WorldWideScience

Sample records for fusion product alpha

  1. Heavy-quark pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-leading O({alpha}{sup 4}{sub s}) order. One-loop squared contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, B.A.; Merebashvili, Z. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Koerner, J.G. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Rogal, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    We calculate the next-to-next-to-leading order O({alpha}{sup 4}{sub s}) one-loop squared corrections to the production of heavy quark pairs in the gluon-gluon fusion process. Together with the previously derived results on the q anti q production channel the results of this paper complete the calculation of the oneloop squared contributions of the next-to-next-to-leading order O({alpha}{sup 4}{sub s}) radiative QCD corrections to the hadroproduction of heavy flavours. Our results, with the full mass dependence retained, are presented in a closed and very compact form, in dimensional regularization. (orig.)

  2. Alpha-nucleus potential for alpha-decay and sub-barrier fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, V Y

    2005-01-01

    The set of parameters for alpha-nucleus potential is derived by using the data for both the alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections around the barrier for reactions alpha+40Ca, alpha+59Co, alpha+208Pb. The alpha-decay half-lives are obtained in the framework of a cluster model using the WKB approximation. The evaluated alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections agreed well with the data. Fusion reactions between alpha-particle and heavy nuclei can be used for both the formation of very heavy nuclei and spectroscopic studies of the formed compound nuclei.

  3. Alpha-nucleus potential for alpha-decay and sub-barrier fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Denisov, V. Yu.; Ikezoe, H.

    2005-01-01

    The set of parameters for alpha-nucleus potential is derived by using the data for both the alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections around the barrier for reactions alpha+40Ca, alpha+59Co, alpha+208Pb. The alpha-decay half-lives are obtained in the framework of a cluster model using the WKB approximation. The evaluated alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections agreed well with the data. Fusion reactions between alpha-particle and heavy nuclei can be used for both the f...

  4. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which fusion alpha particles contribute to the fusion yield is essential to understanding the onset of the thermal runaway process of thermonuclear ignition. It is shown that in inertial confinement fusion, the yield enhancement due to alpha particle heating (before ignition occurs) depends on the generalized Lawson parameter that can be inferred from experimental observables. A universal curve valid for arbitrary laser-fusion targets shows the yield amplification due to alpha heating for a given value of the Lawson parameter. The same theory is used to determine the onset of the burning plasma regime when the alpha heating exceeds the compression work. This result can be used to assess the performance of current ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  5. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  6. Hydrogen Production in Fusion Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M; Uenosono, C.

    1993-01-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated.

  7. Fusion Energy for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J. R.; Steinberg, M.; Salzano, F.; Benenati, R.; Dang, V.; Fogelson, S.; Isaacs, H.; Kouts, H.; Kushner, M.; Lazareth, O.; Majeski, S.; Makowitz, H.; Sheehan, T. V.

    1978-09-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

  8. Higgs production in gluon fusion beyond NNLO

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D; Forte, Stefano; Marzani, Simone; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    We construct an approximate expression for the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO) in alpha_s with finite top mass. We argue that an accurate approximationcan be constructed by exploiting the analiticity of the Mellin space cross section, and the information on its singularity structure coming from large N (soft gluon, Sudakov) and small N (high energy, BFKL) all order resummation. We support our argument with an explicit comparison of the approximate and the exact expressions up to the highest (NNLO) order at which the latter are available. We find that the approximate N3LO result amounts to a correction of 17% to the NNLO QCD cross section for production of a 125 GeV Higgs at the LHC (8 TeV), larger than previously estimated, and it significantly reduces the scale dependence of the NNLO result.

  9. Inertially confined fusion plasmas dominated by alpha-particle self-heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J. A.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G.; Kozioziemski, B.; Grim, G.; Field, J. E.; Frenje, J.; Izumi, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Landen, O.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Rygg, R. R.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Shaughnessy, D.; Strozzi, D.; Town, R. P. J.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-particle self-heating, the process of deuterium-tritium fusion reaction products depositing their kinetic energy locally within a fusion reaction region and thus increasing the temperature in the reacting region, is essential for achieving ignition in a fusion system. Here, we report new inertial confinement fusion experiments where the alpha-particle heating of the plasma is dominant with the fusion yield produced exceeding the fusion yield from the work done on the fuel (pressure times volume change) by a factor of two or more. These experiments have achieved the highest yield (26 +/- 0.5 kJ) and stagnation pressures (≍220 +/- 40 Gbar) of any facility-based inertial confinement fusion experiments, although they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the National Ignition Facility (~300-400 Gbar). These experiments put us in a new part of parameter space that has not been extensively studied so far because it lies between the no-alpha-particle-deposition regime and ignition.

  10. Fokker Planck kinetic modeling of suprathermal alpha-particles in a fusion plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Peigney, Benjamin-Edouard; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We present an ion kinetic model describing the ignition and burn of the deuterium-tritium fuel of inertial fusion targets. The analysis of the underlying physical model enables us to develop efficient numerical methods to simulate the creation, transport and collisional relaxation of fusion reaction products (alpha-particles) at a kinetic level. A two-energy-scale approach leads to a self-consistent modeling of the coupling between suprathermal alpha-particles and the thermal bulk of the imploding plasma. This method provides an accurate numerical treatment of energy deposition and transport processes involving suprathermal particles. The numerical tools presented here are validated against known analytical results. This enables us to investigate the potential role of ion kinetic effects on the physics of ignition and thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion schemes.

  11. Alfven Eigenmode And Ion Bernstein Wave Studies For Controlling Fusion Alpha Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Heeter, R F

    1999-01-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion reactor plasmas, the charged fusion products (such as alpha particles in deuterium-tritium plasmas) will be the dominant power source, and by controlling these charged fusion products using wave-particle interactions the reactor performance could be optimized. This thesis studies two candidate waves: Mode-Converted Ion Bernstein Waves (MCIBWs) and Alfvén Eigenmodes (AEs). Rates of MCIBW-driven losses of alpha-like fast deuterons, previously observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), are reproduced by a new model so that the wave-particle diffusion coefficient can be deduced. The MCIBW power in TFTR is found to be ∼ 1/3 that needed for collisionless alpha particle control. A reasonable reactor power scaling is derived. To study AEs, existing magnetic fluctuation probes at the Joint European Torus (JET) have been absolutely calibrated from 30–500 kHz for the first time, allowing fluctuation measurements with &vbm0;dBpol&vbm0;/B0&am...

  12. GAMMA-RAY DIAGNOSTICS OF ALPHA-SLOWING IN INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION-TARGETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENDOOVEN, PG; DRAKE, RP; CABLE, MD; Dendooven, Peter

    1993-01-01

    For large inertial confinement fusion deuterium-tritium targets, a way to diagnose alpha slowing might be via capture reaction gamma rays. Calculations are presented for two such methods: one uses the alpha+T direct capture gamma rays, the other is based on a series of resonant alpha-capture reactio

  13. GAMMA-RAY DIAGNOSTICS OF ALPHA-SLOWING IN INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION-TARGETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENDOOVEN, PG; DRAKE, RP; CABLE, MD; Dendooven, Peter

    1993-01-01

    For large inertial confinement fusion deuterium-tritium targets, a way to diagnose alpha slowing might be via capture reaction gamma rays. Calculations are presented for two such methods: one uses the alpha+T direct capture gamma rays, the other is based on a series of resonant alpha-capture

  14. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J. R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

  15. On the approximations of the distribution function of fusion alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilato, R., E-mail: roberto.bilato@ipp.mpg.de; Brambilla, M.; Poli, E. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The solution of the drift-kinetic equation for fusion-born alpha particles is derived in the limit of dominant parallel streaming, and it is related to the usual slowing-down distribution function. The typical approximations of the fast tail of fusion-born alpha particles are briefly compared and discussed. In particular, approximating the distribution function of fast-alpha particles with an “equivalent” Maxwellian is inaccurate to describe absorption of radio-frequency waves in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies.

  16. Impact of ICRH on the measurement of fusion alphas by collective Thomson scattering in ITER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Eriksson, L.-G.; Bindslev, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) has been proposed for measuring the phase space distributions of confined fast ion populations in ITER plasmas. This study determines the impact of fast ions accelerated by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) on the ability of CTS to diagnose fusion alphas......, corresponding to an off-axis resonance. The sensitivities of the results to the He-3 concentration (0.1-4%) and the heating power (20-40 MW) are considered. Fusion born alphas dominate the total CTS signal for large Doppler shifts of the scattered radiation. The tritons generate a negligible fraction...... perpendicular velocities, it may be difficult to draw conclusions about the physics of alpha particles alone by CTS. With this exception, the CTS diagnostic can reveal the physics of the fusion alphas in ITER even under the presence of fast ions due to ICRH....

  17. Estimation of the {alpha} particles and neutron distribution generated during a fusion reaction; Evaluation de la distribution des particules {alpha} et des neutrons issus de la reaction de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellacherie, S.

    1997-12-01

    The respective distributions (or density probabilities) of {alpha} particles and neutrons have been modeled using a Monte-Carlo method for the thermonuclear fusion reaction D + T {yields} {alpha} + n + 17.6 MeV. (N.T.).

  18. Expression pattern of the RAR alpha-PML fusion gene in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalay, M; Zangrilli, D; Fagioli, M; Pandolfi, P P; Mencarelli, A; Lo Coco, F; Biondi, A; Grignani, F; Pelicci, P G

    1992-01-01

    Two chimeric genes, PML-RAR alpha and RAR alpha-PML, are formed as a consequence of the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)-specific reciprocal translocation of chromosomes 15 and 17 [t(15;17)]. PML-RAR alpha is expressed as a fusion protein. We investigated the organization and expression pattern of the RAR alpha-PML gene in a series of APL patients representative of the molecular heterogeneity of the t(15;17) and found (i) two types of RAR alpha-PML mRNA junctions (RAR alpha exon 2/PML exon 4 or RAR alpha exon 2/PML exon 7) that maintain the RAR alpha and PML longest open reading frames aligned and are the result of chromosome 15 breaking at two different sites; and (ii) 10 different RAR alpha-PML fusion transcripts that differ for the assembly of their PML coding exons. A RAR alpha-PML transcript was present in most, but not all, APL patients. Images PMID:1317574

  19. Multiscale modeling study of pulsed damage accumulation in alpha-Fe under inertial fusion conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Perlado, J M; Dominguez, E; Prieto, J; Caturla, M J; Díaz de la Rubia, T

    2002-01-01

    Reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels are being considered as candidate materials for the first structural wall of a future fusion reactor, due to their high resistance to neutron irradiation. A combination of molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo has been utilized to analyze and assess the change and evolution of the microstructure in irradiated alpha-Fe, the main component of RAFM steels. We discuss how the pulse frequency, 1 and 10 Hz, may affect the damage production and accumulation. Dose rates of 0.1 and 0.01 dpa/s will be considered in order to represent the damage suffered by a protected first structural wall. These results will be compared with previous work on the subject and with those achieved with continuous irradiation at similar average dose rate.

  20. Simulations of alpha parameters in a TFTR DT supershot with high fusion power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Janos, A.C. [and others

    1995-07-01

    A TFTR supershot with a plasma current of 2.5 MA, neutral beam heating power of 33.7 MW, and a peak DT fusion power of 7.5 MW is studied using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Simulations of alpha parameters such as the alpha heating, pressure, and distributions in energy and v{sub parallel}/v are given. The effects of toroidal ripple and mixing of the fast alpha particles during the sawteeth observed after the neutral beam injection phase are modeled. The distributions of alpha particles on the outer midplane are peaked near forward and backward v{sub parallel}/v. Ripple losses deplete the distributions in the vicinity of v{sub parallel}/v {approximately}{minus}0.4. Sawtooth mixing of fast alpha particles is computed to reduce their central density and broaden their width in energy.

  1. Measurement of limiter heating due to fusion product losses during high fusion power deuterium-tritium operation of TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janos, A.; Owens, D.K.; Darrow, D.; Redi, M.; Zarnstorff, M.; Zweben, S.

    1995-03-01

    Preliminary analysis has been completed on measurements of limiter heating during high fusion power deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation of TFTR, in an attempt to identify heating from alpha particle losses. Recent operation of TFTR with a 50-50 mix of D-T has resulted in fusion power output ({approx} 6.2 MW) orders of magnitude above what was previously achieved on TFTR. A significantly larger absolute number of particles and energy from fusion products compared to D-D operation is expected to be lost to the limiters. Measurements were made in the vicinity of the midplane ({plus_minus} 30{degree}) with thermocouples mounted on the tiles of an outboard limiter. Comparisons were made -between discharges which were similar except for the mix of deuterium and tritium beam sources. Power and energy estimates of predicted alpha losses were as high as 0.13 MW and 64 kJ. Depending on what portion of the limiters absorbed this energy, temperature rises of up to 42 {degrees}C could be expected, corresponding to a heat load of 0.69 MJ/m{sup 2} over a 0.5 sec period, or a power load of 1.4 MW/m{sup 2}. There was a measurable increase in the limiter tile temperature as the fusion power yield increased with a more reactive mixture of D and T at constant beam power during high power D-T operation. Analysis of the data is being conducted to see if the alpha heating component can be extracted. Measured temperature increases were no greater than 1 {degree}C, indicating that there was probably neither an unexpectedly large fraction of lost particles nor unexpected localization of the losses. Limits on the stochastic ripple loss contribution from alphas can be deduced.

  2. Quantum cluster algebras and fusion products

    CERN Document Server

    Di Francesco, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    $Q$-systems are recursion relations satisfied by the characters of the restrictions of special finite-dimensional modules of quantum affine algebras. They can also be viewed as mutations in certain cluster algebras, which have a natural quantum deformation. In this paper, we explain the relation in the simply-laced case between the resulting quantum $Q$-systems and the graded tensor product of Feigin and Loktev. We prove the graded version of the $M=N$ identities, and write expressions for these as non-commuting evaluated multi-residues of suitable products of solutions of the quantum $Q$-system. This leads to a simple reformulation of Feigin and Loktev's fusion coefficients as matrix elements in a representation of the quantum $Q$-system algebra.

  3. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoseyov, Oded (Shimshon, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (North Gallilea, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Cell fusion in tumor progression: the isolation of cell fusion products by physical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincitorio Massimo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell fusion induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG is an efficient but poorly controlled procedure for obtaining somatic cell hybrids used in gene mapping, monoclonal antibody production, and tumour immunotherapy. Genetic selection techniques and fluorescent cell sorting are usually employed to isolate cell fusion products, but both procedures have several drawbacks. Results Here we describe a simple improvement in PEG-mediated cell fusion that was obtained by modifying the standard single-step procedure. We found that the use of two PEG undertreatments obtains a better yield of cell fusion products than the standard method, and most of these products are bi- or trinucleated polykaryocytes. Fusion rate was quantified using fluorescent cell staining microscopy. We used this improved cell fusion and cell isolation method to compare giant cells obtained in vitro and giant cells obtained in vivo from patients with Hodgkin's disease and erythroleukemia. Conclusions In the present study we show how to improve PEG-mediated cell fusion and that cell separation by velocity sedimentation offers a simple alternative for the efficient purification of cell fusion products and to investigate giant cell formation in tumor development.

  5. Alpha-muon sticking and chaos in muon-catalysed d-t fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, S; Kimura, Sachie; Bonasera, Aldo

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the alpha-muon sticking coefficient in the muon-catalysed d-t fusion in the framework of the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model. Especially the influence of muonic chaotic dynamics on the sticking coefficient is brought into focus. The chaotic motion of the muon affects not only the fusion cross section but also the $\\mu-\\alpha$ sticking coefficient. Chaotic systems lead to larger enhancements with respect to regular systems because of the reduction of the tunneling region. Moreover they give smaller sticking probabilities than those of regular events. By utilizing a characteristic of the chaotic dynamics one can avoid losing the muon in the $\\mu$CF cycle. We propose that the application of the so-called "microwave ionization of a Rydberg atom" to the present case could lead to the enhancement of the reactivation process by using X-rays.

  6. Upgrade of the IGN-14 neutron generator for research on detection of fusion-plasma products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igielski, Andrzej; Kurowski, Arkadiusz; Janik, Władysław; Gabańska, Barbara; Woźnicka, Urszula, E-mail: Urszula.Woznicka@ifj.edu.pl

    2015-10-11

    The fast neutron generator (IGN-14) at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN) in Kraków (Poland) is a laboratory multi-purpose experimental device. Neutrons are produced in a beam-target D–D or D–T reactions. A new vacuum chamber installed directly to the end of the ion guide of IGN-14 makes it possible to measure not only neutrons but also alpha particles in the presence of a mixed radiation field of other accompanying reaction products. The new experimental setup allows test detectors dedicated to spectrometric measurements of thermonuclear fusion reaction products. - Highlights: • Nuclear reactions at the target correspond to the fusion reaction in hot plasma. • Measuring vacuum chamber has been built and installed. • Spatial distribution of the particle mixed fields in chamber was calculated. • New experimental setup for tests of detectors dedicated to measure of fusion reaction products.

  7. Double-real corrections at O(alpha alpha_s) to single gauge boson production

    CERN Document Server

    Bonciani, Roberto; Mondini, Roberto; Vicini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We consider the O(alpha alpha_s) corrections to single on-shell gauge boson production at hadron colliders. We concentrate on the contribution of all the subprocesses where the gauge boson is accompanied by the emission of two additional real partons and we evaluate the corresponding total cross sections. The latter are divergent quantities, because of soft and collinear emissions, and are expressed as Laurent series in the dimensional regularization parameter. The total cross sections are evaluated by means of reverse unitarity, i.e. expressing the phase-space integrals in terms of two-loop forward box integrals with cuts on the final state particles. The results are reduced to a combination of Master Integrals, which eventually are evaluated in terms of Generalized Polylogarithms. The presence of internal massive lines in the Feynman diagrams, due to the exchange of electroweak gauge bosons, causes the appearance of 14 Master Integrals which were not previously known in the literature and have been evaluate...

  8. Product Modeling Based on Knowledge Fusion in Virtual Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹湘军; 孙健; 何汉武

    2004-01-01

    Following researches on the knowledge-based product design, product modeling based on knowledge fusion is studied in a virtual environment. Knowledge fusion is the energy sources of product innovation designs. Because a knowledge representation method is the main content of knowledge fusion, production rule way, semantic network, predicate, object-oriented and case-based representations are discussed. Using agents with object-oriented method, the knowledge can be represented as a set. The product knowledge set is divided into two subset: text knowledge and knowledge of engineering graphics that is a different form. Manipulation of the subset knowledge and fusion method is described. The paper also describes a six-tuple function in an agent data structure. A virtual environment computation model is proposed, and a practical example given.

  9. Transport and deceleration of fusion products in microturbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, George J.; Abel, Ian G.; Landreman, Matt; Dorland, William

    2016-06-01

    The velocity-space distribution of alpha particles born in fusion devices is subject to modification at moderate energies due to turbulent transport. Therefore, one must calculate the evolution of an equilibrium distribution whose functional form is not known a priori. Using a novel technique, applicable to any trace impurity, we have made this calculation for fully nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations not only possible but also particularly efficient. We demonstrate a microturbulence-induced departure from the local slowing-down distribution, an inversion of the energy distribution, and associated modifications to the alpha heating and pressure profiles in an ITER-like scenario.

  10. Transport and deceleration of fusion products in microturbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkie, George J; Landreman, Matt; Dorland, William

    2016-01-01

    The velocity-space distribution of alpha particles born in fusion devices is subject to modification at moderate energies due to turbulent transport. Therefore, one must calculate the evolution of an equilibrium distribution whose functional form is not known \\emph{a priori}. Using a novel technique, applicable to any trace impurity, we have made this calculation not only possible, but particularly efficient. We demonstrate a microturbulence-induced departure from the local slowing-down distribution, an inversion of the energy distribution, and associated modifications to the alpha heating and pressure profiles in an ITER-like scenario.

  11. K-alpha conversion efficiency measurments for x-ray scattering in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A L; Neumayer, P; Urry, M K; Robey, H; Niemann, C; Landen, O L; Morse, E; Glenzer, S H

    2006-11-21

    The conversion efficiency of ultra short-pulse laser radiation to K-{alpha} x-rays has been measured for various chlorine-containing targets to be used as x-ray scattering probes of dense plasmas. The spectral and temporal properties of these sources will allow spectrally-resolved x-ray scattering probing with picosecond temporal resolution required for measuring the plasma conditions in inertial confinement fusion experiments. Simulations of x-ray scattering spectra from these plasmas show that fuel capsule density, capsule ablator density, and shock timing information may be inferred.

  12. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Campbell, E. M.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Nora, R.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Glebov, V. Yu; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  13. Core conditions for alpha heating attained in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, A; Woo, K M; Betti, R; Campbell, E M; Mangino, D; Christopherson, A R; McCrory, R L; Nora, R; Regan, S P; Goncharov, V N; Sangster, T C; Forrest, C J; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Glebov, V Yu; Knauer, J P; Marshall, F J; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W

    2016-07-01

    It is shown that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion [Regan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 025001 (2016)10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.025001] extrapolated to a 1.9 MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions.

  14. ConnesFusionTensorProduct/Photon GluonFusion in Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wh-Maksoed, Prodi Of Physics Ui, Depok 16415-Indonesia; Ssi, Wh-Maksoed

    2016-05-01

    As in AJ Wassermann distinguished of classical invariant theory & quantum invariant theory subfactor, in S. Palcoux:``From Neveu-Schwarz Subfactors & Connes Fusion'' described the subfactor theory & Witt-algebra whereas Andreas Thom's explanation about ConnesFusionTensorProduct/CFTP related Connes fusion to composition of homomorphism (i). classical tensor product O-X adds the changes,(ii). Relative tensor product H-X preserve the changes. For photonGluonFusion/PGF defined:''photon is the gauge boson of QED, the simplest of all boson'' devotes to CFT as ``quantum field theory which are invariant under conformal transformation & in 2D there are infinite dimensional algebra. Alain Connes states theirselves Connes fusion as ``associative tensor operation'' to be in coincidences with ``their dynamic behavior driven by the balance in mitochondrial fusion & fission (Carveney, 2007) from Peter Alexander Williams: ``Retinal neuronal remodeling in a model of Optic Atrophy'', Dec, 2011. Great acknowledged to the VicePresident of the R.I, HE.Mr. Drs. M. JUSUF KALLA.

  15. HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from a LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R = 1.0 to 3.0) requirements. These studies also indicate that masses on the order of 1.0 g at densities of rho greater than or equal to 500.0 g/cm/sup 3/ are required for a practical fusion-based fission product transmutation system.

  16. Particle-in-cell simulations of an alpha channeling scenario: electron current drive arising from lower hybrid drift instability of fusion-born ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James; Chapman, Sandra; Dendy, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of fusion-born protons in deuterium plasmas demonstrate a key alpha channeling phenomenon for tokamak fusion plasmas. We focus on obliquely propagating modes at the plasma edge, excited by centrally born fusion products on banana orbits, known to be responsible for observations of ion cyclotron emission in JET and TFTR. A fully self-consistent electromagnetic 1D3V PIC code evolves a ring-beam distribution of 3MeV protons in a 10keV thermal deuterium-electron plasma with realistic mass ratio. A collective instability occurs, giving rise to electromagnetic field activity in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. Waves spontaneously excited by this lower hybrid drift instability undergo Landau damping on resonant electrons, drawing out an asymmetric tail in the distribution of electron parallel velocities, which constitutes a net current. These simulations demonstrate a key building block of some alpha channeling scenarios: the direct collisionless coupling of fusion product energy into a form which can help sustain the equilibrium of the tokamak.

  17. Fusion performances and alpha heating in future JET D-T plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balet, B.; Cordey, J.G.; Gibson, A.; Lomas, P.; Stubberfield, P.M.; Thomas, P. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    The new pump divertor installed at JET should allow high performance pulses of a few seconds duration by both preventing the impurity influx and controlling the density evolution. The TRANSP code has been used in a predictive mode to assess the possible fusion performance of such plasmas fuelled with a 50:50 mixture of D and T, and the effect of alpha particles heating on Te and Ti. Several cases are considered: 50:50 D-T mix; 50:50 D-T mix, no C bloom; 50:50 D-T mix, VH phase, density control; 50:50 D-T mix, VH phase, density control, 6 Ma. The predictions show that if the the bloom and MHD instabilities can be controlled at higher plasma currents using a higher toroidal field to keep a reasonable beta value, then a higher fusion performance steady state plasma with Q{sub DT} superior to 2.5 should be possible. The alpha heating power of 4.9 MW would lead to a 74% increase in Te. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Microstructural refinement of weld fusion zones in {alpha}-{beta} titanium alloys using pulsed current welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaresan, S.; Janaki Ram, G.D. [Indian Inst. of Technol., Chennai (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering; Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Defence Metallurgical Research Lab., Hyderabad (India)

    1999-04-01

    Pulsing of the welding current is one approach for refining the fusion zone grain structure in {alpha}-{beta} titanium alloy welds. This paper reports work in which gas tungsten-arc welds were produced in two {alpha}-{beta} titanium alloys under a variety of conditions including direct current (d.c.) pulsing and alternating current (a.c.) pulsing. The results show that, while d.c. pulsing did also refine the weld metal {beta} grain structure, the effect of a.c. pulsing was much greater. Current pulsing enhances fluid flow, reduces temperature gradients and causes a continual change in the weld pool size and shape. These effects, which are believed to be responsible for refining the solidification structure, are much stronger in a.c. pulsing than in d.c. pulsing. The observed grain refinement was shown to result in an appreciable increase in fusion zone tensile ductility. Post-weld heat treatment improved ductility both in pulsed and unpulsed welds, but pulsed welds showed greater tensile elongation even in the heat treated condition. (orig.) 27 refs.

  19. The ALPHA detector : Module Production and Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Butler, E; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Friesen, T; Gutierrez, A; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Jonsell, S; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Pusa, P; Sampson, J; Seddon, D; Seif el Nasr, S; So, C; Thornhill, J; Wells, D; Jorgensen, L V

    2012-01-01

    ALPHA is one of the experiments situated at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD). A Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is placed to surround the ALPHA atom trap. The main purpose of the SVD is to detect and locate antiproton annihilation events by means of the emitted charged pions. The SVD system is presented with special focus given to the design, fabrication and performance of the modules.

  20. The ALPHA - detector: Module Production and Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; JØrgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; McKenna, J. T. K.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sampson, J.; Sarid, E.; Seddon, D.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2012-01-01

    ALPHA is one of the experiments situated at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD). A Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD) is placed to surround the ALPHA atom trap. The main purpose of the SVD is to detect and locate antiproton annihilation events by means of the emitted charged pions. The SVD system is presented with special focus given to the design, fabrication and performance of the modules.

  1. One-step production of immobilized alpha-amylase in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasiah, Indira A; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2009-04-01

    Industrial enzymes are often immobilized via chemical cross-linking onto solid supports to enhance stability and facilitate repeated use in bioreactors. For starch-degrading enzymes, immobilization usually places constraints on enzymatic conversion due to the limited diffusion of the macromolecular substrate through available supports. This study describes the one-step immobilization of a highly thermostable alpha-amylase (BLA) from Bacillus licheniformis and its functional display on the surface of polyester beads inside engineered Escherichia coli. An optimized BLA variant (Termamyl) was N-terminally fused to the polyester granule-forming enzyme PhaC of Cupriavidus necator. The fusion protein lacking the signal sequence mediated formation of stable polyester beads exhibiting alpha-amylase activity. The alpha-amylase beads were assessed with respect to alpha-amylase activity, which was demonstrated qualitatively and quantitatively. The immobilized alpha-amylase showed Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics exerting a V(max) of about 506 mU/mg of bead protein with a K(m) of about 5 microM, consistent with that of free alpha-amylase. The stability of the enzyme at 85 degrees C and the capacity for repeated usage in a starch liquefaction process were also demonstrated. In addition, structural integrity and functionality of the beads at extremes of pH and temperature, demonstrating their suitability for industrial use, were confirmed by electron microscopy and protein/enzyme analysis. This study proposes a novel, cost-effective method for the production of immobilized alpha-amylase in a single step by using the polyester granules forming protein PhaC as a fusion partner in engineered E. coli.

  2. Carbon-14 production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.

    1976-09-01

    Calculations based on existing composition data were performed to estimate the order of magnitude and the final location of /sup 14/C in fusion reactors. These calculations indicate that approximately 8 Ci/day, formed principally by /sup 14/N activation, will be produced in the UWMAK-II reference reactor (5,000 MWth). If Nb-1 percent Zr is used as the structural material instead of stainless steel 316 this quantity will be more than doubled. No information is available on the form of the /sup 14/C produced, but reduced forms such as carbides, hydrocarbons and perhaps CO may be produced. Most of the /sup 14/C may remain fixed in structural and other reactor materials until the material is reclaimed. Activation of air in the plasma chamber would be an immediate concern.

  3. Achievement of Core Conditions for Alpha Heating in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Betti, R.; Mangino, D.; Christopherson, A. R.; Theobald, W.; Campbell, E. M.; McCrory, R. L.; Regan, S. P.; Goncharov, V. N.; Sangster, T. C.; Forrest, C. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Nora, R.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-10-01

    It is shown for the first time that direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA laser have achieved core conditions that would lead to significant alpha heating at incident energies available at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) scale. The extrapolation of the experimental results from OMEGA to NIF energy assumes only that the implosion hydrodynamic efficiency is unchanged at higher energies. This approach is independent of the uncertainties in the physical mechanism that degrade implosions on OMEGA, and relies solely on a volumetric scaling of the experimentally observed core conditions. It is estimated that the current best-performing OMEGA implosion extrapolated to a 1.9-MJ laser driver with the same illumination configuration and laser-target coupling would produce 125 kJ of fusion energy with similar levels of alpha heating observed in current highest performing indirect-drive NIF implosions. This conclusion is reached using an analytic scaling as well as direct numerical simulations of energy-scaled targets. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. RF heating for fusion product studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellsten, T., E-mail: thel@kth.se; Johnson, T. [Dept. of Fusion Plasma Physics, School of Electrical Engineering, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Sharapov, S. E.; Kiptily, V.; Rimini, F. [CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre Abingdon (United Kingdom); Eriksson, J. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University (Sweden); Mantsinen, M. [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona (Spain); Schneider, M. [IRFM-CEA, Saint-Paul-Lez Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [FOM Inst. DIFFER, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-12-10

    Third harmonic cyclotron heating is an effective tool for accelerating deuterium (D) beams to the MeV energy range, suitable for studying ITER relevant fast particle physics in plasmas without significant tritium content. Such experiments were recently conducted in JET with an ITER like wall in D plasmas with {sup 3}He concentrations up to 30% in order to boost the fusion reactivity by D-{sup 3}He reactions. The harmonic cyclotron heating produces high-energy tails in the MeV range of D ions by on-axis heating and of {sup 3}He ions by tangential off-axis heating. The discharges are characterized by long sawtooth free periods and a rich spectrum of MHD modes excited by the fast D and {sup 3}He ions. The partitions of the power, which depend on the distribution function of D, vary strongly over several slowing down times. Self-consistent modelling of the distribution function with the SELFO-light code are presented and compared with experimental data from fast particle diagnostics.

  5. Experimental investigation of the confinement of d(3He,p)α and d(d,p)t fusion reaction products in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonheure, Georges; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.

    2012-01-01

    In ITER, magnetic fusion will explore the burning plasma regime. Because such burning plasma is sustained by its own fusion reactions, alpha particles need to be confined (Hazeltine 2010 Fusion Eng. Des. 7–9 85). New experiments using d(3He,p)α and d(d,p)t fusion reaction products were performed...... in JET. Fusion product loss was measured from MHD-quiescent plasmas with a charged particle activation probe installed at a position opposite to the magnetic field ion gradient drift (see figure 1)—1.77 m above mid-plane—in the ceiling of JET tokamak. This new kind of escaping ion detector (Bonheure et...... al 2008 Fusion Sci. Technol. 53 806) provides for absolutely calibrated measurements. Both the mechanism and the magnitude of the loss are dealt with by this research. Careful analysis shows measured loss is in quantitative agreement with predictions from the classical orbit loss model. However...

  6. Concept of a charged fusion product diagnostic for NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeglin, W. U.; Valenzuela Perez, R. [Department of Physics, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, Florida 33199 (United States); Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, James Forrestal Campus, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The concept of a new diagnostic for NSTX to determine the time dependent charged fusion product emission profile using an array of semiconductor detectors is presented. The expected time resolution of 1-2 ms should make it possible to study the effect of magnetohydrodynamics and other plasma activities (toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAE), neoclassical tearing modes (NTM), edge localized modes (ELM), etc.) on the radial transport of neutral beam ions. First simulation results of deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton yields for different detector arrangements and methods for inverting the simulated data to obtain the emission profile are discussed.

  7. Li production in alpha-alpha reactions. [relation to gamma ray observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovsky, B.; Ramaty, R.

    1974-01-01

    The cross section for Li-7 production in alpha-alpha reactions is shown to be increased by about a factor of 2 due to the excitation levels of Li-7 and Be-7 at 478 keV and 431 keV, respectively. The cross section for Li-6 production, however, remains the same as calculated on the basis of the detailed balance principle. The lines at 478 keV and 431 keV may link Li-7 production to feasible gamma-ray observations.

  8. Design of a Fast Neutral He Beam System for Feasibility Study of Charge-Exchange Alpha-Particle Diagnostics in a Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Shinto, Katsuhiro; Kitajima, Sumio; Kiyama, Satoru; Nishiura, Masaki; Sasao, Mamiko; Sugawara, Hiroshi; Takenaga, Mahoko; Takeuchi, Shu; Wada, Motoi

    2005-01-01

    For alpha-particle diagnostics in a thermonuclear fusion reactor, neutralization using a fast (~2 MeV) neutral He beam produced by the spontaneous electron detachment of a He- is considered most promising. However, the beam transport of produced fast neutral He has not been studied, because of difficulty for producing high-brightness He- beam. Double-charge-exchange He- sources and simple beam transport systems were developed and their results were reported in the PAC99* and other papers.** To accelerate an intense He- beam and verify the production of the fast neutral He beam, a new test stand has been designed. It consists of a multi-cusp He+

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} enhanced fusions between oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and endothelial cells via VCAM-1/VLA-4 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kai; Zhu, Fei; Zhang, Han-zhong [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST), Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Shang, Zheng-jun, E-mail: shangzhengjun@hotmail.com [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST), Key Laboratory for Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); First Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China)

    2012-08-15

    Fusion between cancer cells and host cells, including endothelial cells, may strongly modulate the biological behavior of tumors. However, no one is sure about the driving factors and underlying mechanism involved in such fusion. We hypothesized in this study that inflammation, one of the main characteristics in tumor microenvironment, serves as a prominent catalyst for fusion events. Our results showed that oral cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with endothelial cells in co-culture and inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) increased fusion of human umbilical vein endothelium cells and oral cancer cells by up to 3-fold in vitro. Additionally, human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and 35 out of 50 (70%) oral squamous carcinoma specimens express VLA-4, an integrin, previously implicated in fusions between human peripheral blood CD34-positive cells and murine cardiomyocytes. Expression of VCAM-1, a ligand for VLA-4, was evident on vascular endothelium of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry analysis revealed that expression of VCAM-1 increased obviously in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated endothelial cells. Anti-VLA-4 or anti-VCAM-1 treatment can decrease significantly cancer-endothelial adhesion and block such fusion. Collectively, our results suggested that TNF-{alpha} could enhance cancer-endothelial cell adhesion and fusion through VCAM-1/VLA-4 pathway. This study provides insights into regulatory mechanism of cancer-endothelial cell fusion, and has important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for prevention of metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous oral cancer-endothelial cell fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} enhanced cell fusions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCAM-1/VLA-4 expressed in oral cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} increased expression of VCAM-1 on endothelial cells. Black

  10. Spectroscopic performance studies of 4H-SiC detectors for fusion alpha-particle diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, P. Vigneshwara; Akhtar, Jamil; Rao, C. V. S.; Vala, Sudhirsinh; Abhangi, Mitul; Murty, N. V. L. Narasimha

    2017-10-01

    The spectroscopic performances of Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) and bulk detectors fabricated on n-type epitaxial 4H-SiC and high-purity semi-insulating (HPSI) 4H-SiC substrates are studied using 241Am alpha-particles. The spectral responses of the SBD detectors reveal a good energy resolution of 55 keV FWHM (∼1%) at -60 V, and ∼90% charge collection efficiency (CCE) at -100 V. The collected signal charge is stable with time in the SBD detectors; hence polarization effects are not noticed, indicating the good crystalline quality of the epitaxial 4H-SiC for detector applications. On the contrary, a poor energy resolution of 675 keV FWHM (12.3%) at -400 V and a maximum CCE of 28% at -500 V are obtained for the bulk detectors. Moreover, the CCE is found to decrease with time after the application of bias voltage implying the polarization phenomenon. Accordingly, the steady-state CCE of the bulk detectors at -500V is decreased to 13% from its initial value. The inferior spectral response of the bulk detectors is possibly due to the charge trapping and polarization effects. Furthermore, the neutron irradiation effects on the α-particle spectral response of the detectors are examined up to a fluence of 1011 n/cm2. To study the reliability of the SBD detectors at higher irradiation levels, the 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation induced changes in the electrical characteristics of the SBD are investigated up to a fluence of 2 × 1015n/cm2 by device simulations and the probable degradation in the detector response is analyzed. Finally, the possibility of employing 4H-SiC detectors for the fusion alpha-particle diagnostics is discussed.

  11. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  12. Effects of alpha stopping power modelling on the ignition threshold in a directly-driven inertial confinement fusion capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Cayzac, Witold; Ramis, Rafael; Singleton, Robert L.

    2017-05-01

    The alpha-particle energy deposition mechanism modifies the ignition conditions of the thermonuclear Deuterium-Tritium fusion reactions, and constitutes a key issue in achieving high gain in Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations have been performed with the code Multi-IFE [R. Ramis, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Comput. Phys. Commun. 203, 226 (2016)] to simulate the implosion of a capsule directly irradiated by a laser beam. The diffusion approximation for the alpha energy deposition has been used to optimize three laser profiles corresponding to different implosion velocities. A Monte-Carlo package has been included in Multi-IFE to calculate the alpha energy transport, and in this case the energy deposition uses both the LP [C.K. Li, R.D. Petrasso, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 3059 (1993)] and the BPS [L.S. Brown, D.L. Preston, R.L. Singleton Jr., Phys. Rep. 410, 237 (2005)] stopping power models. Homothetic transformations that maintain a constant implosion velocity have been used to map out the transition region between marginally-igniting and high-gain configurations. The results provided by the two models have been compared and it is found that - close to the ignition threshold - in order to produce the same fusion energy, the calculations performed with the BPS model require about 10% more invested energy with respect to the LP model.

  13. Multijet production in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at HERA and determination of alpha_s

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Allfrey, P D; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Behrens, U; Bell, M A; Bellagamba, L; Bellan, P M; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Freiburgi, B; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Büttner, C; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Cottrell, A; Cui, Y; D'Agostini, G; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dobur, D; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Everett, A; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fry, C; Gabareen, A; Galas, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Goers, S; Goncalo, R; González, O; Gosau, T; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grigorescu, G; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Helbich, M; Hilger, E; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Horn, C; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Irrgang, P; Jakob, P; Jiménez, M; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Karshon, U; Karstens, F; Kataoka, M; Katkov, I I; Kcira, D; Keramidas, A; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav--, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal--, H; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kulinski, P; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Lammers, S; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, C; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukasik, J; Lukina, O Yu; Luzniak, P; Ma, K J; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Malka, J; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Miglioranzi, S; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Namsoo, T; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Noor, U; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Ota, O; Padhi, S; Palmonari, F; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, Usan; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Plamondon, M; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Ri, Y D; Rinaldi, L; Robins, S; Rosin, M; Ruspa, M; Ryan, P; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Santamarta, R; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schleper, P; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sciulli, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Smith, W H; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Stösslein, U; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutiak, J; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tapper, A D; Targett--, C; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Tyszkiewicz, A; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Whitmore, J J; Whyte, J; Wichmann, K; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wlasenko, M; Wolf, G; Yagues-Molina, A G; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Za, L; Zambrana, M; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zhou, C; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; De Favereau, J; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J

    2005-01-01

    Multijet production rates in neutral current deep inelastic scattering have been measured in the range of exchanged boson virtualities 10 5 GeV and -1 < eta_{LAB}{jet} < 2.5. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations describe the data well. The value of the strong coupling constant alpha_s(M_Z), determined from the ratio of the trijet to dijet cross sections, is alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1179 pm 0.0013(stat.) {+0.0028}_{-0.0046}(exp.) {+0.0064}_{-0.0046}(th.)

  14. QCD Corrections to Higgs Pair Production in Bottom Quark Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Sally; /Brookhaven; Kao, Chung; /Fermilab /Oklahoma U.; Wang, Yili; Williams, Peter; /Oklahoma U.

    2006-10-01

    We present a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion (b{bar b} {yields} hh) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model. The NLO QCD corrections lead to less dependence on the renormalization scale ({mu}{sub R}) and the factorization scale ({mu}{sub F}) than the leading-order (LO) cross section, and they significantly increase the LO cross section. The rate for inclusive Higgs pair production is small in the Standard Model, but can be large in models with enhanced couplings of the b quark to the Higgs bosons.

  15. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A., E-mail: rpp@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, M.T. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez-Rey, D. [CMAM, UAM, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perlado, M. [IFN, ETSII, UPM, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, A. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  16. Quantum design using a multiple internal reflections method in a study of fusion processes in the capture of alpha-particles by nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Maydanyuk, Sergei P; Belchikov, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    A high precision method to determine fusion in the capture of $\\alpha$-particles by nuclei is presented. For $\\alpha$-capture by $^{40}{\\rm Ca}$ and $^{44}{\\rm Ca}$, such an approach gives (1) the parameters of the $\\alpha$--nucleus potential and (2) fusion probabilities. This method found new parametrization and fusion probabilities and decreased the error by $41.72$ times for $\\alpha + ^{40}{\\rm Ca}$ and $34.06$ times for $\\alpha + ^{44}{\\rm Ca}$ in a description of experimental data in comparison with existing results. We show that the sharp angular momentum cutoff proposed by Glas and Mosel is a rough approximation, Wong's formula and the Hill-Wheeler approach determine the penetrability of the barrier without a correct consideration of the barrier shape, and the WKB approach gives reduced fusion probabilities. Based on our fusion probability formula, we explain the difference between experimental cross-sections for $\\alpha + ^{40}{\\rm Ca}$ and $\\alpha + ^{44}{\\rm Ca}$, which is connected with the theory ...

  17. Explanation of Delayed Fusion Product Loss in TFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweben, S. J.; Yavorski, V.; Andrushchenko, Zh. N.; Goloborod'Ko, V. Ya.; Reznik, S. N.; Edenstrasser, J. W.

    1998-11-01

    Observations of partially thermalized, (i.e. "delayed") fusion product loss have been made at the bottom of TFTR in both DD(S.J. Zweben et al, Phys. Plasmas 1, 1469 (1994)) and DT(H. Herrmann et al, Nuclear Fusion 37, 293 (1997)) plasmas, but the cause of these losses was not understood. An explanation is proposed in terms of collisional TF ripple loss(V. Yavorski et al, submitted to Nuclear Fusion 1998), in which the influence of the vacuum region between the plasma edge and the outer wall allows the ripple loss orbits to reach the vessel bottom. The inclusion of the inward shifts of the vacuum flux surfaces causes the angle of intersection of the marginally confined trapped orbits to move from the outer midplane toward the vessel bottom, particularly for high plasma currents, low particle energies, and small plasma radii. Calculations are presented using 3-D Fokker-Planck modeling of ripple loss in TFTR. These results are at least qualitatively and semi-quantitatively consistent with the previous observations of delayed loss.

  18. Neutron-energy-dependent defect production cross sections for fission and fusion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odette, G.R.; Doiron, D.R.

    1976-06-01

    Neutron cross sections for displacements and post-short-term cascade annealing defects are derived from nuclear kinematics calculations of primary atomic recoil energy distributions and the number of secondary defects produced per primary as a function of recoil energy. For the first time, recoil kinematics of charged- and multiple-particle emission reactions are treated rigorously using a compound-nucleus evaporation spectrum nuclear model. Secondary-defect production functions, derived from computer simulation experiments, are taken from the literature. Spectral-averaged defect production cross sections for a fusion reactor first-wall-type environment are on the order of 1.5 to 2.5 times those for a fast fission reactor core-type spectrum. The indicated range of uncertainty is primarily due to secondary-defect production model sensitivity. Nuclear model and data errors are expected to become more significant at high neutron energies, greater than approximately 20 MeV. Fusion reactor environments are found to produce some very energetic recoils and high-energy release events due to charged-particle reactions such as (n,..cap alpha..).

  19. Measurement of loss of DT fusion products using scintillator detectors in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Marsala, R.J.; Palladino, R.W.; Zweben, S.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Tuszewski, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A poloidal array of MeV ion loss probes previously used to measure DD fusion product loss has been upgraded to measure the loss of alpha particles from DT plasmas in TFTR. The following improvements to the system have been made in preparation for the use of tritium in TFTR: (1) relocation of detectors to a neutronshielded enclosure in the basement to reduce neutron-induced background signals; (2) replacement of ZnS:Cu (P31) scintillators in the probes with the Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}0{sub 12}:Ce(P46) variety to minimize damage and assure linearity at the fluxes anticipated from DT plasmas; and (3) shielding of the fiber optic bundles which carry the fight from the probes to the detectors to reduce neutron- and gamma-induced light within them. In addition to the above preparations, the probes have been absolutely calibrated for alpha particles by using the Van de Graaf accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Alpha particle losses from DT plasmas have been observed, and losses at the detector 901 below the midplane are consistent with first orbit loss.

  20. Threshold region for Higgs boson production in gluon fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvini, Marco; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2012-09-07

    We provide a quantitative determination of the effective partonic kinematics for Higgs boson production in gluon fusion in terms of the collider energy at the LHC. We use the result to assess, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, whether the large m(t) approximation is adequate and Sudakov resummation advantageous. We argue that our results hold to all perturbative orders. Based on our results, we conclude that the full inclusion of finite top mass corrections is likely to be important for accurate phenomenology for a light Higgs boson with m(H)~125 GeV at the LHC with √s=14 TeV.

  1. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, H.W.

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of {alpha}-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on {alpha}-particle loss has led to a better understanding of {alpha}-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing {alpha}-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90{degree} lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an {alpha}-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized {alpha}-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  2. Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  3. A role for arabinogalactan proteins in gibberellin-induced alpha-amylase production in barley aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshihito; Kitagawa, Mamiko; Knox, J Paul; Yamaguchi, Isomaro

    2002-03-01

    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are plant proteoglycans that have been implicated in plant growth and development. The possible involvement of AGPs in the action of gibberellin (GA), a class of plant hormones, was examined by applying beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent (beta-Glc)3Y, a synthetic phenyl glycoside that interacts selectively with AGPs, to barley aleurone protoplasts. Gibberellin induces transcription and secretion of alpha-amylases in the protoplasts. Induction of alpha-amylase was clearly inhibited by (beta-Glc)3Y but not by (alpha-Gal)3Y, a negative control of the Yariv reagent that does not interact with AGPs. Transfection analysis, using an alpha-amylase promoter-GUS fusion gene in the protoplasts, indicated that the transcriptional activation of the alpha-amylase promoter was inhibited specifically by (beta-Glc)3Y. These observations are the first indication of an involvement of AGPs in a plant hormone function. The inhibitory effect of (beta-Glc)3Y was not observed when aleurone layers or half-seed grains were used. This result, together with the fact that protoplasts do not have cell walls, suggests that the AGPs that function in alpha-amylase induction reside at the plasma membrane. An aleurone-specific AGP was detected by reversed-phase HPLC, and supported the idea that an AGP may play an important role in aleurone-specific events. The possible mechanism of AGP function in gibberellin-induced alpha-amylase production is discussed.

  4. Jet Production in ep Collisions at Low Q^2 and Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kosior, E.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Tabasco, J.E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic e+p scattering at low negative four momentum transfer squared 5alpha_s.

  5. Rapid Determination of 226Ra and Uranium Isotopes in Solid Samples by Fusion with Lithium Metaborate and Alpha Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bojanowski

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid method has been developed to determine 226Ra in rocks, soils, and sediments. Samples are decomposed by fusion with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in a solution containing sulfates and citric acid. During the dissolution, a fine suspension of mixed barium and radium sulfates is formed. The microcrystals are collected on a membrane filter (pore size 0.1 μm and analysed in an alpha spectrometer. Application of a 133Ba tracer enables us to assess the loss of the analyte, which only rarely exceeds 10%. All analytical operations, beginning from sample decomposition to source preparation for alpha spectrometry, can be accomplished within 1 or 2 h.

  6. Production of Medical isotope Technecium-99 from DT Fusion neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguski, John; Gentile, Charles; Ascione, George

    2011-10-01

    High energy neutrons produced in DT fusion reactors have a secondary application for use in the synthesis of valuable man-made isotopes utilized in industry today. One such isotope is metastable Technecium-99 (Tc99m), a low energy gamma emitter used in ~ 85% of all medical imaging diagnostics. Tc99m is created through beta decay of Molybdenum-99 (Mo99), which itself has only a 66 hour half-life and must be created from a neutron capture by the widely available and stable isotope Molydenum-98. Current worldwide production of Tc99m occurs in just five locations and relies on obtaining the fission byproduct Mo99 from highly enriched Uranium reactors. A Tc99m generator using DT fusion neutrons, however, could potentially be operated at individual hospitals and medical facilities without the use of any fissile material. The neutron interaction of the DT neutrons with Molybdenum in a potential device geometry was modeled using Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. Trial experiments were also performed to test the viability of using DT neutrons to create ample quantities of Tc99m. Modeling and test results will follow.

  7. Non-statistical decay and $\\alpha$-correlations in the $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C fusion-evaporation reaction at 95 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Morelli, L; D'Agostino, M; Gulminelli, F; Bruno, M; Abbondanno, U; Appannababu, S; Barlini, S; Bini, M; Casini, G; Cinausero, M; Degerlier, M; Fabris, D; Gelli, N; Gramegna, F; Kravchuk, V L; Marchi, T; Pasquali, G; Piantelli, S; Valdré, S; Raduta, Ad R

    2014-01-01

    Multiple alpha coincidence and correlations are studied in the reaction $^{12}$C+$^{12}$C at 95 MeV for fusion-evaporation events completely detected in charge. Two specific channels with Carbon and Oxygen residues in coincidence with $\\alpha$-particles are addressed, which are associated with anomalously high branching ratios with respect the predictions by Hauser-Feshbach calculations. Triple alpha emission appears kinematically compatible with a sequential emission from a highly excited Mg. The phase space distribution of $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ coincidences suggests a correlated emission from a Mg compound, leaving an Oxygen residue excited above the threshold for neutron decay. These observations indicate a preferential $\\alpha$ emission of $^{24}$Mg at excitation energies well above the threshold for $6-\\alpha$ decay.

  8. Inertial confinement fusion and prospects for power production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.B.Edwards; C.N.Danson

    2015-01-01

    As our understanding of the environmental impact of fossil fuel based energy production increases, it is becoming clear that the world needs a new energy solution to meet the challenges of the future. A transformation is required in the energy market to meet the need for low carbon, sustainable, affordable generation matched with security of supply. In the short term, an increasing contribution from renewable sources may provide a solution in some locations. In the longer term,low carbon, sustainable solutions must be developed to meet base load energy demand, if the world is to avoid an ever increasing energy gap and the attendant political instabilities. Laser-driven inertial fusion energy(IFE) may offer such a solution.

  9. Cationization of Alpha-Cellulose to Develop New Sustainable Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Moral

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Papermaking has been using high quantities of retention agents, mainly cationic substances and organic compounds such as polyamines. The addition of these agents is related to economic and environmental issues, increasing contamination of the effluents. The aim of this work is to develop a cationic polymer for papermaking purposes based on the utilization of alpha-cellulose. The cationization of mercerized alpha-cellulose with 3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium chloride (CHPTAC is governed by a pseudo-second-order reaction. The initial amorphous fraction of cellulose is reacted with CHPTAC until the equilibrium value of nitrogen substitution is reached. Nitrogen is incorporated as a quaternary ammonium group in the polymer. Also, the kinetic constant increased with decreasing crystallinity index, showing the importance of the previous alkalization stage. The use of modified natural polysaccharides is a sustainable alternative to synthetic, nonbiodegradable polyelectrolytes and thus is desirable with a view to developing new products and new processes.

  10. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Hans W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of α-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on α-particle loss has led to a better understanding of α-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing α-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90° lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an α-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized α-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  11. Effective donor cell fusion conditions for production of cloned dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, JungEun; Oh, HyunJu; Hong, SoGun; Kim, MinJung; Kim, GeonA; Koo, OkJae; Kang, SungKeun; Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2011-03-01

    As shown by the birth of the first cloned dog 'Snuppy', a protocol to produce viable cloned dogs has been reported. In order to evaluate optimum fusion conditions for improving dog cloning efficiency, in vivo matured oocytes were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a female Pekingese using different fusion conditions. Fusion with needle vs chamber methods, and with low vs high pulse strength was compared by evaluating fusion rate and in vivo development of canine cloned embryos. The fusion rates in the high voltage groups were significantly higher than in the low voltage groups regardless of fusion method (83.5 vs 66.1% for the needle fusion method, 67.4 vs 37.9% for the fusion chamber method). After embryo transfer, one each pregnancy was detected after using the needle fusion method with high and low voltage and in the chamber fusion method with high voltage, whereas no pregnancy was detected using the chamber method with low voltage. However, only the pregnancy from the needle fusion method with high voltage was maintained to term and one healthy puppy was delivered. The results of the present study demonstrated that two DC pulses of 3.8 to 4.0 kV/cm for 15 μsec using the needle fusion method were the most effective method for the production of cloned dogs under the conditions of this experiment.

  12. Suppression of the chain nuclear fusion reaction based on the p+{sup 11}B reaction because of the deceleration of alpha particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmatov, M. L., E-mail: M.Shmatov@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    It is shown that a rapid deceleration of alpha particles in matter of electron temperature up to 100 keV leads a strong suppression of the chain nuclear fusion reaction on the basis of the p+{sup 11}B reaction with the reproduction of fast protons in the α+{sup 11}B and n+{sup 10}B reactions. The statement that the chain nuclear fusion reaction based on the p+{sup 11}B reaction with an acceleration of {sup 11}B nuclei because of elastic alpha-particle scattering manifests itself in experiments at the PALS (Prague Asterix Laser System) facility is analyzed.

  13. Measurements of escaping alphas in the TFTR DT experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.

    1995-03-01

    Alpha particle loss to the wall of TFTR has been measured during the initial TFTR DT run period. These measurements were made with the same lost alpha scintillator detector system used previously for DD fusion products, except for a switch of the scintillator material from zinc sulfide (P31) to yttrium aluminate (P46) to insure a linear response up to the maximum alpha flux expected in DT. The alpha loss signals in DT are {approx} 100 times larger than the DD fusion product loss signals, as expected from the neutron rates and the relative sensitivity to DT vs. DD fusion products.

  14. Core fusion power gain and alpha heating in JET, TFTR, and ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budny, R. V.; Cordey, J. G.; TFTR Team; Contributors, JET

    2016-05-01

    Profiles of the ratio of fusion power and the auxiliary heating power q DT are calculated for the TFTR and JET discharges with the highest neutron emission rates, and are predicted for ITER. Core values above 1.3 for JET and 0.8 for TFTR are obtained. Values above 20 are predicted for ITER baseline plasmas.

  15. Cyclotron production of Ac-225 for targeted alpha therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolidis, C; Molinet, R; McGinley, J; Abbas, K; Möllenbeck, J; Morgenstern, A

    2005-03-01

    The feasibility of producing Ac-225 by proton irradiation of Ra-226 in a cyclotron through the reaction Ra-226(p,2n)Ac-225 has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Proton energies were varied from 8.8 to 24.8 MeV and cross-sections were determined by radiochemical analysis of reaction yields. Maximum yields were reached at incident proton energies of 16.8 MeV. Radiochemical separation of Ac-225 from the irradiated target yielded a product suitable for targeted alpha therapy of cancer.

  16. Fine structure of fusion products from soybean cell culture and pea leaf protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowke, L C; Constabel, F; Gamborg, O L

    1977-01-01

    Protoplasts from pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves and cultured soybean (Glycine max L.) cells were fused by means of polyethylene glycol and subsequently cultured for one week. Both agglutinated protoplasts and cultured fusion products were examined by electron microscopy. Agglutination occurred over large areas of the plasma membranes. The membrane contanct was discontinuous and irregularly spaced. Many cultured fusion products regenerated cell walls and divided to form cell clusters. Fusion of pea and soybean interphase nuclei occurred in some cells. The detection of heterochromatin typical of pea in the synkaryon, even after division, suggests the cells were hybrids. The cytoplasm of the cells from the fusion products contained both soybean leucoplasts and pea chloroplasts. The chloroplasts had apparently ceased dividing and some showed signs of degenerating. Large multinucleate fusion products developed cell walls but failed to divide.

  17. Jet Production in ep Collisions at High $Q^2$ and Determination of $\\alpha_s$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, FD; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Asmone, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D -J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H -U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H -C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zus, R

    2010-01-01

    The production of jets is studied in deep-inelastic ep scattering at large negative four momentum transfer squared 150alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1168 +/-0.0007 (exp.) +0.0046/-0.0030 (th.) +/-0.0016(pdf).

  18. Alpha-latrotoxin Triggers Extracellular Ca2+-dependent Exocytosis and Sensitizes Fusion Machinery in Endocrine Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Tao HU; Ping ZHAO; Jie LIU; Zheng-Xing WU; Tao XU

    2006-01-01

    α-Latrotoxin from the venom of black widow spider induces and augments neurotransmitter and hormone release by way of extracellular Ca2+ influx and cellular signal transduction pathways. By using whole cell current and capacitance recording, the photolysis of caged Ca2+, and Ca2+ microfluorometry and amperometry, we investigated the stimulating effect and mechanism of o-latrotoxin on exocytosis in rat pancreatic β cells, LβT2 cells and latrophilin plasmid-transfected INS-1 cells. Our data indicated that: (1) α-latrotoxin increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration through the formation of cation-permitting pores and subsequent Ca2+ influx with the presence of extracellular Ca2+; (2) α-latrotoxin stimulated exocytosis in normal bath solution and its stimulating effect on secretion was eradicated in Ca2+-free bath solution; and (3) α-latrotoxin sensitized the molecular machinery of fusion through activation of protein kinase C and increased the response of cells to Ca2+ photolysed by a flash of ultraviolet light. In summary, α-latrotoxin induced exocytosis by way of Ca2+ influx and accelerated vesicle fusion by the sensitization of fusion machinery.

  19. Development of thin foil Faraday collector as a lost alpha particle diagnostic for high yield D-T tokamak fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Belle, P.; Jarvis, O.N.; Sadler, G.J. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Cecil, F.E. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Alpha particle confinement is necessary for ignition of a D-T tokamak fusion plasma and for first wall protection. Due to high radiation backgrounds and temperatures, scintillators and semiconductor detectors may not be used to study alpha particles which are lost to the first wall during the D-T programs on JET and ITER. An alternative method of charged particle spectrometry capable of operation in these harsh environments, is proposed: it consists of thin foils of electrically isolated conductors with the flux of alpha particles determined by the positive current flowing from the foils. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Evidence of Higgs Boson Production through Vector Boson Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00333580

    The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 provided confirmation of the proposed mechanism for preserving the electroweak $SU(2) \\times U(1)$ gauge symmetry of the Standard Model of particle physics. It also heralded in a new era of precision Higgs physics. This thesis presents a measurement of the rate at which the Higgs boson is produced by vector boson fusion in the \\wwlnln decay channel. With gauge boson couplings in both the production and decay vertices, a VBF measurement in this channel is a powerful probe of the $VVH$ vertex strength. Using $4.5$~fb$^{-1}$ and $20.3$~fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data collected at respective center-of-mass energies of 7 and $8 \\tev$ in the ATLAS detector, measurements of the statistical significance and the signal strength are carried out in the Higgs mass range $100 \\leq m_H \\leq 200 \\gev$. These measurements are enhanced with a boosted decision tree that exploits the correlations between eight kinematic inputs in order to separate signal and background processes. At the...

  1. Fusion of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicka, Aleksandra J; Lyczakowski, Jan J; Blackhurst, Gavin; Pashkuleva, Christiana; Rothschild-Mancinelli, Kyle; Tautvaišas, Dainius; Thornton, Harry; Villanueva, Hugo; Xiao, Weike; Slikas, Justinas; Horsfall, Louise; Elfick, Alistair; French, Christopher

    2014-12-19

    Ethanol is an important biofuel. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli. A fusion of PDC and ADH was generated and expressed in E. coli. The fusion enzyme was demonstrated to possess both activities. AdhB activity was significantly lower when fused to PDC than when the two enzymes were expressed separately. However, cells expressing the fusion protein generated ethanol more rapidly and to higher levels than cells coexpressing Pdc and AdhB, suggesting a specific rate enhancement due to the fusion of the two enzymes.

  2. Additional Beta due to Fast Fusion Products in D-3He Fusion Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Bai-Quan(邓柏权); G.A.Emmert; PENG Li-Lin(彭利林)

    2003-01-01

    An analytical formula for the additional beta due to fast fusion-born ions is derived by using the slowing-down approximation from the Fokker-Planck equation under the assumption of negligible loss term. It is found that the fast ion beta in a D-3 He fusion plasma at a typical temperature of 55 ke V is about 20% of the thermal beta,which is the same ratio as that obtained in a D-T plasma at 20keV.

  3. Measurements of charged fusion product diffusion in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, Rejean Louis [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The single particle confinement of charged fusion products, namely the 1 MeV triton and the 3 MeV proton, has been studied using a detector located near the outer midplane of TFTR. The detector, which measure the flux of escaping particles, is composed of a scintillator [ZnS(Ag)] and a system of collimating apertures, which permit pitch angle, energy and time resolution. It is mounted on a movable probe which can be inserted 25 cm into the vacuum vessel. Measurements indicate a level of losses higher than expected from a first-orbit loss mechanism alone. The primary candidate for explaining the observed anomalous losses is the toroidal field (TF) stochastic ripple diffusion, theoretically discovered by Goldston, White and Boozer. This loss mechanism is expected to be localized near the outer midplane where, at least at high current (≳ 1.0 MA) it would locally dominate over first-orbit losses. Calculations made with a mapping particle orbit code (MAPLOS) show a semi-quantitative agreement with the measurements. The predominant uncertainties in the numerical simulations were found to originate from the modeling of the first wall geometry and also from the assumed plasma current and source profiles. Direct measurements of the diffusion rate were performed by shadowing the detector with a second movable probe used as an obstacle. The diffusion rate was also measured by moving the detector behind the radius of the RF limiters, located on the outer wall. Comparisons of these experimental results with numerical simulations, which include diffusive mechanisms, indicate a quantitative agreement with the TF stochastic ripple diffusion model.

  4. Measurements of charged fusion product diffusion in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    The single particle confinement of charged fusion products, namely the 1 MeV triton and the 3 MeV proton, has been studied using a detector located near the outer midplane of TFTR. The detector, which measure the flux of escaping particles, is composed of a scintillator (ZnS(Ag)) and a system of collimating apertures, which permit pitch angle, energy and time resolution. It is mounted on a movable probe which can be inserted 25 cm into the vacuum vessel. Measurements indicate a level of losses higher than expected from a first-orbit loss mechanism alone. The primary candidate for explaining the observed anomalous losses is the toroidal field (TF) stochastic ripple diffusion, theoretically discovered by Goldston, White and Boozer. This loss mechanism is expected to be localized near the outer midplane where, at least at high current ({approx gt} 1.0 MA) it would locally dominate over first-orbit losses. Calculations made with a mapping particle orbit code (MAPLOS) show a semi-quantitative agreement with the measurements. The predominant uncertainties in the numerical simulations were found to originate from the modeling of the first wall geometry and also from the assumed plasma current and source profiles. Direct measurements of the diffusion rate were performed by shadowing the detector with a second movable probe used as an obstacle. The diffusion rate was also measured by moving the detector behind the radius of the RF limiters, located on the outer wall. Comparisons of these experimental results with numerical simulations, which include diffusive mechanisms, indicate a quantitative agreement with the TF stochastic ripple diffusion model.

  5. Production of Alpha Amylase by Bacillus cereus in Submerged Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen H. Raplong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have the ability to secrete enzymes when they are grown in the presence of certain substrates. Amylases are among the most important industrial enzymes and are of great significance in biotechnological studies. Bacteria belonging to the genus Bacillus were isolated using mannitol egg yolk polymyxin B (MYP agar a highly selective media for Bacillus cereus isolation. The isolates were tested for α-amylase production on nutrient agar supplemented with starch and in submerged fermentation. The bacteria isolated and identified (using the Microgen Bacillus identification kit were all Bacillus cereus and SB2 had the largest zone of hydrolysis of 12mm on nutrient agar supplemented with starch as well as the highest enzyme activity of 1.62U/ml. Amylase activity of 2.56U/ml was obtained after 24 hours incubation in submerged fermentation. When amylase enzyme production parameters where optimized, maximum amylase activity was obtained at a pH of 6.5, temperature of 350C, incubation time of 24 hours and 4% inoculums concentration. Bacillus cereus SB2 is a potential isolate for alpha-amylase production with soluble starch as the sole carbon source in submerged fermentation.

  6. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F.B.; Hone, M.A.; Jarvis, O.N.; Loughlin, M.J.; Sadler, G. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S.; Watkins, N. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.; Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of a sawtooth crash on the radial distribution of the slowing down fusion product tritons and on beams ions, is examined with measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line-integrals before and after sawtooth crashes. In deuterium discharges, the 14 MeV neutron production was wholly attributable to burnup of the 1 MeV fusion product tritons from d-d fusion. The local emissivity of 14 MeV neutrons, and hence of the profile of thermalizing tritons, is shown to be only weakly affected by crashes in the discharges studied. This is in contradiction with the apparent behaviour of injected beam ions as deduced from a study of the considerable changes in local emissivity of the 2.5 MeV neutrons. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the fusion product tritons is consistent with the scaling of the beam injected deuterium. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  7. Low-energy direct photon production in p p and alpha alpha collisions at the cern intersecting storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Young-il

    1986-01-01

    High transverse momentum (p(,T)) direct photons have given us some of our best evidence for low order perturbative QCD proces- ses in hadron collisions. It is also important to examine hadronic collisions with a weakly interacting probe in the low p(,T) region, where hadron interactions involve very complicated phenomena. A previous experiment at SQRT.(s) = 12 GeV has observed an excess of low p(,T) direct photons. The present experiment has studied direct soft photons in pp interactions at SQRT.(s) = 63 GeV and alpha-alpha interactions at SQRT.(s(,NN)) = 31.5 GeV at the CERN ISR. Comparisons of photon production with respect to track production in pp minimum bias events with that in pp events with high transverse energy (E(,T)) and with alpha-alpha minimum bias events are investigated. For alpha-alpha minimum bias data, within experimental errors there was no excess of photons with respect to tracks, compared with pp minimum bias data. But for pp high E(,T) data, we observed an interesting effect: as p(,T) i...

  8. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    By magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/−0.06) MG · cm, a ∼ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. This is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  9. Production and properties of alpha-amylase from Citrobacter species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebuta N. Etim-Osowo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Amylase production by Citrobacter sp. isolated from potato was optimized in batch culture studies under shake flask conditions. Effects and interactions of best sources and levels of carbon and nitrogen estimated by 4 x 5 and 4 x 4 factorial experimental arrangements were significant (P < 0.01 on amylase production. Optimal alpha-amylase yield was obtained in a medium containing sorghum flour (2.0 % w/v and a mixture of (NH42SO4 + soybean meal (1.5% w/v with an initial medium pH of 8.0. Under optimum conditions, amylase yield was maximal (0.499 U/ml after 60h incubation at room temperature (28oC ± 2oC. Characterization studies showed that the enzyme had maximum activity at 60oC, retained 100% of its original activities at 60oC for 2h, was maximally active at pH 7.0 and retained 100% of original activities at pH 9.0 for 2h. Enzyme activity was stimulated by urea, Mg2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+ but inhibited by Hg2+.

  10. Fusion alpha-particle diagnostics for DT experiments on the joint European torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiptily, V. G.; Beaumont, P.; Syme, D. B. [Euratom / CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Belli, F. [Associazione Euratom -ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65, Frascati (Italy); Cecil, F. E.; Riva, M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, BOX 516, Uppsala (Sweden); Craciunescu, T. [Association Euratom -MEdC, National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (Romania); Garcia-Munoz, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association IPP, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Curuia, M.; Soare, S. [Association Euratom -MEdC, National Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technology (Romania); Darrow, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, Princeton, NJ (United States); Fernandes, A. M.; Pereira, R. C.; Sousa, J. [Euratom/IST Fusion Association, Centro de Fusão Nuclear, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Giacomelli, L.; Voitsekhovitch, I. [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Gorini,; Nocente, M. [CNISM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy and Associazione Euratom -ENEA sulla Fusione, IFP Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-08-21

    JET equipped with ITER-like wall (a beryllium wall and a tungsten divertor) can provide auxiliary heating with power up to 35MW, producing a significant population of α-particles in DT operation. The direct measurements of alphas are very difficult and α-particle studies require a significant development of dedicated diagnostics. JET now has an excellent set of confined and lost fast particle diagnostics for measuring the α-particle source and its evolution in space and time, α-particle energy distribution, and α-particle losses. This paper describes how the above mentioned JET diagnostic systems could be used for α-particle measurements, and what options exist for keeping the essential α-particle diagnostics functioning well in the presence of intense DT neutron flux. Also, α-particle diagnostics for ITER are discussed.

  11. Fusion of agarase and neoagarobiose hydrolase for mono-sugar production from agar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkotaini, Bassam; Han, Nam Soo; Kim, Beom Soo

    2017-02-01

    In enzymatic saccharification of agar, endo- and exo-agarases together with neoagarobiose hydrolase (NABH) are important key enzymes for the sequential hydrolysis reactions. In this study, a bifunctional endo/exo-agarase was fused with NABH for production of mono-sugars (D-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose) from agar using only one fusion enzyme. Two fusion enzymes with either bifunctional agarase (Sco3476) or NABH (Zg4663) at the N-terminus, Sco3476-Zg4663 (SZ) and Zg4663-Sco3476 (ZS), were constructed. Both fusion enzymes exhibited their optimal agarase and NABH activities at 40 and 35 °C, respectively. Fusions SZ and ZS enhanced the thermostability of the NABH activity, while only fusion SZ showed a slight enhancement in the NABH catalytic efficiency (K cat/K M) from 14.8 (mg/mL)(-1) s(-1) to 15.8 (mg/mL)(-1) s(-1). Saccharification of agar using fusion SZ resulted in 2-fold higher mono-sugar production and 3-fold lower neoagarobiose accumulation when compared to the physical mixture of Sco3476 and Zg4663. Therefore, this fusion has the potential to reduce enzyme production cost, decrease intermediate accumulation, and increase mono-sugar yield in agar saccharification.

  12. Surface display of monkey metallothionein {alpha} tandem repeats and EGFP fusion protein on Pseudomonas putida X4 for biosorption and detection of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaochuan; Chen, Wenli; Huang, Qiaoyun [Huazhong Agricultural Univ., Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Agricultural Microbiology

    2012-09-15

    Monkey metallothionein {alpha} domain tandem repeats (4mMT{alpha}), which exhibit high cadmium affinity, have been displayed for the first time on the surface of a bacterium using ice nucleation protein N-domain (inaXN) protein from the Xanthomonas campestris pv (ACCC - 10049) as an anchoring motif. The shuttle vector pIME, which codes for INAXN-4mMT{alpha}-EGFP fusion, was constructed and used to target 4mMT{alpha} and EGFP on the surface of Pseudomonas putida X4 (CCTCC - 209319). The surface location of the INAXN-4mMT{alpha}-EGFP fusion was further verified by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. The growth of X4 showed resistance to cadmium presence. The presence of surface-exposed 4mMT{alpha} on the engineered strains was four times higher than that of the wild-type X4. The Cd{sup 2+} accumulation by X4/pIME was not only four times greater than that of the original host bacterial cells but was also remarkably unaffected by the presence of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. Moreover, the surface-engineered strains could effectively bind Cd{sup 2+} under a wide range of pH levels, from 4 to 7. P. putida X4/pIME with surface-expressed 4mMT{alpha}-EGFP had twice the cadmium binding capacity as well as 1.4 times the fluorescence as the cytoplasmic 4mMTa-EGFP. These results suggest that P. putida X4 expressing 4mMT{alpha}-EGFP with the INAXN anchor motif on the surface would be a useful tool for the remediation and biodetection of environmental cadmium contaminants. (orig.)

  13. Production of secreted guar alpha-galactosidase by Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, KJ; Bolhuis, A; Ledeboer, A; Venema, G; Kok, J

    1995-01-01

    A plant alpha-galactosidase gene was inserted in the expression vector pGKV259. The resulting plasmid pGAL2 consisted of the replication functions of the broad-host-range lactococcal plasmid pWVO1, the lactococcal promoter P59, and the DNA sequences encoding the alpha-amylase signal sequence from Ba

  14. Production of secreted guar alpha-galactosidase by Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, KJ; Bolhuis, A; Ledeboer, A; Venema, G; Kok, J

    1995-01-01

    A plant alpha-galactosidase gene was inserted in the expression vector pGKV259. The resulting plasmid pGAL2 consisted of the replication functions of the broad-host-range lactococcal plasmid pWVO1, the lactococcal promoter P59, and the DNA sequences encoding the alpha-amylase signal sequence from

  15. Inertial Confinement Fusion alpha-heating signatures in prompt gamma-ray measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jennifer; Herrmann, Hans; Cerjan, Charlie; Sayre, Daniel; Carpenter, Arthur; Liebman, Judy; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Kim, Yongho

    2015-11-01

    Prompt gamma-rays measured at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with the Gamma-ray Reaction History detector (GRH) supply vital diagnostic information, such as the peak burn time, burn width, and total neutron yield, from prompt DT-fusion gamma-ray emission during high convergence implosion experiments. Additionally, the stagnated cold shell density distribution may be inferred from the time-integrated, calibrated 12C (n,n' γ) signal, thus providing estimates of remaining ablator carbon areal density. Furthermore, simulations suggest that alpha heating signatures might be accessible using more highly resolved temporal gamma-ray emission. Correlation of these signatures with time-dependent neutron emission will constrain the implosion dynamics immediately prior to thermonuclear burn. Measurement of these gamma-ray signatures will be discussed along with updates on our work toward inferred total DT yield and 12C areal density. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07-NA27344, LLNL-ABS-670282.

  16. Ion cyclotron emission due to the newly-born fusion products induced fast Alfven wave radiative instabilities in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-08-01

    The velocity distribution functions of the newly born (t = 0) charged fusion products of tokamak discharges can be approximated by a monoenergetic ring distribution with a finite v{sub {parallel}} such that v{sub {perpendicular}} {approx} v{sub {parallel}} {approx} v{sub j} where (M{sub j}V{sub j}{sup 2}/2) = E{sub j}, the directed birth energy of the charged fusion product species j of mass M{sub j}. As the time t progresses these distribution functions will evolve into a Gaussian in velocity with thermal spreadings given by the perpendicular and parallel temperatures T{sub {perpendicular}j}(t) = T{sub {parallel}j}(t) with T{sub j}(t) increasing as t increases and finally reaches an isotropic saturation value of T{sub {perpendicular}j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) = T{sub {parallel}j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) = T{sub j}(t {approx} {tau}{sub j}) {approx} [M{sub j}T{sub d}E{sub j}/(M{sub j} + M)]{sup 1/2}, where T{sub d} is the temperature of the background deuterium plasma ions, M is the mass of a triton or a neutron for j = protons and alpha particles, respectively, and {tau}{sub j} {approx} {tau}{sub sj}/4 is the thermalization time of the fusion product species j in the background deuterium plasma and {tau}{sub sj} is the slowing-down time. For times t of the order of {tau}{sub j} their distributions can be approximated by a Gaussian in their total energy. Then for times t {ge} {tau}{sub sj} the velocity distributions of these fusion products will relax towards their appropriate slowing-down distributions. Here the authors will examine the radiative stability of all these distributions. The ion cyclotron emission from energetic ion produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic tool.

  17. Reply to ‘Comment “On the fusion triple product and fusion power gain of tokamak pilot plants and reactors”’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, A. E.; Buxton, P. F.; Hugill, J.

    2017-03-01

    In reply to the Comment by Biel et al (2016 Nucl. Fusion 57 038001) on our recent papers Costley et al (2015 Nucl Fusion 55 033001) and Costley (2016 Nucl. Fusion 56 066003), we point out that the fusion triple product, nTτ E, and fusion power gain, Q fus, cannot be expressed solely in terms of independent engineering design variables such as major radius, R, and toroidal field, B; output performance variables such as normalised beta, β N, safety factor, q, and fusion power P fus, have to be invoked. Further, we show that the density limit has the effect of largely cancelling the size dependence in nTτ E and Q fus, which would otherwise be present, when these parameters are expressed in terms of P fus. Considerations of engineering aspects are also briefly discussed.

  18. Complex signal amplitude analysis for complete fusion nuclear reaction products

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, Yu S

    2015-01-01

    A complex analysis has been performed on the energy amplitude signals corresponding to events of Z=117 element measured in the 249Bk+48Ca complete fusion nuclear reaction. These signals were detected with PIPS position sensitive detector. The significant values of pulse height defect both for recoils (ER) and fission fragments (FF) were measured. Comparison with the computer simulations and empirical formulae has been performed both for ER and FF signals.

  19. Overproduction, purification and characterization of human interferon alpha2a-human serum albumin fusion protein produced in methilotropic yeast Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningrum, R. A.; Santoso, A.; Herawati, N.

    2017-05-01

    Human interferon alpha2a (hIFNα2a) is a therapeutic protein that used in cancer and hepatitis B/C therapy. The main problem of using hIFNα-2a is its short elimination half life due to its low molecular weight. Development of higher molecular weight protein by albumin fusion technology is a rational strategy to solve the problem. In our previous research we constructed an open reading frame (ORF) encoding hIFNα2a-human serum albumin (HSA) fusion protein that expressed in Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) protease deficient strain SMD1168. This research was performed to overproduce, purify and characterize the fusion protein. To overproduce the protein, cultivation was performed in buffered complex medium containing glyserol (BMGY) for 24 h and protein overproduction was applied in buffered complex medium containing methanol (BMMY) for 48 hours at 30°C. The fusion protein was purified by blue sepharose affinity chromatography. Molecular weight characterization by SDS PAGE corresponds with its theoretical size, 85 kDa. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the fusion protein was recognized by anti hIFNα2 and anti HSA monoclonal antibody as well. Amino acid sequence of the fusion protein was determined by LC MS/MS2 mass spectrometry with trypsin as proteolitic enzyme. There were three fragments that identified as hIFNα2a and seven fragments that identified as HSA. Total identified amino acids were 150 residues with 20% coverage from total residues. To conclude, hIFNα2a-HSA fusion protein was overproduced, purified and characterized. Characterization based on molecular weight, antibody recognition and amino acid sequence confirmed that the fusion protein has correct identity as theoretically thought.

  20. Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

    2012-01-02

    Two scenarios are typically envisioned for thorium fuel cycles: 'open' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th and fission of {sup 233}U in situ without reprocessing or 'closed' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th followed by reprocessing, and recycling of {sup 233}U either in situ or in critical fission reactors. This study evaluates a third option based on the possibility of breeding fissile material in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor and burning the same fuel in a critical reactor without any reprocessing or reconditioning. This fuel cycle requires the hybrid and the critical reactor to use the same fuel form. TRISO particles embedded in carbon pebbles were selected as the preferred form of fuel and an inertial laser fusion system featuring a subcritical blanket was combined with critical pebble bed reactors, either gas-cooled or liquid-salt-cooled. The hybrid reactor was modeled based on the earlier, hybrid version of the LLNL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE1) system, whereas the critical reactors were modeled according to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) design. An extensive neutronic analysis was carried out for both the hybrid and the fission reactors in order to track the fuel composition at each stage of the fuel cycle and ultimately determine the plant support ratio, which has been defined as the ratio between the thermal power generated in fission reactors and the fusion power required to breed the fissile fuel burnt in these fission reactors. It was found that the maximum attainable plant support ratio for a thorium fuel cycle that employs neither enrichment nor reprocessing is about 2. This requires tuning the neutron energy towards high energy for breeding and towards thermal energy for burning. A high fuel loading in the pebbles allows a faster spectrum in the hybrid blanket; mixing dummy carbon pebbles with fuel pebbles enables a softer spectrum in

  1. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  2. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  3. Probing of incomplete fusion dynamics by spin-distribution measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pushpendra P. [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A.M. University, Aligarh (UP) 202002 (India); NP Group, Inter-University Accelerator Center, PO Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)], E-mail: pushpendrapsingh@gmail.com; Singh, B.P. [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A.M. University, Aligarh (UP) 202002 (India)], E-mail: bpsinghamu@gmail.com; Sharma, M.K.; Gupta, Unnati [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A.M. University, Aligarh (UP) 202002 (India); Kumar, Rakesh [NP Group, Inter-University Accelerator Center, PO Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Singh, D. [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A.M. University, Aligarh (UP) 202002 (India); Singh, R.P.; Murlithar, S. [NP Group, Inter-University Accelerator Center, PO Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Ansari, M.A.; Prasad, R. [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A.M. University, Aligarh (UP) 202002 (India); Bhowmik, R.K. [NP Group, Inter-University Accelerator Center, PO Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India)], E-mail: ranjan@iuac.ernet.in

    2009-01-12

    Aiming to probe incomplete fusion dynamics in {sup 16}O + {sup 169}Tm system, spin-distributions of various reaction products populated via xn-, {alpha}/2{alpha}xn-channels have been measured at E{approx}5.6MeV/nucleon. Prompt {gamma}-rays in coincidence with fast charged particles (Z=1,2) have been recorded to achieve the information about involved reaction processes on the basis of their experimentally observed spin-populations during de-excitation. The experimentally observed spin-distributions for direct-{alpha}-emitting channels (associated with incomplete fusion) have been found to be distinctly different than that observed for fusion-evaporation (complete fusion) channels. The mean value of driving input angular momenta associated with various direct-{alpha}/2{alpha}xn-channels have been found to be higher than that observed for fusion-evaporation xn/{alpha}xn-channels, and increases with direct-{alpha}-multiplicity in forward cone. Experimentally measured, normalized production yields of fusion-evaporation xn/{alpha}xn-channels have been found to be in good agreement with the predictions of theoretical model code PACE4. Further, in order to understand the feeding probability in both complete and incomplete fusion reaction products, an attempt has been made to generate feeding intensity profiles from spin-distribution data. It has been observed that the complete fusion products are strongly fed over a broad spin range, while incomplete fusion products are found to be less fed and/or the population of lower spin states are strongly hindered.

  4. Antibody-independent targeted quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG fusion protein products in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jintang; Sun, Xuefei; Shi, Tujin; Schepmoes, Athena A; Fillmore, Thomas L; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Gritsenko, Marina A; Yang, Feng; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Chae, Sung-Suk; Rubin, Mark A; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John T; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G

    2014-10-01

    Fusions between the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and ETS related gene (ERG) represent one of the most specific biomarkers that define a distinct molecular subtype of prostate cancer. Studies of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions have seldom been performed at the protein level, primarily due to the lack of high-quality antibodies suitable for quantitative studies. Herein, we applied a recently developed PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) strategy for quantifying ERG protein in prostate cancer cell lines and tumors. The highly sensitive PRISM-SRM assays provided confident detection of 6 unique ERG peptides in both TMPRSS2-ERG positive cell lines and tissues, but not in cell lines or tissues lacking the TMPRSS2-ERG rearrangement, clearly indicating that ERG protein expression is significantly increased in the presence of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Significantly, our results provide evidence that two distinct ERG protein isoforms are simultaneously expressed in TMPRSS2-ERG positive samples as evidenced by the concomitant detection of two mutually exclusive peptides in two patient tumors and in the VCaP prostate cancer cell line. Three peptides, shared across almost all fusion protein products, were determined to be the most abundant peptides, providing "signature" peptides for detection of ERG over-expression resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. The PRISM-SRM assays provide valuable tools for studying TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein products in prostate cancer.

  5. Simulation and pre-feasibility analysis of the production process of alpha-methyl ester sulfonates (alpha-MES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Daniel; Orozco, Gustavo; Rincón, Sandra; Gil, Iván

    2010-11-01

    alpha-Methyl esters sulfonates (alpha-MES) are anionic surfactants that are derived from biorenewable resources, offering interesting environmental and chemical properties for application in the detergent industry. A simulation of their production process was conducted using a commercial production process currently used for palm oil. Results, prices of raw materials were submitted to economic analysis, and final MES price was compared with available data for linear alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS) prices. The results for substances properties and product streams obtained from simulation were reliable in agreement to real values. It was found that increasing methyl ester national price by 20%, 50% and the equivalent to linear alkyl benzene price, the final price of alpha-methyl ester sulfonates was lower than the current price of linear alkyl benzene sulfonates. The capital cost and payout period for a production capacity of 49,000tons of surfactant per year were obtained. Results indicate that the process is economically feasible and can be applied to palm oil-based industries in Colombia.

  6. PLZF-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins generated from the variant t(11; 17)(q23; q21) translocation in acute promyelocytic leukemia inhibit ligand-dependent transactivation of wild-type retinoic acid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan; Wang, Zhen-Yi (Shanghai Second Medical Univ. (China)); Guidez, F.; Rousselot, P.; Agadir, A.; Degos, L.; Chomienne, C. (Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire Hematopoietique, Paris (France)); Zelent, A. (Institute for Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)); Waxman, S. (Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Recently, the authors described a recurrent variant translocation, t(11;17)(q23;q21), in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) which juxtaposes PLZF, a gene encoding a zinc finger protein, to RARA, encoding retinoic acid receptor [alpha] (RAR[alpha]). They have now cloned cDNAs encoding PLZF-RAR[alpha] chimeric proteins and studied their transactivating activities. In transient-expression assays, both the PLZF(A)-RAR[alpha] and PLZF(B)-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins like the PML-RAR[alpha] protein resulting from the well-known t(15;17) translocation in APL, antagonized endogenous and transfected wild-type RAR[alpha] in the presence of retinoic acid. Cotransfection assays showed that a significant repression of RAR[alpha] transactivation activity was obtained even with a very low PLZF-RAR[alpha]-expressing plasmid concentration. A [open quotes]dominant negative[close quotes] effect was observed with vectors expressing RAR[alpha] and retinoid X receptor [alpha] (RXR[alpha]). These abnormal transactivation properties observed in retinoic acid-sensitive myeloid cells strongly implicate the PLZF-RAR[alpha] fusion proteins in the molecular pathogenesis of APL.

  7. Ultrastructure of fusion products from soybean cell culture and sweet clover leaf protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowke, L C; Rennie, P J; Kirkpatrick, J W; Constabel, F

    1976-01-01

    Protoplasts from cultured cells of soybean (Glycine max L.) and from sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis L.) mesophyll cells were fused with polyethylene glycol and subsequently cultured for six days. The resulting fusion products as well as unfused protoplasts of each parental species regenerated cell walls and divided. The fusion products were characterized by the presence of soybean leucoplasts and sweet clover chloroplasts. The chloroplasts appeared to be degenerating but other cytoplasmic organelles were typical of actively growing plant cells. The fate of individual nuclei could not be determined.

  8. Production of actinium-225 for alpha particle mediated radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Rose A; Malkemus, Dairin; Mirzadeh, Saed

    2005-05-01

    The initial clinical trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia have demonstrated the effectiveness of the alpha emitter (213)Bi in killing cancer cells. Bismuth-213 is obtained from a radionuclide generator system from decay of 10-days (225)Ac parent. Recent pre-clinical studies have also shown the potential application of both (213)Bi, and the (225)Ac parent radionuclide in a variety of cancer systems and targeted radiotherapy. This paper describes our five years of experience in production of (225)Ac in partial support of the on-going clinical trials. A four-step chemical process, consisting of both anion and cation exchange chromatography, is utilized for routine separation of carrier-free (225)Ac from a mixture of (228)Th, (229)Th and (232)Th. The separation of Ra and Ac from Th is achieved using the marcoporous anion exchange resin MP1 in 8M HNO(3) media. Two sequential MP1/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(6) for Ra and Ac from Th. The separation of Ac from Ra is accomplished on a low cross-linking cation exchange resin AG50-X4 using 1.2M HNO(3) as eluant. Two sequential AG50/NO(3) columns provide a separation factor of approximately 10(2) for Ac from Ra. A 60-day processing schedule has been adopted in order to reduce the processing cost and to provide the highest levels of (225)Ac possible. Over an 8-week campaign, a total of approximately 100 mCi of (225)Ac (approximately 80% of the theoretical yield) is shipped in 5-6 batches, with the first batch typically consisting of approximately 50 mCi. After the initial separation and purification of Ac, the Ra pool is re-processed on a bi-weekly schedule or as needed to provide smaller batches of (225)Ac. The averaged radioisotopic purity of the (225)Ac was 99.6 +/- 0.7% with a (225)Ra content of < or =0.6%, and an average (229)Th content of (4(-4)(+5)) x 10(-5)%.

  9. Antibody-independent Targeted Quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Protein Products in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jintang; Sun, Xuefei; Shi, Tujin; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Yang, Feng; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Chae, Sung Suk; Rubin, Mark; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.

    2014-10-01

    Fusions between the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and ETS related gene (ERG) represent one of the most specific biomarkers that define a distinct molecular subtype of prostate cancer. The studies on TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions have seldom been performed at the protein level, primarily due to the lack of high-quality antibodies or an antibody-independent method that is sufficiently sensitive for detecting the truncated ERG protein products resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions and alternative splicing. Herein, we applied a recently developed PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) strategy for quantifying ERG protein in prostate cancer cell lines and tumors. The highly sensitive PRISM-SRM assays led to confident detection of 6 unique ERG peptides in either the TMPRSS2-ERG positive cell lines or tissues but not in the negative controls, indicating that ERG protein expression is highly correlated with TMPRSS2-ERG gene rearrangements. Significantly, our results demonstrated for the first time that at least two groups of ERG protein isoforms were simultaneously expressed at variable levels in TMPRSS2-ERG positive samples as evidenced by concomitant detection of two mutually exclusive peptides. Three peptides shared across almost all fusion protein products were determined to be the most abundant peptides, and hence can be used as “signature” peptides for detecting ERG overexpression resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. These PRISM-SRM assays provide valuable tools for studying TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein products, thus improving our understanding of the role of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in the biology of prostate cancer.

  10. An evolved Mxe GyrA intein for enhanced production of fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Carrie J; Grosskopf, Vanessa A; Moehling, Taylor J; Tillotson, Benjamin J; Wiepz, Gregory J; Abbott, Nicholas L; Raines, Ronald T; Shusta, Eric V

    2015-02-20

    Expressing antibodies as fusions to the non-self-cleaving Mxe GyrA intein enables site-specific, carboxy-terminal chemical modification of the antibodies by expressed protein ligation (EPL). Bacterial antibody-intein fusion protein expression platforms typically yield insoluble inclusion bodies that require refolding to obtain active antibody-intein fusion proteins. Previously, we demonstrated that it was possible to employ yeast surface display to express properly folded single-chain antibody (scFv)-intein fusions, therefore permitting the direct small-scale chemical functionalization of scFvs. Here, directed evolution of the Mxe GyrA intein was performed to improve both the display and secretion levels of scFv-intein fusion proteins from yeast. The engineered intein was shown to increase the yeast display levels of eight different scFvs by up to 3-fold. Additionally, scFv- and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-intein fusion proteins can be secreted from yeast, and while fusion of the scFvs to the wild-type intein resulted in low expression levels, the engineered intein increased scFv-intein production levels by up to 30-fold. The secreted scFv- and GFP-intein fusion proteins retained their respective binding and fluorescent activities, and upon intein release, EPL resulted in carboxy-terminal azide functionalization of the target proteins. The azide-functionalized scFvs and GFP were subsequently employed in a copper-free, strain-promoted click reaction to site-specifically immobilize the proteins on surfaces, and it was demonstrated that the functionalized, immobilized scFvs retained their antigen binding specificity. Taken together, the evolved yeast intein platform provides a robust alternative to bacterial intein expression systems.

  11. Neutron-induced dpa, transmutations, gas production, and helium embrittlement of fusion materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, M R; Nguyen-Manh, D; Zheng, S; Packer, L W; Sublet, J -Ch

    2013-01-01

    In a fusion reactor materials will be subjected to significant fluxes of high-energy neutrons. As well as causing radiation damage, the neutrons also initiate nuclear reactions leading to changes in the chemical composition of materials (transmutation). Many of these reactions produce gases, particularly helium, which cause additional swelling and embrittlement of materials. This paper investigates, using a combination of neutron-transport and inventory calculations, the variation in displacements per atom (dpa) and helium production levels as a function of position within the high flux regions of a recent conceptual model for the "next-step" fusion device DEMO. Subsequently, the gas production rates are used to provide revised estimates, based on new density-functional-theory results, for the critical component lifetimes associated with the helium-induced grain-boundary embrittlement of materials. The revised estimates give more optimistic projections for the lifetimes of materials in a fusion power plant co...

  12. Hybrid fusion reactor for production of nuclear fuel with minimum radioactive contamination of the fuel cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikhov, E. P.; Kovalchuk, M. V.; Azizov, E. A.; Ignatiev, V. V.; Subbotin, S. A.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the system research on the coordinated development of nuclear and fusion power engineering in the current century. Considering the increasing problems of resource procurement, including limited natural uranium resources, it seems reasonable to use fusion reactors as high-power neutron sources for production of nuclear fuel in a blanket. It is shown that the share of fusion sources in this structural configuration of the energy system can be relatively small. A fundamentally important aspect of this solution to the problem of closure of the fuel cycle is that recycling of highly active spent fuel can be abandoned. Radioactivity released during the recycling of the spent fuel from the hybrid reactor blanket is at least two orders of magnitude lower than during the production of the same number of fissile isotopes after the recycling of the spent fuel from a fast reactor.

  13. The perspectives of fusion energy: The roadmap towards energy production and fusion energy in a distributed energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2014-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion has the potential of providing an environmentally friendly and inexhaustible energy source for mankind. Fusion energy, which powers our sun and the stars, is released when light elements, such as the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, fuse together. This occurs...... The presentation will discuss the present status of the fusion energy research and review the EU Roadmap towards a fusion power plant. Further the cost of fusion energy is assessed as well as how it can be integrated in the distributed energy system...

  14. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of /sup 95/Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire.

  15. Approximating multileg processes: Higgs production via W-fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Philippides, K

    2003-01-01

    Meaningful approximations for multileg processes at tree level are constructed which circumvent the problems of unitarity violation and gauge invariance. In this article we study the LHC: pp to ZZ + 2 jets + X and the Linear Collider: e/sup +/e/sup -/ to ZZ nu /sub e/ nu /sub e/ processes both of which contain the W-fusion scattering process for off-shell Ws. Using the pinch technique the signal and background, which contribute coherently, are separated in a well defined and gauge invariant way thus defining a resonant approximation which behaves well at high energies. The speed of the numerical calculation is greatly reduced compared to the lengthy calculation of the complete set of diagrams while at the same time the approximations describe very well the full result not only close to the resonance but also beyond it, as shown in various differential distributions of the cross section. The problem of regulating the resonant Higgs diagram is treated both with the naive approach of adding a constant width to t...

  16. NCG gluon fusion for the Higgs production at large hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadou, I.; Mebarki, N.; Bekli, M. R. [Laboratoire de Physique Mathematique et Subatomique, University of Constantine (Algeria)

    2012-06-27

    A pure NCG gluon fusion contribution to the Higgs production at large hadron colliders is discussed. It is shown that the NCG results become relevant at very high energies. This can be a good signal for the space-time non commutativity events.

  17. Enhanced loss of fusion products during mode conversion heating in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D.S.; Majeski, R.; Fisch, N.J.; Heeter, R.F.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-07-01

    Ion Bernstein waves (IBWS) have been generated by mode conversion of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) fast waves in TFTR. The loss rate of fusion products in these discharges can be large, up to 10 times the first orbit loss rate. The losses are observed at the passing/trapped boundary, indicating that passing particles are being moved onto loss orbits either by increase of their v{perpendicular} due to the wave, by outward transport in minor radius, or both. The lost particles appear to be DD fusion produced tritons heated to {approximately}1.5 times their birth energy.

  18. Measurement of dijet production in neutral current deep inelastic scattering at high Q**2 and determination of alpha_s

    CERN Document Server

    Breitweg, J; Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Ahn, S H; Amelung, C; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Badgett, W F; Bailey, D C; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, Andreas; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M S; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Barret, O; Bashkirov, V; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Bednarek, B; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bienlein, J K; Bodmann, B; Bokel, C; Boogert, S; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Botje, M; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Brümmer, N; Bussey, Peter J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Cartiglia, N; Chapin, D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cirio, R; Cloth, P; Coboken, K; Coldewey, C; Cole, J E; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Costa, M; Crittenden, James Arthur; Cross, R; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dagan, S; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J; Dementiev, R K; Deppe, O; Derrick, Malcolm; Desler, K; Devenish, R C E; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Eisenhardt, S; Engelen, J; Epperson, D E; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Fagerstroem, C P; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fox-Murphy, A; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Gadaj, T; Galea, R; Gallo, E; García, G; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Gendner, N; Gialas, I; Gilmore, J; Ginsburg, C M; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Göbel, F; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Graciani, R; Grijpink, S; Grosse-Knetter, J; Grzelak, G; Gwenlan, C; Göttlicher, P; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hamatsu, R; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G F; Hayes, M E; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Hebbel, K; Heinloth, K; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iannotti, L; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Ishii, T; Jakob, H P; Jelen, K; Jeoung, H Y; Jones, T W; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Karshon, U; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Kerger, R; Khein, L A; Kim, C L; Kim, J Y; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K H; Koch, W; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P M; Koop, T; Korotkova, N A; Korzhavina, I A; Kotanski, Andrzej; Kowal, A M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D A; Kreisel, A; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Kötz, U; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lane, J B; Lee, J H; Lee, S B; Lee, S W; Levi, G; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, W; Liu, X; Lohrmann, E; Long, K R; Longhin, A; López-Duran-Viani, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Löhr, B; Ma, K J; MacDonald, N; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Markun, P; Martens, J; Martin, J F; Martínez, M; Maselli, S; Massam, Thomas; Mastroberardino, A; Matsushita, T; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; Mattingly, S E K; McCance, G J; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Meyer, A; Milite, M; Miller, D B; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nigro, A; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Oh, B Y; Okrasinski, J R; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Park, S K; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pawlak, R; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Peroni, C; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Raach, H; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, I; Reeder, D D; Repond, J; Robins, S A; Rodrigues, E; Rohde, M; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E; Ruske, O; Ruspa, M; Sabetfakhri, A; Sacchi, R; Sadrozinski, H F W; Salehi, H; Sampson, S; Sartorelli, G; Saull, P R B; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Schnurbusch, H; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Seiden, A; Selonke, F; Shah, T P; Shcheglova, L M; Sinclair, L E; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smalska, B; Smith, W H; Solano, A; Solomin, A N; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Staiano, A; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Stanek, R; Stifutkin, A; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Szuba, D; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Toothacker, W S; Tsurugai, T; Tuning, N; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Umemori, K; Vaiciulis, A W; Van Sighem, A; Vázquez, M E; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Walczak, R; Walker, R; Waugh, R; Weber, A; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wichmann, R; Wick, K; Wieber, H; Wiggers, L; Wildschek, T; Williams, D C; Wing, M; Wodarczyk, M; Wolf, G; Wollmer, U; Wróblewski, A K; Wölfle, S; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yildirim, A; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zakrzewski, J A; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A

    2001-01-01

    Dijet production has been studied in neutral current deep inelastic e+p scattering for 470 < Q**2 < 20000 GeV**2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 38.4 pb**{-1}. Dijet differential cross sections are presented in a kinematic region where both theoretical and experimental uncertainties are small. Next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD calculations describe the measured differential cross sections well. A QCD analysis of the measured dijet fraction as a function of Q**2 allows both a precise determination of alpha_s(M_Z) and a test of the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling constant. A detailed analysis provides a realistic estimate of the uncertainties of the NLO QCD cross sections arising from the parton distribution functions of the proton. The value of alpha_s(M_Z), as determined from the QCD fit, is alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1166 +- 0.0019 (stat.) {+ 0.0024}_{- 0.0033} (exp.)} {+ 0.0057}_{- 0.0044} (th.).

  19. NNLO contributions to inclusive-jet production in DIS and determination of \\alpha_s

    CERN Document Server

    Biekötter, T; Kramer, G

    2015-01-01

    We present the first calculation of inclusive jet production in deep-inelastic scattering with approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (aNNLO) contributions, obtained from a unified threshold resummation formalism. The leading coefficients are computed analytically. We show that the aNNLO contributions reduce the theoretical prediction for jet production in deep-inelastic scattering, improve the description of the final HERA data in particular at high photon virtuality Q^2 and increase the central fit value of the strong coupling constant.

  20. T4-lysozyme fusion for the production of human formyl peptide receptors for structural determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Cui, Ying; Wang, Jiqian

    2014-03-01

    T4-lysozyme (T4L) fusion was introduced in the intracellular loop of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) of human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3), and the ability of T4L fusion to be used in the production of human FPR3 for structural determination was evaluated in this work. The T4L variant of human FPR3 termed FPR3-T4L was expressed in stable tetracycline-inducible HEK293 cells. A systematic detergent screening showed that fos-choline-14 was the optimal detergent to solubilize and subsequently purify FPR3-T4L from HEK293 cells. Immunoaffinity purification in combination with gel filtration was employed to purify the T4L-fused receptor to high homogeneity. The final yield of the human FPR3-T4L monomer from 2 g of cells was 0.2 mg. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the receptor adopted a correct secondary structure after purification, while ligand binding measurement indicated that the receptor was functional. Thus, the presence of T4L fusion did not evidently disturb the expression in HEK293 cells, proper folding, and functionality of human FPR3. Our study of evaluating T4L fusion for the recombinant production of human formyl peptide receptor would facilitate ongoing efforts in the structural characterization of GPCRs.

  1. Discovering a new analogue of thalidomide which may be used as a potent modulator of TNF-alpha production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Braña, Miguel; Acero, Nuria; Añorbe, Loreto; Muñoz Mingarro, Dolores; Llinares, Francisco; Domínguez, Gema

    2009-09-01

    A new series of imide derivatives related to thalidomide were synthesized and evaluated as modulators of TNF-alpha production. These derivatives enhance TNF-alpha production using human leukemia HL-60 cells induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), while inhibiting TNF-alpha production induced with okadaic acid (OA) in the same cell line. The diphenylmaleimide derivative 2f, was found to be the most active product, producing a strong modulation of the cytokine level.

  2. Effect of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in rats with hepatic ischemia-reper fusion injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao Ma; Zhen-Hua Ma

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:With the development of hepatic surgery, especially liver transplantation, the pathophysiological processes of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury have gained special attention. Controlling I/R injury has become one of the most important factors for successful liver transplantation. This study aimed to investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in rats with hepatic I/R injury and promote the recognition of I/R injury in the liver. METHODS:Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups. Rats in the sham-operated (SO) group served as controls. Rats in the hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) group underwent reperfusion after 30 minutes of liver ischemia. Rats were sacriifced at 1, 6 and 12 hours. The expression of TNF-αmRNA in the liver was measured by RT-PCR. Histological changes in the liver were assessed. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in serum were measured. RESULTS:The expression of TNF-αmRNA in the SO group was decreased compared with that in the I/R group (P CONCLUSION:ALT and AST in serum are closely related to hepatic I/R injury and inlfammatory reaction. TNF-αproduction in the liver triggers hepatic I/R injury through a cascade.

  3. Biological effects of activation products and other chemicals released from fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.A.; Poston, T.M.

    1976-09-01

    Literature reviews indicate that existing information is incomplete, often contradictory, and of questionable value for the prediction and assessment of ultimate impact from fusion-associated activation products and other chemical releases. It is still uncertain which structural materials will be used in the blanket and first wall of fusion power plants. However, niobium, vanadium, vanadium-chromium alloy, vanadium-titanium alloy, sintered aluminum product, and stainless steel have been suggested. The activation products of principal concern will be the longer-lived isotopes of /sup 26/Al, /sup 49/V, /sup 51/Cr, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 93/Nb, and /sup 94/Nb. Lithium released to the environment either during the mining cycle, from power plant operation or accident, may be in the form of a number of compound types varying in solubility and affinity for biological organisms. The effects of a severe liquid metal fire or explosion involving Na or K will vary according to inherent abiotic and biotic features of the affected site. Saline, saline-alkaline, and sodic soils of arid lands would be particularly susceptible to alkaline stress. Beryllium released to the environment during the mining cycle or reactor accident situation could be in the form of a number of compound types. Adverse effects to aquatic species from routine chemical releases (biocides, corrosion inhibitors, dissolution products) may occur in the discharge of both fission and fusion power plant designs.

  4. Discourse, Power, and Knowledge in the Management of "Big Science": The Production of Consensus in a Nuclear Fusion Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Extends a Foucauldian view of power/knowledge to the archetypical knowledge-intensive organization, the scientific research laboratory. Describes the discursive production of power/knowledge at the "big science" laboratory conducting nuclear fusion research and illuminates a critical incident in which the fusion research…

  5. Recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen production in Aspergillus niger: evaluating the strategy of gene fusion to native glucoamylase

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    James, ER

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbiology and Biotechnology October 2012/ Vol. 96, No.2 Recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen production in Aspergillus niger: evaluating the strategy of gene fusion to native glucoamylase ER James a,c & WH van Zyl b & PJ van Zyl c & JF Görgens..., Pretoria 0001, South Africa Abstract This study demonstrates the potential of Aspergillus niger as a candidate expression system for virus- like particle production using gene fusion. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) production, targeted...

  6. Reduction of mouse egg surface integrin alpha9 subunit (ITGA9) reduces the egg's ability to support sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vjugina, Ulyana; Zhu, Xiaoling; Oh, Eugene; Bracero, Nabal J; Evans, Janice P

    2009-04-01

    The involvement of egg integrins in mammalian sperm-egg interactions has been controversial, with data from integrin inhibitor studies contrasting with evidence from knockouts showing that specific integrin subunits are not essential for fertility. An alpha(4)/alpha(9) (ITGA4/ITGA9) integrin subfamily member has been implicated in fertilization but not extensively examined, so we tested the following three hypotheses: 1) an ITGA4/ITGA9 integrin participates in sperm-egg interactions, 2) short-term acute knockdown by RNA interference of integrin subunits would result in a fertilization phenotype differing from that of chronic depletion via knockout, and 3) detection of a fertilization phenotype is sensitive to in vitro fertilization (IVF) assay conditions. We show that mouse and human eggs express the alpha(9) integrin subunit (ITGA9). RNA interference-mediated knockdown resulted in reduced levels of Itga9 mRNA and surface protein in mouse eggs. RNA interference attempts to knockdown ITGA9's likely beta partner, beta(1) (ITGB1), resulted in reduced Itgb1 mRNA but no reduction in ITGB1 surface protein. Therefore, studies using a function-blocking anti-ITGB1 antibody tested the hypothesis that ITGB1 participates in gamete interactions. Analyses of sperm-egg interactions with Itga9-knockdown eggs and anti-ITGB1 antibody-treated eggs in IVF assays using specific sperm:egg ratios revealed the following: 1) a reduction, but not complete loss, of sperm-egg binding and fusion was observed and 2) the reduction of sperm-egg binding and fusion was not detected in inseminations with high sperm:egg ratios. These data demonstrate that ITGA9 and ITGB1 participate in sperm-egg interactions but clearly are not the only molecules involved. This also shows that careful design of IVF parameters allows detection of deficiencies in gamete interactions.

  7. Measurement of jet production with ATLAS and extraction of $\\alpha_s$

    CERN Document Server

    Laycock, Paul; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of jets at hadron colliders provides a stringent test of perturbative QCD at the highest energies. The process can also be used to probe the gluon density function of the proton. Specific topologies can be used to extract the strong coupling constant. The ATLAS collaboration has recently measured the inclusive jet production cross section in data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 8TeV and 13TeV. The measurements have been performed differentially in jet rapidity and transverse momentum. The collaboration also presents a first measurement of the di-jet cross section at a center-of-mass energy of 13TeV as a function of the di-jet mass and rapidity. The results have been compared with state-of-the-art theory predictions at NLO in pQCD, interfaced with different parton distribution functions and can be used to constrain the proton structure. We also present new measurements of transverse energy-energy correlations (TEEC) and their associated asymmetries (ATEEC) in multi-jet events at a center...

  8. First Measurement of the Fraction of Top Quark Pair Production Through Gluon-Gluon Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez-Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrerar, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillol, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerritop, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenarr, C; Cuevaso, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdeckerd, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; García, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoloua, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokarisa, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraesda Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hillc, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Le Compte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Leeq, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakisa, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martinj, V; Martínez, M; Martinez-Ballarin, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNultyi, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemerk, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsenf, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohosh, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademackerc, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojiman, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffarde, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thomg, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquezl, F; Velev, G; Vellidisa, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouevq, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whitesone, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittichg, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yangm, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhengb, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2007-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the fraction of top quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion. We use 0.96/fb of s*(1/2)=1.96 TeV p-pbar collision data recorded with the CDF II detector at Fermilab. We identify theE candidate t-tbar events with a high-energy charged lepton, a neutrino candidate, and four or more jets with at least one identified as originating from a b quark. Using charged particles with low transverse momentum in t-tbar events, we find the fraction of top quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion to be 0.07 +/- 0.14(stat) +/- 0.07(syst), in agreement with the standard model NLO prediction of 0.15 +/- 0.05.

  9. Product PCNPsurv or the "reduced" evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion for "hot" fusion reactions studied with the dynamical cluster-decay model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sahila; Kaur, Arshdeep; Hemdeep, Gupta, Raj K.

    2016-04-01

    The product PCNPsurv of compound nucleus (CN) fusion probability PCN and survival probability Psurv is calculated to determine the reduced evaporation residue cross section σER/σfusion , denoted σERreduced, with (total) fusion cross section σfusion given as a sum of CN-formation cross section σCN and non-CN cross section σnCN for each reaction, where σCN is the sum of evaporation residue cross section σER and fusion-fission cross section σff and σnCN, if not measured, is estimated empirically as the difference between measured and calculated σfusion. Our calculations of PCN and Psurv, based on the dynamical cluster-decay model, were successfully made for some 17 "hot" fusion reactions, forming different CN of mass numbers ACN˜100 -300 , with deformations of nuclei up to hexadecapole deformations and "compact" orientations for both coplanar (Φc=0∘ ) and noncoplanar (Φc≠0∘ ) configurations, using various different nuclear interaction potentials. Interesting variations of σERreduced with CN excitation energy E*, fissility parameter χ , CN mass ACN, and Coulomb parameter Z1Z2 show that, independent of entrance channel, different isotopes of CN, and nuclear interaction potentials used, the dominant quantity in the product is Psurv, which classifies all the studied CN into three groups of weakly fissioning, radioactive, and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei, with relative magnitudes of σERreduced˜1 , ˜10-6 , and ˜10-11 , which, like for PCN, get further grouped in two dependencies of (i) weakly fissioning and strongly fissioning superheavy nuclei decreasing with increasing E* and (ii) radioactive nuclei increasing with increasing E*.

  10. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP regulates PGC-1alpha expression and energy production in brown adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Liu, Jun; Saha, Pradip; Huang, Jiansheng; Chan, Lawrence; Spiegelman, Bruce; Moore, David D

    2005-10-01

    Brown adipocytes increase energy production in response to induction of PGC-1alpha, a dominant regulator of energy metabolism. We have found that the orphan nuclear receptor SHP (NR0B2) is a negative regulator of PGC-1alpha expression in brown adipocytes. Mice lacking SHP show increased basal expression of PGC-1alpha, increased energy expenditure, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Increased PGC-1alpha expression in SHP null brown adipose tissue is not due to beta-adrenergic activation, since it is also observed in primary cultures of SHP(-/-) brown adipocytes that are not exposed to such stimuli. In addition, acute inhibition of SHP expression in cultured wild-type brown adipocytes increases basal PGC-1alpha expression, and SHP overexpression in SHP null brown adipocytes decreases it. The orphan nuclear receptor ERRgamma is expressed in BAT and its transactivation of the PGC-1alpha promoter is potently inhibited by SHP. We conclude that SHP functions as a negative regulator of energy production in BAT.

  11. Vector Boson Fusion Production with rm $H \\to \\gamma\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Dubinin, Mikhail; Ma, Yousi; Newman, Harvey B; Pieri, Marco

    2006-01-01

    A study of CMS discovery potential for an intermediate mass Higgs boson is presented in this note. Results have been obtained for the vector boson fusion (VBF) production mode, rm pp rightarrow rm q q H rightarrow rm q q gamma gamma where the final state includes two high-rapidity jets, during the first years of running at low luminosity. Full detector simulation is used both for the Higgs boson signal and all types of background.

  12. Adjoint Monte Carlo Simulation of Fusion Product Activation Probe Experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Äkäslompolo, Simppa; Tardini, Giovanni; Kurki-Suonio, Taina

    2015-01-01

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material makig it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte-Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitated, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within 40%, which can be considered remarkable considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations. Also an alternative probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized...

  13. Adjoint Monte Carlo simulation of fusion product activation probe experiment in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äkäslompolo, S.; Bonheure, G.; Tardini, G.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-10-01

    The activation probe is a robust tool to measure flux of fusion products from a magnetically confined plasma. A carefully chosen solid sample is exposed to the flux, and the impinging ions transmute the material making it radioactive. Ultra-low level gamma-ray spectroscopy is used post mortem to measure the activity and, thus, the number of fusion products. This contribution presents the numerical analysis of the first measurement in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, which was also the first experiment to measure a single discharge. The ASCOT suite of codes was used to perform adjoint/reverse Monte Carlo calculations of the fusion products. The analysis facilitates, for the first time, a comparison of numerical and experimental values for absolutely calibrated flux. The results agree to within a factor of about two, which can be considered a quite good result considering the fact that all features of the plasma cannot be accounted in the simulations.Also an alternative to the present probe orientation was studied. The results suggest that a better optimized orientation could measure the flux from a significantly larger part of the plasma. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  14. A systematic approach to the linear-stability assessment of Alfv\\'en eigenmodes in the presence of fusion-born alpha particles for ITER-like equilibria

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, P; Ferreira, J; Coelho, R; Nabais, F; Borba, D; Loureiro, N F; Oliver, H J C; Sharapov, S E

    2014-01-01

    A systematic approach to assess the linear stability of Alfv\\'en eigenmodes in the presence of fusion-born alpha particles is described. Because experimental results for ITER are not available yet, it is not known beforehand which Alfv\\'en eigenmodes will interact more intensively with the alpha-particle population. Therefore, the number of modes that need to be considered in stability assessments becomes quite large and care must be exercised when choosing the numerical tools to work with, which must be fast and efficient. In the presented approach, all possible eigenmodes are first found after intensively scanning a suitable frequency range. Each solution found is then tested to find if its discretization over the radial grid in use is adequate. Finally, the interaction between the identified eigenmodes and the alpha-particle population is evaluated with the drift-kinetic code CASTOR-K, in order to assess their growth rates and hence their linear stability. The described approach enables one to single out t...

  15. SIRIUS-T: A study of a symmetrically illuminated inertial confinement fusion tritium production facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, B.; Sviatoslavksy, I.N.; Bruggink, D.; Engelstad, R.L.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Larsen, E.M.; Lovell, E.G.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Mogahed, E.A.; Moses, G.A.; Moucha, A.; Peterson, R.R.; Powers, J.; Sawan, M.E.; Wittenberg, L.J.

    1990-12-01

    The aging US tritium production reactors are slowly being phased out and the US Department of Energy has initiated a New Production Reactors Program'' which will provide for the design, construction and operation of new facilities for the production of tritium and other special nuclear materials. Preliminary requirements are currently being prepared, leading to construction and operation by the year 2000. Unfortunately, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cannot possibly be ready to perform such a task on this short time scale. However, it is instructive to see how well it can do in producing tritium when ICF has been demonstrated and a comparison with the proposed production schemes is conducted here. SIRIUS-T is conceptual design study of a tritium production facility utilizing direct drive symmetrically illuminated inertial confinement fusion. The T'' designation distinguishes it from SIRIUS-M, a materials facility, and SIRIUS-C, a commercial power plant. As in any other fusion related design study, a certain amount of technical extrapolation has been made in SIRIUS-T. It should be said early on, however, that in areas of uncertainty, we have always taken the conservative approach. This is evident in our choice of target gain, number of beams selected for symmetric illumination and elsewhere throughout the study. In performing the economic analysis we have also attempted to err on the conservative side. This too is evident in our costing of the driver and the reactor chamber. For these reasons, we feel that this study projects enough confidence as to make it worthy of comparison with the other proposed production systems.

  16. Production of human alpha-1-antitrypsin from transgenic rice cell culture in a membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Karen A; Hong, Lo Ming; Trombly, David M; Xie, Qing; Jackman, Alan P

    2005-01-01

    Transgenic plant cell cultures offer a number of advantages over alternative host expression systems, but so far relatively low product concentrations have been achieved. In this study, transgenic rice cells are used in a two-compartment membrane bioreactor (CELLine 350, Integra Biosciences) for the production of recombinant alpha-1-antitrypsin (rAAT). Expression of rAAT is controlled by the rice alpha-amylase (RAmy3D) promoter, which is induced in the absence of sugar. The extracellular product is retained in the bioreactor's relatively small cell compartment, thereby increasing product concentration. Due to the packed nature of the cell aggregates in the cell compartment, a clarified product solution can be withdrawn from the bioreactor. Active rAAT reached levels of 100-247 mg/L (4-10% of the total extracellular protein) in the cell compartment at 5-6 days postinduction, and multiple inductions of the RAmy3D promoter were demonstrated.

  17. Incomplete vs. Complete Fusion at E/A {approx} 4-7 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pushpendra P [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 1-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Yadav, Abhishek; Sharma, Vijay R; Singh, Devendra P; Gupta, Unnati; Singh, B P; Prasad, R [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A. M. University, Aligarh-202 002 (India); Sharma, Manoj K [Physics Department, S. V. College, Aligarh-202 001 (India); Kumar, R; Golda, K S; Singh, R P; Muralithar, S; Bhowmik, R K, E-mail: pushpendrapsingh@gmail.com [NP-Group, Inter-University Accelerator Center, New Delhi-110 067 (India)

    2011-02-01

    With a view to study onset and strength of incomplete fusion at low projectile energies (i.e., {approx} 4-7 MeV/nucleon) three sets of experiments have been performed in {sup 12}C,{sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm systems. In first set of experiments, spin-distributions and feeding intensity profiles for xn,{alpha}xn/2{alpha}xn-channels have been measured to figure out associated l-values. The spin-distributions for direct-{alpha}-emitting channels (associated with incomplete fusion) have been found to be distinctly different than that observed for fusion-evaporation (complete fusion) channels. The mean value of driving input angular momenta associated with direct-{alpha}-emitting-channels have been found to be higher than that observed for fusion-evaporation xn/{alpha}-emitting-channels, and increases with direct-{alpha}-multiplicity in forward cone. The second set of experiments has been performed to understand influence of incomplete fusion on complete fusion at these energies. Incomplete fusion strength function has been deduced from the analysis of experimental excitation functions. The third set of experiments deals with the validation of data reduction procedure used to deduce incomplete fusion fraction, and to confirm the fusion incompleteness at slightly above barrier energies. Forward-recoil-ranges of heavy reaction products have been measured and analysed on the basis of break-up fusion model. More than one linear-momentum-transfer components associated with full- and/or partial-fusion of projectile with target nucleus have been observed. Experimental ranges of forward-recoils are found to be in good agreement with that estimated using range-energy formulation. The relative strengths of complete and incomplete fusion components deduced from the analysis of forward-recoil-ranges and excitation functions complement each other. Result presented in this paper conclusively demonstrate substantial incomplete fusion contribution at energy as low as 7% above the barrier.

  18. Functional expression and purification of recombinant Hepcidin25 production in Escherichia coli using SUMO fusion technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Vahideh; Saffar, Behnaz; Emamzadeh, Rahman

    2017-04-30

    Hepcidin25 is a small cysteine-rich peptide hormone known as a new class of antimicrobial peptides. The purpose of the present study was to express, purify and investigate the antibacterial properties of recombinant human hepcidin25 protein production in Escherichia coli. Human hepcidin25 gene was optimized and fused to a small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) gene for higher expression. Then SUMO-hepcidin25 was cloned into the pET-32a (+) vector and expressed in E. coli Origami. The fusion protein with a molecular weight of approximately 35kDa was analyzed on SDS-PAGE gel. The highest expression was observed after 6h induction and the fusion protein consisted approximately 47% of the total cellular protein. The purified SUMO-hepcidin25 purity was determined to be higher than 95%, with a final yield of 3.9mgl(-)(1) of media. The recombinant hepcidin25 showed antibacterial activity against both Gram negative (Klebsiella pneumonia) and Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 150μgml(-1), 18.7μg/ml(-1) and 37.5μg/ml(-1), respectively. These results indicated that thioredoxin and SUMO dual fusion system is an efficient production system for synthesis functional human hepcidin25.

  19. Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-Hua; GUO Hai-Ping; MOU Yun-Feng; ZHENG Pu; LIU Rong; YANG Xiao-Fei; YANG Jian

    2013-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established.It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium.The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D+ beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode.The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the threedimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-Ⅵ data file.The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(α,β) thermal scattering model,so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors.

  20. Fusion power production in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor baseline H-mode scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Kessel, C. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Pankin, A. Y. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Self-consistent simulations of 15 MA ITER H-mode DT scenarios, from ramp-up through flat-top, are carried out. Electron and ion temperatures, toroidal angular frequency, and currents are evolved, in simulations carried out using the predictive TRANSPort and integrated modeling code starting with initial profiles and equilibria obtained from tokamak simulation code studies. Studies are carried out examining the dependence and sensitivity of fusion power production on electron density, argon impurity concentration, choice of radio frequency heating, pedestal temperature without and with E × B flow shear effects included, and the degree of plasma rotation. The goal of these whole-device ITER simulations is to identify dependencies that might impact ITER fusion performance.

  1. Diversion of flux toward sesquiterpene production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by fusion of host and heterologous enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Line; Chen, Yun; Bach, Lars Stougaard

    2011-01-01

    The ability to transfer metabolic pathways from the natural producer organisms to the well-characterized cell factory Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well documented. However, as many secondary metabolites are produced by collaborating enzymes assembled in complexes, metabolite production in yeast ma...... demonstrates that engineering the spatial organization of metabolic enzymes around a branch point has great potential for diverting flux toward a desired product. ©American Society for Microbiology. All rights reserved.......The ability to transfer metabolic pathways from the natural producer organisms to the well-characterized cell factory Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well documented. However, as many secondary metabolites are produced by collaborating enzymes assembled in complexes, metabolite production in yeast may...... increased the production of patchoulol, the main sesquiterpene produced by PTS, up to 2-fold. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the fusion strategy can be used in combination with traditional metabolic engineering to further increase the production of patchoulol. This simple test case of synthetic biology...

  2. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessen, Holly Jean; Liao, Hans H; Gort, Steven John; Selifonova, Olga V

    2014-11-18

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  3. Beta-alanine/alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase for 3-hydroxypropionic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessen, Holly Jean [Chanhassen, MN; Liao, Hans H [Eden Prairie, MN; Gort, Steven John [Apple Valley, MN; Selifonova, Olga V [Plymouth, MN

    2011-10-04

    The present disclosure provides novel beta-alanine/alpha ketoglutarate aminotransferase nucleic acid and protein sequences having increased biological activity. Also provided are cells containing such enzymes, as well as methods of their use, for example to produce malonyl semialdehyde and downstream products thereof, such as 3-hydroxypropionic acid and derivatives thereof.

  4. Recoil-alpha-fission and recoil-alpha-alpha-fission events observed in the reaction Ca-48 + Am-243

    CERN Document Server

    Forsberg, U; Andersson, L -L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Golubev, P; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Herzberg, R -D; Hessberger, F P; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Sarmiento, L G; Schädel, M; Yakushev, A; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Dobaczewski, J; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nazarewicz, W; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Shi, Y; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2015-01-01

    Products of the fusion-evaporation reaction Ca-48 + Am-243 were studied with the TASISpec set-up at the gas-filled separator TASCA at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum f\\"ur Schwerionenforschung. Amongst the detected thirty correlated alpha-decay chains associated with the production of element Z=115, two recoil-alpha-fission and five recoil-alpha-alpha-fission events were observed. The latter are similar to four such events reported from experiments performed at the Dubna gas-filled separator. Contrary to their interpretation, we propose an alternative view, namely to assign eight of these eleven decay chains of recoil-alpha(-alpha)-fission type to start from the 3n-evaporation channel 115-288. The other three decay chains remain viable candidates for the 2n-evaporation channel 115-289.

  5. O-16 Coulomb dissociation : towards a new means to determine the C-12+alpha fusion rate in stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleurot, F; van den Berg, AM; Davids, B; Harakeh, MN; Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Guillot, J; Laurent, H; Willis, A; Assuncao, M; Kiener, J; Lefebvre, A; de Sereville, N; Tatischeff, [No Value; Assuncao, L.; Lefebvre, L.; Tafischeff, V.

    2005-01-01

    A feasibility study was made of an important aspect of the Coulomb-dissociation method, which has been proposed for the determination of the rate of the astrophysically important C-12(alpha, gamma)160 reaction. A crucial aspect is the disentanglement of nuclear and Coulomb interactions on one hand a

  6. Measurements of DT alpha particle loss near the outer midplane of TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Redi, M.H.; Schivell, J.; White, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Measurements of DT alpha particle loss to the outer midplane region of TFTR have been made using a radially movable scintillator detector. The conclusion from this data is that mechanisms determining the DT alpha loss to the outer midplane are not substantially different from those for DD fusion products. Some of these results are compared with a simplified theoretical model for TF ripple-induced alpha loss, which is expected to be the dominant classical alpha loss mechanism near the outer midplane. An example of plasma-driven MHD-induced alpha particle loss is shown, but no signs of any ``collective`` alpha instability-induced alpha loss have yet been observed.

  7. Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawan, M. E.; Ghoniem, N. M.; Snead, L.; Katoh, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation damage parameters in SiC/SiC composite structures are determined in both magnetic (MFE) and inertial (IFE) confinement fusion systems. Variations in the geometry, neutron energy spectrum, and pulsed nature of neutron production result in significant differences in damage parameters between the two systems. With the same neutron wall loading, the displacement damage rate in the first wall in an IFE system is ˜10% lower than in an MFE system, while gas production and burnup rates are a factor of 2 lower. Self-cooled LiPb and Flibe blankets were analyzed. While using LiPb results in higher displacement damage, Flibe yields higher gas production and burnup rates. The effects of displacement damage and helium production on defect accumulation in SiC/SiC composites are also discussed.

  8. Higgs production via weak boson fusion in the standard model and the MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figy, Terrance [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Palmer, Sophy [KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany). IThP; Weiglein, Georg [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Weak boson fusion is expected to be an important Higgs production channel at the LHC. Complete one-loop results for weak boson fusion in the Standard Model have been obtained by calculating the full virtual electroweak corrections and photon radiation and implementing these results into the public Monte Carlo program VBFNLO (which includes the NLO QCD corrections). Furthermore the dominant supersymmetric one-loop corrections to neutral Higgs production, in the general case where the MSSM includes complex phases, have been calculated. These results have been combined with all one-loop corrections of Standard Model type and with the propagator-type corrections from the Higgs sector of the MSSM up to the two-loop level. Within the Standard Model the electroweak corrections are found to be as important as the QCD corrections after the application of appropriate cuts. The corrections yield a shift in the cross section of order 5% for a Higgs of mass 100-200 GeV, confirming the result obtained previously in the literature. For the production of a light Higgs boson in the MSSM the Standard Model result is recovered in the decoupling limit, while the loop contributions from superpartners to the production of neutral MSSM Higgs bosons can give rise to corrections in excess of 10% away from the decoupling region. (orig.)

  9. SUMO fusion technology for enhanced protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panavas, Tadas; Sanders, Carsten; Butt, Tauseef R

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the reversible attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein is a post-translational modification that has been demonstrated to play an important role in various cellular processes. Moreover, it has been found that SUMO as an N-terminal fusion partner enhances functional protein production in prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems, based upon significantly improved protein stability and solubility. Following the expression and purification of the fusion protein, the SUMO-tag can be cleaved by specific (SUMO) proteases via their endopeptidase activity in vitro to generate the desired N-terminus of the released protein partner. In addition to its physiological relevance in eukaryotes, SUMO can, thus, be used as a powerful biotechnological tool for protein expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell systems.In this chapter, we will describe the construction of a fusion protein with the SUMO-tag, its expression in Escherichia coli, and its purification followed by the removal of the SUMO-tag by a SUMO-specific protease in vitro.

  10. Production and Partial Purification of Alpha Amylase from Bacillus subtilis (MTCC 121 Using Solid State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dibyangana Raul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Amylase is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of starch into sugars and plays a pivotal role in a variety of areas like use as digestives, for the production of ethanol and high fructose corn syrup, detergents, desiring of textiles, modified starches, hydrolysis of oil-field drilling fluids, and paper recycling. In the present work, solid state fermentation (SSF for α-amylase production has been used in lieu of submerged fermentation (SmF due to its simple technique, low capital investment, lower levels of catabolite repression, and better product recovery. Bacillus subtilis has been well known as producer of alpha amylase and was tested using solid state fermentation for 48 hours at 37°C with wheat bran as substrate. Comparison between different fermentation hours demonstrated high yield of alpha amylase after 48 hours. This alpha amylase has optimum pH and temperature at 7.1 and 40°C, respectively. With the goal to purify alpha amylase, 30–70% (NH42SO4 cut concentrated the amylase activity threefold with respect to crude fermented extract. This was verified in quantitative DNS assay method as well as in zymogram gel profile. The exact molecular weight of the amylase is yet to be determined with the aid of other protein purification techniques.

  11. Production and Partial Purification of Alpha Amylase from Bacillus subtilis (MTCC 121) Using Solid State Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raul, Dibyangana; Biswas, Tania; Mukhopadhyay, Suchita; Kumar Das, Shrayan; Gupta, Suvroma

    2014-01-01

    Amylase is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of starch into sugars and plays a pivotal role in a variety of areas like use as digestives, for the production of ethanol and high fructose corn syrup, detergents, desiring of textiles, modified starches, hydrolysis of oil-field drilling fluids, and paper recycling. In the present work, solid state fermentation (SSF) for α -amylase production has been used in lieu of submerged fermentation (SmF) due to its simple technique, low capital investment, lower levels of catabolite repression, and better product recovery. Bacillus subtilis has been well known as producer of alpha amylase and was tested using solid state fermentation for 48 hours at 37°C with wheat bran as substrate. Comparison between different fermentation hours demonstrated high yield of alpha amylase after 48 hours. This alpha amylase has optimum pH and temperature at 7.1 and 40°C, respectively. With the goal to purify alpha amylase, 30-70% (NH4)2SO4 cut concentrated the amylase activity threefold with respect to crude fermented extract. This was verified in quantitative DNS assay method as well as in zymogram gel profile. The exact molecular weight of the amylase is yet to be determined with the aid of other protein purification techniques.

  12. Fusion of product and process data: Batch-mode and real-time streaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent De Sapio; Spike Leonard

    1999-12-01

    In today's DP product realization enterprise it is imperative to reduce the design-to-fabrication cycle time and cost while improving the quality of DP parts (reducing defects). Much of this challenge resides in the inherent gap between the product and process worlds. The lack of seamless, bi-directional flow of information prevents true concurrency in the product realization world. This report addresses a framework for product-process data fusion to help achieve next generation product realization. A fundamental objective is to create an open environment for multichannel observation of process date, and subsequent mapping of that data onto product geometry. In addition to the sensor-based observation of manufacturing processes, model-based process data provides an important complement to empirically acquired data. Two basic groups of manufacturing models are process physics, and machine kinematics and dynamics. Process physics addresses analytical models that describe the physical phenomena of the process itself. Machine kinematic and dynamic models address the mechanical behavior of the processing equipment. As a secondary objective, an attempt has been made in this report to address part of the model-based realm through the development of an open object-oriented library and toolkit for machine kinematics and dynamics. Ultimately, it is desirable to integrate design definition, with all types of process data; both sensor-based and model-based. Collectively, the goal is to allow all disciplines within the product realization enterprise to have a centralized medium for the fusion of product and process data.

  13. Specific interaction of capsid protein and importin-{alpha}/{beta} influences West Nile virus production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuvanakantham, Raghavan; Chong, Mun-Keat [Flavivirology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, 5 Science Drive 2, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Ng, Mah-Lee, E-mail: micngml@nus.edu.sg [Flavivirology Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, 5 Science Drive 2, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)

    2009-11-06

    West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein has been shown to enter the nucleus of infected cells. However, the mechanism by which C protein enters the nucleus is unknown. In this study, we have unveiled for the first time that nuclear transport of WNV and Dengue virus C protein is mediated by their direct association with importin-{alpha}. This interplay is mediated by the consensus sequences of bipartite nuclear localization signal located between amino acid residues 85-101 together with amino acid residues 42 and 43 of C protein. Elucidation of biological significance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction demonstrated that the binding efficiency of this association influenced the nuclear entry of C protein and virus production. Collectively, this study illustrated the molecular mechanism by which the C protein of arthropod-borne flavivirus enters the nucleus and showed the importance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction in the context of flavivirus life-cycle.

  14. Suppression of TNF-alpha production by S-adenosylmethionine in human mononuclear leukocytes is not mediated by polyamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, J.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Sauter, S.

    2006-01-01

    precursors or metabolites [phosphatidylcholine, choline, betaine, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)] have a modulating effect on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production by endotoxin-stimulated human mononuclear leukocytes and whether SAM-dependent polyamines (spermidine, spermine) are mediators of SAM......-induced inhibition of TNF-alpha synthesis. Methionine and betaine had a moderate stimulatory effect on TNF-alpha production, whereas phosphatidylcholine (ID(50) 5.4 mM), SAM (ID(50) 131 microM), spermidine (ID(50) 4.5 microM) and spermine (ID(50) 3.9 microM) had a predominantly inhibitory effect. Putrescine did...... not alter TNF-alpha release. Inhibitors of polyamine synthesis that blocked either putrescine (difluoromethylornithine) or spermine (CGP48664A) production did not affect TNF-alpha synthesis. Endotoxin stimulation of leukocytes did not alter the intracellular levels of polyamines. In addition...

  15. Two Strategies for Microbial Production of an Industrial Enzyme-Alpha-Amylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Garriott, Owen; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments including hot springs, soda lakes and arctic water. This ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered extremophiles to be of interest in astrobiology, evolutionary biology as well as in industrial applications. Of particular interest to the biotechnology industry are the biological catalysts of the extremophiles, the extremozymes, whose unique stabilities at extreme conditions make them potential sources of novel enzymes in industrial applications. There are two major approaches to microbial enzyme production. This entails enzyme isolation directly from the natural host or creating a recombinant expression system whereby the targeted enzyme can be overexpressed in a mesophilic host. We are employing both methods in the effort to produce alpha-amylases from a hyperthermophilic archaeon (Thermococcus) isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Atlantic Ocean, as well as from alkaliphilic bacteria (Bacillus) isolated from a soda lake in Tanzania. Alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of internal alpha-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch to produce smaller sugars. Thermostable alpha-amylases are used in the liquefaction of starch for production of fructose and glucose syrups, whereas alpha-amylases stable at high pH have potential as detergent additives. The alpha-amylase encoding gene from Thermococcus was PCR amplified using carefully designed primers and analyzed using bioinformatics tools such as BLAST and Multiple Sequence Alignment for cloning and expression in E.coli. Four strains of Bacillus were grown in alkaline starch-enriched medium of which the culture supernatant was used as enzyme source. Amylolytic activity was detected using the starch-iodine method.

  16. Two Strategies for Microbial Production of an Industrial Enzyme-Alpha-Amylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardsdotter, Eva C. M. J.; Garriott, Owen; Pusey, Marc L.; Ng, Joseph D.

    2003-01-01

    Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in, from an anthropocentric view, extreme environments including hot springs, soda lakes and arctic water. This ability of survival at extreme conditions has rendered extremophiles to be of interest in astrobiology, evolutionary biology as well as in industrial applications. Of particular interest to the biotechnology industry are the biological catalysts of the extremophiles, the extremozymes, whose unique stabilities at extreme conditions make them potential sources of novel enzymes in industrial applications. There are two major approaches to microbial enzyme production. This entails enzyme isolation directly from the natural host or creating a recombinant expression system whereby the targeted enzyme can be overexpressed in a mesophilic host. We are employing both methods in the effort to produce alpha-amylases from a hyperthermophilic archaeon (Thermococcus) isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Atlantic Ocean, as well as from alkaliphilic bacteria (Bacillus) isolated from a soda lake in Tanzania. Alpha-amylases catalyze the hydrolysis of internal alpha-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch to produce smaller sugars. Thermostable alpha-amylases are used in the liquefaction of starch for production of fructose and glucose syrups, whereas alpha-amylases stable at high pH have potential as detergent additives. The alpha-amylase encoding gene from Thermococcus was PCR amplified using carefully designed primers and analyzed using bioinformatics tools such as BLAST and Multiple Sequence Alignment for cloning and expression in E.coli. Four strains of Bacillus were grown in alkaline starch-enriched medium of which the culture supernatant was used as enzyme source. Amylolytic activity was detected using the starch-iodine method.

  17. Next-to-Leading Order Corrections to Higgs Boson Pair Production in Gluon Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kerner, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We present a calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production of Higgs boson pairs in gluon fusion keeping the full dependence on the mass of the top quark. The virtual corrections, involving two-loop integrals with up to four mass scales, have been calculated numerically and we present an efficient algorithm to obtain accurate results of the virtual amplitude using numerical integrations. Taking the top quark mass into account we obtain significant differences compared to results obtained in the heavy top limit.

  18. Higgs production in bottom-quark fusion: Matching beyond leading order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Stefano; Napoletano, Davide; Ubiali, Maria

    2016-12-01

    We compute the total cross-section for Higgs boson production in bottom-quark fusion using the so-called FONLL method for the matching of a scheme in which the b-quark is treated as a massless parton to that in which it is treated as a massive final-state particle, and extend our previous results to the case in which the next-to-next-to-leading-log five-flavour scheme result is combined with the next-to-leading-order O (αs3) four-flavour scheme computation.

  19. NLO QCD corrections to Higgs boson production plus three jets in gluon fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Deurzen, H. van; Greiner, N.; Luisoni, G.; Mirabella, E.; Peraro, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Mastrolia, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Padova Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Astronomia; INFN, Sezione di Padova (Italy); Ossola, G. [New York Univ., NY (United States). New York City College of Technology; New York Univ., NY (United States). The Graduate School and University Center; Tramontano, F. [Napoli Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    We report on the calculation of the cross section for Higgs boson production in association with three jets via gluon fusion, at next-to-leading-order (NLO) accuracy in QCD, in the infinite top-mass approximation. After including the complete NLO QCD corrections, we observe a strong reduction in the scale dependence of the result, and an increased steepness in the transverse momentum distributions of both the Higgs and the leading jets. The results are obtained with the combined use of GoSam, Sherpa, and the MadDipole/MadEvent framework.

  20. Charged Higgs production via vector-boson fusion at NNLO in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaro, Marco; Maltoni, Fabio [Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium). CP3; Bolzoni, Paolo [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We present the total cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the strong coupling for single and double charged Higgs production via weak boson fusion. Results are obtained via the structure function approach, which builds upon the approximate, though very accurate, factorization of the QCD corrections between the two quark lines. The theoretical uncertainty on the total cross sections at the LHC from higher order corrections and the parton distribution uncertainties are estimated at the 2% level each for a wide range of Higgs boson masses. (orig.)

  1. Higgs production via vector-boson fusion at NNLO in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Maltoni, Fabio; Zaro, Marco [Catholique Univ. de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (BE). Center for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3)

    2010-03-15

    We present the total cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the strong coupling for Higgs production via weak boson fusion. Our results are obtained via the structure function approach, which builds upon the approximate, though very accurate, factorization of the QCD corrections between the two quark lines. The theoretical uncertainty on the total cross sections at the LHC from higher order corrections and the parton distribution uncertainties are estimated at the 2% level each for a wide range of Higgs boson masses. (orig.)

  2. Enhanced charged Higgs production through W -Higgs fusion in W - b scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Cheung, Kingman; Lee, Jae Sik; Lu, Chih-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We study the associated production of a charged Higgs boson with a bottom quark and a light quark at the LHC via pp → H ± b j in the Two Higgs Doublet Models (2HDMs). Using the effective W approximation, we show that there is exact cancellation among various Feynman diagrams in high energy limit. This may imply that the production of charged Higgs can be significantly enhanced in the presence of large mass differences among the neutral Higgs bosons via W ±-Higgs fusion in the pp → H ± b j process. Particularly, we emphasize the potential enhancement due to a light pseudoscalar boson A, which is still allowed by the current data by which we explicitly calculate the allowed regions in ( M A , tan β) plane, and show that the production cross section can be as large as 0.1 pb for large tan β. We also show that the transverse momentum distribution of the b quark can potentially distinguish the W ± - A fusion diagram from the top diagram. Finally, we point out further enhancement when we go beyond the 2HDMs.

  3. N(pro) fusion technology: On-column complementation to improve efficiency in biopharmaceutical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, S; Missbichler, B; Walther, C; Sponring, M; Cserjan-Puschmann, M; Auer, B; Schneider, R; Dürauer, A

    2016-04-01

    N(pro) fusion technology, a highly efficient system for overexpression of proteins and peptides in Escherichia coli, was further developed by splitting the autoprotease N(pro) into two fragments to generate a functional complementation system. The size of the expression tag is thus reduced from 168 to 58 amino acids, so by 66%. Upon complementation of the fragments auto-proteolytic activity is restored. This process has been shown for three model proteins of different size, a short 16 aa-peptide, MCP-1, and lysozyme. Moreover, the complementation was still functional after immobilization of the N-terminal fragment to a solid support which enables recycling of the immobilized fragment. This strategy enhances overall productivity of N(pro) Fusion Technology and thus allows more efficient production of recombinant proteins with reduced costs and in higher yields. Overall, the N(pro) complementation system has, depending on the size of the target molecule, potential to increase the productivity up to 4 fold for batch refolding and even more for on-column refolding strategies by the proven possibility of regeneration of the immobilized fragment.

  4. Higgs pair production in vector-boson fusion at the LHC and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Bishara, Fady; Rojo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The production of pairs of Higgs bosons at hadron colliders provides unique information on the Higgs sector and on the mechanism underlying electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). Most studies have concentrated on the gluon fusion production mode which has the largest cross section. However, despite its small production rate, the vector-boson fusion channel can also be relevant since even small modifications of the Higgs couplings to vector bosons induce a striking increase of the cross section as a function of the invariant mass of the Higgs boson pair. In this work, we exploit this unique signature to propose a strategy to extract the $hhVV$ quartic coupling and provide model-independent constraints on theories where EWSB is driven by new strong interactions. We take advantage of the higher signal yield of the $b\\bar b b\\bar b$ final state and make extensive use of jet substructure techniques to reconstruct signal events with a boosted topology, characteristic of large partonic energies, where each Higgs boso...

  5. Photolysis of hop-derived trans-iso-alpha-acids and trans-tetrahydroiso-alpha-acids: product identification in relation to the lightstruck flavour of beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyerick, Arne; Zhao, Yining; Sandra, Pat; Huvaere, Kevin; Roelens, Frederik; De Keukeleire, Denis

    2003-03-01

    The photolysis of hop-derived trans-iso-alpha-acids (2a-c; naturally occurring bitter compounds present in beer) and of trans-tetrahydroiso-alpha-acids (5a-c; semi-synthetic advanced hop products) was investigated at 300 nm in methanol. The complex photoreaction mixtures were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using diode array detection and the major photoreaction products were identified by HPLC-mass spectroscopy. The main part of the mixture consisted of compounds, which originated from recombination of radicals derived from Norrish Type I photocleavage of the acyloin moiety in both trans-iso-alpha-acids and trans-tetrahydroiso-alpha-acids. The results confirm the intermediacy of radicals that were previously identified by time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance and they bear relevance to the formation of the lightstruck flavour that is generated when beer is exposed to light. Additionally, new photoproducts were found that are formed by photochemical reactions hitherto undiscovered in hop chemistry, including photoenolization of trans-isohumulone (2a) leading to trans-alloisohumulone (13a) and a retro oxa-di-pi-methane rearrangement in trans-isohumulone (2a) and trans-tetrahydroiso-alpha-acids to humulone (1a) and tetrahydro-alpha-acids (23a-b), respectively.

  6. Operational System-Impact Products for the Space Situational Awareness Environmental Effects Fusion System (SEEFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, S.; Scro, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VSBX) and the Technology Applications Division of the Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC/WXT) have combined efforts under the Rapid Prototyping Center (RPC) to design, develop, test, implement, and validate numerical and graphical products for the Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) Space Situational Awareness Environmental Effects Fusion System (SEEFS). These products are generated to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense weapons, navigation, communications, and surveillance systems. Jointly developed projects that have been completed as prototypes and are undergoing development for real-time operations include a SEEFS architecture and database, five system-impact products, and a high-level decision aid product. This first round of SEEFS products includes Solar Radio Burst Effects (SoRBE) on radar and satellite communications, Radar Auroral Clutter (RAC), Scintillation Effects on radar and satellite communications (RadScint and SatScint), and Satellite Surface and Deep Charge/Discharge (Char/D). The SEEFS architecture and database enable modular use and execution of SEEFS products, and the high-level Decision Aid shows the combined effects of all SEEFS product output on a given asset and on multi-asset missions. This presentation provides a general overview of the SEEFS program, along with details of the first round of products expected to be operational for use in exercises and/or real-time operations in 2007-2008.

  7. Fermentation Kinetics of Media Optimization for the Production of Alpha Amylase by a New Isolate of Aspergillus Oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ikram-ul-Haq; Roheena Abdullah; Hamid Mukhtar; Muhammad Nauman Aftab

    2007-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the isolation and screening of different strains of Aspergillus oryzae for the production of alpha amylase. Ninety strains were isolated from soil and tested for the production of alpha amylase in shake flasks. Of all the strains tested,Aspergillus oryzae GCB-32 and Aspergillus oryzae GCB-35 gave maximum production of alpha amylase. Different culture media were screened for maximum production of alpha amylase by both the strains Aspergillus oryzae GCB-32 and Aspergillus oryzae GCB-35. Kinetic analysis revealed that the values of product yield coefficient (Yp/x) and specific product yield coefficient( qp ) were found highly significant (p ≤ 0.05 ) when medium M1 was used for the enzyme production.

  8. Myxoma virus expressing a fusion protein of interleukin-15 (IL15 and IL15 receptor alpha has enhanced antitumor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Tosic

    Full Text Available Myxoma virus, a rabbit poxvirus, can efficiently infect various types of mouse and human cancer cells. It is a strict rabbit-specific pathogen, and is thought to be safe as a therapeutic agent in all non-rabbit hosts tested including mice and humans. Interleukin-15 (IL15 is an immuno-modulatory cytokine with significant potential for stimulating anti-tumor T lymphocytes and NK cells. Co-expression of IL15 with the α subunit of IL15 receptor (IL15Rα greatly enhances IL15 stability and bioavailability. Therefore, we engineered a new recombinant myxoma virus (vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr, which expresses an IL15Rα-IL15 fusion protein plus tdTomato red fluorescent reporter protein. Permissive rabbit kidney epithelial (RK-13 cells infected with vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr expressed and secreted the IL15Rα-IL15 fusion protein. Functional activity was confirmed by demonstrating that the secreted fusion protein stimulated proliferation of cytokine-dependent CTLL-2 cells. Multi-step growth curves showed that murine melanoma (B16-F10 and B16.SIY cell lines were permissive to vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr infection. In vivo experiments in RAG1-/- mice showed that subcutaneous B16-F10 tumors treated with vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr exhibited attenuated tumor growth and a significant survival benefit for the treated group compared to the PBS control and the control viruses (vMyx-IL15-tdTr and vMyx-tdTr. Immunohistological analysis of the subcutaneous tumors showed dramatically increased infiltration of NK cells in vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr treated tumors compared to the controls. In vivo experiments with immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice revealed a strong infiltrate of both NK cells and CD8+ T cells in response to vMyx-IL15Rα-tdTr, and prolonged survival. We conclude that delivery of IL15Rα-IL15 in a myxoma virus vector stimulates both innate and adaptive components of the immune system.

  9. Higgs Production via Weak Boson Fusion in the Standard Model and the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Figy, Terrance; Weiglein, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Weak boson fusion is expected to be an important Higgs production channel at the LHC. Complete one-loop results for weak boson fusion in the Standard Model have been obtained by calculating the full virtual electroweak corrections and photon radiation and implementing these results into the public Monte Carlo program VBFNLO which includes the NLO QCD corrections. Furthermore the dominant supersymmetric one-loop corrections to neutral Higgs production, in the general case where the MSSM includes complex phases, have been calculated. These results have been combined with all one-loop corrections of Standard Model type and with the propagator-type corrections from the Higgs sector of the MSSM up to the two-loop level. Within the Standard Model the electroweak corrections are found to be as important as the QCD corrections after the application of appropriate cuts. The corrections yield a shift in the cross section of order 5% for a Higgs of mass 100-200 GeV, confirming the result obtained previously in the liter...

  10. Recombinant fusion proteins for the industrial production of disulfide bridge containing peptides: purification, oxidation without concatamer formation, and selective cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döbeli, H; Andres, H; Breyer, N; Draeger, N; Sizmann, D; Zuber, M T; Weinert, B; Wipf, B

    1998-04-01

    We report the biotechnical production of peptides of approximately 35-50 amino acids in length containing one intramolecular disulfide bridge, using a recombinant fusion tail approach. This method fills the technological gap when either (a) chemical synthesis fails due to known problematic peptide sequences or (b) if simple recombinant expression is unsuccessful due to degradation. The fusion tail described here serves several purposes: (i) it enables high expression levels in Escherichia coli to be achieved; (ii) it renders the fusion protein fairly soluble; (iii) it contains a histidine affinity tag for easy purification on Ni-chelate resins, which also serves as a catalyst for the oxygen-dependent formation of the disulfide bridge; and (iv) it suppresses the formation of concatamers during the oxidation process through steric hindrance. The purified fusion protein is then immobilized on a reversed phase column for two purposes: (i) chemical cleavage of the fusion tail by cyanogen bromide and (ii) subsequent purification of the peptide. A very hydrophilic fusion partner is required so that immobilization on the reversed phase column always occurs due to the peptide. Sensitive hydrophobic residues are thereby protected from the cleavage reagent while the cleaved hydrophilic fusion tail is easily separated from the hydrophobic peptide. The method is exemplified by eight peptides representing an immunodominant epitope of the human immunodeficiency virus, but may be useful for a significant variety of similar peptides.

  11. Production of tumor necrosis factors alpha and beta by human mononuclear leukocytes stimulated with mitogens, bacteria, and malarial parasites.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrante, A; Staugas, R E; Rowan-Kelly, B; Bresatz, S; Kumaratilake, L M; Rzepczyk, C M; Adolf, G R

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factors alpha and beta (TNF-alpha and TNF-beta) are multifaceted polypeptide cytokines which may mediate some of the significant changes in cellular homeostasis which accompany the invasion of the mammalian host by viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Although it is well established that bacterial lipopolysaccharide is a potent inducer of TNF-alpha, there is still very little known of the types of agents which can trigger the production of TNFs in mononuclear leukocytes. Using an ...

  12. Modulation of the Bovine Innate Immune Response by Production of 1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 in Bovine Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In cattle, the kidney has been the only known site for production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3) from 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 25(OH)D3 by 1alpha-hydroxylase (1alpha-OHase). However, recent studies have shown that human monocytes express 1alpha-OHase and produce 1,25(OH)2D3 in response to to...

  13. An ion guide for the production of a low energy ion beam of daughter products of {alpha}-emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tordoff, B. [Nuclear Physics Group, Schuster Laboratory, Brunswick Street, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: bwt@phys.jyu.fi; Eronen, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Elomaa, V.V. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Gulick, S. [Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Hager, U. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Karvonen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Kessler, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Lee, J. [Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2T8 (Canada); Moore, I. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Popov, A. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, St. Petersburg 188350 (Russian Federation); Rahaman, S. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Rinta-Antila, S. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Sonoda, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Aystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2006-11-15

    A new ion guide has been modeled and tested for the production of a low energy ({approx}40 kV) ion beam of daughter products of alpha-emitting isotopes. The guide is designed to evacuate daughter recoils originating from the {alpha}-decay of a {sup 233}U source. The source is electroplated onto stainless steel strips and mounted along the inner walls of an ion guide chamber. A combination of electric fields and helium gas flow transport the ions through an exit hole for injection into a mass separator. Ion guide efficiencies for the extraction of {sup 229}Th{sup +} (0.06%), {sup 221}Fr{sup +} (6%) and {sup 217}At{sup +} (6%) beams have been measured. A detailed study of the electric field and gas flow influence on the ion guide efficiency is described for two differing electric field configurations.

  14. An Ion Guide for the Production of a Low Energy Ion Beam of Daughter Products of $\\alpha$-Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Tordoff, B; Elomaa, V V; Gulick, S; Hager, U; Karvonen, P; Kessler, T; Lee, J; Moore, I; Popov, A; Rahaman, S; Rinta-Antila, S; Sonoda, T; Äystö, J

    2006-01-01

    A new ion guide has been modeled and tested for the production of a low energy ($\\approx$ 40 kV) ion beam of daughter products of alpha-emitting isotopes. The guide is designed to evacuate daughter recoils originating from the $\\alpha$-decay of a $^{233}$U source. The source is electroplated onto stainless steel strips and mounted along the inner walls of an ion guide chamber. A combination of electric fields and helium gas flow transport the ions through an exit hole for injection into a mass separator. Ion guide efficiencies for the extraction of $^{229}$Th$^{+}$ (0.06%), $^{221}$Fr$^{+}$ (6%), and $^{217}$At$^{+}$ (6%) beams have been measured. A detailed study of the electric field and gas flow influence on the ion guide efficiency is described for two differing electric field configurations.

  15. INFLUENCE OF ALPHA-1-ACID GLYCOPROTEIN UPON PRODUCTION OF CYTOKINES BY PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. V. Osikov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid is a multifunctional acute phase reactant belonging to the family of lipocalines from plasma alpha-2 globulin fraction. In present study, we investigated dosedependent effects of orosomucoid upon secretion of IL-1â, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4 by mononuclear cells from venous blood of healthy volunteers. Mononuclear cells were separated by means of gradient centrifugation, followed by incubation for 24 hours with 250, 500, or 1000 mcg of orosomucoid per ml RPMI-1640 medium (resp., low, medium and high dose. The levels of cytokine production were assayed by ELISA technique. Orosomucoid-induced secretion of IL-1â and IL-4 was increased, whereas IL-3 secretion was inhibited. IL-2 production was suppressed at low doses of orosomucoid, and stimulated at medium and high doses. The effect of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein upon production of IL-2, IL-3 and IL-4 was dose-dependent. Hence, these data indicate that orosomucoid is capable of modifying IL-1â, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-4 secretion by blood mononuclear cells.

  16. Exercise and IL-6 infusion inhibit endotoxin-induced TNF-alpha production in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starkie, Rebecca; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Jauffred, Sune

    2003-01-01

    During "nondamaging" exercise, skeletal muscle markedly releases interleukin (IL)-6, and it has been suggested that one biological role of this phenomenon is to inhibit the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha, which is known to cause pathogenesis such as insulin resistance and athero......During "nondamaging" exercise, skeletal muscle markedly releases interleukin (IL)-6, and it has been suggested that one biological role of this phenomenon is to inhibit the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha, which is known to cause pathogenesis such as insulin resistance...... and atherosclerosis. To test this hypothesis, we performed three experiments in which eight healthy males either rested (CON), rode a bicycle for 3 h (EX), or were infused with recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) for 3 h while they rested. After 2.5 h, the volunteers received a bolus of Escherichia coli...... exercise and rhIL-6 infusion at physiological concentrations inhibit endotoxin-induced TNF-alpha production in humans. Hence, these data provide the first experimental evidence that physical activity mediates antiinflammatory activity and suggest that the mechanism include IL-6, which is produced...

  17. Production of fungal alpha-amylase by Saccharomyces kluyveri in glucose-limited cultivations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kasper; Sharif, M.Z.; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2004-01-01

    amounts of ethanol. A fed-batch cultivation was carried out with S. kluyveri where the biomass concentration reached 85 g l(-1) and the alpha-amylase concentration reached 320 mg l(-1). Even though S. kluyveri could be grown to high cell density, it was also observed that it has a high maintenance...... and S. cerevisiae were transformed with the same plasmid, which led to secretion of active alpha-amylase in both cases. The S. cerevisiae 2 mu plasmid was found to be stable in S. kluyveri as evaluated by a constant alpha-amylase productivity in a continuous cultivation for more than 40 generations. S....... kluyveri and S. cerevisiae secreted alpha-amylase with similar yields during continuous cultivations at dilution rates of 0.1 and 0.2 h(-1) (4.8-5.7 mg (g dry weight)(-1)). At a dilution rate of 0.3 h(-1) the metabolism of S. kluyveri was fully respiratory, whereas S. cerevisiae produced significant...

  18. Production of alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae for several industrial applications in a single step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfirif, María C; Milatich, Esteban J; Farruggia, Beatriz M; Romanini, Diana

    2016-06-01

    A one-step method as a strategy of alpha-amylase concentration and purification was developed in this work. This methodology requires the use of a very low concentration of biodegradable polyelectrolyte (Eudragit(®) E-PO) and represents a low cost, fast, easy to scale up and non-polluting technology. Besides, this methodology allows recycling the polymer after precipitation. The formation of reversible soluble/insoluble complexes between alpha-amylase and the polymer Eudragit(®) E-PO was studied, and their precipitation in selected conditions was applied with bioseparation purposes. Turbidimetric assays allowed to determine the pH range where the complexes are insoluble (4.50-7.00); pH 5.50 yielded the highest turbidity of the system. The presence of NaCl (0.05M) in the medium totally dissociates the protein-polymer complexes. When the adequate concentration of polymer was added under these conditions to a liquid culture of Aspergillus oryzae, purification factors of alpha-amylase up to 7.43 and recoveries of 88% were obtained in a simple step without previous clarification. These results demonstrate that this methodology is suitable for the concentration and production of alpha-amylase from this source and could be applied at the beginning of downstream processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Alpha Beam Energy Determination Using a Range Measuring Device for Radioisotope Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Byeon Gil; Hong, Seung Pyo; Kim, Ran Young; Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The threshold energy of the {sup 209}Bi(α,3n){sup 210} At reaction is at about 30MeV. Our laboratory suggested an energy measurement method to confirm the proton-beam's energy by using a range measurement device. The experiment was performed energy measurement of alpha beam. The alpha beam of energy 29 MeV has been extracted from the cyclotron for the production of {sup 211}At. This device was composed of four parts: an absorber, a drive shaft, and a servo motor and a Faraday cup. The drive shaft was mounted on the absorber and connects with the axis of the servo motor and rotates linearly and circularly by this servo motor. A Faraday cup is for measuring the beam flux. As this drive shaft rotates, the thickness of the absorber varies depending on the rotation angle of the absorber. The energy of the alpha particle accelerated and extracted from MC-50 cyclotron was calculated with the measurement of the particle range in Al foil and using ASTAR, SRIM, MCNPX software. There were a little discrepancy between the expected energy and the calculated energy within the 0.5MeV error range. We have a plan to make an experiment with various alpha particle energies and another methodology, for example, the cross section measurement of the nuclear reaction.

  20. Interferon-alpha suppressed granulocyte colony stimulating factor production is reversed by CL097, a TLR7/8 agonist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tajuddin, Tariq

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Neutropenia, a major side-effect of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) therapy can be effectively treated by the recombinant form of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), an important growth factor for neutrophils. We hypothesized that IFN-alpha might suppress G-CSF production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), contributing to the development of neutropenia, and that a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist might overcome this suppression. METHODS: Fifty-five patients who were receiving IFN-alpha\\/ribavirin combination therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection were recruited. Absolute neutrophil counts (ANC), monocyte counts and treatment outcome data were recorded. G-CSF levels in the supernatants of PBMCs isolated from the patients and healthy controls were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay following 18 h of culture in the absence or presence of IFN- alpha or the TLR7\\/8 agonist, CL097. RESULTS: Therapeutic IFN-alpha caused a significant reduction in neutrophil counts in all patients, with 15 patients requiring therapeutic G-CSF. The reduction in ANC over the course of IFN-alpha treatment was paralleled by a decrease in the ability of PBMCs to produce G-CSF. In vitro G-CSF production by PBMCs was suppressed in the presence of IFN-alpha; however, co-incubation with a TLR7\\/8 agonist significantly enhanced G-CSF secretion by cells obtained both from HCV patients and healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: Suppressed G-CSF production in the presence of IFN-alpha may contribute to IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia. However, a TLR7\\/8 agonist elicits G-CSF secretion even in the presence of IFN-alpha, suggesting a possible therapeutic role for TLR agonists in treatment of IFN-alpha-induced neutropenia.

  1. Interferon-gamma enhances tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by inhibiting early phase interleukin-10 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhov, A N; Woerly, G; Car, B D; Ryffel, B

    1996-12-01

    The ability of cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor or interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) to modulate the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was examined in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). IFN-gamma profoundly enhances LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha production, whereas IL-10 is markedly inhibitory, demonstrating the opposing effects of IFN-gamma and IL-10 on BMDM. Early neutralization of endogenously produced, LPS-stimulated IL-10 markedly enhanced short term TNF-alpha production, an effect further amplified by the absence of IFN-gamma priming. The regulatory effects of IFN-gamma and IL-10 apparently occurred at the translational (or post-translational) level, with TNF-alpha mRNA steady-state levels remaining unchanged. Furthermore, IFN-gamma exerts its enhancing effect on TNF synthesis by the transcriptional inhibition of IL-10. This in vitro finding was also confirmed in vivo. In the absence of LPS, IFN-gamma was not capable of inducing TNF-alpha production in BMDM, indicating that LPS or other signals are necessary for transcriptional activation. Reduced but significant TNF-alpha production in LPS-injected IFN-gamma receptor -/- mice suggests that IFN-gamma is not an absolute requirement and that other cytokines or cell types contribute in a secondary fashion to the priming of LPS-induced TNF-alpha production in vivo.

  2. The production of a diphoton resonance via photon-photon fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Harland-Lang, L A; Ryskin, M G

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the recent LHC observation of an excess of diphoton events around an invariant mass of 750 GeV, we discuss the possibility that this is due to the decay of a new scalar or pseudoscalar resonance dominantly produced via photon-photon fusion. We present a precise calculation of the corresponding photon-photon luminosity in the inclusive and exclusive scenarios, and demonstrate that the theoretical uncertainties associated with these are small. In the inclusive channel, we show how simple cuts on the final state may help to isolate the photon-photon induced cross section from any gluon-gluon or vector boson fusion induced contribution. In the exclusive case, that is where both protons remain intact after the collision, we present a precise cross section evaluation and show how this mode is sensitive to the parity of the object, as well as potential $CP$-violating effects. We also comment on the case of heavy-ion collisions and consider the production of new heavy colourless fermions, which may coupl...

  3. Production of FMDV virus-like particles by a SUMO fusion protein approach in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shu-Mei

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virus-like particles (VLPs are formed by the self-assembly of envelope and/or capsid proteins from many viruses. Some VLPs have been proven successful as vaccines, and others have recently found applications as carriers for foreign antigens or as scaffolds in nanoparticle biotechnology. However, production of VLP was usually impeded due to low water-solubility of recombinant virus capsid proteins. Previous studies revealed that virus capsid and envelope proteins were often posttranslationally modified by SUMO in vivo, leading into a hypothesis that SUMO modification might be a common mechanism for virus proteins to retain water-solubility or prevent improper self-aggregation before virus assembly. We then propose a simple approach to produce VLPs of viruses, e.g., foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. An improved SUMO fusion protein system we developed recently was applied to the simultaneous expression of three capsid proteins of FMDV in E. coli. The three SUMO fusion proteins formed a stable heterotrimeric complex. Proteolytic removal of SUMO moieties from the ternary complexes resulted in VLPs with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. The method described here can also apply to produce capsid/envelope protein complexes or VLPs of other disease-causing viruses.

  4. [Influence of amaranth on the production of alpha-amylase using Aspergillus niger NRRL 3112].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, D D; Lorda, G; Balatti, A P

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the influence of the amaranth seed meal and the aeration conditions on the alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus niger NRRL 3112 were studied. The assays of selection of culture medium were carried out in a rotary shaker at 250 rpm and 2.5 cm stroke. The aeration conditions were studied in a mechanically stirred fermentor New Brunswick type. A concentration of alpha-amylase of 2750 U.Dun/ml was achieved at 120 h with a dry weight of 8.0 g/l, using a base medium with 5.0 g/l Amaranthus cruentus seed meal. In the experiment performed in a New Brunswick fermentor, the highest value was 2806 U.Dun/ml. This result was obtained after 120 h, operating at 300 rpm and an airflow of 1 l/l. min. in a limited dissolved oxygen concentration. It was determined that the increase in the agitation rate was not favorable to the enzyme production, despite that an increase was verified in the dissolved oxygen. The morphology of the microorganism, in long and ramified hyphae, was the critical factor to obtain higher levels of alpha-amylase.

  5. Production and properties of alpha-amylase from Penicillium chrysogenum and its application in starch hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkan, Bilal; Ertan, Figen

    2005-01-01

    Fungi were screened for their ability to produce alpha-amylase by a plate culture method. Penicillium chrysogenum showed high enzymatic activity. Alpha-amylase production by P. chrysogenum cultivated in liquid media containing maltose (2%) reached its maximum at 6-8 days, at 30 degrees C, with a level of 155 U ml(-1). Some general properties of the enzyme were investigated. The optimum reaction pH and temperature were 5.0 and 30-40 degrees C, respectively. The enzyme was stable at a pH range from 5.0-6.0 and at 30 degrees C for 20 min and the enzyme's 92.1% activity's was retained at 40 degrees C for 20 min without substrate. Hydrolysis products of the enzyme were maltose, unidefined oligosaccharides, and a trace amount of glucose. Alpha-amylase of P. chrysogenum hydrolysed starches from different sources. The best hydrolysis was determined (98.69%) in soluble starch for 15 minute at 30 degrees C.

  6. Continuous hydrogen production during fermentation of alpha-cellulose by the thermophillic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Lauren; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David

    2009-02-15

    Continuous hydrogen (H2) production during fermentation of alpha-cellulose was established using the thermophillic, anaerobic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405. The objectives of this work were to characterize growth of C. thermocellum, quantify H2 production and determine soluble end-product synthesis patterns during fermentation of a cellulosic substrate under continuous culture conditions. A 5 L working volume fermentor was established and growth experiments were maintained for over 3,000 h. Substrate concentrations were varied from 1 to 4 g/L and the feed was introduced with continuous nitrogen gas sparging to prevent clogging of the feed-line. The pH and temperature of the reactor were maintained at 7.0 and 600 degrees C, respectively, throughout the study. At concentrations above 4 g/L, the delivery of alpha-cellulose was impaired due to feed-line clogging and it became difficult to maintain a homogenous suspension. The highest total gas (H2 plus CO2) production rate, 56.6 mL L(-1) h(-1), was observed at a dilution rate of 0.042 h(-1) and substrate concentration of 4 g/L. Under these conditions, the H2 production rate was 5.06 mmol h(-1). Acetate and ethanol were the major soluble end-products, while lactate and formate were greatly reduced compared to production in batch cultures. Concentrations of all metabolites increased with increasing substrate concentration, with the exception of lactate. Despite a number of short-term electrical and mechanical failures during the testing period, the system recovered quickly, exhibiting substantial robustness. A carbon balance was completed to ensure that all end-products were accounted for, with final results indicating near 100% carbon recovery. This study shows that long-term, stable H2 production can be achieved during direct fermentation of an insoluble cellulosic substrate under continuous culture conditions.

  7. Higgs production in bottom-quark fusion in a matched scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Forte

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We compute the total cross-section for Higgs boson production in bottom-quark fusion using the so-called FONLL method for the matching of a scheme in which the b-quark is treated as a massless parton to that in which it is treated as a massive final-state particle. We discuss the general framework for the application of the FONLL method to this process, and then we present explicit expressions for the case in which the next-to-next-to-leading-log five-flavor scheme result is combined with the leading-order O(αs2 four-flavor scheme computation. We compare our results in this case to the four- and five-flavor scheme computations, and to the so-called Santander matching.

  8. Vector-Boson Fusion Higgs Production at Three Loops in QCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Frédéric A; Karlberg, Alexander

    2016-08-12

    We calculate the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N^{3}LO) QCD corrections to inclusive vector-boson fusion Higgs production at proton colliders, in the limit in which there is no color exchange between the hadronic systems associated with the two colliding protons. We also provide differential cross sections for the Higgs transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. We find that the corrections are at the 1‰-2‰ level, well within the scale uncertainty of the next-to-next-to-leading-order calculation. The associated scale uncertainty of the N^{3}LO calculation is typically found to be below the 2‰ level. We also consider theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher order parton distribution functions, and provide an estimate of their importance.

  9. Fully Differential Vector-Boson-Fusion Higgs Production at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciari, Matteo; Dreyer, Frédéric A; Karlberg, Alexander; Salam, Gavin P; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2015-08-21

    We calculate the fully differential next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO) corrections to vector-boson fusion (VBF) Higgs boson production at proton colliders, in the limit in which there is no cross talk between the hadronic systems associated with the two protons. We achieve this using a new "projection-to-Born" method that combines an inclusive NNLO calculation in the structure-function approach and a suitably factorized next-to-leading-order VBF Higgs plus three-jet calculation, using appropriate Higgs plus two-parton counterevents. An earlier calculation of the fully inclusive cross section had found small NNLO corrections, at the 1% level. In contrast, the cross section after typical experimental VBF cuts receives NNLO contributions of about (5-6)%, while differential distributions show corrections of up to (10-12)% for some standard observables. The corrections are often outside the next-to-leading-order scale-uncertainty band.

  10. Vector-Boson Fusion Higgs Production at Three Loops in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Frédéric A.; Karlberg, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N3LO ) QCD corrections to inclusive vector-boson fusion Higgs production at proton colliders, in the limit in which there is no color exchange between the hadronic systems associated with the two colliding protons. We also provide differential cross sections for the Higgs transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. We find that the corrections are at the 1‰-2‰ level, well within the scale uncertainty of the next-to-next-to-leading-order calculation. The associated scale uncertainty of the N3LO calculation is typically found to be below the 2‰ level. We also consider theoretical uncertainties due to missing higher order parton distribution functions, and provide an estimate of their importance.

  11. Self-ignition of an advanced fuel field-reversed configuration reactor by fusion product heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, M.; Ohi, S.; Okamoto, M.; Momota, H.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1987-09-01

    A self-ignition of a deuterium-deuterium (D-D)-/sup 3/He fuel field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma by fusion product heating is studied by using the point plasma model, where an FRC plasma equilibrium is taken into account. It is numerically demonstrated that the D-D-/sup 3/He plasma can be evolved from a deuterium-tritium burning plasma in a controlled manner by means of a compression-decompression control as well as a fueling control. It is also indicated that the increase of a trapped flux is effective for suppressing the excessive elongation of a plasma during the transition. The proposed method may provide a solution to the problem on plasma heating to attain a D-D-/sup 3/He self-ignition.

  12. Multi-Higgs production in gluon fusion at 100 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Degrande, Celine; Mattelaer, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    We carry out a detailed study of multi-Higgs production processes in the gluon fusion channel in the high energy regime relevant to Future Circular hadron colliders and in the high-Higgs-multiplicity limit (> 20). Our results are based on the computation of the leading polygons - the triangles, boxes, pentagons and hexagons - to the scattering processes, further combined with the subsequent branchings to reach high final state multiplicities. The factorial growth of the number of diagrams leads to an exponential enhancement of such large multiplicity cross-sections and, ultimately, in breaking of perturbativity. We find that the characteristic energy and multiplicity scales where these perturbative rates become highly enhanced and grow with increasing energy are within the 100 TeV regime with of the order of 130 Higgses (or more) in the final state. We also show that already for a 50 TeV hadron collider the perturbative cross-sections for 140 bosons are at picobarn level.

  13. Thermal photon production from gluon fusion induced by magnetic fields in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, Alejandro; Dominguez, C A; Hernandez, L A

    2016-01-01

    We compute the production of thermal photons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions by gluon fusion in the presence of an intense magnetic field, and during the early stages of the reaction. This photon yield is an excess over calculations that do not consider magnetic field effects. We add this excess to recent hydrodynamic calculations that are close to describing the experimental transverse momentum distribution in RHIC and LHC. We then show that with reasonable values for the temperature, magnetic field strength, and strong coupling constant, our results provide a very good description of such excess. These results support the idea that the origin of at least some of the photon excess observed in heavy-ion experiments may arise from magnetic field induced processes.

  14. Higgs boson pair production in gluon fusion at NLO with full top-quark mass dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Borowka, S; Heinrich, G; Jones, S P; Kerner, M; Schlenk, J; Schubert, U; Zirke, T

    2016-01-01

    We present the calculation of the cross section and invariant mass distribution for Higgs boson pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Top-quark masses are fully taken into account throughout the calculation. The virtual two-loop amplitude has been generated using an extension of the program GoSam supplemented with an interface to Reduze for the integral reduction. The occurring integrals have been calculated numerically using the program SecDec. Our results, including the full top-quark mass dependence for the first time, allow us to assess the validity of various approximations proposed in the literature, which we also recalculate. We find substantial deviations between the NLO result and the different approximations, which emphasizes the importance of including the full top-quark mass dependence at NLO.

  15. FEASIBILITY OF HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING LASER INERTIAL FUSION AS THE PRIMARY ENERGY SOURCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M

    2006-11-03

    The High Average Power Laser (HAPL) program is developing technology for Laser IFE with the goal of producing electricity from the heat generated by the implosion of deuterium-tritium (DT) targets. Alternatively, the Laser IFE device could be coupled to a hydrogen generation system where the heat would be used as input to a water-splitting process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. The production of hydrogen in addition to electricity would allow fusion energy plants to address a much wider segment of energy needs, including transportation. Water-splitting processes involving direct and hybrid thermochemical cycles and high temperature electrolysis are currently being developed as means to produce hydrogen from high temperature nuclear fission reactors and solar central receivers. This paper explores the feasibility of this concept for integration with a Laser IFE plant, and it looks at potential modifications to make this approach more attractive. Of particular interest are: (1) the determination of the advantages of Laser IFE hydrogen production compared to other hydrogen production concepts, and (2) whether a facility of the size of FTF would be suitable for hydrogen production.

  16. Enhancement and selective production of avermectin B by recombinants of Streptomyces avermitilis via intraspecific protoplast fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi; WEN Jia; SONG Yuan; WEN Ying; LI JiLun

    2007-01-01

    Among eight components of avermectin, B1 fractions have the most effective antiparasitic activities and the lowest level of toxic side-effects and are used widely in veterinary and agricultural fields. Intraspecific protoplast fusion between two strains of Streptomyces avermitilis, one an avermectin high producer (strain 76-05) and the other a genetically engineered strain containing the mutations aveD- and olmA- (strain 73-12) was performed for enhancement and selective production of avermectin B in the absence of oligomycin. Two recombinant strains (F23 and F29) were isolated and characterized with regards to the parental merits. F23 and F29 produced only the four avermectin B components with high yield and produced no oligomycin. The avermectin production of F23 and F29 was about 84.20% and 103.45% of the parental strain 76-05, respectively, and increased about 2.66-fold and 3.50-fold, respectively, compared to that of parental strain 73-12. F23 and F29 were genetically stable prototrophic recombinants and F29 was quite tolerant of fermentation conditions compared to avermectin high producer parental strain 76-05. The ability to produce avermectin B with high yield without the production of other avermectin components and oligomycin will make F23 and F29 useful strains for avermectin production. Strain F29's tolerance of fermentation conditions will also make it suitable for industrial applications.

  17. Higgs production via gluon fusion with K{sub T} factorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [Moscow State Univ., SINP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    We consider the Higgs boson production at high energy hadron colliders in the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization approach. The attention is focused on the dominant gluon-gluon fusion subprocess. We show that the k{sub T}-factorization gives a possibility to investigate the associated Higgs boson and jets production. The predictions in the K{sub T}-factorization approach are very close to the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) pQCD results for inclusive Higgs production at LHC, since the main part of high-order collinear pQCD corrections is already included in the K{sub T}-factorization. In the K{sub T}-factorization approach the calculation of the associated Higgs+ jets production is much simpler than in the collinear factorization approach. However, the large scale dependence of our calculations (of the order of 20 - 50%) probably indicates the sensitivity to the unintegrated gluon distribution.

  18. Fusion ignition research experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale Meade

    2000-07-18

    Understanding the properties of high gain (alpha-dominated) fusion plasmas in an advanced toroidal configuration is the largest remaining open issue that must be addressed to provide the scientific foundation for an attractive magnetic fusion reactor. The critical parts of this science can be obtained in a compact high field tokamak which is also likely to provide the fastest and least expensive path to understanding alpha-dominated plasmas in advanced toroidal systems.

  19. Recombinant Alpha, Beta, and Epsilon Toxins of Clostridium perfringens: Production Strategies and Applications as Veterinary Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marcos Roberto A.; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal S. G.; da Cunha, Carlos Eduardo P.; Mendonça, Marcelo; Salvarani, Felipe M.; Moreira, Ângela N.; Conceição, Fabricio R.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a spore-forming, commensal, ubiquitous bacterium that is present in the gastrointestinal tract of healthy humans and animals. This bacterium produces up to 18 toxins. The species is classified into five toxinotypes (A–E) according to the toxins that the bacterium produces: alpha, beta, epsilon, or iota. Each of these toxinotypes is associated with myriad different, frequently fatal, illnesses that affect a range of farm animals and humans. Alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins are the main causes of disease. Vaccinations that generate neutralizing antibodies are the most common prophylactic measures that are currently in use. These vaccines consist of toxoids that are obtained from C. perfringens cultures. Recombinant vaccines offer several advantages over conventional toxoids, especially in terms of the production process. As such, they are steadily gaining ground as a promising vaccination solution. This review discusses the main strategies that are currently used to produce recombinant vaccines containing alpha, beta, and epsilon toxins of C. perfringens, as well as the potential application of these molecules as vaccines for mammalian livestock animals. PMID:27879630

  20. Effects of alpha-amylase and its inhibitors on acid production from cooked starch by oral streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, S; Miyasawa-Hori, H; Nakajo, K; Washio, J; Mayanagi, H; Fukumoto, S; Takahashi, N

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated acid production from cooked starch by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mitis, and the effects of alpha-amylase inhibitors (maltotriitol and acarbose) and xylitol on acid production. Streptococcal cell suspensions were anaerobically incubated with various carbohydrates that included cooked potato starch in the presence or absence of alpha-amylase. Subsequently, the fall in pH and the acid production rate at pH 7.0 were measured. In addition, the effects of adding alpha-amylase inhibitors and xylitol to the reaction mixture were evaluated. In the absence of alpha-amylase, both the fall in pH and the acid production rate from cooked starch were small. On the other hand, in the presence of alpha-amylase, the pH fell to 3.9-4.4 and the acid production rate was 0.61-0.92 micromol per optical density unit per min. These values were comparable to those for maltose. When using cooked starch, the fall in pH by S. sanguinis and S. mitis was similar to that by S. mutans and S. sobrinus. For all streptococci, alpha-amylase inhibitors caused a decrease in acid production from cooked starch, although xylitol only decreased acid production by S. mutans and S. sobrinus. These results suggest that cooked starch is potentially acidogenic in the presence of alpha-amylase, which occurs in the oral cavity. In terms of the acidogenic potential of cooked starch, S. sanguinis and S. mitis were comparable to S. mutans and S. sobrinus. Alpha-amylase inhibitors and xylitol might moderate this activity.

  1. Enabling low cost biopharmaceuticals: high level interferon alpha-2b production in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landowski, Christopher P; Mustalahti, Eero; Wahl, Ramon; Croute, Laurence; Sivasiddarthan, Dhinakaran; Westerholm-Parvinen, Ann; Sommer, Benjamin; Ostermeier, Christian; Helk, Bernhard; Saarinen, Juhani; Saloheimo, Markku

    2016-06-10

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei has tremendous capability to secrete over 100 g/L of proteins and therefore it would make an excellent host system for production of high levels of therapeutic proteins at low cost. We have developed T. reesei strains suitable for production of therapeutic proteins by reducing the secreted protease activity. Protease activity has been the major hindrance to achieving high production levels. We have constructed a series of interferon alpha-2b (IFNα-2b) production strains with 9 protease deletions to gain knowledge for further strain development. We have identified two protease deletions that dramatically improved the production levels. Deletion of the subtilisin protease slp7 and the metalloprotease amp2 has enabled production levels of IFNα-2b up to 2.1 and 2.4 g/L, respectively. With addition of soybean trypsin protease inhibitor the level of production improved to 4.5 g/L, with an additional 1.8 g/L still bound to the secretion carrier protein. High levels of IFNα-2b were produced using T. reesei strains with reduced protease secretion. Further strain development can be done to improve the production system by reducing protease activity and improving carrier protein cleavage.

  2. A novel adjuvant-free H fusion system for the production of recombinant immunogens in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sofia J; Silva, Pedro; Almeida, André; Conceição, Antónia; Domingues, Lucília; Castro, António

    2013-01-01

    The production of recombinant antigens in Escherichia coli and specific polyclonal antibodies for diagnosis and therapy is still a challenge for world-wide researchers. Several different strategies have been explored to improve both antigen and antibody production, all of them depending on a successful expression and immunogenicity of the antigen. Gene fusion technology attempted to address these challenges: fusion partners have been applied to optimize recombinant antigen production in E. coli, and to increase protein immunogenicity. Taking a 12-kDa surface adhesion antigen from Cryptosporidium parvum (CP12) by example, the novel H fusion partner was presented in this work as an attractive option for the development of recombinant immunogens and its adjuvant-free immunization. The H tag (of only 1 kDa) efficiently triggered a CP12-specific immune response, and it also improved the immunization procedure without requiring co-administration of adjuvants. Moreover, polyclonal antibodies raised against the HCP12 fusion antigen detected native antigen structures displayed on the surface of C. parvum oocysts. The H tag proved to be an advanced strategy and promising technology for the diagnosis and therapy of C. parvum infections in animals and humans, allowing a rapid and simple recombinant production of the CP12 antigen. PMID:23941978

  3. ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ([alpha], n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

    1992-10-01

    The rate of neutron production from ([alpha], n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ([alpha], n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ([alpha], n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ([alpha], n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

  4. ALPHN: A computer program for calculating ({alpha}, n) neutron production in canisters of high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, R.; Hermann, O.W.

    1992-10-01

    The rate of neutron production from ({alpha}, n) reactions in canisters of immobilized high-level waste containing borosilicate glass or glass-ceramic compositions is significant and must be considered when estimating neutron shielding requirements. The personal computer program ALPHA calculates the ({alpha}, n) neutron production rate of a canister of vitrified high-level waste. The user supplies the chemical composition of the glass or glass-ceramic and the curies of the alpha-emitting actinides present. The output of the program gives the ({alpha}, n) neutron production of each actinide in neutrons per second and the total for the canister. The ({alpha}, n) neutron production rates are source terms only; that is, they are production rates within the glass and do not take into account the shielding effect of the glass. For a given glass composition, the user can calculate up to eight cases simultaneously; these cases are based on the same glass composition but contain different quantities of actinides per canister. In a typical application, these cases might represent the same canister of vitrified high-level waste at eight different decay times. Run time for a typical problem containing 20 chemical species, 24 actinides, and 8 decay times was 35 s on an IBM AT personal computer. Results of an example based on an expected canister composition at the Defense Waste Processing Facility are shown.

  5. CR-39 track detector calibration for H, He, and C ions from 0.1-0.5 MeV up to 5 MeV for laser-induced nuclear fusion product identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccou, C; Yahia, V; Depierreux, S; Neuville, C; Goyon, C; Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Ducret, J E; Boutoux, G; Rafelski, J; Labaune, C

    2015-08-01

    Laser-accelerated ion beams can be used in many applications and, especially, to initiate nuclear reactions out of thermal equilibrium. We have experimentally studied aneutronic fusion reactions induced by protons accelerated by the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration mechanism, colliding with a boron target. Such experiments require a rigorous method to identify the reaction products (alpha particles) collected in detectors among a few other ion species such as protons or carbon ions, for example. CR-39 track detectors are widely used because they are mostly sensitive to ions and their efficiency is near 100%. We present a complete calibration of CR-39 track detector for protons, alpha particles, and carbon ions. We give measurements of their track diameters for energy ranging from hundreds of keV to a few MeV and for etching times between 1 and 8 h. We used these results to identify alpha particles in our experiments on proton-boron fusion reactions initiated by laser-accelerated protons. We show that their number clearly increases when the boron fuel is preformed in a plasma state.

  6. A GH57 4-alpha-glucanotransferase of hyperthermophilic origin with potential for alkyl glycoside production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Catherine J.; Leemhuis, Hans; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Grey, Carl; Onnby, Linda; van Leeuwen, Sander S.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    4-alpha-Glucanotransferase (GTase) enzymes (EC 2.4.1.25) modulate the size of alpha-glucans by cleaving and reforming alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds in alpha-glucans, an essential process in starch and glycogen metabolism in plants and microorganisms. The glycoside hydrolase family 57 enzyme (GTase57)

  7. A GH57 4-alpha-glucanotransferase of hyperthermophilic origin with potential for alkyl glycoside production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Catherine J.; Leemhuis, Hans; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Grey, Carl; Onnby, Linda; van Leeuwen, Sander S.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Karlsson, Eva Nordberg

    2015-01-01

    4-alpha-Glucanotransferase (GTase) enzymes (EC 2.4.1.25) modulate the size of alpha-glucans by cleaving and reforming alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds in alpha-glucans, an essential process in starch and glycogen metabolism in plants and microorganisms. The glycoside hydrolase family 57 enzyme (GTase57) s

  8. Associated production of prompt photons and heavy quarks in off-shell gluon-gluon fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, S.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lipatov, A.V.; Zotov, N.P. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-08-15

    In the framework of the k{sub T}-factorization approach, we study the production of prompt photons associated with heavy (charm and beauty) quarks in hadron-hadron collisions at high energies. Our consideration is based on the amplitude for the production of a single photon associated with a quark pair in the fusion of two off-shell gluons. The total and differential cross sections are presented and the conservative error analysis is performed. Two sets of unintegrated gluon distributions in the proton have been used in numerical calculation: the one obtained from Ciafaloni-Catani-Fiorani-Marchesini evolution equation and the other from Kimber-Martin-Ryskin prescription. The theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data taken by the CDF collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron. Our analysis extends to specific angular correlations between the produced prompt photons and muons originating from semileptonic decays of the final charmed or beauty quarks. We point out the importance of such observables, which can serve as a crucial test for the unintegrated gluon densities in a proton. Finally, we extrapolate the theoretical predictions to the CERN LHC energies. (orig.)

  9. Enhancement of monacolin K production via intergeneric protoplast fusion between Aspergillus terreus and Monascus anka

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhi; Lin Wen; Yu Ping; Song Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Intergenric protoplast fusion between Aspergillus terreus CA99 and Monascus anka M-3, the high and low producers of monacolin K respectively, was performed for enhancement of monacolin K production. The 24-hour-old mycelia of A. terreus CA99 and M. anka M-3 were treated with 0.5 % lywallzyme, 0.3 % snailase and 0.3 % cellulase at 34 ℃ for 5 h and at 30 ℃ for 3.5 h, and their protoplasts formation reached 1.76 × 107/mL and 1.68 × 107/mL respectively. Parental protoplasts were irradiated with a 30 W UVlight away from 30 cm for 3 min and then mixed. The mixture was incubated with 30% PEG 6000 for 15 min. The reviving fusants were isolated on the regeneration plates. Of the 363 fusants isolated, over 100 showed enhanced monacolin K production compared with the parental strain M. anka M-3. Ten of them produced monacolin K about 1.6-fold of that M. anka M-3 does and the monacolin K titer of two fusants (F49 and F104) increased by about 1-fold. The monacolin K yields of F49 and F104 were 460 μg/mL and 457 μg/mL respectively. In optimized fermentation medium, the monacolin K titer of F49 reached 1216 μg/mL.

  10. Contrary to BCG, MLM fails to induce the production of TNF alpha and NO by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar; Wek-Rodríguez, Kendy; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Aguilar-Torrentera, Fabiola; Truyens, Carine; Carlier, Yves

    2002-06-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria must possess efficient survival mechanisms to resist the harsh conditions of the intraphagosomal milieu. In this sense, Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) is one of the most evolved intracellular parasites of murine macrophages; this microorganism has developed a series of properties that allows it not only to resist, but also to multiply within the inhospitable environment of the phagolysosome. Inside the macrophages, MLM appears surrounded by a thick lipid-envelope that protects the microorganism from the digestive effect of the phagosomal hydrolases and the acid pH. MLM produces a disease in which the loss of specific cell-mediated immunity ensues, thus preventing activation of macrophages. In vitro, and possibly also in vivo, MLM infects macrophages without triggering the oxidative (respiratory burst) response of these cells, thus preventing the production of the toxic reactive oxygen intermediaries (ROI). Supporting the idea that MLM is within the most evolved pathogenic microorganisms, in the present study we found, that contrary to BCG, M. lepraemurium infects macrophages without stimulating these cells to produce meaningful levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) or nitric oxide (NO). Thus, the ability of the microorganisms to stimulate in their cellular hosts, the production of ROI and RNI (reactive nitrogen intermediates), seems to be an inverse correlate of their pathogenicity; the lesser their ability, the greater their pathogenicity.

  11. ALPHA-AMYLASE PRODUCTION FROM Aspergillus oryzae M BY SUBMERGED FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleimenova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of present study was implementation of the Aspergillus oryzae M strain improved technology using earlier developed method of microorganism selection. 8 pure strains of Aspergillus fungi were screened for the production of extra cellular alpha-amylase using agar medium with starch as a substrate and incubated for 72h at 30 ºС. Zone of clearance was observed for screening of the amylolytic fungi (in mm. Aspergillus oryzae M has demonstrated the highest zone of clearance. Aspergillus oryzae M was cultivated for 42 days in submerged conditions of growth using new method of fungal cultivation. This method based on immobilizing enzymes producers on solid career in submerged conditions of growth gives the way to improve quality of filtrates, which remain clear, does not require additional filtering and easily separated from the mycelium. Moreover, it allows to prolong the process of fungal cultivation and to maintain high enzymatic activity for a long period of time. Presented method allowed increasing alpha-amylase production from 321 U/ml (before immobilization to 502 U/ml (after immobilization.

  12. Stromal Cell-Derived Growth Factor-1 Alpha-Elastin Like Peptide Fusion Protein Promotes Cell Migration and Revascularization of Experimental Wounds in Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Agnes; Maguire, Tim; Schloss, Rene; Berthiaume, Francois; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In previous work, we demonstrated the development of a novel fusion protein containing stromal cell-derived growth factor-1 alpha juxtaposed to an elastin-like peptide (SDF1-ELP), which has similar bioactivity, but is more stable in elastase than SDF1. Herein, we compare the ability of a single topical application of SDF1-ELP to that of SDF1 in healing 1 × 1 cm excisional wounds in diabetic mice. Approach: Human Leukemia-60 cells were used to demonstrate the chemotactic potential of SDF1-ELP versus SDF1 in vitro. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells were used to demonstrate the angiogenic potential of SDF1-ELP versus SDF1 in vitro. The bioactivity of SDF1-ELP versus SDF1 after incubation in ex-vivo diabetic wound fluid was compared. The in-vivo effectiveness of SDF1-ELP versus SDF1 was compared in diabetic mice wound model by monitoring for the number of CD31+ cells in harvested wound tissues. Results: SDF1-ELP promotes the migration of cells and induces vascularization similar to SDF1 in vitro. SDF1-ELP is more stable in wound fluids compared to SDF1. In vivo, SDF1-ELP induced a higher number of vascular endothelial cells (CD31+ cells) compared to SDF1 and other controls, suggesting increased vascularization. Innovation: While growth factors have been shown to improve wound healing, this strategy is largely ineffective in chronic wounds. In this work, we show that SDF1-ELP is a promising agent for the treatment of chronic skin wounds. Conclusion: The superior in vivo performance and stability of SDF1-ELP makes it a promising agent for the treatment of chronic skin wounds. PMID:28116224

  13. Anti-hepatitis B virus activity and mechanisms of recombinant human serum albumin-interferon-alpha-2b fusion protein in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingfa, Xu; Qinglin, Fan; Hui, Huang; Canjun, Wang; Wei, Wei; Lihua, Song

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the anti-hepatitis B virus (anti-HBV) effects and mechanisms of recombinant human serum albumin-interferon-alpha-2b fusion protein (rHSA-IFNalpha-2b) in vitro and in vivo. The inhibiting effects on HBV replication were examined in the HepG2 2.2.15 cell line and in ducks, and the expressions of signal transducers and transactivator 1 (STAT1), IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1) were investigated by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis. In vitro,at concentrations from 0.075 to 1.2 nmol/l, rHSA-IFNalpha-2b inhibited the releases of extracellular hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and HBV DNA in a dose-dependent manner; rHSA- IFNalpha-2b also increased the levels of STAT1, ISGF3 and OAS1. In vivo, rHSA-IFNalpha-2b reduced the levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) DNA in the sera of DHBV-infected ducks. We provide the first evidence that rHSA-IFNalpha-2b significantly inhibits HBV replication in HepG2 2.2.15 cells and in ducks, and that the antiviral effect of rHSA-IFNalpha-2b in vivo is more potent than that of IFNalpha-2b. The anti-HBV mechanism probably operates by triggering the JAK-STAT signaling pathway and increasing the expression of OAS1. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Soft Fusion Energy Path: Isotope Production in Energy Subcritical/Economy Hypercritical D +D Colliding-Beam Mini Fusion Reactor `Exyder'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Bethe1 and Sakharov2 argued for soft fusion energy path via isotope production, substantiated by Manheimer3. - Copious T and 3He production4 , 5 from D(d, p) T and D(d, n) 3He reactions in 725 KeV D +D colliding beams was measured in weak-focusing Self-Collider6 , 7 radius 0.15 m, in B = 3.12 T, non-linearly stabilized by electron cloud oscillations8 to confinement time = 24 s. Simulations6 predict that by switching to strong focusing9, 10 deuterons 0.75 MeV each, generate 1 3He +1T +1p + 1n at total input energy cost 10.72 MeV. Economic value of T and 3He is 65 and 120 MeV/atom, respectively. We obtain economic gain 205MeV/10.72 MeV ~ 2,000% i.e. 3He production funds cost of T. If first wall is made of Thorium n's will breed 233U releasing 200 MeV/fission, at neutron cost 5.36 MeV versus 160 MeV in beam on target, resulting in no cost 3He production, valued 75K/g. 1. Physics Today, May 1979, p.44; 2. Memoirs, Vintage Books, (1992); 3. Phys. Today, May 2012 p. 12; 4. Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 796 (1985); 5. Bull. APS, 57, No. 3 (2012); 6. Part. Acc.1, (1970); 7. ANEUTRONIC FUSION NIM A 271 1-167 (1988); 8. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1818 (1993); 9. Part. Acc. 34, 13 (1990).

  15. The ESO UVES Advanced Data Products Quasar Sample - III. Evidence of Bimodality in the [N/alpha] Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Peroux, Celine; Molaro, Paolo; D'Odorico, Valentina; Vladilo, Giovanni; Popping, Attila

    2014-01-01

    We report here a study of nitrogen and $\\alpha$-capture element (O, S, and Si) abundances in 18 Damped Ly$\\alpha$ Absorbers (DLAs) and sub-DLAs drawn from the ESO-UVES Advanced Data Products (EUADP) database. We report 9 new measurements, 5 upper and 4 lower limits of nitrogen that when compiled with available nitrogen measurements from the literature makes a sample of 108 systems. The extended sample presented here confirms the [N/$\\alpha$] bimodal behaviour suggested in previous studies. Three-quarter of the systems show $\\langle$[N/$\\alpha$]$\\rangle=-0.85$ ($\\pm$0.20 dex) and one-quarter ratios are clustered at $\\langle$[N/$\\alpha$]$\\rangle= -1.41$ ($\\pm$0.14 dex). The high [N/$\\alpha$] plateau is consistent with the HII regions of dwarf irregular and blue compact dwarf galaxies although extended to lower metallicities and could be interpreted as the result of a primary nitrogen production by intermediate mass stars. The low [N/$\\alpha$] values are the lowest ever observed in any astrophysical site. In spi...

  16. Two-stream cyclotron radiative instabilities due to the marginally mirror-trapped fraction for fustion alphas in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-07-01

    It is shown here that the marginally mirror-trapped fraction of the newly-born fusion alpha particles in the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction dominated tokamak plasmas can induce a two-stream cyclotron radiative instability for the fast Alfven waves propagating near the harmonics of the alpha particle cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub c{alpha}}. This can explain both the experimentally observed time behavior and the spatially localized origin of the fusion product ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in TFTR at frequencies {omega} {approx} m{omega}{sub c{alpha}}.

  17. Optimisation study of {alpha}-cyclotron production of At-211/Po-211g for high-LET metabolic radiotherapy purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groppi, F. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: flavia.groppi@mi.infn.it; Bonardi, M.L. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Birattari, C. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Menapace, E. [ENEA, Division for Advanced Physics Technologies, via Don Fiammelli 2, I-40128 Bologna (Italy); Abbas, K. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, IHCP, JRC-Ispra, via E. Fermi, I-21020 Varese (Italy); Holzwarth, U. [Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, IHCP, JRC-Ispra, via E. Fermi, I-21020 Varese (Italy); Alfarano, A. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, IHCP, JRC-Ispra, via E. Fermi, I-21020 Varese (Italy); Morzenti, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Zona, C. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Alfassi, Z.B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University of Negev, Beer-Sheva, Il-84105 (Israel)

    2005-12-01

    The production of no-carrier-added (NCA) {alpha}-emitter {sup 211}At/{sup 211g}Po radionuclides for high-LET targeted radiotherapy and immunoradiotherapy, through the {sup 209}Bi({alpha},2n) reaction, together with the required wet radiochemistry and radioanalytical quality controls carried out at LASA is described, through dedicated irradiation experiments at the MC-40 cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. The amount of both the {gamma}-emitter {sup 210}At and its long half-lived {alpha}-emitting daughter {sup 210}Po is optimised and minimised by appropriate choice of energy and energy loss of {alpha} particle beam. The measured excitation functions for production of the main radioisotopic impurity {sup 210}At{yields}{sup 210}Po are compared with theoretical predictions from model calculations performed at ENEA.

  18. Herpes simplex virus type-1 induces IFN-alpha production via Toll-like receptor 9-dependent and -independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochrein, Hubertus; Schlatter, Beatrix; O'Keeffe, Meredith; Wagner, Cornelia; Schmitz, Frank; Schiemann, Matthias; Bauer, Stefan; Suter, Mark; Wagner, Hermann

    2004-08-03

    Type I IFN production in response to the DNA virus herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is essential in controlling viral replication. We investigated whether plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) were the major tissue source of IFN-alpha, and whether the production of IFN-alpha in response to HSV-1 depended on Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Total spleen cells or bone marrow (BM) cells, or fractions thereof, including highly purified pDC, from WT, TLR9, and MyD88 knockout mice were stimulated with known ligands for TLR9 or active HSV-1. pDC freshly isolated from both spleen and BM were the major source of IFN-alpha in response to oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs, but in response to HSV-1 the majority of IFN-alpha was produced by other cell types. Moreover, IFN-alpha production by non-pDC was independent of TLR9. The tissue source determined whether pDC responded to HSV-1 in a strictly TLR9-dependent fashion. Freshly isolated BM pDC or pDC derived from culture of BM precursors with FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand, produced IFN-alpha in the absence of functional TLR9, whereas spleen pDC did not. Heat treatment of HSV-1 abolished maturation and IFN-alpha production from all TLR9-deficient DC but not WT DC. Thus pDC and non-pDC produce IFN-alpha in response to HSV-1 via both TLR9-independent and -dependent pathways.

  19. alpha-particle production in the scattering of 6He by 208Pb at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Escrig, D.; Sanchez-Benitez, A M; Moro, A. M.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Andres, M. V.; Angulo, C.; Borge, M. J. G.; J. Cabrera; Cherubini, S.; Demaret, P; Espino, J. M.; Figuera, P.; Freer, M.; Garcia-Ramos, J. E.; Gomez-Camacho, J.

    2007-01-01

    New experimental data from the scattering of 6He+208Pb at energies around and below the Coulomb barrier are presented. The yield of breakup products coming from projectile fragmentation is dominated by a strong group of $\\alpha$ particles. The energy and angular distributions of this group have been analyzed and compared with theoretical calculations. This analysis indicates that the $\\alpha$ particles emitted at backward angles in this reaction are mainly due to two-neutron transfer to weakl...

  20. Improving high-resolution quantitative precipitation estimation via fusion of multiple radar-based precipitation products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieeinasab, Arezoo; Norouzi, Amir; Seo, Dong-Jun; Nelson, Brian

    2015-12-01

    For monitoring and prediction of water-related hazards in urban areas such as flash flooding, high-resolution hydrologic and hydraulic modeling is necessary. Because of large sensitivity and scale dependence of rainfall-runoff models to errors in quantitative precipitation estimates (QPE), it is very important that the accuracy of QPE be improved in high-resolution hydrologic modeling to the greatest extent possible. With the availability of multiple radar-based precipitation products in many areas, one may now consider fusing them to produce more accurate high-resolution QPE for a wide spectrum of applications. In this work, we formulate and comparatively evaluate four relatively simple procedures for such fusion based on Fisher estimation and its conditional bias-penalized variant: Direct Estimation (DE), Bias Correction (BC), Reduced-Dimension Bias Correction (RBC) and Simple Estimation (SE). They are applied to fuse the Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and radar-only Next Generation QPE (Q2) products at the 15-min 1-km resolution (Experiment 1), and the MPE and Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) QPE products at the 15-min 500-m resolution (Experiment 2). The resulting fused estimates are evaluated using the 15-min rain gauge observations from the City of Grand Prairie in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex (DFW) in north Texas. The main criterion used for evaluation is that the fused QPE improves over the ingredient QPEs at their native spatial resolutions, and that, at the higher resolution, the fused QPE improves not only over the ingredient higher-resolution QPE but also over the ingredient lower-resolution QPE trivially disaggregated using the ingredient high-resolution QPE. All four procedures assume that the ingredient QPEs are unbiased, which is not likely to hold true in reality even if real-time bias correction is in operation. To test robustness under more realistic conditions, the fusion procedures were evaluated with and

  1. Co-production of alpha-amylase and beta-galactosidase by Bacillus subtilis in complex organic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsoula, Zoe; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Various nutrients belonging to three categories, carbon, organic nitrogen and complex organic sources, were investigated for the first time in terms of their effect on the co-production of extracellular thermostable alpha-amylase and beta-galactosidase by Bacillus subtilis, a bacterium isolated from fresh sheep's milk. Among the organic nitrogen sources tested, tryptone and corn steep liquor favored their production. Substitution of soluble starch by various starchy substrates, such as corn flour, had a positive effect on both enzyme yields. Furthermore, a two-fold higher production of both enzymes was achieved when corn steep liquor or tryptone was used in combination with the different flours. Among the divalent cations examined, calcium ions appeared to be vital for alpha-amylase production. The crude alpha-amylase and beta-galactosidase produced by this B. subtilis strain exhibited maximal activities at 135 degrees C and 65 degrees C, respectively, and were also found to be significantly stable at elevated temperatures.

  2. Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor and Monte Carlo coupled simulation of deuteron/triton transport and secondary products generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-bo; Liu, Han-gang; Wang, Kan; Yang, Xin; Feng, Qi-jie

    2012-09-01

    Thermal-to-fusion neutron convertor has being studied in China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP). Current Monte Carlo codes, such as MCNP and GEANT, are inadequate when applied in this multi-step reactions problems. A Monte Carlo tool RSMC (Reaction Sequence Monte Carlo) has been developed to simulate such coupled problem, from neutron absorption, to charged particle ionization and secondary neutron generation. "Forced particle production" variance reduction technique has been implemented to improve the calculation speed distinctly by making deuteron/triton induced secondary product plays a major role. Nuclear data is handled from ENDF or TENDL, and stopping power from SRIM, which described better for low energy deuteron/triton interactions. As a validation, accelerator driven mono-energy 14 MeV fusion neutron source is employed, which has been deeply studied and includes deuteron transport and secondary neutron generation. Various parameters, including fusion neutron angle distribution, average neutron energy at different emission directions, differential and integral energy distributions, are calculated with our tool and traditional deterministic method as references. As a result, we present the calculation results of convertor with RSMC, including conversion ratio of 1 mm 6LiD with a typical thermal neutron (Maxwell spectrum) incidence, and fusion neutron spectrum, which will be used for our experiment.

  3. Optimization of Thermostable Alpha-Amylase Production Via Mix Agricultural-Residues and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini RAI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports utilization of mixture of wheat and barley bran (1:1 for the production of thermostable alpha-amylase enzyme through a spore former, heat tolerant strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in solid state fermentation. Maximum yield of alpha-amylase (252.77 U mL-1 was obtained in following optimized conditions, inoculums size 2 mL (2 × 106 CFU/mL, moisture 80%, pH 7±0.02, NaCl (3%, temperature 38±1°C, incubation for 72 h, maltose (1% and tryptone (1%. After SSF crude enzyme was purified via ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange and column chromatography by DEAE Cellulose. Purified protein showed a molecular weight of 42 kDa by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. After purification, purified enzyme was characterized against several enzymes inhibitors such as temperature, NaCl, pH, metal and surfactants. Pure enzyme was highly active over broad temperature (50-70°C, NaCl concentration (0.5-4 M, and pH (6-10 ranges, indicating it’s a thermoactive and alkali-stable nature. Moreover, CaCl2, MnCl2, =-mercaptoethanol were found to stimulate the amylase activity, whereas FeCl3, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, CuCl3 and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme. Moreover, enzyme specificity and thermal stability conformed by degradation of different soluble starch up to 55°C. Therefore, the present study proved that the extracellular alpha-amylase extracted through wheat flour residues by organism B. amyloliquefaciens MCCB0075, both have considerable potential for industrial application owing to its properties.

  4. Production of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid using two sequential enzymes overexpressed as double-tagged fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chung-Hsien

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two sequential enzymes in the production of sialic acids, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase (GlcNAc 2-epimerase and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid aldolase (Neu5Ac aldolase, were overexpressed as double-tagged gene fusions. Both were tagged with glutathione S-transferase (GST at the N-terminus, but at the C-terminus, one was tagged with five contiguous aspartate residues (5D, and the other with five contiguous arginine residues (5R. Results Both fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and retained enzymatic activity. The fusions were designed so their surfaces were charged under enzyme reaction conditions, which allowed isolation and immobilization in a single step, through a simple capture with either an anionic or a cationic exchanger (Sepharose Q or Sepharose SP that electrostatically bound the 5D or 5R tag. The introduction of double tags only marginally altered the affinity of the enzymes for their substrates, and the double-tagged proteins were enzymatically active in both soluble and immobilized forms. Combined use of the fusion proteins led to the production of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac from N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc. Conclusion Double-tagged gene fusions were overexpressed to yield two enzymes that perform sequential steps in sialic acid synthesis. The proteins were easily immobilized via ionic tags onto ionic exchange resins and could thus be purified by direct capture from crude protein extracts. The immobilized, double-tagged proteins were effective for one-pot enzymatic production of sialic acid.

  5. Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) production by the marine microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta and Tetraselmis suecica in batch cultuvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carballo Cárdenas, E.C.; Phan Minh Thu, T.; Janssen, M.G.J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Batch experiments with Dunaliella tertiolecta and Tetraselmis suecica were performed to investigate alpha-tocopherol (a-T) production in time, in order to assess the effect of light availability per cell on the production of this antioxidant. In D. tertiolecta a-T content increased during growth, in

  6. Calculation of Radioactivity and Dose Rate of Activated Corrosion Products in Water-Cooled Fusion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled reactor, the dominant radioactive source term under normal operation is activated corrosion products (ACPs, which have an important impact on reactor inspection and maintenance. A three-node transport model of ACPs was introduced into the new version of ACPs source term code CATE in this paper, which makes CATE capable of theoretically simulating the variation and the distribution of ACPs in a water-cooled reactor and suitable for more operating conditions. For code testing, MIT PWR coolant chemistry loop was simulated, and the calculation results from CATE are close to the experimental results from MIT, which means CATE is available and credible on ACPs analysis of water-cooled reactor. Then ACPs in the blanket cooling loop of water-cooled fusion reactor ITER under construction were analyzed using CATE and the results showed that the major contributors are the short-life nuclides, especially Mn-56. At last a point kernel integration code ARShield was coupled with CATE, and the dose rate around ITER blanket cooling loop was calculated. Results showed that after shutting down the reactor only for 8 days, the dose rate decreased nearly one order of magnitude, which was caused by the rapid decay of the short-life ACPs.

  7. Gluon fusion correction to $H W^+ W^- / H Z Z$ production in the POWHEG-BOX

    CERN Document Server

    Baglio, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The study of the Higgs boson properties is one of the most important tasks to be accomplished in the next years, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and at future colliders such as the Future Circular Collider in hadron-hadron mode (FCC-hh), the potential 100 TeV follow-up of the LHC machine. In this view the precise study of the Higgs couplings to weak gauge bosons is crucial and requires as much information as possible. After the recent calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production cross sections and differential distributions of a Standard Model Higgs boson in association with a pair of weak bosons, matched with parton shower in the POWHEG-BOX framework, we present the gluon fusion correction $g g\\to H W^+_{} W^-_{} ( H Z Z)$ to the process $p p \\to H W^+_{} W^-_{} (H Z Z)$. This correction can be sizeable and amounts to $+3\\,\\%$ ($+10\\,\\%$) in the $H W^+_{} W^-_{}$ process and $+5\\,\\%$ ($+18\\,\\%$) in the $H Z Z$ process at the LHC (FCC-hh). We present results on total cross sec...

  8. Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react, producing alpha particles and 14 MeV neutrons. These neutrons escape the reaction plasma and are absorbed by the surrounding material structure of the plant, transferring the heat of the reaction to an external cooling circuit. In such high-energy neutron irradiation environments, extensive atomic displacement damage and transmutation production of helium affect the mechanical properties of materials. Among these effect...

  9. Water consumption and biomass production of protoplast fusion lines of poplar hybrids under drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eHennig

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Woody crops such as poplars (Populus can contribute to meet the increasing energy demand of a growing human population and can therefore enhance the security of energy supply. Using energy from biomass increases ecological sustainability as biomass is considered to play a pivotal role in abating climate change. Because areas for establishing poplar plantations are often confined to marginal sites drought tolerance is one important trait for poplar genotypes cultivated in short rotation coppice. We tested nine-month-old plants of four tetraploid Populus tremula (L. x P. tremuloides (Michx. lines that were generated by protoplast fusion and their diploid counterpart for water consumption and drought stress responses in a greenhouse experiment. The fusion lines showed equivalent or decreased height growth, stem biomass and total leaf area compared to the diploid line. The relative height increment of the fusion lines was not reduced compared to the diploid line when the plants were exposed to drought. The fusion lines were distinguished from the diploid counterpart by stomatal characteristics such as increased size and lower density. The changes in the stomatal apparatus did not affect the stomatal conductance. When exposed to drought the carbohydrate concentrations increased more strongly in the fusion lines than in the diploid line. Two fusion lines consumed significantly less water with regard to height growth, producing equivalent or increased relative stem biomass under drought compared to their diploid relative. Therefore, these tetraploid fusion lines are interesting candidates for short rotation biomass plantation on dry sites.

  10. Water consumption and biomass production of protoplast fusion lines of poplar hybrids under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Anne; Kleinschmit, Jörg R G; Schoneberg, Sebastian; Löffler, Sonja; Janßen, Alwin; Polle, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Woody crops such as poplars (Populus) can contribute to meet the increasing energy demand of a growing human population and can therefore enhance the security of energy supply. Using energy from biomass increases ecological sustainability as biomass is considered to play a pivotal role in abating climate change. Because areas for establishing poplar plantations are often confined to marginal sites drought tolerance is one important trait for poplar genotypes cultivated in short rotation coppice. We tested 9-month-old plants of four tetraploid Populus tremula (L.) × P. tremuloides (Michx.) lines that were generated by protoplast fusion and their diploid counterpart for water consumption and drought stress responses in a greenhouse experiment. The fusion lines showed equivalent or decreased height growth, stem biomass and total leaf area compared to the diploid line. The relative height increment of the fusion lines was not reduced compared to the diploid line when the plants were exposed to drought. The fusion lines were distinguished from the diploid counterpart by stomatal characteristics such as increased size and lower density. The changes in the stomatal apparatus did not affect the stomatal conductance. When exposed to drought the carbohydrate concentrations increased more strongly in the fusion lines than in the diploid line. Two fusion lines consumed significantly less water with regard to height growth, producing equivalent or increased relative stem biomass under drought compared to their diploid relative. Therefore, these tetraploid fusion lines are interesting candidates for short rotation biomass plantation on dry sites.

  11. Production of proton-rich nuclei around Z=84-90 in fusion-evaporation reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Peng-Hui; Niu, Fei; Guo, Ya-Fei; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Li, Jun-Qing; Jin, Gen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Within the framework of the dinuclear system model, production cross sections of proton-rich nuclei with charged numbers of Z=84-90 are investigated systematically. Possible combinations with the $^{28}$Si, $^{32}$S, $^{40}$Ar bombarding the target nuclides $^{165}$Ho, $^{169}$Tm, $^{170-174}$Yb, $^{175,176}$Lu, $^{174,176-180}$Hf and $^{181}$Ta are analyzed thoroughly. The optimal excitation energies and evaporation channels are proposed to produce the proton-rich nuclei. The systems are feasible to be constructed in experiments. It is found that the neutron shell closure of N=126 is of importance during the evaporation of neutrons. The experimental excitation functions in the $^{40}$Ar induced reactions can be nicely reproduced. The charged particle evaporation is comparable with neutrons in cooling the excited proton-rich nuclei, in particular for the channels with $\\alpha$ and proton evaporation. The production cross section increases with the mass asymmetry of colliding systems because of the decrease of...

  12. Star products on graded manifolds and $\\alpha'$-corrections to double field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Originally proposed as an $O(d,d)$-invariant formulation of classical closed string theory, double field theory (DFT) offers a rich source of mathematical structures. Most prominently, its gauge algebra is determined by the so-called C-bracket, a generalization of the Courant bracket of generalized geometry, in the sense that it reduces to the latter by restricting the theory to solutions of a "strong constraint". Recently, infinitesimal deformations of these structures in the string sigma model coupling $\\alpha'$ were found. In this short contribution, we review constructing the Drinfel'd double of a Lie bialgebroid and offer how this can be applied to reproduce the C-bracket of DFT in terms of Poisson brackets. As a consequence, we are able to explain the $\\alpha'$-deformations via a graded version of the Moyal-Weyl product in a class of examples. We conclude with comments on the relation between $B$- and $\\beta$-transformations in generalized geometry and the Atiyah algebra on the Drinfel'd double.

  13. The psmα locus regulates production of Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berube, Bryan J; Sampedro, Georgia R; Otto, Michael; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2014-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human bacterial infection, causing a wide spectrum of disease ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to life-threatening pneumonia and sepsis. S. aureus toxins play an essential role in disease pathogenesis, contributing to both immunomodulation and host tissue injury. Prominent among these toxins are the membrane-active pore-forming cytolysin alpha-toxin (Hla) and the amphipathic α-helical phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptides. As deletion of either the hla or psm locus leads to a phenotypically similar virulence defect in skin and soft tissue infection, we sought to determine the relative contribution of each locus to disease pathogenesis. Here we show that production of Hla can be modulated by PSM expression. An S. aureus mutant lacking PSM expression exhibits a transcriptional delay in hla mRNA production and therefore fails to secrete normal levels of Hla at early phases of growth. This leads to attenuation of virulence in vitro and in murine skin and lung models of infection, correlating with reduced recovery of Hla from host tissues. Production of Hla and restoration of staphylococcal virulence can be achieved in the psm mutant by plasmid-driven overexpression of hla. Our study suggests the coordinated action of Hla and PSMs in host tissue during early pathogenesis, confirming a major role for Hla in epithelial injury during S. aureus infection. These findings highlight the possibility that therapeutics targeting PSM production may simultaneously prevent Hla-mediated tissue injury.

  14. Bioethanol production by a flocculent hybrid, CHFY0321 obtained by protoplast fusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Gi-Wook; Kang, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Yule [Changhae Institute of Cassava and Ethanol Research, Changhae Ethanol Co., LTD, Palbok-Dong 829, Dukjin-Gu, Jeonju 561-203 (Korea); Um, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Mina; Kim, Yang-Hoon [Department of Microbiology, Chungbuk National University, 410 Sungbong-Ro, Heungduk-Gu, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Fusion hybrid yeast, CHFY0321, was obtained by protoplast fusion between non-flocculent-high ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHY1011 and flocculent-low ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces bayanus KCCM12633. The hybrid yeast was used together with the parental strains to examine ethanol production in batch fermentation. Under the conditions tested, the fusion hybrid CHFY0321 flocculated to the highest degree and had the capacity to ferment well at pH 4.5 and 32 C. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation for ethanol production was carried out using a cassava (Manihot esculenta) powder hydrolysate medium containing 19.5% (w v{sup -1}) total sugar in a 5 l lab scale jar fermenter at 32 C for 65 h with an agitation speed of 2 Hz. Under these conditions, CHFY0321 showed the highest flocculating ability and the best fermentation efficiency for ethanol production compared with those of the wild-type parent strains. CHFY0321 gave a final ethanol concentration of 89.8 {+-} 0.13 g l{sup -1}, a volumetric ethanol productivity of 1.38 {+-} 0.13 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1}, and a theoretical yield of 94.2 {+-} 1.58%. These results suggest that CHFY0321 exhibited the fermentation characteristics of S. cerevisiae CHY1011 and the flocculent ability of S. bayanus KCCM12633. Therefore, the strong highly flocculent ethanol fermentative CHFY0321 has potential for improving biotechnological ethanol fermentation processes. (author)

  15. Production of Arctic Sea-ice Albedo by fusion of MISR and MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbouche, Said; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2017-04-01

    We have combined data from the NASA MISR and MODIS spectro-radiometers to create a cloud-free albedo dataset specifically for sea-ice. The MISR (Multi-Angular Spectro-Radiometer) instrument on board Terra satellite has a unique ability to create high-quality Bidirectional Reflectance (BRF) over a 7 minute time interval per single overpass, thanks to its 9 cameras of different view angles (±70°,±60°,±45°,±26°). However, as MISR is limited to narrow spectral bands (443nm, 555nm, 670nm, 865nm), which is not sufficient to mask cloud effectively and robustly, we have used the sea-ice mask MOD09 product (Collection 6) from MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer) instrument, which is also on board Terra satellite and acquiring data simultaneously. Only We have created a new and consistent sea-ice (for Arctic) albedo product that is daily, from 1st March to 22nd September for each and every year between 2000 to 2016 at two spatial grids, 1km x 1km and 5km x 5km in polar stereographic projection. Their analysis is described in a separate report [1]. References [1] Muller & Kharbouche, Variation of Arctic's Sea-ice Albedo between 2000 and 2016 by fusion of MISR and MODIS data. This conference. Acknowledgements This work was supported by www.QA4ECV.eu, a project of European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 607405. We thank our colleagues at JPL and NASA LaRC for processing these data, especially Sebastian Val and Steve Protack.

  16. [Human life and energy production. Prospects opened up by controlled thermonuclear fusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, D

    1997-03-18

    The massive and presently increasing energy production is going to confront mankind with a very important problem in the forthcoming decades, in particular due to the vanishing of resources and to the greenhouse effect. The share of fossil fuels in the energy production will have to decrease, and other energy sources will be needed. Among them controlled thermonuclear fusion has may assets due to its non-radioactive fuel with plentiful supply, its non radioactive and non polluting ashes, its safety, its weak environmental impact, and its irrelevance to nuclear proliferation in a normal setting. During the last three decades, physicists have made a series of steps toward the peaceful use of the dominant source of energy in the Universe. They have learned how to confine by magnetic fields plasmas at temperatures of 200 millions degrees centigrade, and they have developed several specific technologies. This way, they produced 11 million watts of nuclear power by fusing two isotopes of hydrogen. These investigations are conducted in a responsible spirit, that of ecoproduction, where possible negative consequences are anticipated, are made as low as reasonably achievable, and their management is studied. Yet several fundamental issues still have to be solved before on economically efficient industrial thermonuclear power plant be operated. A huge international collaboration involving Japan, the USA, the Russian Federation, and the European Union joined with Switzerland and Canada, is presently designing the first experimental thermonuclear reactor, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). It would cost 9 billion dollars, a cost similar to other large scientific projects. This is an important step toward an electricity producing thermonuclear reactor that would be both safe and respectful of human health and of environment.

  17. Solvent production from starch: Effect of pH on. alpha. -amylase and glucoamylase localization and synthesis in synthetic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, B.K.; Kapp, C.; Goma, G.; Soucaille, P. (Institut National des Sciences Appliquees, 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie Biochimique et Alimentaire)

    1992-08-01

    The fermentation of starch by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has been reviewed in an optimised synthetic medium. A progressive increase of pH from 4.4 to 5.2 led to a higher production of extracellular {alpha}-amylase whereas glucoamylase was poorly affected. A portion of these enzymes was cell-associated and on increasing the pH from 4.4 to 5.8 a decrease was noted in cell-bound enzymes. The association was higher for the glucoamylase than for the {alpha}-amylase. The highest rate of starch consumption was at pH 5.2 whereas due to the earlier shift to solvent production at low pH, the highest solvent production was at pH 4.4. This study suggested that the level of {alpha}-amylase and then the rate of starch hydrolysis was the limiting step of sugar catabolism in C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824. (orig.).

  18. Constraints on ionising photon production from the large-scale Lyman-alpha forest

    CERN Document Server

    Pontzen, Andrew; Peiris, Hiranya; Verde, Licia

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the z~2.5 Lyman-alpha forest on large scales encodes information about the galaxy and quasar populations that keep the intergalactic medium photoionized. We present the first forecasts for constraining the populations with data from current and next-generation surveys. At a minimum the forest should tell us whether galaxies or, conversely, quasars dominate the photon production. The number density and clustering strength of the ionising sources might be estimated to sub-10% precision with a DESI-like survey if degeneracies (e.g., with the photon mean-free-path, small-scale clustering power normalization and potentially other astrophysical effects) can be broken by prior information. We demonstrate that, when inhomogeneous ionisation is correctly handled, constraints on dark energy do not degrade.

  19. Gas production due to alpha particle degradation of polyethylene and polyvinylchloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J.; Okajima, S.; Krause, T.

    1998-07-01

    Alpha particle degradation experiments were performed on polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC) plastic samples typical of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) transuranic (TRU) waste. This was done to evaluate the effects of sealing TRU waste during shipment. Experiments were conducted at three temperatures using low dose rates. Predominant products from both plastics were hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and various organic species, with the addition of hydrochloric acid from PVC. In all experiments, the total pressure decreased. Irradiation at 30 and 60 C and at various dose rates caused small changes for both plastics, but at 100 C coupled thermal-radiolytic effects included discoloration of the material as well as large differences in the gas phase composition.

  20. Implications of alpha-amylase production and beta-glucuronidase expression in Escherichia coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldini, G; Strappini, C; Trotta, F; Cenci, G

    1999-01-01

    Two Escherichia coli strains in which alpha-amylase production differed were used to study in depth some characteristics related to beta-glucuronidase induction by starch. The beta-glucuronidase background activity in Luria broth medium was comparable for the two isolates, but only amylase positive S1 was able to grow on starch molecules supplied as the sole carbon source. In this case growth resulted at higher beta-glucuronidase levels (p beta-glucuronidase activity of amylase negative M94 remained unchanged during starvation on starch medium, but an induced response was observed with methylumbelliferyl-glucuronide. These results further support the hypothesis that starch metabolism is involved in the complex beta-glucuronidase regulation of E. coli strains. This is relevant not only for basic research but also to investigating gut microbial enzymology.

  1. Accumulation of glycation products in. cap alpha. -H pig lens crystallin and its bearing to diabetic cataract genesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, P.; Cabezas-Cerrato, J.

    1988-01-01

    The incorporation of /sup 11/C-glucose in native pig crystalline by in vitro incubation was found, after subsequent dialysis, to affect all 5 classes of crystallin separated by Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. Though the radioactivity of the ..cap alpha..-H fraction was three times greater than that of any of the others, autoradiographs of SDS-PAGE gels showed /sup 11/C-glucose adducts to be present in all soluble protein subunits, without there being any evidence of preferential glycation of the ..cap alpha..-H subunits. The concentration of stable glycation products in the ..cap alpha..-H chromatographic fraction of soluble crystallins is suggested to be due the addition of glycated material to this fraction as result of glycation-induced hyperaggregation, and not because the ..cap alpha..-H subunits were especially susceptible to glycation.

  2. The maltodextrin transport system and metabolism in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and production of novel alpha-glucosides through reverse phosphorolysis by maltose phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Baumann, Martin; Petersen, B.O.

    2009-01-01

    -Glc 1-P and 50 mm glucose, glucosamine, N-acetyl glucosamine, mannose, xylose or l-fucose were 99, 80, 53, 93, 81 and 13%, respectively. Product structures were determined by NMR and ESI-MS to be alpha-Glcp-(1 -> 4)-Glcp (maltose), alpha-Glcp-(1 -> 4)-GlcNp (maltosamine), alpha-Glcp-(1 -> 4)-GlcNAcp (N...

  3. In vivo production of scFv-displaying biopolymer beads using a self-assembly-promoting fusion partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grage, Katrin; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant production and, in particular, immobilization of antibody fragments onto carrier materials are of high interest with regard to diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this study, the recombinant production of scFv-displaying biopolymer beads intracellularly in Escherichia coli was investigated. An anti-beta-galactosidase scFv (single chain variable fragment of an antibody) was C-terminally tagged with the polymer-synthesizing enzyme PhaC from Cupriavidus necator by generating the respective hybrid gene. The functionality of the anti-beta-galactosidase scFv-PhaC fusion protein was assessed by producing the respective soluble fusion protein in an Escherichia coli AMEF mutant strain. AMEF (antibody-mediated enzyme formation) strains contain an inactive mutant beta-galactosidase, which can be activated by binding of an anti-beta-galactosidase antibody. In vivo activation of AMEF beta-galactosidase indicated that the scFv is functional with the C-terminal fusion partner PhaC. It was further demonstrated that polymer biosynthesis and bead formation were mediated by the scFv-PhaC fusion protein in the cytoplasm of recombinant E. coli when the polymer precursor was metabolically provided. This suggested that the C-terminal fusion partner PhaC acts as a functional insolubility partner, providing a natural cross-link to the bead and leading to in vivo immobilization of the scFv. Overproduction of the fusion protein at the polymer bead surface was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/MS analysis of purified beads. Antigen binding functionality and specificity of the beads was assessed by analyzing the binding of beta-galactosidase to scFv-displaying beads and subsequently eluting the bound protein at pH 2.7. A strong enrichment of beta-galactosidase suggested the functional display of scFv at the bead surface as well as the applicability of these beads for antigen purification. Binding of beta-galactosidase to the scFv-displaying beads was quantitatively

  4. Protein body-inducing fusions for high-level production and purification of recombinant proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Andrew J; Joensuu, Jussi J; Richman, Alex; Menassa, Rima

    2011-05-01

    For the past two decades, therapeutic and industrially important proteins have been expressed in plants with varying levels of success. The two major challenges hindering the economical production of plant-made recombinant proteins include inadequate accumulation levels and the lack of efficient purification methods. To address these limitations, several fusion protein strategies have been recently developed to significantly enhance the production yield of plant-made recombinant proteins, while simultaneously assisting in their subsequent purification. Elastin-like polypeptides are thermally responsive biopolymers composed of a repeating pentapeptide 'VPGXG' sequence that are valuable for the purification of recombinant proteins. Hydrophobins are small fungal proteins capable of altering the hydrophobicity of their respective fusion partner, thus enabling efficient purification by surfactant-based aqueous two-phase systems. Zera, a domain of the maize seed storage protein γ-zein, can induce the formation of protein storage bodies, thus facilitating the recovery of fused proteins using density-based separation methods. These three novel protein fusion systems have also been shown to enhance the accumulation of a range of different recombinant proteins, while concurrently inducing the formation of protein bodies. The packing of these fusion proteins into protein bodies may exclude the recombinant protein from normal physiological turnover. Furthermore, these systems allow for quick, simple and inexpensive nonchromatographic purification of the recombinant protein, which can be scaled up to industrial levels of protein production. This review will focus on the similarities and differences of these artificial storage organelles, their biogenesis and their implication for the production of recombinant proteins in plants and their subsequent purification.

  5. [Enhanced porcine interferon-alpha production by Pichia pastoris by methanol/sorbitol co-feeding and energy metabolism shift].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Jin, Hu; Gao, Minjie; Dai, Keke; Dong, Shijuan; Yu, Ruisong; Li, Zhen; Shi, Zhongping

    2012-02-01

    Porcine interferon-alpha (pIFN-alpha) fermentative production by recombinant Pichia pastoris was carried out in a 10-L bioreactor to study its metabolism changes and effects on fermentation under different inducing strategies, by analyzing the change patterns of the corresponding metabolism and energy regeneration. The results show that the specific activities of alcohol oxidase (AOX), formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FLD) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) largely increased when reducing temperature from 30 degrees C to 20 degrees C under pure methanol induction, leading significant enhancements in methanol metabolism, formaldehyde dissimilatory energy metabolism and pIFN-alpha antiviral activity. The highest pIFN-alpha antiviral activity reached 1.4 x 10(6) IU/mL, which was about 10-folds of that obtained under 30 degrees C induction. Using methanol/sorbitol co-feeding strategy at 30 degrees C, the major energy metabolism energizing pIFN-alpha synthesis shifted from formaldehyde dissimilatory energy metabolism pathway to TCA cycle, formaldehyde dissimilatory pathway was weakened and accumulation of toxic intermediate metabolite-formaldehyde was relieved, and methanol flux distribution towards to pIFN-alpha synthesis was enhanced. Under this condition, the highest pIFN-alpha antiviral activity reached 1.8 x 10(7) IU/mL which was about 100-folds of that obtained under pure methanol induction at 30 degrees C. More important, enhanced pIFN-alpha production with methanol/sorbitol co-feeding strategy could be implemented under mild conditions, which greatly reduced the fermentation costs and improved the entire fermentation performance.

  6. HPLC-MS determination of the oxidation products of the reaction between alpha- and beta-pinene and OH radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bergh, V; Coeckelberghs, H; Vanhees, I; De Boer, R; Compernolle, F; Vinckier, C

    2002-03-01

    Biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons such as isoprene, alpha-pinene, and beta-pinene, are emitted by forests in very large quantities. To evaluate the role of alpha- and beta-pinene and their contribution to the global production of trace gases and especially aerosol precursors, a study of the oxidation mechanism of alpha- and beta-pinene with hydroxyl radicals must be conducted. The degradation products of both monoterpenes with hydroxyl radicals were identified and quantified in a fast-flow reactor. The products were collected on a liquid-nitrogen trap coated with a 2,4-DNPH solution to which two internal standards (benzaldehyde-2,4-DNPH and tolualdehyde-2,4-DNPH) had been added. The collection method was based on the in situ conversion of aldehyde and/or ketone compounds to their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivatives. The derivatives were analyzed by HPLC-MS using APCI(-). TIC chromatograms and mass spectral data for the various oxidation products are presented. For alpha-pinene, pinonaldehyde is the most important degradation product, with smaller amounts of acetone, formaldehyde, campholenealdehyde, and acetaldehyde. For beta-pinene, nopinone and formaldehyde are the most abundant products, of almost equal importance, whereas acetone and acetaldehyde are minor compounds.

  7. Product Modeling Based on Knowledge Fusion in Virtual Environment%虚拟环境下知识熔合的产品建模

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹湘军; 孙健; 何汉武

    2004-01-01

    Following researches on the knowledge-based product design, product modeling based on knowledge fusion is studied in a virtual environment. Knowledge fusion is the energy sources of product innovation designs. Because a knowledge representafon method is the main content of knowledge fusion, production rule way, semantic network, predicate, object-oriented and case-based representations are discussed. Using agents with object-oriented method, the knowledge can be represented as a set. The product knowledge set is divided into two subset: text knowledge and knowledge of engineering graphics that is a different form. Manipulation of the subset knowledge and fusion method is described. The paper also describes a six-tuple function in an agent data structure. A virtual environment computation model is proposed, and a practical example given.

  8. Protection against myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury by PPAR-alpha activation is related to production of nitric oxide and endothelin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulhak, A A; Sjöquist, P-O; Xu, C-B;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-alpha) have been shown to reduce ischaemia/reperfusion injury. The mechanisms behind this effect are not well known. We hypothesized that activation of PPAR-alpha exerts cardioprotection via a mechanism related to nitri....... CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the PPAR-alpha activation protects the rat myocardium against ischaemia/ reperfusion injury via a mechanism related to production of NO, and possibly ET-1....

  9. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppresses TNF-alpha -induced production of MMP-1 and -3 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hee-Jin; Yoo, Wan-Hee; Han, Myung-Kwan; Lee, Young-Rae; Kim, Jong-Suk; Lee, Sang-Il

    2008-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fibroblasts produce matrix metaloproteinases (MMPs), which destroy cartilage and bone in RA joint. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the most important mediator leading to MMP production in RA synovial fibroblasts. Here we show that epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (EGCG) suppresses TNF-alpha-induced production of MMP-1 and MMP-3 in RA synovial fibroblasts, which was accompanied by inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) pathways. EGCG treatment resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha-induced production of MMP-1 and MMP-3 at the protein and mRNA levels in RA synovial fibroblast. EGCG treatment also inhibited TNF-alpha-induced phosphorylation of MAPKs, such as ERK1/2, p38, JNK. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that EGCG inhibits binding of AP-1 proteins to its response elements in synovial fibroblast treated. Thus, EGCG may play a role in regulating inflammation and bone destruction in RA patients.

  10. Cold fusion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy.

  11. Excitation of Alfven Cyclotron Instability by charged fusion products in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-08-01

    The spectrum of ion cyclotron emission (ICE) observed in tokamak experiments shows narrow peaks at multiples of the edge cyclotron frequency of background ions. A possible mechanism of ICE based on the fast Alfven Cyclotron Instability (ACI) resonantly excited by high energy charged products ({alpha}-particles or protons) is studied here. The two-dimensional ACI eigenmode structure and eigenfrequency are obtained in the large tokamak aspect ratio limit. The ACI is excited via wave-particle resonances in phase space by tapping the fast ion velocity space free energy. The instability growth rates are computed perturbatively from the perturbed fast particle distribution function, which is obtained by integrating the high frequency gyrokinetic equation along the particle orbit. Numerical examples of ACI growth rates are presented for TFTR plasmas. The fast ion distribution function is assumed to be singular in pitch angle near the plasma edge. The results are employed to understand the ICE in Deuterium-Deuterium (DD) and Deuterium-tritium (DT) tokamak experiments.

  12. Aspergillus nidulans alpha-galactosidase of glycoside hydrolase family 36 catalyses the formation of alpha-galacto-oligosaccharides by transglycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Baumann, Martin J; Petersen, Bent O; Westphal, Yvonne; Hachem, Maher Abou; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Duus, Jens Ø; Schols, Henk A; Svensson, Birte

    2010-09-01

    The alpha-galactosidase from Aspergillus nidulans (AglC) belongs to a phylogenetic cluster containing eukaryotic alpha-galactosidases and alpha-galacto-oligosaccharide synthases of glycoside hydrolase family 36 (GH36). The recombinant AglC, produced in high yield (0.65 g.L(-1) culture) as His-tag fusion in Escherichia coli, catalysed efficient transglycosylation with alpha-(1-->6) regioselectivity from 40 mm 4-nitrophenol alpha-d-galactopyranoside, melibiose or raffinose, resulting in a 37-74% yield of 4-nitrophenol alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-D-Galp, alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-D-Glcp and alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-alpha-D-Galp-(1-->6)-D-Glcp-(alpha1-->beta2)-d-Fruf (stachyose), respectively. Furthermore, among 10 monosaccharide acceptor candidates (400 mm) and the donor 4-nitrophenol alpha-D-galactopyranoside (40 mm), alpha-(1-->6) linked galactodisaccharides were also obtained with galactose, glucose and mannose in high yields of 39-58%. AglC did not transglycosylate monosaccharides without the 6-hydroxymethyl group, i.e. xylose, L-arabinose, L-fucose and L-rhamnose, or with axial 3-OH, i.e. gulose, allose, altrose and L-rhamnose. Structural modelling using Thermotoga maritima GH36 alpha-galactosidase as the template and superimposition of melibiose from the complex with human GH27 alpha-galactosidase supported that recognition at subsite +1 in AglC presumably requires a hydrogen bond between 3-OH and Trp358 and a hydrophobic environment around the C-6 hydroxymethyl group. In addition, successful transglycosylation of eight of 10 disaccharides (400 mm), except xylobiose and arabinobiose, indicated broad specificity for interaction with the +2 subsite. AglC thus transferred alpha-galactosyl to 6-OH of the terminal residue in the alpha-linked melibiose, maltose, trehalose, sucrose and turanose in 6-46% yield and the beta-linked lactose, lactulose and cellobiose in 28-38% yield. The product structures were identified using NMR and ESI-MS and five of the 13

  13. Trans-differentiation of prostatic stromal cells leads to decreased glycoprotein hormone alpha production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpold, Holger; Mascher, Katarina; Untergasser, Gerold; Plas, Eugen; Hermann, Martin; Berger, Peter

    2002-11-01

    Age-related development of benign prostatic hyperplasia is an important health issue in developed countries. The histopathogenetic hallmark of this disease is the increase in relative and absolute numbers of smooth muscle cells (SMC). Glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit (GPHalpha) is expressed in the human prostate, and, because of its structural similarities to other cystine knot growth factors, it has been considered to have growth regulatory functions of its own. Primary cell cultures allowing for selective cultivation of prostatic epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and SMC were established. Directed trans-differentiation and cellular homogeneity was pursued by confocal scanning laser microscopy with cell type-specific markers. GPHalpha production by these cells was assessed by immunofluorimetric assays. Its predominant source was young fibroblasts, whereas replicative senescent fibroblasts, SMC, and control fibroblasts from foreskin did not produce significant amounts. Functionally, GPHalpha reduced growth of stromal cells at concentrations of 10 and 100 nmol/liter as shown by cell viability assays. It is concluded that histogenetic reorganization over the adult lifetime, guided by endocrine factors like steroid hormones together with senescence of fibroblasts, leads to a decreased production of growth inhibitors, such as GPHalpha, favoring proliferation and the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  14. Uses of alpha particles, especially in nuclear reaction studies and medical radionuclide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaim, Syed M.; Spahn, Ingo; Scholten, Bernhard; Neumaier, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM), Nuklearchemie (INM-5)

    2016-11-01

    Alpha particles exhibit three important characteristics: scattering, ionisation and activation. This article briefly discusses those properties and outlines their major applications. Among others, α-particles are used in elemental analysis, investigation and improvement of materials properties, nuclear reaction studies and medical radionuclide production. The latter two topics, dealing with activation of target materials, are treated in some detail in this paper. Measurements of excitation functions of α-particle induced reactions shed some light on their reaction mechanisms, and studies of isomeric cross sections reveal the probability of population of high-spin nuclear levels. Regarding medical radionuclides, an overview is presented of the isotopes commonly produced using α-particle beams. Consideration is also given to some routes which could be potentially useful for production of a few other radionuclides. The significance of α-particle induced reactions to produce a few high-spin isomeric states, decaying by emission of low-energy conversion or Auger electrons, which are of interest in localized internal radiotherapy, is outlined. The α-particle beam, thus broadens the scope of nuclear chemistry research related to development of non-standard positron emitters and therapeutic radionuclides.

  15. Projectile influence on production cross section for ^48Ca-, ^50Ti-, and ^54Cr- induced fusion-evaporation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorov, D. A.; Werke, T. A.; Alfonso, M. C.; Bennett, M. E.; Folden, C. M., III

    2013-04-01

    Evaporation residue excitation functions for ^48Ca, ^50Ti + ^159Tb and ^48Ca, ^54Cr + ^162 Dy were measured at Texas A&M University using the vacuum spectrometer MARS. The produced residues are weakly deformed nuclei near the N = 126 shell closure. However, the production cross sections are insensitive to the associated shell stabilization to the fission barrier, an observation previously reported in literature. The ratio of maximum production cross sections between the ^48Ca/^50Ti and ^48Ca/^54Cr reactions is 47 and 7100, respectively. These substantial differences can be reproduced in theoretical calculations by inclusion of collective enhancements during de-excitation of the compound nucleus. The competition between quasifission and complete fusion further contributes to the observed separation in the excitation functions. Model-dependent estimates of the compound nucleus formation probability, PCN, yield ratios of PCN(^48Ca + ^159 Tb) / PCN(^50Ti + ^159 Tb) 2.5 and PCN(^48Ca + ^162Dy) / PCN(^54Cr + ^162Dy) 5. Heavy-ion fusion reactions with ^48Ca, ^50Ti, and ^54Cr projectiles are of interest due to modern-day efforts to synthesize superheavy elements 119 and 120 in warm fusion reactions with projectiles having Z 20.

  16. Assessment of the Fusion Tags on Increasing Soluble Production of the Active TEV Protease Variant and Other Target Proteins in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuelian; Sun, Jiaqi; Wang, Weiyu; Jiang, Li; Cheng, Beijiu; Fan, Jun

    2016-12-17

    In this study, five fusion tags affecting soluble production and cleavage activity of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease (TEVp) variant in Escherichia coli strains BL21 (DE3) and Rosetta™ (DE3) are investigated. Combination of the augmenting rare transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and the fused expressivity tag (N-terminal seven amino acid residues of E. coli translation initiation factor II) promotes the soluble TEVp partner expressed at relatively high level. Attachment of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) tag increases soluble expression of the protease released from the fusion protein in E. coli cells, but the incorporated TEVp recognition sequence slightly decreases expressivity of the fusion construct. Except for the green fluorescent protein, the attached expressivity tag shows less efficiency than the MBP tag in enhancing expression levels of the selected five target proteins in the Rosetta™ (DE3) cells under different induction conditions. Our results identified that high-level production of the functional target protein as the fusion partner in E. coli is combined with the intrinsic property of fusion tag, fusion protein stability, inherent folding of target protein, rare tRNA abundance, and the incorporated linker. Purified TEVp fusion constructs with the N-terminal expressivity tag, as well as the MBP partner, are the ideal alternatives for removing fusion tag.

  17. Subinhibitory concentrations of thymol reduce enterotoxins A and B and alpha-hemolysin production in Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhang Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeting bacterial virulence factors is now gaining interest as an alternative strategy to develop new types of anti-infective agents. It has been shown that thymol, when used at low concentrations, can inhibit the TSST-1 secretion in Staphylococcus aureus. However, there are no data on the effect of thymol on the production of other exotoxins (e.g., alpha-hemolysin and enterotoxins by S. aureus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Secretion of alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB in both methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates cultured with graded subinhibitory concentrations of thymol was detected by immunoblot analysis. Hemolysin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF release assays were performed to elucidate the biological relevance of changes in alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB secretion induced by thymol. In addition, the influence of thymol on the transcription of hla, sea, and seb (the genes encoding alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB, respectively was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Thymol inhibited transcription of hla, sea and seb in S. aureus, resulting in a reduction of alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB secretion and, thus, a reduction in hemolytic and TNF-inducing activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Subinhibitory concentrations of thymol decreased the production of alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB in both MSSA and MRSA in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that thymol may be useful for the treatment of S. aureus infections when used in combination with beta-lactams and glycopeptide antibiotics, which induce expression of alpha-hemolysin and enterotoxins at subinhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, the structure of thymol may potentially be used as a basic structure for development of drugs aimed against these bacterial virulence factors.

  18. Estimating potential yield of wheat production in China based on cross-scale data-model fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan TIAN; Honglin ZHONG; Runhe SHI; Laixiang SUN; Günther FISCHER; Zhuoran LIANG

    2012-01-01

    The response of the agro-ecological system to the environment includes the response of individual crop's physiologic process and the adaption of the crop community to the environment.Observation and simulation at the single scale level cannot fully explain the above process.It is necessary to develop cross-scale agro-ecological models and study the interaction of agro-ecological processes across different scales.In this research,two typical agroecological models,the Decision Support System for Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT) model and the Agroecological Zone (AEZ) model,are employed,and a framework for effective cross-scale data-model fusion is proposed and illustrated.The national observed data from 36 different agricultural observation stations and historical weather stations (1962-1999) are employed to estimate average crop productivity.Comparison of the two models' estimations are consistent,which would indicate the possibility ofcross-scale crop model fusion.

  19. Hollow glass microsphere production for laser direct-driven fusion targets on Shen Guang II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU; Longhui(邱龙会); FU; Yibei(傅依备); TANG; Yongjian(唐永建); WEI; Yun(魏芸); ZHENG; Yongming(郑永铭); SHI; Tao(师韬); YAO; Shujiu(姚书久)

    2002-01-01

    A liquid-droplet technique was investigated to fabricate thin wall hollow glass microspheres (HGM) used in laser fusion experiments on Shen Guang II. Glass-forming compositions, operating conditions of the droplet generator and the vertical multiple-zone furnace were optimized. Thin wall HGM with diameters of about 100, 200, and 520 μm were fabricated, whose failure pressures, gas retention properties for D2, and chemical durability were all characterized. The results of the fusion experiments show that the HGM targets are quite satisfactory and the highest neutron yields obtained are 4x 109.

  20. Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the fusion protein CusF3H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant protein expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli still is the number one choice for large-scale protein production. Nevertheless, many complications can arise using this microorganism, such as low yields, the formation of inclusion bodies, and the requirement for difficult purification steps. Most of these problems can be solved with the use of fusion proteins. Here, the use of the metal-binding protein CusF3H+ is described as a new fusion protein for recombinant protein expression and purification in E. coli. We have previously shown that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein, with low levels of formation of inclusion bodies, and that proteins can be purified using IMAC resins charged with Cu(II) ions. CusF3H+ is an enhanced variant of CusF, formed by the addition of three histidine residues at the N-terminus. These residues then can bind Ni(II) ions allowing improved purity after affinity chromatography. Expression and purification of Green Fluorescent Protein tagged with CusF3H+ showed that the mutation did not alter the capacity of the fusion protein to increase protein expression, and purity improved considerably after affinity chromatography with immobilized nickel ions; high yields are obtained after tag-removal since CusF3H+ is a small protein of just 10 kDa. Furthermore, the results of experiments involving expression of tagged proteins having medium to large molecular weights indicate that the presence of the CusF3H+ tag improves protein solubility, as compared to a His-tag. We therefore endorse CusF3H+ as a useful alternative fusion protein/affinity tag for production of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. $\\alpha$-particle production in the scattering of 6He by 208Pb at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Escrig, D; Moro, A M; Alvarez, M A G; Andrés, M V; Angulo, C; García-Borge, M J; Cabrera, J; Cherubini, S; Demaret, P; Espino, J M; Figuera, P; Freer, M; García-Ramos, J E; Gómez-Camacho, J; Gulino, M; Kakuee, O R; Martel, I; Metelko, C; Pérez-Bernal, F; Rahighi, J; Rusek, K; Smirnov, D; Tengblad, O; Ziman, V

    2007-01-01

    New experimental data from the scattering of 6He+208Pb at energies around and below the Coulomb barrier are presented. The yield of breakup products coming from projectile fragmentation is dominated by a strong group of $\\alpha$ particles. The energy and angular distributions of this group have been analyzed and compared with theoretical calculations. This analysis indicates that the $\\alpha$ particles emitted at backward angles in this reaction are mainly due to two-neutron transfer to weakly bound states of the final nucleus.

  2. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...

  3. Acute exercise reduces hepatic glucose production through inhibition of the Foxo1/HNF-4alpha pathway in insulin resistant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Cláudio T; Frederico, Marisa J S; da Luz, Gabrielle; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Pauli, José R; Velloso, Lício A

    2010-06-15

    Protein hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF-4alpha) is atypically activated in the liver of diabetic rodents and contributes to hepatic glucose production. HNF-4alpha and Foxo1 can physically interact with each other and represent an important signal transduction pathway that regulates the synthesis of glucose in the liver. Foxo1 and HNF-4alpha interact with their own binding sites in the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) promoters, and this binding is required for their effects on those promoters. However, the effect of physical activity on the HNF-4alpha/Foxo1 pathway is currently unknown. Here, we investigate the protein levels of HNF-4alpha and the HNF-4alpha/Foxo1 pathway in the liver of leptin-deficient (ob/ob) and diet-induced obese Swiss (DIO) mice after acute exercise. The ob/ob and DIO mice swam for four 30 min periods, with 5 min rest intervals for a total swimming time of 2h. Eight hours after the acute exercise protocol, the mice were submitted to an insulin tolerance test (ITT) and determination of biochemical and molecular parameters. Acute exercise improved insulin signalling, increasing insulin-stimulated Akt and Foxo1 phosphorylation and decreasing HNF-4alpha protein levels in the liver of DIO and ob/ob mice under fasting conditions. These phenomena were accompanied by a reduction in the expression of gluconeogenesis genes, such as PEPCK and G6Pase. Importantly, the PI3K inhibitor LY292004 reversed the acute effect of exercise on fasting hyperglycaemia, confirming the involvement of the PI3K pathway. The present study shows that exercise acutely improves the action of insulin in the liver of animal models of obesity and diabetes, resulting in increased phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion of Foxo1, and a reduction in the Foxo1/HNF-4alpha pathway. Since nuclear localization and the association of these proteins is involved in the activation of PEPCK and G6Pase, we believe that the regulation of Foxo1

  4. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strebel, K.; Beck, E.; Strohmaier, K.; Schaller, H.

    1986-03-01

    Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible lambdaPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in /sup 35/S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro.

  5. The pair production of Charged and Neutral Higgs bosons in W and Z gauge boson fusion process

    CERN Document Server

    Morozumi, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    We study the signatures of a two Higgs doublet model of Davidson and Logan. The model includes an extra Higgs doublet with the vacuum expectation value (VEV) much smaller than the one of the standard model like Higgs. The smaller VEV is related to the origin of the small neutrino mass in the two Higgs doublet model. In the model, a single non-standard model like Higgs production of weak gauge boson fusion is suppressed due to the smallness of the vacuum expectation value. In contrast to the single Higgs production, the cross section of the Higgs pair production due to gauge boson fusion is not suppressed. Using the model, we compute the charged Higgs and neutral Higgs pair production cross section in W Z annihilation channel. In the two Higgs doublet model, the charged Higgs H^+ decays into a pair of the charged anti-lepton and right-handed neutrino. The neutral Higgs boson decays into right-handed neutrino and left-handed anti-neutrino pair which is invisible. A single charged anti-lepton and three neutrinos...

  6. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Calpas, Betty; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Stein, Matthias; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Gosselink, Martijn; Haller, Johannes; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sibille, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wolf, Roger; Zeise, Manuel; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Gouskos, Loukas; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Jones, John; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Singh, Anil; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Musenich, Riccardo; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Giubilato, Piero; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Butt, Jamila; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Korenkov, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Dordevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; 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    2014-08-13

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a $b\\bar{b}$ quark pair. The searches use the 8 TeV pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 inverse femtobarns. Certain channels include data from 7 TeV collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels...

  7. Ribozyme modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by peritoneal cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioud, M

    1996-05-01

    We have utilized synthetic ribozymes to modulate the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by peritoneal cells. Two hammerhead ribozymes (mRz1 and mRz2) were prepared by transcription in vitro and their activities in vitro and in vivo were investigated. Both ribozymes cleaved their RNA target with an apparent turnover number (kcat) of 2 min(-1), and inhibited TNF-alpha gene expression in vitro by 50% and 70%, respectively. When mRz1 and mRz2, entrapped in liposomes, were delivered into mice by intraperitoneal injection, they inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha gene expression in vivo with mRz2 being the most effective. This enhanced activity could result from the facilitation of catalysis by cellular endogenous proteins, since they specifically bind to mRz2 as compared to mRz1. Furthermore, a significant mRz2 activity can be recovered from peritoneal cells 2 days post-administration in vivo. The anti-TNF-alpha ribozyme treatment in vivo resulted in a more significant reduction of LPS-induced IFN-gamma protein secretion compared to IL-10. In contrast to this pleiotropic effect, the anti-TNF-alpha ribozyme treatment did not affect the heterogenous expression of Fas ligand by peritoneal cells, indicating the specificity of the treatment. Taken together, the present data indicate that the biological effects of TNF-alpha can be modulated by ribozymes. In addition, the data suggest that ribozymes can be administered in a drug-like manner, and therefore indicate their potential in clinical applications.

  8. Production of cloned dogs by decreasing the interval between fusion and activation during somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sue; Park, Sun Woo; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Eugine; Kim, Yeun Wook; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2009-05-01

    To improve the efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in dogs, we evaluated whether or not the interval between fusion and activation affects the success rate of SCNT. Oocytes retrieved from outbred dogs were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a male or female Golden Retriever. In total, 151 and 225 reconstructed oocytes were transferred to 9 and 14 naturally synchronized surrogates for male and female donor cells, respectively. Chromosomal morphology was evaluated in 12 oocytes held for an interval of 2 hr between fusion and activation and 14 oocytes held for an interval of 4 hr. Three hundred seventy-six and 288 embryos were transferred to 23 and 16 surrogates for the 2 and 4 hr interval groups, respectively. Both the male (two pregnant surrogates gave birth to three puppies) and female (one pregnant surrogate gave birth to one puppy) donor cells gave birth to live puppies (P > 0.05). In the 2 hr group, significantly more reconstructed oocytes showed condensed, metaphase-like chromosomes compared to the 4 hr group (P dogs carried pregnancies to term and four puppies were born. These results demonstrate that decreasing the interval between fusion and activation increases the success rate of clone production and pregnancy. These results may increase the overall efficiency of SCNT in the canine family.

  9. Development of new cloning vectors for the production of immunogenic outer membrane fusion proteins in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornelis, P.; Sierra, J.C.; Lim, A. Jr.; Malur, A. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Paardenstraat (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipoprotein gene (oprI) was modified by cloning an in-frame polylinker in both orientations at the end of oprI. The resulting plasmids pVUBI and pVUB2 allow high lipoprotein production in E. coli after IPTG induction. The modified lipoproteins are present in the outer membrane and surface-exposed. Outer membrane-bound fusion proteins of different sizes were produced and used to generate antibodies without use of adjuvant. An 87 bp DNA fragment from the vp72 capsid protein gene of African Swine Fever virus (ASFV) and the entire Leishmania major glycoprotein gp63 gene were expressed in this system. Finally, a fusion lipoprotein containing a 16 amino acid epitope from the preS2b region of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) was presented by an antigen-presenting cell line to a T-cell hybridoma while the corresponding cross-linked S2b peptide was not. The results suggest that OprI-based fusion proteins can be used to generate both humoral and cellular immune responses. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Overview and Status of the Space Weather System-Impact Products for the SSA Environmental Effects Fusion System (SEEFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, S.

    2008-12-01

    The Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RVBX) and the Space Environment Division of the Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC SYAG/SED) have combined efforts to design, develop, test, implement, and validate numerical and graphical products for Air Force Space Command's (AFSPC) Space Situational Awareness Environmental Effects Fusion System (SEEFS). These products are generated to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense weapons, navigation, communications, and surveillance systems. Jointly developed projects that have been completed as prototypes and are undergoing development for real-time operations include a SEEFS architecture and database, five system-impact products, and a high-level decision aid product. This first round of SEEFS products includes the Solar Radio Burst Effects (SoRBE) on radar and satellite communications, Radar Auroral Clutter (RAC), Scintillation Effects on radar and satellite communications (RadScint and SatScint), and Satellite Surface and Deep Charge/Discharge (Char/D) products. The SEEFS architecture and database enable modular use and execution of the SEEFS products, and the high-level Decision Aid shows the combined effects of all SEEFS product output on a given asset and on multi-asset missions. This presentation will provide general overviews and status update of the SEEFS program, along with details of the first round of products expected to be operational for use in exercises and/or real-time operations in 2009.

  11. Over-expression of pcvA involved in vesicle-vacuolar fusion affects the conidiation and penicillin production in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinxin; Yang, Jing; An, Yang; Pan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Gang

    2012-03-01

    Rab GTPase is required for vesicle-vacuolar fusion during the vacuolar biogenesis in fungi. Rab GTPase-encoding gene, pcvA, was cloned from Penicillium chrysogenum: it contained five introns and its predicted protein contained the conserved Rab GTPase domain involved in GTP-binding and hydrolysis. Over-expression of pcvA significantly stimulated the vesicle-vacuolar fusion but repressed the conidiation and decreased conidial tolerance against thermal stress. Penicillin production was decreased in the pcvA over-expressed strain suggesting that pcvA is involved in vesicle-vacuolar fusion participates in the penicillin biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum.

  12. N-terminal fusion tags for effective production of g-protein-coupled receptors in bacterial cell-free systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyukmanova, E N; Shenkarev, Z O; Khabibullina, N F; Kulbatskiy, D S; Shulepko, M A; Petrovskaya, L E; Arseniev, A S; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2012-10-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) constitute one of the biggest families of membrane proteins. In spite of the fact that they are highly relevant to pharmacy, they have remained poorly explored. One of the main bottlenecks encountered in structural-functional studies of GPCRs is the difficulty to produce sufficient amounts of the proteins. Cell-free systems based on bacterial extracts fromE. colicells attract much attention as an effective tool for recombinant production of membrane proteins. GPCR production in bacterial cell-free expression systems is often inefficient because of the problems associated with the low efficiency of the translation initiation process. This problem could be resolved if GPCRs were expressed in the form of hybrid proteins with N-terminal polypeptide fusion tags. In the present work, three new N-terminal fusion tags are proposed for cell-free production of the human β2-adrenergic receptor, human M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and human somatostatin receptor type 5. It is demonstrated that the application of an N-terminal fragment (6 a.a.) of bacteriorhodopsin fromExiguobacterium sibiricum(ESR-tag), N-terminal fragment (16 а.о.) of RNAse A (S-tag), and Mistic protein fromB. subtilisallows to increase the CF synthesis of the target GPCRs by 5-38 times, resulting in yields of 0.6-3.8 mg from 1 ml of the reaction mixture, which is sufficient for structural-functional studies.

  13. Design for Fusion News Production System Based on Cloud Technology%基于云技术的融合新闻生产系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡一梁

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the business demand of the fusion news production system based on cloud tech-nology,analyzes system business process,puts forward design thought,designed the fusion news business process,and constructs the overall fusion architecture news system;realize the basic functions of fusion news production system.%描述基于云技术融合新闻生产系统的业务需求,分析融合新闻生产系统的业务流程,提出了融合新闻生产系统的设计思路,设计了融合新闻业务流程,构建融合新闻系统的总体架构,实现了融合媒体生产系统的基本功能。

  14. Tip-alpha (hp0596 gene product) is a highly immunogenic Helicobacter pylori protein involved in colonization of mouse gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Renata; Pawlowski, Marcin; Dzwonek, Artur; Mikula, Michal; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Drela, Nadzieja; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2008-03-01

    A product of the Helicobacter pylori hp0596 gene (Tip-alpha) is a highly immunogenic homodimeric protein, unique for this bacterium. Cell fractionation experiments indicate that Tip-alpha is anchored to the inner membrane. In contrast, the three-dimensional model of the protein suggests that Tip-alpha is soluble or, at least, largely exposed to the solvent. hp0596 gene knockout resulted in a significant decrease in the level of H. pylori colonization as measured by real-time PCR assay. In addition, the Tip-alpha recombinant protein was determined to stimulate macrophage to produce IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha. Both results imply that Tip-alpha is rather loosely connected to the inner membrane and potentially released during infection.

  15. Production, purification, and characterization of scFv TNF ligand fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fick, Andrea; Wyzgol, Agnes; Wajant, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) specific for tumor-associated cell surface antigens are the most broadly used reagents to direct therapeutic or diagnostic effector molecules, such as toxins, radioisotopes, and CD3-stimulating scFvs, to tumors. One novel class of effector molecules that can be targeted to tumors by scFvs are ligands of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family. Typically, these molecules have apoptosis inducing and/or immune stimulating properties and are therefore highly attractive for cancer treatment. N-terminal fusion of scFvs does not interfere with the receptor binding capabilities of TNF ligands and thus allows the straightforward generation of scFv TNF ligand fusion proteins. We report here a protocol for the purification of eukaryotically produced scFv TNF ligand fusion proteins based on affinity chromatography on anti-Flag agarose and further describe assays for the determination of the targeting index of this type of scFv-targeted proteins.

  16. Characterization of a small molecule inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-alpha production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Gao-yun; XIE Zhi-qiang; QIAN Ge; CUI Wen-ying; ZHAO Jun-yin; ZHANG Jian-zhong; LIAN Shi

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have shown that reducing the level of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) through the use of anti-TNF antibodies or soluble TNF receptor is a safe and efficacious treatment to inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, novel approaches to achieve this outcome are desired. The aim of this study was to investigate the characterization of a small molecule inhibitor, Y316, which blocks TNF mRNA upregulation and TNF production by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) stimulated monocytes.Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy volunteers were plated in 24-well plates and stimulated with LPS (1 μg/ml), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) (100 ng/ml), zymosan (10 μg/ml) and Tsst (100 ng/ml). Supernatants were collected after 4-hour culture at 37C, and quantitative determination of TNFα, interleukin-1β(IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-2 production in the supernatants was performed by colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Total RNA of PBMC was isolated and cytokine mRNA quantitation was performed by using a RNA level measuring kit (R & D Systems). PBMC were pretreated with Y316 (10 μmol/L, 1 μmol/L, 0.1 μmol/L,0.01 μmol/L and 0.001 μmol/L) or dimethyl sulfoxide at 37C for 10 minutes, and then stimulated with LPS or PMA,protein concentrations of p44.42, IKBα, P38 and Jun NH2-terminal kinase were determined by Western blotting. Cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) of PBMC was measured by enzyme immunoassay kit (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech).Results Y316 blocked TNF production and inhibited the upregulation of TNF mRNA levels in response to LPS, and also prevented the production of IL-1 and IL-6. In contrast, Y316 augmented the production of IL-10 in LPS-stimulated monocytes. Y316 failed to prevent the production of IL-2 and TNF in antigen-stimulated T cells, suggesting that its effects may be cell-type specific. Y316 prevented the phosphorylation and activation of the MAPK, ERK, and

  17. Contributions of complete fusion and break-up–fusion to intermediate mass fragment production in the low energy interaction of 12C and 27Al

    CERN Document Server

    Förtsch, S V; Colleoni, P; Gadioli, E; Gadioli Erba, E; Mairani, A; Steyn, G F; Lawrie, J J; Smit, F D; Connell, S H; Fearick, R W; Thovhogi, T

    2007-01-01

    The measured spectra of a large number of intermediate mass fragments produced at a CM energy of about 110 MeV in the 27Al(12C, x) reaction as well as in its inverse reaction, 12C(27Al, x), are presented. The analysis of these data suggests that, at this energy, the main reaction mechanisms which contribute to the intermediate mass fragment emission are two-nucleus complete fusion and break-up–fusion reactions.

  18. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia without Maturation with a Retinoic Alpha-Receptor Deletion: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosclair, Christopher; Pollen, Maressa; Capraro, Gerald; Cotelingam, James; Shackelford, Rodney E

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by a t(15;17) which fuses the 17q retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence to the 15q PML gene sequence. The resulting fusion product plays a role in the development and maintenance of APL, and is very rarely found in other acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes. Rare complex APL genomic rearrangements have retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletions. Here we report a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in a case of AML without differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in this AML subtype.

  19. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia without Maturation with a Retinoic Alpha-Receptor Deletion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Trosclair

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL is characterized by a t(15;17 which fuses the 17q retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence to the 15q PML gene sequence. The resulting fusion product plays a role in the development and maintenance of APL, and is very rarely found in other acute myeloid leukemia (AML subtypes. Rare complex APL genomic rearrangements have retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletions. Here we report a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in a case of AML without differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a retinoic acid alpha-receptor sequence deletion in this AML subtype.

  20. Control of Fusion and Solubility in Fusion Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Craven, David A

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we consider the control of fusion in fusion systems, proving three previously known, non-trivial results in a new, largely elementary way. We then reprove a result of Aschbacher, that the product of two strongly closed subgroups is strongly closed; to do this, we consolidate the theory of quotients of fusion systems into a consistent theory. We move on considering p-soluble fusion systems, and prove that they are constrained, allowing us to effectively characterize fusion systems of p-soluble groups. This leads us to recast Thompson Factorization for Qd(p)-free fusion systems, and consider Thompson Factorization for more general fusion systems.

  1. Research-to-operations (R2O) for the Space Environmental Effects Fusion System (SEEFS) system-impact products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Stephen

    The Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RVBX) and the Space Environment Branch of the Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC SLG/WMLE) have combined efforts to design, develop, test, implement, and validate numerical and graphical products for Air Force Space Command's (AFSPC) Space Environmental Effects Fusion System (SEEFS). These products are generated to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense weapons, navigation, communications, and surveillance systems. Jointly developed projects that have been completed as prototypes and are undergoing development for real-time operations include a SEEFS architecture and database, five system-impact products, and a high-level decision aid product. This first round of SEEFS products includes the Solar Radio Burst Effects (SoRBE) on radar and satellite communications, Radar Auroral Clutter (RAC), Scintillation Effects on radar and satellite communications (RadScint and SatScint), and Satellite Surface and Deep Charge/Discharge (Char/D) products. This presentation will provide overviews of the current system impact products, along with plans and potentials for future products expected for the SEEFS program. The overviews will include information on applicable research-to-operations (R2O) issues, to include input data coverage and quality control, output confidence levels, modeling standards, and validation efforts.

  2. Combination of ERG9 Repression and Enzyme Fusion Technology for Improved Production of Amorphadiene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baadhe, Rama Raju; Mekala, Naveen Kumar; Parcha, Sreenivasa Rao; Prameela Devi, Yalavarthy

    2013-01-01

    The yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) MTCC 3157 was selected for combinatorial biosynthesis of plant sesquiterpene amorpha-4,11-diene. Our main objective was to overproduce amorpha 4-11-diene, which is a key precursor molecule of artemisinin (antimalarial drug) produced naturally in plant Artemisia annua through mevalonate pathway. Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) is a common intermediate metabolite of a variety of compounds in the mevalonate pathway of yeast and leads to the production of ergosterols, dolichol and ubiquinone, and so forth. In our studies, FPP converted to amorphadiene (AD) by expressing heterologous amorphadiene synthase (ADS) in yeast. First, ERG9 (squalane synthase) promoter of yeast was replaced with repressible methionine (MET3) promoter by using bipartite gene fusion method. Further to overcome the loss of the intermediate FPP through competitive pathways in yeast, fusion protein technology was adopted and farnesyldiphosphate synthase (FPPS) of yeast has been coupled with amorphadiene synthase (ADS) of plant origin (Artemisia annua L.) where amorphadiene production was improved by 2-fold (11.2 mg/L) and 4-fold (25.02 mg/L) in yeast strains YCF-002 and YCF-005 compared with control strain YCF-AD (5.5 mg/L), respectively. PMID:24282652

  3. Combination of ERG9 Repression and Enzyme Fusion Technology for Improved Production of Amorphadiene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Raju Baadhe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 3157 was selected for combinatorial biosynthesis of plant sesquiterpene amorpha-4,11-diene. Our main objective was to overproduce amorpha 4-11-diene, which is a key precursor molecule of artemisinin (antimalarial drug produced naturally in plant Artemisia annua through mevalonate pathway. Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP is a common intermediate metabolite of a variety of compounds in the mevalonate pathway of yeast and leads to the production of ergosterols, dolichol and ubiquinone, and so forth. In our studies, FPP converted to amorphadiene (AD by expressing heterologous amorphadiene synthase (ADS in yeast. First, ERG9 (squalane synthase promoter of yeast was replaced with repressible methionine (MET3 promoter by using bipartite gene fusion method. Further to overcome the loss of the intermediate FPP through competitive pathways in yeast, fusion protein technology was adopted and farnesyldiphosphate synthase (FPPS of yeast has been coupled with amorphadiene synthase (ADS of plant origin (Artemisia annua L. where amorphadiene production was improved by 2-fold (11.2 mg/L and 4-fold (25.02 mg/L in yeast strains YCF-002 and YCF-005 compared with control strain YCF-AD (5.5 mg/L, respectively.

  4. Fusion of Remote Sensing Methods, UAV Photogrammetry and LiDAR Scanning products for monitoring fluvial dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendzioch, Theodora; Langhammer, Jakub; Hartvich, Filip

    2015-04-01

    Fusion of remote sensing data is a common and rapidly developing discipline, which combines data from multiple sources with different spatial and spectral resolution, from satellite sensors, aircraft and ground platforms. Fusion data contains more detailed information than each of the source and enhances the interpretation performance and accuracy of the source data and produces a high-quality visualisation of the final data. Especially, in fluvial geomorphology it is essential to get valuable images in sub-meter resolution to obtain high quality 2D and 3D information for a detailed identification, extraction and description of channel features of different river regimes and to perform a rapid mapping of changes in river topography. In order to design, test and evaluate a new approach for detection of river morphology, we combine different research techniques from remote sensing products to drone-based photogrammetry and LiDAR products (aerial LiDAR Scanner and TLS). Topographic information (e.g. changes in river channel morphology, surface roughness, evaluation of floodplain inundation, mapping gravel bars and slope characteristics) will be extracted either from one single layer or from combined layers in accordance to detect fluvial topographic changes before and after flood events. Besides statistical approaches for predictive geomorphological mapping and the determination of errors and uncertainties of the data, we will also provide 3D modelling of small fluvial features.

  5. Process for manufacture of inertial confinement fusion targets and resulting product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnari, Nino A.; Rensel, Walter B.; Robinson, Merrill G.; Solomon, David E.; Wise, Kensall D.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1982-01-01

    An ICF target comprising a spherical pellet of fusion fuel surrounded by a concentric shell; and a process for manufacturing the same which includes the steps of forming hemispheric shells of a silicon or other substrate material, adhering the shell segments to each other with a fuel pellet contained concentrically therein, then separating the individual targets from the parent substrate. Formation of hemispheric cavities by deposition or coating of a mold substrate is also described. Coatings or membranes may also be applied to the interior of the hemispheric segments prior to joining.

  6. Higgs boson gluon-fusion production beyond threshold in N$^3$LO QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Gehrmann, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we compute the gluon fusion Higgs boson cross-section at N3LO through the second term in the threshold expansion. This calculation constitutes a major milestone towards the full N3LO cross section. Our result has the best formal accuracy in the threshold expansion currently available, and includes contributions from collinear regions besides subleading corrections from soft and hard regions, as well as certain logarithmically enhanced contributions for general kinematics. We use our results to perform a critical appraisal of the validity of the threshold approximation at N3LO in perturbative QCD.

  7. Host-Pathogen Interactions: I. A Correlation Between alpha-Galactosidase Production and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, P D; Albersheim, P

    1969-02-01

    Resistance or susceptibility of Red Kidney, Pinto and Small White beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) to the alpha, beta, and gamma strains of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum was either confirmed or established. These fungal strains secrete alpha-galactosidase, beta-galactosidase and beta-xylosidase when grown on cell walls isolated from the hypocotyls of any of the above bean varieties. These enzymes effectively degrade cell walls isolated from susceptible 5-day old hypocotyls but degrade only slightly the walls isolated from resistant 18-day old hypocotyls. The amounts of the beta-galactosidase and beta-xylosidase secreted by the 3 fungal strains are relatively low and are approximately equivalent. The secretion of these 2 enzymes is not dependent upon the bean variety from which the hypocotyl cell walls used as a carbon source were isolated. However, the fungal strains secrete greater amounts of alpha-galactosidase when grown on hypocotyl cell walls isolated from susceptible plants than when grown on walls from resistant plants. Virulent isolates of the fungus, when grown on hypocotyl cell walls isolated from a susceptible plant, secrete more alpha-galactosidase than do attenuated (avirulent) isolates of the same fungal strain grown under the same conditions. The alpha-galactosidase secreted by each of the fungal strains is capable of removing galactose from the hypocotyl cell walls of each bean variety tested. Galactose is removed from the cell walls of each variety at the same rate regardless of whether the cell walls were isolated from a susceptible or resistant plant.

  8. Production and characterization of alpha-amylase from mango kernel by Fusarium solani NAIMCC-F-02956 using submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Devendra; Yadav, Kaushlesh K; Muthukumar, M; Garg, Neelima

    2013-11-01

    Microbial production of enzymes using low valued agro industrial wastes is gaining importance globally. Mango is one of the major fruit processed into a variety of products. During processing 40-50% of solid waste is generated in form of peel and stones. After decortications of mango stone, kernel is obtained which is a rich source of starch (upto 60%). It was utilized as a substrate for alpha-amylase production using Fusarium soloni. Maximum alpha-amylase production (0.889 U g(-1)) was recorded using a substrate concentration of 5% (w/v), pH-4 and temperature 30 degrees C on 9th day of incubation. Supplementation of production medium with micronutrients viz., Ca2+, Fe2+ or Mg2+ improved the enzyme production while, Zn2+, B3+ or Mn2+ ions exhibited inhibitory effect. The extracellular protein was precipitated by ammonium sulphate up to 70% saturation, dialyzed and purified (27.84 fold) by gel-exclusion (Sephadex G-75) chromatography. Protein profiling on 12% SDS-PAGE revealed three bands corresponding to 26, 27 and 30 kDa molecular sizes. The optimum amylase activity was achieved at pH 5.0 at 40 degrees C. The Michaelis constant (KM), Vmax and activation energy (-Ea) were found to be 3.7 mg ml(-1), 0.24 U mg(-1) and 42.39 kJ mole(-1), respectively.

  9. Realizing Technologies for Magnetized Target Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurden, Glen A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24

    Researchers are making progress with a range of magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) concepts. All of these approaches use the addition of a magnetic field to a target plasma, and then compress the plasma to fusion conditions. The beauty of MIF is that driver power requirements are reduced, compared to classical inertial fusion approaches, and simultaneously the compression timescales can be longer, and required implosion velocities are slower. The presence of a sufficiently large Bfield expands the accessibility to ignition, even at lower values of the density-radius product, and can confine fusion alphas. A key constraint is that the lifetime of the MIF target plasma has to be matched to the timescale of the driver technology (whether liners, heavy ions, or lasers). To achieve sufficient burn-up fraction, scaling suggests that larger yields are more effective. To handle the larger yields (GJ level), thick liquid wall chambers are certainly desired (no plasma/neutron damage materials problem) and probably required. With larger yields, slower repetition rates ({approx}0.1-1 Hz) for this intrinsically pulsed approach to fusion are possible, which means that chamber clearing between pulses can be accomplished on timescales that are compatible with simple clearing techniques (flowing liquid droplet curtains). However, demonstration of the required reliable delivery of hundreds of MJ of energy, for millions of pulses per year, is an ongoing pulsed power technical challenge.

  10. Tame Fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.D. Scott

    2003-01-01

    The first section of this paper covers preliminaries. Essentially, the next four cover units. It is shown that a compatible nearring with DCCR is Nnilpotent if and only if every maximal right N-subgroup is a right ideal. The last five sections relate to fusion (I.e., N-groups minimal for being generated by Nsubgroups, where each is N-isomorphic to a given N-group). Right N-subgroups of a tame nearring N with DCCR, minimal for not annihilating a minimal ideal from the left, are self monogenic and N-isomorphic. That this holds for any collection of minimal ideals is significant. Here, the right N-subgroup involved is a 'fusion product' of the 'components'.

  11. Production of $\\alpha$-particle condensate states in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Ad R; Geraci, E; Neindre, N Le; Napolitani, P; Rivet, M F; Alba, R; Amorini, F; Cardella, G; Chatterjee, M; De Filippo, E; Guinet, D; Lautesse, P; La Guidara, E; Lanzalone, G; Lanzano, G; Lombardo, I; Lopez, O; Maiolino, C; Pagano, A; Pirrone, S; Politi, G; Porto, F; Rizzo, F; Russotto, P; Wieleczko, J P

    2010-01-01

    The fragmentation of quasi-projectiles from the nuclear reaction $^{40}Ca$ + $^{12}C$ at 25 MeV/nucleon was used to produce excited states candidates to $\\alpha$-particle condensation. The experiment was performed at LNS-Catania using the CHIMERA multidetector. Accepting the emission simultaneity and equality among the $\\alpha$-particle kinetic energies as experimental criteria for deciding in favor of the condensate nature of an excited state, we analyze the $0_2^+$ and $2_2^+$ states of $^{12}$C and the $0_6^+$ state of $^{16}$O. A sub-class of events corresponding to the direct 3-$\\alpha$ decay of the Hoyle state is isolated.

  12. The influence of nitrogen sources on the alpha-amylase productivity of Aspergillus oryzae in continuous cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    was shown to be inferior to ammonia as a nitrogen source. A mixture of ammonia and complex nitrogen sources, such as yeast extract or casein hydrolysate, was better than with ammonia as the sole nitrogen source. Even a low concentration of casein hydrolysate (0.05 g l(-1)) resulted in a 35% increase......The influence of the nitrogen source on the cc-amylase productivity of Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in continuous cultivations. Both inorganic and complex nitrogen sources were investigated and glucose was used as the carbon and energy sources. For production of alpha-amylase, nitrate...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions alpha thalassemia alpha thalassemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Alpha thalassemia is a blood disorder that reduces the production ...

  14. Arecoline induces TNF-alpha production and Zonula Occludens-1 redistribution in mouse Sertoli TM4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzer-Min; Luo, Shun-Yuan; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Lee, Chi-Pin; Liu, Yu-Fan; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2014-09-09

    Arecoline, a major alkaloid in Areca nut has the ability to induce oxidative stress. The effect of Areca nut, arecoline on reducing sperm quality and quantity were documented previously using several animal models. Junction disruption by down-regulation of the junction-adhesive protein via oxidative stress is an important route mediating abnormal spermatogenesis. Therefore, in this present study, we investigated the functional role of arecoline on junctional proteins. To analyze direct effects of arecoline on testis cells, confluent mouse testicular Sertoli cell line TM4 was exposed to arecoline. Arecoline decreased insoluble zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) protein expression in TM4 cells, however, arecoline treatment increased TNF-alpha production in both TM4 and monocytic THP1 cells. In addition, ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 reversed arecoline effects on TNF-alpha and ZO-1. Arecoline increases the production of TNF-alpha and induces protein redistribution of ZO-1. All these results explain the role of arecoline in male reproductive dysfunction, besides its cytotoxic induction.

  15. Novel thermostable clostridial strains through protoplast fusion for enhanced biobutanol production at higher temperature—preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ferhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to improve the thermal stability of clostridium strains for enhanced biobutanol production. Thermostable clostridia species were developed through protoplast fusion between mesophilic clostridial species (i.e., Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium acetobutylicum and thermophilic clostridial species (i.e., Clostridium thermocellum. Production of biobutanol was examined in the present preliminary study using the clostridium strains and their protoplast fusants using sugar mixture with composition identical to that of wheat straw acid hydrolysate. Maximum biobutanol production of 9.4 g/L was achieved by a fused strain at 45 °C with total sugar consumption of 66% compared to that at 35 °C (i.e., 8.4 g/L production and 64% total sugar consumption. Glucose and xylose uptake rates were generally higher compared to all other individual sugars in the feedstock. In general, average cell concentrations were in close proximity for all parenting and fused strains at 35 °C; i.e., in the range of 5.12 × 107 to 5.49 × 107 cells/mL. Average cell concentration of fusants between the mesophilic clostridial species and the thermophilic clostridial species slightly increased to ~ 5.62 × 107 cells/mL at a higher temperature of 45 °C. These results, in addition to the ones obtained for the butanol production, demonstrate enhanced thermal stability of both fusants at a higher temperature (45 °C.

  16. Production of Active Bacillus licheniformis Alpha-Amylase in Tobacco and its Application in Starch Liquefaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pen, J; MOLENDIJK, L; Quax, Wim J.; SIJMONS, PC; VANOOYEN, AJJ; VANDENELZEN, PJM; RIETVELD, K; HOEKEMA, A

    1992-01-01

    As a first example of the feasibility of producing industrial bulk enzymes in plants, we have expressed Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase in transgenic tobacco, and applied the seeds directly in starch liquification. The enzyme was properly secreted into the intercellular space, and maximum expre

  17. Rational design of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Bacillus circulans strain 251 to increase alpha-cyclodextrin production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uitdehaag, JCM; Penninga, D; van Alebeek, GJWM; Smith, LM; Dijkstra, BW; Dijkhuizen, L

    2000-01-01

    Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferases (CGTase) (EC;2.4.1.19) are extracellular bacterial enzymes that generate cyclodextrins from starch. All known CGTases produce mixtures of alpha, beta, and gamma-cyclodextrins. A maltononaose inhibitor bound to the active site of the CGTase from Bacillus circulans st

  18. Production of Active Bacillus licheniformis Alpha-Amylase in Tobacco and its Application in Starch Liquefaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pen, J; MOLENDIJK, L; Quax, Wim J.; SIJMONS, PC; VANOOYEN, AJJ; VANDENELZEN, PJM; RIETVELD, K; HOEKEMA, A

    As a first example of the feasibility of producing industrial bulk enzymes in plants, we have expressed Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase in transgenic tobacco, and applied the seeds directly in starch liquification. The enzyme was properly secreted into the intercellular space, and maximum

  19. Investigation of a gas-catcher/ion guide system using alpha-decay recoil products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peraejaervi, K. E-mail: kari.perajarvi@phys.jyu.fi; Huikari, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Dendooven, P

    2002-04-22

    {sup 219}Rn recoils from the alpha decay of {sup 223}Ra have been used to study the efficiency and delay time distributions of a gas-catcher/ion guide system. Ions with charge states up to +4 were coming out of the gas cell. Combining efficiency and delay time measurements, ion survival times in plasma free conditions can be deduced.

  20. CP-even scalar boson production via gluon fusion at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasiou, Charalampos

    2016-01-01

    In view of the searches at the LHC for scalar particle resonances in addition to the 125 GeV Higgs boson, we present the cross section for a CP-even scalar produced via gluon fusion at N3LO in perturbative QCD assuming that it couples directly to gluons in an effective theory approach. We refine our prediction by taking into account the possibility that the scalar couples to the top-quark and computing the corresponding contributions through NLO in perturbative QCD. We assess the theoretical uncertainties of the cross section due to missing higher-order QCD effects and we provide the necessary information for obtaining the cross section value and uncertainty from our results in specific scenarios beyond the Standard Model. We also give detailed results for the case of a 750 GeV scalar, which will be the subject of intense experimental studies.

  1. Screening, mutagenesis and protoplast fusion of Aspergillus niger for the enhancement of extracellular glucose oxidase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, A A; Bazaraa, W A

    2005-07-01

    Various strains of Aspergillus niger were screened for extracellular glucose oxidase (GOD) activity. The most effective producer, strain FS-3 (15.9 U mL(-1)), was mutagenized using UV-irradiation or ethyl methane sulfonate. Of the 400 mutants obtained, 32 were found to be resistant to 2-deoxy D: -glucose, and 17 of these exhibited higher GOD activities (from 114.5 to 332.1%) than the original FS-3 strain. Following determination of antifungal resistance of the highest producing mutants, four mutants were selected and used in protoplast fusions in three different intraspecific crosses. All fusants showed higher activities (from 285.5 to 394.2%) than the original strain. Moreover, of the 30 fusants isolated, 19 showed higher GOD activity than their corresponding higher-producing parent strain.

  2. CP-even scalar boson production via gluon fusion at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Gehrmann, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Lazopoulos, Achilleas; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In view of the searches at the LHC for scalar particle resonances in addition to the 125 GeV Higgs boson, we present the cross section for a CP-even scalar produced via gluon fusion at N3LO in perturbative QCD assuming that it couples directly to gluons in an effective theory approach. We refine our prediction by taking into account the possibility that the scalar couples to the top-quark and computing the corresponding contributions through NLO in perturbative QCD. We assess the theoretical uncertainties of the cross section due to missing higher-order QCD effects and we provide the necessary information for obtaining the cross section value and uncertainty from our results in specific scenarios beyond the Standard Model. We also give detailed results for the case of a 750 GeV scalar, which will be the subject of intense experimental studies.

  3. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  4. Chemical Reactivity of alpha-Pinene-derived Products in the Aqueous Phase: Implications on the Fate of Organic Nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindelaub, J. D.; Hostetler, M. A.; Lipton, M. A.; Shepson, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    The production of organic nitrates has significant atmospheric importance due to the impact on regional air quality by influencing NOx lifetimes and ozone formation. Additionally, these low volatility compounds readily partition into the particle phase and are important contributors to secondary organic aerosol. Once in the aerosol phase, organic nitrates undergo further chemical reactions that govern their fate in the atmosphere and, consequently, their impact on air quality. Recent research indicates that the presence of water on aerosol particles has a major impact on the reactivity of organic nitrates and that condensed phase hydrolysis leads to the destruction of organic nitrate species, depending on structure. Despite this knowledge, the chemical mechanisms, products, product reactivity and volatility are still uncertain, negatively impacting our understanding of aerosol phase processing and the contribution to air quality. To further understand the atmospheric impact of aerosol phase hydrolysis, we analyzed both condensed phase hydrolysis reactions involving alpha-pinene-derived standards and alpha-pinene photochemical chamber reaction filter samples, using a suite of spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques. We were able to measure the pH-dependent hydrolysis rate constants for several types of organic nitrates and identify specific reaction products. The chemistry involved exhibits a strong dependence on pH, providing important mechanistic clues. The results of this study will significantly contribute to our knowledge of aerosol phase chemistry and the impact on regional air quality with respect to the fate of organic nitrate species.

  5. Higgs Boson Pair Production in Gluon Fusion at Next-to-Leading Order with Full Top-Quark Mass Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowka, S; Greiner, N; Heinrich, G; Jones, S P; Kerner, M; Schlenk, J; Schubert, U; Zirke, T

    2016-07-01

    We present the calculation of the cross section and invariant mass distribution for Higgs boson pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Top-quark masses are fully taken into account throughout the calculation. The virtual two-loop amplitude has been generated using an extension of the program GoSam supplemented with an interface to Reduze for the integral reduction. The occurring integrals have been calculated numerically using the program SecDec. Our results, including the full top-quark mass dependence for the first time, allow us to assess the validity of various approximations proposed in the literature, which we also recalculate. We find substantial deviations between the NLO result and the different approximations, which emphasizes the importance of including the full top-quark mass dependence at NLO.

  6. Materials research for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaster, J.; Moeslang, A.; Muroga, T.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion materials research started in the early 1970s following the observation of the degradation of irradiated materials used in the first commercial fission reactors. The technological challenges of fusion energy are intimately linked with the availability of suitable materials capable of reliably withstanding the extremely severe operational conditions of fusion reactors. Although fission and fusion materials exhibit common features, fusion materials research is broader. The harder mono-energetic spectrum associated with the deuterium-tritium fusion neutrons (14.1 MeV compared to hydrogen and helium as transmutation products that might lead to a (at present undetermined) degradation of structural materials after a few years of operation. Overcoming the historical lack of a fusion-relevant neutron source for materials testing is an essential pending step in fusion roadmaps. Structural materials development, together with research on functional materials capable of sustaining unprecedented power densities during plasma operation in a fusion reactor, have been the subject of decades of worldwide research efforts underpinning the present maturity of the fusion materials research programme.

  7. Effect of entrance channel parameters on the fusion of two heavy ions: Excitation functions of reaction products in 16O+66Zn and 37Cl + 45Sc reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Suparne Sodaye; B S Tomar; A Goswami

    2006-06-01

    Excitation functions of reaction products formed in 16O+66Zn and 37Cl + 45Sc systems, leading to the same compound nucleus, 82Sr, were measured using recoilcatcher technique and off-line -ray spectrometry. The contribution of non-compound processes like transfer and incomplete fusion (ICF) reactions to the cross-sections of different evaporation residues were delineated by comparing the experimental data with the predictions of Monte Carlo simulation code PACE2. The results show that non-compound processes become a significant fraction of the total reaction cross-section in 16O+66Zn systems in the beam energy range studied, while 37Cl + 45Sc gives mainly compound nucleus products. The mass asymmetry dependence of the fusion and non-compound cross-sections have been analysed in terms of the static fusion model and sum rule model.

  8. Essential involvement of cross-talk between IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in CXCL10 production in human THP-1 monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xu-Feng; Kim, Dong-Heui; Yoon, Yang-Suk; Jin, Dan; Huang, Xue-Zhu; Li, Jian-Hong; Deung, Young-Kun; Lee, Kyu-Jae

    2009-09-01

    Interferon (IFN)-gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10), a CXC chemokine, has been documented in several inflammatory and autoimmune disorders including atopic dermatitis and bronchial asthma. Although CXCL10 could be induced by IFN-gamma depending on cell type, the mechanisms regulating CXCL10 production following treatment with combination of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha have not been adequately elucidated in human monocytes. In this study, we showed that TNF-alpha had more potential than IFN-gamma to induce CXCL10 production in THP-1 monocytes. Furthermore, IFN-gamma synergistically enhanced the production of CXCL10 in parallel with the activation of NF-kappaB in TNF-alpha-stimulated THP-1 cells. Blockage of STAT1 or NF-kappaB suppressed CXCL10 production. JAKs inhibitors suppressed IFN-gamma plus TNF-alpha-induced production of CXCL10 in parallel with activation of STAT1 and NF-kappaB, while ERK inhibitor suppressed production of CXCL10 as well as activation of NF-kappaB, but not that of STAT1. IFN-gamma-induced phosphorylation of JAK1 and JAK2, whereas TNF-alpha induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Interestingly, IFN-gamma alone had no effect on phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB-alpha, whereas it significantly promoted TNF-alpha-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB-alpha. These results suggest that TNF-alpha induces CXCL10 production by activating NF-kappaB through ERK and that IFN-gamma induces CXCL10 production by increasing the activation of STAT1 through JAKs pathways. Of note, TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB may be the primary pathway contributing to CXCL10 production in THP-1 cells. IFN-gamma potentiates TNF-alpha-induced CXCL10 production in THP-1 cells by increasing the activation of STAT1 and NF-kappaB through JAK1 and JAK2.

  9. Electroweak corrections to Higgs production through ZZ fusion at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudjema, F. [LAPTH, B.P.110, Annecy-le-Vieux F-74941 (France)]. E-mail: boudjema@lapp.in2p3.fr; Fujimoto, J. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Ishikawa, T. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kaneko, T. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kato, K. [Kogakuin University, Nishi-Shinjuku 1-24, Shinjuku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Kurihara, Y. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Shimizu, Y. [KEK, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yasui, Y. [Tokyo Management College, Ichikawa, Chiba 272-0001 (Japan)

    2004-10-21

    We present the full O({alpha}) electroweak radiative corrections to e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}H. The computation is performed with the help of GRACE-loop. The extraction of the full QED corrections is performed, these are quite large at threshold. The genuine weak corrections, for the linear collider energies, when expressed in the G{sub {mu}} scheme are of order -2 to -4% for Higgs masses preferred by the latest precision data. We also extract the m{sub t}{sup 2} type corrections and make a comparison with the weak corrections for the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{nu}{nu}-bar H.

  10. Optimizing HIV-1 protease production in Escherichia coli as fusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piubelli Luciano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the etiological agent in AIDS and related diseases. The aspartyl protease encoded by the 5' portion of the pol gene is responsible for proteolytic processing of the gag-pol polyprotein precursor to yield the mature capsid protein and the reverse transcriptase and integrase enzymes. The HIV protease (HIV-1Pr is considered an attractive target for designing inhibitors which could be used to tackle AIDS and therefore it is still the object of a number of investigations. Results A recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1Pr was overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein with bacterial periplasmic protein dithiol oxidase (DsbA or glutathione S-transferase (GST, also containing a six-histidine tag sequence. Protein expression was optimized by designing a suitable HIV-1Pr cDNA (for E. coli expression and to avoid autoproteolysis and by screening six different E. coli strains and five growth media. The best expression yields were achieved in E. coli BL21-Codon Plus(DE3-RIL host and in TB or M9 medium to which 1% (w/v glucose was added to minimize basal expression. Among the different parameters assayed, the presence of a buffer system (based on phosphate salts and a growth temperature of 37°C after adding IPTG played the main role in enhancing protease expression (up to 10 mg of chimeric DsbA:HIV-1Pr/L fermentation broth. GST:HIVPr was in part (50% produced as soluble protein while the overexpressed DsbA:HIV-1Pr chimeric protein largely accumulated in inclusion bodies as unprocessed fusion protein. A simple refolding procedure was developed on HiTrap Chelating column that yielded a refolded DsbA:HIV-1Pr with a > 80% recovery. Finally, enterokinase digestion of resolubilized DsbA:HIV-1Pr gave more than 2 mg of HIV-1Pr per liter of fermentation broth with a purity ≤ 80%, while PreScission protease cleavage of soluble GST:HIVPr yielded ~ 0.15 mg of pure HIV-1

  11. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  12. Investigation of a gas-catcher/ion guide system using alpha-decay recoil products

    CERN Document Server

    Peraejaervi, K; Rinta-Antila, S; Dendooven, P

    2002-01-01

    sup 2 sup 1 sup 9 Rn recoils from the alpha decay of sup 2 sup 2 sup 3 Ra have been used to study the efficiency and delay time distributions of a gas-catcher/ion guide system. Ions with charge states up to +4 were coming out of the gas cell. Combining efficiency and delay time measurements, ion survival times in plasma free conditions can be deduced.

  13. Effect of phorbol ester on 6-keto PGF sup 1. alpha. production in aorta from control-salt and aldosterone-salt hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.B.; Jones, A.W. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The authors have previously shown that norepinephrine (NE) stimulated 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} and thromboxane B{sub 2}(TXB{sub 2}) production in aorta from control-salt (CSR) and aldosterone-salt hypertensive rats (AHR) through the alpha-1 adrenoceptor (A1AR). While there was no difference in NE-stimulated TXB{sub 2} production between CSR and AHR, 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production was attenuated in aorta from AHR compared tissues. The authors were interested in whether the source of the arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites was through direct coupling of the A1AR and PLA{sub 2} or secondary to activation of PLC. One approach to answering this question was to bypass the receptor and activate protein kinase-C (PKC) directly. PMA caused a time-dependent increase in both 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} and TXB{sub 2}. The time course was much slower than NE-stimulated production of these metabolites, but the pattern was similar with TXB{sub 2} appearing before 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}}. The PMA concentration-response curves for 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production for CSR and AHR were nearly superimposable. Staurosporine inhibited PMA stimulated 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production in CSR and AHR with nearly equal potency. Thus, while activation of PKC results in increases in AA metabolites, alterations in this pathway do not appear to be responsible for the differences observed with NE-stimulated 6-keto-PGF{sub 1{alpha}} production. These data support the concept of direct coupling between the A1AR and PLA{sub 2} in vascular smooth muscle.

  14. Fusion technology for the production of PbLi eutectic alloys; Obtencion de aleaciones eutecticas PbLi mediante procesos de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrena, M. J.; Gomez de Salazar, J. M.; Quinones, J.; Pascual, L.; Soria, A.

    2012-07-01

    The development of thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), whose objective is to produce energy from nuclear fusion, has raised the study of Pb-Li eutectic alloys, as they have been selected for the manufacture of test blanket modules (TBM). However, during the manufacturing process of the Pb-Li alloys, thermal conditions used result in a loss of litium element, which inhibits the formation of eutectic structures. In this work we have done fusion of pure lead and lithium, evaluating different process parameters to obtain Pb-Li (17 at. %) eutectic alloys. The alloys manufactured were characterized by DSC, SEM-EDX and microhardness tests. From these studies we noted that the used of an induction reactor and the process parameters optimized to obtain Pb-Li alloy allow for completely eutectic ingots and high chemical homogeneity and microstructural. (Author) 26 refs.

  15. Characterization of Discontinuous Coarsening Reaction Products in INCONEL® Alloy 740H® Fusion Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechetti, Daniel H.; Dupont, John N.; Watanabe, Masashi; de Barbadillo, John J.

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of γ' coarsened zones (CZs) in alloy 740H fusion welds via a variety of electron microscopy techniques was conducted. The effects of solute partitioning during nonequilibrium solidification on the amount of strengthening precipitates along the grain boundaries were evaluated via electron-probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to present evidence for the preferential growth of CZs toward regions of lower γ' content, even if growth in that direction increases grain boundary area. Scanning electron microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify the propensity for CZs to develop along certain segments of the grain boundaries, as governed by the local variations in γ' content. Scanning transmission electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) was used to assess the compositions of the matrix and precipitate phases within the CZs and to quantify the segregation of alloying components to the reaction front. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling were used to compare calculated and experimental compositions. The work presented here provides new insight into the progression of the discontinuous coarsening (DC) reaction in a complex engineering alloy.

  16. Characterization of Discontinuous Coarsening Reaction Products in INCONEL® Alloy 740H® Fusion Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechetti, Daniel H.; Dupont, John N.; Watanabe, Masashi; de Barbadillo, John J.

    2017-02-01

    Characterization of γ' coarsened zones (CZs) in alloy 740H fusion welds via a variety of electron microscopy techniques was conducted. The effects of solute partitioning during nonequilibrium solidification on the amount of strengthening precipitates along the grain boundaries were evaluated via electron-probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy. Electron backscatter diffraction was used to present evidence for the preferential growth of CZs toward regions of lower γ' content, even if growth in that direction increases grain boundary area. Scanning electron microscopy and image analysis were used to quantify the propensity for CZs to develop along certain segments of the grain boundaries, as governed by the local variations in γ' content. Scanning transmission electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) was used to assess the compositions of the matrix and precipitate phases within the CZs and to quantify the segregation of alloying components to the reaction front. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling were used to compare calculated and experimental compositions. The work presented here provides new insight into the progression of the discontinuous coarsening (DC) reaction in a complex engineering alloy.

  17. Optimization of isonovalal production from alpha-pinene oxide using permeabilized cells of Pseudomonas rhodesiae CIP 107491.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanille, P; Larroche, C

    2003-01-01

    Optimization studies on the synthesis of isonovalal from alpha-pinene oxide by Pseudomonas rhodesiae CIP 107491 operated in a biphasic medium are presented. Three key parameters are identified. The first is the need for a permeabilization of cells by freezing them and then treating the thawed material with an organic solvent such as chloroform, toluene or diethyl ether. This operation allows both enzyme release into the aqueous phase outside the cells and an improvement in the transport properties of both substrate and product across the cell membrane, strongly increasing reaction rates. The second is that the enzyme alpha-pinene oxide lyase, which exhibits an irreversible inactivation by isonovalal (or a by-product), presents a constant turn-over, i.e., the total product synthesis is proportional to the biomass loading and is close to 108 mmol (16.4 g) isonovalal l(-1) g(-1) biomass. The third phenomenon is that the biphasic system used is not phase-transfer-limited, a feature attributed to the spontaneous formation of an oil-in-water emulsion. It is thus possible to carry out a very efficient process, allowing the recovery of 2.63 mol isonovalal l(-1) (400 g l(-1)) from 25 g biomass l(-1) in 2.5 h, corresponding to an average reaction rate as high as 0.70 mmol min(-1) g(-1) cells (160 g l(-1) h(-1)).

  18. Constraints on the trilinear Higgs coupling from vector boson fusion and associated Higgs production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bizon, Wojciech; Haisch, Ulrich; Zanderighi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    We examine the constraints on the trilinear Higgs coupling $\\lambda$ that originate from associated ($Vh$) and vector boson fusion (VBF) Higgs production in $pp$ collisions in the context of the Standard Model effective field theory. The 1-loop contributions to $pp \\to V h$ and $pp \\to jj h$ that stem from insertions of the dimension-6 operator $O_6 = - \\lambda \\left (H^\\dagger H \\right )^3$ are calculated and combined with the ${\\cal O} (\\lambda)$ corrections to the partial decay widths of the Higgs boson. Employing next-to-next-to-leading order QCD predictions, we analyse the sensitivity of current and forthcoming measurements of the signal strengths in $Vh$ and VBF Higgs production to changes in $\\lambda$. We show that future LHC runs may be able to probe modifications of $\\lambda$ with a sensitivity similar to the one that is expected to arise from determinations of double-Higgs production. The sensitivity of differential $Vh$ and VBF Higgs distributions to a modified $h^3$ coupling is also studied.

  19. Pilot-scale production and purification of a staphylokinase based fusion protein over-expressed in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Genshen ZHONG; Aiping YU; Bingxing SHI; Yang LIU; Chutse WU

    2009-01-01

    SFH,a recombinant staphylokinase-based fusion protein linked by the factor Xa recognition peptide at the N-terminus of hirudin,is a promising therapeutic candidate for thromboembolic diseases.To develop SFH into a new thrombolytic agent,scaled-up production was carried out to provide sufficient preparation for animal safety and clinical studies.Here,we describe a pilot-scale cultivation and purification process for the production of SFH.A high-cell-density fed-batch cultivation for the production of SFH in E.coli was developed in a 40-L bioreactor,which produced about 1.1 g/L of recombinant protein.SFH was purified to homogeneity from the E.coli lysate by expanded bed adsorption chromatography and anion-exchange chromatography,with over 99% purity and 54% recovery.Moreover,the residual endotoxin content was less than 0.5 EU/mL.The molecular weight and in vitro bioactivity of SFH were also determined by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and fibrinolytic activity assay,respectively.

  20. The activity of barley alpha-amylase on starch granules is enhanced by fusion of a starch binding domain from Aspergillus niger glucoamylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juge, N.; Nøhr, J.; Le Gal-Coëffet, M.-F.

    2006-01-01

    High affinity for starch granules of certain amylolytic enzymes is mediated by a separate starch binding domain (SBD). In Aspergillus niger glucoamylase (GA-I), a 70 amino acid O-glycosylated peptide linker connects SBD with the catalytic domain. A gene was constructed to encode barley alpha......-amylase 1 (AMY1) fused C-terminally to this SBD via a 37 residue GA-I linker segment. AMY1-SBD was expressed in A. niger, secreted using the AMY1 signal sequence at 25 mg x L(-1) and purified in 50% yield. AMY1-SBD contained 23% carbohydrate and consisted of correctly N-terminally processed multiple forms...

  1. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  2. {sup 16}O Coulomb dissociation: towards a new means to determine the {sup 12}C+{alpha} fusion rate in stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurot, F. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: fleurot@snolab.ca; Berg, A.M. van den [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Davids, B. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Harakeh, M.N. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Kravchuk, V.L. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Wilschut, H.W. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Zernikelaan 25, 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: wilschut@kvi.nl; Guillot, J. [IPN, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay cedex (France); Laurent, H. [IPN, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay cedex (France); Willis, A. [IPN, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay cedex (France); Assuncao, M. [CSNSM, bat. 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Kiener, J. [CSNSM, bat. 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Lefebvre, A. [CSNSM, bat. 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Sereville, N. de [CSNSM, bat. 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Tatischeff, V. [CSNSM, bat. 104-108, 91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2005-06-02

    A feasibility study was made of an important aspect of the Coulomb-dissociation method, which has been proposed for the determination of the rate of the astrophysically important {sup 12}C({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 16}O reaction. A crucial aspect is the disentanglement of nuclear and Coulomb interactions on one hand and the separation of dipole and quadrupole contributions on the other. As a first step the resonant breakup via two well-known 2{sup +} states of {sup 16}O was measured. The differential cross section of {sup 208}Pb({sup 16}O, {sup 16}O*){sup 208}Pb and the angular correlations of the fragments {sup 12}C and {alpha} in the center of mass were measured and compared to theoretical predictions calculated in DWBA and the coupled-channel method. The best agreement was found for the state at 11.52 MeV associated to a one-step excitation from the ground state, while the 9.84 MeV requires coupling to the first-excited 2{sup +} state and is not well described.

  3. Enhancement of yellow pigment production by intraspecific protoplast fusion of Monascus spp. yellow mutant (ade(-)) and white mutant (prototroph).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinsupa, Worawan; Phansiri, Salak; Thongpradis, Panida; Yongsmith, Busaba; Pothiratana, Chetsada

    2016-01-10

    To breed industrially useful strains of a slow-growing, yellow pigment producing strain of Monascus sp., protoplasts of Monascus purpureus yellow mutant (ade(-)) and rapid-growing M. purpureus white mutant (prototroph) were fused and fusants were selected on minimal medium (MM). Preliminary conventional protoplast fusion of the two strains was performed and the result showed that only white colonies were detected on MM. It was not able to differentiate the fusants from the white parental prototroph. To solve this problem, the white parental prototroph was thus pretreated with 20mM iodoacetamide (IOA) for cytoplasm inactivation and subsequently taken into protoplast fusion with slow-growing Monascus yellow mutant. Under this development technique, only the fusants, with viable cytoplasm from Monascus yellow mutant (ade(-)), could thus grow on MM, whereas neither IOA pretreated white parental prototroph nor yellow auxotroph (ade(-)) could survive. Fifty-three fusants isolated from yellow colonies obtained through this developed technique were subsequently inoculated on complete medium (MY agar). Fifteen distinguished yellow colonies from their parental yellow mutant were then selected for biochemical, morphological and fermentative properties in cassava starch and soybean flour (SS) broth. Finally, three most stable fusants (F7, F10 and F43) were then selected and compared in rice solid culture. Enhancement of yellow pigment production over the parental yellow auxotroph was found in F7 and F10, while enhanced glucoamylase activity was found in F43. The formation of fusants was further confirmed by monacolin K content, which was intermediate between the two parents (monacolin K-producing yellow auxotroph and non-monacolin K producing white prototroph).

  4. Methods for increasing production of 3-methyl-2-butenol using fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Howard; Keasling, Jay D.

    2017-04-25

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for increasing production of 3-methyl-2-butenol in a de novo synthetic pathway in a genetically modified host cell using isopentenyl disphosphate (IPP) as a substrate.

  5. Diboson Production, Vector Boson Fusion and Vector Boson Scattering measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Cong; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of pairs of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has performed detailed measurements of integrated and differential cross sections of the production of heavy di-boson pairs, such as WW, WZ and ZZ, in the fully-leptonic and partially in the semi-leptonic final states at centre-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV. Moreover, searches for the production of three W bosons or of a W boson and a photon together with a Z or W boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV will be presented. These studies are closely connected to the electroweak production of a heavy boson and a photon together with two jets. Evidence has been found for the exclusive production of W boson pairs, which will be presented in this talk. When selecting two jets at high invariant mass in addition to the production of th...

  6. Nuclear fusion occurs during mating in Candida albicans and is dependent on the KAR3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard J; Miller, Mathew G; Chua, Penelope R; Maxon, Mary E; Johnson, Alexander D

    2005-02-01

    It is now well established that mating can occur between diploid a and alpha cells of Candida albicans. There is, however, controversy over when, and with what efficiency, nuclear fusion follows cell fusion to create stable tetraploid a/alpha cells. In this study, we have analysed the mating process between C. albicans strains using both cytological and genetic approaches. Using strains derived from SC5314, we used a number of techniques, including time-lapse microscopy, to demonstrate that efficient nuclear fusion occurs in the zygote before formation of the first daughter cell. Consistent with these observations, zygotes micromanipulated from mating mixes gave rise to mononuclear tetraploid cells, even when no selection for successful mating was applied to them. Mating between different clinical isolates of C. albicans revealed that while all isolates could undergo nuclear fusion, the efficiency of nuclear fusion varied in different crosses. We also show that nuclear fusion in C. albicans requires the Kar3 microtubule motor protein. Deletion of the CaKAR3 gene from both mating partners had little or no effect on zygote formation but reduced the formation of stable tetraploids more than 600-fold, as determined by quantitative mating assays. These findings demonstrate that nuclear fusion is an active process that can occur in C. albicans at high frequency to produce stable, mononucleate mating products.

  7. Development of Deep Learning Based Data Fusion Approach for Accurate Rainfall Estimation Using Ground Radar and Satellite Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Chandra, C. V.; Tan, H.; Cifelli, R.; Xie, P.

    2016-12-01

    Rainfall estimation based on onboard satellite measurements has been an important topic in satellite meteorology for decades. A number of precipitation products at multiple time and space scales have been developed based upon satellite observations. For example, NOAA Climate Prediction Center has developed a morphing technique (i.e., CMORPH) to produce global precipitation products by combining existing space based rainfall estimates. The CMORPH products are essentially derived based on geostationary satellite IR brightness temperature information and retrievals from passive microwave measurements (Joyce et al. 2004). Although the space-based precipitation products provide an excellent tool for regional and global hydrologic and climate studies as well as improved situational awareness for operational forecasts, its accuracy is limited due to the sampling limitations, particularly for extreme events such as very light and/or heavy rain. On the other hand, ground-based radar is more mature science for quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), especially after the implementation of dual-polarization technique and further enhanced by urban scale radar networks. Therefore, ground radars are often critical for providing local scale rainfall estimation and a "heads-up" for operational forecasters to issue watches and warnings as well as validation of various space measurements and products. The CASA DFW QPE system, which is based on dual-polarization X-band CASA radars and a local S-band WSR-88DP radar, has demonstrated its excellent performance during several years of operation in a variety of precipitation regimes. The real-time CASA DFW QPE products are used extensively for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. In this paper, a neural network based data fusion mechanism is introduced to improve the satellite-based CMORPH precipitation product by taking into account the ground radar measurements. A deep learning system is

  8. Characterization of products formed in the reaction of ozone with alpha-pinene: case for organic peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachari, Prasanna; Hopke, Philip K

    2008-08-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their subsequent induced pulmonary and systemic oxidative stress has been implicated as an important molecular mechanism of PM-mediated toxicity. However, recent work has shown that there is significant ROS associated with ambient PM. In order to understand the formation mechanisms as well as understand the potential health effects of particle-bound oxidative species, the alpha-pinene-O(3) oxidation chemical system was studied to elucidate the structures of reaction products using liquid chromatography-multiple stage mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)). The classes of compounds identified based on their multiple stage-MS fragmentation patterns, mechanistic considerations of alpha-pinene-O(3) oxidation, and general fragmentation rules, of the products from this reaction system were highly oxygenated species, predominantly containing hydroperoxide and peroxide functional groups. The oxidant species observed were clearly stable for the 1-3 h that elapsed during aerosol collection and analysis, and probably for much longer, thus rendering it possible for these species to bind onto particles forming fine particulate organic peroxides that concentrate on the particles and could deliver concentrated doses of ROS in vivo to tissue.

  9. Constitutive expression of MC1R in HaCaT keratinocytes inhibits basal and UVB-induced TNF-alpha production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Le Gallic, Lionel; Stoebner, Pierre-Emmanuel; Guezennec, Anne; Guesnet, Joelle; Lavabre-Bertrand, Thierry; Martinez, Jean; Meunier, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) binds to melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) on melanocytes to stimulate pigmentation and modulate various cutaneous inflammatory responses. MC1R expression is not restricted to melanocytic cells and may be induced in keratinocytes after UVB exposure. We hypothesized that MC1R signaling in keratinocytes, wherein basal conditions are barely expressed, may modulate mediators of inflammation, such as nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Therefore, we generated HaCaT cells that stably express human MC1R or the Arg151Cys (R151C) nonfunctional variant. We demonstrate that: (1) the constitutive activity of MC1R results in elevated intracellular cAMP level, reduced NF-kappaB activity and decreased TNF-alpha transcription; (2) binding of alpha-MSH to MC1R and the subsequent increase in cAMP production do not inhibit TNFalpha-mediated NF-kappaB activation; (3) MC1R signaling is sufficient to strongly inhibit UVB-induced TNF-alpha expression and this inhibitory effect is further enhanced by alpha-MSH stimulation. Our findings suggest that the constitutive activity of the G-protein-coupled MC1R in keratinocytes may contribute to the modulation of inflammatory events and immune response induced by UV light.

  10. Design of lost alpha particle diagnostics for JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumel, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr.1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)]. E-mail: baeumel@ipp.mpg.de; Werner, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr.1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Semler, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr.1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Mukherjee, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik EURATOM-Association, Wendelsteinstr.1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Darrow, D.S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ (United States); Ellis, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ (United States); Cecil, F.E. [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden CO 80401 (United States); Pedrick, L. [EFDA-JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Altmann, H. [EFDA-JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Kiptily, V. [EFDA-JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gafert, J. [EFDA-JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-15

    In a future magnetic fusion reactor alpha particles will be utlilized for plasma heating. In order to achieve a high efficiency of this process, the aim has to be a good confinement of alpha particles. Therefore, direct measurement of alpha particle losses is of particular interest. Two diagnostics are being prepared for the JET Tokamak that are targeting on exactly this subject: a scintillator probe and a set of Faraday cups . These systems are capable of measuring ICRH tail ions and charged fusion products. The scintillator probe aims to allow the detection of particles with a pitch angle between 30{sup o} and 86{sup o} (5% resolution) and a gyroradius between 20 and 140 mm (15% resolution). The Faraday cup array will detect the current of fast ions at multiple poloidal locations, with a dynamic range of 1 nA/cm{sup 2} to 100 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} at a temporal resolution of 1 ms. For 3.5 MeV {alpha}-particles the energy binning of the foil detector will be 15-50% of the full energy depending on the geometry of the individual collector. The experience in operating both diagnostics in a high temperature and high radiation environment will give valuable information in preparation for the design of similar diagnostics for future fusion devices. This paper covers the design and engineering of both diagnostics together with their envisaged performance.

  11. Observability considerations for multi-sensor and product fusion: Bias, information content, and validation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Hyer, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Christopher, S. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Stackhouse, P. W.

    2009-12-01

    With the successful development of many aerosol products from the NASA A-train as well as new operational geostationary and polar orbiting sensors, the scientific community now has a host of new parameters to use in their analyses. The variety and quality of products has reached a point where the community has moved from basic observation-based science to sophisticated multi-component research that addresses the complex atmospheric environment. In order for these satellite data contribute to the science their uncertainty levels must move from semi-quantitative to quantitative. Initial attempts to quantify uncertainties have led to some recent debate in the community as to the efficacy of aerosol products from current and future NASA satellite sensors. In an effort to understand the state of satellite product fidelity, the Naval Research Laboratory and a newly reformed Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) aerosol panel have both initiated assessments of the nature of aerosol remote sensing uncertainty and bias. In this talk we go over areas of specific concern based on the authors’ experiences with the data, emphasizing the multi-sensor problem. We first enumerate potential biases, including retrieval, sampling/contextual, and cognitive bias. We show examples of how these biases can subsequently lead to the pitfalls of correlated/compensating errors, tautology, and confounding. The nature of bias is closely related to the information content of the sensor signal and its subsequent application to the derived aerosol quantity of interest (e.g., optical depth, flux, index of refraction, etc.). Consequently, purpose-specific validation methods must be employed, especially when generating multi-sensor products. Indeed, cloud and lower boundary condition biases in particular complicate the more typical methods of regressional bias elimination and histogram matching. We close with a discussion of sequestration of uncertainty in multi-sensor applications of

  12. Effect of alpha-Q-value on reaction dynamics at ≈ 4-7 AMeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhowmik R.K.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the dependence of incomplete fusion reaction dynamics on various entrance channel parameters, specially, the alpha-Q-value effect. The excitation functions for several radio-nuclides formed in 13C+159Tb interactions at ≈ 4-7 AMeV have been measured using activation technique followed by γ-spectroscopy. The experimentally measured excitation functions have been analyzed in the framework of statistical model code PACE4. A sizeable contribution of incomplete fusion has been delineated in the production of α-emitting channels in reference to the Monte Carlo simulation based statistical model code PACE4. For better insights into the onset and strength of incomplete fusion, the incomplete fusion strength function has been deduced as a function of various entrance channel parameters. A significant amount of incomplete fusion contribution has been observed at slightly above barrier energies, and found to increase smoothly with incident projectile energy. Present results have also been compared with the results obtained in the interactions of 16O and 12C with same target 159Tb, to probe the dependence of incomplete fusion on projectile, specially, on the binding energy & alpha-Q-value. The present work in light of previous data hints that instead of binding energy, the alpha-Q-value of the projectile is a parameter which influences the in-complete fusion reaction dynamics.

  13. Improving Quantitative Precipitation Estimation via Data Fusion of High-Resolution Ground-based Radar Network and CMORPH Satellite-based Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifelli, R.; Chen, H.; Chandrasekar, V.; Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    A large number of precipitation products at multi-scales have been developed based upon satellite, radar, and/or rain gauge observations. However, how to produce optimal rainfall estimation for a given region is still challenging due to the spatial and temporal sampling difference of different sensors. In this study, we develop a data fusion mechanism to improve regional quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) by utilizing satellite-based CMORPH product, ground radar measurements, as well as numerical model simulations. The CMORPH global precipitation product is essentially derived based on retrievals from passive microwave measurements and infrared observations onboard satellites (Joyce et al. 2004). The fine spatial-temporal resolution of 0.05o Lat/Lon and 30-min is appropriate for regional hydrologic and climate studies. However, it is inadequate for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. Via fusion of the Regional CMORPH product and local precipitation sensors, the high-resolution QPE performance can be improved. The area of interest is the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Metroplex, which is the largest land-locked metropolitan area in the U.S. In addition to an NWS dual-polarization S-band WSR-88DP radar (i.e., KFWS radar), DFW hosts the high-resolution dual-polarization X-band radar network developed by the center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA). This talk will present a general framework of precipitation data fusion based on satellite and ground observations. The detailed prototype architecture of using regional rainfall instruments to improve regional CMORPH precipitation product via multi-scale fusion techniques will also be discussed. Particularly, the temporal and spatial fusion algorithms developed for the DFW Metroplex will be described, which utilizes CMORPH product, S-band WSR-88DP, and X-band CASA radar measurements. In order to investigate the uncertainties associated with each

  14. The fully differential hadronic production of a Higgs boson via bottom quark fusion at NNLO

    CERN Document Server

    Buehler, Stephan; Lazopoulos, Achilleas; Mueller, Romain

    2012-01-01

    The fully differential computation of the hadronic production cross section of a Higgs boson via bottom quarks is presented at NNLO in QCD. Several differential distributions with their corresponding scale uncertainties are presented for the 8 TeV LHC. This is the first application of the method of non-linear mappings for NNLO differential calculations at hadron colliders.

  15. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus infection alters tumor necrosis factor alpha production via Toll-like receptor-dependent pathways in alveolar macrophages and U1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Marlynne Q; Mathys, Jean-Marie; Pereira, Albertina; Ollington, Kevin; Ieong, Michael H; Skolnik, Paul R

    2008-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons are predisposed to pulmonary infections, even after receiving effective highly active antiretroviral therapy. The reasons for this are unclear but may involve changes in innate immune function. HIV type 1 infection of macrophages impairs effector functions, including cytokine production. We observed decreased constitutive tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations and increased soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type II (sTNFRII) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples from HIV-positive subjects compared to healthy controls. Moreover, net proinflammatory TNF-alpha activity, as measured by the TNF-alpha/sTNFRII ratio, decreased as HIV-related disease progressed, as manifested by decreasing CD4 cell count and increasing HIV RNA (viral load). Since TNF-alpha is an important component of the innate immune system and is produced upon activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways, we hypothesized that the mechanism associated with deficient TNF-alpha production in the lung involved altered TLR expression or a deficit in the TLR signaling cascade. We found decreased Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) and TLR4 surface expression in HIV-infected U1 monocytic cells compared to the uninfected parental U937 cell line and decreased TLR message in alveolar macrophages (AMs) from HIV-positive subjects. In addition, stimulation with TLR1/2 ligand (Pam(3)Cys) or TLR4 ligand (lipopolysaccharide) resulted in decreased intracellular phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and subsequent decreased transcription and expression of TNF-alpha in U1 cells compared to U937 cells. AMs from HIV-positive subjects also showed decreased TNF-alpha production in response to these TLR2 and TLR4 ligands. We postulate that HIV infection alters expression of TLRs with subsequent changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cytokine production that ultimately leads to deficiencies of innate immune responses that

  17. Suppressive effects of antimycotics on tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced CCL27, CCL2, and CCL5 production in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Naoko; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2006-08-14

    Antimycotic agents are reported to improve cutaneous symptoms of atopic dermatitis or psoriasis vulgaris. Keratinocytes in these lesions excessively produce chemokines, CCL27, CCL2, or CCL5 which trigger inflammatory infiltrates. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induces production of these chemokines via activating nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). We examined in vitro effects of antimycotics on TNF-alpha-induced CCL27, CCL2, and CCL5 production in human keratinocytes. Antimycotics ketoconazole and terbinafine hydrochloride suppressed TNF-alpha-induced CCL27, CCL2, and CCL5 secretion and mRNA expression in keratinocytes in parallel to the inhibition of NF-kappaB activity while fluconazole was ineffective. Anti-prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) antiserum or antisense oligonucleotides against PGE2 receptor EP2 or EP3 abrogated inhibitory effects of ketoconazole and terbinafine hydrochloride on TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activity and CCL27, CCL2, and CCL5 production, indicating the involvement of endogenous PGE2 in the inhibitory effects. Prostaglandin H2, a precursor of PGE2 can be converted to thromboxane A2. Ketoconazole, terbinafine hydrochloride and thromboxane A2 synthase (EC 5.3.99.5) inhibitor, carboxyheptyl imidazole increased PGE2 release from keratinocytes and reduced that of thromboxane B2, a stable metabolite of thromboxane A2. Carboxyheptyl imidazole also suppressed TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activity and CCL27, CCL2, and CCL5 production. These results suggest that ketoconazole and terbinafine hydrochloride may suppress TNF-alpha-induced NF-kappaB activity and CCL27, CCL2, and CCL5 production by increasing PGE2 release from keratinocytes. These antimycotics may suppress thromboxane A2 synthesis and redirect the conversion of PGH2 toward PGE2. These antimycotics may alleviate inflammatory infiltration in atopic dermatitis or psoriasis vulgaris by suppressing chemokine production.

  18. New developments in the diagnostics for the fusion products on JET in preparation for ITER (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murari, A.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Consorzio RFX, Assoc. EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Bonheure, G. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65, I-00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Cecil, E. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association ' ' Euratom-Belgian State' ' , Royal Military Academy, Avenue de la Renaissance, 30, Kunstherlevinglaan, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Craciunescu, T.; Zoita, V. L. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, Colorado (United States); Darrow, D. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); EURATOM-MEdC Association, National Institute for Laser, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Edlington, T.; Kiptily, V.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Ericsson, G.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Hellesen, C. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxon. OX14 3DB, Abingdon, OXON (United Kingdom); Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, EURATOM-VR Association, Uppsala (Sweden); Mlynar, J. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, IFP Milano (Italy); Perez von Thun, C. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Association Euratom-IPP.CR, Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Za Slovankou 3, CZ-182 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Collaboration: EFDA-JET Contributors

    2010-10-15

    Notwithstanding the advances of the past decades, significant developments are still needed to satisfactorily diagnose ''burning plasmas.'' D-T plasmas indeed require a series of additional measurements for the optimization and control of the configuration: the 14 MeV neutrons, the isotopic composition of the main plasma, the helium ash, and the redistribution and losses of the alpha particles. Moreover a burning plasma environment is in general much more hostile for diagnostics than purely deuterium plasmas. Therefore, in addition to the development and refinement of new measuring techniques, technological advances are also indispensable for the proper characterization of the next generation of devices. On JET an integrated program of diagnostic developments, for JET future and in preparation for ITER, has been pursued and many new results are now available. In the field of neutron detection, the neutron spectra are now routinely measured in the energy range of 1-18 MeV by a time of flight spectrometer and they have allowed studying the effects of rf heating on the fast ions.A new analysis method for the interpretation of the neutron cameras measurements has been refined and applied to the data of the last trace tritium campaign (TTE). With regard to technological upgrades, chemical vapor deposition diamond detectors have been qualified both as neutron counters and as neutron spectrometers, with a potential energy resolution of about one percent. The in situ calibration of the neutron diagnostics, in preparation for the operation with the ITER-like wall, is also promoting important technological developments. With regard to the fast particles, for the first time the temperature of the fast particle tails has been obtained with a new high purity Germanium detector measuring the gamma emission spectrum from the plasma. The effects of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes modes and various MHD instabilities on the confinement of the fast particles have been

  19. New developments in the diagnostics for the fusion products on JET in preparation for ITER (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A; Angelone, M; Bonheure, G; Cecil, E; Craciunescu, T; Darrow, D; Edlington, T; Ericsson, G; Gatu-Johnson, M; Gorini, G; Hellesen, C; Kiptily, V; Mlynar, J; Perez von Thun, C; Pillon, M; Popovichev, S; Syme, B; Tardocchi, M; Zoita, V L

    2010-10-01

    Notwithstanding the advances of the past decades, significant developments are still needed to satisfactorily diagnose “burning plasmas.” D–T plasmas indeed require a series of additional measurements for the optimization and control of the configuration: the 14 MeV neutrons, the isotopic composition of the main plasma, the helium ash, and the redistribution and losses of the alpha particles. Moreover a burning plasma environment is in general much more hostile for diagnostics than purely deuterium plasmas. Therefore, in addition to the development and refinement of new measuring techniques, technological advances are also indispensable for the proper characterization of the next generation of devices. On JET an integrated program of diagnostic developments, for JET future and in preparation for ITER, has been pursued and many new results are now available. In the field of neutron detection, the neutron spectra are now routinely measured in the energy range of 1–18 MeV by a time of flight spectrometer and they have allowed studying the effects of rf heating on the fast ions. A new analysis method for the interpretation of the neutron cameras measurements has been refined and applied to the data of the last trace tritium campaign (TTE). With regard to technological upgrades, chemical vapor deposition diamond detectors have been qualified both as neutron counters and as neutron spectrometers, with a potential energy resolution of about one percent. The in situ calibration of the neutron diagnostics, in preparation for the operation with the ITER-like wall, is also promoting important technological developments. With regard to the fast particles, for the first time the temperature of the fast particle tails has been obtained with a new high purity Germanium detector measuring the gamma emission spectrum from the plasma. The effects of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes modes and various MHD instabilities on the confinement of the fast particles have been determined

  20. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  1. Fusion development and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following: superconducting magnet technology; high field superconductors; advanced magnetic system and divertor development; poloidal field coils; gyrotron development; commercial reactor studies--aries; ITER physics: alpha physics and alcator R D for ITER; lower hybrid current drive and heating in the ITER device; ITER superconducting PF scenario and magnet analysis; ITER systems studies; and safety, environmental and economic factors in fusion development.

  2. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    suggesting that fusion partners may specifically select each other and that heterogeneity between the partners seems to play a role. Therefore, we set out to directly test the hypothesis that fusion factors have a heterogenic involvement at different stages of nuclearity. Therefore, we have analyzed...... on the nuclearity of fusion partners. While CD47 promotes cell fusions involving mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts, syncytin-1 promotes fusion of two multi-nucleated osteoclasts, but also reduces the number of fusions between mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, CD47 seems to mediate fusion mostly through......Investigations addressing the molecular keys of osteoclast fusion are primarily based on end-point analyses. No matter if investigations are performed in vivo or in vitro the impact of a given factor is predominantly analyzed by counting the number of multi-nucleated cells, the number of nuclei per...

  3. Optimization of Thermostable Alpha-Amylase Production Via Mix Agricultural-Residues and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini RAI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports utilization of mixture of wheat and barley bran (1:1 for the production of thermostable alpha-amylase enzyme through a spore former, heat tolerant strain of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens in solid state fermentation. Maximum yield of alpha-amylase (252.77 U mL-1 was obtained in following optimized conditions, inoculums size 2 mL (2 × 106 CFU/mL, moisture 80%, pH 7±0.02, NaCl (3%, temperature 38±1°C, incubation for 72 h, maltose (1% and tryptone (1%. After SSF crude enzyme was purified via ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange and column chromatography by DEAE Cellulose. Purified protein showed a molecular weight of 42 kDa by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. After purification, purified enzyme was characterized against several enzymes inhibitors such as temperature, NaCl, pH, metal and surfactants. Pure enzyme was highly active over broad temperature (50-70°C, NaCl concentration (0.5-4 M, and pH (6-10 ranges, indicating it’s a thermoactive and alkali-stable nature. Moreover, CaCl2, MnCl2, =-mercaptoethanol were found to stimulate the amylase activity, whereas FeCl3, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, CuCl3 and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA strongly inhibited the enzyme. Moreover, enzyme specificity and thermal stability conformed by degradation of different soluble starch up to 55°C. Therefore, the present study proved that the extracellular alpha-amylase extracted through wheat flour residues by organism B. amyloliquefaciens MCCB0075, both have considerable potential for industrial application owing to its properties.

  4. The production of a new fungal alpha-amylase degraded the raw starch by means of solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkan, Bilal; Ertan, Figen

    2010-01-01

    In this study, it was intended to produce a new fungal amylase by solid-state fermentation and purification and also to determine some of its biochemical properties. It was found that Penicillium brevicompactum had the best enzyme activity according to screening methods with amylase degrading raw starch, and P. brevicompactum was selected as the amylase source. Wheat bran, rice husks, and sunflower oil meal were tested to determine the best solid substrate. Wheat bran was determined as the best of these. The fermentation conditions were optimized for the production of amylase. The optimum fermentation conditions were found to be an initial moisture level for the solid substrate of 55%, moistening agent of 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 5.0), incubation period of 7 d, inoculum concentration of 2.5 mL, and incubation temperature at 30 degrees C. Penicillium brevicompactum alpha-amylase was purified 45.98 times by the starch affinity method. The K(m) and V(max) values of alpha-amylase for soluble starch were 5.71 mg/mL and 666.6 U/mL, respectively. This amylase showed maximum activity at between 30 and 50 degrees C and at pH 5.0. Initial enzyme activity was kept at 100% after incubation at 30 degrees C for 45 min. Enzyme was stable in the pH range of 4.0-5.0. This enzyme was activated by Mn(2+), Cu(2+), and Na(+) ions, and was inhibited by Mg(2+), K(+), Fe(3+), and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). The molecular mass of P. brevicompactum alpha-amylase was found to be 32.5 kD by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  5. Integrated cell and process engineering for improved transient production of a "difficult-to-express" fusion protein by CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Yusuf B; Estes, Scott D; Alves, Christina S; Sinacore, Marty S; James, David C

    2015-12-01

    Based on an optimized electroporation protocol, we designed a rapid, milliliter-scale diagnostic transient production assay to identify limitations in the ability of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a model "difficult-to-express" homodimeric Fc-fusion protein, Sp35Fc, that exhibited very low volumetric titer and intracellular formation of disulfide-bonded oligomeric aggregates post-transfection. As expression of Sp35Fc induced an unfolded protein response in transfected host cells, we utilized the transient assay to compare, in parallel, multiple functionally diverse strategies to engineer intracellular processing of Sp35Fc in order to increase production and reduce aggregation as two discrete design objectives. Specifically, we compared the effect of (i) co-expression of ER-resident molecular chaperones (BiP, PDI, CypB) or active forms of UPR transactivators (ATF6c, XBP1s) at varying recombinant gene load, (ii) addition of small molecules known to act as chemical chaperones (PBA, DMSO, glycerol, betaine, TMAO) or modulate UPR signaling (PERK inhibitor GSK2606414) at varying concentration, (iii) a reduction in culture temperature to 32°C. Using this information, we designed a biphasic, Sp35Fc-specific transient manufacturing process mediated by lipofection that utilized CypB co-expression at an optimal Sp35Fc:CypB gene ratio of 5:1 to initially maximize transfected cell proliferation, followed by addition of a combination of PBA (0.5 mM) and glycerol (1% v/v) at the onset of stationary phase to maximize cell specific production and eliminate Sp35Fc aggregation. Using this optimal, engineered process transient Sp35Fc production was significantly increased sixfold over a 12 day production process with no evidence of disulfide-bonded aggregates. Finally, transient production in clonally derived sub-populations (derived from parental CHO host) screened for a heritably improved capability to produce Sp35Fc was also significantly improved by the optimized

  6. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  7. Production of alpha-cuprenene in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous : a step closer to a potent terpene biofactory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melillo, Elena; Setroikromo, Rita; Quax, Wim J.; Kayser, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Background: The red yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is a natural producer of the carotenoid astaxanthin. Because of its high flux, the native terpene pathway leading to the production of the tetraterpene is of particular interest as it can be redirected toward the production of other terpene com

  8. Higgs boson gluon–fusion production at threshold in N3LO QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Anastasiou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the cross-section for the threshold production of the Higgs boson at hadron-colliders at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO in perturbative QCD. We present an analytic expression for the partonic cross-section at threshold and the impact of these corrections on the numerical estimates for the hadronic cross-section at the LHC. With this result we achieve a major milestone towards a complete evaluation of the cross-section at N3LO which will reduce the theoretical uncertainty in the determination of the strengths of the Higgs boson interactions.

  9. Production of two Z-bosons in gluon fusion in the heavy top quark approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Melnikov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We compute QCD radiative corrections to the continuum production of a pair of Z-bosons in the annihilation of two gluons. We only consider the contribution of the top quark loops and we treat them assuming that mt is much larger than any other kinematic invariant in the problem. We estimate the QCD corrections to pp→ZZ using the first non-trivial term in the expansion in the inverse top quark mass and we compare them to QCD corrections of the signal process, pp→H→ZZ.

  10. Gluon fusion and bb¯ corrections to HW+W−/HZZ production in the POWHEG-BOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Baglio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the Higgs boson properties is one of the most important tasks to be accomplished in the next years, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC and at future colliders such as the Future Circular Collider in hadron–hadron mode (FCC-hh, the potential 100 TeV follow-up of the LHC machine. In this view the precise study of the Higgs couplings to weak gauge bosons is crucial and requires as much information as possible. After the recent calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production cross sections and differential distributions of a Standard Model Higgs boson in association with a pair of weak bosons, matched with parton shower in the POWHEG-BOX framework, we present the gluon fusion correction gg→HW+W−(HZZ to the process pp→HW+W−(HZZ. This correction can be sizeable and amounts to +3% (+10% in the HW+W− process and +5% (+18% in the HZZ process at the LHC (FCC-hh. We also present the first study of the impact of the bottom-quark initiated channels bb¯→HW+W−/HZZ and find that they induce a significant +18% correction in the HW+W− channel at the FCC-hh. We present results on total cross sections and distributions at the LHC and at the FCC-hh.

  11. Gluon fusion and b b bar corrections to HW+W-/HZZ production in the POWHEG-BOX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglio, Julien

    2017-01-01

    The study of the Higgs boson properties is one of the most important tasks to be accomplished in the next years, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and at future colliders such as the Future Circular Collider in hadron-hadron mode (FCC-hh), the potential 100 TeV follow-up of the LHC machine. In this view the precise study of the Higgs couplings to weak gauge bosons is crucial and requires as much information as possible. After the recent calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production cross sections and differential distributions of a Standard Model Higgs boson in association with a pair of weak bosons, matched with parton shower in the POWHEG-BOX framework, we present the gluon fusion correction gg → HW+W- (HZZ) to the process pp → HW+W- (HZZ). This correction can be sizeable and amounts to + 3% (+ 10%) in the HW+W- process and + 5% (+ 18%) in the HZZ process at the LHC (FCC-hh). We also present the first study of the impact of the bottom-quark initiated channels b b bar → HW+W- / HZZ and find that they induce a significant + 18% correction in the HW+W- channel at the FCC-hh. We present results on total cross sections and distributions at the LHC and at the FCC-hh.

  12. Construction of Potent Recombinant Strain Through Intergeneric Protoplast Fusion in Endophytic Fungi for Anticancerous Enzymes Production Using Rice Straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Mervat Morsy Abbas Ahmed; Al-Zahrani, Salha Hassan Mastour; El-Bondkly, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2017-02-15

    Among all fungal endophytes isolates derived from different ethno-medical plants, the hyper-yield L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase wild strains Trichoderma sp. Gen 9 and Cladosporium sp. Gen 20 using rice straw under solid-state fermentation (SSF) were selected. The selected strains were used as parents for the intergeneric protoplast fusion program to construct recombinant strain for prompt improvement production of these enzymes in one recombinant strain. Among 21 fusants obtained, the recombinant strain AYA 20-1, with 2.11-fold and 2.58-fold increase in L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase activities more than the parental isolates Trichoderma sp. Gen 9 and Cladosporium sp. Gen 20, respectively, was achieved using rice straw under SSF. Both therapeutic enzymes L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase were purified and characterized from the culture supernatant of the recombinant AYA 20-1 strain with molecular weights of 50.6 and 83.2 kDa, respectively. Both enzymes were not metalloenzymes. Whereas thiol group blocking reagents such as p-chloromercurybenzoate and iodoacetamide totally inhibited L-asparaginase activity, which refer to sulfhydryl groups and cysteine residues involved in its catalytic activity, they have no effect toward L-glutaminase activity. Interestingly, potent anticancer, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities were detected for both enzymes.

  13. Production and characterization of a plant alpha-hydroxynitrile lyase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J; Lakey, J H; Hughes, M A

    1997-02-01

    The coding sequence of the cyanogenic alpha-hydroxynitrile lyase gene of Manihot esculenta Crantz (cassava) was cloned in the plasmid vector pMal-c2 and expressed in Escherichia coli strain JM105. DNA sequencing showed that the recombinant plasmid contained the same sequence as the cDNA clone pHNL10. Peptide sequencing of the recombinant protein showed that the N-terminus was heterogeneous, with either four or six additional amino acid residues compared with the native protein. Circular dichroism spectra indicated similar secondary structure contents for both proteins. Enzyme assays showed that specific activity of native and recombinant proteins were 0.24 and 0.26 mmol CN(-)/mg/min, respectively; that both proteins had optimal activity at 40 degrees C and pH 5.5; and that both proteins were inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane sulfonyl flouride (PMSF). Isoelectric focusing of native and recombinant protein revealed multiple isoforms for both proteins; the recombinant protein had a more basic mean isoelectric point (pl) (5.1) than the native protein (4.5).

  14. Higgs boson gluon-fusion production in QCD at three loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Duhr, Claude; Dulat, Falko; Herzog, Franz; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2015-05-29

    We present the cross section for the production of a Higgs boson at hadron colliders at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N^{3}LO) in perturbative QCD. The calculation is based on a method to perform a series expansion of the partonic cross section around the threshold limit to an arbitrary order. We perform this expansion to sufficiently high order to obtain the value of the hadronic cross at N^{3}LO in the large top-mass limit. For renormalization and factorization scales equal to half the Higgs boson mass, the N^{3}LO corrections are of the order of +2.2%. The total scale variation at N^{3}LO is 3%, reducing the uncertainty due to missing higher order QCD corrections by a factor of 3.

  15. Inverse Problems and Data Fusion for crop production applications targeting optimal growth - Fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Bipjeet; Owusu, Robert K. A.

    2015-01-01

    of the crop growth process based on information on soil quality, field seeding, spraying/fertilization and environmental information in general. Finally, references to software tools, which could form the basis for an open source platform for a planning and monitoring system for optimal crop growth......, such that the crop yield is optimized with respect to several parameters (e.g. high end user value and minimum environmental impact), thus obtaining a sustainable production. The growth process optimization is based on information, including sensor based measurements with sensor quality monitoring, from previous...... and the present growth season. Initially, references targeting the importance of site specific management for obtaining the objective of yield optimization under the constraint of minimizing the environmental load is pointed to. This is followed by key references on modelling, simulation and visualization...

  16. ZZ production in gluon fusion at NLO matched to parton-shower

    CERN Document Server

    Alioli, Simone; Luisoni, Gionata; Röntsch, Raul

    2016-01-01

    We present a calculation of the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the hadroproduction process $gg\\to ZZ \\to e^+e^- \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, matched to the parton shower in the POWHEG framework. We take advantage of the POWHEG BOX tool for the implementation and rely on PYTHIA 8 for the showering and hadronization stages. We fully include $\\gamma^*/Z$ interference effects, while also covering the single-resonant region. For this phenomenological study we focus on four lepton production as a signal process, neglecting all quark mass effects as well as the Higgs-mediated contributions, which are known to be subdominant in this case. We provide predictions from our simulations for the 13 TeV LHC Run II setup, including realistic experimental cuts.

  17. K-shell X-ray production cross sections of Ni induced by protons, alpha-particles, and He{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertol, A.P.L. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Hinrichs, R. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vasconcellos, M.A.Z., E-mail: marcos@if.ufrgs.br [Programa de Pós-graduação em Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    The proton, alpha-particle, and He{sup +} induced X-ray emissions of Ni were measured on mono-elemental thin films in order to obtain the K-shell X-ray production cross section in the energy range of 0.7–2.0 MeV for protons, 4.0–6.5 MeV for alpha-particles, and 3.0–4.0 MeV for He{sup +}. The proton-induced X-ray production cross section for Ni agreed well with the theoretical values, endorsing the quality of the measurements. The X-ray production cross section induced with alpha-particles is in good agreement with ECPSSR theory in the complete range of energies, while for He{sup +} that quantity is systematically below. K{sub β}/K{sub α} ratios were evaluated and compared with experimental and theoretical values.

  18. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum...

  19. Fusion neutronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a systematic and comprehensive introduction to fusion neutronics, covering all key topics from the fundamental theories and methodologies, as well as a wide range of fusion system designs and experiments. It is the first-ever book focusing on the subject of fusion neutronics research. Compared with other nuclear devices such as fission reactors and accelerators, fusion systems are normally characterized by their complex geometry and nuclear physics, which entail new challenges for neutronics such as complicated modeling, deep penetration, low simulation efficiency, multi-physics coupling, etc. The book focuses on the neutronics characteristics of fusion systems and introduces a series of theories and methodologies that were developed to address the challenges of fusion neutronics, and which have since been widely applied all over the world. Further, it introduces readers to neutronics design’s unique principles and procedures, experimental methodologies and technologies for fusion systems...

  20. Measurement of the fraction of t tmacr production via gluon-gluon fusion in p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzurri, P.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C. S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlok, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wagner, W.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-02-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the t tmacr production cross section via gluon-gluon fusion to the total t tmacr production cross section in p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV at the Tevatron. Using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 955pb-1 recorded by the CDF II detector at Fermilab, we select events based on the t tmacr decay to lepton+jets. Using an artificial neural network technique we discriminate between t tmacr events produced via q qmacr annihilation and gg fusion, and find Gf=σ(gg→t tmacr )/σ(p pmacr →t tmacr )<0.33 at the 68% confidence level. This result is combined with a previous measurement to obtain the most stringent measurement of this quantity by CDF to date, Gf=0.07-0.07+0.15.

  1. Influence of carbon source on alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens

    2001-01-01

    The influence of the carbon source on a-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. The following carbon sources were investigated: maltose, maltodextrin (different chain lengths), glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, glycerol, mannitol and acet......The influence of the carbon source on a-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae was quantified in carbon-limited chemostat cultures. The following carbon sources were investigated: maltose, maltodextrin (different chain lengths), glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, glycerol, mannitol...... and acetate. A. oryzae did not grow on galactose as the sole carbon source, but galactose was co-metabolized together with glucose. Relative to that on low glucose concentration (below 10 mg/l), productivity was found to be higher during growth on maltose and maltodextrins, whereas it was lower during growth...

  2. Applying pathway engineering to enhance production of alpha-ketoglutarate in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongwei; Su, Shaojie; Madzak, Catherine; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Hongwen; Chen, Guo

    2016-12-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (α-KG), one of short-chain carboxylates of high commercial relevance, has been widely used in food, medicine, chemical, and cosmetic fields. Compared to other carboxylates, α-KG occupies key positions in the tricarboxylate cycle (TCA cycle) and amino acid metabolic pathway, the over-accumulation of α-KG is restricted both by tighter carbon and nitrogen regulation process. Biotechnology production of α-KG on large industrial level has been impeded by many obstacles. This review aims at highlighting and stating recent efforts toward improving the yield and titer of α-KG in the strains of Yarrowia lipolytica to reach industrial relevance. Fermentation process optimization concerning feedstock utilization, dissolved oxygen controlling, pH manipulation and establishment of fed-batch process, have been assessed and evaluated. Moreover, pathway engineering routes have been applied for enhancing carbon commitment to α-KG, blocking competing pathways, regenerating of co-factors and regulating of carboxylate transporters to facilitate production and accumulation of α-KG. Although no engineered strain can satisfy the requirements of industrial production relevance to date, these strategies provide many clues for accelerating strain development for α-KG production.

  3. Blueberries inhibit proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and IL-6 production in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberries (BB) have been reported to attenuate atherosclerosis in apoE deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, the effect of BB on proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages was investigated. ApoE-/- mice were fed AIN-93G diet (...

  4. Immobilized fusion protein affinity chromatography combined with HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS for rapid screening of PPARγ ligands from natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junfeng; Yi, Xiaojiao; Liu, Wenhui; Xu, Yingchun; Chen, Shuqing; Wu, Yongjiang

    2017-04-01

    Screening agonists of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) from natural products is particularly motivated by the need for effective anti-diabetic agents. However, method for direct identification of PPARγ ligands from a complex sample is rarely reported. Here we propose a novel immobilized fusion protein affinity chromatography (IFPAC) to achieve rapid multicomponent screening. First, functional human PPARγ ligand binding domain (hPPARγLBD) was bacterially produced by fusion to glutathione S-transferase (GST). The unpurified GST-hPPARγLBD was directly applied to a 96-well filter plate prepacked with glutathione sepharose. Due to the strong affinity between GST and glutathione, the fusion protein could selectively attach to the glutathione matrix with an oriented immobilization, which was rapidly purified under non-denaturing conditions. Experimental results indicated that the prepared 96-affinity column array exhibited excellent selectivity and sensitivity for fishing novel interacting compounds. The proposed approach was applied in the high-throughput screening of PPARγ ligands from natural products, followed by rapid characterization of active compounds using HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS. Isochlorogenic acid A in Dendranthema indicum flowers was found to be a PPARγ ligand. Our findings suggested the IFPAC could be a powerful tool for drug discovery from natural products.

  5. Alpha Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha Thalassemia Physicians often mistake alpha thalassemia trait for iron deficiency anemia and incorrectly prescribe iron supplements that have no effect 1 on the anemia. αα αα Normal alpha ...

  6. The vaccinia virus 14-kilodalton (A27L) fusion protein forms a triple coiled-coil structure and interacts with the 21-kilodalton (A17L) virus membrane protein through a C-terminal alpha-helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, M I; Rivas, G; Cregut, D; Serrano, L; Esteban, M

    1998-12-01

    The vaccinia virus 14-kDa protein (encoded by the A27L gene) plays an important role in the biology of the virus, acting in virus-to-cell and cell-to-cell fusions. The protein is located on the surface of the intracellular mature virus form and is essential for both the release of extracellular enveloped virus from the cells and virus spread. Sequence analysis predicts the existence of four regions in this protein: a structureless region from amino acids 1 to 28, a helical region from residues 29 to 37, a triple coiled-coil helical region from residues 44 to 72, and a Leu zipper motif at the C terminus. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and chemical cross-linking studies of the purified wild-type protein and several mutant forms, lacking one or more of the above regions or with point mutations, support the above-described structural division of the 14-kDa protein. The two contiguous cysteine residues at positions 71 and 72 are not responsible for the formation of 14-kDa protein trimers. The location of hydrophobic residues at the a and d positions on a helical wheel and of charged amino acids in adjacent positions, e and g, suggests that the hydrophobic and ionic interactions in the triple coiled-coil helical region are involved in oligomer formation. This conjecture was supported by the construction of a three-helix bundle model and molecular dynamics. Binding assays with purified proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and cytoplasmic extracts from cells infected with a virus that does not produce the 14-kDa protein during infection (VVindA27L) show that the 21-kDa protein (encoded by the A17L gene) is the specific viral binding partner and identify the putative Leu zipper, the predicted third alpha-helix on the C terminus of the 14-kDa protein, as the region involved in protein binding. These findings were confirmed in vivo, following transfection of animal cells with plasmid vectors expressing mutant forms of the 14-kDa protein and

  7. Water extract isolated from Chelidonium majus enhances nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor-alpha production via nuclear factor-kappaB activation in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hwan-Suck; An, Hyo-Jin; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Won, Jin-Hee; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-01-01

    Chelidonium majus is used to treat several inflammatory diseases and tumours. We have examined the effect of C. majus on nitric oxide (NO) production using mouse peritoneal macrophages. When C. majus was used in combination with recombinant interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma, 10 U mL(-1)), there was a marked cooperative induction of NO production. Treatment of rIFN-gamma plus C. majus (1 mgmL(-1)) in macrophages caused a significant increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. The increased production of NO and TNF-alpha from rIFN-gamma plus C. majus-stimulated cells was almost completely inhibited by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (100 microM). These findings demonstrated that C. majus increased the production of NO and TNF-alpha by rIFN-gamma-primed macrophages and suggested that NF-kappaB played a critical role in mediating the effects of C. majus.

  8. Rothia dentocariosa induces TNF-alpha production in a TLR2-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hideo; Taniguchi, Makoto; Fukamachi, Haruka; Arimoto, Takafumi; Morisaki, Hirobumi; Kuwata, Hirotaka

    2014-06-01

    Previous work suggested that Rothia dentocariosa is associated with periodontal inflammatory disease. However, little is known about the pathogenicity of this bacterium. To characterize host response to this bacterium, we measured (via ELISA) the amount of TNF-α in the culture supernatant following the stimulation of THP-1 cells (a human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) with R. dentocariosa cells (ATCC14189 and ATCC14190). Exposure to bacterial cells induced the production of TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. The bacterial induction of TNF-α in THP-1 cells was mediated by the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), as demonstrated by gene-specific knockdown via siRNA, which successfully suppressed TLR2 expression and significantly inhibited the production of TNF-α in the culture supernatant. To confirm the role of TLR2, we examined TLR2-dependent NF-κB activation by R. dentocariosa cells in a distinct cell line. Specifically, HEK293 cells were transiently cotransfected with the human TLR2 gene and an NF-κB-dependent luciferase-encoding reporter gene. The bacterial cells induced NF-κB activation in the transfected HEK293 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, bacterial cells failed to induce NF-κB activation in cells transfected with pEF6 control vector. Taken together, these results suggest that R. dentocariosa induces host TNF-α production by a TLR2-dependent mechanism.

  9. Protoplast fusion technology for improved production of coenzyme Q10 using Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 19367 mutant strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradipta Tokdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Induced mutants generated from Paracoccus denitrificans ATCC 19367 having antibiotic resistant markers, were used as parent strains to carry out protoplast fusion. The generated fusants were screened using standardized protocol for CoQ10 production. Among the generated fusants, one fusant namely PF-P1 showed 1.73 folds enhancements in specific CoQ10 content than wild type strain. Fusant PF-P1 was characterized by biochemical and molecular approaches where it showed differences than wild type strain. The fusant was further identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis that showed eight nucleotide base pair mutation on conserved region and 99% homology with Paracoccus denitrificans strains. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  10. Physical and photo-electrochemical characterizations of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Application for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudjemaa, A.; Boumaza, S. [Technical and Scientific Research Centre of Physical Analysis (CRAPC), BP 248, RP 16004 Algiers (Algeria); Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Gas, Faculty of Chemistry (USTHB), BP 32, 16111 Algiers (Algeria); Trari, M.; Bouguelia, A. [Laboratory of Storage and Valorization of Renewable Energies, Faculty of Chemistry (USTHB), BP 32, 16111 Algiers (Algeria); Bouarab, R. [Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Gas, Faculty of Chemistry (USTHB), BP 32, 16111 Algiers (Algeria)

    2009-05-15

    The optical, electrical and photo-electrochemical properties of dense hematite {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} have been studied for the photo-catalytic hydrogen production. The band gap was evaluated at 1.96 eV from the diffuse reflectance spectrum and the transition is directly allowed; further indirect transition occurs at 2.04 eV. The oxygen deficiency permits the altering of the transport properties and the oxide exhibits n type behavior with activation energy of 0.11 eV. {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is found to be photo-electrochemically active. The flat band potential V{sub fb} (-0.51 V{sub SCE}) and the density N{sub D} (19.12 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) were obtained respectively by extrapolating the linear part to C{sup -2} = 0 and the slope of the Mott-Schottky plot. The complex impedance pattern is circular in the high frequency region followed by a straight line in the low frequency one, a behavior attributed to the Warburg ionic diffusion. The conduction band edge (-0.62 V{sub SCE}) lies below the H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} level (-0.50 V{sub SCE}) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} offers the possibility to be used as hydrogen photocathode. The best activity was obtained in SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} (0.5 M, pH 13.8) solution with a rate evolution of 6 ml (g catalyst){sup -1} min{sup -1}. (author)

  11. Fusion of the Dhfr/Mtx and IR/MAR gene amplification methods produces a rapid and efficient method for stable recombinant protein production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiemi Noguchi

    Full Text Available Amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (Dhfr by methotrexate (Mtx exposure is commonly used for recombinant protein expression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. However, this method is both time- and labor-intensive, and the high-producing cells that are generated are frequently unstable in culture. Another gene amplification method is based on using a plasmid bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR and a matrix attachment region (MAR, which result in the spontaneous initiation of gene amplification in transfected cells. The IR/MAR and Dhfr/Mtx methods of gene amplification are based on entirely different principles. In this study, we combine these two methods to yield a novel method, termed the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method, which was used to express three proteins, the Fc receptor, GFP, and recombinant antibody. The fusion method resulted in a dramatic increase in expression of all three proteins in two CHO sub-lines, DXB-11, and DG44. The IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion amplified the genes rapidly and efficiently, and produced larger amounts of antibody than the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. While the amplified structure produced by the Dhfr/Mtx method was highly unstable, and the antibody production rate rapidly decreased with the culture time of the cells, the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method resulted in stable amplification and generated clonal cells that produced large amounts of antibody protein over a long period of time. In summary, the novel IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method enables isolation of stable cells that produce larger amounts of a target recombinant protein more rapidly and easily than either the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone.

  12. Fusion of the Dhfr/Mtx and IR/MAR gene amplification methods produces a rapid and efficient method for stable recombinant protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Chiemi; Araki, Yoshio; Miki, Daisuke; Shimizu, Noriaki

    2012-01-01

    Amplification of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (Dhfr) by methotrexate (Mtx) exposure is commonly used for recombinant protein expression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. However, this method is both time- and labor-intensive, and the high-producing cells that are generated are frequently unstable in culture. Another gene amplification method is based on using a plasmid bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR) and a matrix attachment region (MAR), which result in the spontaneous initiation of gene amplification in transfected cells. The IR/MAR and Dhfr/Mtx methods of gene amplification are based on entirely different principles. In this study, we combine these two methods to yield a novel method, termed the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method, which was used to express three proteins, the Fc receptor, GFP, and recombinant antibody. The fusion method resulted in a dramatic increase in expression of all three proteins in two CHO sub-lines, DXB-11, and DG44. The IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion amplified the genes rapidly and efficiently, and produced larger amounts of antibody than the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone. While the amplified structure produced by the Dhfr/Mtx method was highly unstable, and the antibody production rate rapidly decreased with the culture time of the cells, the IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method resulted in stable amplification and generated clonal cells that produced large amounts of antibody protein over a long period of time. In summary, the novel IR/MAR-Dhfr fusion method enables isolation of stable cells that produce larger amounts of a target recombinant protein more rapidly and easily than either the Dhfr/Mtx or IR/MAR methods alone.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor alpha production from CD8+ T cells mediates oviduct pathological sequelae following primary genital Chlamydia muridarum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Ashlesh K; Li, Weidang; Chaganty, Bharat K R; Kamalakaran, Sangamithra; Guentzel, M Neal; Seshu, J; Forsthuber, Thomas G; Zhong, Guangming; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2011-07-01

    The immunopathogenesis of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced oviduct pathological sequelae is not well understood. Mice genetically deficient in perforin (perforin(-/-) mice) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production (TNF-α(-/-) mice) displayed comparable vaginal chlamydial clearance rates but significantly reduced oviduct pathology (hydrosalpinx) compared to that of wild-type mice. Since both perforin and TNF-α are effector mechanisms of CD8(+) T cells, we evaluated the role of CD8(+) T cells during genital Chlamydia muridarum infection and oviduct sequelae. Following vaginal chlamydial challenge, (i) mice deficient in TAP I (and therefore the major histocompatibility complex [MHC] I pathway and CD8(+) T cells), (ii) wild-type mice depleted of CD8(+) T cells, and (iii) mice genetically deficient in CD8 (CD8(-/-) mice) all displayed similar levels of vaginal chlamydial clearance but significantly reduced hydrosalpinx, compared to those of wild-type C57BL/6 mice, suggesting a role for CD8(+) T cells in chlamydial pathogenesis. Repletion of CD8(-/-) mice with wild-type or perforin(-/-), but not TNF-α(-/-), CD8(+) T cells at the time of challenge restored hydrosalpinx to levels observed in wild-type C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that TNF-α production from CD8(+) T cells is important for pathogenesis. Additionally, repletion of TNF-α(-/-) mice with TNF-α(+/+) CD8(+) T cells significantly enhanced the incidence of hydrosalpinx and oviduct dilatation compared to those of TNF-α(-/-) mice but not to the levels found in wild-type mice, suggesting that TNF-α production from CD8(+) T cells and non-CD8(+) cells cooperates to induce optimal oviduct pathology following genital chlamydial infection. These results provide compelling new evidence supporting the contribution of CD8(+) T cells and TNF-α production to Chlamydia-induced reproductive tract sequelae.

  14. Analysis of polonium-210 in food products and bioassay samples by isotope-dilution alpha spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhichao; Wu, Zhongyu

    2009-05-01

    A rapid and reliable radiochemical method coupled with a simple and compact plating apparatus was developed, validated, and applied for the analysis of (210)Po in variety of food products and bioassay samples. The method performance characteristics, including accuracy, precision, robustness, and specificity, were evaluated along with a detailed measurement uncertainty analysis. With high Po recovery, improved energy resolution, and effective removal of interfering elements by chromatographic extraction, the overall method accuracy was determined to be better than 5% with measurement precision of 10%, at 95% confidence level.

  15. Garlic (Allium sativum) stimulates lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from J774A.1 murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jessica; Harfouche, Youssef; De La Cruz, Melissa; Zamora, Martha P; Liu, Yan; Rego, James A; Buckley, Nancy E

    2015-02-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is known to have many beneficial attributes such as antimicrobial, antiatherosclerotic, antitumorigenetic, and immunomodulatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the effects of an aqueous garlic extract on macrophage cytokine production by challenging the macrophage J774A.1 cell line with the garlic extract in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under different conditions. The effect of allicin, the major component of crushed garlic, was also investigated. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was found that garlic and synthetic allicin greatly stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production in macrophages treated with LPS. The TNF-α secretion levels peaked earlier and were sustained for a longer time in cells treated with garlic and LPS compared with cells treated with LPS alone. Garlic acted in a time-dependent manner. We suggest that garlic, at least partially via its allicin component, acts downstream from LPS to stimulate macrophage TNF-α secretion.

  16. Microglial production of TNF-alpha is a key element of sustained fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiqian; Fukushima, Hotaka; Ono, Chiaki; Sakai, Mai; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Gunawansa, Nicole; Takahashi, Yuta; Matsuoka, Hiroo; Kida, Satoshi; Tomita, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine productions in the brain are altered in a process of fear memory formation, indicating a possibility that altered microglial function may contribute to fear memory formation. We aimed to investigate whether and how microglial function contributes to fear memory formation. Expression levels of M1- and M2-type microglial marker molecules in microglia isolated from each conditioned mice group were assessed by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but not of other proinflammatory cytokines produced by M1-type microglia, increased in microglia from mice representing retention of fear memory, and returned to basal levels in microglia from mice representing extinction of fear memory. Administration of inhibitors of TNF-α production facilitated extinction of fear memory. On the other hand, expression levels of M2-type microglia-specific cell adhesion molecules, CD206 and CD209, were decreased in microglia from mice representing retention of fear memory, and returned to basal levels in microglia from mice representing extinction of fear memory. Our findings indicate that microglial TNF-α is a key element of sustained fear memory and suggest that TNF-α inhibitors can be candidate molecules for mitigating posttraumatic reactions caused by persistent fear memory.

  17. ONO 3403, a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nitric oxide production and protects mice from lethal endotoxic shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Koide, Naoki; Hiwasa, Takaki; Ookoshi, Motohiro; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Noman, Abu Shadat Mohammod; Iftakhar-E-Khuda, Imtiaz; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    ONO 3403, a new synthetic serine protease inhibitor, is a derivative of camostat mesilate and has a higher protease-inhibitory activity. The effect of ONO 3403 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells wa

  18. Concomitant production of two proteases and alpha-amylase by a novel strain of Bacillus subtilis in a microprocessor controlled bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mukhtar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the simultaneous production of Bacillus subtilis based proteases and alpha amylase using a computer controlled laboratory scale 7.5 L batch bioreactor. The present strain is the first to be reported that concomitantly produces these two industrially important enzymes. The growth and sporulation of Bacillus subtilis was monitored and maximum production of alkaline protease and alpha amylase was found to coincide with maximum sporulation. Two types of proteases were detected in the fermentation broth; a neutral and an alkaline protease most active in a pH range of 7.0-8.0 and 8.0-10, respectively. Maximum production of proteases was observed at an incubation temperature of 37ºC while that of alpha amylase was observed at 40ºC. The optimum aeration and agitation levels for protease production were 0.6 L/L/min and 200rpm, respectively, and for alpha amylase were 0.6 L/L/min and 150 rpm. The kinetic parameters Yp/x and qp were also found to be significant at the given fermentation conditions.

  19. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinderknecht, H. G., E-mail: hgr@mit.edu; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Caggiano, J. A.; Divol, L.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Moran, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2015-08-15

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He and D(T,n){sup 4}He occur, as the primary fusion products {sup 3}He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (∼5–100 mg/cm{sup 2}), the secondary D-{sup 3}He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosions on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions, and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 times and 0.33 times the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.

  20. Constraining the equation of state of nuclear matter from fusion hindrance in reactions leading to the production of superheavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselsky, M.; Klimo, J.; Ma, Yu-Gang; Souliotis, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of fusion hindrance, an effect preventing the synthesis of superheavy elements in the reactions of cold and hot fusion, is investigated using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation, where Coulomb interaction is introduced. A strong sensitivity is observed both to the modulus of incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter, controlling the competition of surface tension and Coulomb repulsion, and to the stiffness of the density-dependence of symmetry energy, influencing the formation of the neck prior to scission. The experimental fusion probabilities were for the first time used to derive constraints on the nuclear equation of state. A strict constraint on the modulus of incompressibility of nuclear matter K0=240 -260 MeV is obtained while the stiff density-dependences of the symmetry energy (γ >1 ) are rejected.

  1. Self-consistent kinetic simulations of lower hybrid drift instability resulting in electron current driven by fusion products in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, J W S; Dendy, R O

    2010-01-01

    We present particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of minority energetic protons in deuterium plasmas, which demonstrate a collective instability responsible for emission near the lower hybrid frequency and its harmonics. The simulations capture the lower hybrid drift instability in a regime relevant to tokamak fusion plasmas, and show further that the excited electromagnetic fields collectively and collisionlessly couple free energy from the protons to directed electron motion. This results in an asymmetric tail antiparallel to the magnetic field. We focus on obliquely propagating modes under conditions approximating the outer mid-plane edge in a large tokamak, through which there pass confined centrally born fusion products on banana orbits that have large radial excursions. A fully self-consistent electromagnetic relativistic PIC code representing all vector field quantities and particle velocities in three dimensions as functions of a single spatial dimension is used to model this situation, by evolving the in...

  2. Expression of herpes simplex virus. beta. and. gamma. genes integrated in mammalian cells and their induction by an. cap alpha. gene product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandri-Goldin, R.M.; Goldin, A.L.; Holland, L.E.

    1983-11-01

    The proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) form three kinetic groups termed ..cap alpha..,..beta..,and ..gamma.., whose synthesis is regulated in a cascade fashion, ..cap alpha.. products are synthesized first during infection, and they are required for synthesis of ..beta.. and ..gamma.. proteins. To examine the expression of several HSV-1 ..beta.. and ..gamma.. genes in the absence of ..cap alpha.. functions, we transferred into mammalian cells a plasmid containing a region of the HSV-1 genome that codes for only ..beta.. and ..gamma.. genes (0.315 to 0.421 map units). The authors found stable integration of at least one copy of the intact plasmid in each cell line. Four HSV-1 transcripts of the ..beta.. and ..gamma.. classes were transcribed constitutively in the cells, including the genes for glycoprotein B and DNA-binding protein. No constitutive synthesis of these two proteins could be demonstrated, however. The integrated HSV-1 genes responded to viral regulatory signals in that they could be induced by infection with HSV-1 mutants resulting in a high level of synthesis of both glycoprotein B and DNA-binding protein. The HSV-1 ..cap alpha.. gene product ICP4 was necessary for this induction, and it was found to be most efficient at a low multiplicity of infection. Functional expression of four genes was demonstrated in that the cell lines complemented infecting HSV-1 temperature-sensitive mutants. The same genes were not available for homologous recombination with infecting virus, however, since no recombinant wild-type virus could be detected. These data demonstrate that HSV-1 ..beta.. and ..gamma.. genes can be transcribed in the absence of ..cap alpha.. functions in mammalian cells, but that they still respond to HSV-1 regulatory signals such as the ..cap alpha.. gene product ICP4.

  3. Exposure assessment to alpha- and beta-pinene, delta(3)-carene and wood dust in industrial production of wood pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edman, K; Lofstedt, H; Berg, P; Eriksson, K; Axelsson, S; Bryngelsson, I; Fedeli, C

    2003-04-01

    The main aim of the study was to measure the exposure to monoterpenes (alpha- and beta-pinene and Delta(3)-carene) and wood dust during industrial production of wood pellets and briquettes. Additional aims were to compare the results from wood dust sampled on a filter with real time measurements using a direct reading instrument and to identify peak exposures to dust. Twenty-four men working at six companies involved in industrial production of wood pellets and briquettes participated in the study. Monoterpenes were measured by diffusive sampling and wood dust was measured as total dust. A data logger (DataRAM) was used for continuous monitoring of dust concentration for 18 of the participants. The sampling time was approximately 8 h. The personal exposure to monoterpenes ranged from 0.64 to 28 mg/m(3) and a statistically significant (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = 0.0002) difference in levels of monoterpenes for workers at different companies was seen. In the companies the personal exposure to wood dust varied between 0.16 and 19 mg/m(3) and for 10 participants the levels exceeded the present Swedish occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 2 mg/m(3). The levels of wood dust during the morning shift were significantly (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.04) higher compared with the afternoon shift. Continuous registration of dust concentration showed peak values for several working operations, especially cleaning of truck engines with compressed air. For 24 workers in six companies involved in industrial production of wood pellets the personal exposure to monoterpenes was low and to wood dust high compared with the present Swedish OEL and previous studies in Swedish wood industries. Since the DataRAM can identify critical working tasks with high wood dust exposure a reduction in exposure levels could probably be achieved by changes in working routines and by the use of protective equipment.

  4. {alpha}-particle production in the scattering of {sup 6}He by {sup 208}Pb at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escrig, D. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez-Benitez, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, E-21071 Huelva (Spain); Institut de Physique Nucleaire and Centre de Recherches du Cyclotron, Universite catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Moro, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: moro@us.es (and others)

    2007-08-01

    New experimental data from the scattering of {sup 6}He + {sup 208}Pb at energies around and below the Coulomb barrier are presented. The yield of breakup products coming from projectile fragmentation is dominated by a strong group of {alpha} particles. The energy and angular distribution of this group have been analyzed and compared with theoretical calculations. This analysis indicates that the {alpha} particles emitted at backward angles in this reaction are mainly due to two-neutron transfer to weakly bound states of the final nucleus.

  5. Strong inhibition of TNF-alpha production and inhibition of IL-8 and COX-2 mRNA expression in monocyte-derived macrophages by RWJ 67657, a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, J; Doornbos-van der Meer, B; de Boer, Peter; van Leeuwen, MA; van Rijswijk, Martin; Limburg, PC

    2004-01-01

    In inflammatory processes, the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase ( MAPK) signal transduction route regulates production and expression of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a pivotal cytokine in rheumatoid arthritis and its production in macroph

  6. Production by R-alpha-methylhistamine of a histamine H3 receptor-mediated decrease in basal vascular resistance in guinea-pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, R L; Gertner, S B; Hey, J A

    1993-10-01

    1. The effect of the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist, R-alpha-methylhistamine given intravenously (10-100 micrograms kg-1) was examined on baseline total peripheral resistance (TPR), and cardiovascular haemodynamics in bilaterally vagotomized, anaesthetized guinea-pigs. 2. R-alpha-methylhistamine produced a dose-dependent hypotension and fall in TPR at 30 and 100 micrograms kg-1. A decrease in heart rate (HR) was observed at a dose of 100 micrograms kg-1. R-alpha-methylhistamine (10-100 micrograms kg-1) also produced a dose-dependent fall in rate pressure product (RPP). There was no effect on cardiac output (CO) or stroke volume (SV) at these doses. 3. Histamine H1 and H2 blockade in animals pretreated with a combination of chlorpheniramine (0.3 mg kg-1) and cimetidine (3.0 mg kg-1) did not alter the haemodynamic actions of R-alpha-methyl-histamine (100 micrograms kg-1, i.v.). Pretreatment with the selective H3 antagonist, thioperamide (1 mg kg-1), completely blocked the action of R-alpha-methylhistamine on haemodynamic parameters. 4. To study the mechanism of action of R-alpha-methylhistamine, the vasodilator hydralazine (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) was used. Hydralazine lowered BP, TRP and RPP in guinea-pigs pretreated with ipratropium (50 micrograms kg-1, i.v.). Hydralazine had no effect on HR, SV or CO. 5. R-alpha-methylhistamine (100 micrograms kg-1) did not affect the vasopressor action and increases in TPR produced by adrenaline (1 and 3 micrograms kg-1). On the other hand, the vasodilator hydralazine (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) inhibited the effects of adrenaline (3 micrograms kg-1) on TPR and RPP. The effect of both doses of adrenaline on BP were attenuated by hydralazine. Therefore, the inhibitory effects of R-alpha-methylhistamine are not mediated through a direct action on vascular smooth muscle.6. In adrenalectomized guinea-pigs, R-alpha-methylhistamine (100 microg kg-1) produced a drop in BP and HR.There was no difference between the effects of R-alpha

  7. Heme precursor injection is effective for Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase fusion protein production by a silkworm expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kounosuke; Lee, Jae Man; Tomozoe, Yusuke; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2015-10-01

    Recombinant peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus, fused with domains of antibody-binding proteins, was successfully obtained by a silkworm larvae expression system. The catalytic activity of the fusion peroxidase was increased 6-fold with the injection of 5-aminolevulinic acid into silkworm larvae as a heme precursor. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ from measurements of the total cross section for top-antitop quark production arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Klijnsma, Thomas; Dissertori, Günther; Salam, Gavin P.

    We present a determination of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ using inclusive top-quark pair production cross section measurements performed at the LHC and at the Tevatron. Following a procedure first applied by the CMS collaboration, we extract individual values of $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ from measurements by different experiments at several centre-of-mass energies, using QCD predictions complete in NNLO perturbation theory, supplemented with NNLL approximations to all orders, and suitable sets of parton distribution functions. The determinations are then combined using a likelihood-based approach, where special emphasis is put on a consistent treatment of theoretical uncertainties and of correlations between various sources of systematic uncertainties. Our final combined result is $\\alpha_s(m_Z) = 0.1177^{+0.0034}_{-0.0036}$.

  9. Collagen I-induced dendritic cells activation is regulated by TNF-alpha production through down-regulation of IRF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Barun; Ki, Hyeon-Hui; Lee, Young-Mi; Kim, Dae-Ki

    2015-03-01

    Previously we have shown that collagen I enhances the maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). Inflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha, interleukin (IL)-1 beta and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are also known to activate DCs. Here we investigated the involvement of TNF-alpha on the collagen I-induced DCs activation. TNF-a neutralization inhibited collagen I-induced IL-12 secretions by DCs. Additionally, we observed suppression of collagen I-induced costimulatory molecules expression along with down-regulation of genes involved in DCs activation pathway. Furthermore, TNF- alpha inhibition upon collagen Istimulation up-regulated the expression of interferon regulatory transcription factor IRF4, when compared to collagen I only treated cells. Collectively, our data demonstrate that collagen I induce TNF- alpha production, which is crucial for the activation and function of DCs, through down-regulation of IRF4, and implicates the importance in development of anti- TNF-alpha therapeutics for several inflammatory diseases.

  10. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Nigel Oswald [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of ~17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, ~200 g/cm3 and ~20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases ~350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  11. Heavy ion beam propagation through a gas-filled chamber for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, N.O.

    1996-10-01

    The work presented here evaluates the dynamics of a beam of heavy ions propagating through a chamber filled with gas. The motivation for this research stems from the possibility of using heavy ion beams as a driver in inertial confinement fusion reactors for the purpose of generating electricity. Such a study is important in determining the constraints on the beam which limit its focus to the small radius necessary for the ignition of thermonuclear microexplosions which are the source of fusion energy. Nuclear fusion is the process of combining light nuclei to form heavier ones. One possible fusion reaction combines two isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium, to form an alpha particle and a neutron, with an accompanying release of {approximately}17.6 MeV of energy. Generating electricity from fusion requires that we create such reactions in an efficient and controlled fashion, and harness the resulting energy. In the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) approach to energy production, a small spherical target, a few millimeters in radius, of deuterium and tritium fuel is compressed so that the density and temperature of the fuel are high enough, {approximately}200 g/cm{sup 3} and {approximately}20 keV, that a substantial number of fusion reactions occur; the pellet microexplosion typically releases {approximately}350 MJ of energy in optimized power plant scenarios.

  12. Alpha heating in toroidal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miley, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    Ignition (or near-ignition) by alpha heating is a key objective for the achievement of economic fusion reactors. While good confinement of high-energy alphas appears possible in larger reactors, near-term tokamak-type ignition experiments as well as some concepts for small reactors (e.g., the Field-Reversed Mirror or FRM) potentially face marginal situations. Consequently, there is a strong motivation to develop methods to evaluate alpha losses and heating profiles in some detail. Such studies for a TFTR-size tokamak and for a small FRM are described here.

  13. Peaceful Uses of Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, E.

    1958-07-03

    Applications of thermonuclear energy for peaceful and constructive purposes are surveyed. Developments and problems in the release and control of fusion energy are reviewed. It is pointed out that the future of thermonuclear power reactors will depend upon the construction of a machine that produces more electric energy than it consumes. The fuel for thermonuclear reactors is cheap and practically inexhaustible. Thermonuclear reactors produce less dangerous radioactive materials than fission reactors and, when once brought under control, are not as likely to be subject to dangerous excursions. The interaction of the hot plasma with magnetic fields opens the way for the direct production of electricity. It is possible that explosive fusion energy released underground may be harnessed for the production of electricity before the same feat is accomplished in controlled fusion processes. Applications of underground detonations of fission devices in mining and for the enhancement of oil flow in large low-specific-yield formations are also suggested.

  14. In vitro production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by human monocytes stimulated with lipopolysaccharide is positively correlated with increased blood monocytes after exposure to a swine barn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, P J; Khozani, T Talaei; Juurlink, B H J; Senthilselvan, A; Rennie, D C; Gerdts, V; Gawaziuk, J; Schneberger, D; Burch, Lauranell H; Dosman, J A

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been interest in the air quality in and around intensive livestock production facilities, such as modern swine production barns, where agricultural workers and surrounding residents may be exposed to elevated levels of organic dusts. The health effects of these exposures are not completely understood. The study that is reported here is a component of a larger investigation of the relationships among the acute effects of high-concentration endotoxin exposure (swine barn dust), polymorphisms in the TLR4 gene, and respiratory outcomes following exposure to swine confinement buildings. The relationships among a mediator of acute lung inflammation, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and clinical responses to acute swine barn exposure were characterized. Analysis of the results showed that in vitro stimulation of human monocytes with as little as 1 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced a significant increase in the monocytes that produced TNF-alpha. Although the proportion of TNF-alpha-positive monocytes after in vitro stimulation with 1 ng/ml of LPS was not associated with gender or TLR4 genotype, it was positively associated with the concentration of monocytes in blood after barn exposure. Thus, these two responses to different forms of LPS exposure are significantly correlated, and more responsive monocytes in vitro indicate a forthcoming relative monocytosis, post barn exposure, which may initiate a cascade of chronic inflammation.

  15. X-ray production cross-sections measurements for high-energy alpha particle beams: New dedicated set-up and first results with aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, T., E-mail: T.Dupuis@ulg.ac.be [Centre Europeen d' Archeometrie, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Chene, G., E-mail: Gregoire.Chene@ulg.ac.be [Centre Europeen d' Archeometrie, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Mathis, F., E-mail: Francois.Mathis@ulg.ac.be [Centre Europeen d' Archeometrie, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Atomique et Spectroscopie, Universite de Liege, Sart Tilman B15, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); and others

    2011-12-15

    The 'IPNAS' laboratory, in collaboration with the 'Centre Europeen d'Archeometrie' is partly focused on material analysis by means of IBA techniques: PIXE, PIGE and RBS. A new transport beam line has been developed at our CGR-520 MeV cyclotron to analyze Cultural Heritage objects using these techniques. This facility allows us to produce proton and alpha particle beams with energies up to 20 MeV. A vacuum chamber dedicated to X-ray production and Non-Rutherford cross-section measurements has been recently constructed. After determination of the chamber's geometry for X-ray detection using thin foils of several elements (11 Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To Z Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 82) and 3 MeV proton beams, the measurement of the X-ray production cross-sections in the 6-12 MeV energy range has started using alpha particle beams on light element targets. These experiments contribute to the filling a serious lack of experimental values for alpha particles of this particular energy range in databases. The recent decision to focus our work on the alpha particle interaction with light elements was taken because of the high interest of the low Z elements in the field of archaeometry.

  16. X-ray production cross-sections measurements for high-energy alpha particle beams: New dedicated set-up and first results with aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, T.; Chêne, G.; Mathis, F.; Marchal, A.; Garnir, H.-P.; Strivay, D.

    2011-12-01

    The "IPNAS" laboratory, in collaboration with the "Centre Européen d'Archéométrie" is partly focused on material analysis by means of IBA techniques: PIXE, PIGE and RBS. A new transport beam line has been developed at our CGR-520 MeV cyclotron to analyze Cultural Heritage objects using these techniques. This facility allows us to produce proton and alpha particle beams with energies up to 20 MeV. A vacuum chamber dedicated to X-ray production and Non-Rutherford cross-section measurements has been recently constructed. After determination of the chamber's geometry for X-ray detection using thin foils of several elements (11 ⩽ Z ⩽ 82) and 3 MeV proton beams, the measurement of the X-ray production cross-sections in the 6-12 MeV energy range has started using alpha particle beams on light element targets. These experiments contribute to the filling a serious lack of experimental values for alpha particles of this particular energy range in databases. The recent decision to focus our work on the alpha particle interaction with light elements was taken because of the high interest of the low Z elements in the field of archaeometry.

  17. Reaction rate sensitivity of 44Ti production in massive stars and implications of a thick target yield measurement of 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, R D; Sheets, S A; Burke, J T; Scielzo, N D; Rauscher, T; Norman, E B; Tumey, S; Brown, T A; Grant, P G; Hurst, A M; Phair, L; Stoyer, M A; Wooddy, T; Fisker, J L; Bleuel, D

    2010-02-16

    We evaluate two dominant nuclear reaction rates and their uncertainties that affect {sup 44}Ti production in explosive nucleosynthesis. Experimentally we develop thick-target yields for the {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction at E{sub {alpha}} = 4.13, 4.54, and 5.36 MeV using {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. At the highest beam energy, we also performed an activation measurement which agrees with the thick target result. From the measured yields a stellar reaction rate was developed that is smaller than current statistical-model calculations and recent experimental results, which would suggest lower {sup 44}Ti production in scenarios for the {alpha}-rich freeze out. Special attention has been paid to assessing realistic uncertainties of stellar reaction rates produced from a combination of experimental and theoretical cross sections. With such methods, we also develop a re-evaluation of the {sup 44}Ti({alpha},p){sup 47}V reaction rate. Using these two rates we carry out a sensitivity survey of {sup 44}Ti synthesis in eight expansions representing peak temperature and density conditions drawn from a suite of recent supernova explosion models. Our results suggest that the current uncertainty in these two reaction rates could lead to as large an uncertainty in {sup 44}Ti synthesis as that produced by different treatments of stellar physics.

  18. Fusion - An energy source for synthetic fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J.; Steinberg, M.

    1980-05-01

    An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

  19. Reduction of the ex vivo production of tumor necrosis factor alpha by alveolar phagocytes after administration of coal fly ash and copper smelter dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeckaert, F.; Buchet, J.P.; Huaux, F.; Lardot, C.; Lison, D.; Yager, J.W. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium). Industrial Toxicology and Occupational Medicine Unit

    1997-06-01

    The effect of intratracheally instilled coal fly ash (FA) and copper smelter dust (Cu) on the lung integrity and on the ex vivo release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) by alveolar phagocyte in mice was investigated. Instillation of tungsten carbide (WC) induced a mild and transient (d 1) inflammatory reaction characterized by an increase of total protein (TP) and an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the alveolar compartment. Compared to WC, Ca{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} produced a significant increase of TP content in BALF. Cu particles caused a severe but transient inflammatory reaction, while a persisting alveolitis (30 d) was observed after treatment with FA. Compared to control saline, a marked inhibition of TNF-alpha release was observed in response to LPS in all groups at d 1. Cytokine production was unregulated in WC- and Ca{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} treated animals after 6 and 30 d respectively. However, a 90% inhibition of TNF-alpha production was still observed at d 30 after administration of Cu and FA. Although arsenic was cleared form the lung tissue 6 d after Ca{sub 3}(AsO{sub 4}){sub 2} administration, a significant fraction persisted (10-15% of the arsenic administered) in the lung of Cu- and FA-treated mice at d 30. It is hypothesized that suppression of TNF-alpha production is dependent upon the slow elimination of the particles and their metal content from the lung.

  20. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  1. Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results in predictable healing. Autograft is currently the “gold standard” source of bone for a fusion. The ... pump. With this technique, the patient presses a button that delivers a predetermined amount of narcotic pain ...

  2. The human leukocyte antigen G promotes trophoblast fusion and β-hCG production through the Erk1/2 pathway in human choriocarcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ji-meng [School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zhao, Hong-xi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038 (China); Wang, Li [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China); Gao, Zhi-ying, E-mail: gaozy301@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China); Yao, Yuan-qing, E-mail: yqyao@126.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HLA-G expression promotes BeWo cells fusion and fusogenic gene expression. •HLA-G is capable of inducing β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cell lines. •Up-regulation of β-hCG production by HLA-G is mediated via the Erk1/2 pathway. -- Abstract: The human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is expressed on the fetal–maternal interface and plays a role in protecting fetal-derived trophoblasts from the maternal immune response, allowing trophoblasts to invade the uterus. However, HLA-G also possesses immune suppressing-independent functions. We found that HLA-G expressing BeWo choriocarcinoma cells increased cell–cell fusion compared to control BeWo cells under forskolin treatment. Regardless of forskolin treatment, the expression of fusogenic gene mRNAs, including syncytin-1, the transcription factor glial cell missing 1 (Gcm1), and beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) were elevated. HLA-G up-regulates β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cells because HLA-G knockdown in JEG-3 cells induces a dramatic decrease in β-hCG compared with control cells. The defect in β-hCG production in HLA-G knocked-down cells could not be completely overcome by stimulating hCG production through increasing intracellular cAMP levels. HLA-G expressing cells have increased phosphorylation levels for extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2) in BeWo cells. The Erk1/2 pathway is inactivated after the inhibition of HLA-G expression in JEG-3 cells. Finally, Erk1/2 inhibition was able to suppress the increased hCG production induced by HLA-G expression. Together, these data suggest novel roles for HLA-G in regulating β-hCG production via the modulation of the Erk1/2 pathway and by inducing trophoblast cell fusion.

  3. Macrophage-elicited osteoclastogenesis in response to bacterial stimulation requires Toll-like receptor 2-dependent tumor necrosis factor-alpha production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, Takashi; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline Attardo

    2008-02-01

    The receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and the proinflammatory cytokines are believed to play important roles in osteoclastogenesis. We recently reported that the innate immune recognition receptor, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), is crucial for inflammatory bone loss in response to infection by Porphyromonas gingivalis, the primary organism associated with chronic inflammatory periodontal disease. However, the contribution of macrophage-expressed TLRs to osteoclastogenesis has not been defined. In this study, we defined a requirement for TLR2 in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-elicited osteoclastogenesis in response to exposure to P. gingivalis. Culture supernatant (CS) fluids from P. gingivalis-stimulated macrophages induced bone marrow macrophage-derived osteoclastogenesis. This activity was dependent on TNF-alpha and occurred independently of RANKL, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and IL-6. CS fluids from P. gingivalis-stimulated TLR2(-/-) macrophages failed to express TNF-alpha, and these fluids induced significantly less osteoclast formation compared with that of the wild-type or the TLR4(-/-) macrophages. In addition, P. gingivalis exposure induced up-regulation of TLR2 expression on the cell surface of macrophages, which was demonstrated to functionally react to reexposure to P. gingivalis, as measured by a further increase in TNF-alpha production. These results demonstrate that macrophage-dependent TLR2 signaling is crucial for TNF-alpha-dependent/RANKL-independent osteoclastogenesis in response to P. gingivalis infection. Furthermore, the ability of P. gingivalis to induce the cell surface expression of TLR2 may contribute to the chronic inflammatory state induced by this pathogen.

  4. Alpha II Spectrin breakdown products in immature Sprague Dawley rat hippocampus and cortex after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Michelle E; Requena, Daniela F; Davis, Lizeth J; Metzger, Ryan R; Bennett, Kimberly S; Morita, Denise; Niedzwecki, Christian; Yang, Zhihui; Wang, Kevin K W

    2014-07-29

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI), proteolysis of Alpha II Spectrin by Calpain 1 produces 145 Spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs) while proteolysis by Caspase 3 produces 120 SBDPs. 145 and 120 SBDP immunoblotting reflects the relative importance of caspase-dependent apoptosis or calpain-dependent excitotoxic/necrotoxic cell death in brain regions over time. In the adult rat, controlled cortical impact (CCI) increased 120 SBDPs in the first hours, lasting a few days, and increased 145 SBDPs within the first few days lasting up to 14 days after injury. Little is known about SBDPs in the immature brain after TBI. Since development affects susceptibility to apoptosis after TBI, we hypothesized that CCI would increase 145 and 120 SBDPs in the immature rat brain relative to SHAM during the first 3 and 5 days, respectively. SBDPs were measured in hippocampi and cortices at post injury days (PID) 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 14 after CCI or SHAM surgery in the 17 day old Sprague Dawley rat. 145 SBDPs increased in both brain tissues ipsilateral to injury during the first 3 days, while changes in contralateral tissues were limited to PID2 cortex. 145 SBDPs elevations were more marked and enduring in hippocampus than in cortex. Against expectations, 120 SBDPs only increased in PID1 hippocampus and PID2 cortex. 145 SBDPs elevations occurred early after CCI, similar to previous studies in the adult rat, but resolved more quickly. The minimal changes in 120 SBDPs suggest that calpain-dependent, but not caspase-dependent, cell death predominates in the 17 day old rat after CCI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. QCD corrections to vector boson pair production in gluon fusion including interference effects with off-shell Higgs at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Caola, Fabrizio; Melnikov, Kirill; Röntsch, Raoul; Tancredi, Lorenzo

    2016-07-18

    We compute next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the production of two massive electroweak bosons in gluon fusion. We consider both the prompt production process $gg \\to VV$ and the production mediated by an exchange of an s-channel Higgs boson, $gg \\to H^* \\to V V$. We include final states with both on- and off-shell vector bosons with leptonic decays. The gluonic production of vector bosons is a loop-induced process, including both massless and massive quarks in the loop. For $gg \\to ZZ$ production, we obtain the NLO QCD corrections to the massive loops through an expansion around the heavy top limit. This approximation is valid below the top production threshold, giving a broad range of invariant masses between the Higgs production and the top production thresholds in which our results are valid. We explore the NLO QCD effects in $gg \\to ZZ$ focusing, in particular, on the interference between prompt and Higgs-mediated processes. We find that the QCD corrections to the interference are large and s...

  6. Abnormal production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -- alpha and clinical efficacy of the TNF inhibitor etanercept in a patient with PAPA syndrome [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortis, Elisabetta; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Insalaco, Antonella; Cioschi, Stefania; Muratori, Flaminia; D'Urbano, Leila E; Ugazio, Alberto G

    2004-12-01

    We report a family with pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderna and acne syndrome (PAPA). The proband presented several episodes of sterile pyogenic arthritis and became unresponsive to glucocorticoids. After treatment with the tumor necrosis factor inhibitor etanercept, the disease underwent rapid and sustained clinical remission. Production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by mononuclear cells of the proband and of the affected relatives was abnormally elevated.

  7. Full $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$ electroweak radiative corrections to $t \\bar{t} \\gamma$ and $e^-e^+\\gamma$ productions at ILC with GRACE-Loop

    CERN Document Server

    Khiem, P H; Fujimoto, J; Igarashi, M; Ishikawa, T; Kaneko, T; Kato, K; Nakazawa, N; Shimizu, Y; Tobimatsu, K; Ueda, T; Vermaseren, J A M; Yasui, Y

    2013-01-01

    The full $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$ electroweak radiative corrections to $t \\bar{t} \\gamma$ and $e^-e^+\\gamma$ productions at the International Linear Collider (ILC) are presented in this paper. The computation is performed with the help of GRACE-Loop system. In the physical results, we discuss on the cross section, electroweak corrections, and the top quark forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) which are the function of the center-of-mass energy.

  8. Production of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha in Human T Lymphocytes by Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Correlates with Toxin-Induced Proliferation and Is Regulated through Protein Kinase C

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    molecules. Immunol. Rev. 131:43-59. Chatila, T., N. Wood, J. Parsonnet, and R. S. Geha. 1988. Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 induces inositol phospholipid...Dohlsten, U. Andersson, G. Hedlund, P. Ericsson, J. Hans- son, and H. O. Sjogren . 1990. Production of TNF-alpha and TNF-beta by staphylococcal... syndrome . Immunobiology 189:270-284. 33. Miethke, T., C. Wahl, K. Heeg, B. Echtenacher, P. H. Krammer, and H. Wagner. 1992. T cell-mediated lethal

  9. Analysis of two separate Higgs boson production processes which decay to two W bosons: vector boson fusion production with a fully leptonic final state and only one reconstructed jet; and WH production with the final state signature WWW*->lvlvqq

    CERN Document Server

    Gormsen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    The possible separation of signal and background for two Higgs boson processes is investigated comparing the significance achieved from an analysis fully based on binary selection criteria with an event selection applying a boosted decision tree as a multivariate method. The two examined channels are: vector boson fusion production of the Higgs particle with the decay H -> WW* -> lvlv, with only one of the two tag jets reconstructed; and the Higgs-strahlung process from a W boson with the signature WH -> WWW* -> lvlvqq. The results for the VBF and WH analysis are obtained from data samples corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb^-1 and 5.8 fb^-1 respectively and a center-of-mass energy of sqrt(s)=13 TeV.

  10. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urichuk, Andrew; Walton, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  11. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    CERN Document Server

    Urichuk, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows, and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  12. Adjoint affine fusion and tadpoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urichuk, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.urichuk@uleth.ca [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Walton, Mark A., E-mail: walton@uleth.ca [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    We study affine fusion with the adjoint representation. For simple Lie algebras, elementary and universal formulas determine the decomposition of a tensor product of an integrable highest-weight representation with the adjoint representation. Using the (refined) affine depth rule, we prove that equally striking results apply to adjoint affine fusion. For diagonal fusion, a coefficient equals the number of nonzero Dynkin labels of the relevant affine highest weight, minus 1. A nice lattice-polytope interpretation follows and allows the straightforward calculation of the genus-1 1-point adjoint Verlinde dimension, the adjoint affine fusion tadpole. Explicit formulas, (piecewise) polynomial in the level, are written for the adjoint tadpoles of all classical Lie algebras. We show that off-diagonal adjoint affine fusion is obtained from the corresponding tensor product by simply dropping non-dominant representations.

  13. Intense fusion neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  14. Search for Higgs boson production via weak boson fusion and decaying to $b \\bar b$ in association with a high-energy photon in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search has been conducted for the $b\\bar b$ decay of the Standard Model Higgs boson produced through vector boson fusion in association with a photon and two jets. The search in this $b\\bar b \\gamma jj$ signature benefits from a large reduction of QCD jet background relative to the inclusive $b\\bar b j j$ signature and from the presence of a high-tranverse-momentum photon for triggering. Results are reported from the analysis of 12.6 fb$^{-1}$ of LHC proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV collected with the ATLAS detector. The observed 95\\% confidence level upper limit on the production cross section times branching ratio for a Higgs mass of 125 GeV is $4.0$ times the Standard Model expectation, and the expected upper limit is $6.0^{+2.3}_{-1.7}$. The measured signal strength is $\\mu=-3.9^{+2.8}_{-2.7}$ times the Standard Model value. The analysis methods are also used to search for $Z+\\gamma$ vector boson fusion production in the same $b\\bar b \\gamma j j$ signature. The observed upper limit on...

  15. Alpha decay of {sup 181}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Henderson, D.J.; Hermann, R. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The {alpha}-decay energy of {sup 181}Pb was measured as 7211(10) keV and 7044(15). In the first study the isotope was produced in {sup 90}Zr bombardments of {sup 94}Mo and, after traversing a velocity filter, implanted in a position-sensitive Si detector; no half life for {sup 181}Pb was reported. In the second study the isotope was produced in {sup 40}Ca bombardments of {sup 144}Sm and transported to a position in front of a Si(Au) surface barrier detector with a fast He-gas-jet capillary system; an estimate of 50 ms was determined for the {sup 181}Pb half life. Recently we investigated {sup 181}Pb {alpha} decay at ATLAS as part of a survey experiment in which a l-pnA beam of 400-MeV {sup 92}Mo was used to irradiate targets of {sup 89}Y, {sup 90,92,94}Zr, and {sup 92}Mo to examine yields for one- and two-nucleon evaporation products from symmetric cold-fusion reactions. Recoiling nuclei of interest were passed through the Fragment Mass Analyzer and implanted in a double-sided silicon strip detector for {alpha}-particle assay. With the {sup 90}Zr target we observed a group at 7065(20) keV which was correlated with A = 181 recoils and had a half life of 45(20) ms. Our new results for {sup 181}Pb therefore agreed with those of the second study. There was no indication in the {sup 90}Zr + {sup 92}Mo data of the 7211(10)-keV {alpha} particles seen by Keller et al. The interested reader is referred to the 1993 atomic mass evaluation wherein the input {alpha}-decay energies and resultant masses of the light Pb isotopes (including {sup 181}Pb) are discussed.

  16. Chronic immune activation in HIV-1 infection contributes to reduced interferon alpha production via enhanced CD40:CD40 ligand interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Donhauser

    Full Text Available Although a signature of increased interferon (IFN-alpha production is observed in HIV-1 infection, the response of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC to Toll-like receptor ligand stimulation is substantially impaired. This functional PDC deficit, which we specifically observed in HIV-1 infected individuals with less than 500 CD4+ T cells/µl, is not well understood. We provide evidence that the peripheral IFN-alpha production in HIV-1 infection is actively suppressed by the enhanced interaction of CD40 ligand (CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor family, and its receptor CD40, which are both upregulated upon immune activation. Plasma levels of soluble CD40L were significantly higher in untreated HIV-1 infected individuals (n = 52 than in subjects on long-term antiretroviral therapy (n = 62, p<0.03 and in uninfected control donors (n = 16, p<0.001. Concomitantly, cell-associated CD40L and the expression of the receptor CD40 on the PDC were significantly upregulated in HIV-1 infection (p<0.05. Soluble and cell-associated CD40L inhibited the PDC-derived IFN-alpha production by CpG oligodeoxynucleotides dose-dependently. This suppressive effect was observed at much lower, physiological CD40L concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of HIV-1 infected individuals compared to controls (p<0.05. The CpG-induced IFN-alpha production in PBMC of HIV-1 infected donors was directly correlated with PDC and CD4+ T cell counts, and inversely correlated with the viral loads (p<0.001. In HIV-1 infected donors with less than 500 CD4+ T cells/µl, the CpG-induced IFN-alpha production was significantly correlated with the percentage of CD40-expressing PDC and the level of CD40 expression on these cells (p<0.05, whereas CD40L plasma levels played a minor role. In addition, low-dose CD40L contributed to the enhanced production of interleukin 6 and 8 in PBMC of HIV-1 infected donors compared to controls. Our data support

  17. Higgs boson form factor effects in $t\\bar t$ production by $W^-W^+$ and $ZZ$ fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Gounaris, G J

    2016-01-01

    We study the fusion processes $W^-W^+\\to t\\bar t$ and $ZZ\\to t\\bar t$ observable at a future $e^-e^+$ collider and we discuss their sensitivity to an $Htt$ form factor which may be due to compositeness, in particular when the $H$ and the top quark have common constituents. We make an amplitude analysis and illustrate which helicity amplitudes and cross sections for specific final $t\\bar t$ polarizations are especially sensitive to this form factor.

  18. Trophoblast fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppertz, Berthold; Gauster, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The villous trophoblast of the human placenta is the epithelial cover of the fetal chorionic villi floating in maternal blood. This epithelial cover is organized in two distinct layers, the multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast directly facing maternal blood and a second layer of mononucleated cytotrophoblasts. During pregnancy single cytotrophoblasts continuously fuse with the overlying syncytiotrophoblast to preserve this end-differentiated layer until delivery. Syncytial fusion continuously supplies the syncytiotrophoblast with compounds of fusing cytotrophoblasts such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids as well as organelles. At the same time the input of cytotrophoblastic components is counterbalanced by a continuous release of apoptotic material from the syncytiotrophoblast into maternal blood. Fusion is an essential step in maintaining the syncytiotrophoblast. Trophoblast fusion was shown to be dependant on and regulated by multiple factors such as fusion proteins, proteases and cytoskeletal proteins as well as cytokines, hormones and transcription factors. In this chapter we focus on factors that may be involved in the fusion process of trophoblast directly or that may prepare the cytotrophoblast to fuse.

  19. Ability of a solid state fermentation technique to significantly minimize catabolic repression of. alpha. -amylase production by Bacillus licheniformis M27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, M.V.; Lonsane, B.K. (Central Food Technological Research Inst., Mysore (India). Fermentation Technology and Bioengineering Discipline)

    1991-08-01

    The production of {alpha}-amylase by Bacillus licheniformis M27 in submerged fermentation was completely inhibited due to catabolic repression in medium containing 1% glucose. In contrast, the enzyme production in a solid state fermentation system was 19,550 units/ml extract even when the medium contained 15% glucose. The peak in enzyme titre was, however, shifted from 48 to 72 h. The ability of the solid state fermentation system to significantly overcome catabolic repression was not known earlier and is probably conferred by various physico-chemical factors and culture conditions specific to the system. (orig.).

  20. Calculation of excitation functions of proton, alpha and deuteron induced reactions for production of medical radioisotopes {sup 122–125}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artun, Ozan, E-mail: ozanartun@yahoo.com; Aytekin, Hüseyin, E-mail: huseyinaytekin@gmail.com

    2015-02-15

    In this work, the excitation functions for production of medical radioisotopes {sup 122–125}I with proton, alpha, and deuteron induced reactions were calculated by two different level density models. For the nuclear model calculations, the Talys 1.6 code were used, which is the latest version of Talys code series. Calculations of excitation functions for production of the {sup 122–125}I isotopes were carried out by using the generalized superfluid model (GSM) and Fermi-gas model (FGM). The results have shown that generalized superfluid model is more successful than Fermi-gas model in explaining the experimental results.

  1. [Metabolism of Yarrowia lipolytica grown on ethanol under conditions promoting the production of alpha-ketoglutaric and citric acids: a comparative study of the central metabolism enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'chenko, A P; Cherniavskaia, O G; Shishkanova, N V; Finogenova, T V

    2002-01-01

    A comparative study of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and glyoxylate cycles in the mutant Yarrowia lipolytica strain N1 capable of producing alpha-ketoglutaric acid (KGA) and citric acid showed that almost all enzymes of the TCA cycle are more active under conditions promoting the production of KGA. The only exception was citrate synthase, whose activity was higher in yeast cells producing citric acid. The production of both acids was accompanied by suppression of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes. The activities of malate dehydrogenase, aconitase, NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, and fumarase were higher in cells producing KGA than in cells producing citric acid.

  2. Efficient production and purification of extracellular domain of human FGFR-Fc fusion proteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowska-Wedzina, Aleksandra; Borek, Aleksandra; Chudzian, Julia; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Otlewski, Jacek

    2014-07-01

    The family of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) plays an important role in cell growth, survival, differentiation and angiogenesis. The three immunoglobulin-like extracellular domains of FGFR (D1, D2, and D3) are critical for ligand binding and specificity towards fibroblast growth factor and heparan sulfate. Fibroblast growth factor receptors are overexpressed in a wide variety of tumors, such as breast, bladder, and prostate cancer, and therefore they are attractive targets for different types of anticancer therapies. In this study, we have cloned, expressed in CHO cells and purified Fc-fused extracellular domains of different types of FGFRs (ECD_FGFR1a-Fc, ECD_FGFR1b-Fc, ECD_FGFR2a-Fc, ECD_FGFR2b-Fc, ECD_FGFR3a-Fc, ECD_FGFR3b-Fc, ECD_FGFR4a-Fc, ECD_FGFR4b-Fc), which could be used as molecular targets for the selection of specific antibodies. The fusion proteins were analyzed using gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and mass spectrometry. To facilitate their full characterization, the fusion proteins were deglycosylated using PNGase F enzyme. With an optimized transient transfection protocol and purification procedure we were able to express the proteins at a high level and purify them to homogeneity.

  3. Production, secretion, and cell surface display of recombinant Sporosarcina ureae S-layer fusion proteins in Bacillus megaterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Denise; Ostermann, Kai; Rödel, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Monomolecular crystalline bacterial cell surface layers (S-layers) have broad application potential in nanobiotechnology due to their ability to generate functional supramolecular structures. Here, we report that Bacillus megaterium is an excellent host organism for the heterologous expression and efficient secretion of hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged versions of the S-layer protein SslA from Sporosarcina ureae ATCC 13881. Three chimeric proteins were constructed, comprising the precursor, C-terminally truncated, and N- and C-terminally truncated forms of the S-layer SslA protein tagged with the human influenza hemagglutinin epitope. For secretion of fusion proteins, the open reading frames were cloned into the Escherichia coli-Bacillus megaterium shuttle vector pHIS1525. After transformation of the respective plasmids into Bacillus megaterium protoplasts, the recombinant genes were successfully expressed and the proteins were secreted into the growth medium. The isolated S-layer proteins are able to assemble in vitro into highly ordered, crystalline, sheetlike structures with the fused HA tag accessible to antibody. We further show by fluorescent labeling that the secreted S-layer fusion proteins are also clustered on the cell envelope of Bacillus megaterium, indicating that the cell surface can serve in vivo as a nucleation point for crystallization. Thus, this system can be used as a display system that allows the dense and periodic presentation of S-layer proteins or the fused tags.

  4. Immunization with HBsAg-Fc fusion protein induces a predominant production of Th1 cytokines and reduces HBsAg level in transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Zhe-feng; WANG Hua-jing; YAO Xin; WANG Xuan-yi; WEN Yu-mei; DAI Jian-xin; XIE You-hua; XU Jian-qing

    2012-01-01

    Background The Fc receptor associated pathway might improve the immune responses against hepatitis B virus (HBV) as previously described by us.In addition,the Flt3 ligand (FL) has been reported to potentiate antigen presenting cells in vivo and may act as a potential adjuvant to boost antigen-specific immune responses.In this study,the immune efficacies of a set of fusion proteins of HBsAg and Fc and/or FL were evaluated in HBsAg transgenic mice.Methods The fusion proteins composed of HBsAg and the Fc domain of murine IgG1 (HBsAg-Fc) and/or the Flt3 ligand,and yeast-derived recombinant HBsAg were used as immunogen to immunize HBsAg transgenic mice,respectively.Serum and liver HBsAg levels,serum anti-HBsAg and cytokine profile,and the activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/AST were investigated after immunization.Results After six injections,the most pronounced decrease in serum and liver HBsAg levels was observed in the HBsAg-Fc immunized group.In addition,serum Th1 cytokines and ALT/AST activities were highest in this group,indicating an effective induction of a favorable cellular immune response.Interestingly,the fusion protein containing HBsAg-Fc and the Flt3 ligand stimulated an alternative Th1-type immune response featured with high level productions of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF- α) and monocyte chemoabstractant protein 1 (MCP-1),causing a more severe cytotoxicity in hepatocytes while showed less effective in reducing serum HBsAg level.Conclusion HBsAg-Fc is effective in eliciting both the humoral and cellular immune responses against HBsAg in HBsAg transgenic mice,which makes it a potential immunogen for the immunotherapy of chronic hepatitis B.

  5. Application of a statistical design to the optimization of parameters and culture medium for alpha-amylase production by Aspergillus oryzae CBS 819.72 grown on gruel (wheat grinding by-product).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Radhouane; Naili, Belgacem; Bejar, Samir

    2008-09-01

    The production optimization of alpha-amylase (E.C.3.2.1.1) from Aspergillus oryzae CBS 819.72 fungus, using a by-product of wheat grinding (gruel) as sole carbon source, was performed with statistical methodology based on three experimental designs. The optimisation of temperature, agitation and inoculum size was attempted using a Box-Behnken design under the response surface methodology. The screening of nineteen nutrients for their influence on alpha-amylase production was achieved using a Plackett-Burman design. KH(2)PO(4), urea, glycerol, (NH(4))(2)SO(4), CoCl(2), casein hydrolysate, soybean meal hydrolysate, MgSO(4) were selected based on their positive influence on enzyme formation. The optimized nutrients concentration was obtained using a Taguchi experimental design and the analysis of the data predicts a theoretical increase in the alpha-amylase expression of 73.2% (from 40.1 to 151.1 U/ml). These conditions were validated experimentally and revealed an enhanced alpha-amylase yield of 72.7%.

  6. What product might a renewal of Heavy IonFusion development offerthat competes with methane microbes and hydrogen HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Grant; Lee, Ed; Yu, Simon; Briggs, Dick; Barnard, John; Friedman, Alex; Qin, Hong; Waldron, Will; Leitner, Mattaheus; Kwan, Joe; Henestroza, Enrique; Caporaso, George; Meier, Wayne; Tabak, Max; Callahan, Debbie; Moir, Ralph; Peterson, Per

    2006-04-19

    In 1994 a Fusion Technology journal publication by Logan, Moir and Hoffman described how exploiting unusually-strong economy-of-scale for large (8 GWe-scale) multi-unit HIF plants sharing a driver and target factory among several low cost molten salt fusion chambers {at} < $40M per 2.4 GW fusion each (Fig. 1), could produce electricity below 3 cts/kWehr, even lower than similar multi-unit fission plants. The fusion electric plant could cost $12.5 B for 7.5 GWe and produce hydrogen fuel by electrolysis at prices competitive with gasoline-powered hybrids getting fuel from oil at $20$/bbl. At $60/bbl oil, the fusion plant can cost $35B and compete {at} 10% APR financing. Given massive and still-increasing world demand for transportation fuel even with oil climbing above $60/bbl, large HIF plants producing both low cost electricity and hydrogen could be more relevant to motivate new R&D funding for HIF development in the next few years. Three major challenges to get there: (1) NIF ignition in indirect drive geometry for liquid chambers, (2) a modular accelerator to enable a one-module IRE < $100 M, (3) compatible HIF target, driver and chamber allowing a small driver {at}< $500 M cost for a >100MWe net power DEMO. This scoping study, at a very preliminary conceptual level, attempts to identify how we might meet the last two great challenges taking advantage of several recent ideas and advances which motivate reconsideration of modular HIF drivers: >60X longitudinal compression of neutralized ion beams using a variable waveform induction module in NDCX down to 2 nanosecond bunches, the proof-of-principle demonstration of fast optical-gated solid state SiC switches by George Caporaso's group at LLNL (see George's RPIA06 paper), and recent work by Ed Lee, John Barnard and Hong Qin on methods for time-dependent correction of chromatic focusing errors in neutralized beams with up to 10 % {Delta}v/v velocity tilt, allowing 5 or more bunches, and shorter bunches

  7. Model for collisional fast ion diffusion into Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor loss cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.S. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences]|[Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zweben, S.J.; Schivell, J.; Budny, R.; Scott, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1994-08-01

    An analytic model is developed to estimate the classical pitch angle scattering loss of energetic fusion product ions into prompt loss orbits in a tokamak geometry. The result is applied to alpha particles produced by deutrium-tritium fusion reactions in a plasma condition relevant to Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). A poloidal angular distribution of collisional fast ion loss at the first wall is obtained and the numerical result from the TRANSP code is discussed. The present model includes the effect that the prompt loss boundary moves away from the slowing-down path due to reduction in banana thickness, which enables us to understand, for the first time. the dependence of the collisional loss rate on Z{sub eff}.

  8. QCD corrections to vector boson pair production in gluon fusion including interference effects with off-shell Higgs at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caola, Fabrizio [CERN Theory Division,Geneva 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Dowling, Matthew; Melnikov, Kirill; Röntsch, Raoul; Tancredi, Lorenzo [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics, KIT,Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-18

    We compute next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the production of two massive electroweak bosons in gluon fusion. We consider both the prompt production process gg→VV and the production mediated by an exchange of an s-channel Higgs boson, gg→H{sup ∗}→VV. We include final states with both on- and off-shell vector bosons with leptonic decays. The gluonic production of vector bosons is a loop-induced process, including both massless and massive quarks in the loop. For gg→ZZ production, we obtain the NLO QCD corrections to the massive loops through an expansion around the heavy top limit. This approximation is valid below the top production threshold, giving a broad range of invariant masses between the Higgs production and the top production thresholds in which our results are valid. We explore the NLO QCD effects in gg→ZZ focusing, in particular, on the interference between prompt and Higgs-mediated processes. We find that the QCD corrections to the interference are large and similar in size to the corrections to both the signal and the background processes. At the same time, we observe that corrections to the interference change rapidly with the four-lepton invariant mass in the region around the ZZ production threshold. We also study the interference effects in gg→W{sup +}W{sup −} production where, due to technical limitations, we only consider contributions of massless loops. We find that the QCD corrections to the interference in this case are somewhat larger than those for either the signal or the background.

  9. Fusion Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    the vesicular SNARE VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2 and the target (plasma membrane) SNAREs SNAP25 and syntaxin-1 results in fusion and release of neurotransmitter, synchronized to the electrical activity of the cell by calcium influx and binding to synaptotagmin. Formation of the SNARE complex is tightly regulated...... and appears to start with syntaxin-1 bound to an SM (Sec1/Munc18-like) protein. Proteins of the Munc13-family are responsible for opening up syntaxin and allowing sequential binding of SNAP-25 and VAMP2/synaptobrevin-2. N- to C-terminal “zippering” of the SNARE domains leads to membrane fusion...

  10. The production of alpha/beta and gamma/delta double negative (DN) T-cells and their role in the maintenance of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John C; Chapman, Fae M; Michael, Sandra D

    2015-07-12

    The ability of the thymus gland to convert bone marrow-derived progenitor cells into single positive (SP) T-cells is well known. In this review we present evidence that the thymus, in addition to producing SP T-cells, also has a pathway for the production of double negative (DN) T-cells. The existence of this pathway was noted during our examination of relevant literature to determine the cause of sex steroid-induced thymocyte loss. In conducting this search our objective was to answer the question of whether thymocyte loss is the end product of a typical interaction between the reproductive and immune systems, or evidence that the two systems are incompatible. We can now report that "thymocyte loss" is a normal process that occurs during the production of DN T-cells. The DN T-cell pathway is unique in that it is mediated by thymic mast cells, and becomes functional following puberty. Sex steroids initiate the development of the pathway by binding to an estrogen receptor alpha located in the outer membrane of the mast cells, causing their activation. This results in their uptake of extracellular calcium, and the production and subsequent release of histamine and serotonin. Lymphatic vessels, located in the subcapsular region of the thymus, respond to the two vasodilators by undergoing a substantial and preferential uptake of gamma/delta and alpha/beta DN T- cells. These T- cells exit the thymus via efferent lymphatic vessels and enter the lymphatic system.The DN pathway is responsible for the production of three subsets of gamma/delta DN T-cells and one subset of alpha/beta DN T-cells. In postpubertal animals approximately 35 % of total thymocytes exit the thymus as DN T-cells, regardless of sex. In pregnant females, their levels undergo a dramatic increase. Gamma/delta DN T-cells produce cytokines that are essential for the maintenance of pregnancy.

  11. Measurements of the ion fraction and mobility of alpha and beta decay products in liquid xenon using EXO-200

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J B; Barbeau, P S; Beck, D; Belov, V; Breidenbach, M; Brunner, T; Burenkov, A; Cao, G F; Chambers, C; Cleveland, B; Coon, M; Craycraft, A; Daniels, T; Danilov, M; Daugherty, S J; Davis, C G; Davis, J; Delaquis, S; Der Mesrobian-Kabakian, A; DeVoe, R; Didberidze, T; Dolgolenko, A; Dolinski, M J; Dunford, M; Fairbank, W; Farine, J; Feldmeier, W; Fierlinger, P; Fudenberg, D; Gornea, R; Graham, K; Gratta, G; Hall, C; Hughes, M; Jewell, M J; Jiang, X S; Johnson, A; Johnson, T N; Johnston, S; Karelin, A; Kaufman, L J; Killick, R; Koffas, T; Kravitz, S; Kuchenkov, A; Kumar, K S; Leonard, D S; Licciardi, C; Lin, Y H; Ling, J; MacLellan, R; Marino, M G; Mong, B; Moore, D; Nelson, R; O'Sullivan, K; Odian, A; Ostrovskiy, I; Piepke, A; Pocar, A; Prescott, C Y; Robinson, A; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Schubert, A; Sinclair, D; Smith, E; Stekhanov, V; Tarka, M; Tolba, T; Tsang, R; Twelker, K; Vuilleumier, J -L; Waite, A; Walton, J; Walton, T; Weber, M; Wen, L J; Wichoski, U; Wright, J D; Wood, J; Yang, L; Yen, Y -R; Zeldovich, O Ya

    2015-01-01

    Alpha decays in the EXO-200 detector are used to measure the fraction of charged $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ and $^{214}\\mathrm{Bi}$ daughters created from alpha and beta decays, respectively. $^{222}\\mathrm{Rn}$ alpha decays in liquid xenon (LXe) are found to produce $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}^{+}$ ions $50.3 \\pm 3.0\\%$ of the time, while the remainder of the $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ atoms are neutral. The fraction of $^{214}\\mathrm{Bi}^{+}$ from $^{214}\\mathrm{Pb}$ beta decays in LXe is found to be $76.4 \\pm 5.7\\%$, inferred from the relative rates of $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ and $^{214}\\mathrm{Po}$ alpha decays in the LXe. The average velocity of $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}$ ions is observed to decrease for longer drift times. Initially the ions have a mobility of $0.390 \\pm 0.006~\\mathrm{cm}^2/(\\mathrm{kV}~\\mathrm{s})$, and at long drift times the mobility is $0.219 \\pm 0.004~\\mathrm{cm}^2/(\\mathrm{kV}~\\mathrm{s})$. Time constants associated with the change in mobility during drift of the $^{218}\\mathrm{Po}^{+}$ ions are found to be propor...

  12. Pyruvate: immunonutritional effects on neutrophil intracellular amino or alpha-keto acid profiles and reactive oxygen species production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathioudakis, D.; Engel, J.; Welters, I.D.; Dehne, M.G.; Matejec, R.; Harbach, H.; Henrich, M.; Schwandner, T.; Fuchs, M.; Weismuller, K.; Scheffer, G.J.; Muhling, J.

    2011-01-01

    For the first time the immunonutritional role of pyruvate on neutrophils (PMN), free alpha-keto and amino acid profiles, important reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced [superoxide anion (O(2) (-)), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))] as well as released myeloperoxidase (MPO) acitivity has been investiga

  13. High circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in centenarians are not associated with increased production in T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandmand, Marie; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Kemp, Kåre

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aging is characterized by increased inflammatory activity reflected by increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines, concomitant with an altered cytokine profile of T lymphocytes. High plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are strongly associated with morbidity an...

  14. TLR9 independent interferon alpha production by neutrophils on NETosis in response to circulating chromatin, a key lupus autoantigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindau, D.; Mussard, J.; Rabsteyn, A.; Ribon, M.; Kotter, I.; Igney, A.; Adema, G.J.; Boissier, M.C.; Rammensee, H.G.; Decker, P. de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Interferon (IFN) alpha is a key immunoregulatory cytokine secreted by activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) that constitute less than 1% of leucocytes. IFNalpha plays an important role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Nevertheless, the natural IFNalpha in

  15. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator includi...

  16. The maltodextrin transport system and metabolism in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and production of novel alpha-glucosides through reverse phosphorolysis by maltose phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Hiroyuki; Baumann, Martin J; Petersen, Bent O; Westphal, Yvonne; Schols, Henk; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Hachem, Maher A; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Duus, Jens Ø; Svensson, Birte

    2009-12-01

    A gene cluster involved in maltodextrin transport and metabolism was identified in the genome of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, which encoded a maltodextrin-binding protein, three maltodextrin ATP-binding cassette transporters and five glycosidases, all under the control of a transcriptional regulator of the LacI-GalR family. Enzymatic properties are described for recombinant maltose phosphorylase (MalP) of glycoside hydrolase family 65 (GH65), which is encoded by malP (GenBank: AAV43670.1) of this gene cluster and produced in Escherichia coli. MalP catalyses phosphorolysis of maltose with inversion of the anomeric configuration releasing beta-glucose 1-phosphate (beta-Glc 1-P) and glucose. The broad specificity of the aglycone binding site was demonstrated by products formed in reverse phosphorolysis using various carbohydrate acceptor substrates and beta-Glc 1-P as the donor. MalP showed strong preference for monosaccharide acceptors with equatorial 3-OH and 4-OH, such as glucose and mannose, and also reacted with 2-deoxy glucosamine and 2-deoxy N-acetyl glucosamine. By contrast, none of the tested di- and trisaccharides served as acceptors. Disaccharide yields obtained from 50 mmbeta-Glc 1-P and 50 mm glucose, glucosamine, N-acetyl glucosamine, mannose, xylose or l-fucose were 99, 80, 53, 93, 81 and 13%, respectively. Product structures were determined by NMR and ESI-MS to be alpha-Glcp-(1-->4)-Glcp (maltose), alpha-Glcp-(1-->4)-GlcNp (maltosamine), alpha-Glcp-(1-->4)-GlcNAcp (N-acetyl maltosamine), alpha-Glcp-(1-->4)-Manp, alpha-Glcp-(1-->4)-Xylp and alpha-Glcp-(1-->4)- L-Fucp, the three latter being novel compounds. Modelling using L. brevis GH65 as the template and superimposition of acarbose from a complex with Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum GH15 glucoamylase suggested that loop 3 of MalP involved in substrate recognition blocked the binding of candidate acceptors larger than monosaccharides.

  17. Applications of solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) for fast ion and fusion reaction product measurements in TEXTOR experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szydlowski, A.; Malinowski, K.; Malinowska, A. [Association EURTOM-IPPLM Warsaw, The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Wassenhove, G. Van [EURATOM-Belgium State Association, LPP, ERM/KMS, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Schweer, B. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Institutte of Plasma Physicx, Juelich (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The paper reports on measurements of fusion reaction protons which were performed on TEXTOR facility in January 2009. The basic experimental scheme was similar to that applied in the previous measurements [1, 2]. The main experimental tool equipment was a small ion pinhole camera which was equipped with a PM-355 detector sample and was attached to a water cooled manipulator. The camera was placed below the plasma ring in the direction of ion drifts, at a distance of 4.4 cm from LCFS. However, in the described experiment it was aligned at an angle to the mayor TEXTOR radius (contrary to previous experiments), so that the input pinhole was oriented first at {gamma} = 45 degrees (shots 108799 - 108818) and then {gamma} = 600 (shots 108832 - 108847). The discharges were executed with one neutral beam of the total power 0.6 - 1.0 MW. In the first series (Nos 108799 - 108818) the plasma was additionally heated by ICRH of frequency 38 MHz. The irradiated detector samples were subjected to the same interrupted etching procedure as the samples used in the CR-39/PM-355 detector calibration measurements [1, 2]. After that, track density distributions and track diameter histograms were measured under an optical microscope. By the use of the calibration curves, it was possible to distinguish craters produced by protons from other craters and to convert the obtained histograms into proton energy spectra. The craters induced by lower energy ions appeared to be concentrated in narrower areas, whereas higher energy ions were registered in a more diffused detector fields. The paper shows again that the CR-39/PM-355 detector is an useful diagnostic tool for tokamak experiments, for measurement of charged ions. References: [1] A. Szydlowski, A. Malinowska, M. Jaskola, A. Korman, M.J. Sadowski, G. Van Wassenhove, B. Schweer and the TEXTOR team, A. Galkowski, 'Application of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors in TEXTOR Experiment for Measurements

  18. Product of Likelihood Ratio Scores Fusion of Dynamic Face, Text Independent Speech and On-line Signature Based Biometrics Verification Application Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed SOLTANE

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of finite Gaussian mixture modal (GMM tuned using Expectation Maximization (EM estimating algorithms for score level data fusion is proposed. Automated biometric systems for human identification measure a “signature” of the human body, compare the resulting characteristic to a database, and render an application dependent decision. These biometric systems for personal authentication and identification are based upon physiological or behavioral features which are typically distinctive, Multi-biometric systems, which consolidate information from multiple biometric sources, are gaining popularity because they are able to overcome limitations such as non-universality, noisy sensor data, large intra-user variations and susceptibility to spoof attacks that are commonly encountered in mono modal biometric systems. Simulation result show that finite mixture modal (GMM is quite effective in modelling the genuine and impostor score densities, fusion based the product of Likelihood Ratio achieves a significant performance on eNTERFACE 2005 multi-biometric database based on dynamic face, on-line signature and text independent speech modalities.

  19. Production of radon and thorium isotopes near N=126 shell closure in 48Ca and 54Cr induced fusion reactions on 162Dy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorov, Dmitriy; Werke, Tyler; Alfonso, Marisa; Folden, Charles

    2012-03-01

    Production of spherical evaporation residues (EVRs) near N=126 shell in 48Ca and 54Cr induced reactions on a 162Dy target was investigated at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute using the vacuum separator MARS. For the 54Cr+162Dy reaction, only upper limits for the 4n exit-channel cross section were measured; this can be attributed to a sizably increased fissility of the 216Th compound nucleus relative to 210Rn formed in the 48Ca bombardment. A factor of > 7300 separates the production cross sections of the 4n EVRs from each reaction. A semi-empirical estimate of the lower limit on the fusion probability, PCN, ratio between the two heavy ion projectiles is PCN(48Ca+162Dy)/PCN(54Cr+162Dy) > 1.2. Investigation of spherical nuclei produced by heavy ion fusion reactions is of current interest due to efforts to synthesize superheavy nuclei near Z=120, N=184 nucleon shells. EVRs produced near the N=126 shell closure have previously revealed surprisingly low survival probabilities despite stabilization from shell effects. Similarly, enhancement of the fission channel in the de-excitation cascade of 210Rn and 216Th is observed in this work and this result can be well modeled by the inclusion of collective effects into the statistical decay of excited nuclei calculations. These results suggest that cross sections for production of superheavy nuclei near predicted Z=120, N=184 closed shells may be small regardless of the anticipated strong shell effects.

  20. Fusion - 2050 perspective (in Polish)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2013-01-01

    The results of strongly exothermic reaction of thermonuclear fusion between nuclei of deuterium and tritium are: helium nuclei and neutrons, plus considerable kinetic energy of neutrons of over 14 MeV. DT nuclides synthesis reaction is probably not the most favorable one for energy production, but is the most advanced technologically. More efficient would be possibly aneutronic fusion. The EU by its EURATOM agenda prepared a Road Map for research and implementation of Fusion as a commercial method of thermonuclear energy generation in the time horizon of 2050.The milestones on this road are tokomak experiments JET, ITER and DEMO, and neutron experiment IFMIF. There is a hope, that by engagement of the national government, and all research and technical fusion communities, part of this Road Map may be realized in Poland. The infrastructure build for fusion experiments may be also used for material engineering research, chemistry, biomedical, associated with environment protection, power engineering, security, ...

  1. PRODUCTION OF PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES AND ALPHA-2-MACROGLOBULIN BY PERIPHERAL BLOOD CELLS IN THE PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Zorina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer worldwide, being quite complicated, with respect to diagnostics and postoperative prognosis. Proinflammatory cytokines are shown to be involved into CRC pathogenesis. However, the changes in alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2-MG, a known regulator of cytokine production, still remain unclear. The aim of this work was to compare contents and production of a2-MG and several pro-inflammatory cytokines in blood serum and supernates from short-term blood cell cultures. The samples were taken from the patients with CRC at initial terms and after surgical removal of the tumor.Studies of cytokines and a2-MG concentrations in serum and supernates of 24-h blood cell cultures from the patients with verified CRC (stages T2-3N0-1M0 and T4N0-1M0 have shown some sufficient differences from healthy volunteers (control group. Pre-surgery IL-6 and TNFα contents in blood of CRC patients was significantly increased agains healthy controls (respectively, 29.9±5.4 and 3.4±1.5 pg/mL versus control group (1.0±0.3 and 0 pg/mL, respectively. Following surgical treatment, the cytokine levels were decreased by 40- 60% after the operation, however, without significant differences from initial values.The supernates of blood cultures stimulated with polyclonal mitogens exhibited significant reduction of IFNγ levels prior to surgery (273±123 pg/ml versus 804±154 pg/mL, and elevated IL-6 levels (14412±2570 pg/mL versus 1970±457 pg/mL. The mean α2-MG concentrations before CRC surgery comprised 1.96±0.11 g/L for blood serum, 0.0304±0.0047 g/L, for non-stimulated blood cell cultures, and 0.0300±0.0052 g/L in mitogen-induced cultures. These parameters did not significantly differ from control values (2.21±0.17 g/L, 0.0328±0.0018 g/L, and 0.0314±0.0019 g/L, respectively. Similar results have been yielded with the samples obtained after surgical treatment of the CRC patients.The obtained data indicate that surgical

  2. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson via Vector Boson Fusion Production Process in the Di-Tau Channels

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    We outline a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying into a τ-pair in association with two jets, which is produced dominantly by the Vector Boson Fusion (VBF) process. The results indicate significant potential for a discovery in the low mass range. We consider fully leptonic, semi-leptonic, and, for the first time, fully hadronic tau decays. Mass reconstruction, central-jet veto, and jet tagging are discussed, and we present an approach to estimate the background from the data. Additional emphasis has been given to trigger issues and the impact of pileup. The results are based on an improved detector description, including misalignments, the most recent reconstruction software, and modern Monte Carlo event generators, including a revised prediction of the underlying event activity.

  3. Studies in fusion reactor technology. Progress report, June 1, 1975--June 30, 1976. [Hydrogen permeation through first wall, radiolytic fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axtmann, R C; Perkins, H K; Noda, T; Fish, J D

    1976-01-01

    Two investigations are described that are pertinent to hydrogen hold-up and re-emission in the first wall of fusion reactors. The first employs existing theory to calculate the range distributions for light ions normally incident on metallic targets at energies of one to 20 keV. Three different statistical atomic potentials were used to approximate the interaction between a swift atom and a target atom. A surface correction to the theory of ion penetration was developed to account for the presence of a free surface in the target. The second study employed the diffusion equation to calculate the time dependent fluxes and concentration profiles of a gas originating at a planar source within a finite slab. The purpose of this procedure was to model the transport of gas implanted beneath a metal surface by the impingement of energetic, gaseous ions. Some studies on radiolytic fuel production are briefly reviewed. (MOW)

  4. Alpha Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... positive side, alpha blockers might decrease low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (the "bad" cholesterol). Alpha blockers can ... PreventionTreatmentofHighBloodPressure/Types-of-Blood-Pressure-Medications_UCM_303247_Article.jsp. Accessed June 4, 2016. Kaplan NM, et ...

  5. Magnetic fusion; La fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project.

  6. Production of aggregation prone human interferon gamma and its mutant in highly soluble and biologically active form by SUMO fusion technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tileva, M; Krachmarova, E; Ivanov, I; Maskos, K; Nacheva, G

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli expression system is a preferable choice for production of recombinant proteins. A disadvantage of this system is the target protein aggregation in "inclusion bodies" (IBs) that further requires solubilisation and refolding, which is crucial for the properties and the yield of the final product. In order to prevent aggregation, SUMO fusion tag technology has been successfully applied for expression of eukaryotic proteins, including human interferon gamma (hIFNγ) that was reported, however, with no satisfactory biological activity. We modified this methodology for expression and purification of both the wild type hIFNγ and an extremely prone to aggregation mutant hIFNγ-K88Q, whose recovery from IBs showed to be ineffective upon numerous conditions. By expression of the N-terminal His-SUMO fusion proteins in the E. coli strain BL21(DE3)pG-KJE8, co-expressing two chaperone systems, at 24 °C a significant increase in solubility of both target proteins (1.5-fold for hIFNγ and 8-fold for K88Q) was achieved. Two-step chromatography (affinity and ion-exchange) with on-dialysis His-SUMO-tag cleavage was applied for protein purification that yielded 6.0-7.0mg/g wet biomass for both proteins with >95% purity and native N-termini. The optimised protocol led to increased yields from 5.5 times for hIFNγ up to 100 times for K88Q in comparison to their isolation from IBs. Purified hIFNγ showed preserved thermal stability and antiproliferative activity corresponding to that of the native reference sample (3 × 10(7)IU/mg). The developed methodology represents an optimised procedure that can be successfully applied for large scale expression and purification of aggregation-prone proteins in soluble native form.

  7. Activation cross sections of $\\alpha$-particle induced nuclear reactions on hafnium and deuteron induced nuclear reaction on tantalum: production of $^{178}$W/$^{178m}$Ta generator

    CERN Document Server

    Tárk'anyi, F; Ditrói, F; Hermanne, A; Ignatyuk, A V; Uddin, M S

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of a systematic study of charged particle production routes of medically relevant radionuclei, the excitation function for indirect production of $^{178m}$Ta through $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,xn)$^{178}$W-$^{178m}$Ta nuclear reaction was measured for the first time up to 40 MeV. In parallel, the side reactions $^{nat}$Hf($\\alpha$,x)$^{179,177,176,175}$W, $^{183,182,178g,177,176,175}$Ta, $^{179m,177m,175}$Hf were also assessed. Stacked foil irradiation technique and $\\gamma$-ray spectrometry were used. New experimental cross section data for the $^{nat}$Ta(d,xn)$^{178}$W reaction are also reported up to 40 MeV. The measured excitation functions are compared with the results of the ALICE-IPPE, and EMPIRE nuclear reaction model codes and with the TALYS 1.4 based data in the TENDL-2013 library. The thick target yields were deduced and compared with yields of other charged particle ((p,4n), (d,5n) and ($^3$He,x)) production routes for $^{178}$W.

  8. Carpal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Carpal fusion may be seen in hereditary and nonhereditary conditions such as acrocallosal syndrome,acromegaly, Apert syndrome, arthrogryposis, Carpenter syndrome, chromosomal abnormalities, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC) syndrome, the F form of acropectorovertebral dysgenesis or the F syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Leopard syndrome, multiple synostosis syndrome, oligosyndactyly syndrome, Pfeiffer-like syndrome, scleroderma, split hand and foot malformatio...

  9. Fusion rules of equivariantizations of fusion categories

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We determine the fusion rules of the equivariantization of a fusion category $\\mathcal{C}$ under the action of a finite group $G$ in terms of the fusion rules of $\\mathcal{C}$ and group-theoretical data associated to the group action. As an application we obtain a formula for the fusion rules in an equivariantization of a pointed fusion category in terms of group-theoretical data. This entails a description of the fusion rules in any braided group-theoretical fusion category.

  10. Fusion rules of equivariantizations of fusion categories

    OpenAIRE

    Burciu, Sebastian; Natale, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    We determine the fusion rules of the equivariantization of a fusion category $\\mathcal{C}$ under the action of a finite group $G$ in terms of the fusion rules of $\\mathcal{C}$ and group-theoretical data associated to the group action. As an application we obtain a formula for the fusion rules in an equivariantization of a pointed fusion category in terms of group-theoretical data. This entails a description of the fusion rules in any braided group-theoretical fusion category.

  11. Fusion Plasma Theory project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This Project Summary book is a published compilation consisting of short descriptions of each project supported by the Fusion Plasma Theory and Computing Group of the Advanced Physics and Technology Division of the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy. The summaries contained in this volume were written by the individual contractors with minimal editing by the Office of Fusion Energy. Previous summaries were published in February of 1982 and December of 1987. The Plasma Theory program is responsible for the development of concepts and models that describe and predict the behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. Emphasis is given to the modelling and understanding of the processes controlling transport of energy and particles in a toroidal plasma and supporting the design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). A tokamak transport initiative was begun in 1989 to improve understanding of how energy and particles are lost from the plasma by mechanisms that transport them across field lines. The Plasma Theory program has actively-participated in this initiative. Recently, increased attention has been given to issues of importance to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Particular attention has been paid to containment and thermalization of fast alpha particles produced in a burning fusion plasma as well as control of sawteeth, current drive, impurity control, and design of improved auxiliary heating. In addition, general models of plasma behavior are developed from physics features common to different confinement geometries. This work uses both analytical and numerical techniques. The Fusion Theory program supports research projects at US government laboratories, universities and industrial contractors. Its support of theoretical work at universities contributes to the office of Fusion Energy mission of training scientific manpower for the US Fusion Energy Program.

  12. Cell surface expression system for the display of heterologous gene products using chimeric flagellin fusions of bacillus halodurans isolate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available N-terminal sequencing gave rise to homology to flagellin protein, product of the hag gene. protein, product of the hag gene. Gene was cloned by using degenerate primers and inverse PCR. The gene sequence as well as the up- and down- stream regions...

  13. Production of Normal Mammalian Organ Culture Using a Medium Containing Mem-Alpha, Leibovitz L 15, Glucose Galactose Fructose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under micro- gravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cells aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel. The medium used for culturing the cells, especially a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal cells contains a mixture of Mem-alpha and Leibovits L15 supplemented with glucose, galactose and fructose.

  14. Search for a Vector Boson Fusion Higgs boson production in the di-photon channel with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This poster was made for the HCP conference. The initial title submitted to the conference organisation committee was "Search for an associated Higgs boson production in the di-photon channel with the ATLAS experiment" and was about the details of the VH measurements in the di-photon channel with 13 fb-1 of data, and the implications in terms of Higgs boson couplings. But since the H->gammagamma was finally not approved to go for HCP, the title and the content of the posters changed from the VH production mode to the VBF production mode (for which we have results with the ICHEP dataset).

  15. JENDL fusion file 99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Satoshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Shibata, Keiichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yu Baosheng [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Kosako, Kazuaki [Sumitomo Atomic Industries, Tokyo (Japan); Yamamuro, Nobuhiro [Data Engineering Co. Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    The double-differential cross sections (DDXs) of secondary neutrons have been evaluated for 79 isotopes and 13 natural elements ranging from H to Bi to improve the accuracy of predictions for the neutronics calculations in the D-T thermonuclear fusion applications. The data given in JENDL-3.1, which was the newest version of JENDL general purpose file when this project was initiated, was combined with new calculations based on the optical model, DWBA, pre-equilibrium and multi-step statistical models, and the DDX data were generated based on various kinds of systematics for medium-mass nuclei. Different methods were employed for light nuclei to which the above method could not be applied. In addition, the DDXs for emission of charged particles (p, d, t, {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particle) were given for {sup 2}H, {sup 9}Be and elements heavier or equal to F. The present results give an overall good description of the measured DDX data of both the neutron and charged particles emission channels. The data were compiled in ENDF-6 format, and released in 1999 as a special purpose file of JENDL family, namely, JENDL Fusion File 99. (author)

  16. Alpha fetoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal alpha globulin; AFP ... Greater than normal levels of AFP may be due to: Cancer in testes , ovaries, biliary (liver secretion) tract, stomach, or pancreas Cirrhosis of the liver Liver cancer ...

  17. Fusion production of solid dispersions containing a heat-sensitive active ingredient by hot melt extrusion and Kinetisol dispersing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinunzio, James C; Brough, Chris; Hughey, Justin R; Miller, Dave A; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

    2010-02-01

    Many techniques for the production of solid dispersions rely on elevated temperatures and prolonged material residence times, which can result in decomposition of temperature-sensitive components. In this study, hydrocortisone was used as a model temperature-sensitive active ingredient to study the effect of formulation and processing techniques as well as to characterize the benefits of KinetiSol Dispersing for the production of solid dispersions. Preformulation studies were conducted using differential scanning calorimetry and hot stage microscopy to identify optimum carriers for the production of amorphous solid dispersions. After identification, solid dispersions were prepared by hot melt extrusion and KinetiSol Dispersing, with material characterized by X-ray diffraction, dissolution and potency testing to evaluate physicochemical properties. Results from the preformulation studies showed that vinylacetate:vinylpyrrolidone (PVPVA) copolymer allowed for hydrocortisone dissolution within the carrier at temperatures as low as 160 degrees C, while hydroxypropyl methylcellulose required temperatures upward of 180 degrees C to facilitate solubilization. Low substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose, a high glass transition temperature control, showed that the material was unable to solubilize hydrocortisone. Manufacturing process control studies using hot melt extruded compositions of hydrocortisone and PVPVA showed that increased temperatures and residence times negatively impacted product potency due to decomposition. Using KinetiSol Dispersing to reduce residence time and to facilitate lower temperature processing, it was possible to produce solid dispersions with improved product potency. This study clearly demonstrated the importance of carrier selection to facilitate lower temperature processing, as well as the effect of residence time on product potency. Furthermore, KinetiSol Dispersing provided significant advantages over hot melt extrusion due to the reduced

  18. Inhibitory effects of the flavonoids isolated from Waltheria indica on the production of NO, TNF-alpha and IL-12 in activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yerra Koteswara; Fang, Shih-Hua; Tzeng, Yew-Min

    2005-05-01

    Three flavonoids were isolated from the whole plants of Waltheria indica and biological properties investigated. On the basis of their spectroscopic data, these compounds were identified as (-)-epicatechin, quercetin, and tiliroside. These flavonoids significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the production of the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO), and the cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-12), in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon (IFN)-gamma activated murine peritoneal macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. The order of inhibitory activity was quercetin>tiliroside>(-)-epicatechin. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages were pre-activated with LPS/IFN-gamma for 24 h, and the inhibitory effects of the above mentioned isolates on the production of NO were determined after a further 24 h, to address the possible mechanisms of their action. The present study supports the use of W. indica for the treatment of inflammatory diseases in traditional medicine.

  19. FUSION WORLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caroline; 黄颖(翻译)

    2009-01-01

    Fusion World”科技展示体验中心是英国设计公司MET Studio为新加坡科技研究局(A*Star)的科学工程委员会(SERC)所设计的,位于启汇城的办公地点,用于展示该委员会的精选技术作品,以吸引潜在的客户和启汇城内的学生购买群体。

  20. Fusion neutron irradiation induced ordering and defect production in Cu/sub 3/Au at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.S.; Guinan, M.W.; Kirk, M.A.; Hahn, P.A.

    1987-08-01

    We irradiate three Cu/sub 3/Au alloys different degrees of initial long-range order at temperatures between 300K and 434K. The resistivity of samples is monitored during irradiation and related to the long-term order parameter by the Muto relation. The results show that the ordering rate, which is proportional to the concentration of freely migrating vacancies, increases at the beginning and then decreases later with fluence. The decrease is a result of the continuous production of sinks in the form of dislocation loops. The effect of sinks on vacancy annihilation in some cases causes a reversed temperature dependence of ordering rate. The free vacancy production rate and the rate of sink production are determined using an ordering kinetics theory. The results of the 14 MeV neutron irradiations are compared to those obtained in other neutron spectra and particle irradiations. The estimated free vacancy production rate is also compared to the primary defect production rate measured at 4.2K in disordered samples.

  1. Nuclear Fusion with Polarized Nucleons & PolFusion

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, Ralf; Büscher, Markus; Vasilyev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a detailed examination of the latest work on the potential of polarized fuel to realize the vision of energy production by nuclear fusion. It brings together contributions from nuclear physicists and fusion physicists with the aims of fostering exchange of information between the two communities, describing the current status in the field, and examining new ideas and projects under development. It is evident that polarized fuel can offer huge improvements for the first generation of fusion reactors and open new technological possibilities for future generations, including neutron lean reactors, which could be the most popular and sustainable energy production option to avoid environmental problems. Nevertheless, many questions must be resolved before polarized fuel can be used for energy production in the different reactor types. Readers will find this book to be a stimulating source of information on the key issues. It is based on contributions from leading scientists delivered at the meetin...

  2. Information fusion for palmprint authentication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangqian; Wang, Kuanquan; Zhang, David

    2006-04-01

    A palmprint can be represented using different features and the different representations reflect the different characteristic of a palmprint. Fusion of multiple palmprint features may enhance the performance of a palmprint authentication system. This paper investigates the fusion of two types of palmprint information: the phase (called PalmCode) and the orientation (called OrientationCode). The PalmCode is extracted using the 2-D Gabor filters based algorithm and the OrientationCode is computed using several directional templates. Then several fusion strategies are investigated and compared. The experimental results show that the fusion of the PalmCode and OrientationCode using the Product, Sum and Weighted Sum strategies can greatly improve the accuracy of palmprint authentication, which is up to 99.6%.

  3. Carpal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Jalalshokouhi*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Carpal fusion may be seen in hereditary and nonhereditary conditions such as acrocallosal syndrome,acromegaly, Apert syndrome, arthrogryposis, Carpenter syndrome, chromosomal abnormalities, ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-cleft (EEC syndrome, the F form of acropectorovertebral dysgenesis or the F syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, Holt-Oram syndrome, Leopard syndrome, multiple synostosis syndrome, oligosyndactyly syndrome, Pfeiffer-like syndrome, scleroderma, split hand and foot malformation, Stickler syndrome, thalidomide embryopathy, Turner syndrome and many other conditions as mentioned in Rubinstein-Taybi's book. Sometimes there is no known causative disease.Diagnosis is usually made by plain X-ray during studying a syndrome or congenital disease or could be an incidental finding like our patients. Hand bone anomalies are more common in syndromes or other congenital or non-hereditary conditions, but polydactyly, syndactyly or oligodactyly and carpal fusions are interesting. X-ray is the modality of choice, but MRI and X-ray CT with multiplanar reconstructions may be used for diagnosis.

  4. Accelerator based fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Chao, Alexander Wu

    2017-08-01

    A feasibility study of fusion reactors based on accelerators is carried out. We consider a novel scheme where a beam from the accelerator hits the target plasma on the resonance of the fusion reaction and establish characteristic criteria for a workable reactor. We consider the reactions d+t\\to n+α,d+{{}3}{{H}\\text{e}}\\to p+α , and p+{{}11}B\\to 3α in this study. The critical temperature of the plasma is determined from overcoming the stopping power of the beam with the fusion energy gain. The needed plasma lifetime is determined from the width of the resonance, the beam velocity and the plasma density. We estimate the critical beam flux by balancing the energy of fusion production against the plasma thermo-energy and the loss due to stopping power for the case of an inert plasma. The product of critical flux and plasma lifetime is independent of plasma density and has a weak dependence on temperature. Even though the critical temperatures for these reactions are lower than those for the thermonuclear reactors, the critical flux is in the range of {{10}22}-{{10}24}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-2}~{{\\text{s}}-1} for the plasma density {ρt}={{10}15}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} in the case of an inert plasma. Several approaches to control the growth of the two-stream instability are discussed. We have also considered several scenarios for practical implementation which will require further studies. Finally, we consider the case where the injected beam at the resonance energy maintains the plasma temperature and prolongs its lifetime to reach a steady state. The equations for power balance and particle number conservation are given for this case.

  5. New developments in the diagnostics for the fusion products on JET in preparation for ITER (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, A.; Angelone, M.; Bonheure, G.; Cecil, E.; Craciunescu, T.; Darrow, D.; Edlington, T.; Ericsson, G.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gorini, G.; Hellesen, C.; Kiptily, V.; Mlynar, J.; Perez von Thun, C.; Pillon, M.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Tardocchi, M.; Zoita, V. L.; Efda-Jet Contributors

    2010-10-01

    Notwithstanding the advances of the past decades, significant developments are still needed to satisfactorily diagnose "burning plasmas." D-T plasmas indeed require a series of additional measurements for the optimization and control of the configuration: the 14 MeV neutrons, the isotopic composition of the main plasma, the helium ash, and the redistribution and losses of the alpha particles. Moreover a burning plasma environment is in general much more hostile for diagnostics than purely deuterium plasmas. Therefore, in addition to the development and refinement of new measuring techniques, technological advances are also indispensable for the proper characterization of the next generation of devices. On JET an integrated program of diagnostic developments, for JET future and in preparation for ITER, has been pursued and many new results are now available. In the field of neutron detection, the neutron spectra are now routinely measured in the energy range of 1-18 MeV by a time of flight spectrometer and they have allowed studying the effects of rf heating on the fast ions. A new analysis method for the interpretation of the neutron cameras measurements has been refined and applied to the data of the last trace tritium campaign (TTE). With regard to technological upgrades, chemical vapor deposition diamond detectors have been qualified both as neutron counters and as neutron spectrometers, with a potential energy resolution of about one percent. The in situ calibration of the neutron diagnostics, in preparation for the operation with the ITER-like wall, is also promoting important technological developments. With regard to the fast particles, for the first time the temperature of the fast particle tails has been obtained with a new high purity Germanium detector measuring the gamma emission spectrum from the plasma. The effects of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes modes and various MHD instabilities on the confinement of the fast particles have been determined with a

  6. A methodology to generate a synergetic land-cover map by fusion of different land-cover products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Hoyos, A.; García-Haro, F. J.; San-Miguel-Ayanz, J.

    2012-10-01

    The main goal of this study is to develop a general framework for building a hybrid land-cover map by the synergistic combination of a number of land-cover classifications with different legends and spatial resolutions. The proposed approach assesses class-specific accuracies of datasets and establishes affinity between thematic legends using a common land-cover language such as the UN Land-Cover Classification System (LCCS). The approach is illustrated over a large region in Europe using four land-cover datasets (CORINE, GLC2000, MODIS and GlobCover), but it can be applied to any set of existing products. The multi-classification map is expected to improve the performance of individual classifications by reconciling their best characteristics while avoiding their main weaknesses. The intermap comparison reveals improved agreement of the hybrid map with all other land-cover products and therefore indicates the successful exploration of synergies between the different products. The approach offers also estimates for the classification confidence associated with the pixel label and flexibility to shift the balance between commission and omission errors, which are critical in order to obtain a desired reliable map.

  7. ADAM12 and alpha9beta1 integrin are instrumental in human myogenic cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafuste, Peggy; Sonnet, Corinne; Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge on molecular systems involved in myogenic precursor cell (mpc) fusion into myotubes is fragmentary. Previous studies have implicated the a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) family in most mammalian cell fusion processes. ADAM12 is likely involved in fusion of murine mpc and human...... extracellular matrix, suggesting specific involvement of ADAM12-alpha9beta1 interaction in the fusion process. Evaluation of the fusion rate with regard to the size of myotubes showed that both ADAM12 antisense oligonucleotides and alpha9beta1 blockade inhibited more importantly formation of large (> or =5...

  8. Insecticidal effects of extracts of seven plant species on larval development, alpha-amylase activity and offspring production of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Insecta: Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbilou, R; Amri, H; Bouayad, N; Ghailani, N; Ennabili, A; Sayah, F

    2008-03-01

    Bioinsecticidal effects of methanol extracts from seven plant species on Tribolium castaneum were investigated. Centaurium erythraea, Peganum harmala, Ajuga iva, Aristolochia baetica, Pteridium aquilinum and Raphanus raphanistrum extracts inhibit growth of larvae. C. erythraea was the most toxic with 63% mortality 10 days after treatment, followed by P. harmala with 58%. C. erythraea and P. aquilinum reduce the emergence rate respectively of 66% and 19%. The duration of larval period was shortened by Launaea arborescens, P. aquilinum and A. iva extracts, whereas R. raphanistrum and P. harmala extracts extend the larval period when compared to the control. Extracts of C. erythraea, P. harmala, A. iva and A. baetica inhibited F1 progeny production. Larvae possess three alpha-amylase isoforms as determined by SDS-PAGE. Larvae fed on treated diet had lower alpha-amylase activity than larvae feed on untreated diet. C. erythraea and P. harmala are the most potent extracts. These plant extracts could be useful to reduce seed damage caused by this pest species.

  9. Heat transfer problems associated with laser fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, T.G.; Bohachevsky, I.O.; Booth, L.A.; Pendergrass, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    Briefly discussed are the laser-initiated fusion reaction, emissions that are produced, and methods that may be used to protect the walls of reactor cavities from these emissions. Thermal loadings encountered in laser fusion reactors will consist of energy deposition by discrete, short, intense pulses of x and gamma rays, fast alpha and other charged particles, and fusion neutrons. Presented are models of energy deposition in structural walls and blanket regions surrounding the reaction chamber and methods used to calculate resulting temperature increases and thermal stresses in these components. The results of such calculations indicate that the design conditions for the engineering of laser-initiated fusion reactors will be severe and a great amount of ingenuity and analysis will be required to meet them successfully.

  10. Auditory cortical deactivation during speech production and following speech perception: an EEG investigation of the temporal dynamics of the auditory alpha rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, David; Harkrider, Ashley W; Thornton, David; Bowers, Andrew L; Saltuklaroglu, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor integration (SMI) across the dorsal stream enables online monitoring of speech. Jenson et al. (2014) used independent component analysis (ICA) and event related spectral perturbation (ERSP) analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) data to describe anterior sensorimotor (e.g., premotor cortex, PMC) activity during speech perception and production. The purpose of the current study was to identify and temporally map neural activity from posterior (i.e., auditory) regions of the dorsal stream in the same tasks. Perception tasks required "active" discrimination of syllable pairs (/ba/ and /da/) in quiet and noisy conditions. Production conditions required overt production of syllable pairs and nouns. ICA performed on concatenated raw 68 channel EEG data from all tasks identified bilateral "auditory" alpha (α) components in 15 of 29 participants localized to pSTG (left) and pMTG (right). ERSP analyses were performed to reveal fluctuations in the spectral power of the α rhythm clusters across time. Production conditions were characterized by significant α event related synchronization (ERS; pFDR covert replay, and that covert replay provides one source of the motor activity previously observed in some speech perception tasks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that inhibition of auditory regions by speech has been observed in real-time with the ICA/ERSP technique.

  11. Catalysed fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Francis

    2012-01-01

    A sizzling romance and a romp with subatomic particles at CERN. Love, discovery and adventure in the city where nations meet and beams collide. Life in a large laboratory. As always, the challenges are the same. Who leads? Who follows? Who succeeds? Who gets the credit? Who gets the women or the men? Young Jeremy arrives in CERN and joins the quest for green energy. Coping with baffling jargon and manifold dangers, he is distracted by radioactive rats, lovely ladies and an unscrupulous rival. Full of doubts and hesitations, he falls for a dazzling Danish girl, who leads him astray. His brilliant idea leads to a discovery and a new route to cold fusion. But his personal life is scrambled. Does it bring fame or failure? Tragedy or triumph?

  12. An altered gp100 peptide ligand with decreased binding by TCR and CD8alpha dissects T cell cytotoxicity from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels eSchaft

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered peptide ligands (APLs provide useful tools to study T cell activation and potentially direct immune responses to improve treatment of cancer patients. To better understand and exploit APLs, we studied the relationship between APLs and T cell function in more detail. Here, we tested a broad panel of gp100(280-288 APLs with respect to T cell cytotoxicity, production of cytokines and activation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT by human T cells gene-engineered with a gp100-HLA-A2-specific TCRalpha/beta. We demonstrated that gp100-specific cytotoxicity, production of cytokines, and activation of NFAT were not affected by APLs with single amino acid substitutions, except for an APL with an amino acid substitution at position 3 (APL A3, which did not elicit any T cell response. A gp100 peptide with a double amino acid mutation (APL S4S6 elicited T cell cytotoxicity and production of IFNgamma, and to a lesser extent TNFalpha, IL-4, and IL-5, but not production of IL-2 and IL-10, or activation of NFAT. Notably, TCR-mediated functions showed decreases in sensitivities for S4S6 versus gp100 wt peptide, which were minor for cytotoxicity but at least a 1000-fold more prominent for the production of cytokines. TCR-engineered T cells did not bind A3-HLA-A2, but did bind S4S6-HLA-A2 although to a lowered extent compared to wt peptide-HLA-A2. Moreover, S4S6-induced T cell function demonstrated an enhanced dependency on CD8alpha. Taken together, most gp100 APLs functioned as agonists, but A3 and S4S6 peptides acted as a null ligand and partial agonist, respectively. Our results further suggest that TCR-mediated cytotoxicity can be dissected from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT, and that the agonist potential of peptide mutants relates to the extent of binding by TCR and CD8alpha. These findings may facilitate the design of APLs to advance the study of T cell activation and their use for therapeutic applications.

  13. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF): Principles, Status, and International Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-11-16

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion that is intermediate between the two extremes of inertial and magnetic confinement. Target plasma preparation is followed by compression to fusion conditions. The use of a magnetic field to reduce electron thermal conduction and potentially enhance DT alpha energy deposition allows the compression rate to be drastically reduced relative to that for inertial confinement fusion. This leads to compact systems with target driver power and intensity requirements that are orders of magnitude lower than for ICF. A liner on plasma experiment has been proposed to provide a firm proof of principle for MTF.

  14. $\\alpha_s$ review (2016)

    CERN Document Server

    d'Enterria, David

    2016-01-01

    The current world-average of the strong coupling at the Z pole mass, $\\alpha_s(m^2_{Z}) = 0.1181 \\pm 0.0013$, is obtained from a comparison of perturbative QCD calculations computed, at least, at next-to-next-to-leading-order accuracy, to a set of 6 groups of experimental observables: (i) lattice QCD "data", (ii) $\\tau$ hadronic decays, (iii) proton structure functions, (iv) event shapes and jet rates in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (v) Z boson hadronic decays, and (vi) top-quark cross sections in p-p collisions. In addition, at least 8 other $\\alpha_s$ extractions, usually with a lower level of theoretical and/or experimental precision today, have been proposed: pion, $\\Upsilon$, W hadronic decays; soft and hard fragmentation functions; jets cross sections in pp, e-p and $\\gamma$-p collisions; and photon F$_2$ structure function in $\\gamma\\,\\gamma$ collisions. These 14 $\\alpha_s$ determinations are reviewed, and the perspectives of reduction of their present uncertainties are discussed.

  15. Oxidative Aging of Gas and Aerosol Products from the Ozonolysis of alpha-Pinene; Results from the MUCHACHAS-2 Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarlo, Peter; Tritscher, Torsten; Praplan, Arnaud; Barmet, Peter; Mertes, Peter; Donahue, Neil; Dommen, Josef; Prevot, Andre; Baltensperger, Urs

    2010-05-01

    The MUltiple CHamber Aerosol CHemical Aging Study 2 (MUCHACHAS-2) took place at the Paul Scherrer Institute 27 meter cubed chamber in January-February 2009. The campaign was designed to study the oxidation of the volatile components from the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene (AP). Experiments began with the dark ozonolysis of AP at low and high AP concentrations (10 and 40 ppb, respectively) followed by OH exposure via several methods including HONO photolysis and dark OH generation from the ozonolysis of tetramethylethene (TME). OH generation via HONO experiments were conducted at both high and low NOx levels. Gas and aerosol phase evolution was monitored with Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS), Ion Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IC-MS), High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS), and a Volatility Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (VHTDMA). AMS results indicate continued chemical evolution of ozonolysis generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) without additional OH exposure and after the precursor had been consumed, showing that the AP ozonolysis system does not reach a equilibrium but continues to react. A NOx dependence on specific m/z aerosol markers was also seen in both the high and low concentration AP experiments. The ratio of m/z 44 to total organics showed a strong correlation with integrated OH exposure. Increases in signal intensity with time were observed for several high molecular weight (150-250 amu) species with significant increases after OH exposure following ozonolysis. These and other results will be presented.

  16. Biglutaminyl-biliverdin IX alpha as a heme degradation product in the dengue fever insect-vector Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luiza O R; Oliveira, Pedro L; Almeida, Igor C; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O

    2007-06-12

    Hemoglobin digestion in the midgut of hematophagous animals results in the release of its prosthetic group, heme, which is a pro-oxidant molecule. Heme enzymatic degradation is a protective mechanism that has been described in several organisms, including plants, bacteria, and mammals. This reaction is catalyzed by heme oxygenase and results in formation of carbon monoxide, ferrous ion, and biliverdin IXalpha. During digestion, a large amount of a green pigment is produced and secreted into the intestinal lumen of Aedes aegypti adult females. In the case of another blood-sucking insect, the kissing-bug Rhodnius prolixus, we have recently shown that heme degradation involves a complex pathway that generates dicysteinyl-biliverdin IX gamma. The light absorption spectrum of the Aedes purified pigment was similar to that of biliverdin, but its mobility on a reverse-phase chromatography column suggested a compound less hydrophobic than biliverdin IXalpha. Structural characterization by ESI-MS revealed that the mosquito pigment is the alpha isomer of biliverdin bound to two glutamine residues by an amide bond. This biglutaminyl-biliverdin is formed by oxidative cleavage of the heme porphyrin ring followed by two subsequent additions of glutamine residues to the biliverdin IXalpha. The role of this pathway in the adaptation of this insect vector to a blood-feeding habit is discussed.

  17. Test of CP invariance in vector-boson fusion production of the Higgs boson using the Optimal Observable method in the ditau decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

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