Gorbachev talks at Geneva in November 1985, 5th Fusion Working Group meeting in Germany in January 1986, extraordinary FWG meeting at Tokyo in February-March 1986, 11th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Control held under IAEA at Kyoto in November 1986, and first formal four-party (Japan, U.S., Soviet Union, EC) meeting at the IAEA headquarters in March this year. The ITER Technical Working Group was established and its first meeting was held on May 21 - 23, 1987. It was concluded in the meeting that the operation of ITER will be performed in two phases intended for nuclear combustion plasma physics studies and stationary operation, respectively. Major research and development activities carried out in the U.S., Europe, the Soviet Union, Japan and IAEA in connection with the development of ITER are outlined. (Nogami, K.)

  4. Neutronic Parametric Study on a Conceptual Design for a Transmutation Fusion Blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq Siddique, M.; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Fusion energy may be the one of options of future energy. In all over the world, researchers are putting their efforts for its commercial and economical availability. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors have been studied for various applications in China. First milestone of fusion energy is expected to be the fusion fission hybrid reactors. In fusion-fission hybrid reactor the blanket design is of second prime importance after fusion source. In this study conceptual design of a fusion blanket is initiated for calculation of tritium production, transmutation of minor actinides (MA) and fission products (FP) and energy multiplication calculations

  5. The international magnetic fusion energy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1988-10-06

    In May of 1988, the long tradition of international cooperation in magnetic fusion energy research culminated in the initiation of design work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). If eventually constructed in the 1990s, ITER would be the world's first magnetic fusion reactor. This paper discusses the background events that led to ITER and the present status of the ITER activity. This paper presents a brief summary of the technical, political, and organizational activities that have led to the creation of the ITER design activity. The ITER activity is now the main focus of international cooperation in magnetic fusion research and one of the largest international cooperative efforts in all of science. 2 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Social assessment on fusion energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kazuyasu

    1981-01-01

    In regard to the research and development for fusion energy technologies which are still in the stage of demonstrating scientific availability, it is necessary to accumulate the demonstrations of economic and environmental availability through the demonstration of technological availability. The purpose of this report is to examine how the society can utilize the new fusion energy technology. The technical characteristics of fusion energy system were analyzed in two aspects, namely the production techniques of thermal energy and electric energy. Also on the social characteristics in the fuel cycle stage of fusion reactors, the comparative analysis with existing fission reactors was carried out. Then, prediction and evaluation were made what change of social cycle fusion power generation causes on the social system formalized as a socio-ecological model. Moreover, the restricting factors to be the institutional obstacles to the application of fusion energy system to the society were analyzed from three levels of the decision making on energy policy. Since the convertor of fusion energy system is steam power generation system similar to existing system, the contents and properties of the social cycle change in the American society to which such new energy technology is applied are not much different even if the conversion will be made in future. (Kako, I.)

  7. Overview of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor Design Study in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jinhua; Feng Kaiming; Deng Baiquan; Deng, P.Zh.; Zhang Guoshu; Hu Gang; He Kaihui; Wu Yican; Qiu Lijian; Huang Qunying; Xiao Bingjia; Liu Xiaoping; Chen Yixue; Kong, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    The motivation for developing fusion-fission hybrid reactors is discussed in the context of electricity power requirements by 2050 in China. A detailed conceptual design of the Fusion Experimental Breeder (FEB) was developed from 1986-1995. The FEB has a subignited tokamak fusion core with a major radius of 4.0 m, a fusion power of 145 MW, and a fusion energy gain Q of 3. Based on this, an engineering outline design study of the FEB, FEB-E, has been performed. This design study is a transition from conceptual to engineering design in this research. The main results beyond that given in the detailed conceptual design are included in this paper, namely, the design studies of the blanket, divertor, test blanket, and tritium and environment issues. In-depth analyses have been performed to support the design. Studies of related advanced concepts such as the waste transmutation blanket concept and the spherical tokamak core concept are also presented

  8. Real-time control of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, B.; Sousa, J.; Varandas, C.A.F.

    2010-01-01

    The next generation fusion experiments, e.g. ITER, will be highly complex and raise new challenges in the field of control and data acquisition systems. The more advanced operation scenarios have to be capable of sustaining long pulse steady-state plasma and to suppress plasma instabilities almost completely. Such scenarios will heavily rely on Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) fast control systems. To ensure safety for the operation these systems have to be robust and resilient to faults while ensuring high availability. Mindful of the importance of such features for future fusion experiments ATCA based systems have been successfully used in fusion experiment as MIMO fast controller. This is the most promising architecture to substantially enhance the performance and capability of existing standard systems delivering well high throughput as well as high availability. The real-time control needs of a fusion experiment, the rational for the presently pursued solutions, the existing problems and the broad scientific and technical questions that need to be addressed on the path to a fusion power plant will be discussed.

  9. Fusion power, who needs it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaw, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    It is pointed out that the fusion community world wide has not aggressively pursued a faster pace of development, which can indeed be justified on the basis of its technical accomplishments, because of certain faulty assumptions. Taking some relevant data of energy consumption (based on fossil fuels) and its environmental impact in the projections for developing countries like India and China, it is demonstrated that there is extreme urgency (time-scale of less than 20-25 years) to develop technologies like fusion if one has to prevent stagnation of per capita energy production (and quality of life) in these countries. We conclude by calling for a new aggressive goal for the world wide fusion programme, namely development of a demonstration power plant producing electricity in an environmentally acceptable manner by the year 2015. (author). 6 refs., 5 tabs., 2 figs

  10. Review of the Strategic Plan for International Collaboration on Fusion Science and Technology Research. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The United States Government has employed international collaborations in magnetic fusion energy research since the program was declassified in 1958. These collaborations have been successful not only in producing high quality scientific results that have contributed to the advancement of fusion science and technology, they have also allowed us to highly leverage our funding. Thus, in the 1980s, when the funding situation made it necessary to reduce the technical breadth of the U.S. domestic program, these highly leveraged collaborations became key strategic elements of the U.S. program, allowing us to maintain some degree of technical breadth. With the recent, nearly complete declassification of inertial confinement fusion, the use of some international collaboration is expected to be introduced in the related inertial fusion energy research activities as well. The United States has been a leader in establishing and fostering collaborations that have involved scientific and technological exchanges, joint planning, and joint work at fusion facilities in the U.S. and worldwide. These collaborative efforts have proven mutually beneficial to the United States and our partners. International collaborations are a tool that allows us to meet fusion program goals in the most effective way possible. Working with highly qualified people from other countries and other cultures provides the collaborators with an opportunity to see problems from new and different perspectives, allows solutions to arise from the diversity of the participants, and promotes both collaboration and friendly competition. In short, it provides an exciting and stimulating environment resulting in a synergistic effect that is good for science and good for the people of the world.

  11. Fusion technology annual report of the association EURATOM/CEA 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaud, P.; Le vagueres, F.

    1998-01-01

    In this book are found technical and scientific papers on the main works carried out in the frame of the european program of fusion technology, during 1998. The presented activities are: plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety (short and long term), european blanket project (long term) with water cooled lithium lead and helium cooled pebble bed blanket, materials for fusion power plant, socio-economic research on fusion, plasma facing components, fuel cycle, inertial confinement. (A.L.B.)

  12. Numerical studies of deuterium-tritium ignition in impact-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubrin, R.M.; Ribe, F.L.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical one-dimensional solution of the Euler equations for an imploding spherical tungsten shell with internal deuterium-tritium gas is applied to study impact-fusion dynamics with parameters of fusion reactor relevance. Thermal conduction and radiative energy loss by the plasma are taken into account, as is heating by fusion generated alpha particles. A variety of target sizes and impact velocities are examined, and scaling laws for fusion yields are deduced which define possible parameters for conceptual commercial impact-fusion power reactors. It is found that shell energies and velocities of about 30 MJ and 110 km/s would be satisfactory. A commercial impact-fusion reactor based on such parameters is discussed

  13. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1984-02-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matricies. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  14. Neutronic study of fusion reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, F.

    1983-06-01

    The problem of effective regeneration is a crucial issue for the fusion reactor, specially for the power reactor because of the conflicting requirements of heat removal and tritium breeding. For that, calculations are performed to evaluate blanket materials. Precise techniques are herein developed to improve the accuracy of the tritium production and the neutron and gamma transport calculations. Many configurations are studied with realistic breeder, structure, and coolant proportions. Accuracy of the results are evaluated from the sensitivity theory and uncertainty study using covariance matrices. At the end of this work, we presented the needs of nuclear data for fusion reactors and we give some advices for improving our knowledge of these data [fr

  15. Steady-state operation of magnetic fusion devices: Plasma control and plasma facing components. Report on the IAEA technical committee meeting held at Fukuoka, 25-29 October 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, F.

    2000-01-01

    An IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Steady-State Operation of Magnetic Fusion Devices - Plasma Control and Plasma Facing Components was held at Fukuoka, Japan, from 25 to 29 October 1999. The meeting was the second IAEA Techical Committee Meeting on the subject, following the one held at Hefei, China, a year earlier. The meeting was attended by over 150 researchers from 10 countries

  16. Fusion--fission hybrid reactors: a capsule introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdren, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A short introduction to fusion-fission hybrid systems is provided touching on (a) basic technological characteristics; (b) potential applications; (c) relevance of environmental considerations in the development rationale for hybrids. References to the more technical literature are supplied

  17. Technical Letter Report - Preliminary Assessment of NDE Methods on Inspection of HDPE Butt Fusion Piping Joints for Lack of Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Hall, Thomas E.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has a multi-year program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide engineering studies and assessments of issues related to the use of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for the reliable inspection of nuclear power plant components. As part of this program, there is a subtask 2D that was set up to address an assessment of issues related to the NDE of high density polyethylene (HDPE) butt fusion joints. This work is being driven by the nuclear industry wanting to employ HDPE materials in nuclear power plant systems. This being a new material for use in nuclear applications, there are a number of issues related to its use and potential problems that may evolve. The industry is pursuing ASME Code Case N-755 entitled 'Use of Polyethylene (PE) Plastic Pipe for Section III, Division 1, Construction and Section XI Repair/Replacement Activities' that contains the requirements for nuclear power plant applications of HDPE. This Code Case requires that inspections be performed after the fusion joint is made by visually examining the bead that is formed and conducting a pressure test of the joint. These tests are only effective in general if gross through-wall flaws exist in the fusion joint. The NRC wants to know whether a volumetric inspection can be conducted on the fusion joint that will reliably detect lack-of-fusion conditions that may be produced during joint fusing. The NRC has requested that the work that PNNL is conducting be provided to assist them in resolving this inspection issue of whether effective volumetric NDE can be conducted to detect lack of fusion (LOF) in the butt HDPE joints. PNNL had 24 HDPE pipe specimens manufactured of 3408 material to contain LOF conditions that could be used to assess the effectiveness of NDE in detecting the LOF. Basic ultrasonic material properties were measured and used to guide the use of phased arrays and time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) work that was

  18. Fusion Safety Program annual report: Fiscal year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Herring, J.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; Lyon, R.E.; Merrill, B.J.; Piet, S.J.

    1988-02-01

    This report summarizes the Fusion Safety Program major activities in fiscal year 1987. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is the designated lead laboraotry and EG and G Idaho, Inc., is the prime contractor for this program, which was initiated in 1979. Activities are conducted at the INEL and in participating laboratories including the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Wisconsin. The technical areas covered in the report include tritium safety, activation product release, reactions involving lithium breeding materials, safety of fusion magnet systems, plasma disruptions, risk assessment methodology, computer codes development for reactor transients, and fusion waste management. Also included in the report is a summary of the safety and environmental analysis and conventional facilities design performed by INEL for the Compact Ignition Tokamak design project, the safety analysis and documentation performed for the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor design, and the technical support provided to the Environmental Safety and Economics Committee (ESECOM). 42 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Models and analyses for inertial-confinement fusion-reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes models and analyses devised at Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the technical characteristics of different inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor elements required for component integration into a functional unit. We emphasize the generic properties of the different elements rather than specific designs. The topics discussed are general ICF reactor design considerations; reactor cavity phenomena, including the restoration of interpulse ambient conditions; first-wall temperature increases and material losses; reactor neutronics and hydrodynamic blanket response to neutron energy deposition; and analyses of loads and stresses in the reactor vessel walls, including remarks about the generation and propagation of very short wavelength stress waves. A discussion of analytic approaches useful in integrations and optimizations of ICF reactor systems concludes the report

  20. EU socio-economic research on fusion: Findings and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosato, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    In 1997 the European Commission launched a Socio-Economic Research program to study under which conditions future fusion power plants may become competitive, compatible with the energy supply system and acceptable for the public. It has been shown, among others, that: 1) local communities are ready to support the construction of an experimental fusion facility, if appropriate communication and awareness campaigns are carried out; 2) since the externalities are much lower than for competitors, fusion power plants may become the major producer of base load electricity at the end of the century in Europe, if climate changes have to be mitigated, if the construction of new nuclear fission power plants continues to be constrained and if nuclear fusion power plants become commercially available in 2050. Cooperating with major international organizations, the program for next year aims to demonstrating, through technical economic programming models and global multi-regional energy environmental scenarios, that the potential global benefits of fusion power plants in the second half of the century largely outdo the RD and D costs borne in the first half to make it available. Making the public aware of such benefits through field experiences will be part of the program. (author)

  1. 19th Meeting of the IFRC Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.

    2014-07-01

    The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) Subcommittee on Atomic and Molecular Data met at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna on 28-29 April 2014 to review the work of the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit (AMDU) within the Nuclear Data Section. The subcommittee heard presentations on the Unit’s activities in the years 2012 and 2013 and discussed priorities for database development and evaluation, coordinated research projects and other meetings, and presentation on the web and elsewhere of the work of the Unit. The IFRC Subcommittee offers the following specific recommendations. • For Coordinated Research Projects in the area of plasma-material interaction highest priority goes to a CRP on erosion and tritium retention for steel surfaces, with emphasis on the kinds of low- or reduced-activation steels that may be used in a reactor. • In the area of atomic and molecular data it is recommended to initiate a new CRP on data for charge exchange processes related to neutral beams. The main topic of interest will be beam interaction with core plasma, but processes relevant to generation of the beam may also be included. • Data for plasma interaction with liquid metals gallium and tin, certain salts and possibly also aluminium, are needed in order to assess uses of these materials in a reactor environment. For a CRP this topic has lower priority than one on steel surfaces, but it is recommended as a good topic for a Technical Meeting. • The Unit should organize again, in 2014 or early 2015, a large “decennial” meeting on atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction data for fusion science and technology to bring together fusion scientists users of A+M+PMI data and atomic, molecular and materials scientists data producers. • The Unit has the mission to provide internationally recommended and evaluated data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction process and related materials structure properties for fusion science and technology; this is

  2. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    on the nuclearity of fusion partners. While CD47 promotes cell fusions involving mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts, syncytin-1 promotes fusion of two multi-nucleated osteoclasts, but also reduces the number of fusions between mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, CD47 seems to mediate fusion mostly through...... individual fusion events using time-lapse and antagonists of CD47 and syncytin-1. All time-lapse recordings have been studied by two independent observers. A total of 1808 fusion events were analyzed. The present study shows that CD47 and syncytin-1 have different roles in osteoclast fusion depending...... broad contact surfaces between the partners' cell membrane while syncytin-1 mediate fusion through phagocytic-cup like structure. J. Cell. Physiol. 9999: 1-8, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  3. Clinical use of digital retrospective image fusion of CT, MRI, FDG-PET and SPECT - fields of indications and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, A.J.; Niehues, S.M.; Amthauer, H.; Felix, R.; Rohlfing, T.; Hosten, N.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and the clinical benefits of retrospective digital image fusion (PET, SPECT, CT and MRI). Materials and methods: In a prospective study, a total of 273 image fusions were performed and evaluated. The underlying image acquisitions (CT, MRI, SPECT and PET) were performed in a way appropriate for the respective clinical question and anatomical region. Image fusion was executed with a software program developed during this study. The results of the image fusion procedure were evaluated in terms of technical feasibility, clinical objective, and therapeutic impact. Results: The most frequent combinations of modalities were CT/PET (n = 156) and MRI/PET (n = 59), followed by MRI/SPECT (n = 28), CT/SPECT (n = 22) and CT/MRI (n = 8). The clinical questions included following regions (more than one region per case possible): neurocranium (n = 42), neck (n = 13), lung and mediastinum (n = 24), abdomen (n = 181), and pelvis (n = 65). In 92.6% of all cases (n = 253), image fusion was technically successful. Image fusion was able to improve sensitivity and specificity of the single modality, or to add important diagnostic information. Image fusion was problematic in cases of different body positions between the two imaging modalities or different positions of mobile organs. In 37.9% of the cases, image fusion added clinically relevant information compared to the single modality. Conclusion: For clinical questions concerning liver, pancreas, rectum, neck, or neurocranium, image fusion is a reliable method suitable for routine clinical application. Organ motion still limits its feasibility and routine use in other areas (e.g., thorax). (orig.)

  4. 3-megajoule heavy-ion fusion driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Hoyer, E.; Keefe, D.

    1981-06-01

    The initiation of inertial confinement fusion reactions with a heavy ion particle beam has been under intensive study since 1976, and the progress of this study is principally documented in the proceedings of annual workshops held by US National Laboratories. At this time a 3MJ, 150 TW, ion beam is a good choice to initiate microexplosions with energy gain of 100. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has made systems studies based on a Linear Induction Accelerator to meet the beam requirements. The accelerator system, expected performance and cost, and technical problems to be addressed in the near future are discussed

  5. Fusion reactor remote maintenance study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sniderman, M.

    1979-04-01

    An analysis of a major maintenance operation, the remote replacement of a modular sector of a tokamak reactor, was performed in substantial detail. Specific assumptions were developed which included concepts from various existing designs so that the operation which was studied includes some design features generic to any fusion reactor design. Based on the work performed in this study, the principal conclusions are: (1) It appears feasible to design a tokamak fusion reactor plant with availability comparable to existing fossil and fission plants, but this will require diligence and comprehensive planning during the complete design phase. (2) Since the total fusion program is paced by the success of each device, maintenance considerations must be incorporated into each device during design, even if the device is an experimental unit. (3) Innovative approaches, such as automatic computer controlled operations, should be developed so that large step reductions in planned maintenance times can be achieved

  6. Engineering options for the U.S. Fusion Demo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillack, M.S.; El-Guebaly, L.; Wong, C.

    1995-01-01

    Through its successful operation, the US Fusion Demo must be sufficiently convincing that a utility or independent power producer will choose to purchase one as its next electric generating plant. A fusion power plant which is limited to the use of currently-proven technologies is unlikely to be sufficiently attractive to a utility unless fuel shortages and regulatory restrictions are far more crippling to competing energy sources than currently anticipated. In that case, the task of choosing an appropriate set of engineering technologies today involves trade-offs between attractiveness and technical risk. The design space for an attractive tokamak fusion power core is not unlimited; previous studies have shown that advanced low-activation ferritic steel, vanadium alloy, or SiC/SiC composites are the only candidates the authors have for the primary in-vessel structural material. An assessment of engineering design options has been performed using these three materials and the associated in-vessel component designs which are compatible with them

  7. Browsing the fusion data in a Google map way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xianming; Pan, W.; Chen, L.; Song, Xiao; Pan, L.; Luo, C.; Zhang, G.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. How to access the ITER data is still an open issue. Concepts from KSTAR(1), W7X(2), EAST(3), and DIIID(4) have been presented. In this paper, a new web application to browse the fusion data in a Google map way is demonstrated on HL-2A database. This dynamic and interactive web application can run in any popular browser(IE, safari, Firefox, Opera), by any hardware (smart phone, PC, ipad, Mac) and operating system (ios, android, windows, linux, Mac OS). No any plug-ins is needed. The details of the framework for this web application are presented. The framework consists of three layers. The front top client layer is developed by Jquery code. The middle layer, which plays a role of a bridge to connect the server and client is developed by PHP code. The behind server layer is developed by Matlab, which responses any command from the front top client, retrieves the data from the HL-2A database, analyses and processes the data, and finally, returns the data to the client in client's favorite way. The way to browse and retrieve the fusion data is well welcomed by many researchers who access fusion data from many other machines. This way may apply to other machines, and present useful idea to the way for accessing ITER data in the future. References: 1) Kim, E.N., Web-based (HTML5) Interactive Graphics for Fusion Research and Collaboration, O4-2, 8. IAEA Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition and Remote Participation for Fusion Research. June 20-24,2011, San Francisco, CA; 2)Davis, W.M., Easy Web Interfaces to IDL Code for NSTX Data Analysis Progress on Standardization and Automation in Software Development on W7X, P2-1. 8. IAEA Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition and Remote Participation for Fusion Research. June 20-24,2011, San Francisco, CA; 3) Yang, F., A Web Based MDSPLUS Data Analysis and Visualization System for EAST, P2-16. 8th IAEA Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition and Remote Participation for

  8. Remote operation of the GOLEM tokamak for Fusion Education

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grover, O.; Kocman, J.; Odstrčil, M.; Odstrčil, T.; Matušů, M.; Stöckel, Jan; Svoboda, V.; Vondrášek, G.; Žára, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 112, November (2016), s. 1038-1044 ISSN 0920-3796. [Technical Meeting on Control, Data Acquisition, and Remote Participation for Fusion Research IAEA /10./. Ahmedabad, 20.04.2015-24.04.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Tokamak technology * Remote participation * Education * Nuclear fusion Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379616303441

  9. Mechanical Engineering Department technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.B.; Abrahamson, L.; Denney, R.M.; Dubois, B.E (eds.)

    1982-01-01

    Technical achievements and publication abstracts related to research in the following Divisions of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are reported in this biannual review: Nuclear Fuel Engineering; Nuclear Explosives Engineering; Weapons Engineering; Energy Systems Engineering; Engineering Sciences; Magnetic Fusion Engineering; and Material Fabrication. (LCL)

  10. Study of fusion reactions forming Cf nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuyagbaatar, J.; Hinde, D. J.; Du Rietz, R.; Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Duellmann, C. E.; Evers, M.; Wakhle, A.; Williams, E.; Yakushev, A.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of a compound nucleus in different projectile and target combinations is a powerful method for investigating the fusion process. Recently, the dominance of quasi-fission over fusion-fission has been inferred for 34 S+ 208 Pb in comparison to 36 S+ 206 Pb; both reactions lead to the compound nucleus 242 Cf*.The mass and angle distributions of the fission fragments from these reactions were studied in order to further investigate the presence of quasi-fission. (authors)

  11. Will nuclear fusion be able to power the next century?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grad, P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is widely regarded as potentially the ultimate energy-generation concept. Although an enormous amount of work and resources has already been committed throughout the world on nuclear fusion research, controlled nuclear fusion has so far proved largely elusive and the difficulties to be overcome before the first commercial fusion reactor is put into operation remain daunting and formidable. In Australia there are three main nuclear fusion research efforts. Sydney University's School of Physics operates a tokamak and a team there has been studying plasma properties in general and in particular radio frequency wave heating of the plasma. At the Australian National University a group has pioneered the construction and operation of an advanced stellarator model called a heliac while at Flinders University in Adelaide a team has developed a rotamak model. The US, Europe, Japan and the USSR each has a frontline fusion research tokamak with Princeton University's TFTR and Culham's JET closest to reactor operation conditions. Although several questions remain to be answered about the safety of a fusion reactor, all experts agree that these problems would be easier to solve than those of conventional fission reactors and there would be no major radioactive waste disposal problem. Some argue that fusion would contribute to the greenhouse effect but most authorities have expressed optimism that fusion, once the technical hurdles are overcome, could economically provide virtually unlimited energy with minimal environmental hazards and at a high safety level

  12. Contribution to the actual discussion on the technological problems of nuclear fusion energy exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1982-02-01

    Recently increased criticism has been raised from many sides as to the technical realization of fusion reactors. The basic argument is continually stated whether it is really sensible to invest the enormous sums of money in order to produce a commercial fusion reactor. In this article, the principle problems facing nuclear fusion are presented and it is outlined which priorities should be set for the realization of fusion energy in the near future. (Auth.)

  13. Application of optical tweezers and excimer laser to study protoplast fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantawang, Titirat; Samipak, Sompid; Limtrakul, Jumras; Chattham, Nattaporn

    2015-07-01

    Protoplast fusion is a physical phenomenon that two protoplasts come in contact and fuse together. Doing so, it is possible to combine specific genes from one protoplast to another during fusion such as drought resistance and disease resistance. There are a few possible methods to induce protoplast fusion, for example, electrofusion and chemical fusion. In this study, chemical fusion was performed with laser applied as an external force to enhance rate of fusion and observed under a microscope. Optical tweezers (1064 nm with 100X objective N.A. 1.3) and excimer laser (308 nm LMU-40X-UVB objective) were set with a Nikon Ti-U inverted microscope. Samples were prepared by soaking in hypertonic solution in order to induce cell plasmolysis. Elodea Canadensis and Allium cepa plasmolysed leaves were cut and observed under microscope. Concentration of solution was varied to induce difference turgor pressures on protoplasts pushing at cell wall. Free protoplasts in solution were trapped by optical tweezers to study the effect of Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution. PEG was diluted by Ca+ solution during the process to induced protoplast cell contact and fusion. Possibility of protoplast fusion by excimer laser was investigated and found possible. Here we report a novel tool for plant cell fusion using excimer laser. Plant growth after cell fusion is currently conducted.

  14. Conceptual design of light ion beam inertia nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    Light ion beam, inertia nuclear fusion system drew attention recently as one of the nuclear fusion systems for power reactors in the history of the research on nuclear fusion. Its beginning seemed to be the judgement that the implosion of fusion fuel pellets with light ions can be realized with the light ions which can be obtained in view of accelerator techniques. Of course, in order to generate practically usable nuclear fusion reaction by this system and maintain it, many technical difficulties must be overcome. This research was carried out for the purpose of discovering such technical problems and searching for their solution. At the time of doing the works, the following policy was adopted. Though their is the difference of fine and rough, the design of a whole reactor system is performed conformably. In order to make comparison with other reactor types and nuclear fusion systems, the design is carried out as the power plant of about one million kWe output. As the extent of the design, the works at conceptual design stage are performed to present the concept of design which satisfies the required function. Basically, the design is made from conservative standpoint. This research of design was started in 1981, and in fiscal 1982, the mutual adjustment among the design of respective parts was performed on the basis of the results in 1981, and the possible revision and new proposal were investigated. (Kako, I.)

  15. Background information and technical basis for assessment of environmental implications of magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, J.B.

    1983-08-01

    This report contains background information for assessing the potential environmental implications of fusion-based central electric power stations. It was developed as part of an environmental review of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Transition of the program from demonstration of purely scientific feasibility (breakeven conditions) to exploration of engineering feasibility suggests that formal program environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act is timely. This report is the principal reference upon which an environmental impact statement on magnetic fusion will be based

  16. Potential Fusion Market for Hydrogen Production Under Environmental Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Potential future hydrogen market and possible applications of fusion were analyzed. Hydrogen is expected as a major energy and fuel mediun for the future, and various processes for hydrogen production can be considered as candidates for the use of fusion energy. In order to significantly contribute to reduction of CO 2 emission, fusion must be deployed in developing countries, and must substitute fossil based energy with synthetic fuel such as hydrogen. Hydrogen production processes will have to evaluated and compared from the aspects of energy efficiency and CO 2 emission. Fusion can provide high temperature heat that is suitable for vapor electrolysis, thermo-chemical water decomposition and steam reforming with biomass waste. That is a possible advantage of fusion over renewables and Light water power reactor. Despite of its technical difficulty, fusion is also expected to have less limitation for siting location in the developing countries. Under environmental constraints, fusion has a chance to be a major primary energy source, and production of hydrogen enhances its contribution, while in 'business as usual', fusion will not be selected in the market. Thus if fusion is to be largely used in the future, meeting socio-economic requirements would be important

  17. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center 1987--1988 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    During the past year, technical progress has been made in all Plasma Fusion Center (PFC) research programs. The Plasma Fusion Center is recognized as one of the leading university research laboratories in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion. Its research programs have produced significant results on several fronts: the basic physics of high-temperature plasmas (plasmas theory, RF heating, free electron lasers, development of advanced diagnostics, and intermediate-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices), major confinement results on the Alcator C tokamak, including pioneering investigations of the stability, heating, and confinement properties of plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields, experiments on the medium-scale TARA tandem mirror, including the development of novel MHD stabilization techniques in axisymmetric geometry, and a broad program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced millimeter-wave source development, and system studies of fusion reactor design, operation, and technology requirements

  18. Parameter study toward economical magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tomoaki; Okano, Kunihiko; Nanahara, Toshiya; Hatayama, Akiyoshi; Yamaji, Kenji; Takuma, Tadashi.

    1996-01-01

    Although the R and D of nuclear fusion reactors has made a steady progress as seen in ITER project, it has become of little doubt that fusion power reactors require hugeness and enormous amount of construction cost as well as surmounting the physics and engineering difficulties. Therefore, it is one of the essential issues to investigate the prospect of realizing fusion power reactors. In this report we investigated the effects of physics and engineering improvements on the economics of ITER-like steady state tokamak fusion reactors using our tokamak system and costing analysis code. With the results of this study, we considered what is the most significant factor for realizing economical competitive fusion reactors. The results show that with the conventional TF coil maximum field (12T), physics progress in β-value (or Troyon coefficient) has the most considerable effect on the reduction of fusion plant COE (Cost of Electricity) while the achievement of H factor = 2-3 and neutron wall load =∼5MW/m 2 is necessary. The results also show that with the improvement of TF coil maximum field, reactors with a high aspect ratio are economically advantageous because of low plasma current driving power while the improvement of current density in the conductors and yield strength of support structures is indispensable. (author)

  19. Fusion reactor design studies: standard accounts for cost estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, S.C.; Willke, T.L.; Young, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    The fusion reactor design studies--standard accounts for cost estimates provides a common format from which to assess the economic character of magnetically confined fusion reactor design concepts. The format will aid designers in the preparation of design concept costs estimates and also provide policymakers with a tool to assist in appraising which design concept may be economically promising. The format sets forth a categorization and accounting procedure to be used when estimating fusion reactor busbar energy cost that can be easily and consistently applied. Reasons for developing the procedure, explanations of the procedure, justifications for assumptions made in the procedure, and the applicability of the procedure are described in this document. Adherence to the format when evaluating prospective fusion reactor design concepts will result in the identification of the more promising design concepts thus enabling the fusion power alternatives with better economic potential to be quickly and efficiently developed

  20. High-Frequency Gravitational Wave Induced Nuclear Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, Giorgio; Baker, Robert M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear fusion is a process in which nuclei, having a total initial mass, combine to produce a single nucleus, having a final mass less than the total initial mass. Below a given atomic number the process is exothermic; that is, since the final mass is less than the combined initial mass and the mass deficit is converted into energy by the nuclear fusion. On Earth nuclear fusion does not happen spontaneously because electrostatic barriers prevent the phenomenon. To induce controlled, industrial scale, nuclear fusion, only a few methods have been discovered that look promising, but net positive energy production is not yet possible because of low overall efficiency of the systems. In this paper we propose that an intense burst of High Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs) could be focused or beamed to a target mass composed of appropriate fuel or target material to efficiently rearrange the atomic or nuclear structure of the target material with consequent nuclear fusion. Provided that efficient generation of HFGW can be technically achieved, the proposed fusion reactor could become a viable solution for the energy needs of mankind and alternatively a process for beaming energy to produce a source of fusion energy remotely - even inside solid materials

  1. Radiation Shielding Information Center: a source of computer codes and data for fusion neutronics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.; Trubey, D.K.; Maskewitz, B.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC), established in 1962 to collect, package, analyze, and disseminate information, computer codes, and data in the area of radiation transport related to fission, is now being utilized to support fusion neutronics technology. The major activities include: (1) answering technical inquiries on radiation transport problems, (2) collecting, packaging, testing, and disseminating computing technology and data libraries, and (3) reviewing literature and operating a computer-based information retrieval system containing material pertinent to radiation transport analysis. The computer codes emphasize methods for solving the Boltzmann equation such as the discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques, both of which are widely used in fusion neutronics. The data packages include multigroup coupled neutron-gamma-ray cross sections and kerma coefficients, other nuclear data, and radiation transport benchmark problem results

  2. First generation of fusion power plants: Design and technology. Proceedings of the 2. IAEA technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This series of meetings has been initiated under recommendation of the International Fusion Research Council for the IAEA and is expected to initiate, develop and mature ideas on fusion strategy that would be of benefit for all players. The present objectives of this meeting are to provide a forum to discuss concepts, technology and environmental aspects of future fusion power plants, the next step following ITER, their role in future energy mix and to assess a selection of urgent topics aiming at identifying the physics and the technological requirements that ITER and a fusion grade materials developing programme will have to address to support the construction of a DEMO(s) fusion power plant(s) prototype demonstrating viable economics. The meeting was organized in five sessions addressing five topics: - (PPCA) Power Plant Concepts and systems Analysis. - (MCP) Materials analysis/Components design/Plasma requirements - (NE) Non-Electric applications of fusion - (SESE) Social, Economic, Safety and Environmental aspects of fusion - (EP) Energy Policy, strategy and scenario for fusion development. A summary session took place at the end of the meeting. Thirty-three participants representing 12 Countries and 3 International Organizations were present at the meeting

  3. The Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Sheffield, G.V.; Bushnell, C.

    1985-01-01

    The basic objective of the next major step in the US fusion programme has been defined as the achievement of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn of a fusion plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) device. Preconceptual design studies have seen completion of four candidate versions to provide the comparative information needed to narrow down the range of TFCX options before proceeding to the conceptual design phase. All four designs share the same objective and conform to common physics, engineering and costing criteria. The four base options considered differed mainly in the toroidal field coil design, two employing superconducting coils and the other two copper coils. In each case (copper and superconducting), one relatively conventional version was carried as well as a version employing more exotic toroidal field coil design assumptions. Sizes range from R=2.6 m for the smaller of the two copper versions to R=4.08 m for the larger superconducting option. In all cases, the plasma current was about 10 MA and the toroidal field about 4 T. (author)

  4. Development of high power solid-state laser for inertial fusion energy driver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Yamanaka, M.; Nakatsuka, M.; Sasaki, T.; Nakai, S.

    1997-01-01

    The design study of the laser fusion power plant KOYO has been conducted as a joint program of universities, national laboratories, and industries in Japan and also with international collaborations. In the design of KOYO, the gain scaling of direct drive implosion with 0.35 μ m wavelength laser light is used. A driver of diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) generates 4 MJ/pulse with 12 Hz and the output pulses are switched to deliver the laser energy successively to four chambers, which operate with 3 Hz. The chamber wall is protected with thick liquid metal which flows down in a SiC woven tube. Following to the conceptual design study, the critical key issues which may affect the technical and economical feasibility of the commercial power plant KOYO have been examined. Research and development of some key technologies have been performed. As the results of the studies on KOYO, it is concluded that the technical and economical feasibility of laser fusion reactor is well in our scope to reach

  5. Fusion plasma physics during half a century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, Bo

    1999-08-01

    A review is given on the potentialities of fusion energy with respect to energy production and related environmental problems, the various approaches to controlled thermonuclear fusion, the main problem areas of research, the historical development, the present state of investigations, and future perspectives. This article also presents a personal memorandum of the author. Thereby special reference will be given to part of the research conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. In large tokamak experiments temperatures above the ignition limit of about 10 8 K have been reached under break-even conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the energy loss. A power producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient. The future international research programme has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basis research and new ideas, and also within lines of magnetic confinement being alternative to that of tokamaks

  6. Real-time image fusion involving diagnostic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, Caroline; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Lucian G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our article is to give an overview of the current and future possibilities of real-time image fusion involving ultrasound. We present a review of the existing English-language peer-reviewed literature assessing this technique, which covers technical solutions (for ultrasound...

  7. Study of Heating and Fusion Power Production in ITER Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Bateman, G.; Kessel, C.; McCune, D. C.; Budny, R. V.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2011-01-01

    ITER simulations, in which the temperatures, toroidal angular frequency and currents are evolved, are carried out using the PTRANSP code starting with initial profiles and boundary conditions obtained from TSC code studies. The dependence of heat deposition and current drive on ICRF frequency, number of poloidal modes, beam orientation, number of Monte Carlo particles and ECRH launch angles is studied in order to examine various possibilities and contingencies for ITER steady state and hybrid discharges. For the hybrid discharges, the fusion power production and fusion Q, computed using the Multi-Mode MMM v7.1 anomalous transport model, are compared with those predicted using the GLF23 model. The simulations of the hybrid scenario indicate that the fusion power production at 1000 sec will be approximately 500 MW corresponding to a fusion Q = 10.0. The discharge scenarios simulated aid in understanding the conditions for optimizing fusion power production and in examining measures of plasma performance.

  8. Proceedings of the IEA-technical workshop on the test cell system for an international fusion materials irradiation facility, Karlsruhe, Germany, July 3-6, 1995. IEA-implementing agreement for a programme of research and development on fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeslang, A.; Lindau, R.

    1995-09-01

    After a Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) study on an International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been launched under the auspices of the IEA, working groups and relevant tasks have been defined and agreed in an IEA-workshop that was held September 26-29 1994 at Karlsruhe. For the Test Cell System 11 tasks were identified which can be grouped into the three major fields neutronics, test matrix/users and test cell engineering. In order to discuss recently achieved results and to coordinate necessary activities for an effective design integration, a technical workshop on the Test Cell System was initiated. This workshop was organized on July 3-6 1995 by the Institute for Materials Research I at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and attended by 20 specialists working in the fields neutronics, fusion materials R and D and test cell engineering in the European Union, Japan, and the United States of America. The presentations and discussions during this workshop have shown together with the elaborated lists of action items, that has been achieved in all three fields, and that from the future IFMIF experimental program for a number of materials a database covering widerspread loading conditions up to DEMO-reactor relevant end-of-life damage levels can be expected. (orig.)

  9. Fusion Energy: Contextual Analysis of the Information Panels Developed by the Scientific Community versus Citizen Discourse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri Anglada, S.; Cornejo Alvarez, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The report presents an exploratory study on the impact of scientific dissemination, particularly a comparative analysis of two discourses on fusion energy as an alternative energy future. The report introduces a comparative analysis of the institutional discourse, as portrayed by the scientific jargon used in a European travelling exhibition on nuclear fusion Fusion Expo, and the social discourse, as illustrated by a citizen deliberation on this very same exhibition. Through textual analysis, the scientific discourse as deployed in the informative panels at the Fusion Expo is compared with the citizen discourse as developed in the discussions within the citizen groups. The ConText software was applied for such analysis. The purpose is to analyze how visitors assimilate, capture and understand highly technical information. Results suggest that, in despite of convergence points, the two discourses present certain differences, showing diverse levels of communication. The scientific discourse shows a great profusion of formalisms and technicalities of scientific jargon. The citizen discourse shows abundance of words associated with daily life and the more practical aspects (economy, efficiency), concerning institutional and evaluative references. In sum, the study shows that although there are a few common communicative spaces, there are still very few turning points. These data indicate that although exhibitions can be a good tool to disseminate advances in fusion energy in informal learning contexts, public feedback is a powerful tool for improving the quality of social dialogue. (Author)

  10. Fusion: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2006-01-01

    The article gives an overview and introduction to the activities of SCK-CEN's research programme on fusion. The decision to construct the ITER international nuclear fusion experiment in Cadarache is highlighted. A summary of the Belgian contributions to fusion research is given with particular emphasis on studies of radiation effects on diagnostics systems, radiation effects on remote handling sensing systems, fusion waste management and socio-economic studies

  11. Overview of US heavy-ion fusion progress and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    2004-01-01

    Significant experimental and theoretical progress has been made in the U.S. heavy ion fusion program on high-current sources, transport, final focusing, chambers and targets for inertial fusion energy (IFE) driven by induction linac accelerators seek to provide the scientific and technical basis for the Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX), an integrated source-to-target physics experiment recently included in the list of future facilities planned by the U.S. Department of Energy. To optimize the design of IBX and future inertial fusion energy drivers, current HIF-VNL research is addressing several key issues (representative, not inclusive): gas and electron cloud effects which can exacerbate beam loss at high beam perveance and magnet aperture fill factors; ballistic neutralized and assisted-pinch focusing of neutralized heavy ion beams; limits on longitudinal compression of both neutralized and un-neutralized heavy ion bunches; and tailoring heavy ion beams for uniform target energy deposition for high energy density physics (HEDP) studies.

  12. Evaluation of the impact of a committed site on fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Nagy, A.

    1979-01-01

    The technical and economic merits of a committed fusion site for development of tokamak, mirror, and EBT reactor from ignition through demo phases were evaluated. Schedule compression resulting from evolving several reactor concepts and/or phases on a committed site as opposed to sequential use of independent sites was estimated. Land, water, and electrical power requirements for a committed fusion site were determined. A conceptual plot plan for siting three fusion reactors on a committed site was configured. Reactor support equipment common to the various concepts was identified as candidates for sharing. Licensing issues for fusion plants were briefly addressed

  13. Chemical analysis developments for fusion materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCown, J.J.; Baldwin, D.L.; Keough, R.F.; Van der Cook, B.P.

    1985-04-01

    Several projects at Hanford under the management of the Westinghouse Hanford Company have involved research and development (R and D) on fusion materials. They include work on the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility and its associated Experimental Lithium System; testing of irradiated lithium compounds as breeding materials; and testing of Li and Li-Pb alloy reactions with various atmospheres, concrete, and other reactor materials for fusion safety studies. In the course of these projects, a number of interesting and challenging analytical chemistry problems were encountered. They include sampling and analysis of lithium while adding and removing elements of interest; sampling, assaying and compound identification efforts on filters, aerosol particles and fire residues; development of dissolution and analysis techniques for measuring tritium and helium in lithium ceramics including oxides, aluminates, silicates and zirconates. An overview of the analytical chemistry development problems plus equipment and procedures used will be presented

  14. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium...... and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities on fusion materials research (Tungsten and ODSFS). Other activities are system analysis...

  15. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium...... and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities on fusion materials research (Tungsten and ODSFS). Other activities are system analysis...

  16. World progress toward fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.F.

    1989-09-01

    This paper will describe the progress in fusion science and technology from a world perspective. The paper will cover the current technical status, including the understanding of fusion's economic, environmental, and safety characteristics. Fusion experiments are approaching the energy breakeven condition. An energy gain (Q) of 30 percent has been achieved in magnetic confinement experiments. In addition, temperatures required for an ignited plasma (Ti = 32 KeV) and energy confinements about 75 percent of that required for ignition have been achieved in separate experiments. Two major facilities have started the experimental campaign to extend these results and achieve or exceed Q = 1 plasma conditions by 1990. Inertial confinement fusion experiments are also approaching thermonuclear conditions and have achieved a compression factor 100-200 times liquid D-T. Because of this progress, the emphasis in fusion research is turning toward questions of engineering feasibility. Leaders of the major fusion R and D programs in the European Community (EC), Japan, the United States, and the U.S.S.R. have agreed on the major steps that are needed to reach the point at which a practical fusion system can be designed. The United States is preparing for an experiment to address the last unexplored scientific issue, the physics of an ignited plasma, during the late 1990's. The EC, Japan, U.S.S.R., and the United States have joined together under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to jointly design and prepare the validating R and D for an international facility, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), to address all the remaining scientific issues and to explore the engineering technology of fusion around the turn of the century. In addition, a network of international agreements have been concluded between these major parties and a number of smaller fusion programs, to cooperate on resolving a complete spectrum of fusion science and

  17. Conceptual design study for a laser fusion hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Bechtel Corporation have been involved in a joint effort to conceptually design a laser fusion hybrid reactor. The design which has evolved is a depleted-uranium fueled fast-fission blanket which produces fissile plutonium and electricity. A major objective of the design study was to evaluate the feasibility of producing fissile fuel with laser fusion. This feasibility evaluation was carried out by analyzing the integrated engineering performance of the complete conceptual design and by identifying the required laser/pellet performance. The performance of the laser fusion hybrid has also been compared to a typical fast breeder reactor. The results show that the laser fusion hybrid produces enough fissile material to fuel more than six light water reactors (LWRs) of equivalent thermal power while operating in a regime which requires an order of magnitude less laser and pellet performance than pure laser fusion. In comparison to a fast breeder reactor the hybrid produces 10 times more fissile fuel. An economic analysis of the design shows that the cost of electricity in a combined hybrid-LWR scenario increases by only 20 to 40 percent when the capital cost of the hybrid ranges from 2 to 3 times more than an LWR

  18. Conceptual design study for a laser fusion hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.

    1976-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Bechtel Corporation have been involved in a joint effort to conceptually design a laser fusion hybrid reactor. The design which has evolved is a depleted-uranium fueled fast-fission blanket which produces fissile plutonium and electricity. A major objective of the design study was to evaluate the feasibility of producing fissile fuel with laser fusion. This feasibility evaluation was carried out by analyzing the integrated engineering performance of the complete conceptual design and by identifying the required laser/pellet performance. The performance of the laser fusion hybrid has also been compared to a typical fast breeder reactor. The results show that the laser fusion hybrid produces enough fissile material to fuel more than six light water reactors (LWR's) of equivalent thermal power while operating in a regime which requires an order of magnitude less laser and pellet performance than pure laser fusion. In comparison to a fast breeder reactor the hybrid produces 10 times more fissile fuel. An economic analysis of the design shows that the cost of electricity in a combined hybrid-LWR scenario is insensitive to the capital cost of the hybrid, increasing by only 20 to 40 percent when the capital cost of the hybrid ranges from 2 to 3 times more than an LWR

  19. Added value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound on biopsies of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Mimi; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Ha, Sang Yun [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    To assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid can improve the lesion conspicuity and feasibility of percutaneous biopsies for focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision making. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 711 US-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed for focal hepatic lesions. Biopsies were performed using CEUS for guidance if lesions were invisible on fusion imaging. We retrospectively evaluated the number of target lesions initially invisible on fusion imaging that became visible after applying CEUS, using a 4-point scale. Technical success rates of biopsies were evaluated based on histopathological results. In addition, the occurrence of changes in clinical decision making was assessed. Among 711 patients, 16 patients (2.3%) were included in the study. The median size of target lesions was 1.1 cm (range, 0.5–1.9 cm) in pre-procedural imaging. After CEUS, 15 of 16 (93.8%) focal hepatic lesions were visualized. The conspicuity score was significantly increased after adding CEUS, as compared to that on fusion imaging (p < 0.001). The technical success rate of biopsy was 87.6% (14/16). After biopsy, there were changes in clinical decision making for 11 of 16 patients (68.8%). The addition of CEUS could improve the conspicuity of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging. This dual guidance using CEUS and fusion imaging may affect patient management via changes in clinical decision-making.

  20. Added value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound on biopsies of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Mimi; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Ha, Sang Yun

    2017-01-01

    To assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid can improve the lesion conspicuity and feasibility of percutaneous biopsies for focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision making. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 711 US-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed for focal hepatic lesions. Biopsies were performed using CEUS for guidance if lesions were invisible on fusion imaging. We retrospectively evaluated the number of target lesions initially invisible on fusion imaging that became visible after applying CEUS, using a 4-point scale. Technical success rates of biopsies were evaluated based on histopathological results. In addition, the occurrence of changes in clinical decision making was assessed. Among 711 patients, 16 patients (2.3%) were included in the study. The median size of target lesions was 1.1 cm (range, 0.5–1.9 cm) in pre-procedural imaging. After CEUS, 15 of 16 (93.8%) focal hepatic lesions were visualized. The conspicuity score was significantly increased after adding CEUS, as compared to that on fusion imaging (p < 0.001). The technical success rate of biopsy was 87.6% (14/16). After biopsy, there were changes in clinical decision making for 11 of 16 patients (68.8%). The addition of CEUS could improve the conspicuity of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging. This dual guidance using CEUS and fusion imaging may affect patient management via changes in clinical decision-making

  1. VNS: A volumetric neutron source for fusion nuclear technology testing and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Peng, Y.K.; Ying, A.Y.

    1994-01-01

    Recent progress in fusion plasma research and the initiation of the Engineering Design Activity for ITER provide incentives to seriously explore technically sound and logically consistent pathways toward development of fusion as a practical and attractive energy source. A critical goal is the successful construction and operation of a fusion power demonstration plant (DEMO). Major world program strategies call for DEMO operation by the year 2025. Such a date is important in order for fusion to play a significant role in the energy supply market in the second half of the twenty-first century. Without such a DEMO goal, it will be very hard to justify major financial commitments in the near term for major projects such as ITER. The major question is whether a DEMO goal by the year 2025 is attainable from a technical standpoint. This has been the central question being addressed in a study, called VENUS. Results to date show that a DEMO by the year 2025 can be realized if three major facilities begin operation in parallel by the year 2005. These facilities are: (1) ITER, (2) VNS, and (3) IFMIF. Results show that VNS is a necessary element toward DEMO in a strategy consistent with present world program plans. The key requirements to test and develop fusion nuclear components (e.g. blanket) are 1 MW/m 2 neutron wall load, >10 m 2 of test area at the first wall, steady state or long burn plasma operation, fluence of ∼6MWy/m 2 at the first wall in ∼10-12 year period, and duty cycle x availability factor of ∼0.3. Results of the study show that an attractive design envelope for VNS that satisfies the nuclear testing and development requirements exists. Within this design envelope, the most attractive design points for VNS appear to be driven plasma (Q∼1) in tokamak configuration with normal toroidal-field copper coils, major radius 1.5-2.0m, fusion power ∼100MW, and neutron wall load ∼1.5MW/m 2

  2. ITER EDA technical activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Six years of technical work under the ITER EDA Agreement have resulted in a design which constitutes a complete description of the ITER device and of its auxiliary systems and facilities. The ITER Council commented that the Final Design Report provides the first comprehensive design of a fusion reactor based on well established physics and technology

  3. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity. Present status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Tatsuo; Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio

    1998-01-01

    For developing the materials for nuclear fusion reactors, it is indispensable to study on the neutron irradiation behavior under fusion reactor conditions, but there is not any high energy neutron irradiation facility that can simulate fusion reactor conditions at present. Therefore, the investigation of the IFMIF was begun jointly by Japan, USA, Europe and Russia following the initiative of IEA. The conceptual design activities were completed in 1997. As to the background and the course, the present status of the research on heavy irradiation and the testing means for fusion materials, the requirement and the technical basis of high energy neutron irradiation, and the international joint design activities are reported. The materials for fusion reactors are exposed to the neutron irradiation with the energy spectra up to 14 MeV. The requirements from the users that the IFMIF should satisfy, the demand of the tests for the materials of prototype and demonstration fusion reactors and the evaluation of the neutron field characteristics of the IFMIF are discussed. As to the conceptual design of the IFMIF, the whole constitution, the operational mode, accelerator system and target system are described. (K.I.)

  4. Energy payback and CO2 gas emissions from fusion and solar photovoltaic electric power plants. Final report to Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.

    2002-01-01

    A cradle-to-grave net energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of a modern photovoltaic facility that produces electricity has been performed and compared to a similar analysis on fusion. A summary of the work has been included in a Ph.D. thesis titled ''Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis'' by Paul J. Meier, and a synopsis of the work was presented at the 15th Topical meeting on Fusion Energy held in Washington, DC in November 2002. In addition, a technical note on the effect of the introduction of fusion energy on the greenhouse gas emissions in the United States was submitted to the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES)

  5. Fundamental radiation effects studies in the fusion materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Fundamental radiation effects studies in the US Fusion Materials Program generally fall under the aegis of the Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Program. In a narrow sense, the problem addressed by the DAFS program is the prediction of radiation effects in fusion devices using data obtained in non-representative environments. From the onset, the program has had near-term and long-term components. The premise for the latter is that there will be large economic penalties for uncertainties in predictive capability. Fusion devices are expected to be large and complex and unanticipated maintenance will be costly. It is important that predictions are based on a maximum of understanding and a minimum of empiricism. Gaining this understanding is the thrust of the long-term component. (orig.)

  6. Exposition sur la Fusion au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    1993-01-01

    The fifth in a series of exhibitions at CERN presenting European research activities will be open to the public from 23 July to 11 September. CERN has invited the European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) to present an overview of present research and technical developments in the field of thermonuclear fusion in Europe and elsewhere in the world.

  7. Technical critique on radiation test facilities for the CTR surface and materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.

    1975-02-01

    Major radiation test facilities will be necessary in the near-term (5 years) and long-term (greater than 10 years) future for the timely development and understanding of fusion confinement systems and of prototype fusion power reactors. The study includes the technical justifications and requirements for CTR Neutron and Plasma Radiation Test Facilities. The initial technical critique covers the feasibility and design problems: in upgrading the performance of the accelerator-rotating (solid TiT) target systems, and in transforming the accelerator-supersonic jet target concept into a radiation testing facility. A scoping assessment on the potential of a pulsed high-beta plasma device (dense plasma focus) is introduced to explore plasma concepts as near-term neutron and plasma radiation sources for the CTR Surface and Materials Program. (U.S.)

  8. Nuclear fusion experimental study on 16 O + 60 Ni system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.P. da.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear fusion cross section measurements were performed in the energy range near The Coulomb Barrier (E Lab -> 40-72 MeV), for the system 16 O + 60 Ni, aiming the study of Fusion Process involving heavy ions. (L.C.J.A.)

  9. Control of tritium permeation through fusion reactor strucural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to provide a brief synopsis of the status of understanding and technology pertaining to the dissolution and permeation of tritium in fusion reactor materials. The following sections of this paper attempt to develop a simple perspective for understanding the consequences of these phenomena and the nature of the technical methodology being contemplated to control their impact on fusion reactor operation. Considered in order are: (1) the occurrence of tritium in the fusion fuel cycle, (2) a set of tentative criteria to guide the analysis of tritium containment and control strategies, (3) the basic mechanisms by which tritium may be released from a fusion plant, and (4) the methods currently under development to control the permeation-related release mechanisms. To provide background and support for these considerations, existing solubility and permeation data for the hydrogen isotopes are compared and correlated under conditions to be expected in fusion reactor systems

  10. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, 1984-1985. Report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    During the past year, technical progress has been made in all Plasma Fusion Center (PFC) research programs. The Plasma Fusion Center is recognized as one of the leading university research laboratories in the physics and engineering aspects of magnetic confinement fusion. Its research programs have produced significant results on four fronts: (1) the basic physics of high-temperature plasmas (plasma theory, rf heating, free electron lasers, development of advanced diagnostics and small-scale experiments on the Versator tokamak and Constance mirror devices); (2) major confinement results on the Alcator C tokamak, including pioneering investigations of the stability, heating, and confinement properties of plasmas at high densities, temperatures and magnetic fields; (3) development of an innovative design for axisymmetric tandem mirrors with inboard thermal barriers, with initial operation of the TARA tandem mirror experiment beginning in 1984; and (4) a broad program of fusion technology and engineering development that addresses problems in several critical subsystem areas (e.g., magnet systems, superconducting materials development, environmental and safety studies, advanced millimeter wave source development, and system studies of fusion reactor design, operation, and technology requirements). A review of these programs is given

  11. The da Vinci robotic surgical assisted anterior lumbar interbody fusion: technical development and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, William J; Peppelman, Walter C; DiMarco, Luciano A

    2013-02-15

    Technique development to use the da Vince Robotic Surgical System for anterior lumbar interbody fusion at L5-S1 is detailed. A case report is also presented. To evaluate and develop the da Vinci robotic assisted laparoscopic anterior lumbar stand-alone interbody fusion procedure. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion is a common procedure associated with potential morbidity related to the surgical approach. The da Vinci robot provides intra-abdominal dissection and visualization advantages compared with the traditional open and laparoscopic approach. The surgical techniques for approach to the anterior lumbar spine using the da Vinci robot were developed and modified progressively beginning with operative models followed by placement of an interbody fusion cage in the living porcine model. Development continued to progress with placement of fusion cage in a human cadaver, completed first in the laboratory setting and then in the operating room. Finally, the first patient with fusion completed using the da Vinci robot-assisted approach is presented. The anterior transperitoneal approach to the lumbar spine is accomplished with enhanced visualization and dissection capability, with maintenance of pneumoperitoneum using the da Vinci robot. Blood loss is minimal. The visualization inside the disc space and surrounding structures was considered better than current open and laparoscopic techniques. The da Vinci robot Surgical System technique continues to develop and is now described for the transperitoneal approach to the anterior lumbar spine. 4.

  12. Fusion: from sacred cow to white elephant?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wooldridge, J.

    1994-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion has the potential to supply lots of relatively cheap power relatively cheaply. It is also renewable and has public support. Because of this potential, fusion has been able to attract huge research funds. The four main research programmes, in Europe, USA, Japan and Russia, include cooperation on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, ITER. The siting of this reactor will be decided in 1998 and it is due to start operation in 2010. It should lead to a demonstration reactor, DEMO, after which a prototype commercial reactor is envisaged for 2030-2050. But this is too far away to solve some of the immediate energy problems such as carbon dioxide emissions and global warming. So even if the technical problems are solved, fusion may not be the wonder energy source when it finally arrives; the trend is away from centralised, high cost, high output generation. Fusion research has taken interest and money away from other alternatives such as tidal energy, fuel cells and photovoltaic cells. Photovoltaics in particular look more feasible than fusion and could be in place far sooner, but lack the funding for research. (UK)

  13. Fusion plasma physics during half a century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bo

    1999-08-01

    A review is given on the potentialities of fusion energy with respect to energy production and related environmental problems, the various approaches to controlled thermonuclear fusion, the main problem areas of research, the historical development, the present state of investigations, and future perspectives. This article also presents a personal memorandum of the author. Thereby special reference will be given to part of the research conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. In large tokamak experiments temperatures above the ignition limit of about 10{sup 8} K have been reached under break-even conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the energy loss. A power producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient. The future international research programme has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basis research and new ideas, and also within lines of magnetic confinement being alternative to that of tokamaks.

  14. Percutaneous Thermal Ablation with Ultrasound Guidance. Fusion Imaging Guidance to Improve Conspicuity of Liver Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakime, Antoine, E-mail: thakime@yahoo.com; Yevich, Steven; Tselikas, Lambros; Deschamps, Frederic [Gustave Roussy - Cancer Campus, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Petrover, David [Imagerie Médicale Paris Centre, IMPC (France); Baere, Thierry De [Gustave Roussy - Cancer Campus, Interventional Radiology Department (France)

    2017-05-15

    PurposeTo assess whether fusion imaging-guided percutaneous microwave ablation (MWA) can improve visibility and targeting of liver metastasis that were deemed inconspicuous on ultrasound (US).Materials and MethodsMWA of liver metastasis not judged conspicuous enough on US was performed under CT/US fusion imaging guidance. The conspicuity before and after the fusion imaging was graded on a five-point scale, and significance was assessed by Wilcoxon test. Technical success, procedure time, and procedure-related complications were evaluated.ResultsA total of 35 patients with 40 liver metastases (mean size 1.3 ± 0.4 cm) were enrolled. Image fusion improved conspicuity sufficiently to allow fusion-targeted MWA in 33 patients. The time required for image fusion processing and tumors’ identification averaged 10 ± 2.1 min (range 5–14). Initial conspicuity on US by inclusion criteria was 1.2 ± 0.4 (range 0–2), while conspicuity after localization on fusion imaging was 3.5 ± 1 (range 1–5, p < 0.001). Technical success rate was 83% (33/40) in intention-to-treat analysis and 100% in analysis of treated tumors. There were no major procedure-related complications.ConclusionsFusion imaging broadens the scope of US-guided MWA to metastasis lacking adequate conspicuity on conventional US. Fusion imaging is an effective tool to increase the conspicuity of liver metastases that were initially deemed non visualizable on conventional US imaging.

  15. Challenges of designing fusion reactors for remote maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    One of the major problems faced by the fusion community is the development of the high level of reliability required to assure that fusion will be a viable commercial power source. Much of the responsibility for solving this problem falls directly on the designer in developing concepts that have a high level of maintainability for the next generation engineering oriented reactors; and long range, in developing full maintainability for the more complicated commercial concepts with their required high level of on-line time. The near-term challenge will include development of unique design concepts to perform inspection, maintenance, replacement, and testing under the stringent conditions imposed by the next generation engineering oriented machines. The long range challenge will focus on basic design concepts that will enable the full maintainability required by commercial fusion. In addition to the purely technical challenges, the fusion community is also faced with the problem of developing programmatic means to assure that reactor maintenance issues are given proper and timely emphasis as the nuclear phase of fusion is approached

  16. Head Start Impact Study. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Shapiro, Gary; Broene, Pam; Jenkins, Frank; Fletcher, Philip; Quinn, Liz; Friedman, Janet; Ciarico, Janet; Rohacek, Monica; Adams, Gina; Spier, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed to provide technical detail to support the analysis and findings presented in the "Head Start Impact Study Final Report" (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, January 2010). Chapter 1 provides an overview of the Head Start Impact Study and its findings. Chapter 2 provides technical information on the…

  17. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Research during this report period has covered the following areas: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) MACKLIB-IV, a new library of nuclear response functions, (5) energy storage and power supply requirements for commercial fusion reactors, (6) blanket/shield design evaluation for commercial fusion reactors, and (7) cross section measurements, evaluations, and techniques

  18. EURATOM strategy towards fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varandas, C.

    2007-01-01

    Research and development (Research and Development) activities in controlled thermonuclear fusion have been carried out since the 60's of the last century aiming at providing a new clean, powerful, practically inexhaustive, safe, environmentally friend and economically attractive energy source for the sustainable development of our society.The EURATOM Fusion Programme (EFP) has the leadership of the magnetic confinement Research and Development activities due to the excellent results obtained on JET and other specialized devices, such as ASDEX-Upgrade, TORE SUPRA, FTU, TCV, TEXTOR, CASTOR, ISTTOK, MAST, TJ-II, W7-X, RFX and EXTRAP. JET is the largest tokamak in operation and the single device that can use deuterium and tritium mixes. It has produced 16 MW of fusion power, during 3 seconds, with an energy amplification of 0.6. The next steps of the EFP strategy towards fusion energy are ITER complemented by a vigorous Accompanying Programme, DEMO and a prototype of a fusion power plant. ITER, the first experimental fusion reactor, is a large-scale project (35-year duration, 10000 MEuros budget), developed in the frame of a very broad international collaboration, involving EURATOM, Japan, Russia Federation, United States of America, Korea, China and India. ITER has two main objectives: (i) to prove the scientific and technical viability of fusion energy by producing 500 MW, during 300 seconds and a energy amplification between 10 and 20; and (ii) to test the simultaneous and integrated operation of the technologies needed for a fusion reactor. The Accompanying Programme aims to prepare the ITER scientific exploitation and the DEMO design, including the development of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). A substantial part of this programme will be carried out in the frame of the Broader Approach, an agreement signed by EURATOM and Japan. The main goal of DEMO is to produce electricity, during a long time, from nuclear fusion reactions. The

  19. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Summaries of research are included for each of the following topics: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) the MACK/MACKLIB system for nuclear response functions, and (5) energy storage and power supply systems for fusion reactors

  20. Application of fusion plasma technology. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, Z.A.

    1976-06-01

    This report presents principal findings of studies conducted at Iowa State on Applications of Fusion Plasma Technology. Two tasks were considered. The first was to identify and investigate plasma processes for near term industrial applications of already developed plasma technology. The second was to explore the potential of reprocessing the fuel for fusion test facilities in a closed-cycle system. For the first task, two applications were considered. One was alumina reduction in magnetically confined plasmas, and the other was uranium enrichment using plasma centrifuges. For the second task, in-core and ex-core plasma purification were considered. Separation techniques that are compatible with the plasma state were identified and preliminary analysis of their effectiveness were carried out. The effects of differential ionization of impurities on the separation effectiveness are considered. Possible technical difficulties in both tasks are identified and recommendations for future work are given

  1. Decontamination and decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, G.R.; Perry, E.D.; Commander, J.C.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is scheduled to complete its end-of-life deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in September 1994. The D-T operation will result in the TFTR machine structure becoming activated, and plasma facing and vacuum components will be contaminated with tritium. The resulting machine activation levels after a two year cooldown period will allow hands on dismantling for external structures, but require remote dismantling for the vacuum vessel. The primary objective of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Project is to provide a facility for construction of a new Department of Energy (DOE) experimental fusion reactor by March 1998. The project schedule calls for a two year shutdown period when tritium decontamination of the vacuum vessel, neutral beam injectors and other components will occur. Shutdown will be followed by an 18 month period of D ampersand D operations. The technical objectives of the project are to: safely dismantle and remove components from the test cell complex; package disassembled components in accordance with applicable regulations; ship packages to a DOE approved disposal or material recycling site; and develop expertise using remote disassembly techniques on a large scale fusion facility. This paper discusses the D ampersand D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, and the technical plan that will be implemented

  2. Instrumented fusion in a 12-month-old with atlanto-occipital dislocation: case report and literature review of infant occipitocervical fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Andrew T; Dewan, Michael C; Patel, Bhairav; Geck, Matthew J; Tomycz, Luke D

    2017-08-01

    The treatment of atlantoaxial dislocation in very young children is challenging and lacks a consensus management strategy. We review the literature on infantile occipitocervical (OC) fusion is appraised and technical considerations are organized for ease of reference. Surgical decisions such as graft type and instrumentation details are summarized, along with the use of bone morphogenic protein and post-operative orthoses. We present the case of a 12-month-old who underwent instrumented occipitocervical (OC) fusion in the setting of traumatic atlanto-occipital dislocation (AOD). Occipitocervical (OC) arthrodesis is obtainable in very young infants and children. Surgical approaches are variable and use a combination of autologous grafting and creative screw and/or wire constructs. The heterogeneity of pathologic etiology leading to OC fusion makes it difficult to make definitive recommendations for surgical management.

  3. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas.

  4. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas

  5. Issues in radioactivity for fusion energy: remote maintenance rating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, D.W.; Maninger, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Recent technical progress in fusion research has been sufficient to encourage the development of conceptual designs for fusion power systems. These design efforts suggest that more attention should be paid to the safety and environmental effects of the radioactivity induced in the structural materials by the fusion neutrons. In particular, radioactivity from neutron activation of the structural components of a fusion power system will be a concern for occupational exposure of personnel. Careful choice of structural materials can significantly reduce this exposure. We propose the Remote Maintenance Rating (RMR) as a numerical means of comparing materials and machine designs with respect to occupational exposures. The RMR is defined as the dose rate at the surface of a uniformly activated, thick, infinite slab with the same composition and density as the machine component. We used the RMR rating system to evaluate the suitability of several different iron-based alloys. The specific fusion power system design used in our evaluation was a conceptual design from the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). We determined that HT-9 is significantly better in terms of radiological dose rates at early times than the other iron-based alloys (by a factor of 3 to 7). We also calculated the behavior of both silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminum (Al), two low activation materials often proposed for reactors

  6. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: summary of sessions EX/C and ICC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  7. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  8. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R J [PPPL

    2011-01-05

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  9. Multitemporal Very High Resolution From Space: Outcome of the 2016 IEEE GRSS Data Fusion Contest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, L.; Zhu, X.; Vakalopoulou, M.; Karantzalos, K.; Paragios, N.; Saux, Le B.; Moser, G.; Tuia, D.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the scientific outcomes of the 2016 Data Fusion Contest organized by the Image Analysis and Data Fusion Technical Committee of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society are discussed. The 2016 Contest was an open topic competition based on a multitemporal and multimodal dataset,

  10. Some safety studies for conceptual fusion--fission hybrid reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.

    1978-07-01

    The objective of this study was to make a preliminary examination of some potential safety questions for conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors. The study and subsequent analysis was largely based upon reference to one design, a conceptual mirror fusion-fission reactor, operating on the deuterium-tritium plasma fusion fuel cycle and the uranium-plutonium fission fuel cycle. The blanket is a fast-spectrum, uranium carbide, helium cooled, subcritical reactor, optimized for the production of fissile fuel. An attempt was made to generalize the results wherever possible

  11. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending December 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, G.

    1998-03-01

    This is the twenty-third in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. A large fraction of this work, particularly in relation to fission reactor experiments, is carried out collaboratively with their partners in Japan, Russia, and the European Union. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  12. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Final conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The TFTR is the first U.S. magnetic confinement device planned to demonstrate the fusion of D-T at reactor power levels. This report addresses the physics objectives and the engineering goals of the TFTR project. Technical, cost, and schedule aspects of the project are included

  13. Electric breeding of fissile materials with low Q, non-mainline fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, J.; Bailey, V.; Oliver, D.; DiCapua, M.; Cooper, R.; Lopez, O.; Lindsey, H.

    1977-10-01

    The application of two novel fusion reactor concepts to the production of fissile fuel for existing and planned fission reactors has been shown to be technically feasible and potentially economically competitive. The performance required of fusion based breeders has been derived in terms of the fusion gain, blanket neutron and energy multiplication, and the performance and economic parameters of the fission reactors. Electron beam heated, linear solenoid confined plasmas were one concept which showed the most promise. A shock heated, wall confined reactor also appeared attractive for breeding

  14. Fusion safety program annual report fiscal year 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY 1997. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in FY 1979 to perform research and develop data needed to ensure safety in fusion facilities. Activities include experiments, analysis, code development and application, and other forms of research. These activities are conducted at the INEEL, different DOE laboratories, and other institutions. The technical areas covered in this report include chemical reactions and activation product release, tritium safety, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Work done for ITER this year has focused on developing the needed information for the Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-2)

  15. Fusion safety program annual report fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Cadwallader, L.C. [and others

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities of the Fusion Safety Program in FY 1997. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is the designated lead laboratory, and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company is the prime contractor for this program. The Fusion Safety Program was initiated in FY 1979 to perform research and develop data needed to ensure safety in fusion facilities. Activities include experiments, analysis, code development and application, and other forms of research. These activities are conducted at the INEEL, different DOE laboratories, and other institutions. The technical areas covered in this report include chemical reactions and activation product release, tritium safety, risk assessment failure rate database development, and safety code development and application to fusion safety issues. Most of this work has been done in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. Work done for ITER this year has focused on developing the needed information for the Non-site Specific Safety Report (NSSR-2).

  16. A comparative study of various advanced fusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momota, H.; Tomita, Y.; Nomura, Y.

    1983-01-01

    For the purpose of comparing the merits and demerits of various advanced fuel cycles, parametric studies of operation conditions are examined. The effects of nuclear elastic collisions and synchrotron radiation are taken into account. It is found that the high-#betta# Catalyzed DD fuel cycle with the transmutation of fusion-produced tritium into helium-3 is most feasible from the point of view of neutron production and tritium handling. The D-D fuel cycles seem to be less attractive compared to the Catalyzed DD. The p- 11 B and p- 6 Li fusion plasmas hardly attain the plasma Q value relevant to reactors. (author)

  17. Utilization of a Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011–2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-12-01

    The IAEA actively promotes the development of controlled fusion as a source of energy. Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA helps Member States to exchange and establish scientific and technical knowledge required for the design, construction and operation of a fusion reactor. Due to their compactness, flexibility and low operation costs, small fusion devices are a great resource for supporting and accelerating the development of mainstream fusion research on large fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. They play an important role in investigating the physics of controlled fusion, developing innovative technologies and diagnostics, testing new materials, training highly qualified personnel for larger fusion facilities, and supporting educational programmes for young scientists. This publication reports on the research work accomplished within the framework of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Utilization of the Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research, organized and conducted by the IAEA in 2011–2016. The CRP has contributed to the coordination of a network of research institutions, thereby enhancing international collaboration through scientific visits, joint experiments and the exchange of information and equipment. A total of 16 institutions and 14 devices from 13 Member States participated in this CRP (Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, Portugal, the Russian Federation, Ukraine and the United Kingdom).

  18. Conceptual design and issues of the laser inertial fusion test (LIFT) reactor—targets and chamber systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimatsu, T.; Kozaki, Y.; Shiraga, H.; Fujita, H.; Okano, K.; Members of LIFT Design Team

    2017-11-01

    We present the conceptual design of an experimental laser fusion plant known as the laser inertial fusion test (LIFT) reactor. The conceptual design aims at technically connecting a single-shot experiment and a commercial power plant. The LIFT reactor is designed on a three-phase scheme, where each phase has specific goals and the dedicated chambers of each phase are driven by the same laser. Technical issues related to the chamber technology including radiation safety to repeat burst mode operation are discussed in this paper.

  19. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    Lodestar has carried out a vigorous research program in the areas of rf, edge plasma and divertor physics, with emphasis largely geared towards improving the understanding and performance of ion-cyclotron heating and current drive (ICRF) systems. Additionally, a research program in the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling was initiated. Theoretical work on high power rf sheath formation for multi-strap rf arrays was developed and benchmarked against recent experimental data from the new JET A2 antennas. Sophisticated modeling tools were employed to understand the sheath formation taking into account realistic three-dimensional antenna geometry. A novel physics explanation of an observed anomaly in the low power loading of antennas was applied to qualitatively interpret data on DIII-D in terms of rf sheaths, and potential applications of the idea to develop a near-field sheath diagnostic were explored. Other rf-wave related topics were also investigated. Full wave ICRF modeling studies were carried out in support of ongoing and planned tokamaks experiments, including the investigation of low frequency plasma heating and current drive regimes for IGNITOR. In a cross-disciplinary study involving both MHD and ICRF physics, ponderomotive feedback stabilization by rf was investigated as a potential means of controlling external kink mode disruptions. In another study, the instability of the ion hybrid wave (IHW) in the presence of fusion alpha particles was studied. In the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling studies, Lodestar began the development of a theory of generalized ballooning and sheath instabilities in the scrape off layer (SOL) of divertor tokamaks. A detailed summary of the technical progress in these areas during the contract period is included, as well as where references to published work can be found. A separate listing of publications, meeting abstracts, and other presentations is also given at the end of this final report

  20. Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics - Annual Progress Report 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom – DTU, Technical University of Denmark (until 31-12- 2011: Association Euratom – Risø DTU) covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport...... temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2011....

  1. Progress in the development of methodology for fusion safety systems studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S.K.; Cambi, G.; Ciattaglia, S.; Fujii-e, Y.; Seki, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The development of fusion safety systems-study methodology, including the aspects of schematic classification of overall fusion safety system, qualitative assessment of fusion system for identification of critical accident scenarios, quantitative analysis of accident consequences and risk for safety design evaluation, and system-level analysis of accident consequences and risk for design optimization, by a consortium of international efforts is presented. The potential application of this methodology into reactor design studies will facilitate the systematic assessment of safety performance of reactor designs and enhance the impacts of safety considerations on the selection of design configurations

  2. Is the public's faith in fusion justified?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkie, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is in the form of a near-verbatim transcript of the presentation given at SOFT. The intention of the paper was to give an outsider's view of the work of the fusion community and, within limits, to be provocative and engender discussion. The paper is therefore deliberately discursive and non-technical. (orig.)

  3. Conceptual design study of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FY87FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The design study of Fusion Experimental Reactor(FER) which has been proposed to be the next step fusion device has been conducted by JAERI Reactor System Laboratory since 1982 and by FER design team since 1984. This is the final report of the FER design team program and describes the results obtained in FY1987 (partially in FY1986) activities. The contents of this report consist of the reference design which is based on the guideline in FY1986 by the Subcomitees set up in Nuclear Fusion Council of Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, the Low-Physics-Risk reactor design for achieving physics mission more reliably and the system study of FER design candidates including above two designs. (author)

  4. Nuclear fusion and neutron processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.V.; Shatalov, G.E.; Sherstnev, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Problems of providing development of the design of an experimental fusion reactor with necessary neutron-physical data are discussed. Isotope composition of spent fuel in the blanket of a hybride fusion reactor (HFR) is given. Neutron balance of the reactor with Li-blanket and neutron balance of the reactor with Pb-multiplier are disclosed. A simplified scheme of neutron and energy balance in the HFR blanket is given. Development and construction of the experimental power reactor is shown to become the nearest problem of the UTS program. Alongside with other complex physical and technical problems solution of this problem requires realization of a wide program of neutron-physical investigations including measurements with required accuracy of neutron cross sections, development of methodical, program and constant basis of neutron calculations and macroscopic experiments on neutron sources

  5. Canada's Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada's fusion strategy is based on developing specialized technologies in well-defined areas and supplying these technologies to international fusion projects. Two areas are specially emphasized in Canada: engineered fusion system technologies, and specific magnetic confinement and materials studies. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project focuses on the first of these areas. It tritium and fusion reactor fuel systems, remote maintenance and related safety studies. In the second area, the Centre Canadian de fusion magnetique operates the Tokamak de Varennes, the main magnetic fusion device in Canada. Both projects are partnerships linking the Government of Canada, represented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and provincial governments, electrical utilities, universities and industry. Canada's program has extensive international links, through which it collaborates with the major world fusion programs, including participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

  6. Adjacent level effects of bi level disc replacement, bi level fusion and disc replacement plus fusion in cervical spine--a finite element based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizan, Ahmad; Goel, Vijay K; Biyani, Ashok; Garfin, Steven R; Bono, Christopher M

    2012-03-01

    Studies delineating the adjacent level effect of single level disc replacement systems have been reported in literature. The aim of this study was to compare the adjacent level biomechanics of bi-level disc replacement, bi-level fusion and a construct having adjoining level disc replacement and fusion system. In total, biomechanics of four models- intact, bi level disc replacement, bi level fusion and fusion plus disc replacement at adjoining levels- was studied to gain insight into the effects of various instrumentation systems on cranial and caudal adjacent levels using finite element analysis (73.6N+varying moment). The bi-level fusion models are more than twice as stiff as compared to the intact model during flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. Bi-level disc replacement model required moments lower than intact model (1.5Nm). Fusion plus disc replacement model required moment 10-25% more than intact model, except in extension. Adjacent level motions, facet loads and endplate stresses increased substantially in the bi-level fusion model. On the other hand, adjacent level motions, facet loads and endplate stresses were similar to intact for the bi-level disc replacement model. For the fusion plus disc replacement model, adjacent level motions, facet loads and endplate stresses were closer to intact model rather than the bi-level fusion model, except in extension. Based on our finite element analysis, fusion plus disc replacement procedure has less severe biomechanical effects on adjacent levels when compared to bi-level fusion procedure. Bi-level disc replacement procedure did not have any adverse mechanical effects on adjacent levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Study of fusion probabilities with halo nuclei using different proximity based potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Raj

    2013-01-01

    We study fusion of halo nuclei with heavy targets using proximity based potentials due to Aage Winther (AW) 95, Bass 80 and Proximity 2010. In order to consider the extended matter distribution of halo nuclei, the nuclei radii borrowed from cross section measurements are included in these potentials. Our study reveals that the barrier heights are effectively reduced and fusion cross sections are appreciably enhanced by including extended radii of these nuclei. We also find that the extended sizes of halos contribute towards enhancement of fusion probabilities in case of proton halo nuclei, but, contribute to transfer or break-up process rather than fusion yield in case of neutron halo nuclei

  8. Circumferential fusion improves outcome in comparison with instrumented posterolateral fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Christensen, Finn B; Soegaard, Rikke

    2006-01-01

    with respect to all four DPQ categories: daily activities, work/leisure, anxiety/depression, and social interest. The Oswestry Disability Index supported these results (P ...STUDY DESIGN: Prospective randomized clinical study with a 5- to 9-year follow-up period. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to analyze the long-term outcome with respect to functional disability, pain, and general health of patients treated by means of circumferential lumbar fusion...... in comparison with those treated by means of instrumented posterolateral lumbar fusion. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Circumferential fusion has become a common procedure in lumbar spinal fusion both as a primary and salvage procedure. However, the claimed advantages of circumferential fusion over conventional...

  9. Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurden, Glen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24

    Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

  10. A Standard Mammography Unit - Standard 3D Ultrasound Probe Fusion Prototype: First Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Jud, Sebastian M; Fasching, Peter A; Hartmann, Arndt; Radicke, Marcus; Rauh, Claudia; Uder, Michael; Wunderle, Marius; Gass, Paul; Langemann, Hanna; Beckmann, Matthias W; Emons, Julius

    2017-06-01

    The combination of different imaging modalities through the use of fusion devices promises significant diagnostic improvement for breast pathology. The aim of this study was to evaluate image quality and clinical feasibility of a prototype fusion device (fusion prototype) constructed from a standard tomosynthesis mammography unit and a standard 3D ultrasound probe using a new method of breast compression. Imaging was performed on 5 mastectomy specimens from patients with confirmed DCIS or invasive carcinoma (BI-RADS ™ 6). For the preclinical fusion prototype an ABVS system ultrasound probe from an Acuson S2000 was integrated into a MAMMOMAT Inspiration (both Siemens Healthcare Ltd) and, with the aid of a newly developed compression plate, digital mammogram and automated 3D ultrasound images were obtained. The quality of digital mammogram images produced by the fusion prototype was comparable to those produced using conventional compression. The newly developed compression plate did not influence the applied x-ray dose. The method was not more labour intensive or time-consuming than conventional mammography. From the technical perspective, fusion of the two modalities was achievable. In this study, using only a few mastectomy specimens, the fusion of an automated 3D ultrasound machine with a standard mammography unit delivered images of comparable quality to conventional mammography. The device allows simultaneous ultrasound - the second important imaging modality in complementary breast diagnostics - without increasing examination time or requiring additional staff.

  11. Studies of conceptual spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain the characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio of A >or approx. 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) the DT reactor with two-component-type operation, (2) the ignited DT reactor, and (3) the ignited catalysed-type DD reactor. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MW.m -2 , it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4 T (DT) and approx. 9 T (Cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of 1 m plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. An assessment of various schemes of generation, compression and translation of spheromak plasmas is presented. (author)

  12. Inertial fusion program in Japan and ignition experiment facility by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, S.

    1989-01-01

    The recent progress in laser fusion research is remarkable with respect to obtaining the high density and high temperature plasma which produces thermonuclear neutrons of 10 13 per shot (pellet gain of 0.2%) and to the understanding of implosion physics. Data bases for laser fusion have been accumulated and technologies for advanced experiments have been developed, both of which enable us to make the reserarch step toward the fusion ignition experiment and the achievement of the breakeven condition, which is estimated to be possible with a 100 kJ blue laser. The demonstration of high gain pellets requires laser energy in the range MJ in blue light. The design studies of the MJ laser are continue in the framework of the solid state laser at ILE. The design studies on the commercial reactor of ICF have proceeded and several conceptual designs have been proposed. These designs utilize a liquid metal first wall and blanket which enable long life for commercial use. As a consequence, the ICF reactor has technically a high feasibility for commercial application. (orig.)

  13. ITER implementation and fusion energy research in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jing; Feng, Zhaoliang; Yang, Changchun

    2015-01-01

    ITER Project is jointly implemented by China, EU, India, Japan, Korea, Russian Federation and USA, under the coordination of Center Team of ITER International Fusion Energy Organization (IO-CT). Chinese fusion research related institutes and industrial enterprises are fully involved in the implementation of China contribution to the project under the leadership of ITER China Domestic Agency (CN-DA), together with IO-CT. The progresses of Procurement Packages (PA) allocated to China and the technical issues, especially on key technology development and schedule, QA/QC issues, are highlighted in this report. The specific enterprises carrying out different PAs are identified in order to make the increasing international manufactures and producers to ITER PAs know each other well for the successful implementation of ITER project. The participation of China to the management of IO-CT is also included, mainly from the governmental aspect and staff recruited from China. On the other hand, the domestic fusion researches, including upgrade of EAST, HL-2A Tokamaks in China, TBM program, the next step design activities for fusion energy power plant, namely, CFETR and training in this area, are also introduced for global cooperation for international fusion community. (author)

  14. Heavy-ion fusion: Future promise and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudziak, D.J.; Saylor, W.W.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The previous several papers in this heavy-ion fusion special session have described work that has taken place as part of the Heavy-Ion Fusion Systems Assessment (HIFSA) project. Key technical issues in the design and costing of targets, accelerator systems, beam transport, reactor and balance-of-plant, and systems integration have been identified and described. The HIFSA systems model was used to measure the relative value of improvements in physics understanding and technology developments in many different areas. The result of this study has been to, within the limits of our 1986 imagination and creativity, define the ''most attractive'' future heavy-ion fusion (HIF) power plant at some time in the future (beyond the year 2020 in this case). The project has specifically avoided narrowing the focus to a point facility design; thus, the generic systems modeling capability developed in the process allows for a relative comparison among design options. The authors describe what are thought to be achievable breakthroughs and what the relative significance of the breakthroughs will be, although the specific mechanism for achieving some breakthroughs may not be clear at this point

  15. Feasibility study of a magnetic fusion production reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, R. W.

    1986-12-01

    A magnetic fusion reactor can produce 10.8 kg of tritium at a fusion power of only 400 MW —an order of magnitude lower power than that of a fission production reactor. Alternatively, the same fusion reactor can produce 995 kg of plutonium. Either a tokamak or a tandem mirror production plant can be used for this purpose; the cost is estimated at about 1.4 billion (1982 dollars) in either case. (The direct costs are estimated at 1.1 billion.) The production cost is calculated to be 22,000/g for tritium and 260/g for plutonium of quite high purity (1%240Pu). Because of the lack of demonstrated technology, such a plant could not be constructed today without significant risk. However, good progress is being made in fusion technology and, although success in magnetic fusion science and engineering is hard to predict with assurance, it seems possible that the physics basis and much of the needed technology could be demonstrated in facilities now under construction. Most of the remaining technology could be demonstrated in the early 1990s in a fusion test reactor of a few tens of megawatts. If the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program constructs a fusion test reactor of approximately 400 MW of fusion power as a next step in fusion power development, such a facility could be used later as a production reactor in a spinoff application. A construction decision in the late 1980s could result in an operating production reactor in the late 1990s. A magnetic fusion production reactor (MFPR) has four potential advantages over a fission production reactor: (1) no fissile material input is needed; (2) no fissioning exists in the tritium mode and very low fissioning exists in the plutonium mode thus avoiding the meltdown hazard; (3) the cost will probably be lower because of the smaller thermal power required; (4) and no reprocessing plant is needed in the tritium mode. The MFPR also has two disadvantages: (1) it will be more costly to operate because it consumes rather than sells

  16. International ITER fusion energy organization. Paving the way to power generation from nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuschen-Liebenstein, R. von

    2006-01-01

    ITER (Latin: the way) is the acronym of a new international large research facility gradually taking shape after the meeting of Gorbachev and Reagan in Reykjavik in 1985. Under the auspices of the IAEA, worldwide scientific and industrial cooperation with 'home teams' of each of the ITER partners began at that time which were commissioned to accumulate the knowledge and the technology of nuclear fusion in the participating countries. At the end of the preparation and decisionmaking process, the design draft of the ITER reactor was elaborated in international cooperation as the basis of the ITER Convention. After lengthy negotiations among the international ITER partners, a European site for the ITER organization and its reactor was found at Cadarache, France. As the first ITER member, Europe now initiated worldwide cooperation in research and development, seeking to demonstrate the technical and scientific feasibility of tapping fusion power for peaceful purposes. The Council of the European Union (competitiveness), at its meeting on September 25, 2006, decided to sign the ITER Convention about the establishment of the International ITER Fusion Energy Organization ('ITER Organization') and about the mutual obligation to make the necessary contributions towards the construction of ITER. (orig.)

  17. Instrument cables and ceramic-to-metal seals for fusion-environment service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.P.

    1982-10-01

    The intent of this paper is to form a technical basis to address questions pertinent to the use of instrument cables, ceramic-to-metal seals, and connector components in a fusion environment. The service environment of future fusion devices poses a unique challenge to instrumentation. The radiation environment of 14 MeV neutrons is markedly different from other instrumented radiation environments. There exist other environmental concerns as well (some instruments may operate at elevated temperatures, etc)

  18. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using nonresorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices: a prospective, randomized study to assess fusion and clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiya, T.U.; Smit, T.H.; Deddens, J.; Mullender, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A prospective randomized clinical study. OBJECTIVE.: To assess fusion, clinical outcome, and complications. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Resorbable poly-L- lactide-co-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages intended to aid spinal interbody fusion have been introduced into clinical practice within

  19. The role of fusion as a future power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kintner, E.E.; Hirsch, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Nations of western Europe, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States are working together to demonstrate the practicality of fusion power early in the 21st century. Many difficult engineering problems make fusion development one of the most formidable scientific and technological challenges ever attempted. However, the outlook is promising for achieving an inexhaustible energy source that is safe, economic, and with acceptable environmental effects. The United States magnetic fusion power development program aims at producing fusion energy experimentally in the early 1980's and demonstrating power production on a commercial scale before 2000. This prognosis reflects the confidence gained in scientific successes of the late 1960's through the present. However, many physics problems remain to be solved and many complex engineering problems without obvious solutions await attention. In response to experimental successes and the perceived importance of the fusion energy alternative, the United States effort has grown rapidly. Scientific investigations of plasma physics continue while planned engineering studies lead toward the practical goal of a commercial technology that will take a prominent place among available energy sources of the next century. Development of laser and electron beam fusion proceeds. Alternative fusion devices are investigated for their potential feasibility while the tokamak configuration is used for principal experimental devices. A national program plan and budget coordinates the efforts of federal laboratories, universities and industry. The utilities industry conducts an independent program which is increasingly coordinated with government-sponsored activity. Fusion energy programs of several nations benefit one another and should cooperate more closely in specific problem areas. Achievement of practical fusion power could be advanced through more effective mutually supporting fusion development programs. The economic and technical

  20. Consultancy on the potential of fusion/fission sub-critical neutron systems for energy production and transmutation. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Workshop on Sub-critical Neutron Production held at the University of Maryland and the Eisenhower Institute on 11-13 October 2004 brought together members of fusion, fission and accelerator technical communities to discuss issues of spent fuel, nonproliferation, reactor safety and the use of neutrons for sub-critical operation of nuclear reactors. The Workshop strongly recommended that the fusion community work closely with other technical communities to ensure that a wider range of technical solutions is available to solve the spent fuel problem and to utilize the current actinide inventories. Participants of the Workshop recommended that a follow-on Workshop, possibly under the aegis of the IAEA, should be held in the first half of the year 2005. The Consultancy Meeting is the response to this recommendation. The objectives of the Consultancy meeting were to hold discussions on the role of fusion/fission systems in sub-critical operations of nuclear reactors. The participants agreed that development of innovative (fourth generation) fission reactors, advanced fuel cycle options, and disposition of existing spent nuclear fuel inventories in various Member Sates can significantly benefit from including sub-critical systems, which are driven by external neutron sources. Spallation neutrons produced by accelerators have been accepted in the past as the means of driving sub-critical reactors. The accelerator community deserves credit in pioneering this novel approach to reactor design. Progress in the design and operation of fusion devices now offers additional innovative means, broadening the range of sub-critical operations of fission reactors. Participants felt that fusion should participate with accelerators in providing a range of technical options in reactor design. Participants discussed concrete steps to set up a small fusion/fission system to demonstrate actinide burning in the laboratory and what advice should be given to the Agency on its role in

  1. Surface study of fusion research in universities linkage organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira.

    1980-04-01

    The surface studies for nuclear fusion research consist of the studies on the surface process and the surface damage. The problems with the surface study are different at different research stages. The plasma-wall interaction in the ignition stage is mainly concerned with heating. The impurity control becomes important in the breakeven stage. In the longer burn experiment, the problems of plasma contamination and ash accumulation are serious, and the blistering is also a problem. From the reactor aspect, the reduction of life of wall due to the irradiation of high fluence must be considered. The surface damage due to plasma disruption is a very big problem. The activities concerning the surface studies in university-linked organizations are the surface characterization for fusion reactor materials by low energy ion scattering spectroscopy, the high power ion irradiation test for CTR first wall, data compilation on plasma-wall interaction, the studies of sputtering process and surface coating, and the study on hydrogen isotope permeation through metals for fusion reactors. Other activities such as the sample characterization at many universities using the SUS 304 samples from the same lot, and the collaboration works on JIPP-T-2 plasma wall experiments are introduced. Concerning the surface study, US-Japan or international collaboration are strongly expected. (Kato, T.)

  2. Role of industry in international fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durston, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    ITER combines a wide variety of technologies on an unprecedented scale of application. The experience of industry in design and integration of complex and advanced systems is helping to ensure that the engineering design of ITER is practicable and best meets the technical and cost objectives. The final development of fusion must take full benefit of the vast experience of industry in the management and coordination of major construction projects coupled with the fusion know-how being developed through participation in the ITER design activities. To achieve this, industry must be given an increasingly prominent role in the realization of the next-step device. The AE model provides an excellent means of achieving this aim. (author) 2 figs

  3. Fusion: The Energy of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, J

    2006-01-01

    field to the non-specialist. Their attempt has resulted in a remarkable success, fill ing a hole in the available literature. The format of this book, with boxed technical details, allows the casual reader to browse without being trapped by excessive detail, whereas the information is still there for the more assiduous reader. The only technical fault is the marring of the presentation by some unresolved production details in chapter 10. With the long-awaited decision to site ITER in Europe, there will inevitably be a strong demand for more information on fusion research for non-specialists, simply to understand what is behind this large project. This book fits the bill. It is written with technical accuracy but without resort to mathematics-a notably tricky target. The non-specialist wishing to find out about the field of fusion research, whether working as a journalist, administrator, secretary, politician, engineer or technician, will find a wealth of detail expressed in an accessible language. The specialist will be surprised by the precision of the text, and by the depth of the historical basis to this research. He will learn much, even if he is already familiar with the current state of art of fusion research. The younger researchers will find a clear history of their chosen field. The reviewer knows of no other book which has met this difficult goal with such ease, and strongly recommends it for the educated layman as well as for the ITER generation of younger physicists who did not live through the evolutionary period of fusion research, with its doubts, disappointments and successes. (book review)

  4. Summary: Fusion technology, safety and environmental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, S.

    2003-01-01

    The year 2002 was in the middle of successive governmental negotiation toward the start of the ITER Construction. The ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) continued until July 2001, and most of the highlighted topics were already reported at the last IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Montreal or in other opportunities. However, the ITER EDA was followed by the Coordinated Technical Activities that provided a lot of qualitative achievements such as, the search for predictions on operation capabilities based on various data bases and analysis, optimization of the design based on its validating technology R and D. As a consequence, at this conference, major contribution in the field of Fusion Technology was again from ITER, and its related topics occupied about 38% of the total number of contributions of 86. In ITER, physics analysis, predictions and heating/current drive technologies are highlighted. Another key feature at this conference was the progress of study toward steady-state operation in both physics and technology research as well as their application to toroidal devices. Several tokamaks and helical devises are under construction or under design, and most of them incorporate super-conducting magnet for their coils. Studies were made for various types of fusion reactors including Spherical Torus, Tokamaks, Helical systems etc., and their common understandings are progressing through their comparative study. Looking in the near term, but beyond ITER, about 20% of the papers were devoted to the fusion materials and blanket development, with the neutron irradiation facilities for the research. Because of the importance of this field to be implemented in parallel with ITER, more contributions would be expected in future. With these themes in mind, the remaining sections of this paper are arranged in the order of 2) ITER, 3) Toroidal Devices under Construction or under Design, 4) Reactor Technology, 5) Safety and Environment, and 6) Conclusion

  5. ITER: the first experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project is a multiphased project, at present proceeding under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency according to the terms of a four-party agreement between the European Atomic Energy Community, the Government of Japan, the Government of the USA and the Government of Russia (''the parties''). The project is based on the tokamak, a Russian invention which has been brought to a high level of development and progress in all major fusion programs throughout the world.The objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for commercial energy production and to test technologies for a demonstration fusion power plant. During the extended performance phase of ITER, it will demonstrate the characteristics of a fusion power plant, producing more than 1500MW of fusion power.The objective of the engineering design activity (EDA) phase is to produce a detailed, complete and fully integrated engineering design of ITER and all technical data necessary for the future decision on the construction of ITER.The ITER device will be a major step from present fusion experiments and will encompass all the major elements required for a fusion reactor. It will also require the development and the implementation of major new components and technologies.The inside surface of the plasma containment chamber will be designed to withstand temperature of up to 500 C, although normal operating temperatures will be substantially lower. Materials will have to be carefully chosen to withstand these temperatures, and a high neutron flux. In addition, other components of the device will be composed of state-of-the-art metal alloys, ceramics and composites, many of which are now in the early stage of development of testing. (orig.)

  6. Energy for the long run: fission or fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Kessler, G.; Holdren, J.; Haefele, W.

    1979-01-01

    The alternatives of the most likely and controversial long-range energy sources, fusion and fast-breeder fission, are compared in several areas: potential biological and social hazards, costs of research and development, capital costs, technical complexity, and time factors. It is concluded that from biological and social hazards standpoint, fusion is preferable to fast-breeder fission reactors; however, the LMFBR has already passed on the threshold of scientific and engineering feasibility. It is pointed out that LMFBR should not be compared with short-term energy sources, e.g. coal or oil, but should be compared only with other long-term energy sources, e.g. other types of breeder reactors

  7. Near and sub-barrier fusion studies with radioactive nuclei: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Harashit

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Understanding of the reaction mechanism with radioactive nuclei, e.g., halo nuclei, at near barrier energies appears to be a challenging problem at present. Recent experimental and theoretical investigations of fusion of exotic nuclei with stable targets have yielded new insights into the structure of these nuclei and its effects on the fusion reaction dynamics. One interesting and intriguing result of this type of study is the controversy over fusion enhancement in the presence of strong break-up channels. Other novel information include an increase of break-up cross-sections and weakening or absence of threshold anomaly, related to energy dependence of optical model potentials, in the neighbourhood of the barrier. It is believed that the coupling of the entrance channel to different non-elastic channels (including break-up) is responsible for the above phenomena and these aspects are more prominent in the near barrier region. An overview of the experimental studies of fusion excitation function with RIB will be presented

  8. Near and sub-barrier fusion studies with radioactive nuclei: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Harashit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text: Understanding of the reaction mechanism with radioactive nuclei, e.g., halo nuclei, at near barrier energies appears to be a challenging problem at present. Recent experimental and theoretical investigations of fusion of exotic nuclei with stable targets have yielded new insights into the structure of these nuclei and its effects on the fusion reaction dynamics. One interesting and intriguing result of this type of study is the controversy over fusion enhancement in the presence of strong break-up channels. Other novel information include an increase of break-up cross-sections and weakening or absence of threshold anomaly, related to energy dependence of optical model potentials, in the neighbourhood of the barrier. It is believed that the coupling of the entrance channel to different non-elastic channels (including break-up) is responsible for the above phenomena and these aspects are more prominent in the near barrier region. An overview of the experimental studies of fusion excitation function with RIB will be presented

  9. Status and possible prospects of an international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzani, F.

    1999-01-01

    Structural materials for future DT fusion power reactors will have to operate under intense neutron fields with energies up to 14 MeV and fluences in the order of 2 MW/m 2 per year. As environmental acceptability, safety considerations and economic viability will be ultimately the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power, the development of radiation-resistant and low activation materials would contribute significantly to fusion development. For this purpose, testing of materials under irradiation conditions close to those expected in a fusion power station would require the availability, in an appropriate time framework, of an intense, high-energy neutron source. Recent advances in linear accelerator technology, in small specimens testing technology, and in the comprehension of damage phenomena, lead to the conclusion that an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source, with beam energy variability, would provide the most realistic option for a fusion materials testing facility. Under the auspices of the IEA, an international effort (EU, Japan, US, RF) to carry out the conceptual design activities (CDA) of an international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF), based on the D-Li concept, have been carried out successfully. A final conceptual design report was produced at the end of 1996. A phase of conceptual design evaluation (CDE), presently underway, is extending and further refining some of the conceptual design details of IFMIF. The results indicate that an IFMIF-class installation would be technically feasible and could meet its mission objectives. However, a suitable phase of Engineering Validation, to carry out some complementary R and D and prototyping, would still be needed to resolve a few key technical uncertainties before the possibility to proceed toward detailed design and construction could be explored. (orig.)

  10. Design of intense neutron source for fusion material study and the role of universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Shiori

    1993-01-01

    Need and requirement for the intense neutron source for fusion materials study have been discussed for many years. Recently, international climate has been becoming gradually maturing to consider this problem more seriously because of the recognition of crucial importance of solving materials problems for fusion energy development. The present symposium was designed to discuss the problems associated with the intense neutron source for material irradiation studies which will have a potential for the National Institute for Fusion Science to become one of the important future research areas. The symposium comprises five sessions; first, the role of materials research in fusion development strategies was discussed followed by a brief summary of current IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) activity. Despite the pressing need for intense fusion neutron source, currently available neutron sources are reactor or accelerator based sources of which FFTF and LASREF were discussed. Then, various concepts of intense neutron source candidates were presented including ESNIT, which are currently under design by JAERI. In the fourth session, discussions were made on the study of materials with the intense neutron source from the viewpoint of materials scientists and engineers as the user of the facility. This is followed by discussions on the role of universities from the two stand points, namely, fusion irradiation studies and fusion materials development. Finally summary discussions were made by the participants, indicating important role fundamental studies in universities for the full utilization of irradiation data and the need of pure 14 MeV neutron source for fundamental studies together with the intense surrogate neutron sources. (author)

  11. Open Data for Global Multimodal Land Use Classification: Outcome of the 2017 IEEE GRSS Data Fusion Contest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokoya, Naoto; Ghamisi, Pedram; Xia, Junshi; Sukhanov, Sergey; Heremans, Roel; Tankoyeu, Ivan; Bechtel, Benjamin; Saux, Le Bertrand; Moser, Gabriele; Tuia, Devis

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present the scientific outcomes of the 2017 Data Fusion Contest organized by the Image Analysis and Data Fusion Technical Committee of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society. The 2017 Contest was aimed at addressing the problem of local climate zones classification based on

  12. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  13. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...... superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009....

  14. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical Univ. of Denmark. Annual progress report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelsen, P.K.; Korsholm, S.B.; Rasmussen, J.J. (eds.)

    2008-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology on investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials have been phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007. (Author)

  15. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical Univ. of Denmark. Annual progress report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelsen, P.K.; Korsholm, S.B.; Rasmussen, J.J.

    2008-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. The activities in technology on investigations of radiation damage of fusion reactor materials have been phased out during 2007. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2007. (Author)

  16. Fusion guidance in endovascular peripheral artery interventions: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Anna M; de Haan, Michiel W; de Graaf, Rick; van Zwam, Willem H; Schurink, Geert Willem H; Nelemans, Patricia J; Wildberger, Joachim E; Das, Marco

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of endovascular guidance by means of live fluoroscopy fusion with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA). Fusion guidance was evaluated in 20 endovascular peripheral artery interventions in 17 patients. Fifteen patients had received preinterventional diagnostic MRA and two patients had undergone CTA. Time for fluoroscopy with MRA/CTA coregistration was recorded. Feasibility of fusion guidance was evaluated according to the following criteria: for every procedure the executing interventional radiologists recorded whether 3D road-mapping provided added value (yes vs. no) and whether PTA and/or stenting could be performed relying on the fusion road-map without need for diagnostic contrast-enhanced angiogram series (CEAS) (yes vs. no). Precision of the fusion road-map was evaluated by recording maximum differences between the position of the vasculature on the virtual CTA/MRA images and conventional angiography. Average time needed for image coregistration was 5 ± 2 min. Three-dimensional road-map added value was experienced in 15 procedures in 12 patients. In half of the patients (8/17), intervention was performed relying on the fusion road-map only, without diagnostic CEAS. In two patients, MRA roadmap showed a false-positive lesion. Excluding three patients with inordinate movements, mean difference in position of vasculature on angiography and MRA/CTA road-map was 1.86 ± 0.95 mm, implying that approximately 95 % of differences were between 0 and 3.72 mm (2 ± 1.96 standard deviation). Fluoroscopy with MRA/CTA fusion guidance for peripheral artery interventions is feasible. By reducing the number of CEAS, this technology may contribute to enhance procedural safety.

  17. Characterization and testing of materials for nuclear reactors. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-03-01

    Nuclear techniques in general and neutrons based methods in particular have played and will continue to play an important role in research in materials science and technology. Today the world is looking at nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as the main sources of energy supply for the future. Research reactors have played a key role in the development of nuclear technology. A materials development programme will thus play a major role in the design and development of new nuclear power plants, for the extension of the life of operating reactors as well as for fusion reactors. Against this background, the IAEA had organized a Technical Meeting on Development, Characterization and Testing of Materials - With Special Reference to the Energy Sector under the activity on specific applications of research reactors. The meeting was held in Vienna, May 29- June 2, 2006. There was also participation by experts in techniques, complementary to neutrons. The participants for the technical meeting were experts in the utilization of nuclear techniques namely the high flux and medium flux research reactors, fusion research and positron annihilation. They presented the design, development and utilization of the facilities at their respective centres for materials characterization with main focus on materials for nuclear energy, both fission and fusion. In core irradiation of materials, development of instrument for residual stress measurement in large and / or irradiated specimen, neutron radiography for inspection of irradiated fuel, work on oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels and SiC composites, relevant to future power systems were cited as application of nuclear techniques in fission reactors. The use of neutron scattering for helium bubbles in steel, application of positron annihilation to study helium bubbles in Cu, Ti-stabilized stainless steel and voidswelling studies etc. show that these techniques have an important role in the development of materials for energy

  18. Progress on the European Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion Power (SEAFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, I.

    1994-01-01

    The Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion Power (SEAFP) project was set up by the European Community Fusion Programme in response to recommendations made by a high level Fusion Programme Evaluation Board. The Evaluation Board stated that fusion potentially possesses ''inherent environmental and safety advantages over all current alternatives for base load electricity generation'', but that a ''convincing demonstration'' of these potential advantages is necessary. SEAFP is undertaken by three main participants: the NET Team, The Euratom/UKAEA Association, and European industry. Other EC fusion laboratories also participate. The work embraces the outline design of fusion power stations, the safety and environmental assessment of those designs, and interactions between design and assessment to improve the design. The project began in April 1992 and will report in December 1994. In the first year of the project, five candidate blanket concepts were developed in parallel. Other aspects of design were developed as far as possible independently of the blanket designs. Assessments were made of the technical merits of the candidate designs, and scoping calculations were used to provide preliminary assessments of their accident and waste management characteristics. Accident identification studies were used to select the bounding sequences to be analysed later in detail. Targets for safety and environmental performance were developed. This phase of the study culminated, in August 1993, in the selection of two plant models, one based on a water/martensitic steel/lithium-lead blanket, the other based on a helium/vanadium alloy/lithium oxide blanket, to be developed and assessed in more detail. Other design variants will be assessed through sensitivity studies. ((orig.))

  19. EURATOM/UKAEA Association fusion research. 1998/99 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    This annual progress report describes the fusion energy research carried out under the Contract of Association between UKAEA and the European atomic energy community, EURATOM: the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association. It covers the period from April 1998 to March 1999, which has been a very active time, and has included contributions to the European Fusion Programme in several important areas. A main objective of the EURATOM/UKAEA Association is to provide support for JET, which is presently operated as a Joint Undertaking, but this will end in December 1999. It is proposed that the facilities will then pass to the UKAEA which will operate them for a programme of work by all the European Associations in support of ITER; UKAEA has been heavily involved in drafting the Implementing Agreement and operating contract with its European partners. There has also been a strong involvement in the JET scientific and technology programme which, following operation with tritium, includes activation studies and the impact of tritium retention. Highlights in the scientific programme included the first measurements of the plasma current density distribution in configurations with the potential for steady state operation. A second key objective is to contribute to the design of ITER, and in particular the RTO-ITER with its focus on a burning plasma of reduced size. ITER is the tokamak proposed to demonstrate the physics and many of the technology requirements for fusion power production, designed by Europe, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States. Experiments on our COMPASS-D tokamak, which has the same geometry as JET and ITER, are supported by a strong theory programme to develop our understanding of key issues for ITER. One such issue is the study of instabilities which arise in the approach to a steady state configuration at high normalised plasma pressure, β, using micro-wave heating and current drive schemes. Data from our 'spherical' tokamak START, which ceased

  20. Shock-tube study of fusion plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.; Tien, J.K.; Jensen, B.; Panayotou, N.F.; Feinberg, B.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have been made of phenomena which occur when a hot (T 1 approximately equal to 6 x 10 6 0 K), dense (n approximately equal to 10 16 cm -3 ), deuterium plasma containing a transverse magnetic field is brought into sudden contact with a cold metal wall. These studies are motivated by the need to understand plasma and metallurgical conditions at the first-wall of a fusion reactor. Experiments were carried out in the Columbia high energy electromagnetic shock tube. Computational simulation was used to investigate the detailed physics of the fusion plasma boundary layer which develops at the wall. The rate of energy transfer from the plasma to the wall was calculated and conditions under which surface melting occurs are estimated. Experimental measurements of plasma-wall heat transfer rates up to 3 x 10 5 watts/cm 2 were obtained and agreement with computed values are good. Fusion reactor first-wall materials have been exposed to 6.0 x 10 21 eV cm -2 (1,000 shots) of deuterium plasma bombardment. Scanning electron micrograph photographs show preferential erosion at grain boundaries, formation of deuterium surface blisters, and evidence of local surface melting. Some cracking is observed along grain boundaries, and a decrease in tensile ductiity is measured

  1. 1986 progress report on R and D work of the Nuclear Fusion Project (PKF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, G.

    1987-03-01

    The Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) and the Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching, have joined to form the Entwicklungsgemeinschaft Kernfusion, and under this roof perform research work on the physical and technical conditions and requirements of using the energy from nuclear fusion, and to plan the design and the construction of the necessary equipment for future large-scale experiments. The activities of the KfK for the development of fusion devices with magnetic confinement have been concentrated in the Nuclear Fusion Project, which cooperates in the European Fusion Technology Programme, on the basis of an association agreement between KfK and Euratom, supported by the European Commission. Supplementary KfK contributions, studies in most cases, create a connection between various fields of work, and prepare the road for new tasks, which in the years to come will be found in the extension of the Fusion Technology Programme and the planning work for NET. The reports collected in this annual survey are contributions from KfK Institutes of the year 1986. An annex presents the Easks taken over by KfK within the Fusion Technology Programme of the EC, and notes on the KfK Institutes taking part in the particular activities facilitate reference to the individual, full-text reports. (orig.) [de

  2. Visceral, vascular, and wound complications following over 13,000 lateral interbody fusions: a survey study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan S; Deukmedjian, Armen R

    2015-04-01

    Minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion (MIS-LIF) has become a popular less invasive treatment option for degenerative spinal disease, deformity, and trauma. While MIS-LIF offers several advantages over traditional anterior and posterior approaches, the procedure is not without risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of visceral, vascular, and wound complications following MIS-LIF performed by experienced surgeons. A survey was conducted by experienced (more than 100 case experience) MIS-LIF surgeons active in the society of lateral access surgery (SOLAS) to collect data on wound infections and visceral and vascular injuries. Of 77 spine surgeons surveyed, 40 (52 %) responded, including 25 (63 %) orthopedic surgeons and 15 (38 %) neurosurgeons, with 20 % practicing at an academic institution and 80 % in community practice. Between 2003 and 2013, 13,004 patients were treated with MIS-LIF by the 40 surgeons who responded to the survey. Of those patients, 0.08 % experienced a visceral complication (bowel injury), 0.10 % experienced a vascular injury, 0.27 % experienced a superficial wound infection, and 0.14 % experienced a deep wound infection. The incidence of surgical site infections and vascular and visceral complications following MIS-LIF in this large series was low and compared favorably with rates for alternative interbody fusion approaches. Although technically demanding, MIS-LIF is a reproducible approach for interbody fusion with a low risk of vascular and visceral complications and infections.

  3. Fusion power by magnetic confinement: plans and the associated need for nuclear engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, R.L.; Beard, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    An essential ingredient in the fusion development plan will be the training of appropriate scientific and technical manpower. In examining the need for fusion-trained nuclear engineers, it is projected that an additional 120 to 250 engineers at the MS and PhD levels will be needed between now and 1980. To be most effective, these graduates must not only be trained in the ''classic'' physical, nuclear, mechanical, and electrical sciences, but they will need specialized training in fusion plasma physics and fusion materials science. To help develop the appropriate educational programs, close cooperation between U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) headquarters, ERDA laboratories, private industry, and the universities will be essential. An emerging need for a carefully structured ''fusion technology'' option in nuclear engineering departments is plainly evident and is already beginning to be developed at leading institutions

  4. Study of DD versus DT fusion fuel cycles for different fusion-fission hybrid energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Baker, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    A study was performed to investigate the characteristics of an energy system to produce fissile fuel for fission reactors. DD and DT fusion reactors were examined in this study with either a thorium or uranium blanket for each fusion reactor. Various fuel cycles were examined for light-water reactors including the denatured fuel cycles (which may offer proliferation resistance compared to other fuel cycles); these fuel cycles include a uranium fuel cycle with 239 Pu makeup, a thorium fuel cycle with 239 Pu makeup, a denatured uranium fuel cycle with 233 U makeup, and a denatured thorium fuel cycle with 233 U makeup. Four different blankets were considered for this study. The first two blankets have a tritium breeding capability for DT reactors. Lithium oxide (Li 2 O) was used for tritium breeding due to its high lithium density and high temperature capability; however, the use of Li 2 O may result in higher tritium inventories compared to other solid breeders

  5. Development of large components for the fusion reactor vacuum circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perinic, D.; Lorrain, C.

    1986-06-01

    The Commission of the European Communities appointed in mid-1983 the Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay and the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH to investigate whether large vacuum components for use in the fusion machine can be built. The following individual targets have been defined for studies under this project: - Elaboration of technical specifications for large components. - Investigation of the feasibility. - Specification of the tests required and planning of a testing facility. The plasma chamber pumping system is essentially concerned

  6. Heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangerter, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    This report on the International Symposium on Heavy Ion Fusion held May 27-29, 1986 summarizes the problems and achievements in the areas of targets, accelerators, focussing, reactor studies, and system studies. The symposium participants recognize that there are large uncertainties in Heavy Ion Fusion but many of them are also optimistic that HIF may ultimately be the best approach to fusion

  7. Application of Recommended Design Practices for Conceptual Nuclear Fusion Space Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.

    2004-01-01

    An AIAA Special Project Report was recently produced by AIAA's Nuclear and Future Flight Propulsion Technical Committee and is currently in peer review. The Report provides recommended design practices for conceptual engineering studies of nuclear fusion space propulsion systems. Discussion and recommendations are made on key topics including design reference missions, degree of technological extrapolation and concomitant risk, thoroughness in calculating mass properties (nominal mass properties, weight-growth contingency and propellant margins, and specific impulse), and thoroughness in calculating power generation and usage (power-flow, power contingencies, specific power). The report represents a general consensus of the nuclear fusion space propulsion system conceptual design community and proposes 15 recommendations. This paper expands on the Report by providing specific examples illustrating how to apply each of the recommendations.

  8. Hydrogen production in early generation fusion power plant and its socio-economic implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, S.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: This paper describes technical possibility of high temperature blanket for the early generation of fusion power plant and its application to hydrogen production. Its anticipated implication and strategy from the socio-economic aspects will be also discussed. Material and energy balances, such as fuel supply and delivery of product energy from fusion plants, as well as waste discharge and accident scenario that lead to environmental impact, are characterized by blanket concepts. Thus blankets are considered to dominate the feature of fusion energy that should respond to the requirements of the sponsors, i.e., public and future market. Fusion blanket concept based on the combinations of LiPb and SiC materials are regarded as a candidate for ITER/TBM, and at the same time, applied in various DEMO designs encompassing high temperature output. Recent developments of SiC-LiPb blanket in Japan, EU, US or China suggests staged development paths starting from TBMs and targeting high temperature blanket and efficient energy output from early generation plants. These strategies are strongly affected by the views of these parties on fusion energy, from the aspects of socio-economics. Hydrogen production process with the high temperature blanket is one of the most important issues, because temperature range much higher than is possible with current or near future fission plants are needed, suggesting market possibility different from that of fission. Fuel cycles, particularly lithium supply and TBR control will be also important. Self-sustained fusion fuel cycle requires technical capability to maintain the lithium contents. Liquid blanket has an advantage in continuous and real-time control TBR in a plant, but large amount of lithium-6 and initial tritium supply remains as issues. As for the environmental effect, normal operation release, assumed accidental scenario, and rad-waste will be the key issue to dominate social acceptance of fusion. (author)

  9. Hydrogen production in early generation fusion power plant and its socio-economic implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes technical possibility of high temperature blanket for the early generation of fusion power plant and its application to hydrogen production. Its anticipated implication and strategy from the socio-economic aspects will be also discussed. Material and energy balances, such as fuel supply and delivery of product energy from fusion plants, as well as waste discharge and accident scenario that lead to environmental impact, are characterized by blanket concepts. Thus blankets are considered to dominate the feature of fusion energy that should respond to the requirements of the sponsors, i.e., public and future market. Fusion blanket concept based on the combinations of LiPb and SiC materials are regarded as a candidate for ITER/TBM, and at the same time, applied in various DEMO designs encompassing high temperature output. Recent developments of SiC-LiPb blanket in Japan, EU, US or China suggests staged development paths starting from TBMs and targeting high temperature blanket and efficient energy output from early generation plants. These strategies are strongly affected by the views of these parties on fusion energy, from the aspects of socio-economics. Hydrogen production process with the high temperature blanket is one of the most important issues, because temperature range much higher than is possible with current or near future fission plants are needed, suggesting market possibility different from that of fission. Fuel cycles, particularly lithium supply and TBR control will be also important. Self-sustained fusion fuel cycle requires technical capability to maintain the lithium contents. Liquid blanket has an advantage in continuous and real-time control TBR in a plant, but large amount of lithium-6 and initial tritium supply remains as issues. As for the environmental effect, normal operation release, assumed accidental scenario, and rad-waste will be the key issue to dominate social acceptance of fusion. (author)

  10. Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark - Annual Progress Report 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its...... been initiated in 2008. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2008....

  11. Summary of the International Workshop on Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Roadmapping in the ITER Era; 7–10 September 2011, Princeton, NJ, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, G.H.; Federici, G.; Li, J.; Maisonnier, D.; Wolf, R.

    2012-01-01

    With the ITER project now well under way, the countries engaged in fusion research are planning, with renewed intensity, the research and major facilities needed to develop the science and technology for harnessing fusion energy. The Workshop on MFE Roadmapping in the ITER Era was organized to provide a timely forum for an international exchange of technical information and strategic perspectives on how best to tackle the remaining challenges leading to a magnetic fusion DEMO, a nuclear fusion device or devices with a level of physics and technology integration necessary to cover the essential elements of a commercial fusion power plant. Presentations addressed issues under four topics: (1) Perspectives on DEMO and the roadmap to DEMO; (2) Technology; (3) Physics-Technology integration and optimization; and (4) Major facilities on the path to DEMO. Participants identified a set of technical issues of high strategic importance, where the development strategy strongly influences the overall roadmap, and where there are divergent understandings in the world community, namely (1) the assumptions used in fusion design codes, (2) the strategy for fusion materials development, (3) the strategy for blanket development, (4) the strategy for plasma exhaust solution development and (5) the requirements and state of readiness for next-step facility options. It was concluded that there is a need to continue and to focus the international discussion concerning the scientific and technical issues that determine the fusion roadmap, and it was suggested that an international activity be organized under appropriate auspices to foster international cooperation on these issues. (conference report)

  12. Fusion Guidance in Endovascular Peripheral Artery Interventions: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, Anna M., E-mail: anni.sailer@mumc.nl; Haan, Michiel W. de, E-mail: m.de.haan@mumc.nl; Graaf, Rick de, E-mail: r.de.graaf@mumc.nl; Zwam, Willem H. van, E-mail: w.van.zwam@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Schurink, Geert Willem H., E-mail: gwh.schurink@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Nelemans, Patricia J., E-mail: patty.nelemans@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology (Netherlands); Wildberger, Joachim E., E-mail: j.wildberger@mumc.nl; Das, Marco, E-mail: m.das@mumc.nl [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of endovascular guidance by means of live fluoroscopy fusion with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA).MethodsFusion guidance was evaluated in 20 endovascular peripheral artery interventions in 17 patients. Fifteen patients had received preinterventional diagnostic MRA and two patients had undergone CTA. Time for fluoroscopy with MRA/CTA coregistration was recorded. Feasibility of fusion guidance was evaluated according to the following criteria: for every procedure the executing interventional radiologists recorded whether 3D road-mapping provided added value (yes vs. no) and whether PTA and/or stenting could be performed relying on the fusion road-map without need for diagnostic contrast-enhanced angiogram series (CEAS) (yes vs. no). Precision of the fusion road-map was evaluated by recording maximum differences between the position of the vasculature on the virtual CTA/MRA images and conventional angiography.ResultsAverage time needed for image coregistration was 5 ± 2 min. Three-dimensional road-map added value was experienced in 15 procedures in 12 patients. In half of the patients (8/17), intervention was performed relying on the fusion road-map only, without diagnostic CEAS. In two patients, MRA roadmap showed a false-positive lesion. Excluding three patients with inordinate movements, mean difference in position of vasculature on angiography and MRA/CTA road-map was 1.86 ± 0.95 mm, implying that approximately 95 % of differences were between 0 and 3.72 mm (2 ± 1.96 standard deviation).ConclusionsFluoroscopy with MRA/CTA fusion guidance for peripheral artery interventions is feasible. By reducing the number of CEAS, this technology may contribute to enhance procedural safety.

  13. Fusion Guidance in Endovascular Peripheral Artery Interventions: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailer, Anna M.; Haan, Michiel W. de; Graaf, Rick de; Zwam, Willem H. van; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Nelemans, Patricia J.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Das, Marco

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of endovascular guidance by means of live fluoroscopy fusion with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computed tomography angiography (CTA).MethodsFusion guidance was evaluated in 20 endovascular peripheral artery interventions in 17 patients. Fifteen patients had received preinterventional diagnostic MRA and two patients had undergone CTA. Time for fluoroscopy with MRA/CTA coregistration was recorded. Feasibility of fusion guidance was evaluated according to the following criteria: for every procedure the executing interventional radiologists recorded whether 3D road-mapping provided added value (yes vs. no) and whether PTA and/or stenting could be performed relying on the fusion road-map without need for diagnostic contrast-enhanced angiogram series (CEAS) (yes vs. no). Precision of the fusion road-map was evaluated by recording maximum differences between the position of the vasculature on the virtual CTA/MRA images and conventional angiography.ResultsAverage time needed for image coregistration was 5 ± 2 min. Three-dimensional road-map added value was experienced in 15 procedures in 12 patients. In half of the patients (8/17), intervention was performed relying on the fusion road-map only, without diagnostic CEAS. In two patients, MRA roadmap showed a false-positive lesion. Excluding three patients with inordinate movements, mean difference in position of vasculature on angiography and MRA/CTA road-map was 1.86 ± 0.95 mm, implying that approximately 95 % of differences were between 0 and 3.72 mm (2 ± 1.96 standard deviation).ConclusionsFluoroscopy with MRA/CTA fusion guidance for peripheral artery interventions is feasible. By reducing the number of CEAS, this technology may contribute to enhance procedural safety

  14. Conceptual design study of a scyllac fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-07-01

    The report describes a conceptual design study of a fusion test reactor based on the Scyllac toroidal theta-pinch approach to fusion. It is not the first attempt to describe the physics and technology required for demonstrating scientific feasibility of the approach, but it is the most complete design in the sense that the physics necessary to achieve the device goals is extrapolated from experimentally tested MHD theories of toroidal systems,and it uses technological systems whose engineering performance has been carefully calculated to ensure that they meet the machine requirements

  15. New neutron cross sections for fusion materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Smither, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron cross sections are being developed for a variety of fusion-related applications including neutron dosimetry, fusion plasma diagnostics, the activation of very long-lived isotopes, and high-energy accelerator neutron sources

  16. Inclusion and difusion studies of D in fusion breeding blanket candidate materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, L.

    2015-07-01

    Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) reaction is the most practical fusion reaction on the way to harness fusion energy. As tritium presents trace quantities on Earth [1], tritium fuel is essential to be generated simultaneously with the D-T reaction in a commerical fusion power plant. Tritium can be obtained in the lithium contained breeding blanket as a transmutation product of nuclear reaction 6Li (n, a)T. Li2T iO3 is considered to be one promising candidate solid tritium breeder material, due to its high lithium density, low activation, compatiblity with structure materials and high chemical stability. The tritium generated in Li2T iO3 breeding blanket needs to be collected and recycled back to the fusion reaction. Therefore, the study of the diffusion characteristic of breeder material Li2T iO3 is necessary to determine tritium mobility and tritium extraction efficiency. In order to study tritium release mechanism of Li2T iO3 breeding material in a fusion power plant environment, a fusion like neutron spectrum is essential while it is now not availble in any laboratory. One alternative is using ion accelerator or implantor to get energetic hydrogenic (H,D,T) ions impacting on breeding material, to simulate the tritium distribution situation. Because of the radioactive property of tritium which will complicate processing procedure, another isotope of hydrogen Deuterium is actually used to be studied. The defect structure in Li2T iO3, due to reactor exposure to fusion generated particles and ? ray irradiation, is achieved by energetic Ti ions. SRIM program is implemented to simulate the D ion or Ti ion distributions after bombarding, as well as the defects. X-ray diffraction technique helps to identify phase compositions. Transmission electron microscopy technique is used to observe the microstructures (Author)

  17. Thick Nano-Crystalline Diamond films for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawedeit, Christoph [Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany)

    2010-06-30

    This Diplomarbeit deals with the characterization of 9 differently grown diamond samples. Several techniques were used to determine the quality of these specimens for inertial confinement fusion targets. The quality of chemical vapor deposition diamond is usually considered in terms of the proportion of sp3-bonded carbon to sp2-bonded carbon in the sample. For fusion targets smoothness, Hydrogen content and density of the diamonds are further important characteristics. These characteristics are analyzed in this thesis. The research for thesis was done at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institut für angewandte Festkörperphysik Freiburg, Germany. Additionally the Lehrstuhl fuer Nukleartechnik at Technical University of Germany supported the work.

  18. Fusion: The Energy of the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, J [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2006-05-15

    to communicate their love and understanding of this exciting field to the non-specialist. Their attempt has resulted in a remarkable success, fill ing a hole in the available literature. The format of this book, with boxed technical details, allows the casual reader to browse without being trapped by excessive detail, whereas the information is still there for the more assiduous reader. The only technical fault is the marring of the presentation by some unresolved production details in chapter 10. With the long-awaited decision to site ITER in Europe, there will inevitably be a strong demand for more information on fusion research for non-specialists, simply to understand what is behind this large project. This book fits the bill. It is written with technical accuracy but without resort to mathematics-a notably tricky target. The non-specialist wishing to find out about the field of fusion research, whether working as a journalist, administrator, secretary, politician, engineer or technician, will find a wealth of detail expressed in an accessible language. The specialist will be surprised by the precision of the text, and by the depth of the historical basis to this research. He will learn much, even if he is already familiar with the current state of art of fusion research. The younger researchers will find a clear history of their chosen field. The reviewer knows of no other book which has met this difficult goal with such ease, and strongly recommends it for the educated layman as well as for the ITER generation of younger physicists who did not live through the evolutionary period of fusion research, with its doubts, disappointments and successes. (book review)

  19. Economics of fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1977-10-15

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics.

  20. Economics of fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This report provides the results of a study of methods of economic analysis applied to the evaluation of fusion research. The study recognizes that a hierarchy of economic analyses of research programs exists: standard benefit-cost analysis, expected value of R and D information, and expected utility analysis. It is shown that standard benefit-cost analysis, as commonly applied to research programs, is inadequate for the evaluation of a high technology research effort such as fusion research. A methodology for performing an expected value analysis is developed and demonstrated and an overview of an approach to perform an expected utility analysis of fusion research is presented. In addition, a potential benefit of fusion research, not previously identified, is discussed and rough estimates of its magnitude are presented. This benefit deals with the effect of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns. The results of this study indicate that it is both appropriate and possible to perform an expected value analysis of fusion research in order to assess the economics of a fusion research program. The results indicate further that the major area of benefits of fusion research is likely due to the impact of a fusion research program on optimal fossil fuel consumption patterns and it is recommended that this benefit be included in future assessments of fusion research economics

  1. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors

  2. Recycling fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooms, L.

    2005-01-01

    The inherent safety and environmental advantages of fusion power in comparison with other energy sources play an important role in the public acceptance. No waste burden for future generations is therefore one of the main arguments to decide for fusion power. The waste issue has thus been studied in several documents and the final conclusion of which it is stated that there is no permanent disposal waste needed if recycling is applied. But recycling of fusion reactor materials is far to be obvious regarding mostly the very high specific activity of the materials to be handled, the types of materials and the presence of tritium. The main objective of research performed by SCK-CEN is to study the possible ways of recycling fusion materials and analyse the challenges of the materials management from fusion reactors, based on current practices used in fission reactors and the requirements for the manufacture of fusion equipment

  3. Economic implications for fusion derived from ESECOM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The main conclusion of the ESECOM study is that commercial fusion power plants have the potential to be economically competitive with present and future alternatives, while at the same time promising significant environmental and safety advantages, if designed properly. Furthermore, a range of fusion reactor approaches was identified which appears to meet these economic, safety and environmental goals. Economic competitiveness is not automatic, but depends on achieving enhanced plasma and engineering performance, such as high beta with low transport losses, efficient current drive and improved high-field coils. The main design characteristics leading to lower cost of electricity are a high degree of safety assurance, compactness, improved coils, and advanced energy conversion coupled with the use of advanced fuels

  4. Factors Affecting Women Enrolment In Technical Institutions In Tanzania A Case Study Of Arusha Technical College

    OpenAIRE

    Glory B. Kaaya; Dr. Esther Waiganjo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors affecting women enrolment in Technical Institutions in Tanzania by focusing on the women. The study examined in detail the factors affecting women enrolment in Technical institutions and Arusha Technical College in particular as well as exploring sexual dynamics within Technical Institutions. Moreover a number of theoretical frameworks were concerned basing on the objectives a case study design was employed involving both qua...

  5. Scoping studies of 233U breeding fusion fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.; Allen, W.O.

    1978-05-01

    Neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to design a laser fusion driven hybrid blanket which maximizes 233 U production per unit of thermal energy (greater than or equal to 1 kg/MW/sub T/-year) with acceptable fusion energy multiplication (M/sub F/ approximately 4). Two hybrid blankets, a thorium and a uranium-thorium blanket, are discussed in detail and their performance is evaluated by incorporating them into an existing hybrid design (the LLL/Bechtel design). The overall performance of the two laser fusion driven 233 U producers is discussed and estimates are given of (1) the number of equivalent thermal power fission reactors (LWR, HWR, SSCR and HTGR) that these fusion breeders can fuel, (2) their capital cost, and (3) the cost of electricity in the combined fusion breder-converter reactor scenario

  6. Scoping studies of 233U breeding fusion fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hansen, L.F.; Allen, W.O.

    1978-01-01

    Neutronic calculations have been carried out in order to design a laser fusion driven hybrid blanket which maximizes 233 U production per unit of thermal energy (greater than or equal to 1 kg/MW/sub T/-year) with acceptable fusion energy multiplication (M/sub F/ approx. 4). Two hybrid blankets, a thorium and a uranium--thorium blanket, are discussed in detail and their performance is evaluated by incorporating them into an existing hybrid design (the LLL/Bechtel design). The overall performance of the two laser fusion driven 233 U producers is discussed and estimates are given of (1) the number of equivalent thermal power fission reactors (LWR, HWR, SSCR and HTGR) that these fusion breeders can fuel, (2) their capital cost, and (3) the cost of electricity in the combined fusion breeder-converter reactor scenario

  7. Nuclear fusion: sixty years of efforts, great advances and challenges. May nuclear fusion replace fossil energies? The Grail which makes start-ups dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, Sylvain; Pajot, Philippe; Delbecq, Denis

    2016-01-01

    A first article proposes an overview of sixty years of researches, investments and realisations aimed at a better knowledge and control of nuclear fusion to solve the Planet's energy problems. After a brief overview of the Sun as an example, and while presenting the principle of magnetic fusion in a tokamak, some key figures illustration the development of ITER, the authors describe magnetic fusion as the royal road to nuclear fusion (challenges for the ITER project, development of Stellarator as a concurrent of tokamaks), and inertial fusion as an alternate approach (principle, military interest, plasma physics). They also indicate other approaches based on a change of energy source, a change in ignition process, or a change in fuel. In a second article, the author discusses the economic perspectives of nuclear fusion: a supposed unlimited fuel, existence of radioactive releases and pollution, operation risks and costs, technical challenges to be faced, a development to be amortised on more than a century except if more compact processes are elaborated and developed. The author also discusses issues of profitability and of proliferation. The third and last article comments the existence of many start-ups, notably financed by Silicon Valley rich companies, which invest in researches and projects on nuclear fusion. They try to develop more compact systems, and aim at manufacturing their first prototypes by 2020. On the other side, academics remain doubtful about their ability to reach their objectives

  8. Review of fission-fusion pellet designs and inertial confinement system studies at EIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifriz, W [Eidgenoessisches Inst. fuer Reaktorforschung, Wuerenlingen (Switzerland)

    1978-01-01

    The article summarizes the work done so far at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR) in the field of the inertial confinement fusion technique. The following subjects are reviewed: a) fission fusion pellet designs using fissionable triggers, b) uranium tampered pellets, c) tampered pellets recycling unwanted actinide wastes from fission reactors in beam-driven micro-explosion reactors, and d) symbiotic fusion/fission reactor studies.

  9. Radiation effects on superconducting fusion magnet components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fusion devices based on the magnetic confinement principle heavily rely on the existence and performance of superconducting magnets and have always significantly contributed to advancing superconductor and magnet technology to their limits. In view of the presently ongoing construction of the tokamak device ITER and the stellerator device Wendelstein 7X and their record breaking parameters concerning size, complexity of design, stored energy, amperage, mechanical and magnetic forces, critical current densities and stability requirements, it is deemed timely to review another critical parameter that is practically unique to these devices, namely the radiation response of all magnet components to the lifetime fluence of fast neutrons and gamma rays produced by the fusion reactions of deuterium and tritium. I will review these radiation effects in turn for the currently employed standard "technical" low temperature superconductors NbTi and Nb 3 Sn, the stabilizing material (Cu) as well as the magnet insulation materials and conclude by discussing the potential of high temperature superconducting materials for future generations of fusion devices, such as DEMO. (author)

  10. Studies on the feasibility of heavy ion beams for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    This Annual Report summarizes the scientific results of work carried out in 1982 in the framework of a feasibility study for inertial confinement fusion with heavy ion beams funded by the German Ministry of Research and Technology. The principal aim of this basic research program is the investigation of key problems and the identification of critical issues of the heavy ion ICF concept in the fields of accelerator research, atomic physics, target physics, and reactor design. The research is carried out by about ten working groups at various research centers and universities. One of the highlights in 1982 was a symposium held end of March at GSI which focussed on a critical analysis of the HIBALL accelerator concept. Whereas technical issues and hardware parameters were found feasible the beam dynamics in the storage rings turned out to be beyond the so far believed stability limits. As a consequence a revised accelerator scenario based on a lower charge state and a higher linac current has been investigated during the last year. First considerations were made on an experimental facility necessary for the study of high-intensity beam dynamics and of beam target interaction. Experimental studies of this kind will be of increasing importance for the future of the project. (orig.) [de

  11. Inertial confinement fusion research and development studies. Final report, October 1979-August 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullis, R.; Finkelman, M.; Leng, J.; Luzzi, T.; Ojalvo, I.; Powell, E.; Sedgley, D.

    1980-08-01

    These Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research and development studies were selected for structural, thermal, and vacuum pumping analyses in support of the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) concept development. An additional task provided an outlined program plan for an ICF Engineering Test Facility, using the HYLIFE concept as a model, although the plan is generally applicable to other ICF concepts. The HYLIFE is one promising type of ICF concept which features a falling array of liquid lithium jets. These jets surround the fusion reaction to protect the first structural wall (FSW) of the vacuum chamber by absorbing the fusion energy, and to act as the tritium breeder. The fusion energy source is a deuterium-tritium pellet injected into the chamber every second and driven by laser or heavy ion beams. The studies performed by Grumman have considered the capabilities of specific HYLIFE features to meet life requirements and the requirement to recover to preshot conditions prior to each subsequent shot. The components under investigation were the FSW which restrains the outward motion of the liquid lithium, the nozzle plate which forms the falling jet array, the graphite shield which is in direct top view of the fusion pellet, and the vacuum pumping system. The FSW studies included structural analysis, and definition of an experimental program to validate computer codes describing lithium motion and the resulting impact on the wall

  12. Applications of Skyrme energy-density functional to fusion reactions spanning the fusion barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Min; Wang, Ning; Li Zhuxia; Wu Xizhen; Zhao Enguang

    2006-01-01

    The Skyrme energy density functional has been applied to the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions. The barriers for fusion reactions are calculated by the Skyrme energy density functional with proton and neutron density distributions determined by using restricted density variational (RDV) method within the same energy density functional together with semi-classical approach known as the extended semi-classical Thomas-Fermi method. Based on the fusion barrier obtained, we propose a parametrization of the empirical barrier distribution to take into account the multi-dimensional character of real barrier and then apply it to calculate the fusion excitation functions in terms of barrier penetration concept. A large number of measured fusion excitation functions spanning the fusion barriers can be reproduced well. The competition between suppression and enhancement effects on sub-barrier fusion caused by neutron-shell-closure and excess neutron effects is studied

  13. International Code Centres Network. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H-K.

    2011-01-01

    Fifteen international experts on computational aspects of atomic, molecular and particle surface interaction data for fusion energy research participated in the 2nd technical meeting of the International Code Centres Network. Participants reported their research on data production and computational capabilities at their institutions. Experts in the field of plasma modeling of magnetic fusion research joined this meeting to present the data needs and bring the perspective of data users. The interaction and discussion among data producers and data users in this two-day meeting led to an agreement that the scope and function of Code Centres Network should be reformulated to serve the needs of fusion community in more effective way. (author)

  14. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume I. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the plasma materials interaction field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Gauster, W.B.; Heifetz, D.; Marmar, E.; Wilson, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the field of plasma materials interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be central for near-term experiments, for intermediate-range reactor devices including D-T burning physics experiments, and for long-term reactor machines. Critical technical issues are ones central to understanding and successful operation of existing and near-term experiments/reactors or devices of great importance for the long run, i.e., ones which will require an extensive, long-term development effort and thus should receive attention now. Four subgroups were formed to assess the critical PMI issues along four major lines: (1) PMI and plasma confinement physics experiments; (2) plasma-edge modelling and theory; (3) surface physics; and (4) materials technology for in-vessel components and the first wall. The report which follows is divided into four major sections, one for each of these topics

  15. Confinement inertial fusion. Power reactors of nuclear fusion by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Ahnert, C.; Aragones, J.M.; Leira, G; Martinez-Val, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The energy crisis and the need of the nuclear fusion energy are analized. The nuclear processes in the laser interation with the ablator material are studied, as well as the thermohydrodinamic processes in the implossion, and the neutronics of the fusion. The fusion reactor components are described and the economic and social impact of its introduction in the future energetic strategies.(author)

  16. Fusion Materials Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiffen, Frederick W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Melton, Stephanie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This document summarizes FY2016 activities supporting the Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Materials Research for MFE carried out by ORNL. The organization of the report is mainly by material type, with sections on specific technical activities.

  17. Magnet design considerations for Tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.; Thomas, R.

    1976-01-01

    Design problems for superconducting ohmic heating and toroidal field coils for large Tokamak fusion reactors are discussed. The necessity for making these coils superconducting is explained, together with the functions of these coils in a Tokamak reactor. Major problem areas include materials related aspects and mechanical design and cryogenic considerations. Projections and comparisons are made based on existing superconducting magnet technology. The mechanical design of large-scale coils, which can contain the severe electromagnetic loading and stress generated in the winding, are emphasized. Additional major tasks include the development of high current conductors for pulsed applications to be used in fabricating the ohmic heating coils. It is important to note, however, that no insurmountable technical barriers are expected in the course of developing superconducting coils for Tokamak fusion reactors. (Auth.)

  18. Innovative safety ideas for fusion experimental machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brereton, S.J.; Gouge, M.; Piet, S.J.; Merrill, B.J.; Holland, D.F.; Sze, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Throughout the early stages of design of fusion experimental devices, such as ITER, safety experts have worked with designers to incorporate safety features into the design. Recent efforts have focused on passive safety features. Although designs of near-term fusion machines may appear consistent with expected regulatory requirements, the safety characteristics can potentially be more attractive. Here, a variety of suggestions that appear promising in terms of improving safety are given. These include new concepts, innovative technologies, further support of past concepts, and possible modification to operating scenarios. Some technical discussion on the feasibility of the proposals is provided. The ideas are generally conceptual at this stage and require further assessment and development work. However, each has the potential for enhancing the safety of experimental devices. 33 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  19. Fusion systems engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Information is given on each of the following topics: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of CTR concepts, and (4) cross section measurements and techniques

  20. Fusion research in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoletnik, S.

    2004-01-01

    Hungarian fusion research started in the 1970s, when the idea of installing a small tokamak experiment emerged. In return to computer equipment a soviet tokamak was indeed sent to Hungary and started to operate as MT-1 at the Central Research Institute for Physics (KFKI) in 1979. Major research topics included diagnostic development, edge plasma studies and investigation of disruptions. Following a major upgrade in 1992 (new vacuum vessel, active position control and PC network based data acquisition system) the MT-1M tokamak was used for the study of transport processes with trace impurity injection, micropellet ablation studies, X-ray tomography and laser blow-off diagnostic development. Although funding ceased in the middle of the 90's the group was held alive by collaborations with EU fusion labs: FZ -Juelich, IPP-Garching and CRPP-EPFL Lausanne. In 1998 the machine was dismantled due to reorganization of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. New horizons opened to fusion research from 1999, when Hungary joined EURATOM and a fusion Association was formed. Since then fusion physics studies are done in collaboration with major EU fusion laboratories, Hungarian researchers also play an active role in JET diagnostics upgrade and ITER design. Major topics are pellet ablation studies, plasma turbulence diagnosis using Beam Emission Spectroscopy and other techniques, tomography and plasma diagnostics using various neutral beams. In fusion relevant technology R and D Hungary has less records. Before joining EURATOM some materials irradiation studies were done at the Budapest Research Reactor at KFKI-AEKI. The present day fusion technology programme focuses still on irradiation studies, nuclear material database and electromagnetic testing techniques. Increasing the fusion technology research activities is a difficult task, as the competition in Hungarian industry is very strong and the interest of organizations in long-term investments into R and D is rather weak and

  1. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume VI. Complementary development plan for engineering development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    The basic approach followed in this volume is to define key technical issues for several fusion reactor technologies and to device program strategies to resolve each of these issues. Particular attention has been paid to elucidating the role of FED vis-a-vis complementary (non-FED) facilities in this process. The remainder of this chapter consists of summaries of the major conclusions of the technology plans in each of the areas studied, i.e., plasma heating, magnetics, nuclear, and systems considerations

  2. Thermal Studies of the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Target during Injection into the Fusion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, R. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Havstad, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LeBlanc, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chang, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Golosker, I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosso, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-09

    The tests of the external heat transfer coefficient suggests that the values used in the numerical analysis for the temperature distribution within the fusion fuel target following flight into the target chamber are probably valid. The tests of the heat transfer phenomena occurring within the target due the rapid heating of the LEH window for the hot gasses within the fusion chamber show that the heat does indeed convect via the internal helium environment of the target towards the capsule and that the pressure in the front compartment of the target adjacent to the LEH window increases such that t bypass venting of the internal helium into the second chamber adjacent to the capsule is needed to prevent rupture of the membranes. The bypass flow is cooled by the hohlraum during this venting. However, the experiments suggest that our internal heat flow calculations may be low by about a factor of 2. Further studies need to be conducted to investigate the differences between the experiment and the numerical analysis. Future studies could also possibly bring the test conditions closer to those expected in the fusion chamber to better validate the results. A sacrificial layer will probably be required on the LEH window of the target and this can be used to mitigate any unexpected target heating.

  3. Economic implications for fusion derived from ESECOM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delene, J.G.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main conclusion of the ESECOM study is that commercial fusion power plants have the potential to be economically competitive with present and future alternatives, while at the same time promising significant environmental and safety advantages, if designed properly. Furthermore, a range of fusion reactor approaches was identified which appears to meet these economic, safety and environmental goals. Economic competitiveness is not automatic, but depends on achieving enhanced plasma and engineering performance, such as high beta with low transport losses, efficient current drive and improved high-field coils. The main design characteristics leading to lower cost of electricity are a high degree of safety assurance compactness, improved coils, and advanced energy conversion coupled with the use of advanced fuels. 14 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    The primary objective of the of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was to provide the Office of Fusion Energy with an evaluation of the potential of inertial fusion for electric power production. The term reactor studies is somewhat of a misnomer since these studies included the conceptual design and analysis of all aspects of the IFE power plants: the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, other balance of plant facilities, target systems (including the target production, injection, and tracking systems), and the two drivers. The scope of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was quite ambitious. The majority of our effort was spent on the conceptual design of two IFE electric power plants, one using an induction linac heavy ion beam (HIB) driver and the other using a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser driver. After the two point designs were developed, they were assessed in terms of their (1) environmental and safety aspects; (2) reliability, availability, and maintainability; (3) technical issues and technology development requirements; and (4) economics. Finally, we compared the design features and the results of the assessments for the two designs

  5. Study on structural materials used in thermonuclear fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billa, R.; Amaral, D.

    1995-01-01

    The main problem related to the construction of a thermonuclear fusion reactor is the absence of suitable materials for the process, concerning to temperature limits, heat flux and life time. The first wall is the most critical part of the structure, being submitted to radiation effects, ionic corrosion and coolant, besides thermal fatigue and tension produced by cyclical burning. The AISI 316(17-12SPH) stainless steel is used as structural material, which has a wide known database. This work proposes an alternative material study to be used in the future thermonuclear fusion reactors. As a option a study on the utilization of Cr-Mn(Fe-17 Mn-10 Cr-0,1 C) steels and their alloy variations is presented

  6. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures

  7. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the titan-1 fusion power core. The major topics covered are: titan-1 fusion-power-core engineering; titan-1 divertor engineering; titan-1 tritium systems; titan-1 safety design and radioactive-waste disposal; and titan-1 maintenance procedures.

  8. The benefits of ITER for the portfolio of fusion configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent plasma science challenges are 1) what limits the pressure in plasmas? (macroscopic stability), 2) how do hot particles and plasma waves interact in the non-linear regime? (wave-particle interactions), 3) what causes plasma transport? (microscopic turbulence and transport) and 4) how can high-temperature plasma and material surface co-exist? (plasma-material interactions). This fusion plasma science is addressed using a 'Portfolio' of configurations, like Stellarator, Tokamak, Spherical Torus, Reversed Field Pinch, Spheromak, and Field Reversed Configuration. Namely, the scientific results from one configuration benefit progress in others. Recent example of this effort can be found in NCSX, NSTX and RFP. ITER will provide very significant benefits to the development of the full fusion portfolio; macroscopic stability, wave-particle interactions, microturbulence and transport, plasma-material interactions, and technical demonstration of an integrated fusion system. (author)

  9. The benefits of ITER for the portfolio of fusion configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R.J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Recent plasma science challenges are 1) what limits the pressure in plasmas? (macroscopic stability), 2) how do hot particles and plasma waves interact in the non-linear regime? (wave-particle interactions), 3) what causes plasma transport? (microscopic turbulence and transport) and 4) how can high-temperature plasma and material surface co-exist? (plasma-material interactions). This fusion plasma science is addressed using a 'Portfolio' of configurations, like Stellarator, Tokamak, Spherical Torus, Reversed Field Pinch, Spheromak, and Field Reversed Configuration. Namely, the scientific results from one configuration benefit progress in others. Recent example of this effort can be found in NCSX, NSTX and RFP. ITER will provide very significant benefits to the development of the full fusion portfolio; macroscopic stability, wave-particle interactions, microturbulence and transport, plasma-material interactions, and technical demonstration of an integrated fusion system. (author)

  10. Fusion Materials Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiffen, F. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Melton, Stephanie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The realization of fusion energy is a formidable challenge with significant achievements resulting from close integration of the plasma physics and applied technology disciplines. Presently, the most significant technological challenge for the near-term experiments such as ITER, and next generation fusion power systems, is the inability of current materials and components to withstand the harsh fusion nuclear environment. The overarching goal of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) fusion materials program is to provide the applied materials science support and understanding to underpin the ongoing Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science fusion energy program while developing materials for fusion power systems. In doing so the program continues to be integrated both with the larger United States (US) and international fusion materials communities, and with the international fusion design and technology communities.This document provides a summary of Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 activities supporting the Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Materials Research for Magnetic Fusion Energy (AT-60-20-10-0) carried out by ORNL. The organization of this report is mainly by material type, with sections on specific technical activities. Four projects selected in the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) solicitation of late 2011 and funded in FY2012-FY2014 are identified by “FOA” in the titles. This report includes the final funded work of these projects, although ORNL plans to continue some of this work within the base program.

  11. Multiple-hook fixation in revision spinal deformity surgery for patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass: technical note and preliminary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A previous multilevel fusion mass encountered during revision spinal deformity surgery may obscure anatomical landmarks, making instrumentation unworkable or incurring substantial blood loss and operative time. This study introduced a surgical technique of multiple-hook fixation for fixating previous multilevel fusion masses in revision spinal deformity surgeries and then evaluated its outcomes. METHODS Patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass who underwent revision corrective surgery down to the lumbosacral junction were retrospectively studied. Multiple hooks were used to fixate the fusion mass and linked to distal pedicle screws in the lumbosacral-pelvic complex. Radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS The charts of 8 consecutive patients with spinal deformity were retrospectively reviewed (7 women, 1 man; mean age 56 years). The primary diagnoses included flat-back deformity (6 cases), thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis (1 case), and lumbar spondylosis secondary to a previous scoliosis fusion (1 case). The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. Operations were performed at T3/4-ilium (4 cases), T7-ilium (1 case), T6-S1 (1 case), T12-S1 (1 case), and T9-L5 (1 case). Of 8 patients, 7 had sagittal imbalance preoperatively, and their mean C-7 plumb line improved from 10.8 ± 2.9 cm preoperatively to 5.3 ± 3.6 cm at final follow-up (p = 0.003). The mean lumbar lordosis of these patients at final follow-up was significantly greater than that preoperatively (35.2° ± 12.6° vs 16.8° ± 11.8°, respectively; p = 0.005). Two perioperative complications included osteotomy-related leg weakness in 1 patient and a stitch abscess in another. CONCLUSIONS The multiple-hook technique provides a viable alternative option for fixating a previous multilevel fusion mass in revision spinal deformity surgery.

  12. Magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The efforts of the Chemical Technology Division in the area of fusion energy include fuel handling, processing, and containment. These studies are closely coordinated with the ORNL Fusion Energy Division. Current experimental studies are concerned with the development of vacuum pumps for fusion reactors, the evaluation and development of techniques for recovering tritium (fuel) from either solid or liquid lithium containing blankets, and the use of deep beds of sorbents as roughing pumps and/or transfer operations. In addition, a small effort is devoted to the support of the ORNL design of The Next Step (TNS) in tokamak reactor development. The more applied studies--vacuum pump development and TNS design--are funded by the DOE/Magnetic Fusion Energy, and the more fundamental studies--blanket recovery and sorption in deep beds--are funded by the DOE/Basic Energy Sciences

  13. Inertial fusion commercial power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation discusses the motivation for inertial fusion energy, a brief synopsis of five recently-completed inertial fusion power plant designs, some general conclusions drawn from these studies, and an example of an IFE hydrogen synfuel plant to suggest that future fusion studies consider broadening fusion use to low-emission fuels production as well as electricity

  14. Extrap conceptual fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eninger, J.E; Lehnert, B.

    1987-12-01

    A study has recently been initiated to asses the fusion reactor potential of the Extrap concept. A reactor model is defined that fulfills certain economic and environmental criteria. This model is applied to Extrap and a reference reactor is outlined. The design is optimized by varying parameters subject to both physics and engineering constraints. Several design options are examined and key engineering issues are identified and addressed. Some preliminary results and conclusions of this work are summarized. (authors)

  15. [Axial lumbar interbody fusion: prospective monocentric study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulík, J; Adámek, S; Barna, M; Kaspříková, N; Polanecký, O; Kryl, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate clinical and radiographic results in the patients who underwent L5-S1 fixation using the technique of percutaneous lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF). The study comprised 23 patients, 11 women and 12 men, who ranged from age of 21 to 63 years, with an average of 48.2 years. In all patients surgical posterior stabilisation involving the L5-S1 segment had previously been done. The initial indications for surgery were L5-S1 spondylolisthesis in 20 and L5-S1 spondylosis and stenosis in three patients. The AxiaLIF technique for L5-S1 fixation was indicated in overweight patients and in those after repeated abdominal or retroperitoneal surgery. A suitable position and shape of the sacrum or lumbosacral junction was another criterion. The patients were evaluated between 26 and 56 months (average, 40.4 months) after primary surgery and, on the basis of CT and radiographic findings, bone union and lumbosacral junction stability were assessed. The clinical outcome was investigated using the ODI and VAS systems and the results were statistically analysed by the Wilcoxon test for paired samples with statistical significance set at a level of 0.05. The average VAS value was 6.6 before surgery and, after surgery, 5.2 at three months, 4.2 at six months, 3.1 at one year, 2.9 at two years and 2.1 at three years (n=18). At two post-operative years, improvement in the VAS value by 56.1% was recorded. The average pre-operative ODI value was 25.1; the post-operative values were 17.0 at six months, 12.3 at one year, 10.6 at two years and 8.2 at three years (n=18). At two years after surgery the ODI value improved by 57.8%. To the question concerning their willingness to undergo, with acquired experience, surgery for the same diagnosis, 21 patients (91.3%) gave an affirmative answer. Neither screw breakage nor neurovascular damage or rectal injury was found. CT scans showed complete interbody bone fusion in 22 of the 23 patients (95

  16. Fusion reactor technology studies. Final report for period August 1, 1972 - October 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Maynard, C.W.

    1984-04-01

    Major accomplishments for the period August 1, 1972 - October 31, 1978 include the publishing of four comprehensive fusion reactor conceptual design studies; experimental studies in the areas of radiation damage, plasma-wall interactions, superconducting magnets and 14-MeV neutron cross sections; development of the concepts of carbon curtains and ISSEC's for use in fusion reactors; development of a neutron and gamma heating computer code, a radioactivity and afterheat computer code and a neutral transport computer code; and studies in the areas of RF heating for tokamaks and resource assessment for fusion reactors

  17. Evaluation of a committed fusion site. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This report is divided into five technical sections. Section 2 is a summary. In Section 3, which covers device and site analyses the major characteristics of devices that might be placed at the site, as envisioned by major fusion laboratories, are described; the characteristics of a site (baseline site) which would accommodate these devices are defined; and various approaches to a committed site meeting the baseline site requirements are discussed. Section 4 describes the scenarios selected to represent possible site development outcomes; these scenarios are evaluated with respect to comparative cost and schedule effects. Section 5 presents a brief evaluation of the effects fusion-fission hybrids might have on the committed site. Major conclusions and recommendations are discussed in Section 6

  18. A feasibility study of a linear laser heated solenoid fusion reactor. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, L.C.

    1976-02-01

    This report examines the feasibility of a laser heated solenoid as a fusion or fusion-fission reactor system. The objective of this study, was an assessment of the laser heated solenoid reactor concept in terms of its plasma physics, engineering design, and commercial feasibility. Within the study many pertinent reactor aspects were treated including: physics of the laser-plasma interaction; thermonuclear behavior of a slender plasma column; end-losses under reactor conditions; design of a modular first wall, a hybrid (both superconducting and normal) magnet, a large CO 2 laser system; reactor blanket; electrical storage elements; neutronics; radiation damage, and tritium processing. Self-consistent reactor configurations were developed for both pure fusion and fusion-fission designs, with the latter designed both to produce power and/or fissile fuels for conventional fission reactors. Appendix A is a bibliography with commentary of theoretical and experimental studies that have been directed at the laser heated solenoid

  19. Mechanical Engineering Department technical abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Mechanical Engineering Department publishes abstracts twice a year to inform readers of the broad range of technical activities in the Department, and to promote an exchange of ideas. Details of the work covered by an abstract may be obtained by contacting the author(s). General information about the current role and activities of each of the Department's seven divisions precedes the technical abstracts. Further information about a division's work may be obtained from the division leader, whose name is given at the end of each divisional summary. The Department's seven divisions are as follows: Nuclear Test Engineering Division, Nuclear Explosives Engineering Division, Weapons Engineering Division, Energy Systems Engineering Division, Engineering Sciences Division, Magnetic Fusion Engineering Division and Materials Fabrication Division

  20. Modeling, analysis and experiments for fusion nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Hadid, A.H.; Raffray, A.R.; Tillack, M.S.; Iizuka, T.

    1988-01-01

    Selected issues in the development of fusion nuclear technology (FNT) have been studied. These relate to (1) near-term experiments, modeling, and analysis for several key FNT issues, and (2) FNT testing in future fusion facilities. A key concern for solid breeder blankets is to reduce the number of candidate materials and configurations for advanced experiments to emphasize those with the highest potential. Based on technical analysis, recommendations have been developed for reducing the size of the test matrix and for focusing the testing program on important areas of emphasis. The characteristics of an advanced liquid metal MHD experiment have also been studied. This facility is required in addition to existing facilities in order to address critical uncertainties in MHD fluid flow and heat transfer. In addition to experiments, successful development of FNT will require models for interpreting experimental data, for planning experiments, and for use as a design tool for fusion components. Modeling of liquid metal fluid flows is a particular area of need in which substantial progress is expected, and initial efforts are reported here. Preliminary results on the modeling of tritium transport and inventory in solid breeders are also summarized. Finally, the thermo-mechanical behavior of liquid-metal-cooled limiters is analyzed and the parameter space for feasible designs is explored. Because of the renewed strong interest in a fusion engineering facility, a critical review and analysis of the important FNT testing requirements have been performed. Several areas have been emphasized due to their strong impact on the design and cost of the test facility. These include (1) the length of the plasma burn and the mode of operation (pulsed vs. steady-state), and (2) the need for a tritium-producing blanket and its impact on the availability of the device. (orig.)

  1. Proximity approach to study fusion probabilities in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj Kumari

    2013-01-01

    The fusion cross-sections at the sub-barrier energies are found to be enhanced compared to the predictions of the barrier penetration model. The aim is to test Bass 80, Aage Winther (AW) 95, Denisov DP, Proximity 2010 and Skyrme Energy Density Formalism (SEDF) at energies above as well as below barrier height. For the present systematic study, the fusion probabilities for the reactions of 28 Si+ 24,26 Mg 30 Si+ 24 Mg and 28,30 Si+ 58,62 Ni have been calculated

  2. Assessment of the critical engineering data needs for the commercialization of magnetic confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waganer, L.M.; Zuckerman, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of twenty-two recent conceptual fusion reactor designs was conducted to ascertain both generic and specific engineering data needs critical for the commercialization of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Design experts or advocates for each concept were queried as to the more critical engineering issues and data needs affecting the achievement of commercialization. For each concept, the technical issues were identified and the data needs quantified. Issues and data needs were then ranked based upon the experts' perceptions of the relative importance of each to the concept. The issues encompassed all aspects of the fusion reactor plant design including materials, performance, maintainability, operability, cost, safety and resources

  3. The fourth international energy agency international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the workshop was to support the advancement of the international development of fusion power through communication and dissemination of information on progress made in beryllium technology. This has been accomplished through presentation of original research on issues of current interest to the fusion beryllium community. The workshop was divided into ten technical sessions that addressed the following general topics: production and characterization, health and safety, forming and joining, chemical compatibility, thermal-mechanical properties, pebble bed behavior, high-heat-flux performance, irradiation effects, plasma-tritium interaction, and molten beryllium-bearing salts

  4. The fourth international energy agency international workshop on beryllium technology for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R.

    2000-05-01

    The main objective of the workshop was to support the advancement of the international development of fusion power through communication and dissemination of information on progress made in beryllium technology. This has been accomplished through presentation of original research on issues of current interest to the fusion beryllium community. The workshop was divided into ten technical sessions that addressed the following general topics: production and characterization, health and safety, forming and joining, chemical compatibility, thermal-mechanical properties, pebble bed behavior, high-heat-flux performance, irradiation effects, plasma-tritium interaction, and molten beryllium-bearing salts.

  5. Anato-metabolic fusion of PET, CT and MRI images; Anatometabolische Bildfusion von PET, CT und MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przetak, C.; Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin/PET-Zentrum; Slomka, P. [University of Western Ontario, Toronto (Canada). Health Sciences Centre; Proeschild, A.; Leonhardi, J. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka (Germany). Inst. fuer bildgebende Diagnostik

    2000-12-01

    The fusion of cross-sectional images - especially in oncology - appears to be a very helpful tool to improve the diagnostic and therapeutic accuracy. Though many advantages exist, image fusion is applied routinely only in a few hospitals. To introduce image fusion as a common procedure, technical and logistical conditions have to be fulfilled which are related to long term archiving of digital data, data transfer and improvement of the available software in terms of usefulness and documentation. The accuracy of coregistration and the quality of image fusion has to be validated by further controlled studies. (orig.) [German] Zur Erhoehung der diagnostischen und therapeutischen Sicherheit ist die Fusion von Schnittbildern verschiedener tomographischer Verfahren insbesondere in der Onkologie sehr hilfreich. Trotz bestehender Vorteile hat die Bildfusion bisher nur in einzelnen Zentren Einzug in die nuklearmedizinische und radiologische Routinediagnostik gefunden. Um die Bildfusion allgemein einsetzen zu koennen, sind bestimmte technische und logistische Voraussetzungen notwendig. Dies betrifft die Langzeitarchivierung von diagitalen Daten, die Moeglichkeiten zur Datenuebertragung und die Weiterentwicklung der verfuegbaren Software, auch was den Bedienkomfort und die Dokumentation anbelangt. Zudem ist es notwendig, die Exaktheit der Koregistrierung und damit die Qualitaet der Bildfusion durch kontrollierte Studien zu validieren. (orig.)

  6. Fusion in the energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusion energy is the fundamental energy source of the Universe, as the energy of the Sun and the stars are produced by fusion of e.g. hydrogen to helium. Fusion energy research is a strongly international endeavor aiming at realizing fusion energy production in power plants on Earth. Reaching...... of integration into the future electricity system and socio-economic studies of fusion energy will be presented, referring to the programme of Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF) under the European Fusion Energy Agreement (EFDA)....

  7. Parameter studies for a two-component fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towner, H.H.

    1975-01-01

    The sensitivity of the energy multiplication of a two-component fusion experiment is examined relative to the following parameters: energy confinement time (tau/sub E/), particle confinement time (tau/sub p/), effective Z of the plasma (Z/sub eff/), injection rate (j/sub I/) and injection energy (E/sub I/). The Energy Research and Development Administration recently approved funding for such a fusion device (the Toroidal Fusion Test Reactor or TFTR) which will be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Hence, such a parameter study seems both timely and necessary. This work also serves as an independent check on the design values proposed for the TFTR to enable it to achieve energy breakeven (F = 1). Using the nominal TFTR design parameters and a self-consistent ion-electron power balance, the maximum F-value is found to be approximately 1.2 which occurs at an injection energy of approximately 210 KeV. The injector operation, i.e. its current and energy capability are shown to be a very critical factor in the TFTR performance. However, if the injectors meet the design objectives, there appears to be sufficient latitude in the other parameters to offer reasonable assurance that energy breakeven can be achieved. (U.S.)

  8. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10 6 atoms/cm 3 with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed

  9. Fusion-fission hybrid studies in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Berwald, D.H.; Cheng, E.T.; Delene, J.G.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Systems and conceptual design studies have been carried out on the following three hybrid types: (1) The fission-suppressed hybrid, which maximizes fissile material produced (Pu or 233 U) per unit of total nuclear power by suppressing the fission process and multiplying neutrons by (n,2n) reactions in materials like beryllium. (2) The fast-fission hybrid, which maximizes fissile material produced per unit of fusion power by maximizing fission of 238 U (Pu is produced) in which twice the fissile atoms per unit of fusion power (but only a third per unit of nuclear power) are made. (3) The power hybrid, which amplifies power in the blanket for power production but does not produce fuel to sell. All three types must sell electrical power to be economical

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Fusion: The Energy of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, J.

    2006-05-01

    field to the non-specialist. Their attempt has resulted in a remarkable success, filling a hole in the available literature. The format of this book, with boxed technical details, allows the casual reader to browse without being trapped by excessive detail, whereas the information is still there for the more assiduous reader. The only technical fault is the marring of the presentation by some unresolved production details in chapter 10. With the long-awaited decision to site ITER in Europe, there will inevitably be a strong demand for more information on fusion research for non-specialists, simply to understand what is behind this large project. This book fits the bill. It is written with technical accuracy but without resort to mathematics—a notably tricky target. The non-specialist wishing to find out about the field of fusion research, whether working as a journalist, administrator, secretary, politician, engineer or technician, will find a wealth of detail expressed in an accessible language. The specialist will be surprised by the precision of the text, and by the depth of the historical basis to this research. He will learn much, even if he is already familiar with the current state of art of fusion research. The younger researchers will find a clear history of their chosen field. The reviewer knows of no other book which has met this difficult goal with such ease, and strongly recommends it for the educated layman as well as for the ITER generation of younger physicists who did not live through the evolutionary period of fusion research, with its doubts, disappointments and successes.

  11. Present status of inertial confinement fusion in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1984-01-01

    The Japanese inertial fusion program has made important progress towards implosion fusion process and the technical development required for realizing the breakeven of inertial fusion energy. The key issues for the ICF research are the development of a high power driver, the pertinent pellet design for implosion by a super computer code, and the diagnostics of implosion process with high space and time resolution. The Institute of Laser Engineering (ILE), Osaka University, is the central laboratory for ICF research in Japan. The ILE Osaka has advanced the Kongo Project aiming at the breakeven of inertial fusion since 1980, and as the first phase, the Gekko 12 Nd glass laser of 20 kJ having 12 beams was constructed. The ILE has also the Lekko 8 CO 2 laser and the Reiden 4 light ion beam machine. In the second phase, a 100 kJ class driver will be provided. At the ILE, rare gas halide lasers such as KrF and ArF have been investigated. Laser plasma coupling, the scaling law for implosion pressure, the invention of a new type target ''Cannonball'', and the development of computer codes are described. Also the activities in universities, government laboratories and industrial companies are reported. (Kako, I.)

  12. Minutes of the IFMIF technical meetings, May 17-20, 2005, Tokyo, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Mizuho; Nakamura, Hiroo; Yutani, Toshiaki; Maebara, Sunao; Umetsu, Tomotake; Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    2005-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) Technical Meetings were held on May 17-20, 2005 at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) Tokyo. The main objectives were 1) to review technical status of the subsystems; accelerator, target and test facilities, 2) to technically discuss interface issues between target and test facilities, 3) to review results of peer-reviews performed in the EU and Japan, 4) to harmonize design/experimental activities among the subsystems, 5) to review and discuss the Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activity (EVEDA) tasks, and 6) to make a report of 1) - 5) to the IFMIF Executive Subcommittee. This report presents a brief summary of the Target Technical, Meeting, Test Facilities Technical Meeting, Target/Test Facilities Interface Meeting, Accelerator Technical Meeting and the Technical Integration Meeting. (author)

  13. Magnetic fusion technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Fusion Technology describes the technologies that are required for successful development of nuclear fusion power plants using strong magnetic fields. These technologies include: ? magnet systems, ? plasma heating systems, ? control systems, ? energy conversion systems, ? advanced materials development, ? vacuum systems, ? cryogenic systems, ? plasma diagnostics, ? safety systems, and ? power plant design studies. Magnetic Fusion Technology will be useful to students and to specialists working in energy research.

  14. Multisensor Fusion for Intrusion Detection and Situational Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Hallstensen, Christoffer V

    2017-01-01

    Cybercrime damage costs the world several trillion dollars annually. And al-though technical solutions to protect organizations from hackers are being con-tinuously developed, criminals learn fast to circumvent them. The question is,therefore, how to create leverage to protect an organization by improving in-trusion detection and situational awareness? This thesis seeks to contribute tothe prior art in intrusion detection and situational awareness by using a multi-sensor data fusion...

  15. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M. (eds.)

    2011-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  16. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2010-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  17. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsholm, S B; Michelsen, P K; Rasmussen, J J; Westergaard, C M [eds.

    2010-04-15

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Minor activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2009. (Author)

  18. Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark. Annual progress report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsholm, S.B.; Michelsen, P.K.; Rasmussen, J.J.; Westergaard, C.M.

    2011-04-01

    The programme of the Research Unit of the Fusion Association Euratom - Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, covers work in fusion plasma physics and in fusion technology. The fusion plasma physics research focuses on turbulence and transport, and its interaction with the plasma equilibrium and particles. The effort includes both first principles based modelling, and experimental observations of turbulence and of fast ion dynamics by collective Thomson scattering. Within fusion technology there are activities related to development of high temperature superconductors. Other activities are system analysis, initiative to involve Danish industry in ITER contracts and public information. A summary is presented of the results obtained in the Research Unit during 2010. (Author)

  19. Five major controversial issues about fusion level selection in corrective surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon Sung; Hwang, Chang Ju; Lee, Dong-Ho; Cho, Jae Hwan

    2017-07-01

    treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis have been resolved by understanding its mechanism and via technical advancement, no definite guideline for fusion level selection has been established. A review of five major controversial issues about fusion level selection could provide better understanding of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. We believe that a thorough validation study of the abovementioned controversial issues can help address them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  1. Beryllium R and D for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Longhurst, G.R.; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Beryllium is one of the primary candidates as both plasma-facing material (PFM) and neutron multiplier in the next-step fusion reactors. Both sintered-product blocks and pebbles are considered in fusion reactor designs. Beryllium evaporated on carbon tiles has also been used in Joint European Torus (JET) and may be considered for other designs. Future efforts are directed toward the pebble form of beryllium. Research and evaluations of data are underway to determine the most attractive material processing approaches in terms of fabrication cost and quality; technical issues associated with heat transfer; thermal, mechanical and irradiation stability; safety and tritium release. Beryllium plasma-facing components will require periodic repair or replacement, therefore disposal or recycling of activated and tritiated beryllium will also be a concern. Beryllium as a component of the molten salt, Flibe is also being considered in novel approaches to the plasma-structure interface. This paper deals with the main issues related to the use of Be in a fusion reactor as both neutron multiplier and first wall material. These issues include potential reactions with steam during accidents and the health and environmental aspects of its use, reprocessing and reuse, or disposal

  2. Beryllium R and D for fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F. E-mail: francesco.scaffidi@iket.fzk.de; Longhurst, G.R.; Shestakov, V.; Kawamura, H

    2000-11-01

    Beryllium is one of the primary candidates as both plasma-facing material (PFM) and neutron multiplier in the next-step fusion reactors. Both sintered-product blocks and pebbles are considered in fusion reactor designs. Beryllium evaporated on carbon tiles has also been used in Joint European Torus (JET) and may be considered for other designs. Future efforts are directed toward the pebble form of beryllium. Research and evaluations of data are underway to determine the most attractive material processing approaches in terms of fabrication cost and quality; technical issues associated with heat transfer; thermal, mechanical and irradiation stability; safety and tritium release. Beryllium plasma-facing components will require periodic repair or replacement, therefore disposal or recycling of activated and tritiated beryllium will also be a concern. Beryllium as a component of the molten salt, Flibe is also being considered in novel approaches to the plasma-structure interface. This paper deals with the main issues related to the use of Be in a fusion reactor as both neutron multiplier and first wall material. These issues include potential reactions with steam during accidents and the health and environmental aspects of its use, reprocessing and reuse, or disposal.

  3. Fusion Canada issue 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue an economic impact study of the Canadian site for ITER, Harvey Skarsgard: fusion pioneer retires, NFP: Phillips and Holtslander exchange roles, Europe's fusion funding proposals and an update of CCFM/TdeV. 1 fig

  4. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending June 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    This is the twenty-second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Topics covered here are: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composites; ferritic/martensitic steels; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects mechanistic studies and experimental methods; dosimetry damage parameters; activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; irradiation facilities; test matrices; and experimental methods.

  5. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending June 30, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-08-01

    This is the twenty-second in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Topics covered here are: vanadium alloys; silicon carbide composites; ferritic/martensitic steels; austenitic stainless steels; insulating ceramics and optical materials; solid breeding materials; radiation effects mechanistic studies and experimental methods; dosimetry damage parameters; activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; irradiation facilities; test matrices; and experimental methods

  6. The IGNITEX fusion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, R.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses the recently proposed fusion ignition experiment, IGNITEX. He emphasizes the basic ideas of this concept rather than the specific details of the physics and engineering aspects of the experiment. This concept is a good example of the importance of maintaining an adequate balance between the basic scientific progress in fusion physics and the new technologies that are becoming available in order to make fusion work. The objective of the IGNITEX project is to produce and control ignited plasmas for scientific study in the simplest and least expensive way possible. Being able to study this not-yet-produced regime of plasma operation is essential to fusion research. Two years after the fission nuclear reaction was discovered, a non-self-sustained fission reaction was produced in a laboratory, and in one more year a self-sustained reaction was achieved at the University of Chicago. However, after almost forty years of fusion research, a self-sustained fusion reaction has yet not been produced in a laboratory experiment. This fact indicates the greater difficulty of the fusion experiment. Because of the difficulty involved in the production of a self-sustained fusion reaction, it is necessary to propose such an experiment with maximum ignition margins, maximum simplicity, and minimum financial risk

  7. Gene Fusion Markup Language: a prototype for exchanging gene fusion data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Shanmugam, Achiraman; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2012-10-16

    An avalanche of next generation sequencing (NGS) studies has generated an unprecedented amount of genomic structural variation data. These studies have also identified many novel gene fusion candidates with more detailed resolution than previously achieved. However, in the excitement and necessity of publishing the observations from this recently developed cutting-edge technology, no community standardization approach has arisen to organize and represent the data with the essential attributes in an interchangeable manner. As transcriptome studies have been widely used for gene fusion discoveries, the current non-standard mode of data representation could potentially impede data accessibility, critical analyses, and further discoveries in the near future. Here we propose a prototype, Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) as an initiative to provide a standard format for organizing and representing the significant features of gene fusion data. GFML will offer the advantage of representing the data in a machine-readable format to enable data exchange, automated analysis interpretation, and independent verification. As this database-independent exchange initiative evolves it will further facilitate the formation of related databases, repositories, and analysis tools. The GFML prototype is made available at http://code.google.com/p/gfml-prototype/. The Gene Fusion Markup Language (GFML) presented here could facilitate the development of a standard format for organizing, integrating and representing the significant features of gene fusion data in an inter-operable and query-able fashion that will enable biologically intuitive access to gene fusion findings and expedite functional characterization. A similar model is envisaged for other NGS data analyses.

  8. Annual report of Naka Fusion Research Establishment from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hidetoshi

    2003-11-01

    This annual report provides an overview of research and development (R and D) activities at Naka Fusion Research Establishment, including those performed in collaboration with other research establishments of JAERI, research institutes, and universities, during the period from 1 April, 2002 to 31 March, 2003. The activities in the Naka Fusion Research Establishment are highlighted by high performance plasma researches in JT-60 and JFT-2M, research and development of fusion reactor technologies towards ITER and fusion power demonstration plants, and activities in support of ITER design and construction. JT-60 program has continued to produce fruitful knowledge and understanding necessary to achieve reactor relevant performances of tokamak fusion devices. JFT-2M has made contributions in more basic areas of tokamak plasma research and development in pursuit of high performance plasma. The objectives of JT-60 research have been more shifted to physics R and Ds in support of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and establishment of physics basis for a steady state tokamak fusion reactor like SSTR as a fusion power demonstration plant. In JFT-2M, the advanced material tokamak experiment program has been carried out to test the low activation ferritic steel for development of the structural material for a fusion reactor. In the area of theories and analyses, significant progress has been made in understanding of the ITB, energy confinement scaling in ITB plasmas, MHD equilibrium in the current hole region, asymmetric feature of divertor plasmas and the divertor detachment. In addition, through the project of numerical experiment on tokamak, the mechanism of the ion temperature gradient mode was clarified by particle simulations. The physics of divertor plasma was also studied by particle simulations. R and Ds of fusion reactor technologies have been carried out both to further improve technologies necessary for ITER construction, and to accumulate

  9. Excimer laser development for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovanielli, D.

    1985-01-01

    The future utility of inertial confinement fusion requires a new driver. Successful experiments coupling laser energy to targets, and our understanding of fuel capsule behavior strongly suggest that a laboratory thermonuclear source is attainable and power production may be considered if a suitable driver with high efficiency, high repetition rate, and most importantly, low capital cost, can be identified. No adequate driver exists today; however, the krypton fluoride laser holds great promise. By the end of this decade, driver development can be brought to the point that a technically justifiable choice can be made for the future direction of ICF

  10. Studies on nuclear fusion energy potential based on a long-term world energy and environment model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimatsu, K.; Fujino, J.; Asaoka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigates introduction conditions and potential of nuclear fusion energy as energy supply and CO 2 mitigation technologies in the 21st century. Time horizon of the 21st century, 10 regionally allocated world energy/environment model (Linearized Dynamic New Earth 21) is used for this study. Following nuclear fusion technological data are taken into consideration: cost of electricity (COE) in nuclear fusion introduction year, annual COE reduction rates, regional introduction year, and maximum regional plant capacity constraints by maximum plant construction speed. We made simulation under a constraint of atmospheric CO 2 concentration of 550 parts per million by volume (ppmv) targeted at year 2100, assuming that sequestration technologies and unknown innovative technologies for CO 2 reduction are available. The results indicate that under the 550ppm scenario with nuclear fusion within maximum construction speed, 66mill/kWh is required for introducing nuclear fusion in 2050, 92 mill/kWh in 2060, and 106 mill/kWh in 2070. Therefore, tokamak type nuclear fusion reactors of present several reactor cost estimates are expected to be introduced between 2060 and 2070, and electricity generation fraction by nuclear fusion will go around 20% in 2100 if nuclear fusion energy growth is limited only by the maximum construction speed. CO 2 reduction by nuclear fusion introduced in 2050 from business-as-usual (BAU) scenario without nuclear fusion is about 20% of total reduction amount in 2100. In conclusion, nuclear fusion energy is revealed to be one of the candidates of energy supply technologies and CO 2 mitigation technologies. Cost competitiveness and removal of capacity constraint factors are desired for use of nuclear fusion energy in a large scale. (author)

  11. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This textbook covers the physics and technology upon which future fusion power reactors will be based. It reviews the history of fusion, reaction physics, plasma physics, heating, and confinement. Descriptions of commercial plants and design concepts are included. Topics covered include: fusion reactions and fuel resources; reaction rates; ignition, and confinement; basic plasma directory; Tokamak confinement physics; fusion technology; STARFIRE: A commercial Tokamak fusion power plant. MARS: A tandem-mirror fusion power plant; and other fusion reactor concepts

  12. Parametric and alternative studies for fusion experimental reactor (FER) (FY 1984)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Since 1980 the design study has been conducted at JAERI for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which has been proposed to be the next machine to JT-60 in the Japanese long term program of fusion reactor development. Starting from 1984 FER design is being reviewed and redesigned. This report is a part of the interim report which describes the results obtained in the review and redesign activities in FY 1984. This report includes the following parametric and alternative studies for the FER reference design: 1) parametric studies concerning with core plasma magnets, and operation scenario and power supply, 2) tritium breeding blanket, 3) the study for the steady state operation FER, 4) OTHERS. (AUTHOR)

  13. Clinical assessment of SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wen; Luan Zhaosheng; Peng Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Study the methodology of the SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion, and Assessment the Clinical application value. Method: 172 patients who underwent SPECT/CT image fusion during 2001-2003 were studied, 119 men, 53 women. 51 patients underwent 18FDG image +CT, 26 patients underwent 99m Tc-RBC Liver pool image +CT, 43 patients underwent 99mTc-MDP Bone image +CT, 18 patients underwent 99m Tc-MAA Lung perfusion image +CT. The machine is Millium VG SPECT of GE Company. All patients have been taken three steps image: X-ray survey, X-ray transmission and nuclear emission image (Including planer imaging, SPECT or 18 F-FDG of dual head camera) without changing the position of the patients. We reconstruct the emission image with X-ray map and do reconstruction, 18FDG with COSEM and 99mTc with OSEM. Then combine the transmission image and the reconstructed emission image. We use different process parameters in deferent image methods. The accurate rate of SPECT/CT image fusion were statistics, and compare their accurate with that of single nuclear emission image. Results: The nuclear image which have been reconstructed by X-ray attenuation and OSEM are apparent better than pre-reconstructed. The post-reconstructed emission images have no scatter lines around the organs. The outline between different issues is more clear than before. The validity of All post-reconstructed images is better than pre-reconstructed. SPECT/CT image fusion make localization have worthy bases. 138 patients, the accuracy of SPECT/CT image fusion is 91.3% (126/138), whereas 60(88.2%) were found through SPECT/CT image fusion, There are significant difference between them(P 99m Tc- RBC-SPECT +CT image fusion, but 21 of them were inspected by emission image. In BONE 99m Tc -MDP-SPECT +CT image fusion, 4 patients' removed bone(1-6 months after surgery) and their relay with normal bone had activity, their morphologic and density in CT were different from normal bones. 11 of 20 patients who could

  14. Experimental studies of tritium barrier concepts for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Renner, T.A.; Pelto, R.H.; Wierdak, C.J.

    1976-01-01

    Ongoing experimental studies at ANL aimed at the development of methods to reduce tritium migration in fusion reactor systems currently include (1) work on the development of multilayered metal composites and impurity-coated refractory metals as barriers to tritium permeation in elevated temperature (greater than 300 0 C) structures and (2) investigations of the kinetics of tritium trapping reactions in inert gas purge streams under conditions that emulate fusion reactor environments. Significant results obtained thus far are (1) demonstration of greater than 50-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of stainless steel structures by using stainless steel-clad composites containing an intermediate layer of a selected copper alloy and (2) verification that surface-oxide coatings lead to greater than 100-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of vanadium, but that severe oxygen penetration and embrittlement of the vanadium occur at temperatures in the range from 300 to 800 0 C and under conditions of extremely low oxygen potential. Other considerations pertaining to the large-scale use of metal composites in fusion reactors are discussed, and progress in efforts to demonstrate the fabricability of metal composites is reviewed. Also presented are results of studies of the efficiencies of (1) CuO and CuO--MnO 2 beds in converting HT to HTO and (2) magnesium metal beds in converting HTO to HT

  15. A sensitive HIV-1 envelope induced fusion assay identifies fusion enhancement of thrombin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, De-Chun; Zhong, Guo-Cai; Su, Ju-Xiang; Liu, Yan-Hong; Li, Yan; Wang, Jia-Ye; Hattori, Toshio; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Feng-Min

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the interaction between HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and target cell receptors, various cell-cell-fusion assays have been developed. In the present study, we established a novel fusion system. In this system, the expression of the sensitive reporter gene, firefly luciferase (FL) gene, in the target cells was used to evaluate cell fusion event. Simultaneously, constitutively expressed Renilla luciferase (RL) gene was used to monitor effector cell number and viability. FL gave a wider dynamic range than other known reporters and the introduction of RL made the assay accurate and reproducible. This system is especially beneficial for investigation of potential entry-influencing agents, for its power of ruling out the false inhibition or enhancement caused by the artificial cell-number variation. As a case study, we applied this fusion system to observe the effect of a serine protease, thrombin, on HIV Env-mediated cell-cell fusion and have found the fusion enhancement activity of thrombin over two R5-tropic HIV strains.

  16. Technical evaluation of major candidate blanket systems for fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, Tatsuzo; Seki, Masahiro; Minato, Akio

    1987-03-01

    The key functions required for tritium breeding blankets for a fusion power reactor are: (1) self-sufficient tritium breeding, (2) in-situ tritium recovery and low tritium inventory, (3) high temperature cooling giving a high efficiency of electricity generation and (4) thermo-mechanical reliability and simplified remote maintenance to obtain high plant availability. Blanket performance is substantially governed by materials selection. Major options of structure/breeder/coolant/neutron multiplier materials considered for the present design study are PCA/Li 2 O/H 2 O/Be, Mo-alloy/Li 2 O/He/Be, Mo-alloy/LiAlO 2 /He/Be, V-alloy/Li/Li/none, and Mo-alloy/Li/He/none. In addition, remote maintenance of blankets, tritium recovery system, heat transport and energy conversion have been investigated. In this report, technological problems and critical R and D issues for power reactor blanket development are identified and a comparison of major candidate blanket concepts is discussed in terms of the present materials data base, economic performance, prospects for future improvements, and engineering feasibility and difficulties based on the results obtained from individual design studies. (author)

  17. Clinical use of digital retrospective image fusion of CT, MRI, FDG-PET and SPECT - fields of indications and results; Klinischer Einsatz der digitalen retrospektiven Bildfusion von CT, MRT, FDG-PET und SPECT - Anwendungsgebiete und Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, A.J.; Niehues, S.M.; Amthauer, H.; Felix, R. [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Rohlfing, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Stanford Univ. (United States); Hosten, N. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ. Greifswald (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and the clinical benefits of retrospective digital image fusion (PET, SPECT, CT and MRI). Materials and methods: In a prospective study, a total of 273 image fusions were performed and evaluated. The underlying image acquisitions (CT, MRI, SPECT and PET) were performed in a way appropriate for the respective clinical question and anatomical region. Image fusion was executed with a software program developed during this study. The results of the image fusion procedure were evaluated in terms of technical feasibility, clinical objective, and therapeutic impact. Results: The most frequent combinations of modalities were CT/PET (n = 156) and MRI/PET (n = 59), followed by MRI/SPECT (n = 28), CT/SPECT (n = 22) and CT/MRI (n = 8). The clinical questions included following regions (more than one region per case possible): neurocranium (n = 42), neck (n = 13), lung and mediastinum (n = 24), abdomen (n = 181), and pelvis (n = 65). In 92.6% of all cases (n = 253), image fusion was technically successful. Image fusion was able to improve sensitivity and specificity of the single modality, or to add important diagnostic information. Image fusion was problematic in cases of different body positions between the two imaging modalities or different positions of mobile organs. In 37.9% of the cases, image fusion added clinically relevant information compared to the single modality. Conclusion: For clinical questions concerning liver, pancreas, rectum, neck, or neurocranium, image fusion is a reliable method suitable for routine clinical application. Organ motion still limits its feasibility and routine use in other areas (e.g., thorax). (orig.)

  18. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section

  19. Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

  20. Microwave reflectometry for fusion plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document contains a collection of 26 papers on ''Microwave Reflectometry for Fusion Plasma Diagnostics'', presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting of the same name held at the JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon, United Kingdom, March 4-6, 1992. It contains five papers on the measurement of plasma density profiles, six papers on theory and simulations in support of the development and application of this type of plasma diagnostics, eight papers on the measurement of density transients and fluctuations, and seven on new approaches to reflectometry-based plasma diagnostics. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. Kessel, et. al.

    2012-02-23

    With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

  2. System study methodology development and potential utilization for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djerassi, H.; Rouillard, J.; Leger, D.; Sarto, S.; Zappellini, G.; Gambi, G.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this new methodology is to combine systemics with heuristics for engineering applications. The system method considers as a whole a set of dynamically interacting elements, organized for tasks. Heuristics tries to describe the rules to apply in scientific research. This methodology is a powerful tool for evaluating the options, compared with conventional analytical methods as a higher number of parameters can be taken into account, with a higher quality standard while comparing the possible options. The system method takes into account interacting data or random relationships by means of simulation modelling. Thus, a dynamical approach can be deduced and a sensitivity analysis can be performed for a very high number of options and basic data. This method can be limited to a specific objective such as a fusion reactor safety analysis, taking into account other major constraints such as the economical environment. The sophisticated architecture of a fusion reactor includes a large number of interacting systems. The new character of the fusion domain and the wide spectrum of the possible options strongly increase the advantages of a system study as a complete safety analysis can be defined before starting with the design. (orig.)

  3. Fusion of magnetic resonance angiography and magnetic resonance imaging for surgical planning for meningioma. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashimura, Hiroshi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Arai, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    A fusion technique for magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and MR imaging was developed to help assess the peritumoral angioarchitecture during surgical planning for meningioma. Three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D-TOF) and 3D-spoiled gradient recalled (SPGR) datasets were obtained from 10 patients with intracranial meningioma, and fused using newly developed volume registration and visualization software. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images from 3D-TOF MR angiography and axial SPGR MR imaging were displayed at the same time on the monitor. Selecting a vessel on the real-time MIP image indicated the corresponding points on the axial image automatically. Fusion images showed displacement of the anterior cerebral or middle cerebral artery in 7 patients and encasement of the anterior cerebral arteries in I patient, with no relationship between the main arterial trunk and tumor in 2 patients. Fusion of MR angiography and MR imaging can clarify relationships between the intracranial vasculature and meningioma, and may be helpful for surgical planning for meningioma. (author)

  4. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending June 30, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burn, G. [ed.] [comp.

    1998-09-01

    This is the twenty-fourth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending June 30, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, G.

    1998-09-01

    This is the twenty-fourth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the US Department of Energy. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  6. Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

    1999-04-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

  7. FRESCO, a simplified code for cost analysis of fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustreo, C.; Casini, G.; Zollino, G.; Bolzonella, T.; Piovan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • FRESCO is a code for rapid evaluation of the cost of electricity of a fusion power plant. • Parameters of the basic machine and unitary costs of components derived from ITER. • Power production components and plant power balance are extrapolated from PPCS. • A special effort is made in the investigation of the pulsed operation scenarios. • Technical and economical FRESCO results are compared with those of two PPCS models. -- Abstract: FRESCO (Fusion REactor Simplified COsts) is a code based on simplified models of physics, engineering and economical aspects of a TOKAMAK-like pulsed or steady-state fusion power plant. The experience coming from various aspects of ITER design, including selection of materials and operating scenarios, is exploited as much as possible. Energy production and plant power balance, including the recirculation requirements, are derived from two models of the PPCS European study, the helium cooled lithium/lead blanket model reactor (model AB) and the helium cooled ceramic one (model B). A detailed study of the availability of the power plant due, among others, to the replacement of plasma facing components, is also included in the code. The economics of the fusion power plant is evaluated through the levelized cost approach. Costs of the basic components are scaled from the corresponding values of the ITER project, the ARIES studies and SCAN model. The costs of plant auxiliaries, including those of the magnetic and electric systems, tritium plants, instrumentation, buildings and thermal energy storage if any, are recovered from ITER values and from those of other power plants. Finally, the PPCS models AB and B are simulated and the main results are reported in this paper

  8. Added Value of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound on Biopsies of Focal Hepatic Lesions Invisible on Fusion Imaging Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Mimi; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Ha, Sang Yun

    2017-01-01

    To assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid can improve the lesion conspicuity and feasibility of percutaneous biopsies for focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision making. The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 711 US-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed for focal hepatic lesions. Biopsies were performed using CEUS for guidance if lesions were invisible on fusion imaging. We retrospectively evaluated the number of target lesions initially invisible on fusion imaging that became visible after applying CEUS, using a 4-point scale. Technical success rates of biopsies were evaluated based on histopathological results. In addition, the occurrence of changes in clinical decision making was assessed. Among 711 patients, 16 patients (2.3%) were included in the study. The median size of target lesions was 1.1 cm (range, 0.5-1.9 cm) in pre-procedural imaging. After CEUS, 15 of 16 (93.8%) focal hepatic lesions were visualized. The conspicuity score was significantly increased after adding CEUS, as compared to that on fusion imaging (p making for 11 of 16 patients (68.8%). The addition of CEUS could improve the conspicuity of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging. This dual guidance using CEUS and fusion imaging may affect patient management via changes in clinical decision-making.

  9. Laser fusion systems design study. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    This study investigated: (1) the formulation and evaluation of an alignment system to accomplish pointing, focusing, centering and translation for the 20-arm SHIVA laser, (2) the formulation and evaluation of concepts for the correction of static phase distortions introduced by the accumulated optical elements in the laser chains, (3) the formulation and evaluation of concepts for the correction of optical path length differences between the arms of the SHIVA system, and (4) the conceptual design of appropriate control system hardware. (U.S.)

  10. Evaluation of the fusion technology and safety programme of the Joint Research Centre (1980-85)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.; Cabibbo, N.; Crocker, J.G.; Lecomte, M.; Merz, E.

    1986-01-01

    The Joint Research Centre, Ispra, has been involved in fusion research since 1973. In July 1985 the Commission of European Communities - DG XII, following a policy of systematically evaluating its RandD activities, appointed a panel of external experts to evaluate the fusion technology and safety programme carried out at the Joint Research Centre. This report describes the work of the panel in evaluating the research performed by the JRC within the framework of its 1984-87 programme. The achievements of the previous programme, 1980-83, were also taken into consideration. The different research areas covered in the programme, i.e.: reactor studies, breeding blanket technology, structural materials studies, risk assessment and tritium laboratory studies, are described and a draft proposal for the period 1987-90 presented. The evaluation panel has been asked to assess the following aspects: the scientific and technical achievements of the programme, the contribution of the programme to the development of other Community policies, the role played by the JRC in the European fusion research (including NET) and in international collaborations such as INTOR. From its assessment the evaluation panel has made a series of recommendations for the current programme and for future work

  11. Tritium system design studies of fusion experimental breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Baiquan; Huang Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    A summary of the tritium system design studies for the engineering outline design of a fusion experimental breeder (FEB-E) is presented. This paper is divided into three sections. In first section, the geometry, loading features and tritium concentrations in liquid lithium of tritium breeding zones of blanket are described. The tritium flow chart corresponding to the tritium fuel cycle system has been constructed, and the inventories in ten subsystems are calculated using SWITRIM code in section 2. Results show that the necessary initial tritium storage to start up FEB-E with fusion power of 143 MW is about 319 g. In final section, the tritium leakage issues under different operation circumstances have been analyzed. It was found that the potential danger of tritium leakage could be resulted from the exhausted gas of the diverter system. It is important to elevate the tritium burnup fraction and reduce the tritium throughput. (authors)

  12. [Image fusion in medical radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, C

    1996-07-20

    Image fusion supports the correlation between images of two or more studies of the same organ. First, the effect of differing geometries during image acquisitions, such as a head tilt, is compensated for. As a consequence, congruent images can easily be obtained. Instead of merely putting them side by side in a static manner and burdening the radiologist with the whole correlation task, image fusion supports him with interactive visualization techniques. This is especially worthwhile for small lesions as they can be more precisely located. Image fusion is feasible today. Easy and robust techniques are readily available, and furthermore DICOM, a rapidly evolving data exchange standard, diminishes the once severe compatibility problems for image data originating from systems of different manufacturers. However, the current solutions for image fusion are not yet established enough for a high throughput of fusion studies. Thus, for the time being image fusion is most appropriately confined to clinical research studies.

  13. Collective dynamics of nuclear fusion: deformation changes and heating during the fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, I.N.; Mikhailova, T.I.; Toro, M. di; Baran, V.; Briancon, C.

    1996-01-01

    The formalism developed elsewhere for the theoretical description of the dynamics involved in the heavy nucleus fusion is applied in this paper to study the history of the fusion of two identical heavy nuclei experiencing central collision. The evolution of the shape and of the temperature of symmetrical fusing systems is studied. The role of the elastoplasticity of nuclear matter in the nonmonotonical changes of the shape is elucidated in this way. A tentative explanation of the ''extra push'' phenomenon is given in terms of the competition between elastic properties of fusing systems driving to the re-separation of colliding nuclei and the dissipative (plastic) properties of nuclear matter transforming the energy of collective motion into the energy of statistical excitation and thus leading to the fusion. The fingerprints of the heavy-nucleus fusion history as it is depicted by the model are traced in the anisotropy of the dipole and quadrupole γ-radiation emitted during the fusion. The parallels in the description of the fusion dynamics given by the simple model used in this paper and by the more fundamental approaches based on the kinetic equation are emphasised. (orig.)

  14. Report on research and development work 1985 on the nuclear fusion project. Annual report of the Association KfK-Euratom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe and the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics together form the Nuclear Fusion Development Association. The partners collaborate with the aim of creating the physical and technical preconditions for the use of the energy released by nuclear fusion and to plan and carry out future large-scale experiments. The work of the Nuclear Research Centre Karlsruhe on fusion with magnetic containment is included in the nuclear fusion project and is part of the European fusion technology programme. The work is supported by an association contract between KfK and Euratom by the European Commission. Connections are built up between areas of work and new projects are prepared by supplementary KfK contributions, mostly studies. This is done with regard to the expansion of the technology programme to be expected for future years and the planning activities for NET. The reports collected here are contributions of the KfK institutes in 1985. The appendix contains a list of the tasks which KfK has taken over from the fusion technology programme of the EEC. References to the institutes' contributions make the assignment of textual contributions easier. (orig.) [de

  15. Damage analysis and fundamental studies program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, D.G.; Farrar, H. IV; Goland, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    The Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) Task Group has been formed by the Office of Fusion Energy to develop procedures for applying data obtained in various irradiation test facilities to projected fusion environments. A long-range program plan has been prepared and implementation has begun. The plan and technical status are briefly described

  16. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  17. Development of an engineering-scale nuclear test of a solid-breeder fusion-blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Bohn, T.S.; Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Scott, A.J.; Watts, K.D.; Welch, E.C.

    1983-08-01

    As part of the Phase I effort on Program Element-II (PE-II) of the Office of Fusion Energy/Argonne National Laboratory First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program, a study has been performed to develop preconceptual hardware designs and preliminary test program descriptions for two fission-reactor-based tests of a water-cooled, solid-breeder fusion reactor blanket concept. First, a list of potentially acceptable reactor facilities is developed, based on a list of required reactor characteristics. From this set of facilities, two facilities are selected for study: the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the Power Burst Facility (PBF). A test which employs a cylindrical unit cell of a solid-breeder fusion reactor blanket, with pressurized-water cooling is designed for each facility. The test design is adjusted to the particular characteristics of each reactor. These two test designs are then compared on the basis of technical issues and cost. Both tests can satisfy the PE-II mission: blanket thermal hydraulic and thermomechanical issues. In addition, both reactors will produce prototypical tritium production rates and profiles and release characteristics with little or no additional modifications

  18. Fusion Canada issue 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the ITER agreement signed with the EDA, the robotic maintenance for NET, the CFFTP Fusion Pilot Study, the new IEA joint programs on environment, safety and economic aspects of fusion power, and a review by the CCFM advisory committee. 3 figs.

  19. Fusion Canada issue 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on the ITER agreement signed with the EDA, the robotic maintenance for NET, the CFFTP Fusion Pilot Study, the new IEA joint programs on environment, safety and economic aspects of fusion power, and a review by the CCFM advisory committee. 3 figs

  20. Case Study: Organotypic human in vitro models of embryonic morphogenetic fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphogenetic fusion of tissues is a common event in embryonic development and disruption of fusion is associated with birth defects of the eye, heart, neural tube, phallus, palate, and other organ systems. Embryonic tissue fusion requires precise regulation of cell-cell and cell...

  1. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures ar...... a barrier to fusion changing from 15 k(B)T at T = 26 degrees C to 10k(H) T at T = 35 degrees C. These results are compatible with the theoretical predictions using the stalk model of vesicle fusion....

  2. Alternate fusion -- continuous inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.; Turner, L.; Nebel, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors argue that alternate approaches to large tokamak confinement are appropriate for fusion applications if: (1) They do not require magnetic confinement of a much higher quality than demonstrated in tokamaks; (2) Their physics basis may be succinctly stated and experimentally tested; (3) They offer near-term applications to important technical problems; and (4) Their cost to proof-of-principle is low enough to be consistent with current budget realities. An approach satisfying all of these criteria is presented. Fusion systems based on continuous inertial confinement are described. In these approaches, the inertia of a nonequilibrium plasma is used to produce local concentrations of plasma density in space and/or time. One implementation (inertial electrostatic confinement) which has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically uses a system of electrostatic grids to accelerate plasma ions toward a spherical focus. This system produced a steady 2 x 10 10 D-T neutrons/second with an overall fusion gain of 10 -5 in a sphere of about 9 cm radius. Recent theoretical developments show how to raise the fusion gain to order unity or greater by replacing the internal grids by a combination of applied magnetic and electrostatic fields. In these approaches, useful thermonuclear conditions may be produced in a system as small as a few mm radius. Confinement is that of a nonneutralized plasma. A pure electron plasma with a radial beam velocity distribution is absolutely confined by an applied Penning trap field. Spherical convergence of the confined electrons forms a deep virtual cathode near r = 0, in which thermonuclear ions are absolutely confined at useful densities. The authors have examined the equilibrium, stability, and classical relaxation of such systems, and obtained many positive physics results. Equilibria exist for both pure electron and partially charge-neutralized systems with arbitrarily high core-plasma densities

  3. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The main purpose of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to develop an experimental fusion reactor through the united efforts of many technologically advanced countries. The ITER terms of reference, issued jointly by the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States, call for an integrated international design activity and constitute the basis of current activities. Joint work on ITER is carried out under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), according to the terms of quadripartite agreement reached between the European Community, Japan, the USSR, and the United States. The site for joint technical work sessions is at the MaxPlanck Institute of Plasma Physics. Garching, Federal Republic of Germany. The ITER activities have two phases: a definition phase performed in 1988 and the present design phase (1989--1990). During the definition phase, a set of ITER technical characteristics and supporting research and development (R ampersand D) activities were developed and reported. The present conceptual design phase of ITER lasts until the end of 1990. The objectives of this phase are to develop the design of ITER, perform a safety and environmental analysis, develop site requirements, define future R ampersand D needs, and estimate cost, manpower, and schedule for construction and operation. A final report will be submitted at the end of 1990. This paper summarizes progress in the ITER program during the 1989 design phase

  4. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending December 31, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burn, G.

    2000-03-01

    This is the twenty-seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components.

  5. Fusion materials semiannual progress report for period ending December 31, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn, G.

    2000-01-01

    This is the twenty-seventh in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components

  6. Annual report of the Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (Fusin Working Group (FWG))

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The Summit Members' Working Group on Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion [Fusion Working Group (FWG)] was established in 1983 in response to the Declaration of the Heads of State and Government at the Versailles Economic Summit meeting of 1982, and in response to the subsequent report of the Working Group in Technology, Growth and Employment (TGE) as endorsed at the Williamsburg Summit meeting, 1983. This document contains the complete written record of each of the three FWG meetings which include the minutes, lists of attendees, agendas, statements, and summary conclusions as well as the full reports of the Technical Working Party. In addition, there is a pertinent exchange of correspondence between FWG members on the role of the Technical Working Party and a requested background paper on the modalities associated with a possible future ETR project

  7. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    We have carried out conceptual design studies of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fission fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid based on standard mirror confinement, and also a small pilot plant hybrid. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000 MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single cell pilot plant

  8. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  9. Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D ampersand D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D ampersand D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D ampersand D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates

  10. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1986-05-01

    In 1982, KfK joined the fusion programme of EURATOM as a further association introducing its experience in nuclear technology. KfK closely cooperates with IPP Garching, the two institutions forming a research unit aiming at planning and realization of future development steps of fusion. KfK has combined its forces in the Nuclear Fusion Project (PKF) with participation of several KfK departments to the project tasks. Previous work of KfK in magnetic fusion has addressed mainly superconducting magnets, plasma heating by cluster ions and studies on structural materials. At present, emphasis of our work has concentrated increasingly on the nuclear part, i.e. the first wall and blanket structures and the elements of the tritium extraction and purification system. Associated to this component development are studies of remote maintenance and safety. Most of the actual work addresses NET, the next step to a demonstration of fusion feasibility. NET is supposed to follow JET, the operating plasma physics experiment of Euratom, on the 1990's. Detailed progress of the work in the past half year is described in this report. (orig./GG)

  11. International fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy of the light elements deuterium and lithium can be released if the 100 MK degree temperature required for deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fusion reactions can be achieved together with sufficient thermal insulation for a net energy yield. Progress of world-wide research shows good prospect for these physical conditions being achieved by the use of magnetic field confinement and of rapidly developing heating methods. Tokamak systems, alternative magnetic systems and inertial confinement progress are described. International co-operation features a number of bilateral agreements between countries: the Euratom collaboration which includes the Joint European Torus, a joint undertaking of eleven Western European nations of Euratom, established to build and operate a major confinement experiment; the development of co-operative projects within the OECD/IEA framework; the INTOR workshop, a world-wide study under IAEA auspices of the next major step in fusion research which might be built co-operatively; and assessments of the potential of nuclear fusion by the IAEA and the International Fusion Research Council. The INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) studies have outlined a major plant of the tokamak type to study the engineering and technology of fusion reactor systems, which might be constructed on a world-wide basis to tackle and share the investment risks of the developments which lie ahead. This paper summarizes the recent progress of research on controlled nuclear fusion, featuring those areas where international co-operation has played an important part, and describes the various arrangements by which this international co-operation is facilitated. (author)

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee Meeting, Innovative approaches to fusion energy, Pleasanton, CA, October 20-23, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    The Purpose of this Meeting is to provide a forum for discussion of approaches to fusion other than conventional tokamaks and stellarators, such as: (1) quasi-steady-state systems (mirrors, RFP's, spheromaks, FRC'S, spherical tori,...); (2) short-pulsed systems (liners, Z-pinch variants, plasma foci, novel ICF, ...); and (3) fusion technology innovations

  13. Study of charged fusion products in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblum, M.

    1981-07-01

    Charged reaction products play a central role in inertial confinement fusion. The investigation of the various processes these particles undergo in laser produced plasmas, their influence on the dynamics of the fusion and their utilization as a diagnostic tool are the main subjects of this thesis. (author)

  14. InterScience and fusion: Projects, collaborations, and spin-offs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castracane, J.

    1995-01-01

    InterScience, Inc. is a small, high technology research and development company which participates in the mission of the fusion energy research program in a variety of ways. The company specializes in basic physics and advanced technologies applied to research and commercial opportunities. InterScience has numerous federal and private sponsors for research and development activities in plasma physics, electro-optics, materials science, electronics, and biomedical engineering. The company currently has several direct research and development projects which involve the assembly of diagnostic hardware for installation and operation at tokamak facilities both in the U.S. and abroad. In addition, the company works in a technical support capacity for both the magnetic and inertial confinement fusion programs. Successful participation in the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program has provided an avenue for the transfer of expertise from the fusion program to alternate agencies and research areas. Examples of this include fiberoptic sensors with data acquisition systems, advanced spectral imaging and image processing, fiberoptic imaging interferometry for biomedical instrumentation development and, micro-electro-mechanical systems

  15. A pharmacological study of Arabidopsis cell fusion between the persistent synergid and endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Kazuki; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Berger, Frédéric; Kinoshita, Tetsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Daisuke

    2018-01-29

    Cell fusion is a pivotal process in fertilization and multinucleate cell formation. A plant cell is ubiquitously surrounded by a hard cell wall, and very few cell fusions have been observed except for gamete fusions. We recently reported that the fertilized central cell (the endosperm) absorbs the persistent synergid, a highly differentiated cell necessary for pollen tube attraction. The synergid-endosperm fusion (SE fusion) appears to eliminate the persistent synergid from fertilized ovule in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we analyzed the effects of various inhibitors on SE fusion in an in vitro culture system. Different from other cell fusions, neither disruption of actin polymerization nor protein secretion impaired SE fusion. However, transcriptional and translational inhibitors decreased the SE fusion success rate and also inhibited endosperm division. Failures of SE fusion and endosperm nuclear proliferation were also induced by roscovitine, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). These data indicate unique aspects of SE fusion such as independence of filamentous actin support and the importance of CDK-mediated mitotic control. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Muon nuclear fusion and low temperature nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Kanetada

    1990-01-01

    Low temperature (or normal temperature) nuclear fusion is one of the phenomena causing nuclear fusion without requiring high temperature. In thermal nuclear fusion, the Coulomb barrier is overcome with the help of thermal energy, but in the low temperature nuclear fusion, the Coulomb barrier is neutralized by the introduction of the particles having larger mass than electrons and negative charges, at this time, if two nuclei can approach to the distance of 10 -13 cm in the neutral state, the occurrence of nuclear fusion reaction is expected. As the mass of the particles is heavier, the neutral region is smaller, and nuclear fusion is easy to occur. The particles to meet this purpose are the electrons within substances and muons. The research on muon nuclear fusion became suddenly active in the latter half of 1970s, the cause of which was the discovery of the fact that the formation of muons occurs resonantly rapidly in D-T and D-D systems. Muons are the unstable elementary particles having the life of 2.2 μs, and they can have positive and negative charges. In the muon catalyzed fusion, the muons with negative charge take part. The principle of the muon catalyzed fusion, its present status and future perspective, and the present status of low temperature nuclear fusion are reported. (K.I.)

  17. Combined development of international nuclear fusion test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Ambassadors of the four most important partners (Common Market, Japan, USA and USSR) in the IAEA sponsored INTOR project, met on the 15 and 16 March 1987 in Vienna under the auspices of the IAEA. A press release was issued acknowledging the considerable technical progress made in magnetic nuclear fusion research. Future design concepts, assistance in research and development work and other activities towards the provision of an international experimental thermonuclear reactor were discussed. (G.T.H.)

  18. Directions for improved fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Delene, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Conceptual fusion reactor studies over the past 10 to 15 years have projected systems that may be too large, complex, and costly to be of commercial interest. One main direction for improved fusion reactors points towards smaller, higher-power-density approaches. First-order economic issues (i.e., unit direct cost and cost of electricity) are used to support the need for more compact fusion reactors. A generic fusion physics/engineering/costing model is used to provide a quantiative basis for these arguments for specific fusion concepts

  19. Frontiers in fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Frontiers in Fusion Research provides a systematic overview of the latest physical principles of fusion and plasma confinement. It is primarily devoted to the principle of magnetic plasma confinement, that has been systematized through 50 years of fusion research. Frontiers in Fusion Research begins with an introduction to the study of plasma, discussing the astronomical birth of hydrogen energy and the beginnings of human attempts to harness the Sun's energy for use on Earth. It moves on to chapters that cover a variety of topics such as: * charged particle motion, * plasma kinetic theory, *

  20. Nuclear fusion: technology development and achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ana, G.; Brad, S.; Lazar, A.; Spiridon, I.; Vijulie, M.

    2009-01-01

    The strategy for reducing the enhanced greenhouse effect, affecting our planet and the increasing energy demand caused by global growth of population, as well, is, certainly, that of adopting, all the three long-term carbon-free options for energy: renewable sources, fission and fusion reactions. All of them should be further explored and developed for the welfare of future generations, thus leaving them the option of a clean and green energy. From all those available options, the fusion is viewed as an energy source that would be effective in solving future demands, referring to the amount of the energy that can be produced taking into account spent fuel to obtain it. The slow (but steady) progress of fusion development linked with the need for large and expensive experimental devices is remarkable; all available technical and scientific information from experiment shows that progress is being made towards a successful reactor (ITER). The desired objective of this intensive research is obtaining of an industrial reactor able to cover energy future requirements. For the construction of this desired reactor, special designs systems are required. The TRF (TRITIUM RECOVERY FACILITY) is one of the installations that have a major importance maintaining an efficient fuel cycle of the reactor in proper function stage. A test model of TRF for implementation in reactor systems, proposed and developed at ICIT Ramnicu Valcea is presented. (authors)