WorldWideScience

Sample records for fusion protein targeting

  1. Human MAP Tau Based Targeted Cytolytic Fusion Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusiji A. Akinrinmade

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most promising small molecule toxins used to generate antibody drug conjugates (ADCs include anti-mitotic agents (e.g., auristatin and its derivatives which are designed to attack cancerous cells at their most vulnerable state during mitosis. We were interested in identifying a human cystostatic protein eventually showing comparable activities and allowing the generation of corresponding targeted fully human cytolytic fusion proteins. Recently, we identified the human microtubule associated protein tau (MAP tau, which binds specifically to tubulin and modulates the stability of microtubules, thereby blocking mitosis and presumably vesicular transport. By binding and stabilizing polymerized microtubule filaments, MAP tau-based fusion proteins skew microtubule dynamics towards cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. This biological activity makes rapidly proliferating cells (e.g., cancer and inflammatory cells an excellent target for MAP tau-based targeted treatments. Their superior selectivity for proliferating cells confers additional selectivity towards upregulated tumor-associated antigens at their surface, thereby preventing off-target related toxicity against normal cells bearing tumor-associated antigens at physiologically normal to low levels. In this review, we highlight recent findings on MAP tau-based targeted cytolytic fusion proteins reported in preclinical immunotherapeutic studies.

  2. Protein knockouts in living eukaryotes using deGradFP and green fluorescent protein fusion targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caussinus, Emmanuel; Kanca, Oguz; Affolter, Markus

    2013-09-24

    This unit describes deGradFP (degrade Green Fluorescent Protein), an easy-to-implement protein knockout method applicable in any eukaryotic genetic system. Depleting a protein in order to study its function in a living organism is usually achieved at the gene level (genetic mutations) or at the RNA level (RNA interference and morpholinos). However, any system that acts upstream of the proteic level depends on the turnover rate of the existing target protein, which can be extremely slow. In contrast, deGradFP is a fast method that directly depletes GFP fusion proteins. In particular, deGradFP is able to counteract maternal effects in embryos and causes early and fast onset loss-of-function phenotypes of maternally contributed proteins. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Targeted Delivery of siRNA into Breast Cancer Cells via Phage Fusion Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Bedi, Deepa; Gillespie, James W; Petrenko, Vasily A.; Ebner, Andreas; Leitner, Michael; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids including antisense oligonucleotides, small interfering RNA (siRNA), aptamers and rybozymes, emerged as versatile therapeutics due to their ability to interfere in a well-planned manner with the flow of genetic information from DNA to protein. However, a systemic use of NAs is hindered by their instability in physiological liquids and inability of intracellular accumulation in the site of action. We first evaluated the potential of cancer specific phage fusion proteins as target...

  4. Targeted delivery of siRNA into breast cancer cells via phage fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Deepa; Gillespie, James W; Petrenko, Vasily A; Ebner, Andreas; Leitner, Michael; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Petrenko, Valery A

    2013-02-04

    Nucleic acids, including antisense oligonucleotides, small interfering RNA (siRNA), aptamers, and rybozymes, emerged as versatile therapeutics due to their ability to interfere in a well-planned manner with the flow of genetic information from DNA to protein. However, a systemic use of NAs is hindered by their instability in physiological liquids and inability of intracellular accumulation in the site of action. We first evaluated the potential of cancer specific phage fusion proteins as targeting ligands that provide encapsulation, protection, and navigation of siRNA to the target cell. The tumor-specific proteins were isolated from phages that were affinity selected from a landscape phage library against target breast cancer cells. It was found that fusion phage coat protein fpVIII displaying cancer-targeting peptides can effectively encapsulate siRNAs and deliver them into the cells leading to specific silencing of the model gene GAPDH. Complexes of siRNA and phage protein form nanoparticles (nanophages), which were characterized by atomic force microscopy and ELISA, and their stability was demonstrated by resistance of encapsulated siRNA to degradation by serum nucleases. The phage protein/siRNA complexes can make a new type of highly selective, stable, active, and physiologically acceptable cancer nanomedicine.

  5. Recombinant chymosin used for exact and complete removal of a prochymosin derived fusion tag releasing intact native target protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Lamberth, Kasper; Nielsen, Lise-Lotte B

    2009-01-01

    Fusion tags add desirable properties to recombinant proteins, but they are not necessarily acceptable in the final products. Ideally, fusion tags should be removed releasing the intact native protein with no trace of the tag. Unique endoproteinases with the ability to cleave outside their own...... recognition sequence can potentially cleave at the boundary of any native protein. Chymosin was recently shown to cleave a pro-chymosin derived fusion tag releasing native target proteins. In our hands, however, not all proteins are chymosin-resistant under the acidic cleavage conditions (pH 4.5) used...... in this system. Here, we have modified the pro-chymosin fusion tag and demonstrated that chymosin can remove this tag at more neutral pH (pH 6.2); conditions, that are less prone to compromise the integrity of target proteins. Chymosin was successfully used to produce intact native target protein both...

  6. Engineering, expression, and renaturation of a collagen-targeted human bFGF fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrades, J A; Wu, L T; Hall, F L; Nimni, M E; Becerra, J

    2001-01-01

    that biologically active rhbFGF fusion proteins can be recovered from transformed bacteria by oxidative refolding; thus, providing a means for its high-yield production, purification, and renaturation from microorganisms. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the auxiliary collagen-binding domain effectively targets the recombinant growth factor to type I collagen. The clinical effect of rhbFGF-F2 on wound healing is also studied in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and evaluated by histological examination comparing with rhbFGF-F1 and commercial bFGF effects. The highly beneficial effects of rhbFGF-F2 on wound healing is suggested to be due to its extremely potent angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation activities, leading to a rapid reepithelialization of the wound. Topical application of rhbFGF-F2 mixed with type I collagen is a more effective method in accelerating closure of full-thickness excisional skin-wound in diabetic rats when compared with the fusion protein alone or commercial hbFGF at the same doses. These studies advance the technology necessary to generate large quantities of targeted bFGF fusion proteins as well as to develop new strategies for specific biomedical applications.

  7. 5-Fluorocytosine combined with Fcy–hEGF fusion protein targets EGFR-expressing cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Keng-Hsueh; Shih, Yi-Sheng; Chang, Cheng Allen; Yen, Sang-Hue; Lan, Keng-Li

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► EGFR-expressing epithelial cancers account for significant portion of cancer deaths. ► EGF–EGFR signaling pathway is validated as an important anticancer drug target. ► EGF and Fcy fusion protein (Fcy–hEGF) can bind to EGFR and convert 5-FC to 5-FU. ► Fcy–hEGF combined with 5-FC preferentially inhibits EGFR-expressing cells viability. -- Abstract: Human epithelial cancers account for approximately 50% of all cancer deaths. This type of cancer is characterized by excessive activation and expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The EGFR pathway is critical for cancer cell proliferation, survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. The EGF–EGFR signaling pathway has been validated as an important anticancer drug target. Increasing numbers of targeted therapies against this pathway have been either approved or are currently under development. Here, we adopted a prodrug system that uses 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and human EGF (hEGF) fused with yeast cytosine deaminase (Fcy) to target EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells and to convert 5-FC to a significantly more toxic chemotherapeutic, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We cloned and purified the Fcy–hEGF fusion protein from Pichia pastoris yeast. This fusion protein specifically binds to EGFR with a similar affinity as hEGF, approximately 10 nM. Fcy–hEGF binds tightly to A431 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which overexpress EGFR, but it binds with a lower affinity to MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, which express lower levels of EGFR. Similarly, the viability of EGFR-expressing cells was suppressed by Fcy–hEGF in the presence of increasing concentrations of 5-FC, and the IC 50 values for A431 and MDA-MB-468 were approximately 10-fold lower than those of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. This novel prodrug system, Fcy–hEGF/5-FC, might represent a promising addition to the available class of inhibitors that specifically target EGFR-expressing cancers.

  8. Purification method for recombinant proteins based on a fusion between the target protein and the C-terminus of calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) was used as an affinity tail to facilitate the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a model target protein. The protein GFP was fused to the C-terminus of CaM, and a factor Xa cleavage site was introduced between the two proteins. A CaM-GFP fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and purified on a phenothiazine-derivatized silica column. CaM binds to the phenothiazine on the column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion and it was, therefore, used as an affinity tail for the purification of GFP. The fusion protein bound to the affinity column was then subjected to a proteolytic digestion with factor Xa. Pure GFP was eluted with a Ca(2+)-containing buffer, while CaM was eluted later with a buffer containing the Ca(2+)-chelating agent EGTA. The purity of the isolated GFP was verified by SDS-PAGE, and the fluorescence properties of the purified GFP were characterized.

  9. Construction of dystrophin fusion proteins to raise targeted antibodies to different epitopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginjaar, H. B.; van Paassen, H. B.; den Dunnen, J. T.; Man, N. T.; Morris, G. E.; Moorman, A. F.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    For the study of the structure and function relationship of dystrophin, defective in DMD, and for diagnostic purposes it is important to dispose of antibodies against different parts of the protein. We have made five different constructs for the expression of fusion proteins containing parts of the

  10. IGF1 is a common target gene of Ewing's sarcoma fusion proteins in mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Cironi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The EWS-FLI-1 fusion protein is associated with 85-90% of Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFT, the remaining 10-15% of cases expressing chimeric genes encoding EWS or FUS fused to one of several ets transcription factor family members, including ERG-1, FEV, ETV1 and ETV6. ESFT are dependent on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 for growth and survival and recent evidence suggests that mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells constitute a candidate ESFT origin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the functional relatedness between ESFT-associated fusion proteins, we compared mouse progenitor cell (MPC permissiveness for EWS-FLI-1, EWS-ERG and FUS-ERG expression and assessed the corresponding expression profile changes. Whereas all MPC isolates tested could stably express EWS-FLI-1, only some sustained stable EWS-ERG expression and none could express FUS-ERG for more than 3-5 days. Only 14% and 4% of the total number of genes that were respectively induced and repressed in MPCs by the three fusion proteins were shared. However, all three fusion proteins, but neither FLI-1 nor ERG-1 alone, activated the IGF1 promoter and induced IGF1 expression. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Whereas expression of different ESFT-associated fusion proteins may require distinct cellular microenvironments and induce transcriptome changes of limited similarity, IGF1 induction may provide one common mechanism for their implication in ESFT pathogenesis.

  11. Protein-induced fusion can be modulated by target membrane lipids through a structural switch at the level of the fusion peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pecheur, EI; Martin, [No Value; Bienvenue, A; Ruysschaert, JM; Hoekstra, D

    2000-01-01

    Regulatory features of protein-induced membrane fusion are largely unclear, particularly at the level of the fusion peptide. Fusion peptides being part of larger protein complexes, such investigations are met with technical limitations. Here, we show that the fusion activity of influenza virus or

  12. Electron beam fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauser, M.J.; Sweeney, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    R The behavior of the DT filled gold shells when irradiated by a variety of pulse shapes was studied. In these pulses the power (and beam current) was varied, but the voltage was kept constant at 1 MeV. In general the performance of the target, for a given peak power, was not significantly affected by the pulse shape. Pulses with rise times of up to half the implosion time do not significantly degrade the target performance. The use of the ''optimal pulse'' of laser fusion with a fixed peak power does not appear to improve the performance of these targets. The main function of the ''optimal pulse'' is to produce a large rho r of the target during the thermonuclear burn. In e-beam targets a total rho r of 5--10 g/cm 2 can be obtained without pulse shaping; the problem here is one of achieving high enough temperatures to ignite the DT. (U.S.)

  13. Enhanced neutralization potency of botulinum neurotoxin antibodies using a red blood cell-targeting fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P Adekar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT potently inhibits cholinergic signaling at the neuromuscular junction. The ideal countermeasures for BoNT exposure are monoclonal antibodies or BoNT antisera, which form BoNT-containing immune complexes that are rapidly cleared from the general circulation. Clearance of opsonized toxins may involve complement receptor-mediated immunoadherence to red blood cells (RBC in primates or to platelets in rodents. Methods of enhancing immunoadherence of BoNT-specific antibodies may increase their potency in vivo. We designed a novel fusion protein (FP to link biotinylated molecules to glycophorin A (GPA on the RBC surface. The FP consists of an scFv specific for murine GPA fused to streptavidin. FP:mAb:BoNT complexes bound specifically to the RBC surface in vitro. In a mouse model of BoNT neutralization, the FP increased the potency of single and double antibody combinations in BoNT neutralization. A combination of two antibodies with the FP gave complete neutralization of 5,000 LD50 BoNT in mice. Neutralization in vivo was dependent on biotinylation of both antibodies and correlated with a reduction of plasma BoNT levels. In a post-exposure model of intoxication, FP:mAb complexes gave complete protection from a lethal BoNT/A1 dose when administered within 2 hours of toxin exposure. In a pre-exposure prophylaxis model, mice were fully protected for 72 hours following administration of the FP:mAb complex. These results demonstrate that RBC-targeted immunoadherence through the FP is a potent enhancer of BoNT neutralization by antibodies in vivo.

  14. FOXO1 is a direct target of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein in Ewing's sarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Liu; Hu, Hsien-Ming; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Chansky, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Inducible and reversible siRNA knockdown of an oncogenic fusion protein such as EWS-Fli1 is feasible and more advantageous than other siRNA methods. → The tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 is a new EWS-Fli1 target. → While trans-activators are known for the FOXO1 gene, there has been no report on negative regulators of FOXO1 transcription. → This study provides first evidence that the EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein can function as a transcriptional repressor of the FOXO1 gene. -- Abstract: Ewing's family tumors are characterized by a specific t(11;22) chromosomal translocation that results in the formation of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein. To investigate the effects of EWS-Fli1 on gene expression, we carried out DNA microarray analysis after specific knockdown of EWS-Fli1 through transfection of synthetic siRNAs. EWS-Fli1 knockdown increased expression of genes such as DKK1 and p57 that are known to be repressed by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein. Among other potential EWS-Fli1 targets identified by our microarray analysis, we have focused on the FOXO1 gene since it encodes a potential tumor suppressor and has not been previously reported in Ewing's cells. To better understand how EWS-Fli1 affects FOXO1 expression, we have established a doxycycline-inducible siRNA system to achieve stable and reversible knockdown of EWS-Fli1 in Ewing's sarcoma cells. Here we show that FOXO1 expression in Ewing's cells has an inverse relationship with EWS-Fli1 protein level, and FOXO1 promoter activity is increased after doxycycline-induced EWS-Fli1 knockdown. In addition, we have found that direct binding of EWS-Fli1 to FOXO1 promoter is attenuated after doxycycline-induced siRNA knockdown of the fusion protein. Together, these results suggest that suppression of FOXO1 function by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein may contribute to cellular transformation in Ewing's family tumors.

  15. Assessment of the Fusion Tags on Increasing Soluble Production of the Active TEV Protease Variant and Other Target Proteins in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuelian; Sun, Jiaqi; Wang, Weiyu; Jiang, Li; Cheng, Beijiu; Fan, Jun

    2017-06-01

    In this study, five fusion tags affecting soluble production and cleavage activity of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease (TEVp) variant in Escherichia coli strains BL21 (DE3) and Rosetta™ (DE3) are investigated. Combination of the augmenting rare transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and the fused expressivity tag (N-terminal seven amino acid residues of E. coli translation initiation factor II) promotes the soluble TEVp partner expressed at relatively high level. Attachment of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) tag increases soluble expression of the protease released from the fusion protein in E. coli cells, but the incorporated TEVp recognition sequence slightly decreases expressivity of the fusion construct. Except for the green fluorescent protein, the attached expressivity tag shows less efficiency than the MBP tag in enhancing expression levels of the selected five target proteins in the Rosetta™ (DE3) cells under different induction conditions. Our results identified that high-level production of the functional target protein as the fusion partner in E. coli is combined with the intrinsic property of fusion tag, fusion protein stability, inherent folding of target protein, rare tRNA abundance, and the incorporated linker. Purified TEVp fusion constructs with the N-terminal expressivity tag, as well as the MBP partner, are the ideal alternatives for removing fusion tag.

  16. [Targeted tumor suppression by a secreted fusion protein consisting of anti- erbB2 antibody and reversed caspase-3 to SKBr3 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-hong; Jia, Lin-tao; Yu, Cui-juan; Qu, Ping; Dong, Hai-long; Zhao, Jing; Xu, Yan-ming; Wang, Cheng-Ji; Yang, An-gang

    2003-04-10

    To investigate the targeted killing effect to SKBr3 cells due to the expression of a secreted fusion protein consisting of anti-erbB2 antibody and reversed caspase-3. A recombinant plasmid pCMV-e23scFv-PEII-revcasp 3 was constructed by subcloning reversed caspase-3 gene to the downstream of anti-erbB2 antibody and transfected into Jurkat cells. The cell lines which secreted expressing fusion protein stably were selected. The fusion protein in media was detected by ELISA and the media was used to culture human breast cancer SKBr3 cells. The recombinant plasmids with liposomes was administrated to BALB/C nude mouses bearing SKBr3 tumor by intramuscular injection. The targetting effect of the recombinant fusion protein caspase-3 was detected by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Fusion protein can be expressed and secreted by Jurkat cells stably and kill SKBr3 cells. Significant prolonged survival time (prolonged by 72%) and inhibition of tumor growth in vivo (within inhibition ratio of 77%) were seen in the group administered with recombinant plasmids. Indirect immunofluorescence staining showed that the recombinant fusion protein caspase-3 has targetting effect. Secreted expression of the fusion protein consisting of anti-erbB2 antibody and reversed caspase-3 can targetedly induce SKBr3 cells to death.

  17. A strategy for targeting recombinant proteins to protein storage vacuoles by fusion to Brassica napus napin in napin-depleted seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Dwayne D; Baron, Marcus; Labbe, Natalie; Coutu, Cathy; Lydiate, Derek; Lui, Helen; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Seeds are capable of accumulating high levels of seed storage proteins (SSP), as well as heterologous proteins under certain conditions. Arabidopsis thaliana was used to develop a strategy to deplete seeds of an endogenous SSP and then replenish them with the same protein fused to a heterologous protein. In several other studies, competition with endogenous SSP for space and metabolic resources was shown to affect the accumulation of recombinant proteins in seeds. We used RNAi to reduce the expression of the five napin genes and deplete the seeds of this SSP. Targeting a recombinant protein to a vacuole or structure within the seed where it can be protected from cytosolic proteases can also promote its accumulation. To achieve this, a synthetic Brassica napus napin gene (Bn napin) was designed that was both impervious to the A. thaliana napin (At napin) RNAi construct and permitted fusion to a heterologous protein, in this case green fluorescent protein (GFP). GFP was placed in several strategic locations within Bn napin with consideration to maintaining structure, processing sites and possible vacuolar targeting signals. In transgenic A. thaliana plants, GFP was strongly localized to the seed protein storage vacuole in all Bn napin fusion configurations tested, but not when expressed alone. This SSP depletion-replenishment strategy outlined here would be applicable to expression of recombinant proteins in industrial crops that generally have large repertoires of endogenous SSP genes. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Direct and indirect targets of the E2A-PBX1 leukemia-specific fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christofer Diakos

    Full Text Available E2A-PBX1 is expressed as a result of the t(1;19 chromosomal translocation in nearly 5% of cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The E2A-PBX1 chimeric transcription factor contains the N-terminal transactivation domain of E2A (TCF3 fused to the C-terminal DNA-binding homeodomain of PBX1. While there is no doubt of its oncogenic potential, the mechanisms of E2A-PBX1-mediated pre-B cell transformation and the nature of direct E2A-PBX1 target genes and pathways remain largely unknown. Herein we used chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP-chip to identify direct targets of E2A-PBX1, and we used gene expression arrays of siRNA E2A-PBX1-silenced cells to evaluate changes in expression induced by the fusion protein. Combined ChIP-chip and expression data analysis gave rise to direct and functional targets of E2A-PBX1. Further we observe that the set of ChIP-chip identified E2A-PBX1 targets show a collective down-regulation trend in the E2A-PBX1 silenced samples compared to controls suggesting an activating role of this fusion transcription factor. Our data suggest that the expression of the E2A-PBX1 fusion gene interferes with key regulatory pathways and functions of hematopoietic biology. Among these are members of the WNT and apoptosis/cell cycle control pathways, and thus may comprise an essential driving force for the propagation and maintenance of the leukemic phenotype. These findings may also provide evidence of potentially attractive therapeutic targets.

  19. Direct and indirect targets of the E2A-PBX1 leukemia-specific fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakos, Christofer; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Shichun; Kager, Leo; Dworzak, Michael; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    E2A-PBX1 is expressed as a result of the t(1;19) chromosomal translocation in nearly 5% of cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The E2A-PBX1 chimeric transcription factor contains the N-terminal transactivation domain of E2A (TCF3) fused to the C-terminal DNA-binding homeodomain of PBX1. While there is no doubt of its oncogenic potential, the mechanisms of E2A-PBX1-mediated pre-B cell transformation and the nature of direct E2A-PBX1 target genes and pathways remain largely unknown. Herein we used chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP-chip) to identify direct targets of E2A-PBX1, and we used gene expression arrays of siRNA E2A-PBX1-silenced cells to evaluate changes in expression induced by the fusion protein. Combined ChIP-chip and expression data analysis gave rise to direct and functional targets of E2A-PBX1. Further we observe that the set of ChIP-chip identified E2A-PBX1 targets show a collective down-regulation trend in the E2A-PBX1 silenced samples compared to controls suggesting an activating role of this fusion transcription factor. Our data suggest that the expression of the E2A-PBX1 fusion gene interferes with key regulatory pathways and functions of hematopoietic biology. Among these are members of the WNT and apoptosis/cell cycle control pathways, and thus may comprise an essential driving force for the propagation and maintenance of the leukemic phenotype. These findings may also provide evidence of potentially attractive therapeutic targets.

  20. Employment of colorimetric enzyme assay for monitoring expression and solubility of GST fusion proteins targeted to inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mačinković, Igor S; Abughren, Mohamed; Mrkic, Ivan; Grozdanović, Milica M; Prodanović, Radivoje; Gavrović-Jankulović, Marija

    2013-12-01

    High levels of recombinant protein expression can lead to the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies. These complex aggregates are commonly solubilized in strong denaturants, such as 6-8M urea, although, if possible, solubilization under milder conditions could facilitate subsequent refolding and purification of bioactive proteins. Commercially available GST-tag assays are designed for quantitative measurement of GST activity under native conditions. GST fusion proteins accumulated in inclusion bodies are considered to be undetectable by such assays. In this work, solubilization of recombinantly produced proteins was performed in 4M urea. The activity of rGST was assayed in 2M urea and it was shown that rGST preserves 85% of its activity under such denaturing conditions. A colorimetric GST activity assay with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was examined for use in rapid detection of expression targeted to inclusion bodies and for the identification of inclusion body proteins which can be solubilized in low concentrations of chaotropic agents. Applicability of the assay was evaluated by tracking protein expression of two GST-fused allergens of biopharmaceutical value in E. coli, GST-Der p 2 and GST-Mus a 5, both targeted to inclusion bodies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. ETO, but not leukemogenic fusion protein AML1/ETO, augments RBP-Jkappa/SHARP-mediated repression of notch target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salat, Daniela; Liefke, Robert; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Borggrefe, Tilman; Oswald, Franz

    2008-05-01

    Notch is a transmembrane receptor that determines cell fates and pattern formation in all animal species. After specific ligand binding, the intracellular part of Notch is cleaved off and translocates to the nucleus, where it targets the DNA binding protein RBP-Jkappa. In the absence of Notch, RBP-Jkappa represses Notch target genes by recruiting a corepressor complex. We and others have previously identified SHARP as one component of this complex. Here, we show that the corepressor ETO as well as the leukemogenic fusion protein AML1/ETO directly interacts with SHARP, that ETO is part of the endogenous RBP-Jkappa-containing corepressor complex, and that ETO is found at Notch target gene promoters. In functional assays, corepressor ETO, but not AML1/ETO, augments SHARP-mediated repression in an histone deacetylase-dependent manner. Furthermore, either the knockdown of ETO or the overexpression of AML1/ETO activates Notch target genes. Therefore, we propose that AML1/ETO can disturb the normal, repressive function of ETO at Notch target genes. This activating (or derepressing) effect of AML1/ETO may contribute to its oncogenic potential in myeloid leukemia.

  2. S-layer fusion protein as a tool functionalizing emulsomes and CurcuEmulsomes for antibody binding and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucisik, Mehmet H; Küpcü, Seta; Breitwieser, Andreas; Gelbmann, Nicola; Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2015-04-01

    Selective targeting of tumor cells by nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems is highly desirable because it maximizes the drug concentration at the desired target while simultaneously protecting the surrounding healthy tissues. Here, we show a design for smart nanocarriers based on a biomimetic approach that utilizes the building principle of virus envelope structures. Emulsomes and CurcuEmulsomes comprising a tripalmitin solid core surrounded by phospholipid layers are modified by S-layer proteins that self-assemble into a two-dimensional array to form a surface layer. One significant advantage of this nanoformulation is that it increases the solubility of the lipophilic anti-cancer agent curcumin in the CurcuEmulsomes by a factor of 2700. In order to make the emulsomes specific for IgG, the S-layer protein is fused with two protein G domains. This S-layer fusion protein preserves its recrystallization characteristics, forming an ordered surface layer (square lattice with 13 nm unit-by-unit distance). The GG domains are presented in a predicted orientation and exhibit a selective binding affinity for IgG. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of insecticidal fusion proteins containing spider toxins targeting sodium and calcium ion channels on pyrethroid-resistant strains of peach-potato aphid (Myzus persicae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Fitches, Elaine; Pyati, Prashant; Gatehouse, John A

    2015-07-01

    The recombinant fusion proteins Pl1a/GNA and Hv1a/GNA contain the spider venom peptides δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a or ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a respectively, linked to snowdrop lectin (GNA). Pl1a targets receptor site 4 of insect voltage-gated sodium channels (NaCh), while Hv1a targets voltage-gated calcium channels. Insecticide-resistant strains of peach-potato aphid (Myzus persicae) contain mutations in NaCh. The pyrethroid-resistant kdr (794J) and super-kdr (UKO) strains contain mutations at residues L1014 and M918 in the channel α-subunit respectively, while the kdr + super-kdr strain (4824J), insensitive to pyrethroids, contains mutations at both L1014 and M918. Pl1a/GNA and Hv1a/GNA fusion proteins have estimated LC50 values of 0.35 and 0.19 mg mL(-1) when fed to wild-type M. persicae. For insecticide-resistant aphids, LC50 for the Pl1a/GNA fusion protein increased by 2-6-fold, correlating with pyrethroid resistance (wild type < kdr < super-kdr < kdr + super-kdr strains). In contrast, LC50 for the Hv1a/GNA fusion protein showed limited correlation with pyrethroid resistance. Mutations in the sodium channel in pyrethroid-resistant aphids also protect against a fusion protein containing a sodium-channel-specific toxin, in spite of differences in ligand-channel interactions, but do not confer resistance to a fusion protein targeting calcium channels. The use of fusion proteins with differing targets could play a role in managing pesticide resistance. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Novel treatment option for MUC16-positive malignancies with the targeted TRAIL-based fusion protein Meso-TR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Gunjal; Gibbs, Jesse; Belt, Brian; Powell, Matthew A; Mutch, David G; Goedegebuure, Peter; Collins, Lynne; Piwnica-Worms, David; Hawkins, William G; Spitzer, Dirk

    2014-01-21

    The targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics represents an ongoing challenge in the field of drug development. TRAIL is a promising cancer drug but its activity profile could benefit from a cancer-selective delivery mechanism, which would reduce potential side effects and increase treatment efficiencies. We recently developed the novel TRAIL-based drug platform TR3, a genetically fused trimer with the capacity for further molecular modifications such as the addition of tumor-directed targeting moieties. MUC16 (CA125) is a well characterized biomarker in several human malignancies including ovarian, pancreatic and breast cancer. Mesothelin is known to interact with MUC16 with high affinity. In order to deliver TR3 selectively to MUC16-expressing cancers, we investigated the possibility of targeted TR3 delivery employing the high affinity mesothelin/MUC16 ligand/receptor interaction. Using genetic engineering, we designed the novel cancer drug Meso-TR3, a fusion protein between native mesothelin and TR3. The recombinant proteins were produced with mammalian HEK293T cells. Meso-TR3 was characterized for binding selectivity and killing efficacy against MUC16-positive cancer cells and controls that lack MUC16 expression. Drug efficacy experiments were performed in vitro and in vivo employing an intraperitoneal xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. Similar to soluble mesothelin itself, the strong MUC16 binding property was retained in the Meso-TR3 fusion protein. The high affinity ligand/receptor interaction was associated with a selective accumulation of the cancer drug on MUC16-expressing cancer targets and directly correlated with increased killing activity in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. The relevance of the mesothelin/MUC16 interaction for attaching Meso-TR3 to the cancer cells was verified by competitive blocking experiments using soluble mesothelin. Mechanistic studies using soluble DR5-Fc and caspase blocking assays confirmed

  5. Novel treatment option for MUC16-positive malignancies with the targeted TRAIL-based fusion protein Meso-TR3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Gunjal; Spitzer, Dirk; Gibbs, Jesse; Belt, Brian; Powell, Matthew A; Mutch, David G; Goedegebuure, Peter; Collins, Lynne; Piwnica-Worms, David; Hawkins, William G

    2014-01-01

    The targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics represents an ongoing challenge in the field of drug development. TRAIL is a promising cancer drug but its activity profile could benefit from a cancer-selective delivery mechanism, which would reduce potential side effects and increase treatment efficiencies. We recently developed the novel TRAIL-based drug platform TR3, a genetically fused trimer with the capacity for further molecular modifications such as the addition of tumor-directed targeting moieties. MUC16 (CA125) is a well characterized biomarker in several human malignancies including ovarian, pancreatic and breast cancer. Mesothelin is known to interact with MUC16 with high affinity. In order to deliver TR3 selectively to MUC16-expressing cancers, we investigated the possibility of targeted TR3 delivery employing the high affinity mesothelin/MUC16 ligand/receptor interaction. Using genetic engineering, we designed the novel cancer drug Meso-TR3, a fusion protein between native mesothelin and TR3. The recombinant proteins were produced with mammalian HEK293T cells. Meso-TR3 was characterized for binding selectivity and killing efficacy against MUC16-positive cancer cells and controls that lack MUC16 expression. Drug efficacy experiments were performed in vitro and in vivo employing an intraperitoneal xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. Similar to soluble mesothelin itself, the strong MUC16 binding property was retained in the Meso-TR3 fusion protein. The high affinity ligand/receptor interaction was associated with a selective accumulation of the cancer drug on MUC16-expressing cancer targets and directly correlated with increased killing activity in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. The relevance of the mesothelin/MUC16 interaction for attaching Meso-TR3 to the cancer cells was verified by competitive blocking experiments using soluble mesothelin. Mechanistic studies using soluble DR5-Fc and caspase blocking assays confirmed

  6. Human Serum Albumin and HER2-Binding Affibody Fusion Proteins for Targeted Delivery of Fatty Acid-Modified Molecules and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Daoyuan; Xia, Guanjun; Li, Zhijun; Li, Zhiyu

    2016-10-03

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is a well-studied therapeutic target as well as a biomarker of breast cancer. HER2-targeting affibody (Z HER2:342 ) is a novel small scaffold protein with an extreme high affinity against HER2 screened by phage display. However, the small molecular weight of Z HER2:342 has limited its pharmaceutical application. Human serum albumin (HSA) and Z HER2:342 fusion protein may not only extend the serum half-life of Z HER2:342 but also preserve the biological function of HSA to bind and transport fatty acids, which can be used to deliver fatty acid-modified therapeutics to HER2-positive cancer cells. Two HSA and Z HER2:342 fusion proteins, one with a single Z HER2:342 domain fused to the C terminus of HSA (rHSA-ZHER2) and another with two tandem copies of Z HER2:342 fused to the C terminus of HSA (rHSA-(ZHER2) 2 ), have been constructed, expressed, and purified. Both fusion proteins possessed the HER2 and fatty acid (FA) binding abilities demonstrated by in vitro assays. Interestingly, rHSA-(ZHER2) 2 , not rHSA-ZHER2, was able to inhibit the proliferation of SK-BR-3 cells at a relatively low concentration, and the increase of HER2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation followed by rHSA-(ZHER2) 2 treatment has been observed. HSA fusion proteins are easy and economical to express, purify, and formulate. As expected, HSA fusion proteins and fusion protein-bound fatty acid-modified FITC could be efficiently taken up by cells. These results proved the feasibility of using HSA fusion proteins as therapeutic agents as well as carriers for targeted drug delivery.

  7. In-silico determination of insecticidal potential of Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein against Lepidopteran targets using molecular docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aftab eAhmad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Study and research of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis transgenic plants have opened new ways to combat insect pests. Over the decades, however, insect pests, especially the Lepidopteran, have developed tolerance against Bt delta-endotoxins. Such issues can be addressed through the development of novel toxins with greater toxicity and affinity against a broad range of insect receptors. In this computational study, functional domains of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal delta-endotoxin (Cry1Ac insecticidal protein and vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3Aa have been fused to develop a broad-range Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein. Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa are non-homologous insecticidal proteins possessing receptors against different targets within the midgut of insects. The insecticidal proteins were fused to broaden the insecticidal activity. Molecular docking analysis of the fusion protein against aminopeptidase-N (APN and cadherin receptors of five Lepidopteran insects (Agrotis ipsilon, Helicoverpa armigera, Pectinophora gossypiella, Spodoptera exigua and Spodoptera litura revealed that the Ser290, Ser293, Leu337, Thr340 and Arg437 residues of the fusion protein are involved in the interaction with insect receptors. The Helicoverpa armigera cadherin receptor, however, showed no interaction, which might be due to either loss or burial of interactive residues inside the fusion protein. These findings revealed that the Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein has a strong affinity against Lepidopteran insect receptors and hence has a potential to be an efficient broad-range insecticidal protein.

  8. Targets for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauser, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes some of the basic principles of fusion target implosions, using some simple targets designed for irradiation by ion beams. Present estimates are that ion beams with 1-5 MJ, and 100-500 TW will be required to ignite high gain targets. (orig.) [de

  9. Expression of scFv-Mel-Gal4 triple fusion protein as a targeted DNA-carrier in Escherichia Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyu; Luo, Jian; Xu, Lining; Zeng, Jianping; Cao, Limin; Dong, Jiahong; Cai, Shouwang

    2013-12-01

    Liver-directed gene therapy has become a promising treatment for many liver diseases. In this study, we constructed a multi-functional targeting molecule, which maintains targeting, endosome-escaping, and DNA-binding abilities for gene delivery. Two single oligonucleotide chains of Melittin (M) were synthesized. The full-length cDNA encoding anti-hepatic asialoglycoprotein receptor scFv C1 (C1) was purified from C1/pIT2. The GAL4 (G) gene was amplified from pSW50-Gal4 by polymerase chain reaction. M, C1 and G were inserted into plasmid pGC4C26H to product the recombinant plasmid pGC-C1MG. The fused gene C1MG was subsequently subcloned into plasmid pET32c to product the recombinant plasmid C1MG/pET32c and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The scFv-Mel-Gal4 triple fusion protein (C1MG) was purified with a Ni(2+) chelating HiTrap HP column. The fusion protein C1MG of roughly 64 kD was expressed in inclusion bodies; 4.5 mg/ml C1MG was prepared with Ni(2+) column purification. Western blot and immunohistochemistry showed the antigen-binding ability of C1MG to the cell surface of the liver-derived cell line and liver tissue slices. Hemolysis testing showed that C1MG maintained membrane-disrupting activity. DNA-binding capacity was substantiated by luciferase assay, suggesting that C1MG could deliver the DNA into cells efficiently on the basis of C1MG. Successful expression of C1MG was achieved in E. coli, and C1MG recombinant protein confers targeting, endosome-escaping and DNA-binding capacity, which makes it probable to further study its liver-specific DNA delivery efficacy in vivo. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Novel Fusion Protein Targeting Mitochondrial DNA Improves Pancreatic Islet Functional Potency and Islet Transplantation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danobeitia, Juan S; Chlebeck, Peter J; Shokolenko, Inna; Ma, Xiaobo; Wilson, Glenn; Fernandez, Luis A

    2017-11-01

    Long-term graft survival is an ongoing challenge in the field of islet transplantation. With the growing demand for transplantable organs, therapies to improve organ quality and reduce the incidence of graft dysfunction are of paramount importance. We evaluated the protective role of a recombinant DNA repair protein targeted to mitochondria (Exscien I-III), as a therapeutic agent using a rodent model of pancreatic islet transplantation. We first investigated the effect of therapy on isolated rat islets cultured with pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 β, interferon γ, and tumor necrosis factor α) for 48 h and documented a significant reduction in apoptosis by flow cytometry, improved viability by immunofluorescence, and conserved functional potency in vitro and in vivo in Exscien I-III-treated islets. We then tested the effect of therapy in systemic inflammation using a rat model of donor brain death (BD) sustained for a 6-h period. Donor rats were allocated to 4 groups: (non-BD + vehicle, non-BD + Exscien I-III, BD + vehicle, and BD + Exscien I-III) and treated with Exscien I-III (4 mg/kg) or vehicle 30 min after BD induction. Sham (non-BD)-operated animals receiving either Exscien I-III or vehicle served as controls. Islets purified from BD + Exscien I-III-treated donors showed a significant increase in glucose-stimulated insulin release in vitro when compared to islets from vehicle-treated counterparts. In addition, donor treatment with Exscien I-III attenuated the effects of BD and significantly improved the functional potency of transplanted islets in vivo. Our data indicate that mitochondrially targeted antioxidant therapy is a novel strategy to protect pancreas and islet quality from the deleterious effects of cytokines in culture and during the inflammatory response associated with donation after BD. The potential for rapid translation into clinical practice makes Exscien I-III an attractive therapeutic option for the management of brain

  11. Designing the Sniper: Improving Targeted Human Cytolytic Fusion Proteins for Anti-Cancer Therapy via Molecular Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bochicchio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted human cytolytic fusion proteins (hCFPs are humanized immunotoxins for selective treatment of different diseases including cancer. They are composed of a ligand specifically binding to target cells genetically linked to a human apoptosis-inducing enzyme. hCFPs target cancer cells via an antibody or derivative (scFv specifically binding to e.g., tumor associated antigens (TAAs. After internalization and translocation of the enzyme from endocytosed endosomes, the human enzymes introduced into the cytosol are efficiently inducing apoptosis. Under in vivo conditions such enzymes are subject to tight regulation by native inhibitors in order to prevent inappropriate induction of cell death in healthy cells. Tumor cells are known to upregulate these inhibitors as a survival mechanism resulting in escape of malignant cells from elimination by immune effector cells. Cytosolic inhibitors of Granzyme B and Angiogenin (Serpin P9 and RNH1, respectively, reduce the efficacy of hCFPs with these enzymes as effector domains, requiring detrimentally high doses in order to saturate inhibitor binding and rescue cytolytic activity. Variants of Granzyme B and Angiogenin might feature reduced affinity for their respective inhibitors, while retaining or even enhancing their catalytic activity. A powerful tool to design hCFPs mutants with improved potency is given by in silico methods. These include molecular dynamics (MD simulations and enhanced sampling methods (ESM. MD and ESM allow predicting the enzyme-protein inhibitor binding stability and the associated conformational changes, provided that structural information is available. Such “high-resolution” detailed description enables the elucidation of interaction domains and the identification of sites where particular point mutations may modify those interactions. This review discusses recent advances in the use of MD and ESM for hCFP development from the viewpoints of scientists involved in both fields.

  12. Expression, purification, and functional analysis of an antigen-targeting fusion protein composed of CD40 ligand and the C-terminal fragment of ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunnuo; Halperin, Scott A; Lee, Song F

    2018-02-01

    Delivering antigen via molecules specifically targeting receptors on the surface of antigen-presenting cells is a strategy to improve immune responses. In this study, an antigen-targeting fusion protein (OVA-CD40LS) composed of the C-terminal fragment of ovalbumin and the extracellular domain of mouse CD40 ligand was constructed by genetic fusion. The OVA-CD40LS and the control OVA (rOVA) genes were cloned in Escherichia coli and over-expressed as insoluble proteins. The rOVA protein was purified from the insoluble fraction of E. coli cell lysate by nickel affinity chromatography and refolded by step-wise dialysis to give a yield of 11.8 mg/L of culture. The OVA-CD40LS was purified by a 'two-round' nickel affinity and on-column protein-refolding chromatography. The yield was 528 μg/L of culture. The purified OVA-CD40LS, but not the rOVA, was able to simulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and up-regulate cell surface marker proteins in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. The purified OVA-CD40LS elicited a robust immune response when injected submucosally in the oral cavity of mice. Collectively, the results indicate that the OVA-CD40LS fusion protein was biologically active, functioning as an antigen-targeting protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression of proteins in Escherichia coli as fusions with maltose-binding protein to rescue non-expressed targets in a high-throughput protein-expression and purification pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewitt, Stephen N.; Choi, Ryan; Kelley, Angela; Crowther, Gregory J.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2011-01-01

    The rescue of protein-expression levels by cloning genes into MBP-fusion vector is described. Despite recent advances, the expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli for crystallization remains a nontrivial challenge. The present study investigates the efficacy of maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion as a general strategy for rescuing the expression of target proteins. From a group of sequence-verified clones with undetectable levels of protein expression in an E. coli T7 expression system, 95 clones representing 16 phylogenetically diverse organisms were selected for recloning into a chimeric expression vector with an N-terminal histidine-tagged MBP. PCR-amplified inserts were annealed into an identical ligation-independent cloning region in an MBP-fusion vector and were analyzed for expression and solubility by high-throughput nickel-affinity binding. This approach yielded detectable expression of 72% of the clones; soluble expression was visible in 62%. However, the solubility of most proteins was marginal to poor upon cleavage of the MBP tag. This study offers large-scale evidence that MBP can improve the soluble expression of previously non-expressing proteins from a variety of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. While the behavior of the cleaved proteins was disappointing, further refinements in MBP tagging may permit the more widespread use of MBP-fusion proteins in crystallographic studies

  14. N-Acetylgalactosamino Dendrons as Clearing Agents to Enhance Liver Targeting of Model Antibody-Fusion Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Barney; Cheal, Sarah M.; Torchon, Geralda; Dilhas, Anna; Yang, Guangbin; Pu, Jun; Punzalan, Blesida; Larson, Steven M.; Ouerfelli, Ouathek

    2014-01-01

    Dendrimer clearing agents represent a unique class of compounds for use in multistep targeting (MST) in radioimmunotherapy and imaging. These compounds were developed to facilitate the removal of excess tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody (mAb) prior to administration of the radionuclide to minimize exposure of normal tissue to radiation. Clearing agents are designed to capture the circulating mAb, and target it to the liver for metabolism. Glycodendrons are ideally suited for MST applications as these highly branched compounds are chemically well-defined thus advantageous over heterogeneous macromolecules. Previous studies have described glycodendron 3 as a clearing agent for use in three-step MST protocols, and early in vivo assessment of 3 showed promise. However, synthetic challenges have hampered its availability for further development. In this report we describe a new sequence of chemical steps which enables the straightforward synthesis and analytical characterization of this class of dendrons. With accessibility and analytical identification solved, we sought to evaluate both lower and higher generation dendrons for hepatocyte targeting as well as clearance of a model protein. We prepared a series of clearing agents where a single biotin is connected to glycodendrons displaying four, eight, sixteen or thirty-two α-thio-N-acetylgalactosamine (α–SGalNAc) units, resulting in compounds with molecular weights ranging from 2 to 17 kDa, respectively. These compounds were fully characterized by LCMS and NMR. We then evaluated the capacity of these agents to clear a model 131I-labeled single chain variable fragment antibody-streptavidin (131I-scFv-SAv) fusion protein from blood and tissue in mice, and compared their clearing efficiencies to that of a 500 kDa dextran-biotin conjugate. Glycodendrons and dextran-biotin exhibited enhanced blood clearance of the scFv-SAv construct. Biodistribution analysis showed liver targeting/uptake of the scFv-SAv construct to

  15. An IL12-IL2-antibody fusion protein targeting Hodgkin's lymphoma cells potentiates activation of NK and T cells for an anti-tumor attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Jahn

    Full Text Available Successful immunotherapy of Hodgkin's disease is so far hampered by the striking unresponsiveness of lymphoma infiltrating immune cells. To mobilize both adoptive and innate immune cells for an anti-tumor attack we fused the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL2 and IL12 to an anti-CD30 scFv antibody in a dual cytokine fusion protein to accumulate both cytokines at the malignant CD30(+ Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in the lymphoma lesion. The tumor-targeted IL12-IL2 fusion protein was superior in activating resting T cells to amplify and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to targeted IL2 or IL12 alone. NK cells were also activated by the dual cytokine protein to secrete IFN-γ and to lyse target cells. The tumor-targeted IL12-IL2, when applied by i.v. injection to immune-competent mice with established antigen-positive tumors, accumulated at the tumor site and induced tumor regression. Data demonstrate that simultaneous targeting of two cytokines in a spatial and temporal simultaneous fashion to pre-defined tissues is feasible by a dual-cytokine antibody fusion protein. In the case of IL12 and IL2, this produced superior anti-tumor efficacy implying the strategy to muster a broader immune cell response in the combat against cancer.

  16. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  17. FOXO1 is a direct target of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein in Ewing's sarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liu, E-mail: lyang@u.washington.edu [Department of Orthopedics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Medical Research Service, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98108 (United States); Hu, Hsien-Ming; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Chansky, Howard A. [Department of Orthopedics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Medical Research Service, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98108 (United States)

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Inducible and reversible siRNA knockdown of an oncogenic fusion protein such as EWS-Fli1 is feasible and more advantageous than other siRNA methods. {yields} The tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 is a new EWS-Fli1 target. {yields} While trans-activators are known for the FOXO1 gene, there has been no report on negative regulators of FOXO1 transcription. {yields} This study provides first evidence that the EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein can function as a transcriptional repressor of the FOXO1 gene. -- Abstract: Ewing's family tumors are characterized by a specific t(11;22) chromosomal translocation that results in the formation of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein. To investigate the effects of EWS-Fli1 on gene expression, we carried out DNA microarray analysis after specific knockdown of EWS-Fli1 through transfection of synthetic siRNAs. EWS-Fli1 knockdown increased expression of genes such as DKK1 and p57 that are known to be repressed by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein. Among other potential EWS-Fli1 targets identified by our microarray analysis, we have focused on the FOXO1 gene since it encodes a potential tumor suppressor and has not been previously reported in Ewing's cells. To better understand how EWS-Fli1 affects FOXO1 expression, we have established a doxycycline-inducible siRNA system to achieve stable and reversible knockdown of EWS-Fli1 in Ewing's sarcoma cells. Here we show that FOXO1 expression in Ewing's cells has an inverse relationship with EWS-Fli1 protein level, and FOXO1 promoter activity is increased after doxycycline-induced EWS-Fli1 knockdown. In addition, we have found that direct binding of EWS-Fli1 to FOXO1 promoter is attenuated after doxycycline-induced siRNA knockdown of the fusion protein. Together, these results suggest that suppression of FOXO1 function by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein may contribute to cellular transformation in Ewing's family tumors.

  18. Hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain contributes to pre-fusion protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Stacy; Nagy, Tamas; Moseley, Hunter; Fried, Michael; Dutch, Rebecca

    2017-04-07

    Enveloped viruses utilize fusion (F) proteins studding the surface of the virus to facilitate membrane fusion with a target cell membrane. Fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is required for release of viral genomic material, so the virus can ultimately reproduce and spread. To drive fusion, the F protein undergoes an irreversible conformational change, transitioning from a metastable pre-fusion conformation to a more thermodynamically stable post-fusion structure. Understanding the elements that control stability of the pre-fusion state and triggering to the post-fusion conformation is important for understanding F protein function. Mutations in F protein transmembrane (TM) domains implicated the TM domain in the fusion process, but the structural and molecular details in fusion remain unclear. Previously, analytical ultracentrifugation was utilized to demonstrate that isolated TM domains of Hendra virus F protein associate in a monomer-trimer equilibrium (Smith, E. C., Smith, S. E., Carter, J. R., Webb, S. R., Gibson, K. M., Hellman, L. M., Fried, M. G., and Dutch, R. E. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 35726-35735). To determine factors driving this association, 140 paramyxovirus F protein TM domain sequences were analyzed. A heptad repeat of β-branched residues was found, and analysis of the Hendra virus F TM domain revealed a heptad repeat leucine-isoleucine zipper motif (LIZ). Replacement of the LIZ with alanine resulted in dramatically reduced TM-TM association. Mutation of the LIZ in the whole protein resulted in decreased protein stability, including pre-fusion conformation stability. Together, our data suggest that the heptad repeat LIZ contributed to TM-TM association and is important for F protein function and pre-fusion stability. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. FUS-DDIT3 Fusion Protein-Driven IGF-IR Signaling is a Therapeutic Target in Myxoid Liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Marcel; Menzel, Jasmin; Bertling, Christian; Cyra, Magdalene; Isfort, Ilka; Steinestel, Konrad; Elges, Sandra; Grünewald, Inga; Altvater, Bianca; Rossig, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Hafner, Susanne; Simmet, Thomas; Åman, Pierre; Wardelmann, Eva; Huss, Sebastian; Hartmann, Wolfgang

    2017-10-15

    Purpose: Myxoid liposarcoma is an aggressive disease with particular propensity to develop hematogenic metastases. Over 90% of myxoid liposarcoma are characterized by a reciprocal t(12;16)(q13;p11) translocation. The resulting chimeric FUS-DDIT3 fusion protein plays a crucial role in myxoid liposarcoma pathogenesis; however, its specific impact on oncogenic signaling pathways remains to be substantiated. We here investigate the functional role of FUS-DDIT3 in IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt signaling driving myxoid liposarcoma pathogenesis. Experimental Design: Immunohistochemical evaluation of key effectors of the IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt signaling axis was performed in a comprehensive cohort of myxoid liposarcoma specimens. FUS-DDIT3 dependency and biological function of the IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt signaling cascade were analyzed using a HT1080 fibrosarcoma-based myxoid liposarcoma tumor model and multiple tumor-derived myxoid liposarcoma cell lines. An established myxoid liposarcoma avian chorioallantoic membrane model was used for in vivo confirmation of the preclinical in vitro results. Results: A comprehensive subset of myxoid liposarcoma specimens showed elevated expression and phosphorylation levels of various IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt signaling effectors. In HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, overexpression of FUS-DDIT3 induced aberrant IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt pathway activity, which was dependent on transcriptional induction of the IGF2 gene. Conversely, RNAi-mediated FUS-DDIT3 knockdown in myxoid liposarcoma cells led to an inactivation of IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt signaling associated with diminished IGF2 mRNA expression. Treatment of myxoid liposarcoma cell lines with several IGF-IR inhibitors resulted in significant growth inhibition in vitro and in vivo Conclusions: Our preclinical study substantiates the fundamental role of the IGF-IR/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in myxoid liposarcoma pathogenesis and provides a mechanism-based rationale for molecular- targeted approaches in myxoid liposarcoma cancer therapy. Clin

  20. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, J.R.; Del Vecchio, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material

  1. Targeted lysis of HIV-infected cells by natural killer cells armed and triggered by a recombinant immunoglobulin fusion protein: implications for immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Neil; Arthos, James; Khazanie, Prateeti; Steenbeke, Tavis D.; Censoplano, Nina M.; Chung, Eva A.; Cruz, Catherine C.; Chaikin, Margery A.; Daucher, Marybeth; Kottilil, Shyam; Mavilio, Domenico; Schuck, Peter; Sun, Peter D.; Rabin, Ronald L.; Radaev, Sergei; Van Ryk, Donald; Cicala, Claudia; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2005-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in both innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses. The adaptive response typically requires that virus-specific antibodies decorate infected cells which then direct NK cell lysis through a CD16 mediated process termed antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In this report, we employ a highly polymerized chimeric IgG1/IgA immunoglobulin (Ig) fusion protein that, by virtue of its capacity to extensively crosslink CD16, activates NK cells while directing the lysis of infected target cells. We employ HIV as a model system, and demonstrate that freshly isolated NK cells preloaded with an HIV gp120-specific chimeric IgG1/IgA fusion protein efficiently lyse HIV-infected target cells at picomolar concentrations. NK cells pre-armed in this manner retain the capacity to kill targets over an extended period of time. This strategy may have application to other disease states including various viral infections and cancers

  2. Target support for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1995-08-01

    General Atomics (GA) plays an important industrial support role for the US Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in the area of target technology. This includes three major activities: target fabrication support, target handling systems development, and target chamber design. The work includes target fabrication for existing ICF experiments, target and target system development for future experiments, and target research and target chamber design for experiments on future machines, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

  3. A Novel Approach to Reinstating Tolerance in Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis Using a Targeted Fusion Protein, mCTA1–T146

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consonni, Alessandra; Sharma, Sapna; Schön, Karin; Lebrero-Fernández, Cristina; Rinaldi, Elena; Lycke, Nils Yngve; Baggi, Fulvio

    2017-01-01

    Reinstating tissue-specific tolerance has attracted much attention as a means to treat autoimmune diseases. However, despite promising results in rodent models of autoimmune diseases, no established tolerogenic therapy is clinically available yet. In the experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) model several protocols have been reported that induce tolerance against the prime disease-associated antigen, the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at the neuromuscular junction. Using the whole AChR, the extracellular part or peptides derived from the receptor, investigators have reported variable success with their treatments, though, usually relatively large amounts of antigen has been required. Hence, there is a need for better formulations and strategies to improve on the efficacy of the tolerance-inducing therapies. Here, we report on a novel targeted fusion protein carrying the immunodominant peptide from AChR, mCTA1–T146, which given intranasally in repeated microgram doses strongly suppressed induction as well as ongoing EAMG disease in mice. The results corroborate our previous findings, using the same fusion protein approach, in the collagen-induced arthritis model showing dramatic suppressive effects on Th1 and Th17 autoaggressive CD4 T cells and upregulated regulatory T cell activities with enhanced IL10 production. A suppressive gene signature with upregulated expression of mRNA for TGFβ, IL10, IL27, and Foxp3 was clearly detectable in lymph node and spleen following intranasal treatment with mCTA1–T146. Amelioration of EAMG disease was accompanied by reduced loss of muscle AChR and lower levels of anti-AChR serum antibodies. We believe this targeted highly effective fusion protein mCTA1–T146 is a promising candidate for clinical evaluation in myasthenia gravis patients. PMID:28959261

  4. Exceptionally Potent Anti-Tumor Bystander Activity of an scFv:sTRAIL Fusion Protein with Specificity for EGP2 Toward Target Antigen-Negative Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Bremer

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported on the target cell-restricted fratricide apoptotic activity of scFvC54:sTRAIL, a fusion protein comprising human-soluble tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL genetically linked to the antibody fragment scFvC54 specific for the cell surface target antigen EGP2. In the present study, we report that the selective binding of scFvC54:sTRAIL to EGP2-positive target cells conveys an exceptionally potent pro-apoptotic effect toward neighboring tumor cells that are devoid of EGP2 expression (bystander cells. The anti-tumor bystander activity of scFvC54:sTRAIL was detectable at target-tobystander cell ratios as low as 1:100. Treatment in the presence of EGP2-blocking or TRAIL-neutralizing antibody strongly inhibited apoptosis in both target and bystander tumor cells. In the absence of target cells, bystander cell apoptosis induction was abrogated. The bystander apoptosis activity of scFvC54:sTRAIL did not require internalization, enzymatic conversion, diffusion, or communication (gap junctional intracellular communication between target and bystander cells. Furthermore, scFvC54:sTRAIL showed no detectable signs of innocent bystander activity toward freshly isolated blood cells. Further development of this new principle is warranted for approaches where cancer cells can escape from antibody-based therapy due to partial loss of target antigen expression.

  5. Exceptionally potent anti-tumor bystander activity of an scFv : sTRAIL fusion protein with specificity for EGP2 toward target antigen-negative tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, E; Samplonius, D; Kroesen, BJ; van Genne, L; de Leij, L; Helfrich, W

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we reported on the target cell-restricted fratricide apoptotic activity of scFvC54:sTRAIL, a fusion protein comprising human-soluble tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) genetically linked to the antibody fragment scFvC54 specific for the cell surface target

  6. Mass Producing Targets for Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Kendall, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Metal-encapsulating technique advances prospects of controlling nuclear fusion. Prefilled fusion targets form at nozzle as molten metal such as tin flows through outer channel and pressurized deuterium/tritium gas flows through inner channel. Molten metal completely encloses gas charge as it drops off nozzle.

  7. Synergistic effects of selective inhibitors targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway or NUP214-ABL1 fusion protein in human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simioni, Carolina; Ultimo, Simona; Martelli, Alberto M; Zauli, Giorgio; Milani, Daniela; McCubrey, James A; Capitani, Silvano; Neri, Luca M

    2016-11-29

    Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) accounts for 25-30% of adult ALL and its incidence increases with age in adults >40 years old. Irrespective of age, the ABL1 fusion genes are markers of poor prognosis and amplification of the NUP214-ABL1 oncogene can be detected mainly in patients with T-ALL. T cell malignancies harboring the ABL1 fusion genes are sensitive to many cytotoxic agents, but up to date complete remissions have not been achieved. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway is often activated in leukemias and plays a crucial role in leukemogenesis.We analyzed the effects of three BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), alone and in combination with a panel of selective PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors, on three NUP214-ABL1 positive T-ALL cell lines that also displayed PI3K/Akt/mTOR activation. Cells were sensitive to anti BCR-ABL1 TKIs Imatinib, Nilotinib and GZD824, that specifically targeted the ABL1 fusion protein, but not the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis. Four drugs against the PI3K/Akt/mTOR cascade, GSK690693, NVP-BGT226, ZSTK474 and Torin-2, showed marked cytotoxic effects on T-leukemic cells, without affecting the NUP214-ABL1 kinase and related pathway. Dephosphorylation of pAkt and pS6 showed the cytotoxicity of these compounds. Either single or combined administration of drugs against the different targets displayed inhibition of cellular viability associated with a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and autophagy, having the combined treatments a significant synergistic cytotoxic effect. Co-targeting NUP214-ABL1 fusion gene and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway could represent a new and effective pharmacological strategy to improve the outcome in NUP214-ABL1 positive T-ALL.

  8. Exo-endo cellulase fusion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Benjamin S [Palo Alto, CA; Larenas, Edmund A [Palo Alto, CA; Mitchinson, Colin [Palo Alto, CA

    2012-01-17

    The present invention relates to a heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct, which encodes a fusion protein having cellulolytic activity comprising a catalytic domain derived from a fungal exo-cellobiohydrolase and a catalytic domain derived from an endoglucanase. The invention also relates to vectors and fungal host cells comprising the heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct as well as methods for producing a cellulase fusion protein and enzymatic cellulase compositions.

  9. Target production for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodworth, J.G.; Meier, W.

    1995-03-01

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will require the ignition and burn of 5-10 fusion fuel targets every second. The technology to economically mass produce high-quality, precision targets at this rate is beyond the current state of the art. Techniques that are scalable to high production rates, however, have been identified for all the necessary process steps, and many have been tested in laboratory experiments or are similar to current commercial manufacturing processes. In this paper, we describe a baseline target factory conceptual design and estimate its capital and operating costs. The result is a total production cost of ∼16 cents per target. At this level, target production represents about 6% of the estimated cost of electricity from a 1-GW e IFE power plant. Cost scaling relationships are presented and used to show the variation in target cost with production rate and plant power level

  10. Spinning targets for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    Several techniques for spinning the ICF targets up prior to or in the course of their compression are suggested. Interference of the rotational shear flow with Rayleigh-Taylor instability is briefly discussed and possible consequences for the target performance are pointed out

  11. Magnetized Target Fusion At General Fusion: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Michel; O'Shea, Peter; Donaldson, Mike; Delage, Michael; Fusion Team, General

    2017-10-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) involves compressing an initial magnetically confined plasma on a timescale faster than the thermal confinement time of the plasma. If near adiabatic compression is achieved, volumetric compression of 350X or more of a 500 eV target plasma would achieve a final plasma temperature exceeding 10 keV. Interesting fusion gains could be achieved provided the compressed plasma has sufficient density and dwell time. General Fusion (GF) is developing a compression system using pneumatic pistons to collapse a cavity formed in liquid metal containing a magnetized plasma target. Low cost driver, straightforward heat extraction, good tritium breeding ratio and excellent neutron protection could lead to a practical power plant. GF (65 employees) has an active plasma R&D program including both full scale and reduced scale plasma experiments and simulation of both. Although pneumatic driven compression of full scale plasmas is the end goal, present compression studies use reduced scale plasmas and chemically accelerated aluminum liners. We will review results from our plasma target development, motivate and review the results of dynamic compression field tests and briefly describe the work to date on the pneumatic driver front.

  12. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlin, J.E.

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well

  13. Reactor potential for magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, J.E

    2001-06-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a possible pathway to thermonuclear fusion different from both magnetic fusion and inertial confinement fusion. An imploding cylindrical metal liner compresses a preheated and magnetized plasma configuration until thermonuclear conditions are achieved. In this report the Magnetized Target Fusion concept is evaluated and a zero-dimensional computer model of the plasma, liner and circuit as a connected system is designed. The results of running this code are that thermonuclear conditions are achieved indeed, but only during a very short time. At peak compression the pressure from the compressed plasma and magnetic field is so large reversing the liner implosion into an explosion. The time period of liner motion reversal is termed the dwell time and is crucial to the performance of the fusion system. Parameters as liner thickness and plasma density are certainly of significant importance to the dwell time, but it seems like a reactor based on the MTF principle hardly can become economic if not innovative solutions are introduced. In the report two such solutions are presented as well.

  14. Magnetized Target Fusion: Prospects for Low-Cost Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter J.; Barnes, Daniel C.; Degnan, James; Parks, Paul; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) has attracted renewed interest in recent years because it has the potential to resolve one of the major problems with conventional fusion energy research - the high cost of facilities to do experiments and in general develop practical fusion energy. The requirement for costly facilities can be traced to fundamental constraints. The Lawson condition implies large system size in the case of conventional magnetic confinement, or large heating power in the case of conventional inertial confinement. The MTF approach is to use much higher fuel density than with conventional magnetic confinement (corresponding to megabar pressures), which results in a much-reduced system size to achieve Lawson conditions. Intrinsically the system must be pulsed because the pressures exceed the strength of any known material. To facilitate heating the fuel (or "target") to thermonuclear conditions with a high-power high-intensity source of energy, magnetic fields are used to insulate the high-pressure fuel from material surroundings (thus "magnetized target"). Because of magnetic insulation, the required heating power intensity is reduced by many orders of magnitude compared to conventional inertial fusion, even with relatively poor energy confinement in the magnetic field, such as that characterized by Bohm diffusion. In this paper we show semi-quantitatively why MTF-should allow fusion energy production without costly facilities within the same generally accepted physical constraints used for conventional magnetic and inertial fusion. We also briefly discuss potential applications of this technology ranging from nuclear rockets for space propulsion to a practical commercial energy system. Finally, we report on the exploratory research underway, and the interesting physics issues that arise in the MTF regime of parameters. Experiments at Los Alamos are focused on formation of a suitable plasma target for compression, utilizing the knowledge base for compact

  15. Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurden, Glen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24

    Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

  16. Fabrication of glass sphere laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rosencwaig, A.; Woerner, R.L.; Koo, J.C.; Dressler, J.L.; Sherohman, J.W.; Weinland, S.L.; Jeffries, M.

    1979-01-01

    We have developed processes at LLL for mass producing the high quality glass microspheres required for current laser fusion targets. Here we describe the methods and the materials used in our liquid-droplet and dried-gel systems. Glass microspheres ranging from 70 to 600 microns O.D., with walls from 0.5 to 18 microns thick and which satisfy the exacting surface and symmetry specifications of targets for high density experiments are now produced routinely

  17. A fusion protein containing a lepidopteran-specific toxin from the South Indian red scorpion (Mesobuthus tamulus and snowdrop lectin shows oral toxicity to target insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitches Elaine

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite evidence suggesting a role in plant defence, the use of plant lectins in crop protection has been hindered by their low and species-specific insecticidal activity. Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA is transported to the haemolymph of insects after oral ingestion, and can be used as a basis for novel insecticides. Recombinant proteins containing GNA expressed as a fusion with a peptide or protein, normally only toxic when injected into the insect haemolymph, have the potential to show oral toxicity as a result of GNA-mediated uptake. Results A gene encoding a toxin, ButaIT, from the red scorpion (Mesobuthus tamulus was synthesised and assembled into expression constructs. One construct contained ButaIT alone, whereas the other contained ButaIT fused N-terminally to a GNA polypeptide (ButaIT/GNA. Both recombinant proteins were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as an expression host, and purified. Recombinant ButaIT and ButaIT/GNA were acutely toxic when injected into larvae of tomato moth (Lacanobia oleracea, causing slow paralysis, leading to mortality or decreased growth. ButaIT/GNA was chronically toxic when fed to L. oleracea larvae, causing decreased survival and weight gain under conditions where GNA alone was effectively non-toxic. Intact ButaIT/GNA was detected in larval haemolymph from insects fed the fusion protein orally, demonstrating transport of the linked polypeptide across the gut. Proteolysis of the fusion protein was also observed. ButaIT/GNA was significantly more toxic that GNA alone when fed to the homopteran Nilaparvata lugens (rice brown planthopper in liquid artificial diet. Conclusion The ButaIT/GNA recombinant fusion protein is toxic to lepidopteran larvae both when injected and when fed orally, showing the utility of GNA as a carrier to transport potentially toxic peptides and proteins across the insect gut. Although ButaIT has been claimed to be lepidopteran

  18. Uniform illumination of spherical laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Uniformity of illumination of spherical laser fusion targets is calculated for eight, twelve, and twenty beams arranged according to the symmetry of the Platonic solids. Uniformity is optimized by varying the f/no. of ideal aberration-free lenses, amount of beam overlap, and the shape of the spatial beam profile. The numerical results show twenty-beam illumination to be slightly better than twelve-beam illumination, with eight beams running a poor third. Refractive energy losses due to nonorthogonal illumination and the implications for the design of a practical laser fusion reactor are discussed

  19. Pichia pastoris-produced mucin-type fusion proteins with multivalent O-glycan substitution as targeting molecules for mannose-specific receptors of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Anki; Sjöblom, Magnus; Strindelius, Lena; Johansson, Tomas; Fleckenstein, Tilly; Chatzissavidou, Nathalie; Lindberg, Linda; Angström, Jonas; Rova, Ulrika; Holgersson, Jan

    2011-08-01

    Mannose-binding proteins like the macrophage mannose receptor (MR), the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Immunoglobulin fusion proteins of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1/mIgG(2b)) carrying mostly O-glycans and, as a control, the α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP/mIgG(2b)) carrying mainly N-linked glycans were stably expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Pichia pastoris-produced PSGL-1/mIgG(2b) was shown to carry O-glycans that mediated strong binding to mannose-specific lectins in a lectin array and were susceptible to cleavage by α-mannosidases including an α1,2- but not an α1,6-mannosidase. Electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of O-glycans containing up to nine hexoses with the penta- and hexasaccharides being the predominant ones. α1,2- and α1,3-linked, but not α1,6-linked, mannose residues were detected by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirming the results of the mannosidase cleavage. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constants for binding of PNGase F-treated mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b) to MR, DC-SIGN and MBL were shown by surface plasmon resonance to be 126, 56 and 16 nM, respectively. In conclusion, PSGL-1/mIgG(2b) expressed in P. pastoris carried O-glycans mainly comprised of α-linked mannoses and with up to nine residues. It bound mannose-specific receptors with high apparent affinity and may become a potent targeting molecule for these receptors in vivo.

  20. Novel VEGF decoy receptor fusion protein conbercept targeting multiple VEGF isoforms provide remarkable anti-angiogenesis effect in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Wang

    Full Text Available VEGF family factors are known to be the principal stimulators of abnormal angiogenesis, which play a fundamental role in tumor and various ocular diseases. Inhibition of VEGF is widely applied in antiangiogenic therapy. Conbercept is a novel decoy receptor protein constructed by fusing VEGF receptor 1 and VEGF receptor 2 extracellular domains with the Fc region of human immunoglobulin. In this study, we systematically evaluated the binding affinity of conbercept with VEGF isoforms and PlGF by using anti-VEGF antibody (Avastin as reference. BIACORE and ELISA assay results indicated that conbercept could bind different VEGF-A isoforms with higher affinity than reference. Furthermore, conbercept could also bind VEGF-B and PlGF, whereas Avastin showed no binding. Oxygen-induced retinopathy model showed that conbercept could inhibit the formation of neovasularizations. In tumor-bearing nude mice, conbercept could also suppress tumor growth very effectively in vivo. Overall, our study have demonstrated that conbercept could bind with high affinity to multiple VEGF isoforms and consequently provide remarkable anti-angiogenic effect, suggesting the possibility to treat angiogenesis-related diseases such as cancer and wet AMD etc.

  1. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2006-01-01

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1 V12 or Cdc42 V12 could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA L63 decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia

  2. Magnetized target fusion in cylindrical geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basko, M.M. E-mail: basko@vitep5.itep.ru; Churazov, M.D.; Kemp, A.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J

    2001-05-21

    General ignition conditions for magnetized target fusion (MTF) in cylindrical geometry are formulated. To attain an MTF ignition state, the deuterium-tritium fuel must be compressed in the regime of self-sustained magnetized implosion (SSMI). We analyze the general conditions and optimal parameter values required for initiating such a regime, and demonstrate that the SSMI regime can already be realized in cylindrical implosions driven by {approx}100 kJ beams of fast ions.

  3. Electrostatics, small particles, and laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    The success of any Inertial Confinement Fusion system for the production of useful power depends critically on the production of suitable targets. This is true whether the arrangement is that proposed by Nuckolls et al. or some other arrangement. The target must have characteristics such as material composition, structure, and surface finish which are tailored to the laser pulse length, energy, peak and average power and pulse shape. To provide useful power on a continuous basis, it is likely that the repetition rate will be 1.0 to 10 per second. Thus, in a 24 hour running period 864,000 targets may be necessary and one must be placed at the focal point of the laser every tenth of a second. For economic operation it is necessary that the targets be produced at costs of less than $1.00 per target

  4. Molecular Determinants for Protein Stabilization by Insertional Fusion to a Thermophilic Host Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Brennal; Labonte, Jason W; Xiong, Tina; Aoraha, Edwin; Williams, Asher; Shah, Vandan; Chau, Edward; Helal, Kazi Yasin; Gray, Jeffrey J; Kim, Jin Ryoun

    2015-11-02

    A universal method that improves protein stability and evolution has thus far eluded discovery. Recently, however, studies have shown that insertional fusion to a protein chaperone stabilized various target proteins with minimal negative effects. The improved stability was derived from insertion into a hyperthermophilic protein, Pyrococcus furiosus maltodextrin-binding protein (PfMBP), rather than from changes to the target protein sequence. In this report, by evaluating the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of various inserted β-lactamase (BLA) homologues, we were able to examine the molecular determinants of stability realized by insertional fusion to PfMBP. Results indicated that enhanced stability and suppressed aggregation of BLA stemmed from enthalpic and entropic mechanisms. This report also suggests that insertional fusion to a stable protein scaffold has the potential to be a useful method for improving protein stability, as well as functional protein evolution. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Crystal structures of MBP fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, David S

    2016-03-01

    Although chaperone-assisted protein crystallization remains a comparatively rare undertaking, the number of crystal structures of polypeptides fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP) that have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has grown dramatically during the past decade. Altogether, 102 fusion protein structures were detected by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. Collectively, these structures comprise a range of sizes, space groups, and resolutions that are typical of the PDB as a whole. While most of these MBP fusion proteins were equipped with short inter-domain linkers to increase their rigidity, fusion proteins with long linkers have also been crystallized. In some cases, surface entropy reduction mutations in MBP appear to have facilitated the formation of crystals. A comparison of the structures of fused and unfused proteins, where both are available, reveals that MBP-mediated structural distortions are very rare. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  6. Targeting proteins for degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Erin K; Harstad, Kristine G; Matouschek, Andreas

    2009-11-01

    Protein degradation plays a central role in many cellular functions. Misfolded and damaged proteins are removed from the cell to avoid toxicity. The concentrations of regulatory proteins are adjusted by degradation at the appropriate time. Both foreign and native proteins are digested into small peptides as part of the adaptive immune response. In eukaryotic cells, an ATP-dependent protease called the proteasome is responsible for much of this proteolysis. Proteins are targeted for proteasomal degradation by a two-part degron, which consists of a proteasome binding signal and a degradation initiation site. Here we describe how both components contribute to the specificity of degradation.

  7. Micromachining of inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobby, P.L.; Salzer, L.J.; Day, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Many experiments conducted on today's largest inertial confinement fusion drive lasers require target components with sub-millimeter dimensions, precisions of a micron or less and surface finishes measured in nanometers. For metal and plastic, techniques using direct machining with diamond tools have been developed that yield the desired parts. New techniques that will be discussed include the quick-flip locator, a magnetically held kinematic mount that has allowed the direct machining of millimeter-sized beryllium hemishells whose inside and outside surface are concentric to within 0.25 micron, and an electronic version of a tracer lathe which has produced precise azimuthal variations of less than a micron

  8. Delivery of therapeutic proteins as secretable TAT fusion products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinterman, Marcella; Farzaneh, Farzin; Habib, Nagy; Malik, Farooq; Gäken, Joop; Tavassoli, Mahvash

    2009-02-01

    The trans-acting activator of transcription (TAT) protein transduction domain (PTD) mediates the transduction of peptides and proteins into target cells. The TAT-PTD has an important potential as a tool for the delivery of therapeutic agents. The production of TAT fusion proteins in bacteria, however, is problematic because of protein insolubility and the absence of eukaryotic post-translational modification. An attractive alternative, both for in vitro protein production and for in vivo applications, is the use of higher eukaryotic cells for secretion of TAT fusion proteins. However, the ubiquitous expression of furin endoprotease (PACE or SPC1) in the Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum, and the presence of furin recognition sequences within TAT-PTD, results in the cleavage and loss of the TAT-PTD domain during its secretory transition through the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. In this study, we show the development of a synthetic TATkappa-PTD in which mutation of the furin recognition sequences, but retention of protein transduction activity, allows secretion of recombinant proteins, followed by successful uptake of the modified protein, by the target cells. This system was used to successfully secrete marker protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), and apoptin, a protein with tumor-specific cytotoxicity. Detection of GFP, phosphorylation, and induction of cell death by TATkappa-GFP-apoptin indicated that the secreted proteins were functional in target cells. This novel strategy therefore has important potential for the efficient delivery of therapeutic proteins.

  9. Protein targeting protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clegg, Roger A

    1998-01-01

    ... of intracellular environment. Because the concept of protein targeting is intuitive rather than explicitly defined, it has been variously used by different groups of researchers in cell biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. For those working in the field of intracellular signaling, an influential introduction to the topic was the seminal article by Hubbard & Cohen (TIBS [1993] 18, 172- 177), which was based on the work of Cohen's laboratory on protein phosphatases. Subsequently, the ideas that t...

  10. Mutations in the fusion peptide and heptad repeat regions of the Newcastle disease virus fusion protein block fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Sergel-Germano, T; McQuain, C; Morrison, T

    1994-01-01

    Nonconservative mutations were introduced by site-specific mutagenesis into the fusion peptide and the adjacent heptad repeat region of the fusion protein of Newcastle disease virus in order to determine the role of both regions in the fusion activity of the protein. Mutations in both regions that allowed for proper folding and intracellular transport of the protein blocked the fusion activity of the protein when assayed in the presence of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein.

  11. Environmental release targets for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulden, W.; Raskob, W.

    2005-01-01

    Within the European fission community, so called European Utility Requirements were developed to define common targets, criteria and evaluation methods for, amongst others, safety, environmental protection and public health with respect to future nuclear fission power plant development. In the case of severe accidents, the objective is to restrict the radiological consequences to the vicinity of the plant, i.e., to avoid early and late countermeasures such as evacuation or relocation of the population, and to restrict food banning to small areas and the first year after the accident. Within the European Fusion Technology Programme, a methodology is being developed in compliance with these European Utility Requirements, to define design requirements for future fusion reactors. First results are presented. Concerning food banning, calculations revealed extremely conservative values for tritium in EU regulations and recommendations. This does not affect assessments for fission reactors, but is an overestimation of the tritium dose impact from ingestion. Therefore, in compliance with scientific justification, considerably higher maximum permissible activity levels for tritium should be considered

  12. Plasma processed coating of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Crane, J.K.; Illige, J.D.; Hatcher, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Coatings for laser fusion targets have been deposited in an inductively coupled discharge device by plasma polymerization. Two feed gases were used: perfluoro-2-butene, which produced a fluorocarbon coating (CF 1 3 ) with a density of 1.8 g/cc, and trans-2-butene which produced a hydrocarbon coating (CH 1 3 ) with a density of 1.0 g/cc. Uniform pin-hole free films have been deposited to a thickness of up to 30 μm of fluorocarbon and up to 110 μm of hydrocarbon. The effect of process variables on surface smoothness has been investigated. The basic defect in the coating has been found to result from shadowing by a small surface irregularity in an anisotropic coating flux

  13. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  14. Intracellular distribution of cowpea mosaic virus movement protein as visualised by green fluorescent protein fusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gopinath, K.; Bertens, P.; Pouwels, J.; Marks, H.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Wellink, J.E.; Kammen, van A.

    2003-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) derivatives expressing movement protein (MP) green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions (MP:GFP) were used to study the intracellular targeting and localization of the MP in cowpea protoplasts and plants. In protoplasts, a virus coding for a wild type MP:GFP (MPfGFP) induced

  15. Method for mounting laser fusion targets for irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, R. Jay; Farnum, Eugene H.; McCall, Gene H.

    1977-07-26

    Methods for preparing laser fusion targets of the ball-and-disk type are disclosed. Such targets are suitable for irradiation with one or two laser beams to produce the requisite uniform compression of the fuel material.

  16. Fusion proteins useful for producing pinene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-Yahya, Pamela P.; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides for a modified host cell comprising a heterologous pinene synthase (PS), or enzymatically active fragment or variant thereof, and optionally a geranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GPPS), or enzymatically active fragment or variant thereof, or a fusion protein comprising: (a) a PS and (b) a GPPS linked by a linker.

  17. Indirect drive targets for fusion power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter A.; Miles, Robin R.

    2016-10-11

    A hohlraum for an inertial confinement fusion power plant is disclosed. The hohlraum includes a generally cylindrical exterior surface, and an interior rugby ball-shaped surface. Windows over laser entrance holes at each end of the hohlraum enclose inert gas. Infrared reflectors on opposite sides of the central point reflect fusion chamber heat away from the capsule. P2 shields disposed on the infrared reflectors help assure an enhanced and more uniform x-ray bath for the fusion fuel capsule.

  18. A bispecific enediyne-energized fusion protein targeting both epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor showing enhanced antitumor efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-Fang; Zhu, Xiao-Fei; Cao, Hai-Ying; Zhong, Gen-Shen; Li, Liang; Deng, Bao-Guo; Chen, Ping; Wang, Pei-Zhen; Miao, Qing-Fang; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2017-04-18

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) both overexpressed on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are known cooperatively to promote tumor progression and drug resistance. This study was to construct a novel bispecific fusion protein EGF-IGF-LDP-AE consisting of EGFR and IGF-IR specific ligands (EGF and IGF-1) and lidamycin, an enediyne antibiotic with potent antitumor activity, and investigate its antitumor efficacy against NSCLC. Binding and internalization assays showed that EGF-IGF-LDP protein could bind to NSCLC cells with high affinity and then internalized into cells with higher efficiency than that of monospecific proteins. In vitro, the enediyne-energized analogue of bispecific fusion protein (EGF-IGF-LDP-AE) displayed extremely potent cytotoxicity to NSCLC cell lines with IC50protein EGF-IGF-LDP-AE was more cytotoxic than monospecific proteins (EGF-LDP-AE and LDP-IGF-AE) and lidamycin. In vivo, EGF-IGF-LDP-AE markedly inhibited the growth of A549 xenografts, and the efficacy was more potent than that of lidamycin and monospecific counterparts. EGF-IGF-LDP-AE caused significant cell cycle arrest and it also induced cell apoptosis in a dosage-dependent manner. Pretreatment with EGF-IGF-LDP-AE inhibited EGF-, IGF-stimulated EGFR and IGF-1R phosphorylation, and blocked two main downstream signaling molecules AKT and ERK activation. These data suggested that EGF-LDP-IGF-AE protein would be a promising targeted agent for NSCLC patients with EGFR and/or IGF-1R overexpression.

  19. HIV-1 gp41 Fusion Intermediate: A Target for HIV Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chungen Pan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 infection is initiated by the binding of gp120 envelope glyco-protein to its cell receptor (CD4 and a coreceptor (CXCR4 or CCR5, followed by a series of conformational changes in the gp41 transmembrane subunit. These changes include insertion of fusion peptide into the target cell membrane and association of C-heptad repeat (CHR peptide with the N-heptad repeat (NHR trimer, a pre-hairpin fusion intermediate. A stable six-helix bundle core is then formed, bringing the viral envelope and target cell membrane into close proximity for fusion. Peptides derived from the CHR region, such as T20 and C34, inhibit HIV-1 fusion by interacting with the gp41 fusion intermediate. A number of anti-HIV-1 peptides and small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 NHR-trimer have been identified. By combining HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting different sites in the gp41 fusion intermediate, a potent synergistic effect takes place, resulting in a potential new therapeutic strategy for the HIV infection/AIDS. Here, we present an overview of the current development of anti-HIV drugs, particularly those targeting the gp41 fusion intermediate.

  20. A novel Escherichia coli solubility enhancer protein for fusion expression of aggregation-prone heterologous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jong-Am; Lee, Dae-Sung; Park, Jin-Seung; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Lee, Jeewon

    2011-07-10

    Through the proteome analysis of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), we previously identified the stress-responsive protein, arsenate reductase (ArsC), that showed a high cytoplasmic solubility and a folding capacity even in the presence of stress-inducing reagents. In this study, we used ArsC as an N-terminal fusion partner to synthesize nine aggregation-prone proteins as water-soluble forms. As a result, solubility of the aggregation-prone proteins increased dramatically by the fusion of ArsC, due presumably to its tendency to facilitate the folding of target proteins. Also, we evaluated and confirmed the efficacy of ArsC-fusion expression in making the fusion-expressed target proteins have their own native function or structure. That is, the self-assembly function of human ferritin light chain, l-arginine-degrading function of arginine deiminase, and the correct secondary structure of human granulocyte colony stimulating factor were clearly observed through transmission electron microscope analysis, colorimetric enzyme activity assay, and circular dichroism, respectively. It is strongly suggested that ArsC can be in general an efficient fusion expression partner for the production of soluble and active heterologous proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins via Fusion Peptides in Intact Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiaw Kiaw Ng

    Full Text Available In current plant biotechnology, the introduction of exogenous DNA encoding desired traits is the most common approach used to modify plants. However, general plant transformation methods can cause random integration of exogenous DNA into the plant genome. To avoid these events, alternative methods, such as a direct protein delivery system, are needed to modify the plant. Although there have been reports of the delivery of proteins into cultured plant cells, there are currently no methods for the direct delivery of proteins into intact plants, owing to their hierarchical structures. Here, we demonstrate the efficient fusion-peptide-based delivery of proteins into intact Arabidopsis thaliana. Bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66 kDa was selected as a model protein to optimize conditions for delivery into the cytosol. The general applicability of our method to large protein cargo was also demonstrated by the delivery of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, 150 kDa into the cytosol. The compatibility of the fusion peptide system with the delivery of proteins to specific cellular organelles was also demonstrated using the fluorescent protein Citrine (27 kDa conjugated to either a nuclear localization signal (NLS or a peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS. In conclusion, our designed fusion peptide system can deliver proteins with a wide range of molecular weights (27 to 150 kDa into the cells of intact A. thaliana without interfering with the organelle-targeting peptide conjugated to the protein. We expect that this efficient protein delivery system will be a powerful tool in plant biotechnology.

  2. Fusion-product energy loss in inertial confinement fusion plasmas with applications to target burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.B.; Miley, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been proposed as a competitor to magnetic fusion in the drive towards energy production, but ICF target performance still contains many uncertainties. One such area is the energy-loss rate of fusion products. This situation is due in part to the unique plasma parameters encountered in ICF plasmas which are compressed to more than one-thousand times solid density. The work presented here investigates three aspects of this uncertainty

  3. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-12-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities.

  4. Parametric study of a target factory for laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherohman, J.W.; Meier, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of a target factory leading to the derivation of production rate equations has provided the basis for a parametric study. Rate equations describing the production of laser fusion targets have been developed for the purpose of identifying key parameters, attractive production techniques and cost scaling relationships for a commercial target factory

  5. Laser fusion target fabrication. Status report, 30 April 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, R.J.; Farnum, E.H.

    1974-11-01

    The laser fusion target fabrication effort at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has been successful in producing targets of the general design requested by, and with a range of parameters acceptable to, the theoretical designers and to the laser/target interaction physics experimentalists. Many novel techniques for handling and measuring the properties of various types of hollow microballoons were developed. (U.S.)

  6. Fc-fusion Proteins in Therapy: An Updated View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Reza; Zolbanin, Naime M; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Majidi, Jafar; Kazemi, Tohid

    2017-01-01

    Fc-fusion proteins are composed of Fc region of IgG antibody (Hinge-CH2-CH3) and a desired linked protein. Fc region of Fc-fusion proteins can bind to neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) thereby rescuing it from degradation. The first therapeutic Fc-fusion protein was introduced for the treatment of AIDS. The molecular designing is the first stage in production of Fc-fusion proteins. The amino acid residues in the Fc region and linked protein are very important in the bioactivity and affinity of the fusion proteins. Although, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are the top selling biologics but the application of therapeutic Fc-fusion proteins in clinic is in progress and among these medications Etanercept is the most effective in therapy. At present, eleven Fc-fusion proteins have been approved by FDA. There are novel Fc-fusion proteins which are in pre-clinical and clinical development. In this article, we review the molecular and biological characteristics of Fc-fusion proteins and then further discuss the features of novel therapeutic Fc-fusion proteins. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Targeting the Conserved Fusion Loop of HAP2 Inhibits the Transmission of Plasmodium berghei and falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Angrisano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Inhibiting transmission of Plasmodium is a central strategy in malarial eradication, and the biological process of gamete fusion during fertilization is a proven target for this approach. The lack of a structure or known molecular function of current anti-malarial vaccine targets has previously been a hindrance in the development of transmission-blocking vaccines. Structure/function studies have indicated that the conserved gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 is a class II viral fusion protein. Here, we demonstrate that targeting a function-critical site of the fusion/cd loop with species-specific antibodies reduces Plasmodium berghei transmission in vivo by 58.9% and in vitro fertilization by up to 89.9%. A corresponding reduction in P. falciparum transmission (75.5%/36.4% reductions in intensity/prevalence is observed in complimentary field studies. These results emphasize conserved mechanisms of fusion in Apicomplexa, while highlighting an approach to design future anti-malarial transmission-blocking vaccines. : Angrisano et al. find that the HAP2 cd-loop can be targeted as an anti-malarial intervention, is immunogenic across multiple plasmodial species, can induce antibodies that specifically recognize the sexual stages of the parasitic life cycle, and can mediate transmission-blocking immunity in the lab and the field. Keywords: HAP2, malaria, transmission, fusion, vaccine

  8. Dim target detection method based on salient graph fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ruo-lan; Shen, Yi-yan; Jiang, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Dim target detection is one key problem in digital image processing field. With development of multi-spectrum imaging sensor, it becomes a trend to improve the performance of dim target detection by fusing the information from different spectral images. In this paper, one dim target detection method based on salient graph fusion was proposed. In the method, Gabor filter with multi-direction and contrast filter with multi-scale were combined to construct salient graph from digital image. And then, the maximum salience fusion strategy was designed to fuse the salient graph from different spectral images. Top-hat filter was used to detect dim target from the fusion salient graph. Experimental results show that proposal method improved the probability of target detection and reduced the probability of false alarm on clutter background images.

  9. A toolkit for graded expression of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Ehm, Patrick; Giehler, Susanne; Mayr, Georg W

    2012-09-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-like proteins of different colors are important tools in cell biology. In many studies, the intracellular targeting of proteins has been determined by transiently expressing GFP fusion proteins and analyzing their intracellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. In most vectors, expression of GFP is driven by the enhancer/promoter cassette of the immediate early gene of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV). This cassette generates high levels of protein expression in most mammalian cell lines. Unfortunately, these nonphysiologically high protein levels have been repeatedly reported to artificially alter the intracellular targeting of proteins fused to GFP. To cope with this problem, we generated a multitude of attenuated GFP expression vectors by modifying the hCMV enhancer/promoter cassette. These modified vectors were transiently expressed, and the expression levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) alone and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) fused to another protein were determined by fluorescence microscopy and/or Western blotting. As shown in this study, we were able to (i) clearly reduce the expression of EGFP alone and (ii) reduce expression of an EYFP fusion protein down to the level of the endogenous protein, both in a graded manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  11. Peptides and membrane fusion : Towards an understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein-induced fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pecheur, EI; Sainte-Marie, J; Bienvenue, A; Hoekstra, D

    1999-01-01

    Processes such as endo- or exocytosis, membrane recycling, fertilization and enveloped viruses infection require one or more critical membrane fusion reactions. A key feature in viral and cellular fusion phenomena is the involvement of specific fusion proteins. Among the few well-characterized

  12. Dual targeting of peroxisomal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eAst

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular compartmentalization into organelles serves to separate biological processes within the environment of a single cell. While some metabolic reactions are specific to a single organelle, others occur in more than one cellular compartment. Specific targeting of proteins to compartments inside of eukaryotic cells is mediated by defined sequence motifs. To achieve multiple targeting to different compartments cells use a variety of strategies. Here, we focus on mechanisms leading to dual targeting of peroxisomal proteins. In many instances, isoforms of peroxisomal proteins with distinct intracellular localization are encoded by separate genes. But also single genes can give rise to differentially localized proteins. Different isoforms can be generated by use of alternative transcriptional start sites, by differential splicing or ribosomal read-through of stop codons. In all these cases different peptide variants are produced, of which only one carries a peroxisomal targeting signal. Alternatively, peroxisomal proteins contain additional signals that compete for intracellular targeting. Dual localization of proteins residing in both the cytoplasm and in peroxisomes may also result from use of inefficient targeting signals. The recent observation that some bona fide cytoplasmic enzymes were also found in peroxisomes indicates that dual targeting of proteins to both the cytoplasm and the peroxisome might be more widespread. Although current knowledge of proteins exhibiting only partial peroxisomal targeting is far from being complete, we speculate that the metabolic capacity of peroxisomes might be larger than previously assumed.

  13. Engineering Styrene Monooxygenase for Biocatalysis: Reductase-Epoxidase Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Thomas; Tucker, Kathryn; Okonkwo, Nonye; Assefa, Berhanegebriel; Conrad, Catleen; Scholtissek, Anika; Schlömann, Michael; Gassner, George; Tischler, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    The enantioselective epoxidation of styrene and related compounds by two-component styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) has targeted these enzymes for development as biocatalysts. In the present work, we prepare genetically engineered fusion proteins that join the C-terminus of the epoxidase (StyA) to the N-terminus of the reductase (StyB) through a linker peptide and demonstrate their utility as biocatalysts in the synthesis of Tyrain purple and other indigoid dyes. A single-vector expression system offers a simplified platform for transformation and expansion of the catalytic function of styrene monooxygenases, and the resulting fusion proteins are self-regulated and couple efficiently NADH oxidation to styrene epoxidation. We find that the reductase domain proceeds through a sequential ternary-complex mechanism at low FAD concentration and a double-displacement mechanism at higher concentrations of FAD. Single-turnover studies indicate an observed rate constant for FAD-to-FAD hydride transfer of ~8 s -1 . This step is rate limiting in the styrene epoxidation reaction and helps to ensure that flavin reduction and styrene epoxidation reactions proceed without wasteful side reactions. Comparison of the reductase activity of the fusion proteins with the naturally occurring reductase, SMOB, and N-terminally histidine-tagged reductase, NSMOB, suggests that the observed changes in catalytic mechanism are due in part to an increase in flavin-binding affinity associated with the N-terminal extension of the reductase.

  14. Compression of magnetized target in the magneto-inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzenov, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model, numerical method and results of the computer analysis of the compression process and the energy transfer in the target plasma, used in magneto-inertial fusion. The computer simulation of the compression process of magnetized cylindrical target by high-power laser pulse is presented.

  15. Neutron penumbral imaging of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, R.A.; Ress, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Using a new technique, penumbral coded-aperture imaging, the first neutron images of laser-driven, inertial-confinement fusion targets were obtained. With these images the deuterium-tritium burn region within a compressed target can be measured directly. 4 references, 11 figures

  16. Design, construction, and characterization of high-performance membrane fusion devices with target-selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwada, Ayumi; Yamane, Iori; Tsuboi, Mana; Ando, Shun; Matsuda, Kiyomi

    2012-01-31

    Membrane fusion proteins such as the hemagglutinin glycoprotein have target recognition and fusion accelerative domains, where some synergistically working elements are essential for target-selective and highly effective native membrane fusion systems. In this work, novel membrane fusion devices bearing such domains were designed and constructed. We selected a phenylboronic acid derivative as a recognition domain for a sugar-like target and a transmembrane-peptide (Leu-Ala sequence) domain interacting with the target membrane, forming a stable hydrophobic α-helix and accelerating the fusion process. Artificial membrane fusion behavior between the synthetic devices in which pilot and target liposomes were incorporated was characterized by lipid-mixing and inner-leaflet lipid-mixing assays. Consequently, the devices bearing both the recognition and transmembrane domains brought about a remarkable increase in the initial rate for the membrane fusion compared with the devices containing the recognition domain alone. In addition, a weakly acidic pH-responsive device was also constructed by replacing three Leu residues in the transmembrane-peptide domain by Glu residues. The presence of Glu residues made the acidic pH-dependent hydrophobic α-helix formation possible as expected. The target-selective liposome-liposome fusion was accelerated in a weakly acidic pH range when the Glu-substituted device was incorporated in pilot liposomes. The use of this pH-responsive device seems to be a potential strategy for novel applications in a liposome-based delivery system. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. Protein body formation in stable transgenic tobacco expressing elastin-like polypeptide and hydrophobin fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Sonia P; Saberianfar, Reza; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Menassa, Rima

    2013-05-10

    Plants are recognized as an efficient and inexpensive system to produce valuable recombinant proteins. Two different strategies have been commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants: transient expression mediated by Agrobacterium; or stable transformation of the plant genome. However, the use of plants as bioreactors still faces two main limitations: low accumulation levels of some recombinant proteins and lack of efficient purification methods. Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), hydrophobin I (HFBI) and Zera® are three fusion partners found to increase the accumulation levels of recombinant proteins and induce the formation of protein bodies (PBs) in leaves when targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in transient expression assays. In this study the effects of ELP and HFBI fusion tags on recombinant protein accumulation levels and PB formation was examined in stable transgenic Nicotiana tabacum. The accumulation of recombinant protein and PB formation was evaluated in two cultivars of Nicotiana tabacum transformed with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to ELP or HFBI, both targeted and retrieved to the ER. The ELP and HFBI tags increased the accumulation of the recombinant protein and induced the formation of PBs in leaves of stable transgenic plants from both cultivars. Furthermore, these tags induced the formation of PBs in a concentration-dependent manner, where a specific level of recombinant protein accumulation was required for PBs to appear. Moreover, agro-infiltration of plants accumulating low levels of recombinant protein with p19, a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), increased accumulation levels in four independent transgenic lines, suggesting that PTGS might have caused the low accumulation levels in these plants. The use of ELP and HFBI tags as fusion partners in stable transgenic plants of tobacco is feasible and promising. In a constitutive environment, these tags increase the accumulation levels

  18. COST-EFFECTIVE TARGET FABRICATION FOR INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GOODIN, D.T; NOBILE, A; SCHROEN, D.G; MAXWELL, J.L; RICKMAN, W.S

    2004-03-01

    A central feature of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant is a target that has been compressed and heated to fusion conditions by the energy input of the driver. The IFE target fabrication programs are focusing on methods that will scale to mass production, and working closely with target designers to make material selections that will satisfy a wide range of required and desirable characteristics. Targets produced for current inertial confinement fusion experiments are estimated to cost about $2500 each. Design studies of cost-effective power production from laser and heavy-ion driven IFE have found a cost requirement of about $0.25-0.30 each. While four orders of magnitude cost reduction may seem at first to be nearly impossible, there are many factors that suggest this is achievable. This paper summarizes the paradigm shifts in target fabrication methodologies that will be needed to economically supply targets and presents the results of ''nth-of-a-kind'' plant layouts and concepts for IFE power plant fueling. Our engineering studies estimate the cost of the target supply in a fusion economy, and show that costs are within the range of commercial feasibility for laser-driven and for heavy ion driven IFE

  19. MEMBRANE-FUSION OF SEMLIKI FOREST VIRUS INVOLVES HOMOTRIMERS OF THE FUSION PROTEIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAHLBERG, JM; WILSCHUT, J; GAROFF, H

    1992-01-01

    Infection of cells with enveloped viruses is accomplished through membrane fusion. The binding and fusion Processes are mediated by the spike proteins in the envelope of the virus particle and usually involve a series of conformational changes in these proteins. We have studied the low-pH-mediated

  20. Control of established colon cancer xenografts using a novel humanized single chain antibody-streptococcal superantigen fusion protein targeting the 5T4 oncofetal antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelcey G Patterson

    Full Text Available Superantigens (SAgs are microbial toxins that cross-link T cell receptors with major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II molecules leading to the activation of large numbers of T cells. Herein, we describe the development and preclinical testing of a novel tumor-targeted SAg (TTS therapeutic built using the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin C (SpeC SAg and targeting cancer cells expressing the 5T4 tumor-associated antigen (TAA. To inhibit potentially harmful widespread immune cell activation, a SpeC mutation within the high-affinity MHC-II binding interface was generated (SpeCD203A that demonstrated a pronounced reduction in mitogenic activity, yet this mutant could still induce immune cell-mediated cancer cell death in vitro. To target 5T4+ cancer cells, we engineered a humanized single chain variable fragment (scFv antibody to recognize 5T4 (scFv5T4. Specific targeting of scFv5T4 was verified. SpeCD203A fused to scFv5T4 maintained the ability to activate and induce immune cell-mediated cytotoxicity of colorectal cancer cells. Using a xenograft model of established human colon cancer, we demonstrated that the SpeC-based TTS was able to control the growth and spread of large tumors in vivo. This required both TAA targeting by scFv5T4 and functional SAg activity. These studies lay the foundation for the development of streptococcal SAgs as 'next-generation' TTSs for cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Structural characterization of Mumps virus fusion protein core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueyong; Xu Yanhui; Lou Zhiyong; Zhu Jieqing; Hu Xuebo; Gao, George F.; Qiu Bingsheng; Rao Zihe; Tien, Po

    2006-01-01

    The fusion proteins of enveloped viruses mediating the fusion between the viral and cellular membranes comprise two discontinuous heptad repeat (HR) domains located at the ectodomain of the enveloped glycoproteins. The crystal structure of the fusion protein core of Mumps virus (MuV) was determined at 2.2 A resolution. The complex is a six-helix bundle in which three HR1 peptides form a central highly hydrophobic coiled-coil and three HR2 peptides pack against the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of central coiled-coil in an oblique antiparallel manner. Fusion core of MuV, like those of simian virus 5 and human respiratory syncytium virus, forms typical 3-4-4-4-3 spacing. The similar charecterization in HR1 regions, as well as the existence of O-X-O motif in extended regions of HR2 helix, suggests a basic rule for the formation of the fusion core of viral fusion proteins

  2. Ion tail filling in laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.B.

    1975-06-01

    Thermonuclear burn begins in laser-fusion targets with the collapse of the imploding fuel shell. At this instant the ion velocity distribution is non-Maxwellian, requiring correction to the commonly used computer simulation codes. This correction is computed and compared with that arising from the loss of fast ions in marginal (rho R less than 0.01 gm cm -2 ) targets. (U.S.)

  3. Enhancing recombinant protein solubility with ubiquitin-like small archeal modifying protein fusion partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Sándor; Pathare, Ganesh Ramnath; Baka, Erzsébet; Boicu, Marius; Kriszt, Balázs; Székács, András; Zinzula, Luca; Kukolya, József; Nagy, István

    2015-11-01

    A variety of protein expression tags with different biochemical properties has been used to enhance the yield and solubility of recombinant proteins. Ubiquitin, SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) and prokaryotic ubiquitin like MoaD (molybdopterin synthase, small subunit) fusion tags are getting more popular because of their small size. In this paper we report on the use of ubiquitin-like small archaeal modifier proteins (SAMPs) as fusion tags since they proved to increase expression yield, stability and solubility in our experiments. Equally important, they did not co-purify with proteins of the expression host and there was information that their specific JAB1/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme (JAMM) protease can recognize the C-terminal VSGG sequence when SAMPs fused, either branched or linearly to target proteins, and cleave it specifically. SAMPs and JAMM proteases from Haloferax volcanii, Thermoplasma acidophilum, Methanococcoides burtonii and Nitrosopumilus maritimus were selected, cloned, expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and tested as fusion tags and cleaving proteases, respectively. Investigated SAMPs enhanced protein expression and solubility on a wide scale. T. acidophilum SAMPs Ta0895 and Ta01019 were the best performing tags and their effect was comparable to the widely used maltose binding protein (MBP) and N utilization substance protein A (NusA) tags. Moreover, H. volcanii SAMP Hvo_2619 contribution was mediocre, whereas M. burtonii Mbur_1415 could not be expressed. Out of four investigated JAMM proteases, only Hvo_2505 could cleave fusion tags. Interestingly, it was found active not only on its own partner substrate Hvo_2619, but it also cleaved off Ta0895. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The novel Fh8 and H fusion partners for soluble protein expression in Escherichia coli: a comparison with the traditional gene fusion technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sofia J; Almeida, André; Castro, António; Domingues, Lucília; Besir, Hüseyin

    2013-08-01

    The Escherichia coli host system is an advantageous choice for simple and inexpensive recombinant protein production but it still presents bottlenecks at expressing soluble proteins from other organisms. Several efforts have been taken to overcome E. coli limitations, including the use of fusion partners that improve protein expression and solubility. New fusion technologies are emerging to complement the traditional solutions. This work evaluates two novel fusion partners, the Fh8 tag (8 kDa) and the H tag (1 kDa), as solubility enhancing tags in E. coli and their comparison to commonly used fusion partners. A broad range comparison was conducted in a small-scale screening and subsequently scaled-up. Six difficult-to-express target proteins (RVS167, SPO14, YPK1, YPK2, Frutalin and CP12) were fused to eight fusion tags (His, Trx, GST, MBP, NusA, SUMO, H and Fh8). The resulting protein expression and solubility levels were evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis before and after protein purification and after tag removal. The Fh8 partner improved protein expression and solubility as the well-known Trx, NusA or MBP fusion partners. The H partner did not function as a solubility tag. Cleaved proteins from Fh8 fusions were soluble and obtained in similar or higher amounts than proteins from the cleavage of other partners as Trx, NusA or MBP. The Fh8 fusion tag therefore acts as an effective solubility enhancer, and its low molecular weight potentially gives it an advantage over larger solubility tags by offering a more reliable assessment of the target protein solubility when expressed as a fusion protein.

  5. Thermal Studies of the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Target during Injection into the Fusion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, R. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Havstad, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LeBlanc, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chang, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Golosker, I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rosso, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-09

    The tests of the external heat transfer coefficient suggests that the values used in the numerical analysis for the temperature distribution within the fusion fuel target following flight into the target chamber are probably valid. The tests of the heat transfer phenomena occurring within the target due the rapid heating of the LEH window for the hot gasses within the fusion chamber show that the heat does indeed convect via the internal helium environment of the target towards the capsule and that the pressure in the front compartment of the target adjacent to the LEH window increases such that t bypass venting of the internal helium into the second chamber adjacent to the capsule is needed to prevent rupture of the membranes. The bypass flow is cooled by the hohlraum during this venting. However, the experiments suggest that our internal heat flow calculations may be low by about a factor of 2. Further studies need to be conducted to investigate the differences between the experiment and the numerical analysis. Future studies could also possibly bring the test conditions closer to those expected in the fusion chamber to better validate the results. A sacrificial layer will probably be required on the LEH window of the target and this can be used to mitigate any unexpected target heating.

  6. Distinct roles for key karyogamy proteins during yeast nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; Rose, Mark D

    2009-09-01

    During yeast mating, cell fusion is followed by the congression and fusion of the two nuclei. Proteins required for nuclear fusion are found at the surface (Prm3p) and within the lumen (Kar2p, Kar5p, and Kar8p) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Electron tomography (ET) of zygotes revealed that mutations in these proteins block nuclear fusion with different morphologies, suggesting that they act in different steps of fusion. Specifically, prm3 zygotes were blocked before formation of membrane bridges, whereas kar2, kar5, and kar8 zygotes frequently contained them. Membrane bridges were significantly larger and occurred more frequently in kar2 and kar8, than in kar5 mutant zygotes. The kinetics of NE fusion in prm3, kar5, and kar8 mutants, measured by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, were well correlated with the size and frequency of bridges observed by ET. However the kar2 mutant was defective for transfer of NE lumenal GFP, but not diffusion within the lumen, suggesting that transfer was blocked at the NE fusion junction. These observations suggest that Prm3p acts before initiation of outer NE fusion, Kar5p may help dilation of the initial fusion pore, and Kar2p and Kar8p act after outer NE fusion, during inner NE fusion.

  7. A novel fusion partner for enhanced secretion of recombinant proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung-Hoon; Sung, Bong Hyun; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Chul Ho; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2016-12-01

    Expressing proteins with fusion partners improves yield and simplifies the purification process. We developed a novel fusion partner to improve the secretion of heterologous proteins that are otherwise poorly excreted in yeast. The VOA1 (YGR106C) gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a subunit of vacuolar ATPase. We found that C-terminally truncated Voa1p was highly secreted into the culture medium, even when fused with rarely secreted heterologous proteins such as human interleukin-2 (hIL-2). Deletion mapping of C-terminally truncated Voa1p, identified a hydrophilic 28-amino acid peptide (HL peptide) that was responsible for the enhanced secretion of target protein. A purification tag and a protease cleavage site were added to use HL peptide as a multi-purpose fusion partner. The utility of this system was tested via the expression and purification of various heterologous proteins. In many cases, the yield of target proteins fused with the peptide was significantly increased, and fusion proteins could be directly purified with affinity chromatography. The fusion partner was removed by in vitro processing, and intact proteins were purified by re-application of samples to affinity chromatography.

  8. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  9. Non-LTE effects in inertial confinement fusion target chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, J.J.; Moses, G.A.; Peterson, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    In previous studies of transport processes in inertial confinement fusion target chambers, the radiative properties of the background plasma were calculated under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). In this paper, the authors present a study of the equation of state and the radiative properties of high temperature, low-to-moderate density ( 21 cm -3 ) plasmas for the determination of the conditions under which non-LTE effects become important and for an assessment of the importance of non-LTE processes in target chambers during high yield inertial fusion target explosions. For this purpose, two-body (radiative and dielectronic) and three-body (collisional) recombination and de-excitation processes are considered in calculating the steady state ionization and excitation populations. The results of this study indicate that non-LTE processes generally become important at temperatures of > or approx. 1, 10 and 100 eV for plasma densities of 10 18 , 10 19 and 10 21 cm -3 , respectively. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the equation of state and the opacities for a non-LTE argon plasma were performed to study the response of a background gas to an inertial fusion target explosion. These calculations indicate that non-LTE processes are often the dominant atomic processes in the background plasma and that they can strongly affect the radiative and shock properties as energy is transported away from the point of the target explosion. (author). 22 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  10. Positional effects of fusion partners on the yield and solubility of MBP fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raran-Kurussi, Sreejith; Keefe, Karina; Waugh, David S

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) is exceptionally effective at promoting the solubility of its fusion partners. However, there are conflicting reports in the literature claiming that (1) MBP is an effective solubility enhancer only when it is joined to the N-terminus of an aggregation-prone passenger protein, and (2) MBP is equally effective when fused to either end of the passenger. Here, we endeavor to resolve this controversy by comparing the solubility of a diverse set of MBP fusion proteins that, unlike those analyzed in previous studies, are identical in every way except for the order of the two domains. The results indicate that fusion proteins with an N-terminal MBP provide an excellent solubility advantage along with more robust expression when compared to analogous fusions in which MBP is the C-terminal fusion partner. We find that only intrinsically soluble passenger proteins (i.e., those not requiring a solubility enhancer) are produced as soluble fusions when they precede MBP. We also report that even subtle differences in inter-domain linker sequences can influence the solubility of fusion proteins. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Detection of targeted GFP-Hox gene fusions during mouse embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, A R; Stadler, H S; Nakamura, K; Capecchi, M R

    1998-10-27

    The ability to use a vital cell marker to study mouse embryogenesis will open new avenues of experimental research. Recently, the use of transgenic mice, containing multiple copies of the jellyfish gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP), has begun to realize this potential. Here, we show that the fluorescent signals produced by single-copy, targeted GFP in-frame fusions with two different murine Hox genes, Hoxa1 and Hoxc13, are readily detectable by using confocal microscopy. Since Hoxa1 is expressed early and Hoxc13 is expressed late in mouse embryogenesis, this study shows that single-copy GFP gene fusions can be used through most of mouse embryogenesis. Previously, targeted lacZ gene fusions have been very useful for analyzing mouse mutants. Use of GFP gene fusions extends the benefits of targeted lacZ gene fusions by providing the additional utility of a vital marker. Our analysis of the Hoxc13(GFPneo) embryos reveals GFP expression in each of the sites expected from analysis of Hoxc13(lacZneo) embryos. Similarly, Hoxa1(GFPneo) expression was detected in all of the sites predicted from RNA in situ analysis. GFP expression in the foregut pocket of Hoxa1(GFPneo) embryos suggests a role for Hoxa1 in foregut-mediated differentiation of the cardiogenic mesoderm.

  12. C-terminal tyrosine residues modulate the fusion activity of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Andreea; Pager, Cara Teresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2011-02-15

    The paramyxovirus family includes important human pathogens such as measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial virus, and the recently emerged, highly pathogenic Hendra and Nipah viruses. The viral fusion (F) protein plays critical roles in infection, promoting both the virus-cell membrane fusion events needed for viral entry as well as cell-cell fusion events leading to syncytia formation. We describe the surprising finding that addition of the short epitope HA tag to the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Hendra virus F protein leads to a significant increase in the extent of cell-cell membrane fusion. This increase was not due to alterations in surface expression, cleavage state, or association with lipid microdomains. Addition of a Myc tag of similar length did not alter Hendra F protein fusion activity, indicating that the observed stimulation was not solely a result of lengthening the CT. Three tyrosine residues within the HA tag were critical for the increase in the extent of fusion, suggesting C-terminal tyrosines may modulate Hendra fusion activity. The effects of addition of the HA tag varied with other fusion proteins, as parainfluenza virus 5 F-HA showed a decreased level of surface expression and no stimulation of fusion. These results indicate that additions to the C-terminal end of the F protein CT can modulate protein function in a sequence specific manner, reinforcing the need for careful analysis of epitope-tagged glycoproteins. In addition, our results implicate C-terminal tyrosine residues in the modulation of the membrane fusion reaction promoted by these viral glycoproteins.

  13. Bacteriophage membrane protein P9 as a fusion partner for the efficient expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yuna; Jung, Hyeim; Lim, Dongbin

    2015-12-01

    Despite their important roles and economic values, studies of membrane proteins have been hampered by the difficulties associated with obtaining sufficient amounts of protein. Here, we report a novel membrane protein expression system that uses the major envelope protein (P9) of phage φ6 as an N-terminal fusion partner. Phage membrane protein P9 facilitated the synthesis of target proteins and their integration into the Escherichia coli cell membrane. This system was used to produce various multi-pass transmembrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters, and ion channels of human origin. Green fluorescent protein fusion was used to confirm the correct folding of the expressed proteins. Of the 14 membrane proteins tested, eight were highly expressed, three were moderately expressed, and three were barely expressed in E. coli. Seven of the eight highly expressed proteins could be purified after extraction with the mild detergent lauryldimethylamine-oxide. Although a few proteins have previously been developed as fusion partners to augment membrane protein production, we believe that the major envelope protein P9 described here is better suited to the efficient expression of eukaryotic transmembrane proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas; Erb, Steven M.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  15. An insight into fusion technology aiding efficient recombinant protein production for functional proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dinesh K; Yadav, Neelam; Yadav, Sarika; Haque, Shafiul; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-12-15

    Advancements in peptide fusion technologies to maximize the protein production has taken a big leap to fulfill the demands of post-genomics era targeting elucidation of structure/function of the proteome and its therapeutic applications, by over-expression in heterologous expression systems. Despite being most preferred protein expression system armed with variety of cardinal fusion tags, expression of the functionally active recombinant protein in E. coli remains plagued. The present review critically analyses the aptness of well-characterized fusion tags utilized for over-expression of recombinant proteins with improved solubility and their compatibility with downstream purification procedures. The combinatorial tandem affinity strategies have shown to provide more versatile options. Solubility decreasing fusion tags have proved to facilitate the overproduction of antimicrobial peptides. Efficient removal of fusion tags prior to final usage is of utmost importance and has been summarized discussing the efficiency of various enzymatic and chemical methods of tag removal. Unfortunately, no single fusion tag works as a magic bullet to completely fulfill the requirements of protein expression and purification in active form. The information provided might help in selection and development of a successful protocol for efficient recombinant protein production for functional proteomics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Coatings for laser fusion targets were deposited up to 135 μm thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 μm diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 μm) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power, gas flow, and pressure, and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets

  17. A minichaperone-based fusion system for producing insoluble proteins in soluble stable forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapova, Olga A; Yurkova, Maria S; Fedorov, Alexey N

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a fusion system for reliable production of insoluble hydrophobic proteins in soluble stable forms. A carrier is thermophilic minichaperone, GroEL apical domain (GrAD), a 15 kDa monomer able to bind diverse protein substrates. The Met-less variant of GrAD has been made for further convenient use of Met-specific CNBr chemical cleavage, if desired. The Met-less GrAD retained stability and solubility of the original protein. Target polypeptides can be fused to either C-terminus or N-terminus of GrAD. The system has been tested with two unrelated insoluble proteins fused to the C-terminus of GrAD. One of the proteins was also fused to GrAD N-terminus. The fusions formed inclusion bodies at 25°C and above and were partly soluble only at lower expression temperatures. Most importantly, however, after denaturation in urea, all fusions without exception were completely renatured in soluble stable forms that safely survived freezing-thawing as well as lyophilization. All fusions for both tested target proteins retained solubility at high concentrations for days. Functional analysis revealed that a target protein may retain functionality in the fusion. Convenience features include potential thermostability of GrAD fusions, capacity for chemical and enzymatic cleavage of a target and His6 tag for purification. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Method for nondestructive fuel assay of laser fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, Eugene H.; Fries, R. Jay

    1976-01-01

    A method for nondestructively determining the deuterium and tritium content of laser fusion targets by counting the x rays produced by the interaction of tritium beta particles with the walls of the microballoons used to contain the deuterium and tritium gas mixture under high pressure. The x rays provide a direct measure of the tritium content and a means for calculating the deuterium content using the initial known D-T ratio and the known deuterium and tritium diffusion rates.

  19. Novel Data Fusion Method and Exploration of Multiple Information Sources for Transcription Factor Target Gene Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Yli-Harja, Olli; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2010-12-01

    Background. Revealing protein-DNA interactions is a key problem in understanding transcriptional regulation at mechanistic level. Computational methods have an important role in predicting transcription factor target gene genomewide. Multiple data fusion provides a natural way to improve transcription factor target gene predictions because sequence specificities alone are not sufficient to accurately predict transcription factor binding sites. Methods. Here we develop a new data fusion method to combine multiple genome-level data sources and study the extent to which DNA duplex stability and nucleosome positioning information, either alone or in combination with other data sources, can improve the prediction of transcription factor target gene. Results. Results on a carefully constructed test set of verified binding sites in mouse genome demonstrate that our new multiple data fusion method can reduce false positive rates, and that DNA duplex stability and nucleosome occupation data can improve the accuracy of transcription factor target gene predictions, especially when combined with other genome-level data sources. Cross-validation and other randomization tests confirm the predictive performance of our method. Our results also show that nonredundant data sources provide the most efficient data fusion.

  20. Functional analysis of the putative fusion domain of the Baculovirus envelope fusion protein F

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, M.; Veenman, F.; Roode, E.C.; Goldbach, R.W.; Vlak, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Group II nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs), e.g., Spodoptera exigua MNPV, lack a GP64-like protein that is present in group I NPVs but have an unrelated envelope fusion protein named F. In contrast to GP64, the F protein has to be activated by a posttranslational cleavage mechanism to become fusogenic.

  1. Antibody-IL2 Fusion Protein Delivery by Gene Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gan, Jacek

    1998-01-01

    .... The KS-IL2 fusion protein recognizes the KSA antigen expressed on a broad range of human carcinomas, including breast cancer and is effective at preventing outgrowth of the KSA positive, syngeneic...

  2. Antibody-IL2 Fusion Protein Delivery by Gene Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolet, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the work described is to assess the feasibility of a gene therapy approach to deliver a specific antibody cytokine fusion protein called CC49-1L2 to a tumor expressing antigen reactive with the antibody...

  3. Breast Cancer Therapy Using Antibody-Endostatin Fusion Proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shin, Seung-Uon

    2006-01-01

    To produce a more effective form of Herceptin and improve efficacy of human endostatin, we have constructed an anti-HER2 IgG3-human endostatin fusion protein by joining human endostatin to the 3 end...

  4. Information management data base for fusion target fabrication processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J.

    1983-01-01

    A computer-based data management system has been developed to handle data associated with target fabrication processes including glass microballoon characterization, gas filling, materials coating, and storage locations. The system provides automatic data storage and computation, flexible data entry procedures, fast access, automated report generation, and secure data transfer. It resides on a CDC CYBER 175 computer and is compatible with the CDC data base language Query Update, but is based on custom fortran software interacting directly with the CYBER's file management system. The described data base maintains detailed, accurate, and readily available records of fusion targets information

  5. Purification of CD47-streptavidin fusion protein from bacterial lysate using biotin-agarose affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Nasrin; Peng, Ching-An

    2016-07-08

    CD47 is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein that modulates the activity of a plethora of immune cells via its extracellular domain. Therefore, CD47 plays important roles in the regulation of immune responses and may serve as targets for the development of immunotherapeutic agents. To make sure CD47 functionality is intact under the process of protein conjugation, CD47-streptavidin fusion protein was expressed and purified because it can easily bind to biotin-tagged materials via the unique biotin-streptavidin affinity. In this study, gene sequences of CD47 extracellular domain (CD47ECD) and core streptavidin (coreSA) with a total 834 bp were inserted into pET20b plasmid to construct recombinant plasmid encoding CD47-SA fusion gene. After bacteria transformation, the CD47-SA fusion protein was expressed by isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction. The collected bacteria lysate was loaded on biotinylated agarose to proceed the purification of CD47-SA fusion protein. Due to the unexpected high affinity between biotin and coreSA, standard washing and elution approaches (e.g., varying pH, using biotin, and applying guanidine hydrochloride) reported for biotin-streptavidin affinity chromatography were not able to separate the target fusion protein. Instead, using low concentration of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 followed with alkaline buffer could efficiently weaken the binding between biotin and coreSA, thereby eluting out CD47-SA fusion protein from the biotin agarose column. The purified CD47-SA fusion protein was further characterized by molecular biology methods and its antiphagocytic functionality was confirmed by the phagocytosis assay. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:949-958, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Rational design of a fusion partner for membrane protein expression in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianying; Choulet, Julie; Samuelson, James C

    2009-08-01

    We have designed a novel protein fusion partner (P8CBD) to utilize the co-translational SRP pathway in order to target heterologous proteins to the E. coli inner membrane. SRP-dependence was demonstrated by analyzing the membrane translocation of P8CBD-PhoA fusion proteins in wt and SRP-ffh77 mutant cells. We also demonstrate that the P8CBD N-terminal fusion partner promotes over-expression of a Thermotoga maritima polytopic membrane protein by replacement of the native signal anchor sequence. Furthermore, the yeast mitochondrial inner membrane protein Oxa1p was expressed as a P8CBD fusion and shown to function within the E. coli inner membrane. In this example, the mitochondrial targeting peptide was replaced by P8CBD. Several practical features were incorporated into the P8CBD expression system to aid in protein detection, purification, and optional in vitro processing by enterokinase. The basis of membrane protein over-expression toxicity is discussed and solutions to this problem are presented. We anticipate that this optimized expression system will aid in the isolation and study of various recombinant forms of membrane-associated protein.

  7. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis.

  8. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe Fahrenkrog

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML. In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE, in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α. Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis.

  9. The fusion-related hydrophobic domain of Sendai F protein can be moved through the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, N G; Hsu, M C

    1986-01-01

    Recent work on a prokaryotic membrane protein, gene III protein (pIII) of coliphage f1, showed that polypeptide segments of sufficient hydrophobicity functioned to stop transfer of the polypeptide across the cell membrane: strings of 16 or more hydrophobic amino acids sufficed. A fusion-related hydrophobic domain (FRHD) of Sendai F protein, a sequence of 26 consecutive uncharged residues, has been implicated in the fusion of the viral membrane envelope and the target-cell membrane through a h...

  10. Fabrication and characterization of cryogenic targets for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieger, H.; Kim, K.

    1979-08-01

    A new technique has been developed which is capable of fabricating uniform cryogenic targets for use in inertial confinement fusion. The essence of the technique is to directly wet a target with a cold helium gas jet, which results in freezing of the DT mixture contained in the target. A controlled amount of current is pulsed through a heater wire surrounding the target, giving rise to fast evaporation and refreezing of the DT-condensate into a uniform layer. Experiments, which have been performed with D 2 -filled glass microshells, successfully produce uniform layers of both liquid and solid D 2 inside the glass shells. A set of data illustrating the technique is presented and analyzed

  11. Alternative divertor target concepts for next step fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazul, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    The operational conditions of a divertor target in the next steps of fusion devices are more severe in comparison with ITER. The current divertor designs and technologies have a limited application concerning these conditions, and so new design concepts/technologies are required. The main reasons which practically prevent the use of the traditional motionless solid divertor target are analyzed. We describe several alternative divertor target concepts in this paper. The comparative analysis of these concepts (including the advantages and the drawbacks) is made and the prospects for their practical implementation are prioritized. The concept of the swept divertor target with a liquid metal interlayer between the moving armour and motionless heat-sink is presented in more detail. The critical issues of this design are listed and outlined, and the possible experiments are presented.

  12. SAR Target Recognition with Feature Fusion Based on Stacked Autoencoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Miao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A feature fusion algorithm based on a Stacked AutoEncoder (SAE for Synthetic Aperture Rader (SAR imagery is proposed in this paper. Firstly, 25 baseline features and Three-Patch Local Binary Patterns (TPLBP features are extracted. Then, the features are combined in series and fed into the SAE network, which is trained by a greedy layer-wise method. Finally, the softmax classifier is employed to fine tune the SAE network for better fusion performance. Additionally, the Gabor texture features of SAR images are extracted, and the fusion experiments between different features are carried out. The results show that the baseline features and TPLBP features have low redundancy and high complementarity, which makes the fused feature more discriminative. Compared with the SAR target recognition algorithm based on SAE or CNN (Convolutional Neural Network, the proposed method simplifies the network structure and increases the recognition accuracy and efficiency. 10-classes SAR targets based on an MSTAR dataset got a classification accuracy up to 95.88%, which verifies the effectiveness of the presented algorithm.

  13. Henipavirus Mediated Membrane Fusion, Virus Entry and Targeted Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar B. Nikolov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Paramyxoviridae genus Henipavirus is presently represented by the type species Hendra and Nipah viruses which are both recently emerged zoonotic viral pathogens responsible for repeated outbreaks associated with high morbidity and mortality in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. These enveloped viruses bind and enter host target cells through the coordinated activities of their attachment (G and class I fusion (F envelope glycoproteins. The henipavirus G glycoprotein interacts with host cellular B class ephrins, triggering conformational alterations in G that lead to the activation of the F glycoprotein, which facilitates the membrane fusion process. Using the recently published structures of HeV-G and NiV-G and other paramyxovirus glycoproteins, we review the features of the henipavirus envelope glycoproteins that appear essential for mediating the viral fusion process, including receptor binding, G-F interaction, F activation, with an emphasis on G and the mutations that disrupt viral infectivity. Finally, recent candidate therapeutics for henipavirus-mediated disease are summarized in light of their ability to inhibit HeV and NiV entry by targeting their G and F glycoproteins.

  14. The Fusion Loops of the Initial Prefusion Conformation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Fusion Protein Point Toward the Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fontana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available All enveloped viruses, including herpesviruses, must fuse their envelope with the host membrane to deliver their genomes into target cells, making this essential step subject to interference by antibodies and drugs. Viral fusion is mediated by a viral surface protein that transits from an initial prefusion conformation to a final postfusion conformation. Strikingly, the prefusion conformation of the herpesvirus fusion protein, gB, is poorly understood. Herpes simplex virus (HSV, a model system for herpesviruses, causes diseases ranging from mild skin lesions to serious encephalitis and neonatal infections. Using cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging, we have characterized the structure of the prefusion conformation and fusion intermediates of HSV-1 gB. To this end, we have set up a system that generates microvesicles displaying full-length gB on their envelope. We confirmed proper folding of gB by nondenaturing electrophoresis-Western blotting with a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs covering all gB domains. To elucidate the arrangement of gB domains, we labeled them by using (i mutagenesis to insert fluorescent proteins at specific positions, (ii coexpression of gB with Fabs for a neutralizing MAb with known binding sites, and (iii incubation of gB with an antibody directed against the fusion loops. Our results show that gB starts in a compact prefusion conformation with the fusion loops pointing toward the viral membrane and suggest, for the first time, a model for gB’s conformational rearrangements during fusion. These experiments further illustrate how neutralizing antibodies can interfere with the essential gB structural transitions that mediate viral entry and therefore infectivity.

  15. The Heptad Repeat C Domain of the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein Plays a Key Role in Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Imogen M; Chappell, Keith J; Watterson, Daniel; Young, Paul R

    2018-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) mediates host cell entry through the fusion (F) protein, which undergoes a conformational change to facilitate the merger of viral and host lipid membrane envelopes. The RSV F protein comprises a trimer of disulfide-bonded F 1 and F 2 subunits that is present on the virion surface in a metastable prefusion state. This prefusion form is readily triggered to undergo refolding to bring two heptad repeats (heptad repeat A [HRA] and HRB) into close proximity to form a six-helix bundle that stabilizes the postfusion form and provides the free energy required for membrane fusion. This process can be triggered independently of other proteins. Here, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of a third heptad repeat region, HRC (amino acids 75 to 97), an amphipathic α-helix that lies at the interface of the prefusion F trimer and is a major structural feature of the F 2 subunit. We performed alanine scanning mutagenesis from Lys-75 to Met-97 and assessed all mutations in transient cell culture for expression, proteolytic processing, cell surface localization, protein conformation, and membrane fusion. Functional characterization revealed a striking distribution of activity in which fusion-increasing mutations localized to one side of the helical face, while fusion-decreasing mutations clustered on the opposing face. Here, we propose a model in which HRC plays a stabilizing role within the globular head for the prefusion F trimer and is potentially involved in the early events of triggering, prompting fusion peptide release and transition into the postfusion state. IMPORTANCE RSV is recognized as the most important viral pathogen among pediatric populations worldwide, yet no vaccine or widely available therapeutic treatment is available. The F protein is critical for the viral replication process and is the major target for neutralizing antibodies. Recent years have seen the development of prefusion stabilized F protein-based approaches to

  16. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Coatings for laser fusion were deposited up to 135μm thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 μm diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 μm) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power (20 watts), gas flow (0.3 sccm trans-2-butene, 10.0 sccm hydrogen), and pressure (75 millitorr), and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets

  17. Enhanced SUMOylation of proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif by SUMO-Ubc9 fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Tae; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Matunis, Mike J.; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Identifying new targets for SUMO and understanding the function of protein SUMOylation are largely limited by low level of SUMOylation. It was found recently that Ubc9, the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme, is covalently modified by SUMO at a lysine 14 in the N-terminal alpha helix, and that SUMO-modified Ubc9 has enhanced conjugation activity for certain target proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM). Here, we show that, compared to intact Ubc9, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein has higher conjugating activity for SIM-containing targets such as Sp100 and human cytomegalovirus IE2. Assays using an IE2 SIM mutant revealed the requirement of SIM for the enhanced IE2 SUMOylation by SUMO-Ubc9. In pull-down assays with cell extracts, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein bound to more diverse cellular proteins and interacted with some SIM-containing proteins with higher affinities than Ubc9. Therefore, the devised SUMO-Ubc9 fusion will be useful for identifying SIM-containing SUMO targets and producing SUMO-modified proteins.

  18. Enhanced SUMOylation of proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif by SUMO-Ubc9 fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Tae; Kim, Kyeong Kyu [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 300 Cheoncheondong Jangangu, Suwon, Gyeonggido 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Matunis, Mike J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ahn, Jin-Hyun, E-mail: jahn@med.skku.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 300 Cheoncheondong Jangangu, Suwon, Gyeonggido 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-09

    Identifying new targets for SUMO and understanding the function of protein SUMOylation are largely limited by low level of SUMOylation. It was found recently that Ubc9, the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme, is covalently modified by SUMO at a lysine 14 in the N-terminal alpha helix, and that SUMO-modified Ubc9 has enhanced conjugation activity for certain target proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM). Here, we show that, compared to intact Ubc9, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein has higher conjugating activity for SIM-containing targets such as Sp100 and human cytomegalovirus IE2. Assays using an IE2 SIM mutant revealed the requirement of SIM for the enhanced IE2 SUMOylation by SUMO-Ubc9. In pull-down assays with cell extracts, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein bound to more diverse cellular proteins and interacted with some SIM-containing proteins with higher affinities than Ubc9. Therefore, the devised SUMO-Ubc9 fusion will be useful for identifying SIM-containing SUMO targets and producing SUMO-modified proteins.

  19. On the efficiency of conical targets for laser thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovskij, A.V.; Korobkin, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    Advantages and drawbacks of conical targets (CT) for laser fusion (LF) are discussed. Possibility of the laser power reduction, laser pulse lengthening and neutron yield increase are analyzed for an ideal conical target with absolutely rigid and heat-proof walls as compared to a spherical target of the same mass. A simple theory is suggested which makes it possible to take into account an effect of walls on the fusion process in the conical target with gaseous fuel and heavy shell. Energy losses due to wall deformations and heat conduction are estimated. An influence of these effects on the neutron yield is estimated. CT used in the LF experiments are found to have serious drawbacks in comparison with spherical ones. These drawbacks are connected with the effect of walls on the processes taking place in CT. Analysis of CT, for which the effect of walls is not significant, points up some definite advantages of CT as compared with spherical one. These advantages are the possibility of laser pulse lengthening and laser power reduction in comparison with the irradiation of a sphere of an equal mass. These two positive qualities are connected with the fact that CT has large linear dimensions [ru

  20. Engineering of a parainfluenza virus type 5 fusion protein (PIV-5 F): development of an autonomous and hyperfusogenic protein by a combinational mutagenesis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, O; Durupt, F; Cartet, G; Thomas, L; Lina, B; Rosa-Calatrava, M

    2009-12-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is accomplished by fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane. For the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV-5), this fusion involves an attachment protein (HN) and a class I viral fusion protein (F). We investigated the effect of 20 different combinations of 12 amino-acid substitutions within functional domains of the PIV-5 F glycoprotein, by performing cell surface expression measurements, quantitative fusion and syncytia assays. We found that combinations of mutations conferring an autonomous phenotype with mutations leading to an increased fusion activity were compatible and generated functional PIV-5 F proteins. The addition of mutations in the heptad-repeat domains led to both autonomous and hyperfusogenic phenotypes, despite the low cell surface expression of the corresponding mutants. Such engineering approach may prove useful not only for deciphering the fundamental mechanism behind viral-mediated membrane fusion but also in the development of potential therapeutic applications.

  1. A fusion DNA vaccine that targets antigen-presenting cells increases protection from viral challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliyannis, Georgia; Boyle, Jefferey S.; Brady, Jamie L.; Brown, Lorena E.; Lew, Andrew M.

    2000-06-01

    Improving the immunological potency, particularly the Ab response, is a serious hurdle for the protective efficacy and hence broad application of DNA vaccines. We examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a hemagglutinin-based influenza DNA vaccine that was targeted to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) by fusion to CTLA4. The targeted vaccine was shown to induce an accelerated and increased Ab response (as compared with those receiving the nontargeted control) that was predominated by IgG1 and recognized conformationally dependent viral epitopes. Moreover, mice receiving the APC-targeted DNA vaccine had significantly reduced viral titers (100-fold) after a nonlethal virus challenge. The increased protective efficacy was most likely because of increased Ab responses, as cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were not enhanced. Targeting was demonstrated by direct binding studies of CTLA4 fusion proteins to the cognate ligand (B7; expressed on APCs in vivo). In addition, a targeted protein was detected at 4-fold higher levels in draining lymph nodes within 2-24 h of administration. Therefore, this study demonstrates that targeting DNA-encoded antigen to APCs results in enhanced immunity and strongly suggests that this approach may be useful in improving the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines.

  2. Induction of protein body formation in plant leaves by elastin-like polypeptide fusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joensuu Jussi J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elastin-like polypeptides are synthetic biopolymers composed of a repeating pentapeptide 'VPGXG' sequence that are valuable for the simple non-chromatographic purification of recombinant proteins. In addition, elastin-like polypeptide fusions have been shown to enhance the accumulation of a range of different recombinant proteins in plants, thus addressing the major limitation of plant-based expression systems, which is a low production yield. This study's main objectives were to determine the general utility of elastin-like polypeptide protein fusions in various intracellular compartments and to elucidate elastin-like polypeptide's mechanism of action for increasing recombinant protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum of plants. Results The effect of elastin-like polypeptide fusions on the accumulation of green fluorescent protein targeted to the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, apoplast, and endoplasmic reticulum was evaluated. The endoplasmic reticulum was the only intracellular compartment in which an elastin-like polypeptide tag was shown to significantly enhance recombinant protein accumulation. Interestingly, endoplasmic reticulum-targeted elastin-like polypeptide fusions induced the formation of a novel type of protein body, which may be responsible for elastin-like polypeptide's positive effect on recombinant protein accumulation by excluding the heterologous protein from normal physiological turnover. Although expressed in the leaves of plants, these novel protein bodies appeared similar in size and morphology to the prolamin-based protein bodies naturally found in plant seeds. The elastin-like polypeptide-induced protein bodies were highly mobile organelles, exhibiting various dynamic patterns of movement throughout the cells, which were dependent on intact actin microfilaments and a functional actomyosin motility system. Conclusion An endoplasmic reticulum-targeted elastin-like polypeptide fusion approach

  3. Revealing Surface Waters on an Antifreeze Protein by Fusion Protein Crystallography Combined with Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianjun; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-10-08

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to ice through an extensive, flat, relatively hydrophobic surface. It has been suggested that this ice-binding site (IBS) organizes surface waters into an ice-like clathrate arrangement that matches and fuses to the quasi-liquid layer on the ice surface. On cooling, these waters join the ice lattice and freeze the AFP to its ligand. Evidence for the generality of this binding mechanism is limited because AFPs tend to crystallize with their IBS as a preferred protein-protein contact surface, which displaces some bound waters. Type III AFP is a 7 kDa globular protein with an IBS made up two adjacent surfaces. In the crystal structure of the most active isoform (QAE1), the part of the IBS that docks to the primary prism plane of ice is partially exposed to solvent and has clathrate waters present that match this plane of ice. The adjacent IBS, which matches the pyramidal plane of ice, is involved in protein-protein crystal contacts with few surface waters. Here we have changed the protein-protein contacts in the ice-binding region by crystallizing a fusion of QAE1 to maltose-binding protein. In this 1.9 Å structure, the IBS that fits the pyramidal plane of ice is exposed to solvent. By combining crystallography data with MD simulations, the surface waters on both sides of the IBS were revealed and match well with the target ice planes. The waters on the pyramidal plane IBS were loosely constrained, which might explain why other isoforms of type III AFP that lack the prism plane IBS are less active than QAE1. The AFP fusion crystallization method can potentially be used to force the exposure to solvent of the IBS on other AFPs to reveal the locations of key surface waters.

  4. Coating Nanoparticles with Plant-Produced Transferrin-Hydrophobin Fusion Protein Enhances Their Uptake in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Lauri J; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Salonen, Jarno J; Saberianfar, Reza; Menassa, Rima; Santos, Hélder A; Joensuu, Jussi J; Ritala, Anneli

    2017-06-21

    The encapsulation of drugs to nanoparticles may offer a solution for targeted delivery. Here, we set out to engineer a self-assembling targeting ligand by combining the functional properties of human transferrin and fungal hydrophobins in a single fusion protein. We showed that human transferrin can be expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants as a fusion with Trichoderma reesei hydrophobins HFBI, HFBII, or HFBIV. Transferrin-HFBIV was further expressed in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells. Both partners of the fusion protein retained their functionality; the hydrophobin moiety enabled migration to a surfactant phase in an aqueous two-phase system, and the transferrin moiety was able to reversibly bind iron. Coating porous silicon nanoparticles with the fusion protein resulted in uptake of the nanoparticles in human cancer cells. This study provides a proof-of-concept for the functionalization of hydrophobin coatings with transferrin as a targeting ligand.

  5. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinman, D.

    1994-03-01

    On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities which took place under this contract during the period of October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. During this period, GA was assigned 18 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included ''Capabilities Activation'' and ''Capabilities Demonstration'' to enable us to begin production of glass and composite polymer capsules. Capsule delivery tasks included ''Small Glass Shell Deliveries'' and ''Composite Polymer Capsules'' for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We also were asked to provide direct ''Onsite Support'' at LLNL and LANL. We continued planning for the transfer of ''Micromachining Equipment from Rocky Flats'' and established ''Target Component Micromachining and Electroplating Facilities'' at GA. We fabricated over 1100 films and filters of 11 types for Sandia National Laboratory and provided full-time onsite engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to make targets for the Naval Research Laboratory. We investigated spherical interferometry, built an automated capsule sorter, and developed an apparatus for calorimetric measurement of fuel fill for LLNL. We assisted LANL in the ''Characterization of Opaque b-Layered Targets.'' We developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process

  6. Expression,purification and cell penetrativity of fusion protein PDT/GR-ΔLBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct the fusion gene expression vector of penetrating peptide(PDT and the glucocorticoid receptor lack of ligand binding domain(GR-ΔLBD,and evaluate the prokaryotic expression,purification and cell penetrativity of fusion protein PDT/GR-ΔLBD.Methods The target gene fragment GR-ΔLBD was obtained from plasmid pEGFP-GR-ΔLBD by double digestion,and sub-cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-PDT to construct the fusion gene expression vector pGEX-PDT/GR-ΔLBD.PDT/GR-ΔLBD fusion protein was obtained after the expression vector was transformed into E.coli,followed by sequential induction with IPTG,treatment with glutathione-agarose resin and elution with glutathione.SDS-PAGE was performed to determine the expression of PDT/GR-ΔLBD fusion protein,and it which was diluted into a final concentration of 0,500 and 1000nmol/L,labeled with fluorescein FITC and co-cultivated with TC-1 cells for 2 hours,and the penetrativity was observed by fluorescence microscopy.Results The successfully constructed prokaryotic expression vector pPDT/GR-ΔLBD had the capacity of expressing protein,and it was 78.6kD in molecular weight,which was consistent with the theoretical value(80kD of the fusion protein PDT/GR-ΔLBD.PDT-GR-ΔLBD,penetrating the nuclear membrane in a concentration-dependent manner,was concentrated within nuclei.Conclusion PDT/GR-ΔLBD fusion protein,with good solubility and cell penetrativity,paves the way for further research on its anti-inflammatory effects.

  7. Generation of Fluorescent Protein Fusions in Candida Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonia, Sara; Berman, Judith; Gale, Cheryl A

    2017-03-04

    Candida species, prevalent colonizers of the intestinal and genitourinary tracts, are the cause of the majority of invasive fungal infections in humans. Thus, molecular and genetic tools are needed to facilitate the study of their pathogenesis mechanisms. PCR-mediated gene modification is a straightforward and quick approach to generate epitope-tagged proteins to facilitate their detection. In particular, fluorescent protein (FP) fusions are powerful tools that allow visualization and quantitation of both yeast cells and proteins by fluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting, respectively. Plasmids containing FP encoding sequences, along with nutritional marker genes that facilitate the transformation of Candida species, have been generated for the purpose of FP construction and expression in Candida. Herein, we present a strategy for constructing a FP fusion in a Candida species. Plasmids containing the nourseothricin resistance transformation marker gene (NAT1) along with sequences for either green, yellow, or cherry FPs (GFP, YFP, mCherry) are used along with primers that include gene-specific sequences in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to generate a FP cassette. This gene-specific cassette has the ability to integrate into the 3'-end of the corresponding gene locus via homologous recombination. Successful in-frame fusion of the FP sequence into the gene locus of interest is verified genetically, followed by analysis of fusion protein expression by microscopy and/or immuno-detection methods. In addition, for the case of highly expressed proteins, successful fusions can be screened for primarily by fluorescence imaging techniques.

  8. Study on Fusion Protein and Its gene in Baculovirus Specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemr, W.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Baculoviruses are subdivided into two groups depending on the type of budded virus envelop fusion protein; group I utilized gp64 which include the most of nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPVs), group II utilized F protein which include the remnants of NPVs and all Granuloviruses (GVs). Recent studies reported the viral F protein coding gene as a host cellular sourced gene and may evolutionary acquired from the host genome referring to phylogeny analysis of fusion proteins. Thus, it was deduced that F protein coding gene is species- specific nucleotide sequence related to the type of the specific host and if virus could infect an unexpected host, the resulted virus may encode a vary F gene. In this regard, the present study utilized the mentioned properties of F gene in an attempt to produce a model of specific and more economic wider range granulovirus bio- pesticide able to infect both Spodoptera littoralis and Phthorimaea operculella larvae. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny analysis were performed on six members of group II baculovirus, novel universal PCR primers were manually designed from the conserved regions in the alignment graph, targeted to amplify species- specific sequence entire F gene open reading frame (ORF) which is useful in molecular identification of baculovirus in unknown samples. So, the PCR product of SpliGV used to prepare a specific probe for the F gene of this type of virus. Results reflected that it is possible to infect S. littoralis larvae by PhopGV if injected into larval haemocoel, the resulted virus of this infection showed by using DNA hybridization technique to be encode to F gene homologous with the F gene of Spli GV, which is revealed that the resulted virus acquired this F gene sequence from the host genome after infection. Consequently, these results may infer that if genetic aberrations occur in the host genome, this may affect in baculoviral infectivity. So, this study aimed to investigate the effect of gamma radiation at

  9. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP) in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed without a fusion partner. Immunoblot analysis showed that ubiquitin was processed from the final protein product, and ubiquitination was up-regulated in all transgenic plants analyzed. Driven by CaMV 35S promoter and phaseolin signal peptide, hG-CSF was observed to be secreted into apoplast in leaves but deposited in protein storage vacuole (PSV) in seeds, indicating that targeting of the hG-CSF was tissue-dependent in transgenic tobacco. Bioactivity assay showed that hG-CSF expressed in both seeds and leaves was bioactive to support the proliferation of NFS-60 cells. Conclusions In this study, the expression of bioactive hG-CSF in transgenic plants was improved through ubiquitin fusion strategy, demonstrating that protein expression can be enhanced in both plant leaves and seeds through fusion with ubiquitin and providing a typical case of tissue-dependent expression of recombinant protein in transgenic plants. PMID:21985646

  10. A systematic investigation of the stability of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczak, Monika; Bukowski, Michał; Górecki, Andrzej; Dubin, Grzegorz; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2015-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides important insights into structure-function relationship in biomolecules. However, protein crystals are usually hard to obtain which hinders our understanding of multiple important processes. Crystallization requires large amount of protein sample, whereas recombinant proteins are often unstable or insoluble. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion is one of the approaches to increase protein synthesis, solubility and stability, facilitating crystallization. In this study we analyze the influence of the linker length, composition and the position of GFP relative to the fusion partner on the fusion protein production and stability. To this end, multiple constructs of enzymatically impaired variant of PemKSa toxin from Staphylococcus aureus CH91 fused to GFP were generated. Fusion protein production in Escherichia coli was evaluated. The proteins were purified and their stability tested. PemKSa-α14aa-GFP fusion provided best production and stability. Obtained results demonstrate the importance of optimization of fusion protein construct, including linker selection and the order of fusion partners, in obtaining high quantities of stable protein for crystallization.

  11. Studies on shock ignition targets for inertial fusion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.; Marocchino, A.; Giannini, A.; Mancini, A.; Temporal, M.

    2013-11-01

    Shock-ignited inertial fusion targets are studied by one dimensional and two-dimensional numerical simulations. Most of the study refers to the simple all-DT HiPER baseline target (imploded mass of 0.29 mg); both the reference laser wavelength λ = 0.35 μm, and λ = 0.25 μm are considered. The target achieves 1D gain about 80 (120) with total laser energy of 260 kJ (180 kJ) at λ = 0.35 μm (0.25 μm). Operating windows for the parameters of the laser ignition spike are described. According to preliminary simulations, gain 80-100 is also obtained by a scaled target (imploded mass of 1.8 mg) driven by 1.5 MJ of green laser light (0.53 μm). Two dimensional simulations indicate robustness to irradiation nonuniformities, and high sensitivity to target mispositioning. This can however be reduced by increasing the power of the ignition spike.

  12. Prokaryotic ubiquitin-like ThiS fusion enhances the heterologous protein overexpression and aggregation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sujuan; Xu, Jian; Ge, Ying; Yan, Zheng; Du, Guohua; Wang, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Fusion tags are commonly employed to enhance target protein expression, improve their folding and solubility, and reduce protein degradation in expression of recombinant proteins. Ubiquitin (Ub) and SUMO are highly conserved small proteins in eukaryotes, and frequently used as fusion tags in prokaryotic expression. ThiS, a smaller sulfur-carrier protein involved in thiamin synthesis, is conserved among most prokaryotic species. The structural similarity between ThiS and Ub provoked us into expecting that the former could be used as a fusion tag. Hence, ThiS was fused to insulin A and B chains, murine Ribonuclease Inhibitor (mRI) and EGFP, respectively. When induced in Escherichia coli, ThiS-fused insulin A and B chains were overexpressed in inclusion bodies, and to higher levels in comparison to the same proteins fused with Ub. On the contrast, ThiS fusion of mRI, an unstable protein, resulted in enhanced degradation that was not alleviated in protease-deficient strains. While the degradation of Ub- and SUMO-fused mRI was less and seemed protease-dependent. Enhanced degradation of mRI did not occur for the fusions with half-molecules of ThiS. When ThiS-tag was fused to the C-terminus of EGFP, higher expression, predominantly in inclusion bodies, was observed again. It was further found that ThiS fusion of EGFP significantly retarded its refolding process. These results indicated that prokaryotic ThiS is able to promote the expression of target proteins in E. coli, but enhanced degradation may occur in case of unstable targets. Unlike eukaryotic Ub-based tags usually increase the solubility and folding of proteins, ThiS fusion enhances the expression by augmenting the formation of inclusion bodies, probably through retardation of the folding of target proteins.

  13. Challenges Surrounding the Injection and Arrival of Targets at LIFE Fusion Chamber Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, R; Spaeth, M; Manes, K; Amendt, P; Tabak, M; Bond, T; Kucheyev, S; Latkowski, J; Loosmore, G; Bliss, E; Baker, K; Bhandarkar, S; Petzoldt, R; Alexander, N; Tillack, M; Holdener, D

    2010-12-01

    IFE target designers must consider several engineering requirements in addition to the physics requirements for successful target implosion. These considerations include low target cost, high manufacturing throughput, the ability of the target to survive the injection into the fusion chamber and arrive in a condition and physical position consistent with proper laser-target interaction and ease of post-implosion debris removal. This article briefly describes these considerations for the Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy (LIFE) targets currently being designed.

  14. The Ancient Gamete Fusogen HAP2 Is a Eukaryotic Class II Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fédry, Juliette; Liu, Yanjie; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Pei, Jimin; Li, Wenhao; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Traincard, François; Meola, Annalisa; Bricogne, Gérard; Grishin, Nick V; Snell, William J; Rey, Félix A; Krey, Thomas

    2017-02-23

    Sexual reproduction is almost universal in eukaryotic life and involves the fusion of male and female haploid gametes into a diploid cell. The sperm-restricted single-pass transmembrane protein HAP2-GCS1 has been postulated to function in membrane merger. Its presence in the major eukaryotic taxa-animals, plants, and protists (including important human pathogens like Plasmodium)-suggests that many eukaryotic organisms share a common gamete fusion mechanism. Here, we report combined bioinformatic, biochemical, mutational, and X-ray crystallographic studies on the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii HAP2 that reveal homology to class II viral membrane fusion proteins. We further show that targeting the segment corresponding to the fusion loop by mutagenesis or by antibodies blocks gamete fusion. These results demonstrate that HAP2 is the gamete fusogen and suggest a mechanism of action akin to viral fusion, indicating a way to block Plasmodium transmission and highlighting the impact of virus-cell genetic exchanges on the evolution of eukaryotic life. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wen-guo; Zhen, Yong-su; Lu, Xin-an; Shang, Bo-yang; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Sheng-hua; Zhou, Daifu; Li, Liang; Li, Yi; Luo, Yongzhang

    2013-01-01

    Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Therefore, we reasoned that endostatin-lidamycin (ES-LDM) fusion proteins upon energizing with enediyne chromophore may obtain the combined capability targeting tumor vasculature and tumor cell by respective ES and LDM moiety. In this study, we designed and obtained two new endostatin-based fusion proteins, endostatin-LDP (ES-LDP) and LDP-endostatin (LDP-ES). In vitro, the antiangiogenic effect of fusion proteins was determined by the wound healing assay and tube formation assay and the cytotoxicity of their enediyne-energized analogs was evaluated by CCK-8 assay. Tissue microarray was used to analyze the binding affinity of LDP, ES or ES-LDP with specimens of human lung tissue and lung tumor. The in vivo efficacy of the fusion proteins was evaluated with human lung carcinoma PG-BE1 xenograft and the experimental metastasis model of 4T1-luc breast cancer. ES-LDP and LDP-ES disrupted the formation of endothelial tube structures and inhibited endothelial cell migration. Evidently, ES-LDP accumulated in the tumor and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. ES-LDP and ES show higher binding capability than LDP to lung carcinoma; in addition, ES-LDP and ES share similar binding capability. Furthermore, the enediyne-energized fusion protein ES-LDP-AE demonstrated significant efficacy against lung carcinoma xenograft in athymic mice. The ES-based fusion protein therapy provides some fundamental information for further drug development. Targeting both tumor vasculature and tumor cells by endostatin

  16. New insights into transcriptional and leukemogenic mechanisms of AML1-ETO and E2A fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Guo, Chun; Steinauer, Nickolas; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 15% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases are caused by aberrant expression of AML1-ETO, a fusion protein generated by the t(8;21) chromosomal translocation. Since its discovery, AML1-ETO has served as a prototype to understand how leukemia fusion proteins deregulate transcription to promote leukemogenesis. Another leukemia fusion protein, E2A-Pbx1, generated by the t(1;19) translocation, is involved in acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs). While AML1-ETO and E2A-Pbx1 are structurally unrelated fusion proteins, we have recently shown that a common axis, the ETO/E-protein interaction, is involved in the regulation of both fusion proteins, underscoring the importance of studying protein-protein interactions in elucidating the mechanisms of leukemia fusion proteins. In this review, we aim to summarize these new developments while also providing a historic overview of the related early studies. A total of 218 publications were reviewed in this article, a majority of which were published after 2004.We also downloaded 3D structures of AML1-ETO domains from Protein Data Bank and provided a systematic summary of their structures. By reviewing the literature, we summarized early and recent findings on AML1-ETO, including its protein-protein interactions, transcriptional and leukemogenic mechanisms, as well as the recently reported involvement of ETO family corepressors in regulating the function of E2A-Pbx1. While the recent development in genomic and structural studies has clearly demonstrated that the fusion proteins function by directly regulating transcription, a further understanding of the underlying mechanisms, including crosstalk with other transcription factors and cofactors, and the protein-protein interactions in the context of native proteins, may be necessary for the development of highly targeted drugs for leukemia therapy.

  17. Expression screening of fusion partners from an E. coli genome for soluble expression of recombinant proteins in a cell-free protein synthesis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Ho; Keum, Jung-Won; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2011-01-01

    While access to soluble recombinant proteins is essential for a number of proteome studies, preparation of purified functional proteins is often limited by the protein solubility. In this study, potent solubility-enhancing fusion partners were screened from the repertoire of endogenous E. coli proteins. Based on the presumed correlation between the intracellular abundance and folding efficiency of proteins, PCR-amplified ORFs of a series of highly abundant E. coli proteins were fused with aggregation-prone heterologous proteins and then directly expressed for quantitative estimation of the expression efficiency of soluble translation products. Through two-step screening procedures involving the expression of 552 fusion constructs targeted against a series of cytokine proteins, we were able to discover a number of endogenous E. coli proteins that dramatically enhanced the soluble expression of the target proteins. This strategy of cell-free expression screening can be extended to quantitative, global analysis of genomic resources for various purposes.

  18. Protein aggregation kinetics during Protein A chromatography. Case study for an Fc fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Abhinav A; Gupta, Priyanka; Han, Xuejun

    2007-11-09

    Protein A chromatography has come to be widely adopted for large-scale purification of monoclonal antibodies and Fc fusion proteins. The low pH conditions required for Protein A elution can often lead to aggregation issues for these products. A concerted study of the kinetics of aggregate formation and their relation to chromatography on Protein A media has been lacking. This paper provides a framework to describe aggregation kinetics for an Fc fusion protein that was highly susceptible to aggregate formation under low pH conditions. In contrast to what is usually expected to be a higher order reaction, first order aggregation kinetics were observed for this protein over a wide range of conditions. A comparison of the rate constants of aggregation forms an effective means of comparing various stabilizing additives to the elution buffer with one another. Inclusion of urea in the elution buffer at moderate concentrations (Protein A column were both found to be effective solutions to the aggregation issue. Elution from the Protein A resin was found to increase the aggregation rate constants over and above what would be expected from exposure to low pH conditions in solution alone. This demonstrates that Protein A-Fc interactions can destabilize product structure and increase the tendency to aggregate. The results presented here are anticipated to assist the development of Protein A process conditions for products that are prone to form high molecular weight aggregates during column elution.

  19. The actin cytoskeleton inhibits pore expansion during PIV5 fusion protein-promoted cell-cell fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wurth, Mark A.; Schowalter, Rachel M.; Smith, Everett Clinton; Moncman, Carole L.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis; McCann, Richard O.

    2010-01-01

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote both virus-cell fusion, required for viral entry, and cell-cell fusion, resulting in syncytia formation. We used the F-actin stabilizing drug, jasplakinolide, and the G-actin sequestrant, latrunculin A, to examine the role of actin dynamics in cell-cell fusion mediated by the parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) F protein. Jasplakinolide treatment caused a dose-dependent increase in cell-cell fusion as measured by both syncytia and reporter gene assays, and l...

  20. A fusion protein of interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 protects against blood-induced cartilage damage in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vulpen, L F D; Popov-Celeketic, J; van Meegeren, M. E R; Coeleveld, K; van Laar, J M; Hack, C E; Schutgens, R E G; Mastbergen, S C; Lafeber, F P J G

    Essentials Targeted treatment for hemophilic arthropathy, still causing significant morbidity, is lacking. This study evaluates the efficacy of a fusion of protein of interleukin(IL)-4 and IL-10. In vitro the fusion protein prevents blood-induced cartilage damage in a dose-dependent manner. In

  1. Effect of linker length and residues on the structure and stability of a fusion protein with malaria vaccine application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamriz, Shabnam; Ofoghi, Hamideh; Moazami, Nasrin

    2016-09-01

    Recombinant protein technology has revolutionized the world of biology and medicine. Following this progress, fusion protein technology, as a novel innovation, has opened new horizons for the development of proteins that do not naturally exist. Fusion proteins are generated via genetically fusing two or more genes coding for separate proteins, thus the product is a single protein having functional properties of both proteins. As an indispensable element in fusion protein construction, linkers are used to separate the functional domains in order to improve their expression, folding and stability. We computationally fused an antigen and an adjuvant together using different linkers to obtain a two-domain fusion construct which can potentially act as an oral vaccine candidate against malaria. We then predicted the structures computationally to find out the probable folding of each domain in the designed construct. One of the fusion constructs was selected based on the highest value for C-score. Ramchandran Plot analysis represented that most residues were fallen in favorable regions. Our in silico analysis showed that (GGGGS)3 linker confers the best structure and stability for our target fusion protein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.; Auerbach, J.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Whitlock, R.R.; Obenshain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-08-01

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 μm and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 10 7 cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils

  3. Microfabricated Ion Beam Drivers for Magnetized Target Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter; Ji, Qing; Ardanuc, Serhan; Miller, Joseph; Lal, Amit; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Efficient, low-cost drivers are important for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF). Ion beams offer a high degree of control to deliver the required mega joules of driver energy for MTF and they can be matched to several types of magnetized fuel targets, including compact toroids and solid targets. We describe an ion beam driver approach based on the MEQALAC concept (Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator) with many beamlets in an array of micro-fabricated channels. The channels consist of a lattice of electrostatic quadrupoles (ESQ) for focusing and of radio-frequency (RF) electrodes for ion acceleration. Simulations with particle-in-cell and beam envelope codes predict >10x higher current densities compared to state-of-the-art ion accelerators. This increase results from dividing the total ion beam current up into many beamlets to control space charge forces. Focusing elements can be biased taking advantage of high breakdown electric fields in sub-mm structures formed using MEMS techniques (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). We will present results on ion beam transport and acceleration in MEMS based beamlets. Acknowledgments: This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  4. rDNA Mediated Bioconjugates: Fusion Proteins and their Intended Use in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya-Ozsan, Ayse Goksu; Oner, Ayse Filiz

    2017-01-01

    Protein bioconjugates can be synthesized by using chemical reactions, enzymatic reactions or genetic engineering technologies. Naturally occurred protein fusion event is used on purpose in the development of better biopharmaceuticals by applying genetic engineering methodologies. This review will mainly focus on the types of fusion proteins produced with the use of recombinant DNA technology, by combining genes or parts of genes from the same or different organisms, in order to be used in pharmaceutical applications for several purposes. Main concerns for the development of better biopharmaceuticals include quality, efficacy, safety, immunogenicity and toxicity issues. Extending half-life of the drug to increase patient compliance, targeting the drugs to reduce toxicity, improving the manufacturing environment to reduce the costs and revealing protein interaction technologies to find novel and superior drugs are the main aims of fusion protein production. Here, related tags and examples of fusion methods for different purposes will be explained precisely. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Eradication of Human Hepatic and Pulmonary Melanoma Metastases in SCID Mice by Antibody--Interleukin 2 Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jurgen C.; Pancook, James D.; Gillies, Stephen D.; Mendelsohn, John; Reisfeld, Ralph A.

    1996-04-01

    Antibody--cytokine fusion proteins combine the unique targeting ability of antibodies with the multifunctional activity of cytokines. Here, we demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of such constructs for the treatment of hepatic and pulmonary metastases of different melanoma cell lines. Two antibody--interleukin 2 (IL-2) fusion proteins, ch225-IL2 and ch14.18-IL2, constructed by fusion of a synthetic sequence coding for human IL-2 to the carboxyl end of the Cγ 1 gene of the corresponding antibodies, were tested for their therapeutic efficacy against xenografted human melanoma in vivo. Tumorspecific fusion proteins completely inhibited the growth of hepatic and pulmonary metastases in C.B-17 scid/scid mice previously reconstituted with human lymphokine-activated killer cells, whereas treatment with combinations of the corresponding antibodies plus recombinant IL-2 only reduced the tumor load. Even when treatment with fusion proteins was delayed up to 8 days after inoculation of tumor cells, it still resulted in complete eradication of micrometastases that were established at that time point. Selection of tumor cell lines expressing or lacking the targeted antigen of the administered fusion protein proved the specificity of the observed antitumor effect. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the tumorspecific fusion protein accumulated not only in subcutaneous tumors but also in lungs and livers affected with micrometastases. Survival times of animals treated with the fusion protein were more than doubled as compared to those treated with the combination of the corresponding antibody plus IL-2. Our data demonstrate that an immunotherapeutic approach using cytokines targeted by antibodies to tumor sites has potent effects against disseminated human melanoma.

  6. Coating Nanoparticles with Plant-Produced Transferrin-Hydrophobin Fusion Protein Enhances Their Uptake in Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Lauri J.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Makila, Ermei M.

    2017-01-01

    The encapsulation of drugs to nanoparticles may offer a solution for targeted delivery. Here, we set out to engineer a self assembling targeting ligand by combining the functional properties of human transferrin and fungal hydrophobins in a single fusion protein. We showed that human transferrin...

  7. Identification of direct targets of plant transcription factors using the GR fusion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Winter, Cara M; Wellmer, Frank; Wagner, Doris

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor-dependent activation of plant transcription factors has proven to be a powerful tool for the identification of their direct target genes. In the absence of the synthetic steroid hormone dexamethasone (dex), transcription factors fused to the hormone-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (TF-GR) are held in an inactive state, due to their cytoplasmic localization. This requires physical interaction with the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) complex. Hormone binding leads to disruption of the interaction between GR and HSP90 and allows TF-GR fusion proteins to enter the nucleus. Once inside the nucleus, they bind to specific DNA sequences and immediately activate or repress expression of their targets. This system is well suited for the identification of direct target genes of transcription factors in plants, as (A) there is little basal protein activity in the absence of dex, (B) steroid application leads to rapid transcription factor activation, (C) no side effects of dex treatment are observed on the physiology of the plant, and (D) secondary effects of transcription factor activity can be eliminated by simultaneous application of an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis, cycloheximide (cyc). In this chapter, we describe detailed protocols for the preparation of plant material, for dex and cyc treatment, for RNA extraction, and for the PCR-based or genome-wide identification of direct targets of transcription factors fused to GR.

  8. Regulation of Exocytotic Fusion Pores by SNARE Protein Transmembrane Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyong Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-triggered exocytotic release of neurotransmitters and hormones from neurons and neuroendocrine cells underlies neuronal communication, motor activity and endocrine functions. The core of the neuronal exocytotic machinery is composed of soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs. Formation of complexes between vesicle-attached v- and plasma-membrane anchored t-SNAREs in a highly regulated fashion brings the membranes into close apposition. Small, soluble proteins called Complexins (Cpx and calcium-sensing Synaptotagmins cooperate to block fusion at low resting calcium concentrations, but trigger release upon calcium increase. A growing body of evidence suggests that the transmembrane domains (TMDs of SNARE proteins play important roles in regulating the processes of fusion and release, but the mechanisms involved are only starting to be uncovered. Here we review recent evidence that SNARE TMDs exert influence by regulating the dynamics of the fusion pore, the initial aqueous connection between the vesicular lumen and the extracellular space. Even after the fusion pore is established, hormone release by neuroendocrine cells is tightly controlled, and the same may be true of neurotransmitter release by neurons. The dynamics of the fusion pore can regulate the kinetics of cargo release and the net amount released, and can determine the mode of vesicle recycling. Manipulations of SNARE TMDs were found to affect fusion pore properties profoundly, both during exocytosis and in biochemical reconstitutions. To explain these effects, TMD flexibility, and interactions among TMDs or between TMDs and lipids have been invoked. Exocytosis has provided the best setting in which to unravel the underlying mechanisms, being unique among membrane fusion reactions in that single fusion pores can be probed using high-resolution methods. An important role will likely be played by methods that can probe single fusion pores

  9. Improved prediction of drug-target interactions using regularized least squares integrating with kernel fusion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a central task in drug discovery processes. In this work, a simple but effective regularized least squares integrating with nonlinear kernel fusion (RLS-KF) algorithm is proposed to perform DTI predictions. Using benchmark DTI datasets, our proposed algorithm achieves the state-of-the-art results with area under precision–recall curve (AUPR) of 0.915, 0.925, 0.853 and 0.909 for enzymes, ion channels (IC), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and nuclear receptors (NR) based on 10 fold cross-validation. The performance can further be improved by using a recalculated kernel matrix, especially for the small set of nuclear receptors with AUPR of 0.945. Importantly, most of the top ranked interaction predictions can be validated by experimental data reported in the literature, bioassay results in the PubChem BioAssay database, as well as other previous studies. Our analysis suggests that the proposed RLS-KF is helpful for studying DTI, drug repositioning as well as polypharmacology, and may help to accelerate drug discovery by identifying novel drug targets. - Graphical abstract: Flowchart of the proposed RLS-KF algorithm for drug-target interaction predictions. - Highlights: • A nonlinear kernel fusion algorithm is proposed to perform drug-target interaction predictions. • Performance can further be improved by using the recalculated kernel. • Top predictions can be validated by experimental data.

  10. Improved prediction of drug-target interactions using regularized least squares integrating with kernel fusion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Yanli, E-mail: ywang@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; Bryant, Stephen H., E-mail: bryant@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

    2016-02-25

    Identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a central task in drug discovery processes. In this work, a simple but effective regularized least squares integrating with nonlinear kernel fusion (RLS-KF) algorithm is proposed to perform DTI predictions. Using benchmark DTI datasets, our proposed algorithm achieves the state-of-the-art results with area under precision–recall curve (AUPR) of 0.915, 0.925, 0.853 and 0.909 for enzymes, ion channels (IC), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and nuclear receptors (NR) based on 10 fold cross-validation. The performance can further be improved by using a recalculated kernel matrix, especially for the small set of nuclear receptors with AUPR of 0.945. Importantly, most of the top ranked interaction predictions can be validated by experimental data reported in the literature, bioassay results in the PubChem BioAssay database, as well as other previous studies. Our analysis suggests that the proposed RLS-KF is helpful for studying DTI, drug repositioning as well as polypharmacology, and may help to accelerate drug discovery by identifying novel drug targets. - Graphical abstract: Flowchart of the proposed RLS-KF algorithm for drug-target interaction predictions. - Highlights: • A nonlinear kernel fusion algorithm is proposed to perform drug-target interaction predictions. • Performance can further be improved by using the recalculated kernel. • Top predictions can be validated by experimental data.

  11. Electron and ion beam transport to fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.R.; Baker, L.; Miller, P.A.; Mix, L.P.; Olsen, J.N.; Poukey, J.W.; Wright, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    ICF reactors have been proposed which incorporate a gas-filled chamber to reduce x-ray and debris loading of the first wall. Focused beams of either electrons or ions must be transported efficiently for 2-4 m to a centrally located fusion target. Laser-initiated current-carrying plasma discharge channels provide the guiding magnetic field and the charge- and current-neutralizing medium required for beam propagation. Computational studies of plasma channel formation in air using a 1-D MHD model with multigroup radiation diffusion have provided a good comparison with the expansions velocity and time dependent refractivity profile determined by holographic interferometry. Trajectory calculations have identified a beam expansion mechanism which combines with the usual ohmic dissipation to reduce somewhat the transported beam fluence for electrons. Additional trajectory calculations have been performed for both electrons and light ions to predict the limits on the particle current density which can be delivered to a central target by overlapping the many independently-generated beams. Critical features of the use of plasma channels for transport and overlap of charged particle beams are being tested experimentally with up to twelve electron beams from the Proto II accelerator

  12. Oligomerization and toxicity of A{beta} fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, Joanne M., E-mail: Jo.Caine@csiro.au [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Bharadwaj, Prashant R. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer' s Disease Research and Care, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia (Australia); Sankovich, Sonia E. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D. [The Department of Pathology and Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Streltsov, Victor A.; Varghese, Jose [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} We expressed amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide as a soluble maltose binding protein fusion (MBP-A{beta}42 and MBP-A{beta}16). {yields} The full length A{beta} peptide fusion, MBP-A{beta}42, forms oligomeric species as determined by SDS-PAGE gels, gel filtration and DLS. {yields} The MBP-A{beta}42, but not MBP-A{beta}16 or MBP alone, is toxic to both yeast and mammalian cells as determined by toxicity assays. -- Abstract: This study has found that the Maltose binding protein A{beta}42 fusion protein (MBP-A{beta}42) forms soluble oligomers while the shorter MBP-A{beta}16 fusion and control MBP did not. MBP-A{beta}42, but neither MBP-A{beta}16 nor control MBP, was toxic in a dose-dependent manner in both yeast and primary cortical neuronal cells. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MBP-A{beta}42 as a reagent for drug screening assays in yeast and neuronal cell cultures and as a candidate for further A{beta}42 characterization.

  13. Generation and compression of a target plasma for magnetized target fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Sheehey, P.T. [and others

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is intermediate between the two very different approaches to fusion: inertial and magnetic confinement fusion (ICF and MCF). Results from collaboration with a Russian MTF team on their MAGO experiments suggest they have a target plasma suitable for compression to provide an MTF proof of principle. This LDRD project had tow main objectives: first, to provide a computational basis for experimental investigation of an alternative MTF plasma, and second to explore the physics and computational needs for a continuing program. Secondary objectives included analytic and computational support for MTF experiments. The first objective was fulfilled. The second main objective has several facets to be described in the body of this report. Finally, the authors have developed tools for analyzing data collected on the MAGO a nd LDRD experiments, and have tested them on limited MAGO data.

  14. Engineering Globular Protein Vesicles through Tunable Self-Assembly of Recombinant Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yeongseon; Choi, Won Tae; Heller, William T; Ke, Zunlong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Champion, Julie A

    2017-09-01

    Vesicles assembled from folded, globular proteins have potential for functions different from traditional lipid or polymeric vesicles. However, they also present challenges in understanding the assembly process and controlling vesicle properties. From detailed investigation of the assembly behavior of recombinant fusion proteins, this work reports a simple strategy to engineer protein vesicles containing functional, globular domains. This is achieved through tunable self-assembly of recombinant globular fusion proteins containing leucine zippers and elastin-like polypeptides. The fusion proteins form complexes in solution via high affinity binding of the zippers, and transition through dynamic coacervates to stable hollow vesicles upon warming. The thermal driving force, which can be tuned by protein concentration or temperature, controls both vesicle size and whether vesicles are single or bi-layered. These results provide critical information to engineer globular protein vesicles via self-assembly with desired size and membrane structure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The actin cytoskeleton inhibits pore expansion during PIV5 fusion protein-promoted cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurth, Mark A.; Schowalter, Rachel M.; Smith, Everett Clinton; Moncman, Carole L.; Ellis Dutch, Rebecca; McCann, Richard O.

    2010-01-01

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote both virus-cell fusion, required for viral entry, and cell-cell fusion, resulting in syncytia formation. We used the F-actin stabilizing drug, jasplakinolide, and the G-actin sequestrant, latrunculin A, to examine the role of actin dynamics in cell-cell fusion mediated by the parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) F protein. Jasplakinolide treatment caused a dose-dependent increase in cell-cell fusion as measured by both syncytia and reporter gene assays, and latrunculin A treatment also resulted in fusion stimulation. Treatment with jasplakinolide or latrunculin A partially rescued a fusion pore opening defect caused by deletion of the PIV5 F protein cytoplasmic tail, but these drugs had no effect on fusion inhibited at earlier stages by either temperature arrest or by a PIV5 heptad repeat peptide. These data suggest that the cortical actin cytoskeleton is an important regulator of fusion pore enlargement, an energetically costly stage of viral fusion protein-mediated membrane merger.

  16. Localization of somatostatin receptors at the light and electron microscopical level by using antibodies raised against fusion proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helboe, Lone; Møller, Morten

    2000-01-01

    Somatostatin, antibodies against somatostatin receptors, hypothalamus, Müller cells, fusion protein technique......Somatostatin, antibodies against somatostatin receptors, hypothalamus, Müller cells, fusion protein technique...

  17. Protein fusion tags for efficient expression and purification of recombinant proteins in the periplasmic space of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ajamaluddin

    2016-06-01

    Disulfide bonds occurred in majority of secreted protein. Formation of correct disulfide bonds are must for achieving native conformation, solubility and activity. Production of recombinant proteins containing disulfide bond for therapeutic, diagnostic and various other purposes is a challenging task of research. Production of such proteins in the reducing cytosolic compartment of E. coli usually ends up in inclusion bodies formation. Refolding of inclusion bodies can be difficult, time and labor consuming and uneconomical. Translocation of these proteins into the oxidative periplasmic compartment provides correct environment to undergo proper disulfide bonds formation and thus achieving native conformation. However, not all proteins can be efficiently translocated to the periplasm with the help of bacterial signal peptides. Therefore, fusion to a small well-folded and stable periplasmic protein is more promising for periplasmic production of disulfide bonded proteins. In the past decades, several full-length proteins or domains were used for enhancing translocation and solubility. Here, protein fusion tags that significantly increase the yields of target proteins in the periplasmic space are reviewed.

  18. Accumulation of specific sterol precursors targets a MAP kinase cascade mediating cell–cell recognition and fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, Martin; Lichius, Alexander; Priegnitz, Bert-Ewald; Brandt, Ulrike; Gottschalk, Johannes; Nawrath, Thorben; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Read, Nick D.; Schulz, Stefan; Fleißner, André

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are vital components of eukaryotic cell membranes. Defects in sterol biosynthesis, which result in the accumulation of precursor molecules, are commonly associated with cellular disorders and disease. However, the effects of these sterol precursors on the metabolism, signaling, and behavior of cells are only poorly understood. In this study, we show that the accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain specifically disrupts cell–cell communication and fusion in the fungus Neurospora crassa. Genetically identical germinating spores of this fungus undergo cell–cell fusion, thereby forming a highly interconnected supracellular network during colony initiation. Before fusion, the cells use an unusual signaling mechanism that involves the coordinated and alternating switching between signal sending and receiving states of the two fusion partners. Accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain disrupts this coordinated cell–cell communication and suppresses cell fusion. These specific sterol precursors target a single ERK-like mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAK-1)-signaling cascade, whereas a second MAP kinase pathway (MAK-2), which is also involved in cell fusion, is unaffected. These observations indicate that a minor specific change in sterol structure can exert a strong detrimental effect on a key signaling pathway of the cell, resulting in the absence of cell fusion. PMID:27708165

  19. Renal cold storage followed by transplantation impairs expression of key mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Parajuli

    Full Text Available The majority of transplanted kidneys are procured from deceased donors which all require exposure to cold storage (CS for successful transplantation. Unfortunately, this CS leads to renal and mitochondrial damage but, specific mitochondrial targets affected by CS remain largely unknown. The goal of this study is to determine whether pathways involved with mitochondrial fusion or fission, are disrupted during renal CS.Male Lewis rat kidneys were exposed to cold storage (CS alone or cold storage combined with transplantation (CS/Tx. To compare effects induced by CS, kidney transplantation without CS exposure (autotransplantation; ATx was also used. Mitochondrial function was assessed using high resolution respirometry. Expression of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins were monitored using Western blot analysis.CS alone (no Tx reduced respiratory complex I and II activities along with reduced expression of the primary mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin related protein (DRP1, induced loss of the long form of Optic Atrophy Protein (OPA1, and altered the mitochondrial protease, OMA1, which regulates OPA1 processing. CS followed by Tx (CS/Tx reduced complex I, II, and III activities, and induced a profound loss of the long and short forms of OPA1, mitofusin 1 (MFN1, and mitofusin 2 (MFN2 which all control mitochondrial fusion. In addition, expression of DRP1, along with its primary receptor protein, mitochondrial fission factor (MFF, were also reduced after CS/Tx. Interestingly, CS/Tx lead to aberrant higher molecular weight OMA1 aggregate expression.Our results suggest that CS appears to involve activation of the OMA1, which could be a key player in proteolysis of the fusion and fission protein machinery following transplantation. These findings raise the possibility that impaired mitochondrial fission and fusion may be unrecognized contributors to CS induced mitochondrial injury and compromised renal graft function after transplantation.

  20. Vaccinia mature virus fusion regulator A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 proteins of the viral entry fusion complex and dissociates from mature virions at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Shih, Ao-Chun; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia mature virus enters cells through either endocytosis or plasma membrane fusion, depending on virus strain and cell type. Our previous results showed that vaccinia virus mature virions containing viral A26 protein enter HeLa cells preferentially through endocytosis, whereas mature virions lacking A26 protein enter through plasma membrane fusion, leading us to propose that A26 acts as an acid-sensitive fusion suppressor for mature virus (S. J. Chang, Y. X. Chang, R. Izmailyan R, Y. L. Tang, and W. Chang, J. Virol. 84:8422-8432, 2010). In the present study, we investigated the fusion suppression mechanism of A26 protein. We found that A26 protein was coimmunoprecipitated with multiple components of the viral entry-fusion complex (EFC) in infected HeLa cells. Transient expression of viral EFC components in HeLa cells revealed that vaccinia virus A26 protein interacted directly with A16 and G9 but not with G3, L5 and H2 proteins of the EFC components. Consistently, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-A26 fusion protein, but not GST, pulled down A16 and G9 proteins individually in vitro. Together, our results supported the idea that A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 protein at neutral pH contributing to suppression of vaccinia virus-triggered membrane fusion from without. Since vaccinia virus extracellular envelope proteins A56/K2 were recently shown to bind to the A16/G9 subcomplex to suppress virus-induced fusion from within, our results also highlight an evolutionary convergence in which vaccinia viral fusion suppressor proteins regulate membrane fusion by targeting the A16 and G9 components of the viral EFC complex. Finally, we provide evidence that acid (pH 4.7) treatment induced A26 protein and A26-A27 protein complexes of 70 kDa and 90 kDa to dissociate from mature virions, suggesting that the structure of A26 protein is acid sensitive.

  1. Localization of a region in the fusion protein of avian metapneumovirus that modulates cell-cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongwei; Feng, Kurtis; Yao, Xiangjie; Cai, Hui; Li, Junan; Mirza, Anne M; Iorio, Ronald M; Li, Jianrong

    2012-11-01

    The genus Metapneumovirus within the subfamily Pneumovirinae of the family Paramyxoviridae includes two members, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), causing respiratory tract infections in humans and birds, respectively. Paramyxoviruses enter host cells by fusing the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Membrane fusion of hMPV appears to be unique, in that fusion of some hMPV strains requires low pH. Here, we show that the fusion (F) proteins of aMPV promote fusion in the absence of the attachment protein and low pH is not required. Furthermore, there are notable differences in cell-cell fusion among aMPV subtypes. Trypsin was required for cell-cell fusion induced by subtype B but not subtypes A and C. The F protein of aMPV subtype A was highly fusogenic, whereas those from subtypes B and C were not. By construction and evaluation of chimeric F proteins composed of domains from the F proteins of subtypes A and B, we localized a region composed of amino acid residues 170 to 338 in the F protein that is responsible for the hyperfusogenic phenotype of the F from subtype A. Further mutagenesis analysis revealed that residues R295, G297, and K323 in this region collectively contributed to the hyperfusogenicity. Taken together, we have identified a region in the aMPV F protein that modulates the extent of membrane fusion. A model for fusion consistent with these data is presented.

  2. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Plattet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MeV, a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options.

  3. Biophysical Properties and Antiviral Activities of Measles Fusion Protein Derived Peptide Conjugated with 25-Hydroxycholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Bárbara; Santos, Nuno C; Porotto, Matteo

    2017-10-31

    Measles virus (MV) infection is re-emerging, despite the availability of an effective vaccine. The mechanism of MV entry into a target cell relies on coordinated action between the MV hemagglutinin (H) receptor binding protein and the fusion envelope glycoprotein (F) which mediates fusion between the viral and cell membranes. Peptides derived from the C -terminal heptad repeat (HRC) of F can interfere with this process, blocking MV infection. As previously described, biophysical properties of HRC-derived peptides modulate their antiviral potency. In this work, we characterized a MV peptide fusion inhibitor conjugated to 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), a cholesterol derivative with intrinsic antiviral activity, and evaluated its interaction with membrane model systems and human blood cells. The peptide (MV.

  4. Expression and processing of fluorescent fusion proteins of amyloid precursor protein (APP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Kathleen; Huang, Xiangping; He, Xiangyuan; Chung, Charlotte H Y; Li, Guangpu; Tang, Jordan

    2013-06-01

    Processing of β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases in neurons produces amyloid-β (Aβ), whose excess accumulation leads to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Knowledge on subcellular trafficking pathways of APP and its fragments is important for the understanding of AD pathogenesis. We designed fusion proteins comprising a C-terminal fragment of APP (app) and fluorescent proteins GFP (G) and DsRed (D) to permit the tracking of the fusion proteins and fragments in cells. CAD cells expressing these proteins emitted colocalized green and red fluorescence and produce ectodomains, sGapp and sRapp, and Aβ, whose level was reduced by inhibitors of β- and γ-secretases. The presence of GappR in endosomes was observed via colocalization with Rab5. These observations indicated that the fusion proteins were membrane inserted, transported in vesicles and proteolytically processed by the same mechanism for APP. By attenuating fusion protein synthesis with cycloheximide, individual fluorescent colors from the C-terminus of the fusion proteins appeared in the cytosol which was strongly suppressed by β-secretase inhibitor, suggesting that the ectodomains exit the cell rapidly (t1/2 about 20min) while the C-terminal fragments were retained longer in cells. In live cells, we observed the fluorescence of the ectodomains located between parental fusion proteins and plasma membrane, suggesting that these ectodomain positions are part of their secretion pathway. Our results indicate that the native ectodomain does not play a decisive role for the key features of APP trafficking and processing and the new fusion proteins may lead to novel insights in intracellular activities of APP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A fluorescent cassette-based strategy for engineering multiple domain fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorchid Ahmad

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The engineering of fusion proteins has become increasingly important and most recently has formed the basis of many biosensors, protein purification systems, and classes of new drugs. Currently, most fusion proteins consist of three or fewer domains, however, more sophisticated designs could easily involve three or more domains. Using traditional subcloning strategies, this requires micromanagement of restriction enzymes sites that results in complex workaround solutions, if any at all. Results Therefore, to aid in the efficient construction of fusion proteins involving multiple domains, we have created a new expression vector that allows us to rapidly generate a library of cassettes. Cassettes have a standard vector structure based on four specific restriction endonuclease sites and using a subtle property of blunt or compatible cohesive end restriction enzymes, they can be fused in any order and number of times. Furthermore, the insertion of PCR products into our expression vector or the recombination of cassettes can be dramatically simplified by screening for the presence or absence of fluorescence. Conclusions Finally, the utility of this new strategy was demonstrated by the creation of basic cassettes for protein targeting to subcellular organelles and for protein purification using multiple affinity tags.

  6. Construction, expression, functional сharacterization and practical application of fusion protein SPA-ВAPmut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbatiuk O. B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The creation of genetically engineered fusion protein SPA-BAPmut and its application as a secondary immunoreagent in immunoassays. Methods. Gene cloning, PCR, electrophoresis, DNA sequencing, bacteria cells culturing, protein expression and purification, ELISA, Western-blotting were used. Results. The DNA sequences encoding Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SPA and bacterial alkaline phosphatase with enhanced catalytic activity (BAPmut were used for construction of gene encoding fusion protein SPA-BAPmut that was expressed in the high-productive Escherichia coli system and obtained in a soluble form. Cultivation conditions to provide a high-level expression of SPA-ВAPmut (> 1 g/l were determined. The target protein was obtained with purity more than 95 % using ІМАХ method. SPA-ВAPmut is thermostable, and both parts of fusion protein (SPA and BAPmut retain their IgG binding and alkaline phosphatase activity for a long time. SPA-BAPmut was used as a substitute of secondary antibodies in immunoassays. As little as 5 ng of the antigen could be detected in Western blotting and 1 g/ml of IgG in ELISA. Conclusions. The possibility of using SPA-ВAPmut as universal secondary immunoreagent for different types of immunoassays was shown.

  7. Site-selective protein immobilization by covalent modification of GST fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yiqing; Guo, Tianlin; Tang, Guanghui; Wu, Hui; Wong, Nai-Kei; Pan, Zhengying

    2014-11-19

    The immobilization of functional proteins onto solid supports using affinity tags is an attractive approach in recent development of protein microarray technologies. Among the commonly used fusion protein tags, glutathione S-transferase (GST) proteins have been indispensable tools for protein-protein interaction studies and have extensive applications in recombinant protein purification and reversible protein immobilization. Here, by utilizing pyrimidine-based small-molecule probes with a sulfonyl fluoride reactive group, we report a novel and general approach for site-selective immobilization of Schistosoma japonicum GST (sjGST) fusion proteins through irreversible and specific covalent modification of the tyrosine-111 residue of the sjGST tag. As demonstrated by sjGST-tagged eGFP and sjGST-tagged kinase activity assays, this immobilization approach offers the advantages of high immobilization efficiency and excellent retention of protein structure and activity.

  8. Comparative immunoblot analysis with 10 different, partially overlapping recombinant fusion proteins derived from 5 different cytomegalovirus proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zanten, J.; LAZZAROTTO, T; CAMPISI, B; VORNHAGEN, R; JAHN, G; LANDINI, MP; The, T. Hauw

    Ten fusion proteins derived from five various CMV encoded proteins were used for the detection of specific antibody response by immunoblot technique in sera from renal transplant recipients. The fusion proteins were derived from the following CMV specific proteins: the assembly protein ppUL80a with

  9. Targeting protein-protein interaction between MLL1 and reciprocal proteins for leukemia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Hui; Li, Dong-Dong; Chen, Wei-Lin; You, Qi-Dong; Guo, Xiao-Ke

    2018-01-15

    The mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1), as a lysine methyltransferase, predominantly regulates the methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) and functions in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal. MLL1 gene fuses with partner genes that results in the generation of MLL1 fusion proteins (MLL1-FPs), which are frequently detected in acute leukemia. In the progress of leukemogenesis, a great deal of proteins cooperate with MLL1 to form multiprotein complexes serving for the dysregulation of H3K4 methylation, the overexpression of homeobox (HOX) cluster genes, and the consequent generation of leukemia. Hence, disrupting the interactions between MLL1 and the reciprocal proteins has been considered to be a new treatment strategy for leukemia. Here, we reviewed potential protein-protein interactions (PPIs) between MLL1 and its reciprocal proteins, and summarized the inhibitors to target MLL1 PPIs. The druggability of MLL1 PPIs for leukemia were also discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Heterologous production of peptides in plants: fusion proteins and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Juliane Flávia Cançado; Dias, Simoni Campos; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Lacorte, Cristiano

    2013-11-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has allowed the ectopic production of proteins and peptides of different organisms leading to biopharmaceutical production in large cultures of bacterial, yeasts and mammalian cells. Otherwise, the expression of recombinant proteins and peptides in plants is an attractive alternative presenting several advantages over the commonly used expression systems including reduced production costs, easy scale-up and reduced risks of pathogen contamination. Different types of proteins and peptides have been expressed in plants, including antibodies, antigens, and proteins and peptides of medical, veterinary and industrial applications. However, apart from providing a proof of concept, the use of plants as platforms for heterologous protein and peptide production still depends on key steps towards optimization including the enhancement of expression levels, manipulation of post-transcriptional modifications and improvements in purification methods. In this review, strategies to increase heterologous protein and peptide stability and accumulation are discussed, focusing on the expression of peptides through the use of gene fusions.

  11. Numerical studies of liners for magnetized target fusion (MTF)

    CERN Document Server

    Faehl, R J; Sheehey, P T; Lindemuth, I R

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Magnetized target fusion (MTF) requires the fast compression of hot, dense plasmas by a conducting liner. We have used two-dimensional MHD calculations to study the electromagnetic implosion of metallic liners driven by realistic current waveforms. Parametric studies have indicated that the liner should reach velocities of 3-20 km/s, depending on the magnetic field configuration, and reach convergence ratios (initial radius divided by final radius) of at least 10. These parameters are accessible with large capacitor bank power supplies such as SHIVA or ATLAS, or with magnetic flux compression generators. One issue with the high currents that are required to implode the liner is that Ohmic heating will melt or vaporize the outer part of the liner. Calculations have shown that this is a realistic concern. We are currently addressing questions of liner instability and flux diffusion under MTF conditions. Another issue is that the magnetic fields needed to inhibit thermal losses to the wa...

  12. Quantitative imaging of green fluorescent protein in cultured cells: comparison of microscopic techniques, use in fusion proteins and detection limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niswender, K D; Blackman, S M; Rohde, L; Magnuson, M A; Piston, D W

    1995-11-01

    To determine the application limits of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter gene or protein tag, we expressed GFP by itself and with fusion protein partners, and used three different imaging methods to identify GFP fluorescence. In conventional epifluorescence photomicroscopy, GFP expressed in cells could be distinguished as a bright green signal over a yellow-green autofluorescence background. In quantitative fluorescence microscopy, however, the GFP signal is contaminated by cellular autofluorescence. Improved separation of GFP signal from HeLa cell autofluorescence was achieved by the combination of confocal scanning laser microscopy using 488-nm excitation, a rapid cut-on dichroic mirror and a narrow-bandpass emission filter. Two-photon excitation of GFP fluorescence at the equivalent of approximately 390 nm provided better absorption than did 488-nm excitation. This resulted in increased signal/background but also generated a different autofluorescence pattern and appeared to increase GFP photobleaching. Fluorescence spectra similar to those of GFP alone were observed when GFP was expressed as a fusion protein either with glutathione-S-transferase (GST) or with glucokinase. Furthermore, purified GST.GFP fusion protein displayed an extinction coefficient and quantum yield consistent with values previously reported for GFP alone. In HeLa cells, the cytoplasmic GFP concentration must be greater than approximately 1 microM to allow quantifiable discrimination over autofluorescence. However, lower expression levels may be detectable if GFP is targeted to discrete subcellular compartments, such as the plasma membrane, organelles or nucleus.

  13. Repetitive laser fusion experiment and operation using a target injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Komeda, Osamu; Mori, Yoshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Since 2008, a collaborative research project on laser fusion development based on a high-speed ignition method using repetitive laser has been carried out with several collaborative research institutes. This paper reports the current state of operation of high repetition laser fusion experiments, such as target introduction and control based on a target injection system that allows free falling under 1 Hz, using a high repetition laser driver that has been under research and development, as well as the measurement of targets that freely fall. The HAMA laser driver that enabled high repetition fusion experiments is a titanium sapphire laser using a diode-pumped solid-state laser KURE-I of green light output as a driver pump light source. In order to carry out high repetition laser fusion experiments, the target injection device allows free falling of deuterated polystyrene solid sphere targets of 1 mm in diameter under 1 Hz. The authors integrated the developed laser and injection system, and succeeded first in the world in making the nuclear fusion reaction continuously by hitting the target to be injected with laser, which is essential technology for future laser nuclear fusion reactor. In order to realize repetition laser fusion experiments, stable laser, target synchronization control, and target position measurement technologies are indispensable. (A.O.)

  14. Fusion protein is the main determinant of metapneumovirus host tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Miranda; Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Herfst, Sander; van Amerongen, Geert; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2009-06-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) and avian metapneumovirus subgroup C (AMPV-C) infect humans and birds, respectively. This study confirmed the difference in host range in turkey poults, and analysed the contribution of the individual metapneumovirus genes to host range in an in vitro cell-culture model. Mammalian Vero-118 cells supported replication of both HMPV and AMPV-C in contrast to avian quail fibroblast (QT6) cells in which only AMPV-C replicated to high titres. Inoculation of Vero-118 and QT6 cells with recombinant HMPV in which genes were exchanged with those of AMPV-C revealed that the metapneumovirus fusion (F) protein is the main determinant for host tropism. Chimeric viruses in which polymerase complex proteins were exchanged between HMPV and AMPV-C replicated less efficiently compared with HMPV in QT6 cells. Using mini-genome systems, it was shown that exchanging these polymerase proteins resulted in reduced replication and transcription efficiency in QT6 cells. Examination of infected Vero-118 and QT6 cells revealed that viruses containing the F protein of AMPV-C yielded larger syncytia compared with viruses containing the HMPV F protein. Cell-content mixing assays revealed that the F protein of AMPV-C was more fusogenic compared with the F protein of HMPV, and that the F2 region is responsible for the difference observed between AMPV-C and HMPV F-promoted fusion in QT6 and Vero-118 cells. This study provides insight into the determinants of host tropism and membrane fusion of metapneumoviruses.

  15. In Situ Protein Binding Assay Using Fc-Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Nirmala; Siddiqui, Tabrez J

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes an in situ protein-protein interaction assay between tagged recombinant proteins and cell-surface expressed synaptic proteins. The assay is arguably more sensitive than other traditional protein binding assays such as co-immunoprecipitation and pull-downs and provides a visual readout for binding. This assay has been widely used to determine the dissociation constant of binding of trans-synaptic adhesion proteins. The step-wise description in the protocol should facilitate the adoption of this method in other laboratories.

  16. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells.

  17. FY-2013 FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) Joint Research Target Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Hubbard, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Maingi, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Whyte, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The H-mode confinement regime is characterized by a region of good thermal and particle confinement at the edge of the confined plasma, and has generally been envisioned as the operating regime for ITER and other next step devices. This good confinement is often interrupted, however, by edge-localized instabilities, known as ELMs. On the one hand, these ELMs provide particle and impurity flushing from the plasma core, a beneficial effect facilitating density control and stationary operation. On the other hand, the ELMs result in a substantial fraction of the edge stored energy flowing in bursts to the divertor and first wall; this impulsive thermal loading would result in unacceptable erosion of these material surfaces if it is not arrested. Hence, developing and understanding operating regimes that have the energy confinement of standard H-mode and the stationarity that is provided by ELMs, while at the same time eliminating the impulsive thermal loading of large ELMs, is the focus of the 2013 FES Joint Research Target (JRT): Annual Target: Conduct experiments and analysis on major fusion facilities, to evaluate stationary enhanced confinement regimes without large Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), and to improve understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms that allow acceptable edge particle transport while maintaining a strong thermal transport barrier. Mechanisms to be investigated can include intrinsic continuous edge plasma modes and externally applied 3D fields. Candidate regimes and techniques have been pioneered by each of the three major US facilities (C-Mod, D3D and NSTX). Coordinated experiments, measurements, and analysis will be carried out to assess and understand the operational space for the regimes. Exploiting the complementary parameters and tools of the devices, joint teams will aim to more closely approach key dimensionless parameters of ITER, and to identify correlations between edge fluctuations and transport. The role of rotation will be

  18. Functional Carboxy-Terminal Fluorescent Protein Fusion to Pseudorabies Virus Small Capsid Protein VP26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B; Jean, Jolie; Esteves, Andrew D; Tanneti, Nikhila S; Scherer, Julian; Enquist, Lynn W

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent protein fusions to herpesvirus capsids have proven to be a valuable method to study virus particle transport in living cells. Fluorescent protein fusions to the amino terminus of small capsid protein VP26 are the most widely used method to visualize pseudorabies virus (PRV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) particles in living cells. However, these fusion proteins do not incorporate to full occupancy and have modest effects on virus replication and pathogenesis. Recent cryoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that herpesvirus small capsid proteins bind to capsids via their amino terminus, whereas the carboxy terminus is unstructured and therefore may better tolerate fluorescent protein fusions. Here, we describe a new recombinant PRV expressing a carboxy-terminal VP26-mCherry fusion. Compared to previously characterized viruses expressing amino-terminal fusions, this virus expresses more VP26 fusion protein in infected cells and incorporates more VP26 fusion protein into virus particles, and individual virus particles exhibit brighter red fluorescence. We performed single-particle tracking of fluorescent virus particles in primary neurons to measure anterograde and retrograde axonal transport, demonstrating the usefulness of this novel VP26-mCherry fusion for the study of viral intracellular transport. IMPORTANCE Alphaherpesviruses are among the very few viruses that are adapted to invade the mammalian nervous system. Intracellular transport of virus particles in neurons is important, as this process underlies both mild peripheral nervous system infection and severe spread to the central nervous system. VP26, the small capsid protein of HSV and PRV, was one of the first herpesvirus proteins to be fused to a fluorescent protein. Since then, these capsid-tagged virus mutants have become a powerful tool to visualize and track individual virus particles. Improved capsid tags will facilitate fluorescence microscopy studies of virus particle intracellular

  19. Recurrent Fusion Genes in Leukemia: An Attractive Target for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhui; Wu, Nan; Liu, Duo; Jin, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Since the first fusion gene was discovered decades ago, a considerable number of fusion genes have been detected in leukemia. The majority of them are generated through chromosomal rearrangement or abnormal transcription. With the development of techniques, high-throughput sequencing method makes it possible to detect fusion genes systematically in multiple human cancers. Owing to their biological significance and tumor-specific expression, some of the fusion genes are attractive diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) targeting BCR-ABL1 fusions have been widely used to treat CML. The combination of ATRA and ATO targeting PML-RARA fusions has proven to be effective in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Moreover, therapy with high dose cytarabine (HDAC) has significantly improved the prognosis of core binding factor (CBF) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, studies on fusion genes may benefit patients with leukemia by providing more diagnostic markers and therapies in the future. The presented review focuses on the history of fusion genes, mechanisms of formation, and treatments against specific fusion genes in leukemia.

  20. Protein accumulation and rumen stability of wheat γ-gliadin fusion proteins in tobacco and alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Chi-Ham, Cecilia L; Cohen-Davidyan, Tamar; DeBen, Christopher; Getachew, Girma; DePeters, Edward; Putnam, Daniel; Bennett, Alan

    2015-09-01

    The nutritional value of various crops can be improved by engineering plants to produce high levels of proteins. For example, because methionine deficiency limits the protein quality of Medicago Sativa (alfalfa) forage, producing alfalfa plants that accumulate high levels of a methionine-rich protein could increase the nutritional value of that crop. We used three strategies in designing methionine-rich recombinant proteins that could accumulate to high levels in plants and thereby serve as candidates for improving the protein quality of alfalfa forage. In tobacco, two fusion proteins, γ-gliadin-δ-zein and γ-δ-zein, as well as δ-zein co-expressed with β-zein, all formed protein bodies. However, the γ-gliadin-δ-zein fusion protein accumulated to the highest level, representing up to 1.5% of total soluble protein (TSP) in one transformant. In alfalfa, γ-gliadin-δ-zein accumulated to 0.2% of TSP, and in an in vitro rumen digestion assay, γ-gliadin-δ-zein was more resistant to microbial degradation than Rubisco. Additionally, although it did not form protein bodies, a γ-gliadin-GFP fusion protein accumulated to much higher levels, 7% of TSP, than a recombinant protein comprised of an ER localization signal fused to GFP in tobacco. Based on our results, we conclude that γ-gliadin-δ-zein is a potential candidate protein to use for enhancing methionine levels in plants and for improving rumen stability of forage protein. γ-gliadin fusion proteins may provide a general platform for increasing the accumulation of recombinant proteins in transgenic plants. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Coronavirus escape from heptad repeat 2 (HR2)-derived peptide entry inhibition as a result of mutations in the HR1 domain of the spike fusion protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Berend Jan; Rossen, John W. A.; Bartelink, Willem; Zuurveen, Stephanie J.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Duquerroy, Stephane; Boucher, Charles A. B.; Rottier, Peter J. M.

    Peptides based on heptad repeat (HR) domains of class I viral fusion proteins are considered promising antiviral drugs targeting virus cell entry. We have analyzed the evolution of the mouse hepatitis coronavirus during multiple passaging in the presence of an HR2-based fusion inhibitor.

  2. Structure and Function Study of HIV and Influenza Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuang

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza virus are membrane-enveloped viruses causing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and flu. The initial step of HIV and influenza virus infection is fusion between viral and host cell membrane catalyzed by the viral fusion protein gp41 and hemagglutinin (HA) respectively. However, the structure of gp41 and HA as well as the infection mechanism are still not fully understood. This work addresses (1) full length gp41 ectodomain and TM domain structure and function and (2) IFP membrane location and IFP-membrane interaction. My studies of gp41 protein and IFP can provide better understanding of the membrane fusion mechanism and may aid development of anti-viral therapeutics and vaccine. The full length ectodomain and transmembrane domain of gp41 and shorter constructs were expressed, purified and solubilized at physiology conditions. The constructs adopt overall alpha helical structure in SDS and DPC detergents, and showed hyperthermostability with Tm > 90 °C. The oligomeric states of these proteins vary in different detergent buffer: predominant trimer for all constructs and some hexamer fraction for HM and HM_TM protein in SDS at pH 7.4; and mixtures of monomer, trimer, and higher-order oligomer protein in DPC at pH 4.0 and 7.4. Substantial protein-induced vesicle fusion was observed, including fusion of neutral vesicles at neutral pH, which are the conditions similar HIV/cell fusion. Vesicle fusion by a gp41 ectodomain construct has rarely been observed under these conditions, and is aided by inclusion of both the FP and TM, and by protein which is predominantly trimer rather than monomer. Current data was integrated with existing data, and a structural model was proposed. Secondary structure and conformation of IFP is a helix-turn-helix structure in membrane. However, there has been arguments about the IFP membrane location. 13C-2H REDOR solid-state NMR is used to solve this problem. The IFP adopts major alpha

  3. Target detection method by airborne and spaceborne images fusion based on past images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanjing; Kang, Qing; Wang, Zhenggang; Shen, ZhiQiang; Pu, Huan; Han, Hao; Gu, Zhongzheng

    2017-11-01

    To solve the problem that remote sensing target detection method has low utilization rate of past remote sensing data on target area, and can not recognize camouflage target accurately, a target detection method by airborne and spaceborne images fusion based on past images is proposed in this paper. The target area's past of space remote sensing image is taken as background. The airborne and spaceborne remote sensing data is fused and target feature is extracted by the means of airborne and spaceborne images registration, target change feature extraction, background noise suppression and artificial target feature extraction based on real-time aerial optical remote sensing image. Finally, the support vector machine is used to detect and recognize the target on feature fusion data. The experimental results have established that the proposed method combines the target area change feature of airborne and spaceborne remote sensing images with target detection algorithm, and obtains fine detection and recognition effect on camouflage and non-camouflage targets.

  4. Inhibition of Nipah Virus Infectin In Vivo: Targeting an Early Stage of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation during Viral Entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Porotto; B Rockx; C Yokoyama; A Talekar; I DeVito; l Palermo; J Liu; R Cortese; M Lu; et al.

    2011-12-31

    In the paramyxovirus cell entry process, receptor binding triggers conformational changes in the fusion protein (F) leading to viral and cellular membrane fusion. Peptides derived from C-terminal heptad repeat (HRC) regions in F have been shown to inhibit fusion by preventing formation of the fusogenic six-helix bundle. We recently showed that the addition of a cholesterol group to HRC peptides active against Nipah virus targets these peptides to the membrane where fusion occurs, dramatically increasing their antiviral effect. In this work, we report that unlike the untagged HRC peptides, which bind to the postulated extended intermediate state bridging the viral and cell membranes, the cholesterol tagged HRC-derived peptides interact with F before the fusion peptide inserts into the target cell membrane, thus capturing an earlier stage in the F-activation process. Furthermore, we show that cholesterol tagging renders these peptides active in vivo: the cholesterol-tagged peptides cross the blood brain barrier, and effectively prevent and treat in an established animal model what would otherwise be fatal Nipah virus encephalitis. The in vivo efficacy of cholesterol-tagged peptides, and in particular their ability to penetrate the CNS, suggests that they are promising candidates for the prevention or therapy of infection by Nipah and other lethal paramyxoviruses.

  5. Transposon assisted gene insertion technology (TAGIT: a tool for generating fluorescent fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We constructed a transposon (transposon assisted gene insertion technology, or TAGIT that allows the random insertion of gfp (or other genes into chromosomal loci without disrupting operon structure or regulation. TAGIT is a modified Tn5 transposon that uses Kan(R to select for insertions on the chromosome or plasmid, beta-galactosidase to identify in-frame gene fusions, and Cre recombinase to excise the kan and lacZ genes in vivo. The resulting gfp insertions maintain target gene reading frame (to the 5' and 3' of gfp and are integrated at the native chromosomal locus, thereby maintaining native expression signals. Libraries can be screened to identify GFP insertions that maintain target protein function at native expression levels, allowing more trustworthy localization studies. We here use TAGIT to generate a library of GFP insertions in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor (LacI. We identified fully functional GFP insertions and partially functional insertions that bind DNA but fail to repress the lacZ operon. Several of these latter GFP insertions localize to lacO arrays integrated in the E. coli chromosome without producing the elongated cells frequently observed when functional LacI-GFP fusions are used in chromosome tagging experiments. TAGIT thereby faciliates the isolation of fully functional insertions of fluorescent proteins into target proteins expressed from the native chromosomal locus as well as potentially useful partially functional proteins.

  6. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins: roles in protein folding, stability, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Smith, Stacy E; Carter, James R; Webb, Stacy R; Gibson, Kathleen M; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2013-12-13

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote membrane fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes, a critical early step in viral infection. Although mutational analyses have indicated that transmembrane (TM) domain residues can affect folding or function of viral fusion proteins, direct analysis of TM-TM interactions has proved challenging. To directly assess TM interactions, the oligomeric state of purified chimeric proteins containing the Staphylococcal nuclease (SN) protein linked to the TM segments from three paramyxovirus F proteins was analyzed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis in detergent and buffer conditions that allowed density matching. A monomer-trimer equilibrium best fit was found for all three SN-TM constructs tested, and similar fits were obtained with peptides corresponding to just the TM region of two different paramyxovirus F proteins. These findings demonstrate for the first time that class I viral fusion protein TM domains can self-associate as trimeric complexes in the absence of the rest of the protein. Glycine residues have been implicated in TM helix interactions, so the effect of mutations at Hendra F Gly-508 was assessed in the context of the whole F protein. Mutations G508I or G508L resulted in decreased cell surface expression of the fusogenic form, consistent with decreased stability of the prefusion form of the protein. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis of TM domains containing these mutations gave higher relative association constants, suggesting altered TM-TM interactions. Overall, these results suggest that trimeric TM interactions are important driving forces for protein folding, stability and membrane fusion promotion.

  7. Optimization of the Expression of DT386-BR2 Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best condition for the production of DT386-BR2 fusion protein, an immunotoxin consisting of catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, for targeted eradication of cancer cells, in terms of the host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. Recombinant pET28a vector containing the codons optimized for the expression of the DT386-BR2 gene was transformed to different strains of Escherichia coli ( E. coli BL21 DE3, E. coli Rosetta DE3 and E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 DE3), followed by the induction of expression using 1 mM IPTG. Then, the strain with the highest ability to produce recombinant protein was selected and used to determine the best expression condition using response surface methodology (RSM). Finally, the best culture medium was selected. Densitometry analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the expressed fusion protein showed that E. coli Rosetta DE3 produced the highest amounts of the recombinant fusion protein when quantified by 1 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (178.07 μg/ml). Results of RSM also showed the best condition for the production of the recombinant fusion protein was induction with 1 mM IPTG for 2 h at 37°C. Finally, it was established that terrific broth could produce higher amounts of the fusion protein when compared to other culture media. In this study, we expressed the recombinant DT386-BR2 fusion protein in large amounts by optimizing the expression host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. This fusion protein will be subjected to purification and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects in future studies.

  8. Optimization of the Expression of DT386-BR2 Fusion Protein in Escherichia coli using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shafiee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the best condition for the production of DT386-BR2 fusion protein, an immunotoxin consisting of catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, for targeted eradication of cancer cells, in terms of the host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. Materials and Methods: Recombinant pET28a vector containing the codons optimized for the expression of the DT386-BR2 gene was transformed to different strains of Escherichia coli (E. coli BL21 DE3, E. coli Rosetta DE3 and E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 DE3, followed by the induction of expression using 1 mM IPTG. Then, the strain with the highest ability to produce recombinant protein was selected and used to determine the best expression condition using response surface methodology (RSM. Finally, the best culture medium was selected. Results: Densitometry analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the expressed fusion protein showed that E. coli Rosetta DE3 produced the highest amounts of the recombinant fusion protein when quantified by 1 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (178.07 μg/ml. Results of RSM also showed the best condition for the production of the recombinant fusion protein was induction with 1 mM IPTG for 2 h at 37°C. Finally, it was established that terrific broth could produce higher amounts of the fusion protein when compared to other culture media. Conclusion: In this study, we expressed the recombinant DT386-BR2 fusion protein in large amounts by optimizing the expression host, cultivation condition, and culture medium. This fusion protein will be subjected to purification and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects in future studies.

  9. Direct targeting of membrane fusion by SNARE mimicry: Convergent evolution of Legionella effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xingqi; Halder, Partho; Yavuz, Halenur; Jahn, Reinhard; Shuman, Howard A

    2016-08-02

    Legionella pneumophila, the Gram-negative pathogen causing Legionnaires' disease, infects host cells by hijacking endocytic pathways and forming a Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) in which the bacteria replicate. To promote LCV expansion and prevent lysosomal targeting, effector proteins are translocated into the host cell where they alter membrane traffic. Here we show that three of these effectors [LegC2 (Legionella eukaryotic-like gene C2)/YlfB (yeast lethal factor B), LegC3, and LegC7/YlfA] functionally mimic glutamine (Q)-SNARE proteins. In infected cells, the three proteins selectively form complexes with the endosomal arginine (R)-SNARE vesicle-associated membrane protein 4 (VAMP4). When reconstituted in proteoliposomes, these proteins avidly fuse with liposomes containing VAMP4, resulting in a stable complex with properties resembling canonical SNARE complexes. Intriguingly, however, the LegC/SNARE hybrid complex cannot be disassembled by N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor. We conclude that LegCs use SNARE mimicry to divert VAMP4-containing vesicles for fusion with the LCV, thus promoting its expansion. In addition, the LegC/VAMP4 complex avoids the host's disassembly machinery, thus effectively trapping VAMP4 in an inactive state.

  10. Mistic and TarCF as fusion protein partners for functional expression of the cannabinoid receptor 2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ananda; Feng, Rentian; Tong, Qin; Zhang, Yuxun; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2012-06-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in signal recognition and cellular communication making them important therapeutic targets. Large-scale production of these membrane proteins in their native form is crucial for understanding their mechanism of action and target-based drug design. Here we report the overexpression system for a GPCR, the cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2), in Escherichia coli C43(DE3) facilitated by two fusion partners: Mistic, an integral membrane protein expression enhancer at the N-terminal, and TarCF, a C-terminal fragment of the bacterial chemosensory transducer Tar at the C-terminal of the CB2 open reading frame region. Multiple histidine tags were added on both ends of the fusion protein to facilitate purification. Using individual and combined fusion partners, we found that CB2 fusion protein expression was maximized only when both partners were used. Variable growth and induction conditions were conducted to determine and optimize protein expression. More importantly, this fusion protein Mistic-CB2-TarCF can localize into the E. coli membrane and exhibit functional binding activities with known CB2 ligands including CP55,940, WIN55,212-2 and SR144,528. These results indicate that this novel expression and purification system provides us with a promising strategy for the preparation of biologically active GPCRs, as well as general application for the preparation of membrane-bound proteins using the two new fusion partners described. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. GCC2-ALK as a targetable fusion in lung adenocarcinoma and its enduring clinical responses to ALK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Junhong; Wu, Xue; Tong, Xiaoling; Wei, Wangzhi; Chen, Anan; Wang, Xiaonan; Shao, Yang W; Huang, Jianan

    2018-01-01

    ALK, RET and ROS1 fusions have been identified as treatable targets in 5%-15% of non-small-cell lung cancers, and thanks to the advanced sequencing technologies, their new partner genes have been steadily detected. Here we identified a rare fusion of ALK (GCC2-ALK) in a patient with advanced lung adenocarcinoma and monitored the treatment efficacy of ALK inhibitors on this patient. We further performed in vitro functional studies of this fusion protein for evaluating its oncogenic potential. The GCC2-ALK fusion gene was identified by targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) from the tumor DNA samples, and its fusion product was confirmed by Sanger sequencing the cDNA product. The functional study of GCC2-ALK was performed in Ba/F3 cells with cell proliferation and viability assays. The activation of downstream signaling pathways of ALK and their responses to crizotinib inhibition were studied in HEK-293 and 293T cells with ectopic expression of GCC2-ALK. In parallel, disease progression in the patient was monitored by computed tomography scanning and targeted NGS of either liquid or tissue biopsy samples throughout and after crizotinib treatment. Similarly to EML4-ALK, the GCC2-ALK fusion protein promotes IL-3-independent growth of Ba/F3 cells. Ectopic expression of GCC2-ALK leads to hyper-activation of ALK downstream signaling that can be inhibited by crizotinib. Crizotinib treatment of the patient resulted in 18 months of progression free survival without any trace of GCC2-ALK fusion in the liquid biopsies. Re-biopsy of a lung lesion at progression identified the re-occurrence of GCC2-ALK. The patient was then administrated with a second-generation ALK inhibitor, ceritinib, and received partial response until the last follow-up. We identified and functionally validated GCC2-ALK as a constitutively activated fusion in NSCLC. The patient was benefited from crizotinib treatment initially and then ceritinib after progression, suggesting GCC2-ALK as a novel

  12. Target Properties Effects on Central versus Peripheral Vertical Fusion Interaction Tested on a 3D Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Neveu, Pascaline; Fattakhova, Yulia; Ferragut, Stéphanie; Lamard, Mathieu; Cochener, Béatrice; de Bougrenet de la Tocnaye, Jean-Louis

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the impact of target properties on vertical fusion amplitude (VFA) using a 3D display platform; the performance of the subjects allowed us to assess how central and peripheral retina regions interact during the fusion process. Fourteen subjects were involved in the test. VFA was recorded by varying the viewing distance, target complexity, disparity velocity, lighting condition and background luminance. Base-up prisms were introduced to create vertical disparity in the peripheral retinal area, whereas an offset compensation was added in the central area. Data were analyzed in JMP software using T-test and repeated-measures ANOVA tests. VFA is significantly affected by target properties including viewing distance, target complexity and disparity velocity; the impact from lighting condition and background luminance is not significant. Although central retina plays a crucial role in the fusion process, peripheral regions also affect the fusion performance when stimulus size on retina and contents disparity values are modified between central and peripheral vision. Vertical fusion is affected by various target properties. For the first time, peripheral vertical disparity direction effects on central fusion and eye motion response have been explored. Besides, a quantitative interaction of central and peripheral fusion is observed, which could be applied in clinical measurement on binocular disease concerning central and peripheral vision conflict.

  13. Storage and Containment of Nuclear Targets for Pulsed Fission-Fusion Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The combined fission-fusion fuel target is the heart of an engine concept that can open the solar system to fast and efficient human exploration. This is a unique...

  14. Measles Virus Mutants Possessing the Fusion Protein with Enhanced Fusion Activity Spread Effectively in Neuronal Cells, but Not in Other Cells, without Causing Strong Cytopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shinji; Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Koga, Ritsuko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Since human neurons, its main target cells, do not express known MV receptors (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule [SLAM] and nectin 4), it remains to be understood how MV infects and spreads in them. We have recently reported that fusion-enhancing substitutions in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein (T461I and S103I/N462S/N465S), which are found in multiple SSPE virus isolates, promote MV spread in human neuroblastoma cell lines and brains of suckling hamsters. In this study, we show that hyperfusogenic viruses with these substitutions also spread efficiently in human primary neuron cultures without inducing syncytia. These substitutions were found to destabilize the prefusion conformation of the F protein trimer, thereby enhancing fusion activity. However, these hyperfusogenic viruses exhibited stronger cytopathology and produced lower titers at later time points in SLAM- or nectin 4-expressing cells compared to the wild-type MV. Although these viruses spread efficiently in the brains of SLAM knock-in mice, they did not in the spleens. Taken together, the results suggest that enhanced fusion activity is beneficial for MV to spread in neuronal cells where no cytopathology occurs, but detrimental to other types of cells due to strong cytopathology. Acquisition of enhanced fusion activity through substitutions in the extracellular domain of the F protein may be crucial for MV's extensive spread in the CNS and development of SSPE. IMPORTANCE Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Its cause is not well understood, and no effective therapy is currently available. Recently, we have reported that enhanced fusion activity of MV through the mutations in its fusion protein is a major determinant of

  15. Electrostatic levitation, control and transport in high rate, low cost production of inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Johnson, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion requires production of power plant grade targets at high rates and process yield. A review of present project specifications and techniques to produce targets is discussed with special emphasis on automating the processes and combining them with an electrostatic transport and suspension system through the power plant target factory

  16. Design of a single-chain multi-enzyme fusion protein establishing the polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Jane A; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2010-05-03

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates are biodegradable biocompatible polymers naturally produced by various bacteria and archaea. Biotechnological production in transgenic plants has already been demonstrated with efficient polyhydroxybutyrate production requiring targeting of the enzymes to the chloroplasts. Three enzymes are required to establish the polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthesis pathway in non-naturally producing microorganisms or plants. To facilitate production of biopolyesters in plants, a gene encoding a translational fusion of the polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthesis enzymes PhaA (beta-ketothiolase), PhaB (acetoacetyl-CoA reductase) and PhaC (PHA synthase) was constructed. Escherichia coli harboring a plasmid encoding this fusion protein (PhaA-PhaB-PhaC) under control of the lac promoter accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate contributing to 0.4% (w/w) of cellular dry weight. Insertion of an extended linker between PhaA and PhaB increased polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation to 3.9% (w/w) of cellular dry weight. Introduction of a second plasmid encoding PhaA and PhaB restored polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation to wildtype levels of about 35% (w/w) of cellular dry weight suggesting that the functions of PhaA and/or PhaB were limiting factors. Deletion of PhaA in trans led to significantly reduced polyhydroxybutyrate production suggesting that the PhaA activity in the fusion protein is reduced. This study showed that a single-chain translational fusion protein comprising the three enzymes essential for polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis can be engineered which will strongly facilitate the establishment of recombinant polyhydroxybutyrate production organisms particularly requiring targeting to sub-cellular compartments such as the chloroplasts in plants. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sequential Conformational Changes in the Morbillivirus Attachment Protein Initiate the Membrane Fusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Herren, Michael; Avila, Mislay; Alves, Lisa; Bringolf, Fanny; Örvell, Claes; Langedijk, Johannes P.; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K.; Plattet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Despite large vaccination campaigns, measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause major morbidity and mortality in humans and animals, respectively. The MeV and CDV cell entry system relies on two interacting envelope glycoproteins: the attachment protein (H), consisting of stalk and head domains, co-operates with the fusion protein (F) to mediate membrane fusion. However, how receptor-binding by the H-protein leads to F-triggering is not fully understood. Here, we report that an anti-CDV-H monoclonal antibody (mAb-1347), which targets the linear H-stalk segment 126-133, potently inhibits membrane fusion without interfering with H receptor-binding or F-interaction. Rather, mAb-1347 blocked the F-triggering function of H-proteins regardless of the presence or absence of the head domains. Remarkably, mAb-1347 binding to headless CDV H, as well as standard and engineered bioactive stalk-elongated CDV H-constructs treated with cells expressing the SLAM receptor, was enhanced. Despite proper cell surface expression, fusion promotion by most H-stalk mutants harboring alanine substitutions in the 126-138 “spacer” section was substantially impaired, consistent with deficient receptor-induced mAb-1347 binding enhancement. However, a previously reported F-triggering defective H-I98A variant still exhibited the receptor-induced “head-stalk” rearrangement. Collectively, our data spotlight a distinct mechanism for morbillivirus membrane fusion activation: prior to receptor contact, at least one of the morbillivirus H-head domains interacts with the membrane-distal “spacer” domain in the H-stalk, leaving the F-binding site located further membrane-proximal in the stalk fully accessible. This “head-to-spacer” interaction conformationally stabilizes H in an auto-repressed state, which enables intracellular H-stalk/F engagement while preventing the inherent H-stalk’s bioactivity that may prematurely activate F. Receptor-contact disrupts the

  18. Construction of a Novel Liver-Targeting Fusion Interferon by Incorporation of a Plasmodium Region I-Plus Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon alpha (IFN α exerts a multiplicity of biological actions including antiviral, immunomodulatory, and antiproliferative effects. Administration of IFN α is the current treatment for chronic hepatitis B; however, therapy outcome has not been completely satisfactory. The systemic effects of IFN α may account for its low in vivo biological activity and multiple adverse events. The purpose of this study was to design a novel liver-targeting fusion interferon (IFN-CSP by fusing IFN α2b with a Plasmodium region I-plus peptide, thus targeting the drug specifically to the liver. The DNA sequence encoding IFN-CSP was constructed using improved splicing by overlapping extension-PCR method, and then cloned into the pET-21b vector for protein expression in E. coli BL21 (DE3. The recombinant protein was expressed as a His-tagged protein and purified using a combination of Ni affinity and HiTrap affinity chromatography at a purity of over 95%. The final yield of biologically active IFN-CSP was up to 270 mg/L culture. The purified recombinant protein showed anti-HBV activity and liver-targeting potentiality in vitro. These data suggests that the novel fusion interferon IFN-CSP may be an excellent candidate as a liver-targeting anti-HBV agent.

  19. Bactericidal effects of a fusion protein of llama heavy-chain antibodies coupled to glucose oxidase on oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szynol, A; de Soet, J J; Sieben-van Tuyl, E; Bos, J W; Frenken, L G

    2004-09-01

    Enzymes such as lactoperoxidase and glucose oxidase (GOx) are used as antimicrobial agents in oral care products. Their low specificities and substantiveness can be reduced by covalent coupling of antimicrobial molecules to antibodies. Variable domains (V(HH)) derived from llama heavy-chain antibodies are particularly suited for such an approach. The antibodies are composed solely of heavy-chain dimers; therefore, production of active fusion proteins by using molecular biology-based techniques is less complicated than production by use of conventional antibodies. In this study, a fusion protein consisting of V(HH) and GOx was constructed and expressed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A llama was immunized with Streptococcus mutans strain HG982. Subsequently, B lymphocytes were isolated and cDNA fragments encoding the V(HH) fragments were obtained by reverse transcription-PCR. After construction of a V(HH) library in Escherichia coli and screening of the library against mutans group streptococci and Streptococcus sanguinis strains, we found two V(HH) fragments with high specificities for S. mutans strains. A GOx gene was linked to the two V(HH) genes and cloned into S. cerevisiae yeasts. The yeasts expressed and secreted the recombinant proteins into the growth medium. The test of binding of fusion proteins to oral bacteria through their V(HH) fragments showed that S. mutans had been specifically targeted by GOx-S120, one of the fusion protein constructs. A low concentration of the fusion protein was also able to selectively kill S. mutans within 20 min in the presence of lactoperoxidase and potassium iodide. These findings demonstrate that the fusion protein GOx-V(HH) is potentially valuable in the selective killing of target bacteria such as S. mutans.

  20. Localization of a Region in the Fusion Protein of Avian Metapneumovirus That Modulates Cell-Cell Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongwei; Feng, Kurtis; Yao, Xiangjie; Cai, Hui; Li, Junan; Mirza, Anne M.; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Metapneumovirus within the subfamily Pneumovirinae of the family Paramyxoviridae includes two members, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), causing respiratory tract infections in humans and birds, respectively. Paramyxoviruses enter host cells by fusing the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Membrane fusion of hMPV appears to be unique, in that fusion of some hMPV strains requires low pH. Here, we show that the fusion (F) proteins of aMPV promote fusion in the absence of the attachment protein and low pH is not required. Furthermore, there are notable differences in cell-cell fusion among aMPV subtypes. Trypsin was required for cell-cell fusion induced by subtype B but not subtypes A and C. The F protein of aMPV subtype A was highly fusogenic, whereas those from subtypes B and C were not. By construction and evaluation of chimeric F proteins composed of domains from the F proteins of subtypes A and B, we localized a region composed of amino acid residues 170 to 338 in the F protein that is responsible for the hyperfusogenic phenotype of the F from subtype A. Further mutagenesis analysis revealed that residues R295, G297, and K323 in this region collectively contributed to the hyperfusogenicity. Taken together, we have identified a region in the aMPV F protein that modulates the extent of membrane fusion. A model for fusion consistent with these data is presented. PMID:22915815

  1. A recombinant fusion protein-based, fluorescent protease assay for high throughput-compatible substrate screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozóki, Beáta; Gazda, Lívia; Tóth, Ferenc; Miczi, Márió; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2018-01-01

    In connection with the intensive investigation of proteases, several methods have been developed for analysis of the substrate specificity. Due to the great number of proteases and the expected target molecules to be analyzed, time- and cost-efficient high-throughput screening (HTS) methods are preferred. Here we describe the development and application of a separation-based HTS-compatible fluorescent protease assay, which is based on the use of recombinant fusion proteins as substrates of proteases. The protein substrates used in this assay consists of N-terminal (hexahistidine and maltose binding protein) fusion tags, cleavage sequences of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) and HIV-1 proteases, and a C-terminal fluorescent protein (mApple or mTurquoise2). The assay is based on the fluorimetric detection of the fluorescent proteins, which are released from the magnetic bead-attached substrates by the proteolytic cleavage. The protease assay has been applied for activity measurements of TEV and HIV-1 proteases to test the suitability of the system for enzyme kinetic measurements, inhibition studies, and determination of pH optimum. We also found that denatured fluorescent proteins can be renatured after SDS-PAGE of denaturing conditions, but showed differences in their renaturation abilities. After in-gel renaturation both substrates and cleavage products can be identified by in-gel UV detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fusion expression of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein in E.coli

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Qiao-Zhen; Duan, Guang-Cai; Fan, Qing-Tang; Xi, Yuan-Lin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To produce a recombinant protein rMBP-NAP, which was fusionally expressed by Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) neutrophil-activating protein (NAP) and E. coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) and to evaluate its immunoreactivity and immunogenicity.

  3. Polyionic and cysteine-containing fusion peptides as versatile protein tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilie, Hauke; Richter, Susanne; Bergelt, Sabine; Frost, Stefan; Gehle, Franziska

    2013-08-01

    In response to advances in proteomics research and the use of proteins in medical and biotechnological applications, recombinant protein production and the design of specific protein characteristics and functions has become a widely used technology. In this context, protein fusion tags have been developed as indispensable tools for protein expression, purification, and the design of functionalized surfaces or artificially bifunctional proteins. Here we summarize how positively or negatively charged polyionic fusion peptides with or without an additional cysteine can be used as protein tags for protein expression and purification, for matrix-assisted refolding of aggregated protein, and for coupling of proteins either to technologically relevant matrices or to other proteins. In this context we used cysteine-containing polyionic fusion peptides for the design of immunotoxins. In general, polyionic fusion tags can be considered as a multifunctional module in protein technology.

  4. Small molecules targeting heterotrimeric G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Mohammed Akli

    2018-05-05

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface receptors regulating many human and animal physiological functions. Their implication in human pathophysiology is obvious with almost 30-40% medical drugs commercialized today directly targeting GPCRs as molecular entities. However, upon ligand binding GPCRs signal inside the cell through many key signaling, adaptor and regulatory proteins, including various classes of heterotrimeric G proteins. Therefore, G proteins are considered interesting targets for the development of pharmacological tools that are able to modulate their interaction with the receptors, as well as their activation/deactivation processes. In this review, old attempts and recent advances in the development of small molecules that directly target G proteins will be described with an emphasis on their utilization as pharmacological tools to dissect the mechanisms of activation of GPCR-G protein complexes. These molecules constitute a further asset for research in the "hot" areas of GPCR biology, areas such as multiple G protein coupling/signaling, GPCR-G protein preassembly, and GPCR functional selectivity or bias. Moreover, this review gives a particular focus on studies in vitro and in vivo supporting the potential applications of such small molecules in various GPCR/G protein-related diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The MARVEL domain protein, Singles Bar, is required for progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Beatriz; Maeland, Anne D; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Bloor, James W; Brown, Nicholas H; Michelson, Alan M

    2007-07-15

    Multinucleated myotubes develop by the sequential fusion of individual myoblasts. Using a convergence of genomic and classical genetic approaches, we have discovered a novel gene, singles bar (sing), that is essential for myoblast fusion. sing encodes a small multipass transmembrane protein containing a MARVEL domain, which is found in vertebrate proteins involved in processes such as tight junction formation and vesicle trafficking where--as in myoblast fusion--membrane apposition occurs. sing is expressed in both founder cells and fusion competent myoblasts preceding and during myoblast fusion. Examination of embryos injected with double-stranded sing RNA or embryos homozygous for ethane methyl sulfonate-induced sing alleles revealed an identical phenotype: replacement of multinucleated myofibers by groups of single, myosin-expressing myoblasts at a stage when formation of the mature muscle pattern is complete in wild-type embryos. Unfused sing mutant myoblasts form clusters, suggesting that early recognition and adhesion of these cells are unimpaired. To further investigate this phenotype, we undertook electron microscopic ultrastructural studies of fusing myoblasts in both sing and wild-type embryos. These experiments revealed that more sing mutant myoblasts than wild-type contain pre-fusion complexes, which are characterized by electron-dense vesicles paired on either side of the fusing plasma membranes. In contrast, embryos mutant for another muscle fusion gene, blown fuse (blow), have a normal number of such complexes. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that sing acts at a step distinct from that of blow, and that sing is required on both founder cell and fusion-competent myoblast membranes to allow progression past the pre-fusion complex stage of myoblast fusion, possibly by mediating fusion of the electron-dense vesicles to the plasma membrane.

  6. Protein Targeting to the Plastid of Euglena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnford, Dion G; Schwartzbach, Steven D

    2017-01-01

    The lateral transfer of photosynthesis between kingdoms through endosymbiosis is among the most spectacular examples of evolutionary innovation. Euglena, which acquired a chloroplast indirectly through an endosymbiosis with a green alga, represents such an example. As with other endosymbiont-derived plastids from eukaryotes, there are additional membranes that surround the organelle, of which Euglena has three. Thus, photosynthetic genes that were transferred from the endosymbiont to the host nucleus and whose proteins are required in the new plastid, are now faced with targeting and plastid import challenges. Early immunoelectron microscopy data suggested that the light-harvesting complexes, photosynthetic proteins in the thylakoid membrane, are post-translationally targeted to the plastid via the Golgi apparatus, an unexpected discovery at the time. Proteins targeted to the Euglena plastid have complex, bipartite presequences that direct them into the endomembrane system, through the Golgi apparatus and ultimately on to the plastid, presumably via transport vesicles. From transcriptome sequencing, dozens of plastid-targeted proteins were identified, leading to the identification of two different presequence structures. Both have an amino terminal signal peptide followed by a transit peptide for plastid import, but only one of the two classes of presequences has a third domain-the stop transfer sequence. This discovery implied two different transport mechanisms; one where the protein was fully inserted into the lumen of the ER and another where the protein remains attached to, but effectively outside, the endomembrane system. In this review, we will discuss the biochemical and bioinformatic evidence for plastid targeting, discuss the evolution of the targeting system, and ultimately provide a working model for the targeting and import of proteins into the plastid of Euglena.

  7. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  8. The destructive effect of botulinum neurotoxins on the SNARE protein: SNAP-25 and synaptic membrane fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Lu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic exocytosis requires the assembly of syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 on the plasma membrane and synaptobrevin 2 (VAMP2 on the vesicular membrane to bridge the two opposite membranes. It is believed that the three SNARE proteins assemble in steps along the dynamic assembly pathway. The C-terminus of SNAP-25 is known to be the target of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A and BoNT/E that block neurotransmitters release in vivo. In this study, we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation of the SNAP-25 C-terminus in binary and ternary SNARE complexes. The fluorescence lipid mixing assay shows that the C-terminal of SNAP-25 is essential for membrane fusion, and that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants cleaved by BoNT/A and BoNT/E display different inhibition effects on membrane fusion: SNAP-25E (Δ26 abolishes the fusion activity of the SNARE complex, while SNAP-25A (Δ9 loses most of its function, although it can still form a SDS-resistant SNARE complex as the wild-type SNAP-25. CW-EPR spectra validate the unstable structures of the SNARE complex formed by SNAP-25 mutants. We propose that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants will disrupt the assembly of the SNARE core complex, and then inhibit the synaptic membrane fusion accordingly.

  9. Side chain packing below the fusion peptide strongly modulates triggering of the Hendra virus F protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2010-10-01

    Triggering of the Hendra virus fusion (F) protein is required to initiate the conformational changes which drive membrane fusion, but the factors which control triggering remain poorly understood. Mutation of a histidine predicted to lie near the fusion peptide to alanine greatly reduced fusion despite wild-type cell surface expression levels, while asparagine substitution resulted in a moderate restoration in fusion levels. Slowed kinetics of six-helix bundle formation, as judged by sensitivity to heptad repeat B-derived peptides, was observed for all H372 mutants. These data suggest that side chain packing beneath the fusion peptide is an important regulator of Hendra virus F triggering.

  10. Flexible Fusion Structure-Based Performance Optimization Learning for Multisensor Target Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Quanbo; Wei, Zhongliang; Cheng, Tianfa; Chen, Shaodong; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2017-05-06

    Compared with the fixed fusion structure, the flexible fusion structure with mixed fusion methods has better adjustment performance for the complex air task network systems, and it can effectively help the system to achieve the goal under the given constraints. Because of the time-varying situation of the task network system induced by moving nodes and non-cooperative target, and limitations such as communication bandwidth and measurement distance, it is necessary to dynamically adjust the system fusion structure including sensors and fusion methods in a given adjustment period. Aiming at this, this paper studies the design of a flexible fusion algorithm by using an optimization learning technology. The purpose is to dynamically determine the sensors' numbers and the associated sensors to take part in the centralized and distributed fusion processes, respectively, herein termed sensor subsets selection . Firstly, two system performance indexes are introduced. Especially, the survivability index is presented and defined. Secondly, based on the two indexes and considering other conditions such as communication bandwidth and measurement distance, optimization models for both single target tracking and multi-target tracking are established. Correspondingly, solution steps are given for the two optimization models in detail. Simulation examples are demonstrated to validate the proposed algorithms.

  11. Immobilization and purification of enzymes with staphylococcal protein A gene fusion vectors.

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, B; Abrahmsén, L; Uhlén, M

    1985-01-01

    Two improved plasmid vectors, containing the gene coding for staphylococcal protein A and adapted for gene fusions, have been constructed. These vectors allow fusion of any gene to the protein A moiety, giving fusion proteins which can be purified, in a one-step procedure by IgG affinity chromatography. One vector, pRIT2, is designed for temperature-inducible expression of intracellular fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and the other pRIT5, is a shuttle vector designed for secretion. The la...

  12. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Anna M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-01-18

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called diabodies, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  13. Hexahistidine-tagged maltose-binding protein as a fusion partner for the production of soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Brian P; Nallamsetty, Sreedevi; Waugh, David S

    2009-01-01

    Insolubility of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is a major impediment to their production for structural and functional studies. One way to circumvent this problem is to fuse an aggregation-prone protein to a highly soluble partner. E. coli maltose-binding protein (MBP) has emerged as one of the most effective solubilizing agents. In this chapter, we describe how to construct combinatorially-tagged His(6)MBP fusion proteins by recombinational cloning and how to evaluate their yield and solubility. We also describe a procedure to determine how efficiently a His(6)MBP fusion protein is cleaved by tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease in E. coli and a method to assess the solubility of the target protein after it has been separated from His(6)MBP.

  14. Protein fold recognition using geometric kernel data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Pooya; Jeuris, Ben; Vandebril, Raf; Moreau, Yves

    2014-07-01

    Various approaches based on features extracted from protein sequences and often machine learning methods have been used in the prediction of protein folds. Finding an efficient technique for integrating these different protein features has received increasing attention. In particular, kernel methods are an interesting class of techniques for integrating heterogeneous data. Various methods have been proposed to fuse multiple kernels. Most techniques for multiple kernel learning focus on learning a convex linear combination of base kernels. In addition to the limitation of linear combinations, working with such approaches could cause a loss of potentially useful information. We design several techniques to combine kernel matrices by taking more involved, geometry inspired means of these matrices instead of convex linear combinations. We consider various sequence-based protein features including information extracted directly from position-specific scoring matrices and local sequence alignment. We evaluate our methods for classification on the SCOP PDB-40D benchmark dataset for protein fold recognition. The best overall accuracy on the protein fold recognition test set obtained by our methods is ∼ 86.7%. This is an improvement over the results of the best existing approach. Moreover, our computational model has been developed by incorporating the functional domain composition of proteins through a hybridization model. It is observed that by using our proposed hybridization model, the protein fold recognition accuracy is further improved to 89.30%. Furthermore, we investigate the performance of our approach on the protein remote homology detection problem by fusing multiple string kernels. The MATLAB code used for our proposed geometric kernel fusion frameworks are publicly available at http://people.cs.kuleuven.be/∼raf.vandebril/homepage/software/geomean.php?menu=5/. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. MRI/TRUS fusion software-based targeted biopsy: the new standard of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, M; Costa Moretti, T B; Emberton, M; Villers, A; Valerio, M

    2015-09-01

    The advent of multiparametric MRI has made it possible to change the way in which prostate biopsy is done, allowing to direct biopsies to suspicious lesions rather than randomly. The subject of this review relates to a computer-assisted strategy, the MRI/US fusion software-based targeted biopsy, and to its performance compared to the other sampling methods. Different devices with different methods to register MR images to live TRUS are currently in use to allow software-based targeted biopsy. Main clinical indications of MRI/US fusion software-based targeted biopsy are re-biopsy in men with persistent suspicious of prostate cancer after first negative standard biopsy and the follow-up of patients under active surveillance. Some studies have compared MRI/US fusion software-based targeted versus standard biopsy. In men at risk with MRI-suspicious lesion, targeted biopsy consistently detects more men with clinically significant disease as compared to standard biopsy; some studies have also shown decreased detection of insignificant disease. Only two studies directly compared MRI/US fusion software-based targeted biopsy with MRI/US fusion visual targeted biopsy, and the diagnostic ability seems to be in favor of the software approach. To date, no study comparing software-based targeted biopsy against in-bore MRI biopsy is available. The new software-based targeted approach seems to have the characteristics to be added in the standard pathway for achieving accurate risk stratification. Once reproducibility and cost-effectiveness will be verified, the actual issue will be to determine whether MRI/TRUS fusion software-based targeted biopsy represents anadd-on test or a replacement to standard TRUS biopsy.

  16. N-Terminal-Based Targeted, Inducible Protein Degradation in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Sekar

    Full Text Available Dynamically altering protein concentration is a central activity in synthetic biology. While many tools are available to modulate protein concentration by altering protein synthesis rate, methods for decreasing protein concentration by inactivation or degradation rate are just being realized. Altering protein synthesis rates can quickly increase the concentration of a protein but not decrease, as residual protein will remain for a while. Inducible, targeted protein degradation is an attractive option and some tools have been introduced for higher organisms and bacteria. Current bacterial tools rely on C-terminal fusions, so we have developed an N-terminal fusion (Ntag strategy to increase the possible proteins that can be targeted. We demonstrate Ntag dependent degradation of mCherry and beta-galactosidase and reconfigure the Ntag system to perform dynamic, exogenously inducible degradation of a targeted protein and complement protein depletion by traditional synthesis repression. Model driven analysis that focused on rates, rather than concentrations, was critical to understanding and engineering the system. We expect this tool and our model to enable inducible protein degradation use particularly in metabolic engineering, biological study of essential proteins, and protein circuits.

  17. Targeting protein-protein interactions for parasite control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Taylor

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Finding new drug targets for pathogenic infections would be of great utility for humanity, as there is a large need to develop new drugs to fight infections due to the developing resistance and side effects of current treatments. Current drug targets for pathogen infections involve only a single protein. However, proteins rarely act in isolation, and the majority of biological processes occur via interactions with other proteins, so protein-protein interactions (PPIs offer a realm of unexplored potential drug targets and are thought to be the next-generation of drug targets. Parasitic worms were chosen for this study because they have deleterious effects on human health, livestock, and plants, costing society billions of dollars annually and many sequenced genomes are available. In this study, we present a computational approach that utilizes whole genomes of 6 parasitic and 1 free-living worm species and 2 hosts. The species were placed in orthologous groups, then binned in species-specific orthologous groups. Proteins that are essential and conserved among species that span a phyla are of greatest value, as they provide foundations for developing broad-control strategies. Two PPI databases were used to find PPIs within the species specific bins. PPIs with unique helminth proteins and helminth proteins with unique features relative to the host, such as indels, were prioritized as drug targets. The PPIs were scored based on RNAi phenotype and homology to the PDB (Protein DataBank. EST data for the various life stages, GO annotation, and druggability were also taken into consideration. Several PPIs emerged from this study as potential drug targets. A few interactions were supported by co-localization of expression in M. incognita (plant parasite and B. malayi (H. sapiens parasite, which have extremely different modes of parasitism. As more genomes of pathogens are sequenced and PPI databases expanded, this methodology will become increasingly

  18. Characterization of a mitochondrially targeted single-stranded DNA-binding protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Andrew C; Song, Daqing; Alvarez, Luis A; Wall, Melisa K; Almond, David; McClellan, David A; Maxwell, Anthony; Nielsen, Brent L

    2005-04-01

    A gene encoding a predicted mitochondrially targeted single-stranded DNA binding protein (mtSSB) was identified in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence. This gene (At4g11060) codes for a protein of 201 amino acids, including a 28-residue putative mitochondrial targeting transit peptide. Protein sequence alignment shows high similarity between the mtSSB protein and single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB) from bacteria, including residues conserved for SSB function. Phylogenetic analysis indicates a close relationship between this protein and other mitochondrially targeted SSB proteins. The predicted targeting sequence was fused with the GFP coding region, and the organellar localization of the expressed fusion protein was determined. Specific targeting to mitochondria was observed in in-vitro import experiments and by transient expression of a GFP fusion construct in Arabidopsis leaves after microprojectile bombardment. The mature mtSSB coding region was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and the protein was purified for biochemical characterization. The purified protein binds single-stranded, but not double-stranded, DNA. MtSSB stimulates the homologous strand-exchange activity of E. coli RecA. These results indicate that mtSSB is a functional homologue of the E. coli SSB, and that it may play a role in mitochondrial DNA recombination.

  19. Using Haloarcula marismortui bacteriorhodopsin as a fusion tag for enhancing and visible expression of integral membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Feng Hsu

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are key targets for pharmacological intervention because of their vital functions. Structural and functional studies of membrane proteins have been severely hampered because of the difficulties in producing sufficient quantities of properly folded and biologically active proteins. Here we generate a high-level expression system of integral membrane proteins in Escherichia coli by using a mutated bacteriorhodopsin (BR from Haloarcula marismortui (HmBRI/D94N as a fusion partner. A purification strategy was designed by incorporating a His-tag on the target membrane protein for affinity purification and an appropriate protease cleavage site to generate the final products. The fusion system can be used to detect the intended target membrane proteins during overexpression and purification either with the naked eye or by directly monitoring their characteristic optical absorption. In this study, we applied this approach to produce two functional integral membrane proteins, undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase and carnitine/butyrobetaine antiporter with significant yield enhancement. This technology could facilitate the development of a high-throughput strategy to screen for conditions that improve the yield of correctly folded target membrane proteins. Other robust BRs can also be incorporated in this system.

  20. Protein-protein interactions and cancer: targeting the central dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Amanda L; Janda, Kim D

    2011-01-01

    Between 40,000 and 200,000 protein-protein interactions have been predicted to exist within the human interactome. As these interactions are of a critical nature in many important cellular functions and their dysregulation is causal of disease, the modulation of these binding events has emerged as a leading, yet difficult therapeutic arena. In particular, the targeting of protein-protein interactions relevant to cancer is of fundamental importance as the tumor-promoting function of several aberrantly expressed proteins in the cancerous state is directly resultant of its ability to interact with a protein-binding partner. Of significance, these protein complexes play a crucial role in each of the steps of the central dogma of molecular biology, the fundamental processes of genetic transmission. With the many important discoveries being made regarding the mechanisms of these genetic process, the identification of new chemical probes are needed to better understand and validate the druggability of protein-protein interactions related to the central dogma. In this review, we provide an overview of current small molecule-based protein-protein interaction inhibitors for each stage of the central dogma: transcription, mRNA splicing and translation. Importantly, through our analysis we have uncovered a lack of necessary probes targeting mRNA splicing and translation, thus, opening up the possibility for expansion of these fields.

  1. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Battisti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, targeted delivery can be much more efficient than systemic application, while improving bioavailability and limiting undesirable side effects. This review describes how the use of targeted nanocarriers such as nanoparticles and liposomes can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, thus increasing their safety and maximizing the therapeutic effect.

  2. Physics and technology of inertial fusion energy targets chambers and drivers. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    The third IAEA Technical Meeting on Physics and Technology of Inertial Fusion Energy Targets and Chambers took place 11-13 October 2004 in the Yousung Hotel Daejon, Republic of Korea. The first meeting was held in Madrid, Spain, 7-9 June 2000, and the second one in San Diego, California, 17-19 June 2002. Nuclear fusion has the promise of becoming an abundant energy source with good environmental compatibility. Excellent progress has been made in controlled nuclear fusion research on both magnetic and inertial approaches for plasma confinement. The IAEA plays a pro-active role to catalyze innovation and enhance worldwide commitment to fusion. This is done by creating awareness of the different concepts of magnetic as well as inertial confinement. The International Fusion Research Council (IFRC) supports the IAEA in the development of strategies to enhance fusion research in Member States. As part of the recommendations, a technical meeting on the physics and technology of inertial fusion energy (IFE) was proposed in one of the council meetings. The objective of the technical meeting was to contribute to advancing the understanding of targets and chambers for all proposed inertial fusion energy power plant designs. The topics to be covered were: Target design and physics, chamber design and physics, target fabrication injection and Tritium handling, assessment of safety, environment and economy aspect of IFE. It was recognized by the International Advisory Committee that the scope of the meeting should also include fusion drivers. The presentations of the meeting included target and chamber physics and technology for all proposed IFE plant concepts (laser driven, heavy-ion driven, Z-pinches, etc.). The final Research Coordination Meeting of the Coordinated Research Project on Elements of Power Plant Design for Inertial Fusion Energy, including further new results and achievements, followed the technical meeting. Twenty-nine participants from 12 countries participated

  3. Complementation between avirulent Newcastle disease virus and a fusion protein gene expressed from a retrovirus vector: requirements for membrane fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, T; McQuain, C; McGinnes, L

    1991-01-01

    The cDNA derived from the fusion gene of the virulent AV strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was expressed in chicken embryo cells by using a retrovirus vector. The fusion protein expressed in this system was transported to the cell surface and was efficiently cleaved into the disulfide-linked F1-F2 form found in infectious virions. The cells expressing the fusion gene grew normally and could be passaged many times. Monolayers of these cells would plaque, in the absence of trypsin, avirul...

  4. Magnetized target fusion: An ultra high energy approach in an unexplored parameter space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion is a concept that may lead to practical fusion applications in a variety of settings. However, the crucial first step is to demonstrate that it works as advertised. Among the possibilities for doing this is an ultrahigh energy approach to magnetized target fusion, one powered by explosive pulsed power generators that have become available for application to thermonuclear fusion research. In a collaborative effort between Los Alamos and the All-Russian Scientific Institute for Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) a very powerful helical generator with explosive power switching has been used to produce an energetic magnetized plasma. Several diagnostics have been fielded to ascertain the properties of this plasma. We are intensively studying the results of the experiments and calculationally analyzing the performance of this experiment

  5. Magnetic compression/magnetized target fusion (MAGO/MTF), an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1998-03-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) was reported in two papers at the First Symposium on Current Trends in International Fusion Research. MTF is intermediate between two very different mainline approaches to fusion: Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). The only US MTF experiments in which a target plasma was compressed were the Sandia National Laboratory ``Phi targets``. Despite the very interesting results from that series of experiments, the research was not pursued, and other embodiments of MTF concept such as the Fast Liner were unable to attract the financial support needed for a firm proof of principle. A mapping of the parameter space for MTF showed the significant features of this approach. The All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) has an on-going interest in this approach to thermonuclear fusion, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and VNIIEF have done joint target plasma generation experiments relevant to MTF referred to as MAGO (transliteration of the Russian acronym for magnetic compression). The MAGO II experiment appears to have achieved on the order of 200 eV and over 100 KG, so that adiabatic compression with a relatively small convergence could bring the plasma to fusion temperatures. In addition, there are other experiments being pursued for target plasma generation and proof of principle. This paper summarizes the previous reports on MTF and MAGO and presents the progress that has been made over the past three years in creating a target plasma that is suitable for compression to provide a scientific proof of principle experiment for MAGO/MTF.

  6. LocFuse: human protein-protein interaction prediction via classifier fusion using protein localization information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahiri, Javad; Mohammad-Noori, Morteza; Ebrahimpour, Reza; Saadat, Samaneh; Bozorgmehr, Joseph H; Goldberg, Tatyana; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2014-12-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) detection is one of the central goals of functional genomics and systems biology. Knowledge about the nature of PPIs can help fill the widening gap between sequence information and functional annotations. Although experimental methods have produced valuable PPI data, they also suffer from significant limitations. Computational PPI prediction methods have attracted tremendous attentions. Despite considerable efforts, PPI prediction is still in its infancy in complex multicellular organisms such as humans. Here, we propose a novel ensemble learning method, LocFuse, which is useful in human PPI prediction. This method uses eight different genomic and proteomic features along with four types of different classifiers. The prediction performance of this classifier selection method was found to be considerably better than methods employed hitherto. This confirms the complex nature of the PPI prediction problem and also the necessity of using biological information for classifier fusion. The LocFuse is available at: http://lbb.ut.ac.ir/Download/LBBsoft/LocFuse. The results revealed that if we divide proteome space according to the cellular localization of proteins, then the utility of some classifiers in PPI prediction can be improved. Therefore, to predict the interaction for any given protein pair, we can select the most accurate classifier with regard to the cellular localization information. Based on the results, we can say that the importance of different features for PPI prediction varies between differently localized proteins; however in general, our novel features, which were extracted from position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs), are the most important ones and the Random Forest (RF) classifier performs best in most cases. LocFuse was developed with a user-friendly graphic interface and it is freely available for Linux, Mac OSX and MS Windows operating systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Escherichia coli EDA is a novel fusion expression partner to improve solubility of aggregation-prone heterologous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoon-Sik; Song, Jong-Am; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Lee, Jeewon

    2015-01-20

    Since the use of solubility enhancer proteins is one of the effective methods to produce active recombinant proteins within Escherichia coli, the development of a novel fusion expression partner that can be applied to various aggregation-prone proteins is of crucial importance. In our previous work, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was employed to systematically analyze the E. coli BL21 (DE3) proteome profile in response to heat treatment, and KDPG aldolase (EDA) was identified as a heat-responsive and aggregation-resistant protein. When used as fusion expression partner, EDA significantly increased the solubility of seven aggregation-prone heterologous proteins in the E. coli cytoplasm. The efficacy of EDA as a fusion expression partner was evaluated through the analysis of bioactivity or secondary structure of several target proteins: EDA-fusion expression resulted in the synthesis of bioactive human ferritin light chain and bacterial arginine deiminase and the formation of correct secondary structure of human granulocyte colony stimulation factor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorescent IgG fusion proteins made in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Yael; Raichlin, Dina; Benhar, Itai

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most powerful tools in biological and biomedical research and are presently the fastest growing category of new bio-pharmaceutics. The most common format of antibody applied for therapeutic, diagnostic and analytical purposes is the IgG format. For medical applications, recombinant IgGs are made in cultured mammalian cells in a process that is too expensive to be considered for producing antibodies for diagnostic and analytical purposes. Therefore, for such purposes, mouse monoclonal antibodies or polyclonal sera from immunized animals are used. While looking for an easier and more rapid way to prepare full-length IgGs for therapeutic purposes, we recently developed and reported an expression and purification protocol for full-length IgGs, and IgG-based fusion proteins in E. coli, called "Inclonals." By applying the Inclonals technology, we could generate full-length IgGs that are genetically fused to toxins. The aim of the study described herein was to evaluate the possibility of applying the "Inclonals" technology for preparing IgG-fluorophore fusion proteins. We found that IgG fused to the green fluorescent proteins enhanced GFP (EGFP) while maintaining functionality in binding, lost most of its fluorescence during the refolding process. In contrast, we found that green fluorescent Superfolder GFP (SFGFP)-fused IgG and red fluorescent mCherry-fused IgG were functional in antigen binding and maintained fluorescence intensity. In addition, we found that we can link several SFGFPs in tandem to each IgG, with fluorescence intensity increasing accordingly. Fluorescent IgGs made in E. coli may become attractive alternatives to monoclonal or polyclonal fluorescent antibodies derived from animals.

  9. The hTAF II 68-TEC fusion protein functions as a strong transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sol; Lee, Hye Jin; Jun, Hee Jung; Kim, Jungho

    2008-06-01

    Human extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is caused by a chromosomal translocation that involves TEC (translocated in extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma), and either EWS (Ewing's sarcoma) or hTAF(II)68 (human TATA-binding protein-associated factor II 68), which generates EWS-TEC or hTAF(II)68-TEC fusion proteins, respectively. Although there has been a great deal of progress in characterizing EWS-TEC, there is relatively little known about the biological function of hTAF(II)68-TEC. We have examined the functional consequences of the fusion of the amino terminal domain (NTD) of hTAF(II)68 to TEC in EMC. The chimeric gene encodes a nuclear protein that binds DNA with the same sequence specificity as parental TEC. Nuclear localization of hTAF(II)68-TEC was dependent on the DNA binding domain, and we identified a cluster of basic amino acids in the DNA binding domain, KRRR, that specifically mediate the nuclear localization of hTAF(II)68-TEC. The transactivation activity of hTAF(II)68-TEC was higher than TEC towards a known target promoter that contained several TEC binding sites. Finally, deletion analysis of hTAF(II)68-TEC indicated that the hTAF(II)68 NTD, and the AF1 and AF2 domains of hTAF(II)68-TEC are necessary for full transactivation potential. These results suggest that the oncogenic effect of the t(9;17) translocation may be due to the hTAF(II)68-TEC chimeric protein and that fusion of the hTAF(II)68 NTD to the TEC protein produces a gain of function chimeric product. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Recurrent MET fusion genes represent a drug target in pediatric glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Astrid Marie

    2016-01-01

    fusions activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and, in cooperation with lesions compromising cell cycle regulation, induced aggressive glial tumors in vivo. MET inhibitors suppressed MET tumor growth in xenograft models. Finally, we treated a pediatric patient bearing a MET-fusion......Pediatric glioblastoma is one of the most common and most deadly brain tumors in childhood. Using an integrative genetic analysis of 53 pediatric glioblastomas and five in vitro model systems, we identified previously unidentified gene fusions involving the MET oncogene in ∼10% of cases. These MET...

  11. Dimeric and trimeric fusion proteins generated with fimbrial adhesins of uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Manuel Luna-Pineda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is the main etiologic agent. Fimbriae assembled on the bacterial surface are essential for adhesion in the urinary tract epithelium. In this study, the FimH, CsgA, and PapG adhesins were fused to generate biomolecules as potential target vaccines against UTIs. The fusion protein design was generated using bioinformatics tools, and template fusion gene sequences were synthesized by GenScript in the following order fimH-csgA-papG-fimH-csgA (fcpfc linked to the nucleotide sequence encoding the EAAAK5 peptide. Monomeric (fimH, csgA, and papG, dimeric (fimH-csgA, and trimeric (fimH-csgA-papG genes were cloned into the pLATE31 expression vector and generated products of 1040, 539, 1139, 1442, and 2444 bp, respectively. Fusion protein expression in BL21 E. coli was induced with 1 mM IPTG, and His-tagged fusion proteins were purified under denaturing conditions and refolded by dialysis using C-buffer. Coomassie blue-stained SDS-PAGE gels and Western blot analysis revealed bands of 29.5, 11.9, 33.9, 44.9, and 82.1 kDa corresponding to FimH, CsgA, PapG, FC, and FCP proteins, respectively. Mass spectrometry analysis by MALDI-TOF/TOF revealed specific peptides that confirmed the fusion protein structures. Dynamic light scattering analysis revealed the polydispersed state of the fusion proteins. The FimH, CsgA, and PapG stimulated the release of 372 to 398 pg/mL IL-6; interestingly, the FC and FCP stimulated the release of 464.79 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.018 and 521.24 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.002 IL-6, respectively. In addition, the FC and FCP stimulated the release of 398.52 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.001 and 450.40 pg/mL (p ≤ 0.002 IL-8, respectively. High levels of IgA and IgG antibodies in human sera reacted against the fusion proteins, and under identical conditions, low levels of IgA and IgG antibodies were detected in human urine. Rabbit

  12. Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraghi, M.

    1976-01-01

    It is proposed that Iran as a world's potential supplier of fossile fuel should participate in fusion research and gain experience in this new field. Fusion, as an ultimate source of energy in future, and the problems concerned with the fusion reactors are reviewed. Furthermore; plasma heating, magnetic and inertial confinement in a fusion reactor are discussed. A brief description of tokamak, theta pinch and magnetic mirror reactors is also included

  13. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    SNARE proteins constitute the minimal machinery needed for membrane fusion. SNAREs operate by forming a complex, which pulls the lipid bilayers into close contact and provides the mechanical force needed for lipid bilayer fusion. At the chemical synapse, SNARE-complex formation between...... the vesicular SNARE VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2 and the target (plasma membrane) SNAREs SNAP25 and syntaxin-1 results in fusion and release of neurotransmitter, synchronized to the electrical activity of the cell by calcium influx and binding to synaptotagmin. Formation of the SNARE complex is tightly regulated...... and appears to start with syntaxin-1 bound to an SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) protein. Proteins of the Munc13-family are responsible for opening up syntaxin and allowing sequential binding of SNAP-25 and VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2. N- to C-terminal “zippering” of the SNARE domains leads to membrane fusion...

  14. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future

  15. Physics of laser fusion. Volume II. Diagnostics of experiments on laser fusion targets at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    These notes present the experimental basis and status for laser fusion as developed at LLNL. There are two other volumes in this series: Vol. I, by C.E. Max, presents the theoretical laser-plasma interaction physics; Vol. III, by J.F. Holzrichter et al., presents the theory and design of high-power pulsed lasers. A fourth volume will present the theoretical implosion physics. The notes consist of six sections. The first, an introductory section, provides some of the history of inertial fusion and a simple explanation of the concepts involved. The second section presents an extensive discussion of diagnostic instrumentation used in the LLNL Laser Fusion Program. The third section is a presentation of laser facilities and capabilities at LLNL. The purpose here is to define capability, not to derive how it was obtained. The fourth and fifth sections present the experimental data on laser-plasma interaction and implosion physics. The last chapter is a short projection of the future.

  16. Oncogenic fusion proteins expressed in immature hematopoietic cells fail to recapitulate the transcriptional changes observed in human AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, N; Porse, B T

    2014-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations are observed in one-third of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases. Targeting and understanding the effects of the resulting aberrant oncogenic fusion proteins may help developing drugs against specific leukemic subtypes, as demonstrated earlier by the use of ATRA....... Surprisingly, we found that the gene-expression profiles of CD34+ human HSPCs transformed with the potent oncogenic fusion proteins AML-ETO or MLL-AF9, only weakly resembled those derived from primary AML samples. Hence, our work raises concerns as to the relevance of the use of in vitro transduced cells...... in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor (HSPCs) cells transduced with oncogenic fusion genes are regarded as promising in vitromodels of their corresponding AML subtypes. Here, we critically assessed the potential of such in vitro models using an integrative bioinformatics approach...

  17. Resolution of Disulfide Heterogeneity in Nogo Receptor 1 Fusion Proteins by Molecular Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Weinreb; D Wen; F Qian; C Wildes; E Garber; L Walus; M Jung; J Wang; J Relton; et al.

    2011-12-31

    NgRI (Nogo-66 receptor) is part of a signalling complex that inhibits axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Truncated soluble versions of NgRI have been used successfully to promote axon regeneration in animal models of spinal-cord injury, raising interest in this protein as a potential therapeutic target. The LRR (leucine-rich repeat) regions in NgRI are flanked by N- and C-terminal disulfide-containing 'cap' domains (LRRNT and LRRCT respectively). In the present work we show that, although functionally active, the NgRI(310)-Fc fusion protein contains mislinked and heterogeneous disulfide patterns in the LRRCT domain, and we report the generation of a series of variant molecules specifically designed to prevent this heterogeneity. Using these variants we explored the effects of modifying the NgRI truncation site or the spacing between the NgRI and Fc domains, or replacing cysteines within the NgRI or IgG hinge regions. One variant, which incorporates replacements of Cys{sup 266} and Cys{sup 309} with alanine residues, completely eliminated disulfide scrambling while maintaining functional in vitro and in vivo efficacy. This modified NgRI-Fc molecule represents a significantly improved candidate for further pharmaceutical development, and may serve as a useful model for the optimization of other IgG fusion proteins made from LRR proteins.

  18. Heat-shock protein fusion vectors for improved expression of soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyratsous, Christos A; Panagiotidis, Christos A

    2012-01-01

    Molecular chaperones or heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are protein machines that interact with unfolded or partially folded polypeptides and assist them in attaining their proper conformation. The folding reaction relies on a complex array of scaffolding effects and ATP-driven conformational changes that mediate the temporary unfolding and subsequent refolding of protein substrates. DnaK and GroEL are the two major Escherichia coli chaperones. They belong to the HSP70 and HSP60 families of proteins, respectively, and play a major role in protein folding. Here, we describe a set of bacterial expression vectors that permits the fusion of a protein of interest to DnaK or GroEL and its subsequent quantitative expression in a soluble, easily purifiable form. We also provide a set of compatible co-chaperone expression constructs that permit the simultaneous co-expression of the DnaK and GroEL physiological partners to further increase protein solubility. The system was successfully tested using the murine prion protein (PrP). Although PrP is normally insoluble when expressed in E. coli, we show that utilizing our vectors it can be produced in a soluble form as a DnaK or GroEL fusion. This system is useful for the production of a large array of proteins that fail to fold properly when expressed in E. coli.

  19. Fusion neutron generation by high-repetitive target injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Pellet injection and repetitive laser illumination are key technologies for realizing inertial fusion energy. The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu Photonics K. K. and Toyota Motor Corporation demonstrate the pellet injection, counter laser beams' engagement and neutron generation. Deuterated polystyrene (CD) bead pellets, after free-falling for a distance of 18 cm at 1 Hz, are successfully engaged by two counter laser beams from a diode-pumped, ultra-intense laser HAMA. The laser energy, pulse duration, wavelength and the intensity are 0.63 J per beam, 104 fs, 811 nm and 4.7 x 10 18 W/cm 2 , respectively. The irradiated pellets produce D (D, n) 3 He-reacted neutrons with a maximum yield of 9.5 x 10 4 /4π sr/shot. A straight channel with 10 μm-diameter is found through the beads. The pellet size is 1 mm. The results indicate potentially useful technologies for the next step in realizing inertial fusion energy. The results are reviewed as well as some oversea activities. (author)

  20. Inertial fusion energy target injection, tracking, and beam pointing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzoldt, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Several cryogenic targets must be injected each second into a reaction chamber. Required target speed is about 100 m/s. Required accuracy of the driver beams on target is a few hundred micrometers. Fuel strength is calculated to allow acceleration in excess of 10,000 m/s 2 if the fuel temperature is less than 17 K. A 0.1 μm thick dual membrane will allow nearly 2,000 m/s 2 acceleration. Acceleration is gradually increased and decreased over a few membrane oscillation periods (a few ms), to avoid added stress from vibrations which could otherwise cause a factor of two decrease in allowed acceleration. Movable shielding allows multiple targets to be in flight toward the reaction chamber at once while minimizing neutron heating of subsequent targets. The use of multiple injectors is recommended for redundancy which increases availability and allows a higher pulse rate. Gas gun, rail gun, induction accelerator, and electrostatic accelerator target injection devices are studied, and compared. A gas gun is the preferred device for indirect-drive targets due to its simplicity and proven reliability. With the gas gun, the amount of gas required for each target (about 10 to 100 mg) is acceptable. A revolver loading mechanism is recommended with a cam operated poppet valve to control the gas flow. Cutting vents near the muzzle of the gas gun barrel is recommended to improve accuracy and aid gas pumping. If a railgun is used, we recommend an externally applied magnetic field to reduce required current by an order of magnitude. Optical target tracking is recommended. Up/down counters are suggested to predict target arrival time. Target steering is shown to be feasible and would avoid the need to actively point the beams. Calculations show that induced tumble from electrostatically steering the target is not excessive

  1. Junction region of EWS-FLI1 fusion protein has a dominant negative effect in Ewing’s Sarcoma in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jully, Babu; Vijayalakshmi, Ramshankar; Gopal, Gopisetty; Sabitha, Kesavan; Rajkumar, Thangarajan

    2012-01-01

    Ewing’s sarcoma is a malignancy characterized by a specific 11:22 chromosomal translocation which generates a novel EWS-FLI1 fusion protein functioning as an aberrant transcription factor. In the present study, we have further characterized the junction region of the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein. In-silico model of EWS-FLI1 fusion protein was analysed for ligand binding sites, and a putative region (amino acid (aa) 251–343 of the type 1 fusion protein) in the vicinity of the fusion junction was cloned and expressed using bacterial expression. The recombinant protein was characterized by Circular Dichroism (CD). We then expressed aa 251–280 ectopically in Ewing’s sarcoma cell-line and its effect on cell proliferation, tumorigenicity and expression of EWS-FLI1 target genes were analysed. Our modelling analysis indicated that Junction region (aa 251–343) encompasses potential ligand biding sites in the EWS-FLI1 protein and when expressed in bacteria was present as soluble form. Ectopically expressing this region in Ewing’s sarcoma cells inhibited tumorigenicity, and EWS-FLI1 target genes indicating a dominant negative biological effect. Junction region can be exploited further as target for drug development in future to specifically target EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s Sarcoma

  2. Molecular Principles of Gene Fusion Mediated Rewiring of Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latysheva, Natasha S; Oates, Matt E; Maddox, Louis; Flock, Tilman; Gough, Julian; Buljan, Marija; Weatheritt, Robert J; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-18

    Gene fusions are common cancer-causing mutations, but the molecular principles by which fusion protein products affect interaction networks and cause disease are not well understood. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of the structural, interactomic, and regulatory properties of thousands of putative fusion proteins. We demonstrate that genes that form fusions (i.e., parent genes) tend to be highly connected hub genes, whose protein products are enriched in structured and disordered interaction-mediating features. Fusion often results in the loss of these parental features and the depletion of regulatory sites such as post-translational modifications. Fusion products disproportionately connect proteins that did not previously interact in the protein interaction network. In this manner, fusion products can escape cellular regulation and constitutively rewire protein interaction networks. We suggest that the deregulation of central, interaction-prone proteins may represent a widespread mechanism by which fusion proteins alter the topology of cellular signaling pathways and promote cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The coronavirus spike protein : mechanisms of membrane fusion and virion incorporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    The coronavirus spike protein is a membrane-anchored glycoprotein responsible for virus-cell attachment and membrane fusion, prerequisites for a successful virus infection. In this thesis, two aspects are described regarding the molecular biology of the coronavirus spike protein: its membrane fusion

  4. HUWE1 and TRIP12 Collaborate in Degradation of Ubiquitin-Fusion Proteins and Misframed Ubiquitin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben G; Steinhauer, Cornelia; Lees, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells an uncleavable ubiquitin moiety conjugated to the N-terminus of a protein signals the degradation of the fusion protein via the proteasome-dependent ubiquitin fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. In yeast the molecular mechanism of the UFD pathway has been well characterized. Rec...

  5. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  6. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Krokhin, O. N.; Osipov, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  7. Production and evaluation of cytotoxic effects of DT386-BR2 fusion protein as a novel anti-cancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a fusion protein consisting of the catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects for targeted eradication of cancer cells. For this purpose, The DT386-BR2 structure was predicted using Modeller 9.14 and the best predicted model was selected based on the minimum DOPE score. A synthetic gene encoding DT386-BR2 was cloned in pET28a expression vector, expressed and purified by affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed the expression of the DT386-BR2 fusion protein by revealing a band of about 47kDa after the induction of the expression. Finally, the purified protein was subjected to MTT assay for evaluation of its cyto-lethal effects on cancer and normal cell lines. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction in survival percent of HeLa and MCF-7 cancer cells in comparison to negative control (PBS), while the cytotoxic effect was not significant on the normal cells, i.e. HUVEC and HEK 293. The IC50 of DT386-BR2 for HeLa and MCF-7 was about 0.55 and 2.08μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the production and purification of DT386-BR2 fusion protein was successfully achieved and its cytotoxic effects on the studied cancer cell lines was established. The promising cytotoxic effects of this newly constructed fusion protein made it a suitable candidate for targeted therapy of cancer, and further in vitro and in vivo studies on this fusion protein is underway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fabrication of cryogenic inertial-confinement-fusion targets using target free-fall technique. Report No. 2-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Murphy, M.J.

    1982-04-01

    Techniques for fabricating cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets (i.e., spherical shells containing a uniform layer of DT ice) are investigated using target free-fall concept. Detection and characterization of the moving targets are effected by optoelectronic means, of which the principal is an RF ac-interferometer. This interferometer system demonstrates, for the first time, the speed capabilities of the phase-modulation ac-interferometry. New techiques developed for handling, holding, launching, and transporting targets are also described. Results obtained at both room and cryogenic temperatures are presented

  9. Site-specific modification of genome with cell-permeable Cre fusion protein in preimplantation mouse embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Kim, Hwain; Lee, Daekee

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific recombination (SSR) by Cre recombinase and its target sequence, loxP, is a valuable tool in genetic analysis of gene function. Recently, several studies reported successful application of Cre fusion protein containing protein transduction peptide for inducing gene modification in various mammalian cells including ES cell as well as in the whole animal. In this study, we show that a short incubation of preimplantation mouse embryos with purified cell-permeable Cre fusion protein results in efficient SSR. X-Gal staining of preimplantation embryos, heterozygous for Gtrosa26 tm1Sor , revealed that treatment of 1-cell or 2-cell embryos with 3 μM of Cre fusion protein for 2 h leads to Cre-mediated excision in 70-85% of embryos. We have examined the effect of the concentration of the Cre fusion protein and the duration of the treatment on embryonic development, established a condition for full term development and survival to adulthood, and demonstrated the germ line transmission of excised Gtrosa26 allele. Potential applications and advantages of the highly efficient technique described here are discussed.

  10. Optimization of proximity ligation assay (PLA) for detection of protein interactions and fusion proteins in non-adherent cells: application to pre-B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaize, Lydie; Jakobczyk, Hélène; Rio, Anne-Gaëlle; Gandemer, Virginie; Troadec, Marie-Bérengère

    2017-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities, including chromosomal translocations, are described for many hematological malignancies. From the clinical perspective, detection of chromosomal abnormalities is relevant not only for diagnostic and treatment purposes but also for prognostic risk assessment. From the translational research perspective, the identification of fusion proteins and protein interactions has allowed crucial breakthroughs in understanding the pathogenesis of malignancies and consequently major achievements in targeted therapy. We describe the optimization of the Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA) to ascertain the presence of fusion proteins, and protein interactions in non-adherent pre-B cells. PLA is an innovative method of protein-protein colocalization detection by molecular biology that combines the advantages of microscopy with the advantages of molecular biology precision, enabling detection of protein proximity theoretically ranging from 0 to 40 nm. We propose an optimized PLA procedure. We overcome the issue of maintaining non-adherent hematological cells by traditional cytocentrifugation and optimized buffers, by changing incubation times, and modifying washing steps. Further, we provide convincing negative and positive controls, and demonstrate that optimized PLA procedure is sensitive to total protein level. The optimized PLA procedure allows the detection of fusion proteins and protein interactions on non-adherent cells. The optimized PLA procedure described here can be readily applied to various non-adherent hematological cells, from cell lines to patients' cells. The optimized PLA protocol enables detection of fusion proteins and their subcellular expression, and protein interactions in non-adherent cells. Therefore, the optimized PLA protocol provides a new tool that can be adopted in a wide range of applications in the biological field.

  11. Advances in Target Design for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, D. A.; Tabak, M.; Bennet, G. R.; Cuneo, M. E.; Vesey, R. A.; Nikroo, A.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past few years, the emphasis in heavy ion target design has moved from the distributed radiator target [1,2] to the hybrid target [3] because the hybrid target allows a larger beam focal spot than the distributed radiator (5 mm radius rather than 2 mm radius). The larger spot relaxes some of the requirements on the driver, but introduces some new target physics issues. Most notable is the use of shine shields and shims in the hohlraum to achieve symmetry rather than achieving symmetry by beam placement. The shim is a thin layer of material placed on or near the capsule surface to block a small amount of excess radiation. While we have been developing this technique for the heavy ion hybrid target, the technique can be used in any indirect drive target. We have begun testing the concept of a shim to improve symmetry using a double-ended z pinch hohlraum [4] on the Sandia Z-machine. Experiments using shimmed thin wall capsules have shown that we can reverse the sign of a P2 asymmetry and significantly reduce the size of a P4 asymmetry. These initial experiments demonstrate the concept of a shim as another method for controlling early time asymmetries in ICF capsules. (Author)

  12. Protein kinase A-dependent transactivation by the E2A-Pbx1 fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogo, A; Waterman, M R; Kamps, M P; Kagawa, N

    1995-10-27

    The chimeric gene E2A-PBX1 is formed by the t(1;19) chromosomal translocation exclusively associated with pediatric pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL). The resultant fusion protein from this chimeric gene contains the DNA-binding homeodomain of Pbx1. The first and only functional Pbx1 binding site has been localized in bovine CYP17 to a sequence (CRS1) that participates in cAMP-dependent transcription of this gene encoding the steroid hydroxylase, 17 alpha-hydroxylase cytochrome P450. Because Pbx1 is not expressed in pre-B cells, it may be possible that the E2a-Pbx1 fusion protein expressed in pre-B cells having this translocation will activate, in response to cAMP, transcription of genes not normally expressed in these cells leading to arrest of differentiation at the pre-B cell stage. We have now shown that reporter genes comprising CRS1 are activated transcriptionally by protein kinase A (PKA) in the pre-B cell line 697, which endogenously expresses the fusion protein, and that overexpression of E2A-Pbx1 in additional cell lines enhances transcription of reporter genes in a PKA-dependent fashion. Thus, it seems plausible that arrest in the pre-B stage leading to pre-B ALL includes cAMP-dependent activation of E2A-Pbx1.

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein promotes TLR-4-dependent neutrophil extracellular trap formation by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle A Funchal

    Full Text Available Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis.

  14. A novel charged-particle diagnostic for compression in inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radha, P. B.; Skupsky, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Soures, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    A new technique for diagnosing compression in multiple regions of inertial confinement fusion targets is discussed. This diagnostic uses knock-on deuterons and protons that have been elastically scattered by 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion neutrons. The target is composed of three different materials: DT gas contained in a plastic shell overcoated by deuterated plastic. The effect on the knock-on deuteron spectrum of mixing of these layers from hydrodynamic instabilities is also discussed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  15. Method for selecting hollow microspheres for use in laser fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, Eugene H.; Fries, R. Jay; Havenhill, Jerry W.; Smith, Maurice Lee; Stoltz, Daniel L.

    1976-01-01

    Hollow microspheres having thin and very uniform wall thickness are useful as containers for the deuterium and tritium gas mixture used as a fuel in laser fusion targets. Hollow microspheres are commercially available; however, in commercial lots only a very small number meet the rigid requirements for use in laser fusion targets. Those meeting these requirements may be separated from the unsuitable ones by subjecting the commercial lot to size and density separations and then by subjecting those hollow microspheres thus separated to an external pressurization at which those which are aspherical or which have nonuniform walls are broken and separating the sound hollow microspheres from the broken ones.

  16. Human HLA class I- and HLA class II-restricted cloned cytotoxic T lymphocytes identify a cluster of epitopes on the measles virus fusion protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.S. van Binnendijk (Rob); J.P.M. Versteeg-van Oosten (José); M.C.M. Poelen (Martien); H.F. Brugghe; P. Hoogerhout (Peter); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe transmembrane fusion (F) glycoprotein of measles virus is an important target antigen of human HLA class I- and class II-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Genetically engineered F proteins and nested sets of synthetic peptides spanning the F protein were used to determine

  17. Elastin-like-polypeptide based fusion proteins for osteogenic factor delivery in bone healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Bryce; Yuan, Yuan; Koria, Piyush

    2016-07-08

    Modern treatments of bone injuries and diseases are becoming increasingly dependent on the usage of growth factors to stimulate bone growth. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), a potent osteogenic inductive protein, exhibits promising results in treatment models, but recently has had its practical efficacy questioned due to the lack of local retention, ectopic bone formation, and potentially lethal inflammation. Where a new delivery technique of the BMP-2 is necessary, here we demonstrate the viability of an elastin-like peptide (ELP) fusion protein containing BMP-2 for delivery of the BMP-2. This fusion protein retains the performance characteristics of both the BMP-2 and ELP. The fusion protein was found to induce osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells as evidenced by the production of alkaline phosphatase and extracellular calcium deposits in response to treatment by the fusion protein. Retention of the ELPs inverse phase transition property has allowed for expression of the fusion protein within a bacterial host (such as Escherichia coli) and easy and rapid purification using inverse transition cycling. The fusion protein formed self-aggregating nanoparticles at human-body temperature. The data collected suggests the viability of these fusion protein nanoparticles as a dosage-efficient and location-precise noncytotoxic delivery vehicle for BMP-2 in bone treatment. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1029-1037, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Dimeric and Trimeric Fusion Proteins Generated with Fimbrial Adhesins of UropathogenicEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Pineda, Víctor M; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Ochoa, Sara A; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen; Cázares-Domínguez, Vicenta; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia; Arellano-Galindo, José; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the main etiologic agent. Fimbriae assembled on the bacterial surface are essential for adhesion to the urinary tract epithelium. In this study, the FimH, CsgA, and PapG adhesins were fused to generate biomolecules for use as potential target vaccines against UTIs. The fusion protein design was generated using bioinformatics tools, and template fusion gene sequences were synthesized by GenScript in the following order fimH - csgA - papG - fimH - csgA ( fcpfc ) linked to the nucleotide sequence encoding the [EAAAK] 5 peptide. Monomeric ( fimH, csgA , and papG ), dimeric ( fimH-csgA ), and trimeric ( fimH - csgA - papG ) genes were cloned into the pLATE31 expression vector and generated products of 1040, 539, 1139, 1442, and 2444 bp, respectively. Fusion protein expression in BL21 E. coli was induced with 1 mM IPTG, and His-tagged proteins were purified under denaturing conditions and refolded by dialysis using C-buffer. Coomassie blue-stained SDS-PAGE gels and Western blot analysis revealed bands of 29.5, 11.9, 33.9, 44.9, and 82.1 kDa, corresponding to FimH, CsgA, PapG, FC, and FCP proteins, respectively. Mass spectrometry analysis by MALDI-TOF/TOF revealed specific peptides that confirmed the fusion protein structures. Dynamic light scattering analysis revealed the polydispersed state of the fusion proteins. FimH, CsgA, and PapG stimulated the release of 372-398 pg/mL IL-6; interestingly, FC and FCP stimulated the release of 464.79 pg/mL ( p ≤ 0.018) and 521.24 pg/mL ( p ≤ 0.002) IL-6, respectively. In addition, FC and FCP stimulated the release of 398.52 pg/mL ( p ≤ 0.001) and 450.40 pg/mL ( p ≤ 0.002) IL-8, respectively. High levels of IgA and IgG antibodies in human sera reacted against the fusion proteins, and under identical conditions, low levels of IgA and IgG antibodies were detected in human urine

  19. An ion beam target for 3 GJ fusion output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, K.

    1989-01-01

    If the burn fraction of fuel in a cryogenic target of one-shell three-layers (lead tamper, aluminum pusher and solid DT) is assumed to be 35% (T i =4 keV and ρR=4 g/cm 2 ), the mass of fuel in a target must be 23 mg. An optimum condition for the target is that the rate of beam energy deposition in the pusher layer is 85%. For such an optimized target the ion beam energy and power radiating on the target are required to be 6 MJ and 200 TW/cm 2 , respectively, in order to realize T i =4 keV and ρR=4 g/cm 2 for the fuel. A spherical hollow-shell target forms a converging nozzle for the fuel and the fuel is compressed in a supersonic region. When the implosion velocity is u=3x10 5 m/s at r=5.5 mm, the Mach number of the fuel is M=12 and in the supersonic region the fuel is compressed to ρ=269ρ solid =51.2 g/cm 3 at r=0.27 mm, and in the subsonic region to ρ=3.51x10 4 ρ solid =6.67x10 3 g/cm 3 at r=10 -2 mm. (orig.)

  20. Chaperone activity of human small heat shock protein-GST fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbach, Hannah; Butler, Caley; McMenimen, Kathryn A

    2017-07-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are a ubiquitous part of the machinery that maintains cellular protein homeostasis by acting as molecular chaperones. sHsps bind to and prevent the aggregation of partially folded substrate proteins in an ATP-independent manner. sHsps are dynamic, forming an ensemble of structures from dimers to large oligomers through concentration-dependent equilibrium dissociation. Based on structural studies and mutagenesis experiments, it is proposed that the dimer is the smallest active chaperone unit, while larger oligomers may act as storage depots for sHsps or play additional roles in chaperone function. The complexity and dynamic nature of their structural organization has made elucidation of their chaperone function challenging. HspB1 and HspB5 are two canonical human sHsps that vary in sequence and are expressed in a wide variety of tissues. In order to determine the role of the dimer in chaperone activity, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was genetically linked as a fusion protein to the N-terminus regions of both HspB1 and HspB5 (also known as Hsp27 and αB-crystallin, respectively) proteins in order to constrain oligomer formation of HspB1 and HspB5, by using GST, since it readily forms a dimeric structure. We monitored the chaperone activity of these fusion proteins, which suggest they primarily form dimers and monomers and function as active molecular chaperones. Furthermore, the two different fusion proteins exhibit different chaperone activity for two model substrate proteins, citrate synthase (CS) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH). GST-HspB1 prevents more aggregation of MDH compared to GST-HspB5 and wild type HspB1. However, when CS is the substrate, both GST-HspB1 and GST-HspB5 are equally effective chaperones. Furthermore, wild type proteins do not display equal activity toward the substrates, suggesting that each sHsp exhibits different substrate specificity. Thus, substrate specificity, as described here for full-length GST

  1. [Expression and characterization of recombinant Sj23HD-HSA fusion protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Chuan-Xin; Yang, Jian-Linag; Feng, Wei; Yin, Xu-Ren; Song, Li-Jun; Wang, Jie; Qian, Chun-Yan; Ke, Xue-Dan

    2011-12-01

    To prepare the fusion protein of large hydrophilic domain of 23 kDa membrane protein of Schistosoma japonicum and the mature peptide of human serum albumin (Sj23HD-HSA) and investigate its immunoreactivity. A fusion protein gene encoding Sj23HD-HSA fusion protein was prepared by overlapping PCR, which was confirmed by TA cloning and DNA sequencing. The fusion gene of Sj23HD-HSA was directionally subcloned into yeast expression plasmid pWX530 to construct a recombinant plasmid Sj23HD-HSA/pWX530. The transformants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae containing the recombinant plasmid Sj23HD-HSA/pWX530 were screened on leu deficient SD medium after yeast competent cells were transformed with recombinant plasmid. The excretive Sj23HD-HSA protein was expressed by culturing the yeast transformants at 30 degrees C for 1 week, and the protein component of culture supernatant was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Sj23HD-HSA fusion protein was purified through Ion Exchange Chromatography. The immunoreactivity of recombinant Sj23HD-HSA fusion protein was determined by Western blotting with sera of schistosomiasis, clonorchiasis and healthy. The gene encoding the Sj23HD-HSA fusion protein was constructed successfully, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The yeast transformants containing plasmid Sj23HD-HSA/pWX530 could express the excretive Sj23HD-HSA fusion protein without inducing. The results of Western blotting indicated Sj23HD-HSA could be recognized by the sera of schistosomiasis, but could not be recognized by the sera of clonorchiasis and healthy respectively. Sj23HD-HSA fusion protein with good immune reactivity is prepared successfully, which will be a potential antigen for schistosomiasis immunodiagnosis.

  2. The fusion partner specifies the oncogenic potential of NUP98 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Jesslyn; Curtis, David J; Hussey, Damian J; Dobrovic, Alexander; Aplan, Peter D; Slape, Christopher I

    2013-12-01

    NUP98 is among the most promiscuously translocated genes in hematological diseases. Among the 28 known fusion partners, there are two categories: homeobox genes and non-homeobox genes. The homeobox fusion partners are well-studied in animal models, resulting in HoxA cluster overexpression and hematological disease. The non-homeobox fusion partners are less well studied. We created transgenic animal models for three NUP98 fusion genes (one homeobox, two non-homeobox), and show that in this system, the NUP98-homeobox fusion promotes self-renewal and aberrant gene expression to a significantly greater extent. We conclude that homeobox partners create more potent NUP98 fusion oncogenes than do non-homeobox partners. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interkingdom protein domain fusion: the case of an antimicrobial protein in potato (Solanum tuberosum)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Talianová, Martina; Vyskot, Boris; Janoušek, Bohuslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 297, 1-2 (2011), s. 129-139 ISSN 0378-2697 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA521/08/0932; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H002; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : horizontal gene transfer * interkingdom gene fusion * antimicrobial protein Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.335, year: 2011

  4. IL-2/neuroantigen fusion proteins as antigen-specific tolerogens in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE): correlation of T cell-mediated antigen presentation and tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannie, Mark D; Clayson, Barbara A; Buskirk, Elizabeth J; DeVine, Jarret L; Hernandez, Jose J; Abbott, Derek J

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether the Ag-targeting activity of cytokine/neuroantigen (NAg) fusion proteins may be associated with mechanisms of tolerance induction. To assess this question, we expressed fusion proteins comprised of a N-terminal cytokine domain and a C-terminal NAg domain. The cytokine domain comprised either rat IL-2 or IL-4, and the NAg domain comprised the dominant encephalitogenic determinant of the guinea pig myelin basic protein. Subcutaneous administration of IL2NAg (IL-2/NAg fusion protein) into Lewis rats either before or after an encephalitogenic challenge resulted in an attenuated course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In contrast, parallel treatment of rats with IL4NAg (IL-4/NAg fusion protein) or NAg lacked tolerogenic activity. In the presence of IL-2R(+) MHC class II(+) T cells, IL2NAg fusion proteins were at least 1,000 times more potent as an Ag than NAg alone. The tolerogenic activity of IL2NAg in vivo and the enhanced potency in vitro were both dependent upon covalent linkage of IL-2 and NAg. IL4NAg also exhibited enhanced antigenic potency. IL4NAg was approximately 100-fold more active than NAg alone in the presence of splenic APC. The enhanced potency of IL4NAg also required covalent linkage of cytokine and NAg and was blocked by soluble IL-4 or by a mAb specific for IL-4. Other control cytokine/NAg fusion proteins did not exhibit a similar enhancement of Ag potency compared with NAg alone. Thus, the IL2NAg and IL4NAg fusion proteins targeted NAg for enhanced presentation by particular subsets of APC. The activities of IL2NAg revealed a potential relationship between NAg targeting to activated T cells, T cell-mediated Ag presentation, and tolerance induction.

  5. Role of osteogenic protein-1/bone morphogenetic protein-7 in spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Munns

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Justin Munns, Daniel K Park, Kern SinghDepartment of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: Osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1, also known as bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7, is a protein in the TGF-β family of cellular proteins that has shown potential for application in patients undergoing spinal fusion due to its proven osteoinductive effects, particularly in patients with spondylolisthesis. OP-1 initiates numerous processes at the cellular level, acting on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts to stimulate bone growth. Animal studies of OP-1 have provided strong evidence for the ability of OP-1 to initiate ossification in posterolateral arthrodesis. Promising findings in early clinical trials with OP-1 prompted FDA approval for use in long bone nonunions in 2001 and subsequently for revision posterolateral arthrodesis in 2004 under a conditional Humanitarian Device Exemption. Larger clinical trials have recently shown no notable safety concerns or increases in adverse events associated with OP-1. However, a recent clinical trial has not conclusively demonstrated the noninferiority of OP-1 compared to autograft in revision posterolateral arthrodesis. The future of OP-1 application in patients with spondylolisthesis thus remains uncertain with the recent rejection of Premarket Approval (PMA status by the FDA (April 2009. Further investigation of its treatment success and immunological consequences appears warranted to establish FDA approval for its use in its current form.Keywords: osteogenic protein-1, bone morphogenetic protein-7, spinal fusion

  6. An alternative easy method for antibody purification and analysis of protein-protein interaction using GST fusion proteins immobilized onto glutathione-agarose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalazar, L; Alonso, C A I; De Castro, R E; Cesari, A

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of small proteins designed to perform protein-protein assays can be a difficult task. Often, the modification of reactive residues necessary for the interaction between the immobilized protein and the matrix compromises the interaction between the protein and its target. In these cases, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is a valuable tag providing a long arm that makes the bait protein accessible to the mobile flow phase of the chromatography. In the present report, we used a GST fusion version of the 8-kDa protein serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 3 (SPINK3) as the bait to purify anti-SPINK3 antibodies from a rabbit crude serum. The protocol for immobilization of GST-SPINK3 to glutathione-agarose beads was modified from previously reported protocols by using an alternative bifunctional cross-linker (dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate)) in a very simple procedure and by using simple buffers under physiological conditions. We concluded that the immobilized protein remained bound to the column after elution with low pH, allowing the reuse of the column for alternative uses, such as screening for other protein-protein interactions using SPINK3 as the bait.

  7. A recombinant fusion protein containing a spider toxin specific for the insect voltage-gated sodium ion channel shows oral toxicity towards insects of different orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant fusion protein technology allows specific insecticidal protein and peptide toxins to display activity in orally-delivered biopesticides. The spider venom peptide δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a, which targets insect voltage-gated sodium channels, was fused to the “carrier” snowdrop lectin (GNA) to confer oral toxicity. The toxin itself (PI1a) and an amaurobitoxin/GNA fusion protein (PI1a/GNA) were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. Although both proteins caused mortality when injected into cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae) larvae, the PI1a/GNA fusion was approximately 6 times as effective as recombinant PI1a on a molar basis. PI1a alone was not orally active against cabbage moth larvae, but a single 30 μg dose of the PI1a/GNA fusion protein caused 100% larval mortality within 6 days when fed to 3rd instar larvae, and caused significant reductions in survival, growth and feeding in 4th – 6th instar larvae. Transport of fusion protein from gut contents to the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae, and binding to the nerve chord, was shown by Western blotting. The PI1a/GNA fusion protein also caused mortality when delivered orally to dipteran (Musca domestica; housefly) and hemipteran (Acyrthosiphon pisum; pea aphid) insects, making it a promising candidate for development as a biopesticide. PMID:24486516

  8. Cell fusion assay by expression of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein to analyze the mutation of palivizumab-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Yosuke; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Sawada, Akihito; Ito, Takashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) consists of fusion (F), glyco (G), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins as envelope proteins, and infects through cell fusion. F protein is expressed on the surface of infected cells, and induces cell fusion. In the present report, expression plasmids of the F, G and SH proteins were constructed and cell fusion activity was investigated under T7 RNA polymerase. F protein alone induced cell fusion at a lower concentration than previously reported, and co-expression of F and SH proteins induced cell fusion more efficiently than F protein alone. Palivizumab is the only prophylactic agent against RSV infection. Palivizumab-resistant strains having mutations of the F protein of K272E and S275F were reported. These mutations were introduced into an F-expression plasmid, and exhibited no inhibition of cell fusion with palivizumab. Among the RSV F protein mutants, N276S has been reported to have partial resistance against palivizumab, but the F expression plasmid with the N276S mutation showed a reduction in cell fusion in the presence of palivizumab, showing no resistance to palivizumab. The present expression system was useful for investigating the mechanisms of RSV cell fusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  10. Solid-state processes to produce hemispherical components for inertial fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.D.; Robinson, M.G.; Hillegas, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The designs proposed for next-generation targets and components for inertial fusion (IF) involve complex multilayer, multishell configurations. Solid-state process technology offers a wide assortment of fabrication techniques useful in the realization of such structures. This paper presents several such processes which are capable of producing freestanding hemishells of a variety of materials

  11. Novel antibody-cytokine fusion proteins featuring granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, interleukin-3 and interleukin-4 as payloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Anja Sophie; Tintor, Diana; Neri, Dario

    2018-04-10

    Neutrophils can strongly influence disease activity in cancer and in chronic inflammation. Here, we report for the first time the construction and characterization of antibody-fusion proteins featuring granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-3 as payloads capable of enhancing neutrophil activity and a novel antibody-interleukin-4 fusion protein with neutrophil inhibitory potential. We used the F8 antibody specific to the alternatively-spliced extra domain A (EDA) of fibronectin as a targeting agent, since the cognate antigen is strongly upregulated in diseases characterized by angiogenesis. The fusion proteins GCSF-F8, F8-IL3 and F8-IL4-F8, were cloned, expressed, and their targeting ability assessed, exhibiting preferential tumor uptake with tumor:blood ratios at 24 h after injection of 3.3, 18.2 and 27.3, respectively. In F9 tumor bearing-mice GCSF-F8 and F8-IL3 did not provide a therapeutic benefit, while F8-IL4-F8 showed a potent tumor growth retardation. In the collagen-induced model of arthritis, GCSF-F8 and F8-IL3 induced a worsening of the disease, while F8-IL4-F8 slowed arthritis progression but, surprisingly, exhibited substantial toxicity when used in combination with dexamethasone. Collectively, the results indicate that the novel fusion proteins could be expressed and efficiently delivered to the site of disease. However, they were not superior to other antibody-cytokine fusions previously described by our laboratory. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. ChiPPI: a novel method for mapping chimeric protein-protein interactions uncovers selection principles of protein fusion events in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Gorohovski, Alessandro; Tagore, Somnath; Sekar, Vaishnovi; Vazquez, Miguel; Valencia, Alfonso

    2017-07-07

    Fusion proteins, comprising peptides deriving from the translation of two parental genes, are produced in cancer by chromosomal aberrations. The expressed fusion protein incorporates domains of both parental proteins. Using a methodology that treats discrete protein domains as binding sites for specific domains of interacting proteins, we have cataloged the protein interaction networks for 11 528 cancer fusions (ChiTaRS-3.1). Here, we present our novel method, chimeric protein-protein interactions (ChiPPI) that uses the domain-domain co-occurrence scores in order to identify preserved interactors of chimeric proteins. Mapping the influence of fusion proteins on cell metabolism and pathways reveals that ChiPPI networks often lose tumor suppressor proteins and gain oncoproteins. Furthermore, fusions often induce novel connections between non-interactors skewing interaction networks and signaling pathways. We compared fusion protein PPI networks in leukemia/lymphoma, sarcoma and solid tumors finding distinct enrichment patterns for each disease type. While certain pathways are enriched in all three diseases (Wnt, Notch and TGF β), there are distinct patterns for leukemia (EGFR signaling, DNA replication and CCKR signaling), for sarcoma (p53 pathway and CCKR signaling) and solid tumors (FGFR and EGFR signaling). Thus, the ChiPPI method represents a comprehensive tool for studying the anomaly of skewed cellular networks produced by fusion proteins in cancer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Computational probing protein-protein interactions targeting small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Cui; Chen, Shi-Long; Deng, Nai-Yang; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-15

    With the booming of interactome studies, a lot of interactions can be measured in a high throughput way and large scale datasets are available. It is becoming apparent that many different types of interactions can be potential drug targets. Compared with inhibition of a single protein, inhibition of protein-protein interaction (PPI) is promising to improve the specificity with fewer adverse side-effects. Also it greatly broadens the drug target search space, which makes the drug target discovery difficult. Computational methods are highly desired to efficiently provide candidates for further experiments and hold the promise to greatly accelerate the discovery of novel drug targets. Here, we propose a machine learning method to predict PPI targets in a genomic-wide scale. Specifically, we develop a computational method, named as PrePPItar, to Predict PPIs as drug targets by uncovering the potential associations between drugs and PPIs. First, we survey the databases and manually construct a gold-standard positive dataset for drug and PPI interactions. This effort leads to a dataset with 227 associations among 63 PPIs and 113 FDA-approved drugs and allows us to build models to learn the association rules from the data. Second, we characterize drugs by profiling in chemical structure, drug ATC-code annotation, and side-effect space and represent PPI similarity by a symmetrical S-kernel based on protein amino acid sequence. Then the drugs and PPIs are correlated by Kronecker product kernel. Finally, a support vector machine (SVM), is trained to predict novel associations between drugs and PPIs. We validate our PrePPItar method on the well-established gold-standard dataset by cross-validation. We find that all chemical structure, drug ATC-code, and side-effect information are predictive for PPI target. Moreover, we can increase the PPI target prediction coverage by integrating multiple data sources. Follow-up database search and pathway analysis indicate that our new

  14. Membrane fusion triggers rapid degradation of two gamete-specific, fusion-essential proteins in a membrane block to polygamy in Chlamydomonas

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yanjie; Misamore, Michael J.; Snell, William J.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membranes of gametes are specialized for fusion, yet, once fusion occurs, in many organisms the new zygote becomes incapable of further membrane fusion reactions. The molecular mechanisms that underlie this loss of fusion capacity (block to polygamy) remain unknown. During fertilization in the green alga Chlamydomonas, the plus gamete-specific membrane protein FUS1 is required for adhesion between the apically localized sites on the plasma membranes of plus and minus gametes that a...

  15. Cytoplasmic Motifs in the Nipah Virus Fusion Protein Modulate Virus Particle Assembly and Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gunner P; Contreras, Erik M; Dabundo, Jeffrey; Henderson, Bryce A; Matz, Keesha M; Ortega, Victoria; Ramirez, Alfredo; Park, Arnold; Aguilar, Hector C

    2017-05-15

    fusion glycoprotein, in the incorporation of other viral proteins into viral particles. By identifying several regions in the fusion glycoprotein that drive viral assembly, we further our understanding of how these viruses assemble and egress from infected cells. The results presented will likely be useful toward designing treatments targeting this aspect of the viral life cycle and for the production of new viral particle-based vaccines. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. SAR Target Recognition Based on Multi-feature Multiple Representation Classifier Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinzheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR image target recognition algorithm based on multi-feature multiple representation learning classifier fusion. First, it extracts three features from the SAR images, namely principal component analysis, wavelet transform, and Two-Dimensional Slice Zernike Moments (2DSZM features. Second, we harness the sparse representation classifier and the cooperative representation classifier with the above-mentioned features to get six predictive labels. Finally, we adopt classifier fusion to obtain the final recognition decision. We researched three different classifier fusion algorithms in our experiments, and the results demonstrate thatusing Bayesian decision fusion gives thebest recognition performance. The method based on multi-feature multiple representation learning classifier fusion integrates the discrimination of multi-features and combines the sparse and cooperative representation classification performance to gain complementary advantages and to improve recognition accuracy. The experiments are based on the Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR database,and they demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  17. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Cook, R.C.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Letts, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    We describe progress made during 1986 in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser fusion. The foam materials are polystyrene and resorcinolformaldehyde. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationships of their properties to target specifications are presented. In the final section, we discuss statistical experimental design techniques that are being used to optimize the foams. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Expression of a fusion protein of human ciliary neurotrophic factor and soluble CNTF-receptor and identification of its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Pia, März; Uwe, Otten; Ge, Ji-Guang; Stefan, Rose-John

    2003-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has pleiotropic actions on many neuronal populations as well as on glia. Signal transduction by CNTF requires that it bind first to CNTF-R, permitting the recruitment of gp130 and LIF-R, forming a tripartite receptor complex. Cells that only express gp130 and LIF-R, but not CNTF-R are refractory to stimulation by CNTF. On many target cells CNTF only acts in the presence of its specific agonistic soluble receptors. We engineered a soluble fusion protein by linking the COOH-terminus of sCNTF-R to the NH2-terminus of CNTF. Recombinant CNTF/sCNTF-R fusion protein (Hyper-CNTF) was successfully expressed in COS-7 cells. The apparent molecular mass of the Hyper-CNTF protein was estimated from western blots to be 75 kDa. Proliferation assays of transfected BAF/3 cells in response to CNTF and Hyper-CNTF were used to verify the activity of the cytokines. The proliferative results confirmed that CNTF required homodimerization of the gp130, CNTF-R and LIF-R receptor subunit whereas Hyper-CNTF required heterodimerization of the gp130 and LIF-R receptor subunit. We concluded that the fusion protein Hyper-CNTF had superagonistic activity on target cells expressing gp130 and LIF-R, but lacking membrane-bound CNTF-R.

  19. pH regulation in early endosomes and interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins control avian retrovirus fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Tanay M; Marin, Mariana; Mason, Caleb; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2017-05-12

    Enveloped viruses infect host cells by fusing their membranes with those of the host cell, a process mediated by viral glycoproteins upon binding to cognate host receptors or entering into acidic intracellular compartments. Whereas the effect of receptor density on viral infection has been well studied, the role of cell type-specific factors/processes, such as pH regulation, has not been characterized in sufficient detail. Here, we examined the effects of cell-extrinsic factors (buffer environment) and cell-intrinsic factors (interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins, IFITMs), on the pH regulation in early endosomes and on the efficiency of acid-dependent fusion of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV), with endosomes. First, we found that a modest elevation of external pH can raise the pH in early endosomes in a cell type-dependent manner and thereby delay the acid-induced fusion of endocytosed ASLV. Second, we observed a cell type-dependent delay between the low pH-dependent and temperature-dependent steps of viral fusion, consistent with the delayed enlargement of the fusion pore. Third, ectopic expression of IFITMs, known to potently block influenza virus fusion with late compartments, was found to only partially inhibit ASLV fusion with early endosomes. Interestingly, IFITM expression promoted virus uptake and the acidification of endosomal compartments, resulting in an accelerated fusion rate when driven by the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored, but not by the transmembrane isoform of the ASLV receptor. Collectively, these results highlight the role of cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic factors in regulating the efficiency and kinetics of virus entry and fusion with target cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Antisperm protein targets in azoospermia men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Sadegh Soltani Zangbar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The number of couples that meet the definition of infertility at reproductive ages is increasing worldwide. One of the most known conditions of infertility in males is azoospermia, defined as complete absence of spermatozoa in the semen. Azoospermia manifests in two forms, namely obstructive and non-obstructive azoospermia. Although the presence of antisperm antibody (ASA has been reported in 88% of the patients with obstructive azoospermia (OA, interestingly, there is no data regarding ASA targets in OA individuals. AIM: The present study aimed to identify sperm antibody targets in a group of OA men. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The present study was carried out on 27 OA infertile men and 27 healthy fertile age-matched males as cases and controls, respectively. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The sperm proteome was separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis technique, transferred onto the polyvinylidene fluoride membrane, and blotted with the sera of a group of OA men. Then, it was compared with the membranes blotted with the sera of a group of healthy fertile men. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify the different blotted spots and finally the results of the mass analysis were confirmed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method. RESULTS: The results indicated that OA patients might produce antibody against two sperm proteins, Tektin-2 and triose phosphate isomerase. Moreover, the expressions of the two targeted proteins were confirmed at RNA level. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the present study revealed two functionally important sperm proteins as antibody targets in azoospermic men.

  1. Analysis of the ball-plate laser fusion target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.L.

    1975-01-01

    Two dimensional computer simulation results of the two exploding pusher ball-plate targets are in approximate agreement with the experimental space and time integrated x-ray spectra, x-ray microscope data, neutron yields, and laser energy absorptions. Three parameters were used to characterize the laser absorption due to plasma instabilities. Two dumpall parameters were used to model the energy absorption and a single variable was used to define the electron temperature. The values, as well as the selection procedure for these parameters are discussed

  2. X-ray absorption in characterization of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, X.; Coudeville, A.; Eyharts, P.; Perrine, J.P.; Rouillard, R.

    1982-11-01

    Many plastic or metal coated targets are opaque, so their thickness and thickness uniformity cannot be obtained by optical means. Therefore, we have built and tested a new system using monochromatic X-ray absorption measurements. This system is also able to perform non-destructive measurements of argon fill pressure in glass microballoons. The X-ray source is a diffraction tube with a chromium target and fine focus (0.4 x 0.8 mm 2 ). Since monochromatic calculations are involved in this method, we use electronic discrimination to isolate the chromium Kα line (5.4 keV) from the bremsstrahlung spectrum. The detectors are xenon-filled proportional counters. The system is composed of two beams (10 μm in diameter), one used as a reference and the other as the measurement arm. A PET desk computer is coupled ot the experiment. We achieved a precision better than 10% for gold layers in the range of 0.1 to 1 μm, and better than 20% for argon pressures in the range of 5 - 13 bars

  3. Peptide mimics of a conformationally constrained protective epitopes of respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chargelegue, D.; Obeid, O.E.; Shaw, D.M.; Denbury, A.N.; Hobby, P.; Hsu, S.C.; Steward, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    Aims: To identify peptides that mimic (mimotopes) conformational and protective epitopes of RSV fusion protein and to assess their efficacy as immunogens and potential vaccines. Material and methods: An 8-mer solid- phase (TG resin) library was screened with a neutralising and protective RSV fusion

  4. Gene transfer mediated by fusion protein hemagglutinin reconstituted in cationic lipid vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoen, P; Chonn, A; Cullis, PR; Wilschut, J; Scherrer, P

    Hemagglutinin, the membrane fusion protein of influenza virus,is known to mediate a low-pH-dependent fusion reaction between the viral envelope and the limiting membrane of the endosomal cell compartment following cellular uptake of the virus particles by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we

  5. Targeting protein biotinylation enhances tuberculosis chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Divya; Park, Sae Woong; Essawy, Maram M; Dawadi, Surendra; Mason, Alan; Nandakumar, Madhumitha; Zimmerman, Matthew; Mina, Marizel; Ho, Hsin Pin; Engelhart, Curtis A; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C; Rhee, Kyu; Ehrt, Sabine; Aldrich, Courtney C; Dartois, Véronique; Schnappinger, Dirk

    2018-04-25

    Successful drug treatment for tuberculosis (TB) depends on the unique contributions of its component drugs. Drug resistance poses a threat to the efficacy of individual drugs and the regimens to which they contribute. Biologically and chemically validated targets capable of replacing individual components of current TB chemotherapy are a major unmet need in TB drug development. We demonstrate that chemical inhibition of the bacterial biotin protein ligase (BPL) with the inhibitor Bio-AMS (5'-[ N -(d-biotinoyl)sulfamoyl]amino-5'-deoxyadenosine) killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ), the bacterial pathogen causing TB. We also show that genetic silencing of BPL eliminated the pathogen efficiently from mice during acute and chronic infection with Mtb Partial chemical inactivation of BPL increased the potency of two first-line drugs, rifampicin and ethambutol, and genetic interference with protein biotinylation accelerated clearance of Mtb from mouse lungs and spleens by rifampicin. These studies validate BPL as a potential drug target that could serve as an alternate frontline target in the development of new drugs against Mtb . Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  6. Human antibody recognition of antigenic site IV on Pneumovirus fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Jarrod J; Binshtein, Elad; Human, Stacey; Fong, Rachel H; Alvarado, Gabriela; Doranz, Benjamin J; Moore, Martin L; Ohi, Melanie D; Crowe, James E

    2018-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major human pathogen that infects the majority of children by two years of age. The RSV fusion (F) protein is a primary target of human antibodies, and it has several antigenic regions capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies. Antigenic site IV is preserved in both the pre-fusion and post-fusion conformations of RSV F. Antibodies to antigenic site IV have been described that bind and neutralize both RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV). To explore the diversity of binding modes at antigenic site IV, we generated a panel of four new human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and competition-binding suggested the mAbs bind at antigenic site IV. Mutagenesis experiments revealed that binding and neutralization of two mAbs (3M3 and 6F18) depended on arginine (R) residue R429. We discovered two R429-independent mAbs (17E10 and 2N6) at this site that neutralized an RSV R429A mutant strain, and one of these mAbs (17E10) neutralized both RSV and hMPV. To determine the mechanism of cross-reactivity, we performed competition-binding, recombinant protein mutagenesis, peptide binding, and electron microscopy experiments. It was determined that the human cross-reactive mAb 17E10 binds to RSV F with a binding pose similar to 101F, which may be indicative of cross-reactivity with hMPV F. The data presented provide new concepts in RSV immune recognition and vaccine design, as we describe the novel idea that binding pose may influence mAb cross-reactivity between RSV and hMPV. Characterization of the site IV epitope bound by human antibodies may inform the design of a pan-Pneumovirus vaccine.

  7. Antibiotics in development targeting protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, Joyce A

    2011-12-01

    The resolution of antibiotic-ribosomal subunit complexes and antibacterial-protein complexes at the atomic level has provided new insights into modifications of clinically relevant antimicrobials and provided new classes that target the protein cellular apparatus. New chemistry platforms that use fragment-based drug design or allow novel modifications in known structural classes are being used to design new antibiotics that overcome known resistance mechanisms and extend spectrum and potency by circumventing ubiquitous efflux pumps. This review provides details on seven antibiotics in development for treatment of moderate-to-severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and/or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: solithromycin, cethromycin, omadacycline, CEM-102, GSK1322322, radezolid, and tedizolid. Two antibiotics of the oxazolidinone class, PF-02341272 and AZD5847, are being developed as antituberculosis agents. Only three antibiotics that target the protein cellular machinery, TP-434, GSK2251052, and plazomicin, have a spectrum that encompasses multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. These compounds provide hope for treating key pathogens that cause serious disease in both the community and the hospital. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. A New Target in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: EML4-ALK Fusion Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan WANG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It was only 3 years ago that the fusion gene between echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like4 (EML4 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK has been identified in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. EML4-ALK is most often detected in never smokers with lung adenocarcinoma and has unique pathologic features. EML4-ALK fusion gene is oncogenic, which could be suppressed by ALK-inhibitor through blocking the downstream signaling passway of EML4-ALK. This review will focus on the molecular structure, function, biology, detection method and the diagnostic and therapeutic meaning of EML4-ALK of lung cancer.

  9. Role of conserved histidine residues in the low-pH dependence of the Semliki Forest virus fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao-Ling; Zheng, Yan; Kielian, Margaret

    2009-05-01

    A wide variety of enveloped viruses infects cells by taking advantage of the low pH in the endocytic pathway to trigger virus-membrane fusion. For alphaviruses such as Semliki Forest virus (SFV), acidic pH initiates a series of conformational changes in the heterodimeric virus envelope proteins E1 and E2. Low pH dissociates the E2/E1 dimer, releasing the membrane fusion protein E1. E1 inserts into the target membrane and refolds to a trimeric hairpin conformation, thus driving the fusion reaction. The means by which E1 senses and responds to low pH is unclear, and protonation of conserved E1 histidine residues has been proposed as a possible mechanism. We tested the role of four conserved histidines by mutagenesis of the wild-type (wt) SFV infectious clone to create virus mutants with E1 H3A, H125A, H331A, and H331A/H333A mutations. The H125A, H331A, and H331A/H333A mutants had growth properties similar to those of wt SFV and showed modest change or no change in the pH dependence of virus-membrane fusion. By contrast, the E1 H3A mutation produced impaired virus growth and a markedly more acidic pH requirement for virus-membrane fusion. The dissociation of the H3A heterodimer and the membrane insertion of the mutant E1 protein were comparable to those of the wt in efficiency and pH dependence. However, the formation of the H3A homotrimer required a much lower pH and showed reduced efficiency. Together, these results and the location of H3 suggest that this residue acts to regulate the low-pH-dependent refolding of E1 during membrane fusion.

  10. Screening Fusion Tags for Improved Recombinant Protein Expression in E. coli with the Expresso® Solubility and Expression Screening System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Eric J; Auldridge, Michele E

    2017-11-01

    The simplicity, speed, and low cost of bacterial culture make E. coli the system of choice for most initial trials of recombinant protein expression. However, many heterologous proteins are either poorly expressed in bacteria, or are produced as incorrectly folded, insoluble aggregates that lack the activity of the native protein. In many cases, fusion to a partner protein can allow for improved expression and/or solubility of a difficult target protein. Although several different fusion partners have gained favor, none are universally effective, and identifying the one that best improves soluble expression of a given target protein is an empirical process. This unit presents a strategy for parallel screening of fusion partners for enhanced expression or solubility. The Expresso® Solubility and Expression Screening System includes a panel of seven distinct fusion partners and utilizes an extremely simple cloning strategy to enable rapid screening and identification of the most effective fusion partner. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Ikeya, Makoto; Fukuta, Makoto; Woltjen, Knut; Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Toguchida, Junya

    2013-03-22

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT-SSX. Although precise function of SYT-SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT-SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT-SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT-SSX2 gene. SYT-SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT-SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT-SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT-SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly different in response to the induction of SYT-SSX, and more than half of SYT-SSX target genes in hPSCs were not induced in hMSCs. These results suggest the importance of cellular context for correct understanding of SYT-SSX function, and demonstrated how our new system will help to overcome this issue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression, Purification, and Biophysical Characterization of a Secreted Anthrax Decoy Fusion Protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalimuthu Karuppanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax toxin receptor-mediated drug development for blocking anthrax toxin action has received much attention in recent decades. In this study, we produced a secreted anthrax decoy fusion protein comprised of a portion of the human capillary morphogenesis gene-2 (CMG2 protein fused via a linker to the fragment crystallizable (Fc domain of human immunoglobulin G1 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a transient expression system. Using the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV 35S promoter and co-expression with the p19 gene silencing suppressor, we were able to achieve a high level of recombinant CMG2-Fc-Apo (rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein accumulation. Production kinetics were observed up to eight days post-infiltration, and maximum production of 826 mg/kg fresh leaf weight was observed on day six. Protein A affinity chromatography purification of the rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid showed the homodimeric form under non-reducing gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the molecular integrity of the secreted protein. The N-glycosylation pattern of purified rCMG2-Fc-Apo protein was analysed; the major portion of N-glycans consists of complex type structures in both protein samples. The most abundant (>50% N-glycan structure was GlcNAc2(XylMan3(FucGlcNAc2 in rCMG2-Fc-Apo recovered from whole leaf extract and apoplast wash fluid. High mannose N-glycan structures were not detected in the apoplast wash fluid preparation, which confirmed the protein secretion. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that high-level production of rCMG2-Fc-Apo can be achieved by transient production in Nicotiana benthamiana plants with apoplast targeting.

  13. High pressure deuterium-tritium gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, A.J.; Spaletta, H.W.; Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Hardwick, D.A.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental studies of muon-catalyzed fusion, the density of the hydrogen gas mixture is an important parameter. Catalysis of up to 150 fusions per muon has been observed in deuterium-tritium gas mixtures at liquid hydrogen density; at room temperature, such densities require a target gas pressure of the order of 1000 atmospheres (100 MPa, 15,000 psi). We report here the design considerations for hydrogen gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments that operate at 1000 and 10,000 atmospheres. The 1000 atmosphere high pressure target vessels are fabricated of Type A-286 stainless steel and lined with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper to provide a barrier to hydrogen permeation of the stainless steel. The 10,000 atmosphere ultrahigh pressure target vessels are made from 18Ni (200 grade) maraging steel and are lined with OFHC copper, again to prevent hydrogen permeation of the steel. In addition to target design features, operating requirements, fabrication procedures, and secondary containment are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  14. Synthetic Aperture Radar Target Recognition with Feature Fusion Based on a Stacked Autoencoder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction is a crucial step for any automatic target recognition process, especially in the interpretation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery. In order to obtain distinctive features, this paper proposes a feature fusion algorithm for SAR target recognition based on a stacked autoencoder (SAE. The detailed procedure presented in this paper can be summarized as follows: firstly, 23 baseline features and Three-Patch Local Binary Pattern (TPLBP features are extracted. These features can describe the global and local aspects of the image with less redundancy and more complementarity, providing richer information for feature fusion. Secondly, an effective feature fusion network is designed. Baseline and TPLBP features are cascaded and fed into a SAE. Then, with an unsupervised learning algorithm, the SAE is pre-trained by greedy layer-wise training method. Capable of feature expression, SAE makes the fused features more distinguishable. Finally, the model is fine-tuned by a softmax classifier and applied to the classification of targets. 10-class SAR targets based on Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR dataset got a classification accuracy up to 95.43%, which verifies the effectiveness of the presented algorithm.

  15. The role of Z-pinches and related configurations in magnetized target fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.

    1997-01-01

    The use of a magnetic field within a fusion target is now known as Magnetized Target Fusion in the US and as MAGO (Magnitnoye Obzhatiye, or magnetic compression) in Russia. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (e.g., ICF), MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm, magnetized, wall-confined plasma of intermediate density within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression and heating of the plasma by imploding the confining wall, or pusher. In many ways, MTF can be considered a marriage between the more mature MFE and ICF approaches, and this marriage potentially eliminates some of the hurdles encountered in the other approaches. When compared to ICF, MTF requires lower implosion velocity, lower initial density, significantly lower radial convergence, and larger targets, all of which lead to substantially reduced driver intensity, power, and symmetry requirements. When compared to MFE, MTF does not require a vacuum separating the plasma from the wall, and, in fact, complete magnetic confinement, even if possible, may not be desirable. The higher density of MTF and much shorter confinement times should make magnetized plasma formation a much less difficult step than in MFE. The substantially lower driver requirements and implosion velocity of MTF make z-pinch magnetically driven liners, magnetically imploded by existing modern pulsed power electrical current sources, a leading candidate for the target pusher of an MTF system

  16. Cognitive zonal fusion biopsy of the prostate: Original technique between target and saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea B. Galosi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe our experience in prostate biopsy using a new standardized cognitive fusion techniques, that we call “cognitive zonal fusion biopsy”. This new technique is based on two operative options: the first based on target biopsies, the Cognitive Target Biopsy (CTB if the same target was detected with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS and multiparametric magnetic resonance (mpMRI; the second based on saturation biopsies, the Zonal Saturation Biopsy (ZSB on anatomical zone/s containing the region of interest if the same target was not evident with TRUS and MRI. We evaluated results of our technique compared to standard biopsy in order to identify clinically relevant prostate cancer. Methods: This is a single-center prospective study conducted in 58 pts: 25 biopsy-naïve, 25 with previous negative biopsy and in 8 with cancer in active surveillance. Based on mpMRI and transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS, all patients were scheduled for standard 12-core TRUS-guided biopsy. If mpMRI was suggestive or positive (PI-RADS 3, 4 or 5: patients underwent additional targeted 2 to 6 cores using cognitive zonal fusion technique. Results: 31/58 (53.4% patients had a cancer. Our technique detected 80.6% (25 of 31 with clinically significant prostate cancer, leading to detection of insignificant cancer in 20%. Using standard mapping in MR negative areas we found 5 clinically significant cancer and 4 not significant cancers. MRI cancer detection rate was 18/31 (58.1%, and 9/18 (50% in high grade tumors. Therefore MRI missed 50% of high grade cancers. The mean number of cores taken with cognitive zonal fusion biopsy was 6.1 (2-17, in addition biopsy sampling was done outside the ROI areas. Overall 15.4 cores (12-22 were taken. Cancer amount in Zonal Biopsy was larger than 7.3 mm (1-54.5 in comparison with 5.2 mm (1-23.5 in standard mapping. Largest percentage of cancer involvement with cognitive zonal fusion technique was detected in 19.4% vs 15.9%. Conclusions

  17. Pharmacological Agents Targeting the Cellular Prion Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Letizia Barreca

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC, a glycoprotein expressed at the surface of a wide variety of cell types, into a misfolded conformer (the scrapie form of PrP, or PrPSc that accumulates in brain tissues of affected individuals. PrPSc is a self-catalytic protein assembly capable of recruiting native conformers of PrPC, and causing their rearrangement into new PrPSc molecules. Several previous attempts to identify therapeutic agents against prion diseases have targeted PrPSc, and a number of compounds have shown potent anti-prion effects in experimental models. Unfortunately, so far, none of these molecules has successfully been translated into effective therapies for prion diseases. Moreover, mounting evidence suggests that PrPSc might be a difficult pharmacological target because of its poorly defined structure, heterogeneous composition, and ability to generate different structural conformers (known as prion strains that can elude pharmacological intervention. In the last decade, a less intuitive strategy to overcome all these problems has emerged: targeting PrPC, the common substrate of any prion strain replication. This alternative approach possesses several technical and theoretical advantages, including the possibility of providing therapeutic effects also for other neurodegenerative disorders, based on recent observations indicating a role for PrPC in delivering neurotoxic signals of different misfolded proteins. Here, we provide an overview of compounds claimed to exert anti-prion effects by directly binding to PrPC, discussing pharmacological properties and therapeutic potentials of each chemical class.

  18. Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  19. Role of protein disulfide isomerase and other thiol-reactive proteins in HIV-1 envelope protein-mediated fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Wu; Silver, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Cell-surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been proposed to promote disulfide bond rearrangements in HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) that accompany Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated the role of PDI in ways that have not been previously tested by downregulating PDI with siRNA and by overexpressing wild-type or variant forms of PDI in transiently and stably transfected cells. These manipulations, as well as treatment with anti-PDI antibodies, had only small effects on infection or cell fusion mediated by NL4-3 or AD8 strains of HIV-1. However, the cell-surface thiol-reactive reagent 5, 5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) had a much stronger inhibitory effect in our system, suggesting that cell-surface thiol-containing molecules other than PDI, acting alone or in concert, have a greater effect than PDI on HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated one such candidate, thioredoxin, a PDI family member reported to reduce a labile disulfide bond in CD4. We found that the ability of thioredoxin to reduce the disulfide bond in CD4 is enhanced in the presence of HIV-1 Env gp120 and that thioredoxin also reduces disulfide bonds in gp120 directly in the absence of CD4. We discuss the implications of these observations for identification of molecules involved in disulfide rearrangements in Env during fusion

  20. Chemical Screens Identify Drugs that Enhance or Mitigate Cellular Responses to Antibody-Toxin Fusion Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Antignani

    Full Text Available The intersection of small molecular weight drugs and antibody-based therapeutics is rarely studied in large scale. Both types of agents are currently part of the cancer armamentarium. However, very little is known about how to combine them in optimal ways. Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin gene fusion proteins engineered to target cancer cells via antibody binding to surface antigens. For fusion proteins derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE, potency relies on the enzymatic domain of the toxin which catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 causing inhibition of protein synthesis leading to cell death. Candidate immunotoxins have demonstrated clear value in clinical trials but generally have not been curative as single agents. Therefore we undertook three screens to discover effective combinations that could act synergistically. From the MIPE-3 library of compounds we identified various enhancers of immunotoxin action and at least one major class of inhibitor. Follow-up experiments confirmed the screening data and suggested that immunotoxins when administered with everolimus or nilotinib exhibit favorable combinatory activity and would be candidates for preclinical development. Mechanistic studies revealed that everolimus-immunotoxin combinations acted synergistically on elements of the protein synthetic machinery, including S61 kinase and 4E-BP1 of the mTORC1 pathway. Conversely, PARP inhibitors antagonized immunotoxins and also blocked the toxicity due to native ADP-ribosylating toxins. Thus, our goal of investigating a chemical library was justified based on the identification of several approved compounds that could be developed preclinically as 'enhancers' and at least one class of mitigator to be avoided.

  1. Dynamic in vivo imaging and cell tracking using a histone fluorescent protein fusion in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Virginia E

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in optical imaging modalities and the continued evolution of genetically-encoded fluorescent proteins are coming together to facilitate the study of cell behavior at high resolution in living organisms. As a result, imaging using autofluorescent protein reporters is gaining popularity in mouse transgenic and targeted mutagenesis applications. Results We have used embryonic stem cell-mediated transgenesis to label cells at sub-cellular resolution in vivo, and to evaluate fusion of a human histone protein to green fluorescent protein for ubiquitous fluorescent labeling of nucleosomes in mice. To this end we have generated embryonic stem cells and a corresponding strain of mice that is viable and fertile and exhibits widespread chromatin-localized reporter expression. High levels of transgene expression are maintained in a constitutive manner. Viability and fertility of homozygous transgenic animals demonstrates that this reporter is developmentally neutral and does not interfere with mitosis or meiosis. Conclusions Using various optical imaging modalities including wide-field, spinning disc confocal, and laser scanning confocal and multiphoton excitation microscopy, we can identify cells in various stages of the cell cycle. We can identify cells in interphase, cells undergoing mitosis or cell death. We demonstrate that this histone fusion reporter allows the direct visualization of active chromatin in situ. Since this reporter segments three-dimensional space, it permits the visualization of individual cells within a population, and so facilitates tracking cell position over time. It is therefore attractive for use in multidimensional studies of in vivo cell behavior and cell fate.

  2. [Preparation and the biological effect of fusion protein GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc) fusion protein as long acting GLP-1 receptor agonist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yun-cheng

    2015-12-01

    GLP-1 has a variety of anti-diabetic effects. However, native GLP-1 is not suitable for treatment of diabetes due to its short half-life (t½, 2-5 min). Exendin-4 is a polypeptide isolated from lizard saliva, which can bind to GLP-1 receptor, produce physiological effects similar to GLP-1, t½ up to 2.5 h, therefore, we developed a long-lasting GLP-1 receptor agonists and GLP-1-exendin-4 fusion IgG4 Fc [GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc)]. We constructed the eukaryotic expression vector of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc)-pOptiVEC- TOPO by gene recombination technique and expressed the fusion protein human GLP-1-IgG4 (Fc) in CHO/DG44 cells. The fusion protein stimulated the INS-1 cells secretion of insulin, GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein in CD1 mice pharmacokinetic experiments, as well as GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein did anti-diabetic effect on streptozotocin induced mice. Results demonstrated that the GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) positive CHO/DG44 clones were chosen and the media from these positive clones. Western blotting showed that one protein band was found to match well with the predicted relative molecular mass of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc). Insulin RIA showed that GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) dose-dependently stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. Pharmacokinetic studies in CD1 mice showed that with intraperitoneal injection (ip), the fusion protein peaked at 30 min in circulation and maintained a plateau for 200 h. Natural biological half-life of exendin-4 was (1.39 ± 0.28) h, GLP-1 in vivo t½ 4 min, indicating that fusion protein has long-lasting effects on the modulation of glucose homeostasis. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) was found to be effective in reducing the incidence of diabetes in multiple-low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice, longer duration of the biological activity of the fusion protein. The biological activity was significantly higher than that of GLP-1 and exendin-4. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) has good anti-diabetic activity

  3. Expression of polyhedrin-hEGF fusion protein in cultured cells and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-06-02

    , protease K, X-gal and related reagents were purchased from Roche ..... fusion protein in silkworm larvae infected with recombinant Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus. J. Gen. Virol. 68: 2599-2606. Massotte D (2003).

  4. Antibody-Cytokine Fusion Proteins for the Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrision, Sherie

    2002-01-01

    .... Expression of these cytokines by cancer cells has been shown to render them immunogenic. The anti- HER2/neu antibody fusion proteins were intended to localize the cytokine at the tumor where it is expected to elicit an immune response...

  5. Antibody-Cytokine Fusion Proteins for the Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrison, Sherri

    2000-01-01

    We have proposed to develop novel antibody fusion proteins in which antibodies specific for the breast cancer tumor associated antigen HER2/neu will be genetically fused to the cytokines IL-2, IL-12, and GM-CSF...

  6. The distribution of BRAF gene fusions in solid tumors and response to targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Wang, Kai; Chmielecki, Juliann; Gay, Laurie; Johnson, Adrienne; Chudnovsky, Jacob; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Ali, Siraj M; Elvin, Julia A; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Roels, Steven; Miller, Vincent A; Nakamura, Brooke N; Gray, Adam; Wong, Michael K; Stephens, Philip J

    2016-02-15

    Although the BRAF V600E base substitution is an approved target for the BRAF inhibitors in melanoma, BRAF gene fusions have not been investigated as anticancer drug targets. In our study, a wide variety of tumors underwent comprehensive genomic profiling for hundreds of known cancer genes using the FoundationOne™ or FoundationOne Heme™ comprehensive genomic profiling assays. BRAF fusions involving the intact in-frame BRAF kinase domain were observed in 55 (0.3%) of 20,573 tumors, across 12 distinct tumor types, including 20 novel BRAF fusions. These comprised 29 unique 5' fusion partners, of which 31% (9) were known and 69% (20) were novel. BRAF fusions included 3% (14/531) of melanomas; 2% (15/701) of gliomas; 1.0% (3/294) of thyroid cancers; 0.3% (3/1,062) pancreatic carcinomas; 0.2% (8/4,013) nonsmall-cell lung cancers and 0.2% (4/2,154) of colorectal cancers, and were enriched in pilocytic (30%) vs. nonpilocytic gliomas (1%; p < 0.0001), Spitzoid (75%) vs. nonSpitzoid melanomas (1%; p = 0.0001), acinar (67%) vs. nonacinar pancreatic cancers (<1%; p < 0.0001) and papillary (3%) vs. nonpapillary thyroid cancers (0%; p < 0.03). Clinical responses to trametinib and sorafenib are presented. In conclusion, BRAF fusions are rare driver alterations in a wide variety of malignant neoplasms, but enriched in Spitzoid melanoma, pilocytic astrocytomas, pancreatic acinar and papillary thyroid cancers. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  7. Moving target detection based on temporal-spatial information fusion for infrared image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toing, Wu-qin; Xiong, Jin-yu; Zeng, An-jun; Wu, Xiao-ping; Xu, Hao-peng

    2009-07-01

    Moving target detection and localization is one of the most fundamental tasks in visual surveillance. In this paper, through analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of the traditional approaches about moving target detection, a novel approach based on temporal-spatial information fusion is proposed for moving target detection. The proposed method combines the spatial feature in single frame and the temporal properties within multiple frames of an image sequence of moving target. First, the method uses the spatial image segmentation for target separation from background and uses the local temporal variance for extracting targets and wiping off the trail artifact. Second, the logical "and" operator is used to fuse the temporal and spatial information. In the end, to the fusion image sequence, the morphological filtering and blob analysis are used to acquire exact moving target. The algorithm not only requires minimal computation and memory but also quickly adapts to the change of background and environment. Comparing with other methods, such as the KDE, the Mixture of K Gaussians, etc., the simulation results show the proposed method has better validity and higher adaptive for moving target detection, especially in infrared image sequences with complex illumination change, noise change, and so on.

  8. Fusion tags for protein solubility, purification and immunogenicity in Escherichia coli: the novel Fh8 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sofia; Almeida, André; Castro, António; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are now widely produced in diverse microbial cell factories. The Escherichia coli is still the dominant host for recombinant protein production but, as a bacterial cell, it also has its issues: the aggregation of foreign proteins into insoluble inclusion bodies is perhaps the main limiting factor of the E. coli expression system. Conversely, E. coli benefits of cost, ease of use and scale make it essential to design new approaches directed for improved recombinant protein production in this host cell. With the aid of genetic and protein engineering novel tailored-made strategies can be designed to suit user or process requirements. Gene fusion technology has been widely used for the improvement of soluble protein production and/or purification in E. coli, and for increasing peptide's immunogenicity as well. New fusion partners are constantly emerging and complementing the traditional solutions, as for instance, the Fh8 fusion tag that has been recently studied and ranked among the best solubility enhancer partners. In this review, we provide an overview of current strategies to improve recombinant protein production in E. coli, including the key factors for successful protein production, highlighting soluble protein production, and a comprehensive summary of the latest available and traditionally used gene fusion technologies. A special emphasis is given to the recently discovered Fh8 fusion system that can be used for soluble protein production, purification, and immunogenicity in E. coli. The number of existing fusion tags will probably increase in the next few years, and efforts should be taken to better understand how fusion tags act in E. coli. This knowledge will undoubtedly drive the development of new tailored-made tools for protein production in this bacterial system.

  9. Fusion tags for protein solubility, purification and immunogenicity in Escherichia coli: the novel Fh8 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sofia; Almeida, André; Castro, António; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are now widely produced in diverse microbial cell factories. The Escherichia coli is still the dominant host for recombinant protein production but, as a bacterial cell, it also has its issues: the aggregation of foreign proteins into insoluble inclusion bodies is perhaps the main limiting factor of the E. coli expression system. Conversely, E. coli benefits of cost, ease of use and scale make it essential to design new approaches directed for improved recombinant protein production in this host cell. With the aid of genetic and protein engineering novel tailored-made strategies can be designed to suit user or process requirements. Gene fusion technology has been widely used for the improvement of soluble protein production and/or purification in E. coli, and for increasing peptide’s immunogenicity as well. New fusion partners are constantly emerging and complementing the traditional solutions, as for instance, the Fh8 fusion tag that has been recently studied and ranked among the best solubility enhancer partners. In this review, we provide an overview of current strategies to improve recombinant protein production in E. coli, including the key factors for successful protein production, highlighting soluble protein production, and a comprehensive summary of the latest available and traditionally used gene fusion technologies. A special emphasis is given to the recently discovered Fh8 fusion system that can be used for soluble protein production, purification, and immunogenicity in E. coli. The number of existing fusion tags will probably increase in the next few years, and efforts should be taken to better understand how fusion tags act in E. coli. This knowledge will undoubtedly drive the development of new tailored-made tools for protein production in this bacterial system. PMID:24600443

  10. The N-domain of Escherichia coli phosphoglycerate kinase is a novel fusion partner to express aggregation-prone heterologous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jong-Am; Lee, Dae-Sung; Park, Jin-Seung; Han, Kyung-Yeon; Lee, Jeewon

    2012-02-01

    As a fusion partner to express aggregation-prone heterologous proteins, we investigated the efficacy of Escherichia coli phosphoglycerate kinase (ePGK) that consists of two functional domains (N- and C-domain) and reportedly has a high structural stability. When the full-length ePGK (F-ePGK) was used as a fusion partner, the solubility of the heterologous proteins increased, but some of them still had a large fraction of insoluble aggregates. Surprisingly, the fusion expression using the N-domain of ePGK (N-ePGK) made the insoluble fraction significantly reduce to less than 10% for all the heterologous fusion proteins tested. Also, we evaluated the efficacy of N-ePGK in making the target proteins be expressed with their own native function or structure. It was found that of human ferritin light chain, bacterial arginine deiminase, human granulocyte colony stimulating factor were synthesized evidently with the self-assembly function, L-arginine-degrading activity, and the correct secondary structure, respectively, through the fusion expression using N-ePGK. These results indicate that N-ePGK is a highly potent fusion partner that can be widely used for the synthesis of a variety of heterologous proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A novel Ffu fusion system for secretory expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cheng; Wu, Shanshan; Cui, Lupeng; Wu, Yulu; Jiang, Tianyue; He, Bingfang

    2017-12-21

    The high level of excretion and rapid folding ability of β-fructofuranosidase (β-FFase) in Escherichia coli has suggested that β-FFase from Arthrobacter arilaitensis NJEM01 can be developed as a fusion partner. Based on the modified Wilkinson and Harrison algorithm and the preliminary verification of the solubility-enhancing ability of β-FFase truncations, three β-FFase truncations (i.e., Ffu209, Ffu217, and Ffu312) with a native signal peptide were selected as novel Ffu fusion tags. Four difficult-to-express protein models; i.e., CARDS TX, VEGFR-2, RVs and Omp85 were used in the assessment of Ffu fusion tags. The expression levels and solubility of each protein were markedly enhanced by the Ffu fusion system. Each protein had a favorable Ffu tag. The Ffu fusion tags performed preferably when compared with the well-known fusion tags MBP and NusA. Strikingly, it was confirmed that Ffu fusion proteins were secreted into the periplasm by the periplasmic analysis and N-amino acid sequence analysis. Further, efficient excretion of HV3 with defined anti-thrombin activity was obtained when it was fused with the Ffu312 tag. Moreover, HV3 remained soluble and demonstrated notable anti-thrombin activity after the removal of the Ffu312 tag by enterokinase. Observations from this work not only complements fusion technologies, but also develops a novel and effective secretory system to solve key issues that include inclusion bodies and degradation when expressing heterologous proteins in E. coli, especially for proteins that require disulfide bond formation, eukaryotic-secreted proteins, and membrane-associated proteins.

  12. Inhibition of protein translation by the DISC1-Boymaw fusion gene from a Scottish family with major psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohu; Higa, Kerin K; Kim, Minjung; Zhou, Lynn; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2014-11-01

    The t(1; 11) translocation appears to be the causal genetic lesion with 70% penetrance for schizophrenia, major depression and other psychiatric disorders in a Scottish family. Molecular studies identified the disruption of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene by chromosome translocation at chromosome 1q42. Our previous studies, however, revealed that the translocation also disrupted another gene, Boymaw (also termed DISC1FP1), on chromosome 11. After translocation, two fusion genes [the DISC1-Boymaw (DB7) and the Boymaw-DISC1 (BD13)] are generated between the DISC1 and Boymaw genes. In the present study, we report that expression of the DB7 fusion gene inhibits both intracellular NADH oxidoreductase activities and protein translation. We generated humanized DISC1-Boymaw mice with gene targeting to examine the in vivo functions of the fusion genes. Consistent with the in vitro studies on the DB7 fusion gene, protein translation activity is decreased in the hippocampus and in cultured primary neurons from the brains of the humanized mice. Expression of Gad67, Nmdar1 and Psd95 proteins are also reduced. The humanized mice display prolonged and increased responses to the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, on various mouse genetic backgrounds. Abnormal information processing of acoustic startle and depressive-like behaviors are also observed. In addition, the humanized mice display abnormal erythropoiesis, which was reported to associate with depression in humans. Expression of the DB7 fusion gene may reduce protein translation to impair brain functions and thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Recombinant production of a peroxidase-protein G fusion protein in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainer, Florian Wolfgang; Darnhofer, Barbara; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Glieder, Anton

    2016-02-10

    Streptococcal protein G (SpG) binds immunoglobulin G from a broad range of mammalian species with high affinity. Chemical conjugations of SpG to the reporter enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) are commonly used in immunohistochemical applications. However, commercial HRP preparations are typically isolated from horseradish roots as varying mixtures of HRP isoenzymes with different biochemical properties, and chemical conjugation procedures lead to heterogeneous HRP-SpG preparations, partially including inactivated enzyme. A recombinant process allows the production of a well-defined HRP isoenzyme fused to SpG at constant 1:1 stoichiometry in a single step without the need for laborious chemical conjugation. By using state-of-the-art biotechnological tools, we produced a recombinant HRP-SpG fusion protein in Pichia pastoris in bioreactor cultivations. Purified HRP-SpG was tested successfully for functional binding of antibodies from different mammalian serums. Recombinant production of this novel well-defined fusion protein follows quality-by-design principles and facilitates the production of more reliable and cost-effective diagnostic kits. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Directions for reactor target design based on the US heavy ion fusion systems assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.C.; Dudziak, D.; Magelssen, G.; Zuckerman, D.; Dreimeyer, D.

    1986-01-01

    We studied areas of major uncertainty in target design using the cost of electricity as our figure of merit. Net electric power from the plant was fixed at 1000 MW to eliminate large effects due to economies of scale. The system is relatively insensitive to target gain. Factors of three changes in gain cause only 8 to 12% changes in electricity cost. An increase in the peak power needed to drive targets poses only a small cost risk, but requires many more beamlets be transported to the target. A shortening of the required ion range causes both cost and beamlet difficulties. A factor of 4 decrease in the required range at a fixed driver energy increases electricity cost by 44% and raises the number of beamlets to 240. Finally, the heavy ion fusion system can accommodate large increases in target costs. To address the major uncertainties, target design should concentrate on the understanding requirements for ion range and peak driver power

  15. Repetition rate target and fusion chamber systems for HiPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Bedrich; Edwards, Chris; Tyldesley, Mike; Griffiths, Mike; Le Garrec, Bruno; Perlado, Manolo; Perin, Jean-Paul; Guillaume, Didier; Neely, David; Polan, Jiří; Kozlová, Michaela; Homer, Pavel; Nejdl, Jaroslav; Sanders, Steve; Havlík, Petr; Kopecký, Martin; Kolařík, Vladimír; Papírek, Tomáš; Hlaváč, Martin; Haley, Richard; MacFarlane, Lewis; Alexander, Neil

    2011-06-01

    We review development in the repetition-rate target area systems and technologies within the Work Package 15 of the HiPER Preparatory Phase project. The activities carried out in 2009-2010 have been involving analysis of solutions and baseline design of major elements of the repetition-rated fusion chamber, analysis of prospective injector technologies, numerical modelling of target survival during acceleration phase and during flight in the environment of fusion chamber, analysis of options of remote handling, systems of mitigation of fusion debris, and others. The suggested solutions assume operation at the repetition rate of 10 Hz and fusion yield between 20 and 100 MJ. Shock ignition is assumed as the baseline ignition scenario, although some technologies are applicable in the fast ignition; a number of the technologies identified are exploitable as well in the indirect drive. The operation of the HiPER repetition-rate chamber will contribute to technology development for the Demonstration Reactor HiPER facility.

  16. Deltabaculoviruses encode a functional type I budded virus envelope fusion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Envelope fusion proteins (F proteins) are major constituents of budded viruses (BVs) of alpha- and betabaculoviruses (Baculoviridae) and are essential for the systemic infection of insect larvae and insect cells in culture. An F protein homolog gene was absent in gammabaculoviruses. Here we show tha...

  17. The TIP30 protein complex, arachidonic acid and coenzyme A are required for vesicle membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengliang Zhang

    Full Text Available Efficient membrane fusion has been successfully mimicked in vitro using artificial membranes and a number of cellular proteins that are currently known to participate in membrane fusion. However, these proteins are not sufficient to promote efficient fusion between biological membranes, indicating that critical fusogenic factors remain unidentified. We have recently identified a TIP30 protein complex containing TIP30, acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 4 (ACSL4 and Endophilin B1 (Endo B1 that promotes the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles, which transport endosomal acidification enzymes vacuolar (H⁺-ATPases (V-ATPases to the early endosomes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that the TIP30 protein complex facilitates the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles in vitro. Fusion of the two vesicles also depends on arachidonic acid, coenzyme A and the synthesis of arachidonyl-CoA by ACSL4. Moreover, the TIP30 complex is able to transfer arachidonyl groups onto phosphatidic acid (PA, producing a new lipid species that is capable of inducing close contact between membranes. Together, our data suggest that the TIP30 complex facilitates biological membrane fusion through modification of PA on membranes.

  18. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Entry Inhibitors Targeting the F Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibo Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the main viral cause of respiratory tract infection in infants as well as some elderly and high-risk adults with chronic pulmonary disease and the severely immunocompromised. So far, no specific anti-RSV therapeutics or effective anti-RSV vaccines have been reported. Only one humanized monoclonal antibody, Palivizumab, has been approved for use in high-risk infants to prevent RSV infection. Ribavirin is the only drug licensed for therapy of RSV infection, but its clinical use is limited by its nonspecific anti-RSV activity, toxic effect, and relatively high cost. Therefore, development of novel effective anti-RSV therapeutics is urgently needed. The RSV envelope glycoprotein F plays an important role in RSV fusion with, and entry into, the host cell and, consequently, serves as an attractive target for developing RSV entry inhibitors. This article reviews advances made in studies of the structure and function of the F protein and the development of RSV entry inhibitors targeting it.

  19. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Nicole R.; Hecht, Karen A.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas; Rorrer, Gregory L.; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-01-08

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins incorporating a tetracysteine tag for site-directed labeling with biarsenical affinity probes and either EGFP or single chain antibody to test colocalization of probes with the EGFP-tagged recombinant protein or binding of biosilica-immobilized antibodies to large and small molecule antigens, respectively. Site-directed labeling with the biarsenical probes demonstrated colocalization with EGFP-encoded proteins in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting their use in studying biosilica maturation. Isolated biosilica transformed with a single chain antibody against either the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) effectively bound the respective antigens. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime of the TNT surrogate Alexa Fluor 555-trinitrobenzene reflected the high binding specificity of the transformed isolated biosilica. These results demonstrated the potential use of biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies as binders for large and small molecule antigens in sensing and therapeutics.

  20. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV F occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV F , we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV F at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy

  1. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C. [Unidad de Microscopía Electrónica y Confocal, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Calder, Lesley J. [National Institute for Medical Research, MRC, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Melero, José A., E-mail: jmelero@isciii.es [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  2. Photoactivatable green fluorescent protein-based visualization and quantification of mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial network complexity in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowski, Mariusz; Cleland, Megan M; Roelofs, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Technological improvements in microscopy and the development of mitochondria-specific imaging molecular tools have illuminated the dynamic rearrangements of these essential organelles. These rearrangements are mainly the result of two opposing processes: mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial fission. Consistent with this, in addition to mitochondrial motility, these two processes are major factors determining the overall degree of continuity of the mitochondrial network, as well as the average size of mitochondria within the cell. In this chapter, we detail the use of advanced confocal microscopy and mitochondrial matrix-targeted photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (mito-PAGFP) for the investigation of mitochondrial dynamics. We focus on direct visualization and quantification of mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial network complexity in living mammalian cells. These assays were instrumental in important recent discoveries within the field of mitochondrial biology, including the role of mitochondrial fusion in the activation of mitochondrial steps in apoptosis, participation of Bcl-2 family proteins in mitochondrial morphogenesis, and stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion. We present some basic directions that should be helpful in designing mito-PAGFP-based experiments. Furthermore, since analyses of mitochondrial fusion using mito-PAGFP-based assays rely on time-lapse imaging, critical parameters of time-lapse microscopy and cell preparation are also discussed.

  3. A Generic Protocol for Purifying Disulfide-Bonded Domains and Random Protein Fragments Using Fusion Proteins with SUMO3 and Cleavage by SenP2 Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besir, Hüseyin

    2017-01-01

    Recombinant expression of heterologous proteins in E. coli is well established for a wide range of proteins, although in many cases, purifying soluble and properly folded proteins remains challenging (Sorensen and Mortensen, J Biotechnol 115:113-128, 2005; Correa and Oppezzo, Methods Mol Biol 1258:27-44, 2015). Proteins that contain disulfide bonds (e.g., cytokines, growth factors) are often particularly difficult to purify in soluble form and still need optimizing of protocols in almost every step of the process (Berkmen, Protein Expr Purif 82:240-251, 2012; de Marco, Microb Cell Fact 11:129, 2012). Expression of disulfide bonded proteins in the periplasm of E. coli is one approach that can help to obtain soluble protein with the correct disulfide bridges forming in the periplasm. This offers the appropriate conditions for disulfide formation although periplasmic expression can also result in low expression levels and incorrect folding of the target protein (Schlapschy and Skerra, Methods Mol Biol 705:211-224, 2011). Generation of specific antibodies often requires a specific antigenic sequence of a protein in order to get an efficient immune response and minimize cross-reactivity of antibodies. Larger proteins like GST (Glutathione-S-transferase) or MBP (maltose binding protein) as solubilizing fusion partners are frequently used to keep antigens soluble and immunize animals. This approach has the disadvantage that the immune response against the fusion partner leads to additional antibodies that need to be separated from the antigen-specific antibodies. For both classes of proteins mentioned above, a protocol has been developed and optimized using the human version of small ubiquitin-like modifier 3 (SUMO3) protein and its corresponding protease SenP2. This chapter describes the experimental steps for expression, purification, refolding, and cleavage that are applicable to both disulfide-bonded proteins with a defined structure and random protein fragments for

  4. Escherichia coli fusion carrier proteins act as solubilizing agents for recombinant uncoupling protein 1 through interactions with GroEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douette, Pierre; Navet, Rachel; Gerkens, Pascal; Galleni, Moreno; Levy, Daniel; Sluse, Francis E.

    2005-01-01

    Fusing recombinant proteins to highly soluble partners is frequently used to prevent aggregation of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Moreover, co-overexpression of prokaryotic chaperones can increase the amount of properly folded recombinant proteins. To understand the solubility enhancement of fusion proteins, we designed two recombinant proteins composed of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a mitochondrial membrane protein, in fusion with MBP or NusA. We were able to express soluble forms of MBP-UCP1 and NusA-UCP1 despite the high hydrophobicity of UCP1. Furthermore, the yield of soluble fusion proteins depended on co-overexpression of GroEL that catalyzes folding of polypeptides. MBP-UCP1 was expressed in the form of a non-covalent complex with GroEL. MBP-UCP1/GroEL was purified and characterized by dynamic light scattering, gel filtration, and electron microscopy. Our findings suggest that MBP and NusA act as solubilizing agents by forcing the recombinant protein to pass through the bacterial chaperone pathway in the context of fusion protein

  5. Enhanced expression of rabies virus surface G-protein in Escherichia coli using SUMO fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ankit; Yadav, Dinesh; Rai, Krishan Mohan; Srivastava, Meenal; Verma, Praveen C; Singh, Pradhyumna K; Tuli, Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Fusion systems are known to increase the expression of difficult to express recombinant proteins in soluble form to facilitate their purification. Rabies glycoprotein was also tough to express at sufficient level in soluble form in both E. coli and plant. The present work was aimed to over-express and purify this membrane protein from soluble extract of E. coli. Fusion of Small Ubiqutin like Modifier (SUMO) with rabies glycoprotein increased ~1.5 fold higher expression and ~3.0 fold solubility in comparison to non-fused in E. coli. The SUMO fusion also simplified the purification process. Previously engineered rabies glycoprotein gene in tobacco plants provides complete protection to mice, but the expression was very low for purification. Our finding demonstrated that the SUMO-fusion was useful for enhancing expression and solubility of the membrane protein and again proves to be a good alternative technology for applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical research.

  6. Minimizing scatter-losses during pre-heat for magneto-inertial fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam J.; Awe, Thomas J.; Bliss, David E.; Glinsky, Michael E.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Harding, Eric; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Jennings, Christopher; Kimmel, Mark W.; Knapp, Patrick; Lewis, Sean M.; Peterson, Kyle; Schollmeier, Marius; Schwarz, Jens; Shores, Jonathon E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Smith, Ian C.; Speas, C. Shane; Vesey, Roger A.; Weis, Matthew R.; Porter, John L.

    2018-02-01

    The size, temporal and spatial shape, and energy content of a laser pulse for the pre-heat phase of magneto-inertial fusion affect the ability to penetrate the window of the laser-entrance-hole and to heat the fuel behind it. High laser intensities and dense targets are subject to laser-plasma-instabilities (LPI), which can lead to an effective loss of pre-heat energy or to pronounced heating of areas that should stay unexposed. While this problem has been the subject of many studies over the last decades, the investigated parameters were typically geared towards traditional laser driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) with densities either at 10% and above or at 1% and below the laser's critical density, electron temperatures of 3-5 keV, and laser powers near (or in excess of) 1 × 1015 W/cm2. In contrast, Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010) and Slutz and Vesey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 025003 (2012)] currently operates at 5% of the laser's critical density using much thicker windows (1.5-3.5 μm) than the sub-micron thick windows of traditional ICF hohlraum targets. This article describes the Pecos target area at Sandia National Laboratories using the Z-Beamlet Laser Facility [Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44(12), 2421 (2005)] as a platform to study laser induced pre-heat for magneto-inertial fusion targets, and the related progress for Sandia's MagLIF program. Forward and backward scattered light were measured and minimized at larger spatial scales with lower densities, temperatures, and powers compared to LPI studies available in literature.

  7. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  8. Prostate cancer diagnosis: Efficacy of a simple electromagnetic MRI-TRUS fusion method to target biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelidi, Amina; Ohana, Mickael; Labani, Aïssam; Alemann, Guillaume; Lang, Herve; Roy, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A very simple electromagnetic device for fusion with MRI examination during TRUS guided biopsies increases the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. • This device has advantages: a short time for the fusion registration, no additional cumbersome material and no intense training to be fluent with. • Low or intermediate suspicious area for prostate carcinoma on mpMRI can be due to benign histological abnormalities or high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. - Abstract: Objective: To assess that transrectal ultrasound guidance (TRUS) targeted biopsies (TB) aimed with an easy to use electronic real-time fusion registration device have a higher rate of prostate cancer (PC) detection than standard biopsies (SB). Material and methods: This prospective study included 130 patients referred for TRUS biopsies after suspicious MRI. They underwent 16-core SB and 2 to 3 cores in each MRI suspicious area, using a fusion software. We noted SB and TB positivity for PC and Gleason score (GS). We used the McNemar test to compare SB and TB, with a statistical significance p < 0.05. Results: Among 130 patients, 68.5% had PC. Additional time due to the fusion registration was 3.3 min. One hundred fifteen patients (88.4%) had pathological findings on the histological analysis (prostate cancer n = 89, others n = 26). TB diagnosed PC in 75 patients with negative SB. Positivity rate for PC was significantly higher for TB than SB (p = 0.03). Among highly suspicious MRI lesions, detection rate of histological abnormalities using SB and TB was 96% with 79.7% of PC. Most PC that TB diagnosed alone were clinically significant (86.3%). Conclusion: TRUS biopsies performed with a simple MRI and US electronic fusion is an unrestrainedly method to increase PC diagnosis.

  9. Prostate cancer diagnosis: Efficacy of a simple electromagnetic MRI-TRUS fusion method to target biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelidi, Amina; Ohana, Mickael; Labani, Aïssam; Alemann, Guillaume [Department of Radiology B, University Hospital of Strasbourg, New Civil Hospital, 1, place de l’ hôpital BP 426, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Lang, Herve [Department of Urology, University Hospital of Strasbourg, New Civil Hospital, 1, place de l’hôpital BP 426, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Roy, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.roy@chru-strasbourg.fr [Department of Radiology B, University Hospital of Strasbourg, New Civil Hospital, 1, place de l’ hôpital BP 426, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A very simple electromagnetic device for fusion with MRI examination during TRUS guided biopsies increases the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. • This device has advantages: a short time for the fusion registration, no additional cumbersome material and no intense training to be fluent with. • Low or intermediate suspicious area for prostate carcinoma on mpMRI can be due to benign histological abnormalities or high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. - Abstract: Objective: To assess that transrectal ultrasound guidance (TRUS) targeted biopsies (TB) aimed with an easy to use electronic real-time fusion registration device have a higher rate of prostate cancer (PC) detection than standard biopsies (SB). Material and methods: This prospective study included 130 patients referred for TRUS biopsies after suspicious MRI. They underwent 16-core SB and 2 to 3 cores in each MRI suspicious area, using a fusion software. We noted SB and TB positivity for PC and Gleason score (GS). We used the McNemar test to compare SB and TB, with a statistical significance p < 0.05. Results: Among 130 patients, 68.5% had PC. Additional time due to the fusion registration was 3.3 min. One hundred fifteen patients (88.4%) had pathological findings on the histological analysis (prostate cancer n = 89, others n = 26). TB diagnosed PC in 75 patients with negative SB. Positivity rate for PC was significantly higher for TB than SB (p = 0.03). Among highly suspicious MRI lesions, detection rate of histological abnormalities using SB and TB was 96% with 79.7% of PC. Most PC that TB diagnosed alone were clinically significant (86.3%). Conclusion: TRUS biopsies performed with a simple MRI and US electronic fusion is an unrestrainedly method to increase PC diagnosis.

  10. An arc-resistant target for the divertor of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugill, J.

    1979-01-01

    If the α-particle energy released by a D-T fusion reactor is channelled onto a target by means of a magnetic divertor, the plasma temperature in the exhaust is several keV for reasonable fractional burn-up in the reacting plasma. This leads to a high potential across the sheath between the plasma and a material target, which can initiate unipolar arcs between the plasma and target, eroding the target and contaminating the plasma. However, it is shown that a target composed of a cloud of sufficiently small solid spheres could, in principle, be free from unipolar arcs. Various design considerations lead to a sphere radius in the range 0.1 to about 1 mm. (orig.)

  11. ION BEAM HEATED TARGET SIMULATIONS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER PHYSICS AND INERTIAL FUSION ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J.J.; Armijo, J.; Bailey, D.S.; Friedman, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Kaganovich, I.; Leung, P.T.; Logan, B.G.; Marinak, M.M.; More, R.M.; Ng, S.F.; Penn, G.E.; Perkins, L.J.; Veitzer, S.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yu, S.S.; Zylstra, A.B.

    2008-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  12. Ion Beam Heated Target Simulations for Warm Dense Matter Physics and Inertial Fusion Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, J J; Armijo, J; Bailey, D S; Friedman, A; Bieniosek, F M; Henestroza, E; Kaganovich, I; Leung, P T; Logan, B G; Marinak, M M; More, R M; Ng, S F; Penn, G E; Perkins, L J; Veitzer, S; Wurtele, J S; Yu, S S; Zylstra, A B

    2008-08-12

    Hydrodynamic simulations have been carried out using the multi-physics radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA and the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamics code DISH. We simulate possible targets for a near-term experiment at LBNL (the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, NDCX) and possible later experiments on a proposed facility (NDCX-II) for studies of warm dense matter and inertial fusion energy related beam-target coupling. Simulations of various target materials (including solids and foams) are presented. Experimental configurations include single pulse planar metallic solid and foam foils. Concepts for double-pulsed and ramped-energy pulses on cryogenic targets and foams have been simulated for exploring direct drive beam target coupling, and concepts and simulations for collapsing cylindrical and spherical bubbles to enhance temperature and pressure for warm dense matter studies are described.

  13. Optimizing HIV-1 protease production in Escherichia coli as fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volontè, Federica; Piubelli, Luciano; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2011-06-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the etiological agent in AIDS and related diseases. The aspartyl protease encoded by the 5' portion of the pol gene is responsible for proteolytic processing of the gag-pol polyprotein precursor to yield the mature capsid protein and the reverse transcriptase and integrase enzymes. The HIV protease (HIV-1Pr) is considered an attractive target for designing inhibitors which could be used to tackle AIDS and therefore it is still the object of a number of investigations. A recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1Pr) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein with bacterial periplasmic protein dithiol oxidase (DsbA) or glutathione S-transferase (GST), also containing a six-histidine tag sequence. Protein expression was optimized by designing a suitable HIV-1Pr cDNA (for E. coli expression and to avoid autoproteolysis) and by screening six different E. coli strains and five growth media. The best expression yields were achieved in E. coli BL21-Codon Plus(DE3)-RIL host and in TB or M9 medium to which 1% (w/v) glucose was added to minimize basal expression. Among the different parameters assayed, the presence of a buffer system (based on phosphate salts) and a growth temperature of 37°C after adding IPTG played the main role in enhancing protease expression (up to 10 mg of chimeric DsbA:HIV-1Pr/L fermentation broth). GST:HIVPr was in part (50%) produced as soluble protein while the overexpressed DsbA:HIV-1Pr chimeric protein largely accumulated in inclusion bodies as unprocessed fusion protein. A simple refolding procedure was developed on HiTrap Chelating column that yielded a refolded DsbA:HIV-1Pr with a > 80% recovery. Finally, enterokinase digestion of resolubilized DsbA:HIV-1Pr gave more than 2 mg of HIV-1Pr per liter of fermentation broth with a purity ≤ 80%, while PreScission protease cleavage of soluble GST:HIVPr yielded ~ 0.15 mg of pure HIV-1Pr per liter. By using this optimized

  14. Optimizing HIV-1 protease production in Escherichia coli as fusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piubelli Luciano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the etiological agent in AIDS and related diseases. The aspartyl protease encoded by the 5' portion of the pol gene is responsible for proteolytic processing of the gag-pol polyprotein precursor to yield the mature capsid protein and the reverse transcriptase and integrase enzymes. The HIV protease (HIV-1Pr is considered an attractive target for designing inhibitors which could be used to tackle AIDS and therefore it is still the object of a number of investigations. Results A recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1Pr was overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein with bacterial periplasmic protein dithiol oxidase (DsbA or glutathione S-transferase (GST, also containing a six-histidine tag sequence. Protein expression was optimized by designing a suitable HIV-1Pr cDNA (for E. coli expression and to avoid autoproteolysis and by screening six different E. coli strains and five growth media. The best expression yields were achieved in E. coli BL21-Codon Plus(DE3-RIL host and in TB or M9 medium to which 1% (w/v glucose was added to minimize basal expression. Among the different parameters assayed, the presence of a buffer system (based on phosphate salts and a growth temperature of 37°C after adding IPTG played the main role in enhancing protease expression (up to 10 mg of chimeric DsbA:HIV-1Pr/L fermentation broth. GST:HIVPr was in part (50% produced as soluble protein while the overexpressed DsbA:HIV-1Pr chimeric protein largely accumulated in inclusion bodies as unprocessed fusion protein. A simple refolding procedure was developed on HiTrap Chelating column that yielded a refolded DsbA:HIV-1Pr with a > 80% recovery. Finally, enterokinase digestion of resolubilized DsbA:HIV-1Pr gave more than 2 mg of HIV-1Pr per liter of fermentation broth with a purity ≤ 80%, while PreScission protease cleavage of soluble GST:HIVPr yielded ~ 0.15 mg of pure HIV-1

  15. Green fluorescence protein-based content-mixing assay of SNARE-driven membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Jung, Young-Hun; Park, Joon-Bum; Shin, Jonghyeok; Park, Myungseo; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2017-06-17

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins mediate intracellular membrane fusion by forming a ternary SNARE complex. A minimalist approach utilizing proteoliposomes with reconstituted SNARE proteins yielded a wealth of information pinpointing the molecular mechanism of SNARE-mediated fusion and its regulation by accessory proteins. Two important attributes of a membrane fusion are lipid-mixing and the formation of an aqueous passage between apposing membranes. These two attributes are typically observed by using various fluorescent dyes. Currently available in vitro assay systems for observing fusion pore opening have several weaknesses such as cargo-bleeding, incomplete removal of unencapsulated dyes, and inadequate information regarding the size of the fusion pore, limiting measurements of the final stage of membrane fusion. In the present study, we used a biotinylated green fluorescence protein and streptavidin conjugated with Dylight 594 (DyStrp) as a Föster resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor and acceptor, respectively. This FRET pair encapsulated in each v-vesicle containing synaptobrevin and t-vesicle containing a binary acceptor complex of syntaxin 1a and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 revealed the opening of a large fusion pore of more than 5 nm, without the unwanted signals from unencapsulated dyes or leakage. This system enabled determination of the stoichiometry of the merging vesicles because the FRET efficiency of the FRET pair depended on the molar ratio between dyes. Here, we report a robust and informative assay for SNARE-mediated fusion pore opening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Construction,expression,purification and identification of prokaryotic expression vector of MART-1 fusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-ting MENG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct a prokaryotic expression plasmid containing a fusion gene of MART-1 expressing the His-MART-1 fusion protein in E.coli,and to purify the protein and identify the immunogenicity of His-MART-1.Methods The MART-1 coding sequence was amplified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR,and then cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector(pET-28b containing His tag.The constructed vector,verified by restriction endonuclease digestion,PCR and DNA sequencing,was then transformed into E.coli for expression.The expression of MART-1 recombinant protein was induced by IPTG in E.coli,purified with Ni2+-NTA affinity chromatography method,and identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting.ELISA was used to detect the IFN-γ expression secreted by the His-MART-1 specific CD4+ T cells which recognized the His-MART-1 fusion protein presented by dendritic cells(DCs.Results The successful construction of recombinant plasmid was confirmed by restriction digestion,PCR and sequencing.The molecular weight of the purified fusion protein was identified as 13kD by SDS-PAGE,which was identical to the expected value.It was confirmed by western blotting that His-MART-1 fusion protein could be recognized by His monoclonal antibody.ELISA analysis showed that His-MART-1 fusion protein presented by DCs could induce IFN-γ secretion of MART-1 specific CD4+ T cells.Conclusion The recombinant plasmid of pET-28b-MART-1 has been successfully constructed.The expressed His-MART-1 fusion protein has been purified and the immunogenicity of inducing responses between DCs and CD4+ T cells has been determined.

  17. Design and construction of self-assembling supramolecular protein complexes using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoya; Arai, Ryoichi

    2017-08-01

    The central goal of nanobiotechnology is to design and construct novel biomaterials of nanometer sizes. In this short review, we describe recent progress of several approaches for designing and creating artificial self-assembling protein complexes and primarily focus on the following biotechnological strategies for using artificial and fusion proteins as nanoscale building blocks: fusion proteins designed for symmetrical self-assembly; three-dimensional domain-swapped oligomers; self-assembling designed coiled-coil peptide modules; metal-directed self-assembling engineered proteins; computationally designed self-assembling de novo proteins; and self-assembling protein nanobuilding blocks (PN-Blocks) using an intermolecularly folded dimeric de novo protein. These state-of-the-art nanobiotechnologies for designing supramolecular protein complexes will facilitate the development of novel functional nanobiomaterials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-03-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a `fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures.

  19. Subcloning of HIV-2 nef genes in E. coli and immunological reactivity of expressed fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, R; Siakkou, H; Mayer, J; Kienzle, N; Müller-Lantzsch, N; Krüger, D H

    1993-09-01

    The nef gene located in the 3' region of the HIV-2 genome encodes an N-terminally myristylated protein of 27-35 kD, likely to be involved in the regulation of viral transcription. The nef genes of HIV-2 isolates GH-1, ROD, ST, BEN, and D194.17 were inserted into E. coli pEX vectors and expression of Nef beta-galactosidase fusion proteins was detected in stained gels. All fusion proteins specifically reacted with a rabbit serum raised against bacterially expressed Nef from HIV-2D194.17. Sera from monkeys inoculated with HIV-2BEN or SIVMAC251 recognized the Nef proteins of only certain HIV-2 isolates. No cross-reactivity of these sera with HIV-1 Nef and of a rabbit anti-HIV-1-Nef serum with the described HIV-2 Nef fusion proteins was observed.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HspX/EsxS Fusion Protein: Gene Cloning, Protein Expression, and Purification in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Farzad; Yousefi-Avarvand, Arshid; Derakhshan, Mohammad; Meshkat, Zahra; Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Aryan, Ehsan; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clone, express, and purify a novel multidomain fusion protein of Micobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in a prokaryotic system. An hspX/esxS gene construct was synthesized and ligated into a pGH plasmid, E. coli TOP10 cells were transformed, and the vector was purified. The vector containing the construct and pET-21b (+) plasmid were digested with the same enzymes and the construct was ligated into pET-21b (+). The accuracy of cloning was confirmed by colony PCR and sequencing. E. coli BL21 cells were transformed with the pET-21b (+)/hspX/esxS expression vector and protein expression was evaluated. Finally, the expressed fusion protein was purified on a Ni-IDA column and verified by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. The hspX/esxS gene construct was inserted into pET-21b (+) and recombinant protein expression was induced with IPTG in E. coli BL21 cells. Various concentrations of IPTG were tested to determine the optimum concentration for expression induction. The recombinant protein was expressed in insoluble inclusion bodies. Three molar guanidine HCl was used to solubilize the insoluble protein. An HspX/EsxS Mtb fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant protein was purified. After immunological analysis, the HspX/EsxS fusion protein might be an anti-tuberculosis vaccine candidate in future clinical trial studies.

  1. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan Trang Nguyen, Ngoc; Thi Le, Ly

    2012-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people.

  2. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang Nguyen, Ngoc Doan; Le, Ly Thi

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people. (review)

  3. Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the fusion protein CusF3H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant protein expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli still is the number one choice for large-scale protein production. Nevertheless, many complications can arise using this microorganism, such as low yields, the formation of inclusion bodies, and the requirement for difficult purification steps. Most of these problems can be solved with the use of fusion proteins. Here, the use of the metal-binding protein CusF3H+ is described as a new fusion protein for recombinant protein expression and purification in E. coli. We have previously shown that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein, with low levels of formation of inclusion bodies, and that proteins can be purified using IMAC resins charged with Cu(II) ions. CusF3H+ is an enhanced variant of CusF, formed by the addition of three histidine residues at the N-terminus. These residues then can bind Ni(II) ions allowing improved purity after affinity chromatography. Expression and purification of Green Fluorescent Protein tagged with CusF3H+ showed that the mutation did not alter the capacity of the fusion protein to increase protein expression, and purity improved considerably after affinity chromatography with immobilized nickel ions; high yields are obtained after tag-removal since CusF3H+ is a small protein of just 10 kDa. Furthermore, the results of experiments involving expression of tagged proteins having medium to large molecular weights indicate that the presence of the CusF3H+ tag improves protein solubility, as compared to a His-tag. We therefore endorse CusF3H+ as a useful alternative fusion protein/affinity tag for production of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Information-management data base for fusion-target fabrication processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J.

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based data-management system has been developed to handle data associated with target-fabrication processes including glass microballoon characterization, gas filling, materials coating, and storage locations. The system provides automatic data storage and computation, flexible data-entry procedures, fast access, automated report generation, and secure data transfer. It resides on a CDC CYBER 175 computer and is compatible with the CDC data-base-language Query Update, but is based on custom FORTRAN software interacting directly with the CYBER's file-management system. The described data base maintains detailed, accurate, and readily available records of fusion targets information

  5. System for automatic x-ray-image analysis, measurement, and sorting of laser fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, R.M.; Perkins, D.E.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the Automatic X-Ray Image Analysis and Sorting (AXIAS) system which is designed to analyze and measure x-ray images of opaque hollow microspheres used as laser fusion targets. The x-ray images are first recorded on a high resolution film plate. The AXIAS system then digitizes and processes the images to accurately measure the target parameters and defects. The primary goals of the AXIAS system are: to provide extremely accurate and rapid measurements, to engineer a practical system for a routine production environment and to furnish the capability of automatically measuring an array of images for sorting and selection

  6. Surface Density of the Hendra G Protein Modulates Hendra F Protein-Promoted Membrane Fusion: Role for Hendra G Protein Trafficking and Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Whitman, Shannon D.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2007-01-01

    Hendra virus, like most paramyxoviruses, requires both a fusion (F) and attachment (G) protein for promotion of cell-cell fusion. Recent studies determined that Hendra F is proteolytically processed by the cellular protease cathepsin L after endocytosis. This unique cathepsin L processing results in a small percentage of Hendra F on the cell surface. To determine how the surface densities of the two Hendra glycoproteins affect fusion promotion, we performed experiments that varied the levels ...

  7. Cell-to-Cell Measles Virus Spread between Human Neurons Is Dependent on Hemagglutinin and Hyperfusogenic Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuma; Watanabe, Shumpei; Fukuda, Yoshinari; Hashiguchi, Takao; Yanagi, Yusuke; Ohno, Shinji

    2018-03-15

    Measles virus (MV) usually causes acute infection but in rare cases persists in the brain, resulting in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE). Since human neurons, an important target affected in the disease, do not express the known MV receptors (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule [SLAM] and nectin 4), how MV infects neurons and spreads between them is unknown. Recent studies have shown that many virus strains isolated from SSPE patients possess substitutions in the extracellular domain of the fusion (F) protein which confer enhanced fusion activity. Hyperfusogenic viruses with such mutations, unlike the wild-type MV, can induce cell-cell fusion even in SLAM- and nectin 4-negative cells and spread efficiently in human primary neurons and the brains of animal models. We show here that a hyperfusogenic mutant MV, IC323-F(T461I)-EGFP (IC323 with a fusion-enhancing T461I substitution in the F protein and expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein), but not the wild-type MV, spreads in differentiated NT2 cells, a widely used human neuron model. Confocal time-lapse imaging revealed the cell-to-cell spread of IC323-F(T461I)-EGFP between NT2 neurons without syncytium formation. The production of virus particles was strongly suppressed in NT2 neurons, also supporting cell-to-cell viral transmission. The spread of IC323-F(T461I)-EGFP was inhibited by a fusion inhibitor peptide as well as by some but not all of the anti-hemagglutinin antibodies which neutralize SLAM- or nectin-4-dependent MV infection, suggesting the presence of a distinct neuronal receptor. Our results indicate that MV spreads in a cell-to-cell manner between human neurons without causing syncytium formation and that the spread is dependent on the hyperfusogenic F protein, the hemagglutinin, and the putative neuronal receptor for MV. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV), in rare cases, persists in the human central nervous system (CNS) and causes subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) several

  8. Calculation of fusion gain in fast ignition with magnetic target by relativistic electrons and protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Fast ignition is a new method for inertial confinement fusion (ICF in which the compression and ignition steps are separated. In the first stage, fuel is compressed by laser or ion beams. In the second phase, relativistic electrons are generated by pettawat laser in the fuel. Also, in the second phase 5-35 MeV protons can be generated in the fuel. Electrons or protons can penetrate in to the ultra-dense fuel and deposit their energy in the fuel . More recently, cylindrical rather than spherical fuel chambers with magnetic control in the plasma domain have been also considered. This is called magnetized target fusion (MTF. Magnetic field has effects on relativistic electrons energy deposition rate in fuel. In this work, fast ignition method in cylindrical fuel chambers is investigated and transportation of the relativistic electrons and protons is calculated using MCNPX and FLUKA codes with 0. 25 and 0. 5 tesla magnetic field in single and dual hot spot. Furthermore, the transfer rate of relativistic electrons and high energy protons to the fuel and fusion gain are calculated. The results show that the presence of external magnetic field guarantees higher fusion gain, and relativistic electrons are much more appropriate objects for ignition. MTF in dual hot spot can be considered as an appropriate substitution for the current ICF techniques.

  9. Double Weight-Based SAR and Infrared Sensor Fusion for Automatic Ground Target Recognition with Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel double weight-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR and infrared (IR sensor fusion method (DW-SIF for automatic ground target recognition (ATR. IR-based ATR can provide accurate recognition because of its high image resolution but it is affected by the weather conditions. On the other hand, SAR-based ATR shows a low recognition rate due to the noisy low resolution but can provide consistent performance regardless of the weather conditions. The fusion of an active sensor (SAR and a passive sensor (IR can lead to upgraded performance. This paper proposes a doubly weighted neural network fusion scheme at the decision level. The first weight ( α can measure the offline sensor confidence per target category based on the classification rate for an evaluation set. The second weight ( β can measure the online sensor reliability based on the score distribution for a test target image. The LeNet architecture-based deep convolution network (14 layers is used as an individual classifier. Doubly weighted sensor scores are fused by two types of fusion schemes, such as the sum-based linear fusion scheme ( α β -sum and neural network-based nonlinear fusion scheme ( α β -NN. The experimental results confirmed the proposed linear fusion method ( α β -sum to have the best performance among the linear fusion schemes available (SAR-CNN, IR-CNN, α -sum, β -sum, α β -sum, and Bayesian fusion. In addition, the proposed nonlinear fusion method ( α β -NN showed superior target recognition performance to linear fusion on the OKTAL-SE-based synthetic database.

  10. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β -lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β -lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β -lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  11. Safety and environmental advantages of using tritium-lean targets for inertial fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latkowski, J.F.; Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Atzeni, S. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Italy); Sanz, J. [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia and Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Dept. Ingenieria Energetica, Bilbao (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    While traditional inertial fusion energy target designs typically use equimolar portions of deuterium and tritium and have areal densities ({rho}r) of {approx} 3 g/cm{sup 2}, significant safety and environmental (S and E) advantages may be obtained through the use of high-density ({rho}r {approx} 10 g/cm{sup 2}) targets with tritium components as low as 0.5%. Such targets would absorb much of the neutron energy within the target and could be self-sufficient from a tritium breeding point of view. Tritium self-sufficiency within the target would free target chamber designers from the need to use lithium-bearing blanket materials, while low inventories within each target would translate into low inventories in target fabrication facilities. Absorption of much of the neutron energy within the target, the extremely low tritium inventories, and the greatly moderated neutron spectrum, make 'tritium-lean' targets appear quite attractive from an S and E perspective. (authors)

  12. Trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation are mediated by both the protein kinase C and a pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waka Omata

    Full Text Available The syncytiotrophoblast of the human placenta is an epithelial barrier that interacts with maternal blood and is a key for the transfer of nutrients and other solutes to the developing fetus. The syncytiotrophoblast is a true syncytium and fusion of progenitor cytotrophoblasts is the cardinal event leading to the formation of this layer. BeWo cells are often used as a surrogate for cytotrophoblasts, since they can be induced to fuse, and then express certain differentiation markers associated with trophoblast syncytialization. Dysferlin, a syncytiotrophoblast membrane repair protein, is up-regulated in BeWo cells induced to fuse by treatment with forskolin; this fusion is thought to occur through cAMP/protein kinase A-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that dysferlin may also be up-regulated in response to fusion through other pathways. Here, we show that BeWo cells can also be induced to fuse by treatment with an activator of protein kinase C, and that this fusion is accompanied by increased expression of dysferlin. Moreover, a dramatic synergistic increase in dysferlin expression is observed when both the protein kinase A and protein kinase C pathways are activated in BeWo cells. This synergy in fusion is also accompanied by dramatic increases in mRNA for the placental fusion proteins syncytin 1, syncytin 2, as well as dysferlin. Dysferlin, however, was shown to be dispensable for stimulus-induced BeWo cell syncytialization, since dysferlin knockdown lines fused to the same extent as control cells. The classical trophoblast differentiation marker human chorionic gonadotropin was also monitored and changes in the expression closely parallel that of dysferlin in all of the experimental conditions employed. Thus different biochemical markers of trophoblast fusion behave in concert supporting the hypothesis that activation of both protein kinase C and A pathways lead to trophoblastic differentiation.

  13. Target design for high fusion yield with the double Z-pinch-driven hohlraum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Lemke, R. W.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Cuneo, M. E.; Stygar, W. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Campbell, R. B.; Christenson, P. J.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Porter, J. L.; Slutz, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    A key demonstration on the path to inertial fusion energy is the achievement of high fusion yield (hundreds of MJ) and high target gain. Toward this goal, an indirect-drive high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target involving two Z-pinch x-ray sources heating a central secondary hohlraum is described by Hammer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)]. In subsequent research at Sandia National Laboratories, theoretical/computational models have been developed and an extensive series of validation experiments have been performed to study hohlraum energetics, capsule coupling, and capsule implosion symmetry for this system. These models have been used to design a high-yield Z-pinch-driven ICF target that incorporates the latest experience in capsule design, hohlraum symmetry control, and x-ray production by Z pinches. An x-ray energy output of 9 MJ per pinch, suitably pulse-shaped, is sufficient for this concept to drive 0.3-0.5 GJ capsules. For the first time, integrated two-dimensional (2D) hohlraum/capsule radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have demonstrated adequate hohlraum coupling, time-dependent radiation symmetry control, and the successful implosion, ignition, and burn of a high-yield capsule in the double Z-pinch hohlraum. An important new feature of this target design is mode-selective symmetry control: the use of burn-through shields offset from the capsule that selectively tune certain low-order asymmetry modes (P 2 ,P 4 ) without significantly perturbing higher-order modes and without a significant energy penalty. This paper will describe the capsule and hohlraum design that have produced 0.4-0.5 GJ yields in 2D simulations, provide a preliminary estimate of the Z-pinch load and accelerator requirements necessary to drive the system, and suggest future directions for target design work

  14. Protein solubility and differential proteomic profiling of recombinant Escherichia coli overexpressing double-tagged fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung-Hsien; Lee, Wen-Chien

    2010-08-28

    Overexpression of recombinant proteins usually triggers the induction of heat shock proteins that regulate aggregation and solubility of the overexpressed protein. The two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE)-mass spectrometry approach was used to profile the proteome of Escherichia coli overexpressing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase (GlcNAc 2-epimerase) and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid aldolase (Neu5Ac aldolase), both fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) and polyionic peptide (5D or 5R). Overexpression of fusion proteins by IPTG induction caused significant differential expression of numerous cellular proteins; most of these proteins were down-regulated, including enzymes connected to the pentose phosphate pathway and the enzyme LuxS that could lead to an inhibition of tRNA synthesis. Interestingly, when plasmid-harboring cells were cultured in LB medium, gluconeogenesis occurred mainly through MaeB, while in the host strain, gluconeogenesis occurred by a different pathway (by Mdh and PckA). Significant up-regulation of the chaperones ClpB, HslU and GroEL and high-level expression of two protective small heat shock proteins (IbpA and IbpB) were found in cells overexpressing GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D but not in GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R-expressing E. coli. Although most of the recombinant protein was present in insoluble aggregates, the soluble fraction of GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D was higher than that of GST-Neu5Ac aldolase-5R. Also, in cells overexpressing recombinant GST-GlcNAc 2-epimerase-5D, the expression of σ32 was maintained at a higher level following induction. Differential expression of metabolically functional proteins, especially those in the gluconeogenesis pathway, was found between host and recombinant cells. Also, the expression patterns of chaperones/heat shock proteins differed among the plasmid-harboring bacteria in response to overproduction of recombinant proteins. In conclusion, the solubility of overexpressed recombinant proteins could

  15. Leukemogenic mechanisms and targets of a NUP98/HHEX fusion in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Dragana; Gorello, Paolo; Liu, Ting; Ehret, Sabire; La Starza, Roberta; Desjobert, Cecile; Baty, Florent; Brutsche, Martin; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheila; Santoro, Alessandra; Mecucci, Christina; Schwaller, Juerg

    2008-06-15

    We have studied a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and t(10;11)(q23;p15) as the sole cytogenetic abnormality. Molecular analysis revealed a translocation involving nucleoporin 98 (NUP98) fused to the DNA-binding domain of the hematopoietically expressed homeobox gene (HHEX). Expression of NUP98/HHEX in murine bone marrow cells leads to aberrant self-renewal and a block in normal differentiation that depends on the integrity of the NUP98 GFLG repeats and the HHEX homeodomain. Transplantation of bone marrow cells expressing NUP98/HHEX leads to transplantable acute leukemia characterized by extensive infiltration of leukemic blasts expressing myeloid markers (Gr1(+)) as well as markers of the B-cell lineage (B220(+)). A latency period of 9 months and its clonal character suggest that NUP98/HHEX is necessary but not sufficient for disease induction. Expression of EGFP-NUP98/HHEX fusions showed a highly similar nuclear localization pattern as for other NUP98/homeodomain fusions, such as NUP98/HOXA9. Comparative gene expression profiling in primary bone marrow cells provided evidence for the presence of common targets in cells expressing NUP98/HOXA9 or NUP98/HHEX. Some of these genes (Hoxa5, Hoxa9, Flt3) are deregulated in NUP98/HHEX-induced murine leukemia as well as in human blasts carrying this fusion and might represent bona fide therapeutic targets.

  16. Inhibition of influenza A virus (H1N1 fusion by benzenesulfonamide derivatives targeting viral hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu

    Full Text Available Hemagglutinin (HA of the influenza virus plays a crucial role in the early stage of the viral life cycle by binding to sialic acid on the surface of host epithelial cells and mediating fusion between virus envelope and endosome membrane for the release of viral genomes into the cytoplasm. To initiate virus fusion, endosome pH is lowered by acidification causing an irreversible conformational change of HA, which in turn results in a fusogenic HA. In this study, we describe characterization of an HA inhibitor of influenza H1N1 viruses, RO5464466. One-cycle time course study in MDCK cells showed that this compound acted at an early step of influenza virus replication. Results from HA-mediated hemolysis of chicken red blood cells and trypsin sensitivity assay of isolated HA clearly showed that RO5464466 targeted HA. In cell-based assays involving multiple rounds of virus infection and replication, RO5464466 inhibited an established influenza infection. The overall production of progeny viruses, as a result of the compound's inhibitory effect on fusion, was dramatically reduced by 8 log units when compared with a negative control. Furthermore, RO5487624, a close analogue of RO5464466, with pharmacokinetic properties suitable for in vivo efficacy studies displayed a protective effect on mice that were lethally challenged with influenza H1N1 virus. These results might benefit further characterization and development of novel anti-influenza agents by targeting viral hemagglutinin.

  17. Naturally-occurring, dually-functional fusions between restriction endonucleases and regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jixiao; Blumenthal, Robert M

    2013-10-02

    Restriction-modification (RM) systems appear to play key roles in modulating gene flow among bacteria and archaea. Because the restriction endonuclease (REase) is potentially lethal to unmethylated new host cells, regulation to ensure pre-expression of the protective DNA methyltransferase (MTase) is essential to the spread of RM genes. This is particularly true for Type IIP RM systems, in which the REase and MTase are separate, independently-active proteins. A substantial subset of Type IIP RM systems are controlled by an activator-repressor called C protein. In these systems, C controls the promoter for its own gene, and for the downstream REase gene that lacks its own promoter. Thus MTase is expressed immediately after the RM genes enter a new cell, while expression of REase is delayed until sufficient C protein accumulates. To study the variation in and evolution of this regulatory mechanism, we searched for RM systems closely related to the well-studied C protein-dependent PvuII RM system. Unexpectedly, among those found were several in which the C protein and REase genes were fused. The gene for CR.NsoJS138I fusion protein (nsoJS138ICR, from the bacterium Niabella soli) was cloned, and the fusion protein produced and partially purified. Western blots provided no evidence that, under the conditions tested, anything other than full-length fusion protein is produced. This protein had REase activity in vitro and, as expected from the sequence similarity, its specificity was indistinguishable from that for PvuII REase, though the optimal reaction conditions were different. Furthermore, the fusion was active as a C protein, as revealed by in vivo activation of a lacZ reporter fusion to the promoter region for the nsoJS138ICR gene. Fusions between C proteins and REases have not previously been characterized, though other fusions have (such as between REases and MTases). These results reinforce the evidence for impressive modularity among RM system proteins, and raise

  18. Cryogenic-laser-fusion target implosion studies performed with the OMEGA uv-laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, F.J.; Letzring, S.A.; Verdon, C.P.; Skupsky, S.; Keck, R.L.; Knauer, J.P.; Kremens, R.L.; Bradley, D.K.; Kessler, T.; Delettrez, J.; and others.

    1989-01-01

    A series of direct-drive laser-fusion implosion experiments was performed on cryogenically cooled, DT-filled glass microballoons with the OMEGA 24-beam uv (351-nm) laser system. The targets consisted of glass microballoons having radii of 100 to 150 μm, wall thicknesses of 3 to 7 μm, filled with DT gas at pressures of 75 to 100 atm. The targets were cooled to below the freezing point of DT, in situ, by a cryogenic target system. The targets were irradiated by approximately 1 to 1.2 kJ of uv light in 650-ps Gaussian pulses. The on-target irradiation uniformity was enhanced for these experiments by the use of distributed phase plates, which brought the estimated irradiation nonuniformities to ∼12% (σ rms ). Target performance was diagnosed by an array of x-ray, plasma, and nuclear instruments. The measured target performance showed ∼70% absorption, thermonuclear yields of 10 6 to 10 8 neutrons, and final fuel areal densities of 20 to 40 mg/cm 2 for the optimum targets examined in these experiments. Fuel densities at the time of thermonuclear neutron production, inferred from direct measurements of the fuel areal density, were in the range of 20 to 50 g/cm 3 (100 to 200 times the density of liquid DT) for the optimum targets

  19. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of a Fusion Protein Tuberculosis Vaccine Combining Five Esx Family Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhi-Hao; Sun, Rui-Feng; Lin, Chen; Chen, Fu-Zeng; Mai, Jun-Tao; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Xu, Zi-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    One strategy to develop the next generation of tuberculosis vaccines is to construct subunit vaccines based on T cell antigens. In this study, we have evaluated the vaccine potential of a fusion protein combining EsxB, EsxD, EsxG, EsxU, and EsxM of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( M. tb ). This recombinant protein, named BM, was expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli . Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with purified BM protein formulated in Freund's incomplete adjuvant induced the production of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-2) and multifunctional CD4 + T cells. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with BM protein followed by intravenous challenge with Mycobacterium bovis BCG resulted in better levels of protection than the two leading antigens, Ag85A and PPE18. Taken together, these results indicate that BM is a protective antigen. Future studies to combine BM with other antigens and evaluate its effectiveness as a booster of BCG or as a therapeutic vaccine are warranted.

  20. Beyond anchoring: the expanding role of the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain in protein folding, stability, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Culler, Megan R; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Creamer, Trevor P; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    While work with viral fusion proteins has demonstrated that the transmembrane domain (TMD) can affect protein folding, stability, and membrane fusion promotion, the mechanism(s) remains poorly understood. TMDs could play a role in fusion promotion through direct TMD-TMD interactions, and we have recently shown that isolated TMDs from three paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins interact as trimers using sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analysis (E. C. Smith, et al., submitted for publication). Immediately N-terminal to the TMD is heptad repeat B (HRB), which plays critical roles in fusion. Interestingly, addition of HRB decreased the stability of the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions. This result, combined with previous findings that HRB forms a trimeric coiled coil in the prefusion form of the whole protein though HRB peptides fail to stably associate in isolation, suggests that the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions work in concert with elements in the F ectodomain head to stabilize a weak HRB interaction. Thus, changes in TMD-TMD interactions could be important in regulating F triggering and refolding. Alanine insertions between the TMD and HRB demonstrated that spacing between these two regions is important for protein stability while not affecting TMD-TMD interactions. Additional mutagenesis of the C-terminal end of the TMD suggests that β-branched residues within the TMD play a role in membrane fusion, potentially through modulation of TMD-TMD interactions. Our results support a model whereby the C-terminal end of the Hendra virus F TMD is an important regulator of TMD-TMD interactions and show that these interactions help hold HRB in place prior to the triggering of membrane fusion.

  1. Tandem SUMO fusion vectors for improving soluble protein expression and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Fernando; Ciragan, Annika; Iwaï, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Availability of highly purified proteins in quantity is crucial for detailed biochemical and structural investigations. Fusion tags are versatile tools to facilitate efficient protein purification and to improve soluble overexpression of proteins. Various purification and fusion tags have been widely used for overexpression in Escherichia coli. However, these tags might interfere with biological functions and/or structural investigations of the protein of interest. Therefore, an additional purification step to remove fusion tags by proteolytic digestion might be required. Here, we describe a set of new vectors in which yeast SUMO (SMT3) was used as the highly specific recognition sequence of ubiquitin-like protease 1, together with other commonly used solubility enhancing proteins, such as glutathione S-transferase, maltose binding protein, thioredoxin and trigger factor for optimizing soluble expression of protein of interest. This tandem SUMO (T-SUMO) fusion system was tested for soluble expression of the C-terminal domain of TonB from different organisms and for the antiviral protein scytovirin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Residues in the Hendra Virus Fusion Protein Transmembrane Domain Are Critical for Endocytic Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Popa, Andreea; Carter, James R.; Smith, Stacy E.; Hellman, Lance; Fried, Michael G.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus classified as a biosafety level four agent. The fusion (F) protein of Hendra virus is critical for promoting viral entry and cell-to-cell fusion. To be fusogenically active, Hendra virus F must undergo endocytic recycling and cleavage by the endosomal/lysosomal protease cathepsin L, but the route of Hendra virus F following internalization and the recycling signals involved are poorly understood. We examined the intracellular distribution of H...

  3. A Novel Strategy for the Preparation of Codon-Optimized Truncated Ulp1 and its Simplified Application to Cleavage the SUMO Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Liu, Haifeng; Liu, Yawei; Li, Yuting; Yan, Lei; Yuan, Xiaohuan; Zhang, Yufei; Wu, Yan; Liu, Jieting; Zhang, Chunlei; Chu, Yanhui

    2016-04-01

    Ubiquitin-like protease 1 (Ulp1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae emerges as a fundamental tool to obtain the natural N-terminal target protein by cleavage of the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) fusion protein. However, the costly commercial Ulp1 and its complicated procedures limit its application in the preparation of the target protein with natural N-terminal sequence. Here, we describe the preparation of bioactive codon-optimized recombinant truncated Ulp1 (Leu403-Lys621) (rtUlp1) of S. cerevisiae in Escherichia coli using only one-step with Ni-NTA affinity chromatograph, and the application of rtUlp1 to cleave the SUMO fusion protein by simply mixing the purified rtUlp1, SUMO fusion protein and DL-Dithiothreitol in Tris-HCl buffer. The optimal expression level of non-fusion protein rtUlp1 accounts for approximately 50 % of the total cellular protein and 36% of the soluble form by addition of isopropyl β-D-l-thiogalactopyranoside at a final concentration of 0.4 mM at 18 °C for 20 h. The purification of target protein rtUlp1 was conducted by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The final yield of rtUlp1 was 45 mg/l in flask fermentation with a purity up to 95%. Furthermore, the high purity of rtUlp1 could effectively cleave the SUMO-tTβRII fusion protein (SUMO gene fused to truncated transforming growth factor-beta receptor type II gene) with the above simplified approach, and the specific activity of the rtUlp1 reached up to 2.8 × 10(4) U/mg, which is comparable to the commercial Ulp1. The preparation and application strategy of the rtUlp1 with commonly available laboratory resources in this study will be convenient to the cleavage of the SUMO fusion protein to obtain the natural N-terminal target protein, which can be implemented in difficult-to-express protein functional analysis.

  4. Two single mutations in the fusion protein of Newcastle disease virus confer hemagglutinin-neuraminidase independent fusion promotion and attenuate the pathogenicity in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fusion (F) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) plays an important role in viral infection and pathogenicity through mediating membrane fusion between the virion and host cells in the presence of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Previously, we obtained a velogenic NDV genotype VII muta...

  5. [Construction and expression of recombinant human serum albumin-EPO fusion protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Chun; Gou, Xing-Hua; Han, Lei; Li, De-Hua; Zhao, Lan-Ying; Wu, Qia-Qing

    2011-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To construct the recombinant plasmid pCI-HLE encoding human serum album-EPO (HSA-EPO) fusion protein and to express it in CHO cell. The cDNA encoding human serum album and EPO were amplified by PCR, and then spliced with the synsitic DNA fragment encoding GS (GGGGS), by overlap PCR extension to form LEPO. After BamH I digestion, the HSA and LEPO was ligated to generate the fusion HSA-EPO gene and was then cloned into the expression vector pCI-neo to generate the recombinant plasmid pCI-HLE. The plasmid pCI-HLE was transfected into CHO cell by liposome protocol. Then, the recombinant cells were screened by G418 and identified by PCR and Western blot. Expression of fusion protein was evaluated by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Restrictive enzymes digestion and DNA sequencing revealed that HSA-EPO fusion gene was cloned into expression vector pCI-neo successfully. PCR and Western blot analysis confirmed that the fusion gene was integrated in the genome of CHO cells and expressed successfully. The HSA-EPO production varied from 86 Iu/(mL x 10(6) x 72 h) to 637 IU/(mLx 10(6) x 72 h). The results confirmed that HSA-EPO fusion gene can be expressed in the CHO cells, with EPO immunogenicity, which could serve as foundation for the development of long-lasting recombinant HSA-EPO protein.

  6. Egg CD9 protein tides correlated with sperm oscillations tune the gamete fusion ability in mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaux, Benjamin; Favier, Sophie; Perez, Eric; Gourier, Christine

    2018-01-23

    Mammalian fertilization involves membrane events -adhesion, fusion, sperm engulfment, membrane block to polyspermy- whose causes remain largely unknown. Recently, specific oscillations of the sperm in contact with the egg were shown to be necessary for fusion. Using a microfluidic chip to impose the venue for the encounter of two gametes allowed real-time observation of the membrane remodelling occurring at the sperm/egg interface. The spatiotemporal mapping of egg CD9 revealed that this protein concentrates at the egg/sperm interface as a result of sperm oscillations, until a CD9-rich platform is nucleated on which fusion immediately takes place. Within 2 to 5 minutes after fusion, most of the CD9 leaves the egg for the external aqueous medium. Then an egg membrane wave engulfs the sperm head in approximately 25 minutes. These results show that sperm oscillations initiate the CD9 recruitment that causes gamete fusion after which CD9 and associated proteins leave the membrane in a process likely to contribute to block polyspermy. They highlight that the gamete fusion story in mammals is an unexpected interplay between mechanical constraints and proteins. © The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of protective immune responses induced by pneumococcal surface protein A in fusion with pneumolysin derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibelly Goulart

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA and Pneumolysin derivatives (Pds are important vaccine candidates, which can confer protection in different models of pneumococcal infection. Furthermore, the combination of these two proteins was able to increase protection against pneumococcal sepsis in mice. The present study investigated the potential of hybrid proteins generated by genetic fusion of PspA fragments to Pds to increase cross-protection against fatal pneumococcal infection. Pneumolisoids were fused to the N-terminus of clade 1 or clade 2 pspA gene fragments. Mouse immunization with the fusion proteins induced high levels of antibodies against PspA and Pds, able to bind to intact pneumococci expressing a homologous PspA with the same intensity as antibodies to rPspA alone or the co-administered proteins. However, when antibody binding to pneumococci with heterologous PspAs was examined, antisera to the PspA-Pds fusion molecules showed stronger antibody binding and C3 deposition than antisera to co-administered proteins. In agreement with these results, antisera against the hybrid proteins were more effective in promoting the phagocytosis of bacteria bearing heterologous PspAs in vitro, leading to a significant reduction in the number of bacteria when compared to co-administered proteins. The respective antisera were also capable of neutralizing the lytic activity of Pneumolysin on sheep red blood cells. Finally, mice immunized with fusion proteins were protected against fatal challenge with pneumococcal strains expressing heterologous PspAs. Taken together, the results suggest that PspA-Pd fusion proteins comprise a promising vaccine strategy, able to increase the immune response mediated by cross-reactive antibodies and complement deposition to heterologous strains, and to confer protection against fatal challenge.

  8. Mannosylated mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion proteins enhance antigen-specific antibody and T lymphocyte responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustaf Ahlén

    Full Text Available Targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC improve their immunogenicity and capacity to induce Th1 responses and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL. We have generated a mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion protein (PSGL-1/mIgG(2b, which upon expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris became multivalently substituted with O-linked oligomannose structures and bound the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN with high affinity in vitro. Here, its effects on the humoral and cellular anti-ovalbumin (OVA responses in C57BL/6 mice are presented.OVA antibody class and subclass responses were determined by ELISA, the generation of anti-OVA CTLs was assessed in (51Cr release assays using in vitro-stimulated immune spleen cells from the different groups of mice as effector cells and OVA peptide-fed RMA-S cells as targets, and evaluation of the type of Th cell response was done by IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 ELISpot assays.Immunizations with the OVA - mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b conjugate, especially when combined with the AbISCO®-100 adjuvant, lead to faster, stronger and broader (with regard to IgG subclass OVA IgG responses, a stronger OVA-specific CTL response and stronger Th1 and Th2 responses than if OVA was used alone or together with AbISCO®-100. Also non-covalent mixing of mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b, OVA and AbISCO®-100 lead to relatively stronger humoral and cellular responses. The O-glycan oligomannoses were necessary because PSGL-1/mIgG(2b with mono- and disialyl core 1 structures did not have this effect.Mannosylated mucin-type fusion proteins can be used as versatile APC-targeting molecules for vaccines and as such enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses.

  9. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China); Zhang, Huaidong [CAS Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens and Biosafety, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China); Gong, Rui, E-mail: gongr@wh.iov.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens and Biosafety, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China); Xiao, Gengfu, E-mail: xiaogf@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei 430071 (China)

    2015-05-08

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell–cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459–567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell–cell fusion). - Highlights: • ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes. • The fusion core of ZFERV Env forms stable coiled-coil trimer including three NHRs and three CHRs. • The structural mechanism of viral entry mediated by ZFERV Env is disclosed. • The results are helpful for further discovery of physiological function of ZFERV Env in zebrafish.

  10. Linked production of pyroglutamate-modified proteins via self-cleavage of fusion tags with TEV protease and autonomous N-terminal cyclization with glutaminyl cyclase in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ping Shih

    Full Text Available Overproduction of N-terminal pyroglutamate (pGlu-modified proteins utilizing Escherichia coli or eukaryotic cells is a challenging work owing to the fact that the recombinant proteins need to be recovered by proteolytic removal of fusion tags to expose the N-terminal glutaminyl or glutamyl residue, which is then converted into pGlu catalyzed by the enzyme glutaminyl cyclase. Herein we describe a new method for production of N-terminal pGlu-containing proteins in vivo via intracellular self-cleavage of fusion tags by tobacco etch virus (TEV protease and then immediate N-terminal cyclization of passenger target proteins by a bacterial glutaminyl cyclase. To combine with the sticky-end PCR cloning strategy, this design allows the gene of target proteins to be efficiently inserted into the expression vector using two unique cloning sites (i.e., SnaB I and Xho I, and the soluble and N-terminal pGlu-containing proteins are then produced in vivo. Our method has been successfully applied to the production of pGlu-modified enhanced green fluorescence protein and monocyte chemoattractant proteins. This design will facilitate the production of protein drugs and drug target proteins that possess an N-terminal pGlu residue required for their physiological activities.

  11. Object level HSI-LIDAR data fusion for automated detection of difficult targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, A V; Daniel, B J; Neumann, J G; Kim, A M; Lee, K R

    2011-10-10

    Data fusion from disparate sensors significantly improves automated man-made target detection performance compared to that of just an individual sensor. In particular, it can solve hyperspectral imagery (HSI) detection problems pertaining to low-radiance man-made objects and objects in shadows. We present an algorithm that fuses HSI and LIDAR data for automated detection of man-made objects. LIDAR is used to define a set of potential targets based on physical dimensions, and HSI is then used to discriminate between man-made and natural objects. The discrimination technique is a novel HSI detection concept that uses an HSI detection score localization metric capable of distinguishing between wide-area score distributions inherent to natural objects and highly localized score distributions indicative of man-made targets. A typical man-made localization score was found to be around 0.5 compared to natural background typical localization scores being less than 0.1.

  12. JAK inhibitors suppress t(8;21) fusion protein-induced leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Miao-Chia; Peterson, Luke F.; Yan, Ming; Cong, Xiuli; Hickman, Justin H.; DeKelver, Russel C.; Niewerth, Denise; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in components of the JAK/STAT pathway, including those in cytokine receptors and JAKs, lead to increased activity of downstream signaling and are frequently found in leukemia and other hematological disorders. Thus, small-molecule inhibitors of this pathway have been the focus of targeted therapy in these hematological diseases. We previously showed that t(8;21) fusion protein AML1-ETO and its alternatively spliced variant AML1-ETO9a (AE9a) enhance the JAK/STAT pathway via down-regulation of CD45, a negative regulator of this pathway. To investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting JAK/STAT in t(8;21) leukemia, we examined the effects of a JAK2-selective inhibitor TG101209 and a JAK1/2-selective inhibitor INCB18424 on t(8;21) leukemia cells. TG101209 and INCB18424 inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of these cells. Furthermore, TG101209 treatment in AE9a leukemia mice reduced tumor burden and significantly prolonged survival. TG101209 also significantly impaired the leukemia-initiating potential of AE9a leukemia cells in secondary recipient mice. These results demonstrate the potential therapeutic efficacy of JAK inhibitors in treating t(8;21) AML. PMID:23812420

  13. Mechanistic insight provided by glutaredoxin within a fusion to redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Østergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    have generated a fusion of the two proteins, rxYFP-Grx1p. In comparison to isolated subunits, intramolecular transfer of reducing equivalents made the fusion protein kinetically superior in reactions with glutathione. The rate of GSSG oxidation was thus improved by a factor of 3300. The reaction......Redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP) contains a dithiol disulfide pair that is thermodynamically suitable for monitoring intracellular glutathione redox potential. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1p) from yeast is known to catalyze the redox equilibrium between rxYFP and glutathione, and here, we...... separately and in the fusion. This could not be ascribed to the lack of an unproductive side reaction to glutaredoxin disulfide. Instead, slower alkylation kinetics with iodoacetamide indicates a better leaving-group capability of the remaining cysteine residue, which can explain the increased activity....

  14. Protein NCRII-18: the role of gene fusion in the molecular evolution of restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibryashkina, Elena M; Solonin, Alexander S; Zakharova, Marina V

    2017-06-01

    This work first constructed the fusion protein NCRII-18 by fusing the restriction endonuclease Ecl18kI gene and part of the gene coding for the N-terminal domain of the endonuclease EcoRII. The fusion of the EcoRII N-terminal domain leads to a change in the properties of the recombinant protein. Unlike Ecl18kI, which made the basis of NCRII-18, the fusion protein predominantly recognizes the CCWGG sites, having lost the capability of interacting with the CCSGG sites. Experimental data support the hypothesis of a close evolutionary relationship between type IIE and IIP restriction endonucleases via a recombination between domains with active site structure and elements for recognition with domains responsible for recognition of DNA sequences. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  15. Simple purification of a foreign protein using polyhedrin fusion in a baculovirus expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong Yul; Choi, Jae Young; Kang, Joong Nam; Wang, Yong; Shim, Hee Jin; Liu, Qin; Tao, Xueying; Xu, Hong Guang; Hyun, Jin-Ho; Woo, Soo Dong; Jin, Byung Rae; Je, Yeon Ho

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we found that expression by translational fusion of the polyhedrin (Polh)-green fluorescence protein (GFP) led to the formation of granular structures, and that these fluorescent granules were easily precipitated by high-speed centrifugation. Here, we developed an easy, fast, mass purification system using this baculovirus expression system (BES). An enhanced GFP (EGFP) fused with the Polh gene at the N-terminus, including a linker and enterokinase (EK) site between Polh and EGFP, was expressed in Sf9 cells. The cells infected by AcPolhEKA-EGFP produced fluorescent granules. The EGFP fusion protein was purified from granule-containing cells in three steps: cell harvest, sonication, and EK digestion. Through final enterokinase digestion, EGFP presented mainly in the supernatant, and this supernatant fraction also showed a pure EGFP band. These results suggest that a combined procedure of Polh fusion expression and enterokinase digestion can be used for rapid and easy purification of other proteins.

  16. The Progress of Research Project for Magnetized Target Fusion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xian-Jun

    2015-11-01

    The fusion of magnetized plasma called Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is a hot research area recently. It may significantly reduce the cost and size. Great progress has been achieved in past decades around the world. Five years ago, China initiated the MTF project and has gotten some progress as follows: 1. Verifying the feasibility of ignition of MTF by means of first principle and MHD simulation; 2. Generating the magnetic field over 1400 Tesla, which can be suppress the heat conduction from charged particles, deposit the energy of alpha particle to promote the ignition process, and produce the stable magnetized plasma for the target of ignition; 3. The imploding facility of FP-1 can put several Mega Joule energy to the solid liner of about ten gram in the range of microsecond risen time, while the simulating tool has been developed for design and analysis of the process; 4. The target of FRC can be generated by ``YG 1 facility'' while some simulating tools have be developed. Next five years, the above theoretical work and the experiments of MTF may be integrated to step up as the National project, which may make my term play an important lead role and be supposed to achieve farther progress in China. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11175028.

  17. Multi-UAV Doppler Information Fusion for Target Tracking Based on Distributed High Degrees Information Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Benzerrouk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV Doppler-based target tracking has not been widely investigated, specifically when using modern nonlinear information filters. A high-degree Gauss–Hermite information filter, as well as a seventh-degree cubature information filter (CIF, is developed to improve the fifth-degree and third-degree CIFs proposed in the most recent related literature. These algorithms are applied to maneuvering target tracking based on Radar Doppler range/range rate signals. To achieve this purpose, different measurement models such as range-only, range rate, and bearing-only tracking are used in the simulations. In this paper, the mobile sensor target tracking problem is addressed and solved by a higher-degree class of quadrature information filters (HQIFs. A centralized fusion architecture based on distributed information filtering is proposed, and yielded excellent results. Three high dynamic UAVs are simulated with synchronized Doppler measurement broadcasted in parallel channels to the control center for global information fusion. Interesting results are obtained, with the superiority of certain classes of higher-degree quadrature information filters.

  18. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousparou Christina A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. Methods The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21. This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model with differing p21 or p53 status. Results Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Conclusions Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology.

  19. Generation of a selectively cytotoxic fusion protein against p53 mutated cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kousparou, Christina A; Yiacoumi, Efthymia; Deonarain, Mahendra P; Epenetos, Agamemnon A

    2012-01-01

    A significant number of cancers are caused by defects in p21 causing functional defects in p21 or p53 tumour-suppressor proteins. This has led to many therapeutic approaches including restoration by gene therapy with wild-type p53 or p21 using viral or liposomal vectors, which have toxicity or side-effect limitations. We set out to develop a safer, novel fusion protein which has the ability to reconstitute cancer cell lines with active p21 by protein transduction. The fusion protein was produced from the cell-translocating peptide Antennapedia (Antp) and wild-type, full-length p21 (Antp-p21). This was expressed and refolded from E. coli and tested on a variety of cell lines and tumours (in a BALB/c nude xenograft model) with differing p21 or p53 status. Antp-p21 penetrated and killed cancer cells that do not express wild type p53 or p21. This included cells that were matched to cogenic parental cell lines. Antp-p21 killed cancer cells selectively that were malignant as a result of mutations or nuclear exclusion of the p53 and p21 genes and over-expression of MDM2. Non-specific toxicity was excluded by showing that Antp-p21 penetrated but did not kill p53- or p21- wild-type cells. Antp-p21 was not immunogenic in normal New Zealand White rabbits. Recombinant Antp peptide alone was not cytotoxic, showing that killing was due to the transduction of the p21 component of Antp-p21. Antp-p21 was shown to penetrate cancer cells engrafted in vivo and resulted in tumour eradication when administered with conventionally-used chemotherapeutic agents, which alone were unable to produce such an effect. Antp-p21 may represent a new and promising targeted therapy for patients with p53-associated cancers supporting the concept that rational design of therapies directed against specific cancer mutations will play a part in the future of medical oncology

  20. Plant pathology: monitoring a pathogen-targeted host protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jeff; Dodds, Peter

    2003-05-13

    A plant protein RIN4 is targeted and modified by bacterial pathogens as part of the disease process. At least two host resistance proteins monitor this pathogen interference and trigger the plant's defence responses.

  1. Signal processing, sensor fusion, and target recognition; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 20-22, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Vibeke; Kadar, Ivan

    Consideration is given to a multiordered mapping technique for target prioritization, a neural network approach to multiple-target-tracking problems, a multisensor fusion algorithm for multitarget multibackground classification, deconvolutiom of multiple images of the same object, neural networks and genetic algorithms for combinatorial optimization of sensor data fusion, classification of atmospheric acoustic signals from fixed-wing aircraft, and an optics approach to sensor fusion for target recognition. Also treated are a zoom lens for automatic target recognition, a hybrid model for the analysis of radar sensors, an innovative test bed for developing and assessing air-to-air noncooperative target identification algorithms, SAR imagery scene segmentation using fractal processing, sonar feature-based bandwidth compression, laboratory experiments for a new sonar system, computational algorithms for discrete transform using fixed-size filter matrices, and pattern recognition for power systems.

  2. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins in Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadegan, Shayan Abdollah; Abedi, Aidin; Jazayeri, Seyed Behnam; Nasiri Bonaki, Hirbod; Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2017-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been commonly used as a graft substitute in spinal fusion. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning on life-threatening complications of recombinant human BMPs (rhBMPs) in cervical spine fusion in 2008, their off-label use has been continued. This investigation aimed to review the evidence for the use of rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 in anterior cervical spine fusions. A comprehensive search was performed through Ovid (MEDLINE), PubMed, and Embase. The risk of bias assessment was according to the recommended criteria by the Cochrane Back and Neck group and MINORS (Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies). A wide array of radiographic and clinical outcomes including the adverse events were collated. Eighteen articles (1 randomized and 17 nonrandomized) were eligible for inclusion. The fusion rate was higher with use of rhBMP in most studies and our meta-analysis of the pooled data from 4782 patients confirmed this finding (odds ratio, 5.45; P fusion yields a significantly higher fusion rate with similar patient-reported outcomes, yet increased risk of life-threatening complications. Thus, we do not recommend the use of rhBMP in anterior cervical fusions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells

  4. In Vivo Immobilization of Fusion Proteins on Bioplastics by the Novel Tag BioF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldes, Cristina; García, Pedro; García, José L.; Prieto, María A.

    2004-01-01

    A new protein immobilization and purification system has been developed based on the use of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs, or bioplastics), which are biodegradable polymers accumulated as reserve granules in the cytoplasm of certain bacteria. The N-terminal domain of the PhaF phasin (a PHA-granule-associated protein) from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 was used as a polypeptide tag (BioF) to anchor fusion proteins to PHAs. This tag provides a novel way to immobilize proteins in vivo by using bioplastics as supports. The granules carrying the BioF fusion proteins can be isolated by a simple centrifugation step and used directly for some applications. Moreover, when required, a practically pure preparation of the soluble BioF fusion protein can be obtained by a mild detergent treatment of the granule. The efficiency of this system has been demonstrated by constructing two BioF fusion products, including a functional BioF-β-galactosidase. This is the first example of an active bioplastic consisting of a biodegradable matrix carrying an active enzyme. PMID:15184113

  5. Measurement of DT neutron-induced activity in glass-microshell laser fusion targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, S. M.; Campbell, E. M.; Bennett, C.

    1980-10-01

    Laser fusion targets consisting of DT gas contained in Teflon-coated glass microshells produce 14.1-MeV neutrons that can interact with the (Si-28) nuclei in the glass to produce radioactive (Al-28). Using a very efficient collection-detection scheme that could detect the decay of 10% of the (Al-28) created, these nuclei are identified by their 1.78-MeV gamma ray, which decayed with a 2.2-min half-life. From the number of (Al-28) nuclei created and the neutron yield the compressed glass areal density was found to be 0.0059 g/sq cm.

  6. Antibody-Induced Internalization of the Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemans, A; De Schryver, M; Van der Gucht, W; Heykers, A; Pintelon, I; Hotard, A L; Moore, M L; Melero, J A; McLellan, J S; Graham, B S; Broadbent, L; Power, U F; Caljon, G; Cos, P; Maes, L; Delputte, P

    2017-07-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections remain a major cause of respiratory disease and hospitalizations among infants. Infection recurs frequently and establishes a weak and short-lived immunity. To date, RSV immunoprophylaxis and vaccine research is mainly focused on the RSV fusion (F) protein, but a vaccine remains elusive. The RSV F protein is a highly conserved surface glycoprotein and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies induced by natural infection. Here, we analyzed an internalization process of antigen-antibody complexes after binding of RSV-specific antibodies to RSV antigens expressed on the surface of infected cells. The RSV F protein and attachment (G) protein were found to be internalized in both infected and transfected cells after the addition of either RSV-specific polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) or RSV glycoprotein-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), as determined by indirect immunofluorescence staining and flow-cytometric analysis. Internalization experiments with different cell lines, well-differentiated primary bronchial epithelial cells (WD-PBECs), and RSV isolates suggest that antibody internalization can be considered a general feature of RSV. More specifically for RSV F, the mechanism of internalization was shown to be clathrin dependent. All RSV F-targeted MAbs tested, regardless of their epitopes, induced internalization of RSV F. No differences could be observed between the different MAbs, indicating that RSV F internalization was epitope independent. Since this process can be either antiviral, by affecting virus assembly and production, or beneficial for the virus, by limiting the efficacy of antibodies and effector mechanism, further research is required to determine the extent to which this occurs in vivo and how this might impact RSV replication. IMPORTANCE Current research into the development of new immunoprophylaxis and vaccines is mainly focused on the RSV F protein since, among others, RSV F-specific antibodies are

  7. A tri-modality image fusion method for target delineation of brain tumors in radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Guo

    Full Text Available To develop a tri-modality image fusion method for better target delineation in image-guided radiotherapy for patients with brain tumors.A new method of tri-modality image fusion was developed, which can fuse and display all image sets in one panel and one operation. And a feasibility study in gross tumor volume (GTV delineation using data from three patients with brain tumors was conducted, which included images of simulation CT, MRI, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET examinations before radiotherapy. Tri-modality image fusion was implemented after image registrations of CT+PET and CT+MRI, and the transparency weight of each modality could be adjusted and set by users. Three radiation oncologists delineated GTVs for all patients using dual-modality (MRI/CT and tri-modality (MRI/CT/PET image fusion respectively. Inter-observer variation was assessed by the coefficient of variation (COV, the average distance between surface and centroid (ADSC, and the local standard deviation (SDlocal. Analysis of COV was also performed to evaluate intra-observer volume variation.The inter-observer variation analysis showed that, the mean COV was 0.14(± 0.09 and 0.07(± 0.01 for dual-modality and tri-modality respectively; the standard deviation of ADSC was significantly reduced (p<0.05 with tri-modality; SDlocal averaged over median GTV surface was reduced in patient 2 (from 0.57 cm to 0.39 cm and patient 3 (from 0.42 cm to 0.36 cm with the new method. The intra-observer volume variation was also significantly reduced (p = 0.00 with the tri-modality method as compared with using the dual-modality method.With the new tri-modality image fusion method smaller inter- and intra-observer variation in GTV definition for the brain tumors can be achieved, which improves the consistency and accuracy for target delineation in individualized radiotherapy.

  8. High-level expression of soluble recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli using an HE-maltotriose-binding protein fusion tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingqian; Guo, Wanying; Su, Bingqian; Guo, Yujie; Wang, Jiang; Chu, Beibei; Yang, Guoyu

    2018-02-01

    Recombinant proteins are commonly expressed in prokaryotic expression systems for large-scale production. The use of genetically engineered affinity and solubility enhancing fusion proteins has increased greatly in recent years, and there now exists a considerable repertoire of these that can be used to enhance the expression, stability, solubility, folding, and purification of their fusion partner. Here, a modified histidine tag (HE) used as an affinity tag was employed together with a truncated maltotriose-binding protein (MBP; consisting of residues 59-433) from Pyrococcus furiosus as a solubility enhancing tag accompanying a tobacco etch virus protease-recognition site for protein expression and purification in Escherichia coli. Various proteins tagged at the N-terminus with HE-MBP(Pyr) were expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) cells to determine expression and solubility relative to those tagged with His6-MBP or His6-MBP(Pyr). Furthermore, four HE-MBP(Pyr)-fused proteins were purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography to assess the affinity of HE with immobilized Ni 2+ . Our results showed that HE-MBP(Pyr) represents an attractive fusion protein allowing high levels of soluble expression and purification of recombinant protein in E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. SNaPe: a versatile method to generate multiplexed protein fusions using synthetic linker peptides for in vitro applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Veronika; Cryle, Max J

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the structure and function of protein complexes and multi-domain proteins is highly important in biology, although the in vitro characterization of these systems is often complicated by their size or the transient nature of protein/protein interactions. To assist in the characterization of such protein complexes, we have developed a modular approach to fusion protein generation that relies upon Sortase-mediated and Native chemical ligation using synthetic Peptide linkers (SNaPe) to link two separately expressed proteins. In this approach, we utilize two separate linking steps - sortase-mediated and native chemical ligation - together with a library of peptide linkers to generate libraries of fusion proteins. We have demonstrated the viability of SNaPe to generate libraries from fusion protein constructs taken from the biosynthetic enzymes responsible for late stage aglycone assembly during glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis. Crucially, SNaPe was able to generate fusion proteins that are inaccessible via direct expression of the fusion construct itself. This highlights the advantages of SNaPe to not only access fusion proteins that have been previously unavailable for biochemical and structural characterization but also to do so in a manner that enables the linker itself to be controlled as an experimental parameter of fusion protein generation. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Ubiquitin-like prokaryotic MoaD as a fusion tag for expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sujuan; Wang, Xin; Xu, Jian; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Nan

    2014-01-21

    Eukaryotic ubiquitin and SUMO are frequently used as tags to enhance the fusion protein expression in microbial host. They increase the solubility and stability, and protect the peptides from proteolytic degradation due to their stable and highly conserved structures. Few of prokaryotic ubiquitin-like proteins was used as fusion tags except ThiS, which enhances the fusion expression, however, reduces the solubility and stability of the expressed peptides in E. coli. Hence, we investigated if MoaD, a conserved small sulfur carrier in prokaryotes with the similar structure of ubiquitin, could also be used as fusion tag in heterologous expression in E. coli. Fusion of MoaD to either end of EGFP enhanced the expression yield of EGFP with a similar efficacy of ThiS. However, the major parts of the fusion proteins were expressed in the aggregated form, which was associated with the retarded folding of EGFP, similar to ThiS fusions. Fusion of MoaD to insulin chain A or B did not boost their expression as efficiently as ThiS tag did, probably due to a less efficient aggregation of products. Interestingly, fusion of MoaD to the murine ribonuclease inhibitor enhanced protein expression by completely protecting the protein from intracellular degradation in contrast to ThiS fusion, which enhanced degradation of this unstable protein when expressed in E. coli. Prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein MoaD can act as a fusion tag to promote the fusion expression with varying mechanisms, which enriches the arsenal of fusion tags in the category of insoluble expression.

  11. Directed Supramolecular Surface Assembly of SNAP-tag Fusion Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlenheuer, D.A.; Wasserberg, D.; Haase, C.; Nguyen, Hoang D.; Schenkel, J.H.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Ravoo, B.J.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular assembly of proteins on surfaces and vesicles was investigated by site-selective incorporation of a supramolecular guest element on proteins. Fluorescent proteins were site-selectively labeled with bisadamantane by SNAP-tag technology. The assembly of the bisadamantane functionalized

  12. Immobilization of ferrocene-modified SNAP-fusion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasserberg, D.; Uhlenheuer, D.; Neirynck, P.; Neirynck, Pauline; Cabanas Danés, Jordi; Schenkel, J.H.; Ravoo, B.J.; An, Q.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Milroy, L.G.; Brunsveld, Luc; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The supramolecular assembly of proteins on surfaces has been investigated via the site-selective incorporation of a supramolecular moiety on proteins. To this end, fluorescent proteins have been site-selectively labeled with ferrocenes, as supramolecular guest moieties, via SNAP-tag technology. The

  13. [The high expression of HPV31 and 52 L2 fusion protein in E. coli and detection of its immunogenicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling; Ren, Jiao; Zhao, Li; Feng, Jing; Hao, Ming-Qiang; Tan, Wen-Jie; Ruan, Li; Qu, Peng-Peng; Tian, Hou-Wen

    2013-04-01

    To express HPV31 and 52 L2 fusion protein and detect its immunogenicity. According to the amino acid sequences of HPV31 and 52 L2 11-200AA published in the GenBank database, weartificially synthesized the HPV31 and 52 L2 fusion gene which was optimized according to Escherichia coli codon usage and encodes 11-200 amino acid of HPV31 and HPV52 L2, then cloned it into pET-9a vector. The HPV31 and 52 L2 fusion protein was expressed in Prokaryotic expression system and the mice were immunized with the fusion protein after purification. The immunogenicity was characterized in vaccinated mice. HPV31 and 52 L2 fusion protein was highly expressed in E. coli, the amount of fusion protein is nearly 20% of the total bacterial protein. The purified fusion protein with aluminum adjuvant could induce specific high titer of IgG antibodies detected by ELISA, and also induce the neutralizing antibodies against pseudovirus of HPV31 and HPV52 and cross-neutralizing antibodies against pseudovirus of HPV45, 58, 16, 18. HPV31 and 52 L2 fusion protein could induce neutralizing and cross-neutralizing antibodies against HPV pseudovirus. It provides laboratory basis for development of HPV L2 protein vaccine.

  14. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  15. The addition of a sagittal image fusion improves the prostate cancer detection in a sensor-based MRI /ultrasound fusion guided targeted biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günzel, Karsten; Cash, Hannes; Buckendahl, John; Königbauer, Maximilian; Asbach, Patrick; Haas, Matthias; Neymeyer, Jörg; Hinz, Stefan; Miller, Kurt; Kempkensteffen, Carsten

    2017-01-13

    To explore the diagnostic benefit of an additional image fusion of the sagittal plane in addition to the standard axial image fusion, using a sensor-based MRI/US fusion platform. During July 2013 and September 2015, 251 patients with at least one suspicious lesion on mpMRI (rated by PI-RADS) were included into the analysis. All patients underwent MRI/US targeted biopsy (TB) in combination with a 10 core systematic prostate biopsy (SB). All biopsies were performed on a sensor-based fusion system. Group A included 162 men who received TB by an axial MRI/US image fusion. Group B comprised 89 men in whom the TB was performed with an additional sagittal image fusion. The median age in group A was 67 years (IQR 61-72) and in group B 68 years (IQR 60-71). The median PSA level in group A was 8.10 ng/ml (IQR 6.05-14) and in group B 8.59 ng/ml (IQR 5.65-12.32). In group A the proportion of patients with a suspicious digital rectal examination (DRE) (14 vs. 29%, p = 0.007) and the proportion of primary biopsies (33 vs 46%, p = 0.046) were significantly lower. The rate of PI-RADS 3 lesions were overrepresented in group A compared to group B (19 vs. 9%; p = 0.044). Classified according to PI-RADS 3, 4 and 5, the detection rates of TB were 42, 48, 75% in group A and 25, 74, 90% in group B. The rate of PCa with a Gleason score ≥7 missed by TB was 33% (18 cases) in group A and 9% (5 cases) in group B; p-value 0.072. An explorative multivariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed that PI-RADS, a suspicious DRE and performing an additional sagittal image fusion were significant predictors for PCa detection in TB. 9 PCa were only detected by TB with sagittal fusion (sTB) and sTB identified 10 additional clinically significant PCa (Gleason ≥7). Performing an additional sagittal image fusion besides the standard axial fusion appears to improve the accuracy of the sensor-based MRI/US fusion platform.

  16. Construction and expression of recombinant fusion protein of thioredoxin-ApoO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenlu; Zhao, Shuiping; Yu, Bilian; Xiong, Dan

    2011-02-01

    To construct human apolipoprotein O (apolipoprotein O, ApoO) expression vector and obtain recombinant fusion protein thioredoxin (Trx)-ApoO by pET prokaryotic expression system. The ApoO gene fragment from the human liver cDNA library was amplified by PCR. The resulting product was cloned into pET-32a(+) vector and sequenced. The confirmed cDNA was cloned into plasmid E.coli DH10B and then transformed into E.coli BL 21 (DE3) where it was induced to express protein by isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The fusion protein was purified by Ni-NTA resin. The ApoO gene was cloned by PCR and a 519 bp DNA fragment was shown on the agarose electrophoresis. The cloned gene was sequenced and demonstrated to have the same sequence as that of human ApoO gene in GenBank which justified a successful construction of recombinant plasmid. ApoO cDNA gene fragment was induced by IPTG, and a 34 kD recombinant fusion protein Trx-ApoO was tested on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide (SDS-PAGE). Human ApoO gene is successfully cloned and its recombinant fusion protein Trx-ApoO is expressed.

  17. Identifying unexpected therapeutic targets via chemical-protein interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Drug medications inevitably affect not only their intended protein targets but also other proteins as well. In this study we examined the hypothesis that drugs that share the same therapeutic effect also share a common therapeutic mechanism by targeting not only known drug targets, but also by interacting unexpectedly on the same cryptic targets. By constructing and mining an Alzheimer's disease (AD drug-oriented chemical-protein interactome (CPI using a matrix of 10 drug molecules known to treat AD towards 401 human protein pockets, we found that such cryptic targets exist. We recovered from CPI the only validated therapeutic target of AD, acetylcholinesterase (ACHE, and highlighted several other putative targets. For example, we discovered that estrogen receptor (ER and histone deacetylase (HDAC, which have recently been identified as two new therapeutic targets of AD, might already have been targeted by the marketed AD drugs. We further established that the CPI profile of a drug can reflect its interacting character towards multi-protein sets, and that drugs with the same therapeutic attribute will share a similar interacting profile. These findings indicate that the CPI could represent the landscape of chemical-protein interactions and uncover "behind-the-scenes" aspects of the therapeutic mechanisms of existing drugs, providing testable hypotheses of the key nodes for network pharmacology or brand new drug targets for one-target pharmacology paradigm.

  18. Design and characterization of novel recombinant listeriolysin O-protamine fusion proteins for enhanced gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Hyung; Provoda, Chester; Lee, Kyung-Dall

    2015-02-02

    To improve the efficiency of gene delivery for effective gene therapy, it is essential that the vector carries functional components that can promote overcoming barriers in various steps leading to the transport of DNA from extracellular to ultimately nuclear compartment. In this study, we designed genetically engineered fusion proteins as a platform to incorporate multiple functionalities in one chimeric protein. Prototypes of such a chimera tested here contain two domains: one that binds to DNA; the other that can facilitate endosomal escape of DNA. The fusion proteins are composed of listeriolysin O (LLO), the endosomolytic pore-forming protein from Listeria monocytogenes, and a 22 amino acid sequence of the DNA-condensing polypeptide protamine (PN), singly or as a pair: LLO-PN and LLO-PNPN. We demonstrate dramatic enhancement of the gene delivery efficiency of protamine-condensed DNA upon incorporation of a small amount of LLO-PN fusion protein and further improvement with LLO-PNPN in vitro using cultured cells. Additionally, the association of anionic liposomes with cationic LLO-PNPN/protamine/DNA complexes, yielding a net negative surface charge, resulted in better in vitro transfection efficiency in the presence of serum. An initial, small set of data in mice indicated that the observed enhancement in gene expression could also be applicable to in vivo gene delivery. This study suggests that incorporation of a recombinant fusion protein with multiple functional components, such as LLO-protamine fusion protein, in a nonviral vector is a promising strategy for various nonviral gene delivery systems.

  19. Role for Homodimerization in Growth Deregulation by E2a Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayly, Richard; LeBrun, David P.

    2000-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor E2a-Pbx1 is expressed in some cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia as a result of chromosomal translocation 1;19. The early observation that E2a-Pbx1 incorporates transcriptional activation domains from E2a and a DNA-binding homeodomain from Pbx1 inspired a model in which E2a-Pbx1 promotes leukemogenic transformation of lymphoid progenitor cells through transcriptional induction of target genes defined by the Pbx1 portion of the molecule. However, the subsequent demonstration that the only known DNA-binding module on the molecule, the Pbx1 homeodomain, is dispensable for the induction of lymphoblastic lymphoma in transgenic mice called into question the contribution made by the Pbx1 portion. In this study, we have used a domain swap approach coupled with a fibroblast-based focus formation assay to evaluate further the requirement for PBX1-encoded peptide elements in growth deregulation by E2a-Pbx1. No impairment of focus formation was observed when the entire Pbx1 portion was replaced with DNA-binding/dimerization domains derived from yeast transcription factor GAL4 or GCN4. Furthermore, replacement of Pbx1 with tandem FKBP domains that mediate homodimerization in the presence of a synthetic ligand led to striking growth deregulation exclusively in the presence of the dimerizing agent. N-terminal elements encoded by E2A, including the AD1 transcriptional activation domain, were required for dimerization-induced focus formation. We conclude that transcriptional target genes defined by heterologous C-terminal DNA-binding modules are not required in growth deregulation by E2a fusion proteins. We speculate that interactions between N-terminal E2a elements and undefined proteins that could function as components of a transcriptional coactivator complex may be more important. PMID:10913162

  20. TAT-MTS-MCM fusion proteins reduce MMA levels and improve mitochondrial activity and liver function in MCM-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich-Hadad, Tal; Hadad, Rita; Feldman, Anat; Greif, Hagar; Lictenstein, Michal; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya

    2018-03-01

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMA) is a disorder of organic acid metabolism resulting from a functional defect of the mitochondrial enzyme, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM). The main treatments for MMA patients are dietary restriction of propiogenic amino acids and carnitine supplementation. Liver or combined liver/kidney transplantation has been used to treat those with the most severe clinical manifestations. Thus, therapies are necessary to help improve quality of life and prevent liver, renal and neurological complications. Previously, we successfully used the TAT-MTS-Protein approach for replacing a number of mitochondrial-mutated proteins. In this targeted system, TAT, an 11 a.a peptide, which rapidly and efficiently can cross biological membranes, is fused to a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS), followed by the mitochondrial mature protein which sends the protein into the mitochondria. In the mitochondria, the TAT-MTS is cleaved off and the native protein integrates into its natural complexes and is fully functional. In this study, we used heterologous MTSs of human, nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, to target the human MCM protein into the mitochondria. All fusion proteins reached the mitochondria and successfully underwent processing. Treatment of MMA patient fibroblasts with these fusion proteins restored mitochondrial activity such as ATP production, mitochondrial membrane potential and oxygen consumption, indicating the importance of mitochondrial function in this disease. Treatment with the fusion proteins enhanced cell viability and most importantly reduced MMA levels. Treatment also enhanced albumin and urea secretion in a CRISPR/Cas9-engineered HepG2 MUT (-/-) liver cell line. Therefore, we suggest using this TAT-MTS-Protein approach for the treatment of MMA. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  1. O6-alkylguanine-DNA transferase (SNAP) as capture module for site-specific covalent bioconjugation of targeting protein on nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchelli, Serena; Colombo, Miriam; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Corsi, Fabio; Montenegro, Josè M.; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Prosperi, Davide

    2013-02-01

    A bimodular genetic fusion comprising a delivery module (scFv) and a capture module (SNAP) is proposed as a novel strategy for the biologically mediated site-specific covalent conjugation of targeting proteins to nanoparticles. ScFv800E6, an scFv mutant selective for HER2 antigen overexpressed in breast cancer cells was chosen as targeting ligand. The fusion protein SNAP-scFv was irreversibly immobilized on magnetofluorescent nanoparticles through the recognition between SNAP module and pegylated O6-alkylguanine derivative. The targeting efficiency of the resulting nanoparticle against HER2-positive breast cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence.

  2. Enhancing Ignition Probability and Fusion Yield in NIF Indirect Drive Targets with Applied Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, L. John; Logan, B. Grant; Ho, Darwin; Zimmerman, George; Rhodes, Mark; Blackfield, Donald; Hawkins, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Imposed magnetic fields of tens of Tesla that increase to greater than 10 kT (100 MGauss) under capsule compression may relax conditions for ignition and propagating burn in indirect-drive ICF targets. This may allow attainment of ignition, or at least significant fusion energy yields, in presently-performing ICF targets on the National Ignition Facility that today are sub-marginal for thermonuclear burn through adverse hydrodynamic conditions at stagnation. Results of detailed 2D radiation-hydrodynamic-burn simulations applied to NIF capsule implosions with low-mode shape perturbations and residual kinetic energy loss indicate that such compressed fields may increase the probability for ignition through range reduction of fusion alpha particles, suppression of electron heat conduction and stabilization of higher-mode RT instabilities. Optimum initial applied fields are around 50 T. Off-line testing has been performed of a hohlraum coil and pulsed power supply that could be integrated on NIF; axial fields of 58T were obtained. Given the full plasma structure at capsule stagnation may be governed by 3-D resistive MHD, the formation of closed magnetic field lines might further augment ignition prospects. Experiments are now required to assess the potential of applied magnetic fields to NIF ICF ignition and burn. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. On stimulated scattering of laser light in inertial fusion energy targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, Lj [National Inst. for Fusion Science, The Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Ishiguro, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Theory and Computer Simulation Center, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sato, T. [JAMSTEC, Earth Simulator Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Propagation of a laser light through regions of an underdense plasma is an active research topic in laser fusion. In particular, a large effort has been invested in studies of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) which can reflect laser energy and produce energetic particles to preheat a fusion energy target. Experiments, theory and simulations agree on a complex interplay between various laser-plasma instabilities. By particle-in-cell simulations of an underdense electron-plasma, we have found, apart from the standard SRS, a strong backscattering near the electron plasma frequency at densities beyond the quarter critical. This novel instability, recognized in recent experiments as stimulated laser scattering on a trapped electron-acoustic mode (SEAS), is absent from a classical theory of laser-parametric instabilities. A parametric excitation of SEAS instability, is explained by a three-wave resonant decay of the incident laser light into a standing backscattered wave and a slow trapped electron acoustic wave ({omega} < {omega}{sub p}). Large SEAS pulsations, eventually suppressed by relativistic heating of electrons, are observed in our simulations. This phenomenon seems relevant to future hohlraum target and fast ignition experiments. (author)

  4. Structure?Activity Relationship Studies of Indole-Based Compounds as Small Molecule HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitors Targeting Glycoprotein 41

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Guangyan; Sofiyev, Vladimir; Kaur, Hardeep; Snyder, Beth A.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Hogan, Priscilla A.; Ptak, Roger G.; Gochin, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    We previously described indole-containing compounds with the potential to inhibit HIV-1 fusion by targeting the hydrophobic pocket of transmembrane glycoprotein gp41. Here we report optimization and structure?activity relationship studies on the basic scaffold, defining the role of shape, contact surface area, and molecular properties. Thirty new compounds were evaluated in binding, cell?cell fusion, and viral replication assays. Below a 1 ?M threshold, correlation between binding and biologi...

  5. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-07-08

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. PMID:27226547

  7. A protein coevolution method uncovers critical features of the Hepatitis C Virus fusion mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douam, Florian; Mancip, Jimmy; Mailly, Laurent; Montserret, Roland; Ding, Qiang; Verhoeyen, Els; Baumert, Thomas F.; Ploss, Alexander; Carbone, Alessandra

    2018-01-01

    Amino-acid coevolution can be referred to mutational compensatory patterns preserving the function of a protein. Viral envelope glycoproteins, which mediate entry of enveloped viruses into their host cells, are shaped by coevolution signals that confer to viruses the plasticity to evade neutralizing antibodies without altering viral entry mechanisms. The functions and structures of the two envelope glycoproteins of the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), E1 and E2, are poorly described. Especially, how these two proteins mediate the HCV fusion process between the viral and the cell membrane remains elusive. Here, as a proof of concept, we aimed to take advantage of an original coevolution method recently developed to shed light on the HCV fusion mechanism. When first applied to the well-characterized Dengue Virus (DENV) envelope glycoproteins, coevolution analysis was able to predict important structural features and rearrangements of these viral protein complexes. When applied to HCV E1E2, computational coevolution analysis predicted that E1 and E2 refold interdependently during fusion through rearrangements of the E2 Back Layer (BL). Consistently, a soluble BL-derived polypeptide inhibited HCV infection of hepatoma cell lines, primary human hepatocytes and humanized liver mice. We showed that this polypeptide specifically inhibited HCV fusogenic rearrangements, hence supporting the critical role of this domain during HCV fusion. By combining coevolution analysis and in vitro assays, we also uncovered functionally-significant coevolving signals between E1 and E2 BL/Stem regions that govern HCV fusion, demonstrating the accuracy of our coevolution predictions. Altogether, our work shed light on important structural features of the HCV fusion mechanism and contributes to advance our functional understanding of this process. This study also provides an important proof of concept that coevolution can be employed to explore viral protein mediated-processes, and can guide the

  8. SUMO fusion technology for enhanced protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panavas, Tadas; Sanders, Carsten; Butt, Tauseef R

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the reversible attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein is a post-translational modification that has been demonstrated to play an important role in various cellular processes. Moreover, it has been found that SUMO as an N-terminal fusion partner enhances functional protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems, based upon significantly improved protein stability and solubility. Following the expression and purification of the fusion protein, the SUMO-tag can be cleaved by specific (SUMO) proteases via their endopeptidase activity in vitro to generate the desired N-terminus of the released protein partner. In addition to its physiological relevance in eukaryotes, SUMO can, thus, be used as a powerful biotechnological tool for protein expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell systems.In this chapter, we will describe the construction of a fusion protein with the SUMO-tag, its expression in Escherichia coli, and its purification followed by the removal of the SUMO-tag by a SUMO-specific protease in vitro.

  9. Quantitative detection of fusion protein rIFN-ß-HSA by a sandwich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A method that allowed detection and quantification of recombinant fusion protein rIFN-ß-HSA in complex mixtures and fermentation media was described. The method was based on a double antibody sandwich ELISA, which was developed by using an anti-IFN-ß monoclonal antibody as capture antibody and an ...

  10. Human antibodies and fusion proteins as HIV-1 therapeutic | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Available for licensing from the NCI are novel human anti-HIV-1 domain antibodies and their fusion proteins for anti-HIV-1 antibodies and anti-retroviral as therapeutics and/or preventatives for infection by different HIV-1 strains.

  11. Quantitative detection of fusion protein rIFN-β-HSA by a sandwich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-14

    Feb 14, 2011 ... A method that allowed detection and quantification of recombinant fusion protein rIFN-β-HSA in complex mixtures and ... practical working range was estimated to be 21.01 ng/ml to 672.50 ng/ml and the limit of detection was. 13.88 ng/ml. ..... avidin labeling system, enzyme-linked radioactive assay, etc.

  12. Membrane fusion is induced by a distinct peptide sequence of the sea urchin fertilization protein bindin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulrich, AS; Glabe, CG; Hoekstra, D

    1998-01-01

    Fertilization in the sea urchin is mediated by the membrane-associated acrosomal protein bindin, which plays a key role in the adhesion and fusion between sperm and egg. We have investigated the structure/function relationship of an 18-amino acid peptide fragment "B18," which represents the minimal

  13. Anti-Diabetic Effects of CTB-APSL Fusion Protein in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS, then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb, promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC and low density lipoprotein (LDL levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6. Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes.

  14. Neutron pre-emission at the fusion of 11 Li halo nuclei with Si targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrascu, M.; Isbasescu, A.; Petrascu, H.; Bordeanu, C.; David, I.; Lazar, I.; Mihai, I.; Vaman, G.; Tanihata, I.; Kobayashi, T.; Korsheninnikov, A.; Fukuda, S.; Kumagai, H.; Momota, S.; Ozawa, A.; Yoshida, K.; Nikolski, E.; Giurgiu, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this contribution, the first experiment on fusion of 11 Li halo nuclei with Si targets is reported. A novel effect consisting of a large neutron pre-emission probability in the fusion process was observed. The neutron halo nuclei are characterized by very large matter radii, small separation energy and small internal momentum of the valence neutrons. Until now, the halo nuclei were investigated mostly by elastic, inelastic scattering and breakup processes. It was recently predicted that due to the very large dimension of 11 Li, one may expect, that in a fusion experiment on a light target, the valence neutrons will not be absorbed together with the 9 Li core, but will be emitted in the early stage of the reaction process. The experiment aiming to check this expectation, performed at RIKEN-RIPS facility, is described. In the experimental arrangement, three main parts are present: the first part contains the detectors used for the control, identification and determination of the beam characteristics; the second part consists of a Multiple Sampling Ionisation Chamber (MUSIC), used for identification of the inclusive evaporation residue spectra produced in the detector-target; the third part consists of two wall neutron detectors, each made up of 15 plastic scintillators. This detector was used for the energy and position determination of the neutrons originating from the target. The projectile energy range was 11.2 - 15.2 AMeV, centered at 13 AMeV. The neutrons resulting from the reaction were measured by time-of-light technique. The position on the 'wall' of the detected neutrons could be also determined. The measured neutron spectra from 11 Li and 9 Li are shown. A marked different between the two spectra was found and it is explained by the contribution of a large amount of pre-emission (breakup) processes, in case of 11 Li projectiles. The position spectra point out the evaporation origin of the neutrons in case of 9 Li projectiles while for 11 Li only the

  15. Low Resolution Structure of RAR1-GST-Tag Fusion Protein in Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taube, M.; Kozak, M.; Jarmolowski, A.

    2010-01-01

    RAR1 is a protein required for resistance mediated by many R genes and function upstream of signaling pathways leading to H 2 O 2 accumulation. The structure and conformation of RAR1-GST-Tag fusion protein from barley (Hordeum vulgare) in solution was studied by the small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation. It was found that the dimer of RAR1-GST-Tag protein is characterized in solution by radius of gyration R G = 6.19 nm and maximal intramolecular vector D max = 23 nm. On the basis of the small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation SAXS data two bead models obtained by ab initio modeling are proposed. Both models show elongated conformations. We also concluded that molecules of fusion protein form: dimers in solution via interaction of GST domains. (authors)

  16. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Permyakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L. genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  17. Rational design of highly potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins: Implication for developing antiviral therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Gao, George F.; Tien Po

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant protein containing one heptad-repeat 1 (HR1) segment and one HR2 segment of the HIV-1 gp41 (HR1-HR2) has been shown to fold into thermally stable six-helix bundle, representing the fusogenic core of gp41. In this study, we have used the fusogenic core as a scaffold to design HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins by linking another HR1 to the C terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR121) or additional HR2 to the N terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR212). Both recombinant proteins could be abundantly and solubly expressed and easily purified, exhibiting high stability and potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 fusion with IC 50 values of 16.2 ± 2.8 and 2.8 ± 0.63 nM, respectively. These suggest that these rationally designed proteins can be further developed as novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics

  18. Melittin-MIL-2 fusion protein as a candidate for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingjun; Wang, Haitao; Liu, Linjie; Wang, Bin; Sun, Guirong

    2016-06-01

    Cytokine fusion protein that modulates the immune response holds great potential for cancer immunotherapy. IL-2 is an effective treatment against advanced cancers. However, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-2 is limited by severe systemic toxicity. Several mutants recombinant IL-2 can increase antitumor activity and minimize systemic toxicity. Melittin is an attractive anticancer candidate because of its wide-spectrum lytic properties. We previously generated a bifunctional fusion protein melittin-MIL-2, composed of melittin and a mutant IL-2. The melittin-MIL-2 inhibited the growth of human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells in vitro and in vivo tumor growth. However, whether this antitumor effect could also be used in cancer immunotherapy was unknown. To assess its cancer immunotherapy potential, we further investigated its more effective antitumor immune response and antitumor effect against cancers of different tissue origins in vitro and in vivo. The specific IL-2 activity of the melittin-MIL-2 fusion protein was tested on the cytokine growth dependent cell line CTLL-2. The cytolytic activity was detected by standard 4-h (51)Cr-release assays. PBMC stimulation in response to the melittin-MIL-2 was determined by IFN-γ release assay. We observed the cancer cell proliferation of different tissue origins by MTT assay. The ability of melittin-MIL-2 to inhibit tumor growth in vivo was evaluated by using human liver (SMMC-7721 cancer cells), lung (A549 cancer cells) and ovarian (SKOV3 cancer cells) cancer xenograft models. To assess the immunity within the tumor microenvironment, the level of some cytokines including IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12 and IL-4 was analyzed by ELISA. We injected the MDA-MB-231 cells and the melittin-MIL-2 into mice, and the anti-metastatic effect was examined by counting nodules in the lung. The melittin-MIL-2 was more effective in inducing T cell and NK-cell cytotoxicity. The fusion protein significantly increased IFN-γ production in PBMCs. In vitro, the

  19. Clinical Applications of Phage-Derived sFvs and sFv Fusion Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Chester

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Single chain Fv antibodies (sFvs have been produced from filamentous bacteriophage libraries obtained from immunised mice. MFE-23, the most characterised of these sFvs, is reactive with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, a glycoprotein that is highly expressed in colorectal adenocarcinomas. MFE-23 has been expressed in bacteria and purified in our laboratory for two clinical trials; a gamma camera imaging trial using 123I-MFE-23 and a radioimmunoguided surgery trial using 125I-MFE-23, where tumour deposits are detected by a hand-held probe during surgery. Both these trials show MFE-23 is safe and effective in localising tumour deposits in patients with cancer. We are now developing fusion proteins which use MFE-23 to deliver a therapeutic moiety; MFE-23::CPG2 targets the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2 for use in the ADEPT (antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy system and MFE::TNFα aims to reduce sequestration and increase tumor concentrations of systemically administered TNFα.

  20. C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs maintained during serial passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, W.-P.; Frey, Teryl K.

    2006-01-01

    Rubella virus (RUB) replicons are derivatives of the RUB infectious cDNA clone that retain the nonstructural open reading frame (NS-ORF) that encodes the replicase proteins but not the structural protein ORF (SP-ORF) that encodes the virion proteins. RUB defective interfering (DI) RNAs contain deletions within the SP-ORF and thus resemble replicons. DI RNAs often retain the 5' end of the capsid protein (C) gene that has been shown to modulate virus-specific RNA synthesis. However, when replicons either with or without the C gene were passaged serially in the presence of wt RUB as a source of the virion proteins, it was found that neither replicon was maintained and DI RNAs were generated. The majority DI RNA species contained in-frame deletions in the SP-ORF leading to a fusion between the 5' end of the C gene and the 3' end of the E1 glycoprotein gene. DI infectious cDNA clones were constructed and transcripts from these DI infectious cDNA clones were maintained during serial passage with wt RUB. The C-E1 fusion protein encoded by the DI RNAs was synthesized and was required for maintenance of the DI RNA during serial passage. This is the first report of a functional novel gene product resulting from deletion during DI RNA generation. Thus far, the role of the C-E1 fusion protein in maintenance of DI RNAs during serial passage remained elusive as it was found that the fusion protein diminished rather than enhanced DI RNA synthesis and was not incorporated into virus particles

  1. Matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus blocks autophagosome fusion with lysosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gannagé, Monique; Dormann, Dorothee; Albrecht, Randy

    2009-01-01

    demonstrate that influenza A virus inhibits macroautophagy, a cellular process known to be manipulated by diverse pathogens. Influenza A virus infection causes accumulation of autophagosomes by blocking their fusion with lysosomes, and one viral protein, matrix protein 2, is necessary and sufficient...... for this inhibition of autophagosome degradation. Macroautophagy inhibition by matrix protein 2 compromises survival of influenza virus-infected cells but does not influence viral replication. We propose that influenza A virus, which also encodes proapoptotic proteins, is able to determine the death of its host cell...

  2. Construction of a linker library with widely controllable flexibility for fusion protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Huang, Ziliang; Zhang, Chong; Dong, Bo-Jun; Guo, Ruo-Hai; Yue, Hong-Wei; Yan, Li-Tang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility or rigidity of the linker between two fused proteins is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. In this study, we constructed a linker library with five elementary units based on the combination of the flexible (GGGGS) and the rigid (EAAAK) units. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that more rigid units in the linkers lead to more helical conformation and hydrogen bonds, and less distance fluctuation between the N- and C-termini of the linker. The diversity of linker flexibility of the linker library was then studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion proteins, which showed that there is a wide range of distribution of the FRET efficiency. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation of CFP-YFP with different linkers also gave identical results with that of FRET efficiency analysis, and we further found that the combination manner of the linker peptide had a remarkable effect on the orientation of CFP and YFP domains. Our studies demonstrated that the construction of the linker library with the widely controllable flexibility could provide appropriate linkers with the desirable characteristics to engineer the fusion proteins with the expected functions.

  3. Insertion of inter-domain linkers improves expression and bioactivity of Zygote arrest (Zar) fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jonathan M; Charlesworth, Amanda

    2017-04-01

    Developmentally important proteins that are crucial for fertilization and embryogenesis are synthesized through highly regulated translation of maternal mRNA. The Zygote arrest proteins, Zar1 and Zar2, are crucial for embryogenesis and have been implicated in binding mRNA and repressing mRNA translation. To investigate Zar1 and Zar2, the full-length proteins had been fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST) or MS2 protein tags with minimal inter-domain linkers derived from multiple cloning sites; however, these fusion proteins expressed poorly and/or lacked robust function. Here, we tested the effect of inserting additional linkers between the fusion domains. Three linkers were tested, each 17 amino acids long with different physical and chemical properties: flexible hydrophilic, rigid extended or rigid helical. In the presence of any of the three linkers, GST-Zar1 and GST-Zar2 had fewer breakdown products. Moreover, in the presence of any of the linkers, MS2-Zar1 was expressed to higher levels, and in dual luciferase tethered assays, both MS2-Zar1 and MS2-Zar2 repressed luciferase translation to a greater extent. These data suggest that for Zar fusion proteins, increasing the length of linkers, regardless of their physical or chemical properties, improves stability, expression and bioactivity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Spatiotemporal dynamics of membrane remodeling and fusion proteins during endocytic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Henning; Auffarth, Kathrin; Kurre, Rainer; Lisse, Dominik; Piehler, Jacob; Ungermann, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Organelles of the endolysosomal system undergo multiple fission and fusion events to combine sorting of selected proteins to the vacuole with endosomal recycling. This sorting requires a consecutive remodeling of the organelle surface in the course of endosomal maturation. Here we dissect the remodeling and fusion machinery on endosomes during the process of endocytosis. We traced selected GFP-tagged endosomal proteins relative to exogenously added fluorescently labeled α-factor on its way from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. Our data reveal that the machinery of endosomal fusion and ESCRT proteins has similar temporal localization on endosomes, whereas they precede the retromer cargo recognition complex. Neither deletion of retromer nor the fusion machinery with the vacuole affects this maturation process, although the kinetics seems to be delayed due to ESCRT deletion. Of importance, in strains lacking the active Rab7-like Ypt7 or the vacuolar SNARE fusion machinery, α-factor still proceeds to late endosomes with the same kinetics. This indicates that endosomal maturation is mainly controlled by the early endosomal fusion and remodeling machinery but not the downstream Rab Ypt7 or the SNARE machinery. Our data thus provide important further understanding of endosomal biogenesis in the context of cargo sorting. © 2015 Arlt et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qianlong [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Blissard, Gary W. [Boyce Thompson Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United State (United States); Liu, Tong-Xian [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Li, Zhaofei, E-mail: zhaofeili73@outlook.com [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  6. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qianlong; Blissard, Gary W.; Liu, Tong-Xian; Li, Zhaofei

    2016-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  7. Baculoviral polyhedrin-Bacillus thuringiensis toxin fusion protein: a protein-based bio-insecticide expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong Hyun; Yeo, Joo Sang; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2005-10-20

    Previously, we found that baculoviral polyhedrin (Polh) used as a fusion partner for recombinant expression in Escherichia coli showed almost the same characteristics (rapid solubilization under alkaline conditions and specific degradation by specific alkaline proteases in insect midgut) as the native baculoviral Polh, and formed easily isolatable inclusion bodies. Here, Polh derived from the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) was fused with a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin protein (truncated Cry1Ac having toxin region as a model Bt toxin) for the novel generation of a new bio-insecticide. The Polh-Cry1Ac fusion protein (approximately 99 kDa) was highly expressed (3.6-fold induction as compared to E. coli-derived single Cry1Ac (approximately 68 kDa)) as an insoluble inclusion body fraction in E. coli. Trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin, which have similar properties to the insect midgut alkaline proteases, rapidly degraded the Polh portion in vitro, leaving only the toxic Cry1Ac protein behind. In vivo, the Polh-Cry1Ac fusion protein showed high insecticidal activity against the pest, Plutella xylostella. Because this novel bio-insecticide employs E. coli as the host, mass production at a low cost should be possible. Also, since this is a protein-based insecticide, living modified organism (LMO) issues such as environmental and ecological safety can be avoided. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  9. A recombinant fusion toxin based on enzymatic inactive C3bot1 selectively targets macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Dmochewitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The C3bot1 protein (~23 kDa from Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosylates and thereby inactivates Rho. C3bot1 is selectively taken up into the cytosol of monocytes/macrophages but not of other cell types such as epithelial cells or fibroblasts. Most likely, the internalization occurs by a specific endocytotic pathway via acidified endosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we tested whether enzymatic inactive C3bot1E174Q serves as a macrophage-selective transport system for delivery of enzymatic active proteins into the cytosol of such cells. Having confirmed that C3bot1E174Q does not induce macrophage activation, we used the actin ADP-ribosylating C2I (∼50 kDa from Clostridium botulinum as a reporter enzyme for C3bot1E174Q-mediated delivery into macrophages. The recombinant C3bot1E174Q-C2I fusion toxin was cloned and expressed as GST-protein in Escherichia coli. Purified C3bot1E174Q-C2I was recognized by antibodies against C2I and C3bot and showed C2I-specific enzyme activity in vitro. When applied to cultured cells C3bot1E174Q-C2I ADP-ribosylated actin in the cytosol of macrophages including J774A.1 and RAW264.7 cell lines as well as primary cultured human macrophages but not of epithelial cells. Together with confocal fluorescence microscopy experiments, the biochemical data indicate the selective uptake of a recombinant C3-fusion toxin into the cytosol of macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, we demonstrated that C3bot1E174Q can be used as a delivery system for fast, selective and specific transport of enzymes into the cytosol of living macrophages. Therefore, C3-based fusion toxins can represent valuable molecular tools in experimental macrophage pharmacology and cell biology as well as attractive candidates to develop new therapeutic approaches against macrophage-associated diseases.

  10. Comparative study of somatostatin-human serum albumin fusion proteins and natural somatostatin on receptor binding, internalization and activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Peng

    Full Text Available Albumin fusion technology, the combination of small molecular proteins or peptides with human serum albumin (HSA, is an effective method for improving the medicinal values of natural small molecular proteins or peptides. However, comparative studies between HSA-fusion proteins or peptides and the parent small molecules in biological and molecular mechanisms are less reported. In this study, we examined the binding property of two novel somatostatin-HSA fusion proteins, (SST142-HSA and (SST282-HSA, to human SSTRs in stably expressing SSTR1-5 HEK 293 cells; observed the regulation of receptor internalization and internalized receptor recycling; and detected the receptors activation of HSA fusion proteins in stably expressing SSTR2- and SSTR3-EGFP cells. We showed that both somatostatin-HSA fusion proteins had high affinity to all five SSTRs, stimulated the ERK1/2 phosphorylation and persistently inhibited the accumulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP in SSTR2- and SSTR3-expressing cells; but were less potent than the synthetic somatostatin-14 (SST-14. Our experiments also showed that somatostatin-HSA fusion proteins did not induce the receptors internalization; rather, they accelerated the recycling of the internalized receptors induced by SST-14 to the plasma membrane. Our results indicated that somatostatin-HSA fusion proteins, different from SST-14, exhibit some particular properties in binding, regulating, and