WorldWideScience

Sample records for fusion engineering test

  1. Design of a fusion engineering test facility

    Sager, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    The fusion Engineering Test Facility (ETF) is being designed to provide for engineering testing capability in a program leading to the demonstration of fusion as a viable energy option. It will combine power-reactor-type components and subsystems into an integrated tokamak system and provide a test bed to test blanket modules in a fusion environment. Because of the uncertainties in impurity control two basic designs are being developed: a design with a bundle divertor (Design 1) and one with a poloidal divertor (Design 2). The two designs are similar where possible, the latter having somewhat larger toroidal field (TF) coils to accommodate removal of the larger torus sectors required for the single-null poloidal divertor. Both designs have a major radius of 5.4 m, a minor radius of 1.3 m, and a D-shaped plasma with an elongation of 1.6. Ten TF coils are incorporated in both designs, producing a toroidal field of 5.5 T on-axis. The ohmic heating and equilibrium field (EF) coils supply sufficient volt-seconds to produce a flat-top burn of 100 s and a duty cycle of 135 s, including a start of 12 s, a burn termination of 10 s, and a pumpdown of 13 s. The total fusion power during burn is 750 MW, giving a neutron wall loading of 1.5 MW/m 2 . In Design 1 of the poloidal field (PF) coils except the fast-response EF coils are located outside the FT coils and are superconducting. The fast-response coils are located inside the TF coil bore near the torus and are normal conducting so that they can be easily replaced.In Design 2 all of the PF coils are located outside the TF coils and are superconducting. Ignition is achieved with 60 MW of neutral beam injection at 150 keV. Five megawatts of radio frequency heating (electron cyclotron resonance heating) is used to assist in the startup and limit the breakdown requirement to 25 V

  2. Utilization of fission reactors for fusion engineering testing

    Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fission reactors can be used to conduct some of the fusion nuclear engineering tests identified in the FINESSE study. To further define the advantages and disadvantages of fission testing, the technical and programmatic constraints on this type of testing are discussed here. This paper presents and discusses eight key issues affecting fission utilization. Quantitative comparisons with projected fusion operation are made to determine the technical assets and limitations of fission testing. Capabilities of existing fission reactors are summarized and compared with technical needs. Conclusions are then presented on the areas where fission testing can be most useful

  3. Physical and engineering aspects of a fusion engineering test facility based on mirror confinement

    Kawabe, T.; Hirayama, S.; Hojo, H.; Kozaki, Y.; Yoshikawa, K.

    1986-01-01

    Controlled fusion research has accomplished great progress in the field of confinement of high-density and high-temperature plasmas and breakeven experiments are expected before the end of the 1980s. Many experiments have been proposed as the next step for fusion research. Among them is the study of ignited plasmas and another is the study of fusion engineering. Some of the important studies in fusion engineering are the integrated test in a fusion reactor environment as well as tests of first-wall materials and of the reactor structures, and test for tritium breeding and blanket modules or submodules. An ideal neutron source for the study of fusion engineering is the deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasma itself. A neutron facility based on a D-T-burning plasma consists of all of the components that a real fusion power reactor would have, so eventually the integrated test for fusion reactor engineering can be done as well as the tests for each engineering component

  4. The FENIX [Fusion ENgineering International EXperimental] test facility

    Slack, D.S.; Patrick, R.E.; Chaplin, M.R.; Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.S.; Summers, L.T.; Kerns, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Fusion ENgineering International EXperimental Magnet Facility (FENIX), under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is a significant step forward in meeting the testing requirements necessary for the development of superconductor for large-scale, superconducting magnets. A 14-T, transverse field over a test volume of 150 x 60 x 150 mm in length will be capable of testing conductors the size of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Proposed conductors for ITER measure ∼35 mm on one side and will operate at currents of up to 40 kA at fields of ∼14 T. The testing of conductors and associated components, such as joints, will require large-bore, high-field magnet facilities. FENIX is being constructed using the existing A 2o and A 2i magnets from the idle MFTF. The east and west A 2 pairs will be mounted together to form a split-pair solenoid. The pairs of magnets will be installed in a 4.0-m cryostat vessel located in the HFTF building at LLNL. Each magnet is enclosed in its own cryostat, the existing 4.0-m vessel serving only as a vacuum chamber. 4 refs., 8 figs

  5. Fusion engineering device design description

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein.

  6. Fusion Engineering Device design description

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein

  7. Fusion engineering device design description

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-12-01

    The US Magnetic Fusion Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. During 1981, the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), developed a baseline design for the FED. This design is summarized herein

  8. Engineering design of a fusion test reactor (FTR) and fusion engineering research facility (FERF) based on a toroidal theta pinch

    Abdou, M.; Burke, R.J.; Dauzvardis, P.V.; Foss, M.; Gerstl, S.A.W.; Maroni, V.A.; Pierce, A.W.; Turner, A.F.; Krakowski, R.A.; Linford, R.K.; Oliphant, T.A.; Ribe, F.L.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes two advanced toroidal theta-pinch devices which are being proposed for future construction. The Fusion Test Reactor (FTR) is being designed to produce thermonuclear energy (at 20 MeV/neutron) equal to the maximum plasma energy (Q=1) and to demonstrate α-particle heating. The Fusion Engineering and Research Facility (FERF) is being designed to test materials in a fusion environment where the average 14-MeV neutron flux from the plasma is greater than or of the order of 5.10 13 n/cm 2 .s over large surface areas. These devices employ the staged theta-pinch principle where the heating is accomplished by rapid (about 0.1 μs) implosion and expansion followed by a slow compression of the plasma. The rapid implosion injects as much heat as possible at as large a plasma radious as possible so that the plasma remains stable even after further compression. The final compression to ignition requires the transfer of a large amount of magnetic energy which implies a long transfer time (about 1 ms) for realistic voltages in the driving circuit. Throughout the heating and burn cycle the plasma must remain in equilibrium and stable to the dominant MHD-modes. A sufficiently large plasma radius guarantees stability against the m = 1 modes. These equilibrium and stability conditions and the requirements on thermonuclear burn determine the design parameters for either machine. The design parameters must also be consistent with economic limitations and technological feasibility of components. In addition to these requirements, the FERF must provide a steady and reliable source of fusion neutrons. (author)

  9. Fusion power demonstration - a baseline for the mirror engineering test reactor

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Neef, W.S.

    1983-01-01

    Developing a definition of an engineering test reactor (ETR) is a current goal of the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE). As a baseline for the mirror ETR, the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) concept has been pursued at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in cooperation with Grumman Aerospace, TRW, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Envisioned as an intermediate step to fusion power applications, the FPD would achieve DT ignition in the central cell, after which blankets and power conversion would be added to produce net power. To achieve ignition, a minimum central cell length of 67.5 m is needed to supply the ion and alpha particles radial drift pumping losses in the transition region. The resulting fusion power is 360 MW. Low electron-cyclotron heating power of 12 MW, ion-cyclotron heating of 2.5 MW, and a sloshing ion beam power of 1.0 MW result in a net plasma Q of 22. A primary technological challenge is the 24-T, 45-cm bore choke coil, comprising a copper hybrid insert within a 15 to 18 T superconducting coil

  10. Track-mounted remote handling system for the Tokamak Fusion Engineering Test

    Kelly, V.P.; Berger, J.D.; Daubert, R.L.; Yount, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Concepts for remote handling machines (IVM) designed to transverse the interior of toroidal vessels with guidance and support from track systems have been developed for the proposed Tokamak Fusion Engineering Test (TFET). TFET has been proposed as an upgrade for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), currently nearing completion. The track-mounted IVMs were conceived to perform in-vessel remote maintenance for TFET, including removal and replacement of pump limiter blades and protective tiles as well as other maintenance-related tasks such as vessel wall inspection leak testing and interior cleanup. The conceptual IVMs consist of three manipulator arms mounted on a common frame member: a single power manipulator arm with high load carrying capacity and two lower-capacity servomanipulator arms. Descriptions of the IVM concepts, in-vessel track systems, and ex-vessel handling systems are presented

  11. Utilization of fusion neutrons in the tokamak fusion test reactor for blanket performance testing and other nuclear engineering experiments

    Caldwell, C.S.; Pettus, W.G.; Schmotzer, J.K.; Welfare, F.; Womack, R.

    1979-01-01

    In addition to developing a set of reacting-plasma/blanket-neutronics benchmark data, the TFTR fusion application experiments would provide operational experience with fast-neutron dosimetry and the remote handling of blanket modules in a tokamak reactor environment; neutron streaming and hot-spot information invaluable for the optimal design of penetrations in future fusion reactors; and the identification of the most damage-resistant insulators for a variety of fusion-reactor components

  12. The engineering test facility

    Steiner, D.; Becraft, W.R.; Sager, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper describes the design status of the ETF. (orig.)

  13. Engineering test facility

    Steiner, D.; Becraft, W.R.; Sager, P.H.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper described the design status of the ETF

  14. Linear stability of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes in the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor

    Yang, Wenjun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Li, Guoqiang, E-mail: ligq@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Hu, Youjun; Gao, Xiang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    The Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is under design. It aims to fill the gaps between ITER and DEMO. In the reactor, the deuterium-tritium fusion reaction and the auxiliary heating will generate a lot of energetic particles. It is possible that these energetic particles will drive toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) instabilities under the conditions of CFETR plasma parameters. These instabilities can result in energetic particles redistribution or loss, so it’s vital to study TAE instabilities in CFETR. The aim of this paper is to study the possibility of reducing TAE instabilities by changing safety factor profiles in CFETR. NOVA and NOVA-K codes are used to study TAE stability. The equilibria are constructed using the CORSICA code. Safety factor profiles are selected as the three typical profiles of ITER scenarios. For the three different safety factor profiles, we use NOVA to scan and calculate their continuum spectrum and eigenmode structures, then use NOVA-K to calculate the different damping and driving mechanisms for different toroidal mode numbers. The numerical calculations show that if the safety factor profiles are chosen appropriately, then all the TAEs can be stable. Thus, it’s possible to reduce the TAE instabilities by changing safety factor profiles in CFETR. We also scan the temperature and density profiles to see their effects on the TAE instabilities. It shows that the TAE instabilities keep unchanged for a wide range of profiles.

  15. Activation calculation and radiation analysis for China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor

    Chen, Zhi, E-mail: zchen@ustc.edu.cn; Qiao, Shiji; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, X. George

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Activation calculation was performed using FLUKA for the main components of CFETR. • Radionuclides and radioactive wastes were assessed for CFETR. • The Waste Disposal Ratings (WDR) were assessed for CFETR. - Abstract: The activation calculation and analysis for the China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) will play an important role in its system design, maintenance, inspection and assessment of nuclear waste. Using the multi-particle transport code FLUKA and its associated data library, we calculated the radioactivity, specific activity, waste disposal rating from activation products, nuclides in the tritium breeding blanket, shielding layer, vacuum vessel and toroidal field coil (TFC) of CFETR. This paper presents the calculation results including neutron flux, activation products and waste disposal rating after one-year full operation of the CFETR. The findings show that, under the assumption of one-year operation at the 200 MW fusion power, the total radioactivity inventory will be 1.05 × 10{sup 19} Bq at shutdown and 1.03 × 10{sup 17} Bq after ten years. The primary residual nuclide is found to be {sup 55}Fe in ten years after the shutdown. The waste disposal rating (WDR) values are very low (<<1), according to Class C limits, CFETR materials are qualified for shallow land burial. It is shown that CFETR has no serious activation safety issue.

  16. Fusion systems engineering

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Summaries of research are included for each of the following topics: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) the MACK/MACKLIB system for nuclear response functions, and (5) energy storage and power supply systems for fusion reactors

  17. Fusion systems engineering

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Research during this report period has covered the following areas: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of fusion concepts, (4) MACKLIB-IV, a new library of nuclear response functions, (5) energy storage and power supply requirements for commercial fusion reactors, (6) blanket/shield design evaluation for commercial fusion reactors, and (7) cross section measurements, evaluations, and techniques

  18. Development of an engineering-scale nuclear test of a solid-breeder fusion-blanket concept

    Deis, G.A.; Bohn, T.S.; Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Scott, A.J.; Watts, K.D.; Welch, E.C.

    1983-08-01

    As part of the Phase I effort on Program Element-II (PE-II) of the Office of Fusion Energy/Argonne National Laboratory First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program, a study has been performed to develop preconceptual hardware designs and preliminary test program descriptions for two fission-reactor-based tests of a water-cooled, solid-breeder fusion reactor blanket concept. First, a list of potentially acceptable reactor facilities is developed, based on a list of required reactor characteristics. From this set of facilities, two facilities are selected for study: the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the Power Burst Facility (PBF). A test which employs a cylindrical unit cell of a solid-breeder fusion reactor blanket, with pressurized-water cooling is designed for each facility. The test design is adjusted to the particular characteristics of each reactor. These two test designs are then compared on the basis of technical issues and cost. Both tests can satisfy the PE-II mission: blanket thermal hydraulic and thermomechanical issues. In addition, both reactors will produce prototypical tritium production rates and profiles and release characteristics with little or no additional modifications

  19. Fusion systems engineering

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Information is given on each of the following topics: (1) fusion reactor systems studies, (2) development of blanket processing technology for fusion reactors, (3) safety studies of CTR concepts, and (4) cross section measurements and techniques

  20. First-wall, blanket, and shield engineering test program for magnetically confined fusion power reactors

    Maroni, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The key engineering areas identified for early study relate to FW/B/S system thermal-hydraulics, thermomechnics, nucleonics, electromagnetics, assembly, maintenance, and repair. Programmatic guidance derived frm planning exercises involving over thirty organizations (laboratories, industries, and universities) has indicated (1) that meaningful near term engineering testing should be feasible within the bounds of a modest funding base, (2) that there are existing facilities and expertise which can be profitably utilized in this testing, and (3) that near term efforts should focus on the measurement of engineering data and the verification/calibration of predictive methods for anticipated normal operational and transient FW/B/S conditions. The remainder of this paper discusses in more detail the planning strategies, proposed approach to near term testing, and longer range needs for integrated FW/B/S test facilities

  1. Initial progress in the first wall, blanket, and shield Engineering Test Program for magnetically confined fusion-power reactors

    Herman, H.; Baker, C.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1981-10-01

    The first wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program (ETP) progressed from the planning stage into implementation during July, 1981. The program, generic in nature, comprises four Test Program Elements (TPE's), the emphasis of which is on defining the performance parameters for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) and the major fusion device to follow FED. These elements are: (1) nonnuclear thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing of first wall and component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads and heat transient (i.e., plasma disruption) effects; (2) nonnuclear and nuclear testing of FW/B/S components and assemblies with emphasis on bulk (nuclear) heating effects, integrated FW/B/S hydraulics and mechanics, blanket coolant system transients, and nuclear benchmarks; (3) FW/B/S electromagnetic and eddy current effects testing, including pulsed field penetration, torque and force restraint, electromagnetic materials, liquid metal MHD effects and the like; and (4) FW/B/S Assembly, Maintenance and Repair (AMR) studies focusing on generic AMR criteria, with the objective of preparing an AMR designers guidebook; also, development of rapid remote assembly/disassembly joint system technology, leak detection and remote handling methods

  2. Fusion engineering. Vol. 2

    Young, N.E.; Pinter, G.R.; Spinos, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    An x-ray crystal spectrometer is scheduled for installation in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor in 1984 coinciding with the TFTR deuterium operation phase. This spectrometer is designed to measure the spectra of hydrogen-like and helium-like impurities in the plasma. Ion temperatures electron temperatures, electron density and the distribution of impurity charge states are obtained from the x-ray detector count ratios. The velocity of the toroidal rotation of the plasma is also discerned using this device. The x-ray crystal spectrometer is based on the Bragg diffraction of x-rays from a curved crystal impinging on a multiwire proportional counter. Only those x-rays that satisfy the Bragg relationship (lambda =2d sin theta) will be diffracted and strike the proportional counter. This paper is limited to a discussion of the physical characteristics of the spectrometer and the methods devised to satisfy the operational aspects of such a device

  3. Engineering test facility design center

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The ETF would provide a test bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This section describes the status of this design

  4. Laser fusion and precision engineering

    Nakai, Sadao

    1989-01-01

    The development of laser nuclear fusion energy for attaining the self supply of energy in Japan and establishing the future perspective as the nation is based in the wide fields of high level science and technology. Therefore to its promotion, large expectation is placed as the powerful traction for the development of creative science and technology which are particularly necessary in Japan. The research on laser nuclear fusion advances steadily in the elucidation of the physics of pellet implosion which is its basic concept and compressed plasma parameters. In September, 1986, the number of neutron generation 10 13 , and in October, 1988, the high density compression 600 times as high as solid density have been achieved. Based on these results, now the laser nuclear fusion is in the situation to begin the attainment of ignition condition for nuclear fusion and the realization of break even. The optical components, high power laser technology, fuel pellet production, high resolution measurement, the simulation of implosion using a supercomputer and so on are closely related to precision engineering. In this report, the mechanism of laser nuclear fusion, the present status of its research, and the basic technologies and precision engineering are described. (K.I.)

  5. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  6. Comparison benchmark between tokamak simulation code and TokSys for Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor vertical displacement control design

    Qiu Qing-Lai; Xiao Bing-Jia; Guo Yong; Liu Lei; Wang Yue-Hang

    2017-01-01

    Vertical displacement event (VDE) is a big challenge to the existing tokamak equipment and that being designed. As a Chinese next-step tokamak, the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) has to pay attention to the VDE study with full-fledged numerical codes during its conceptual design. The tokamak simulation code (TSC) is a free boundary time-dependent axisymmetric tokamak simulation code developed in PPPL, which advances the MHD equations describing the evolution of the plasma in a rectangular domain. The electromagnetic interactions between the surrounding conductor circuits and the plasma are solved self-consistently. The TokSys code is a generic modeling and simulation environment developed in GA. Its RZIP model treats the plasma as a fixed spatial distribution of currents which couple with the surrounding conductors through circuit equations. Both codes have been individually used for the VDE study on many tokamak devices, such as JT-60U, EAST, NSTX, DIII-D, and ITER. Considering the model differences, benchmark work is needed to answer whether they reproduce each other’s results correctly. In this paper, the TSC and TokSys codes are used for analyzing the CFETR vertical instability passive and active controls design simultaneously. It is shown that with the same inputs, the results from these two codes conform with each other. (paper)

  7. Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnet system

    VanSant, J.H.; Kozman, T.A.; Bulmer, R.H.; Ng, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    In 1979, R.H. Bulmer of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) discussed a proposed tandem-mirror magnet system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at the 8th symposium on Engineering Problems in Fusion Research. Since then, Congress has voted funds for expanding LLNL's MFTF to a tandem-mirror facility (designated MFTF-B). The new facility, scheduled for completion by 1985, will seek to achieve two goals: (1) Energy break-even capability (Q or the ratio of fusion energy to plasma heating energy = 1) of mirror fusion, (2) Engineering feasibility of reactor-scale machines. Briefly stated, 22 superconducting magnets contained in a 11-m-diam by 65-m-long vacuum vessel will confine a fusion plasma fueled by 80 axial streaming-plasma guns and over 40 radial neutral beams. We have already completed a preliminary design of this magnet system

  8. Initial trade and design studies for the fusion engineering device

    Flanagan, C.A.; Steiner, D.; Smith, G.E.

    1981-06-01

    The Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980 calls for the operation of a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. It is the intent of the Act that the FED, in combination with other testing facilities, will establish the engineering feasibility of magnetic fusion energy. The Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC), under the guidance of a Technical Management Board (TMB), initiated a program of trade and design studies in October 1980 to support the selection of the FED concept. This document presents the results of these initial trade and design studies. Based on these results, a baseline configuration has been identified and the Design Center effort for the remainder of the fiscal year will be devoted to the development of a self-consistent FED design description

  9. Fusion power system: technology and engineering considerations

    Fillo, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Engineering concepts are discussed for the following topics: (1) blanket environment, (2) blanket materials, (3) tritium breeding, (4) heat removal problems, (5) materials selection for radiation shields, (6) afterheat, and (7) fusion blanket design

  10. Generomak: Fusion physics, engineering and costing model

    Delene, J.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Sheffield, J.; Dory, R.A.

    1988-06-01

    A generic fusion physics, engineering and economics model (Generomak) was developed as a means of performing consistent analysis of the economic viability of alternative magnetic fusion reactors. The original Generomak model developed at Oak Ridge by Sheffield was expanded for the analyses of the Senior Committee on Environmental Safety and Economics of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM). This report describes the Generomak code as used by ESECOM. The input data used for each of the ten ESECOM fusion plants and the Generomak code output for each case is given. 14 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs

  11. FENIX [Fusion ENgineering International eXperimental]: A test facility for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] and other new superconducting magnets

    Slack, D.S.; Patrick, R.E.; Miller, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Fusion ENgineering International eXperimental (FENIX) Test Facility which is nearing completion at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a 76-t set of superconducting magnets housed in a 4-m-diameter cryostat. It represents a significant step toward meeting the testing needs for the development of superconductors appropriate for large-scale magnet applications such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The magnet set is configured to allow radial access to the 0.4-m-diameter high-field region where maximum fields up to 14 T will be provided. The facility is fitted with a thermally isolated test well with a port to the high-field region that allows insertion and removal of test conductors without disturbing the cryogenic environment of the magnets. It is expected that the facility will be made available to magnet developers internationally, and this paper discusses its general design features, its construction, and its capabilities

  12. Chemical engineering side of nuclear fusion power

    Johnson, E.F.

    1976-10-01

    It is widely recognized that chemical engineering has important roles to play in the development of national and world wide energy resources through optimal utilization of fossil fuel reserves. It is much less appreciated that there are crucial chemical engineering problems in the development of energy production from other sources. In particular the successful development of nuclear fusion power generating systems will require the solution of many problems that are uniquely suited to chemical engineers. This article presents a brief overview of the fusion development program and an identification of the major technological problems remaining to be solved

  13. Mirror fusion test facility

    Post, R.F.

    1978-01-01

    The MFTF is a large new mirror facility under construction at Livermore for completion in 1981--82. It represents a scaleup, by a factor of 50 in plasma volume, a factor of 5 or more in ion energy, and a factor of 4 in magnetic field intensity over the Livermore 2XIIB experiment. Its magnet, employing superconducting NbTi windings, is of Yin-Yang form and will weigh 200 tons. MFTF will be driven by neutral beams of two levels of current and energy: 1000 amperes of 20 keV (accelerating potential) pulsed beams for plasma startup; 750 amperes of 80 keV beams of 0.5 second duration for temperature buildup and plasma sustainment. Two operating modes for MFTF are envisaged: The first is operation as a conventional mirror cell with n/sup tau/ approximately equal to 10 12 cm -3 sec, W/sub i/ = 50 keV, where the emphasis will be on studying the physics of mirror cells, particularly the issues of improved techniques of stabilization against ion cyclotron modes and of maximization of the electron temperature. The second possible mode is the further study of the Field Reversed Mirror idea, using high current neutral beams to sustain the field-reversed state. Anticipating success in the coming Livermore Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) MFTF has been oriented so that it could comprise one end cell of a scaled up TM experiment. Also, if MFTF were to succeed in achieving a FR state it could serve as an essentially full-sized physics prototype of one cell of a FRM fusion power plant

  14. Three equipment concepts for the Fusion Engineering Device

    Spampinato, P.T.; Masson, L.S.; Watts, K.D.; Grant, N.R.; Kuban, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    Maintenance equipment which is needed to remotely handle fusion device components is being conceptually developed for the Fusion Engineering Design Center. This will test the assumption that these equipment needs can be satisfied by present technology. In addition, the development of equipment conceptual designs will allow for cost estimates which have a much higher degree of certainty. Accurate equipment costs will be useful for assessments which trade off gains in availability as a function of increased investments in maintenance equipment

  15. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  16. Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnet

    Henning, C.H.; Hodges, A.J.; Van Sant, J.H.; Hinkle, R.E.; Horvath, J.A.; Hintz, R.E.; Dalder, E.; Baldi, R.; Tatro, R.

    1979-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is the largest of the mirror program experiments for magnetic fusion energy. It seeks to combine and extend the near-classical plasma confinement achieved in 2XIIB with the most advanced neutral-beam and magnet technologies. The product of ion density and confinement time will be improved more than an order of magnitude, while the superconducting magnet weight will be extrapolated from the 15 tons in Baseball II to 375 tons in MFTF. Recent reactor studies show that the MFTF will traverse much of the distance in magnet technology towards the reactor regime. Design specifics of the magnet are given

  17. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume II. Design description

    1981-10-01

    This volume summarizes the design of the FED. It includes a description of the major systems and subsystems, the supporting plasma design analysis, a projected device cost and associated construction schedule, and a description of the facilities to house and support the device. This effort represents the culmination of the FY81 studies conducted at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC). Unique in these design activities has been the collaborative involvement of the Design Center personnel and numerous resource physicists from the fusion community who have made significant contributions in the physics design analysis as well as the physics support of the engineering design of the major FED systems and components

  18. Demountable toroidal fusion core facility for physics optimization and fusion engineering

    Bogart, S.L.; Wagner, C.E.; Krall, N.A.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Weggel, C.F.; Lund, K.O.; Sedehi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Following a successful compact ignition tokamak (CIT) experiment, a fusion facility will be required for physics optimization (POF) and fusion engineering research (FERF). The POF will address issues such as high-beta operation, current drive, impurity control, and will test geometric and configurational variations such as the spherical torus or the reversed-field pinch (RFP). The FERF will be designed to accumulate rapidly a large neutron dose in prototypical fusion subsystems exposed to radiation. Both facilities will require low-cost replacement cores and rapid replacement times. The Demountable Toroidal Fusion Core (DTFC) facility is designed to fulfill these requirements. It would be a cost-effective stepping stone between the CIT and a demonstration fusion reactor

  19. The fusion engineering data base

    Musicki, Z.; Maynard, C.W.; Watanabe, Y.; Bennethum, A.; Gruetzmacher, K.

    1986-01-01

    A computerized data base, called FUSEDATA, has been conceived in order to systematically present the performance parameters of components and systems used in fusion plants and experiments. By putting together a framework where data could be systematically input, the authors made it substantially easier to install the proper data when it becomes available (at first from the experimental facilities now operating). The data base consists of different tables that contain information which defines the system, its operating and environmental conditions as well as the necessary performance data (reliability, maintenance, economics, etc.)

  20. Engineering the fusion reactor first wall

    Wurden, Glen; Scott, Willms

    2008-01-01

    Recently the National Academy of Engineering published a set of Grand Challenges in Engineering in which the second item listed was entitled 'Provide energy from fusion'. Clearly a key component of this challenge is the science and technology associated with creating and maintaining burning plasmas. This is being vigorously addressed with both magnetic and inertial approaches with various experiments such as ITER and NIF. Considerably less attention is being given to another key component of this challenge, namely engineering the first wall that will contain the burning plasma. This is a daunting problem requiring technologies and materials that can not only survive, but also perform multiple essential functions in this extreme environment. These functions are (1) shield the remainder of the device from radiation. (2) convert of neutron energy to useful heat and (3) breed and extract tritium to maintain the reactor fuel supply. The first wall must not contaminate the plasma with impurities. It must be infused with cooling to maintain acceptable temperatures on plasma facing and structural components. It must not degrade. It must avoid excessive build-up of tritium on surfaces, and, if surface deposits do form, must be receptive to cleaning techniques. All these functions and constraints must be met while being subjected to nuclear and thermal radiation, particle bombardment, high magnetic fields, thermal cycling and occasional impingement of plasma on the surface. And, operating in a nuclear environment, the first wall must be fully maintainable by remotely-operated manipulators. Elements of the first wall challenge have been studied since the 1970' s both in the US and internationally. Considerable foundational work has been performed on plasma facing materials and breeding blanket/shield modules. Work has included neutronics, materials fabrication and joining, fluid flow, tritium breeding, tritium recovery and containment, energy conversion, materials damage and

  1. Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1978-01-01

    A large, new Mirror Fusion Test Facility is under construction at LLL. Begun in FY78 it will be completed at the end of FY78 at a cost of $94.2M. This facility gives the mirror program the flexibility to explore mirror confinement principles at a signficant scale and advances the technology of large reactor-like devices. The role of MFTF in the LLL program is described here

  2. Technological and engineering challenges of fusion

    Maisonnier, David; Hayward, Jim

    2008-01-01

    The current fusion development scenario in Europe assumes the sequential achievement of key milestones. Firstly, the qualification of the DEMO/reactor physics basis in ITER, secondly, the qualification of materials for in-vessel components in IFMIF and, thirdly, the qualification of components and processes in DEMO. Although this scenario is constrained by budgetary considerations, it assumes the resolution of many challenges in physics, technology and engineering. In the first part of the paper, the technological and engineering challenges to be met in order to satisfy the current development scenario will be highlighted. These challenges will be met by an appropriate share of the work between ITER, IFMIF, DEMO and the necessary accompanying programme, which will have to include a number of dedicated facilities (e.g. for the development of H and CD systems). In the second part of the paper, the consequences of a considerable acceleration of the fusion development programme will be discussed. Although most of the technological and engineering challenges identified above will have to be met within a shorter timescale, it is possible to limit the requirements and expectation for a first fusion power plant with respect to those adopted for the current fusion development scenario. However, it must be recognised that such a strategy will inevitably result in increased risk and a reduction in the economy of the plant. (author)

  3. Engineering aspects of particle beam fusion systems

    Cook, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy is supporting research directed toward demonstration of DT fuel ignition in an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsule. As part of the ICF effort, two major Particle Beam Fusion Accelerators (PBFA I and II) are being developed at Sandia National Laboratories with the objective of providing energetic light ion beams of sufficient power density for target implosion. Supporting light ion beam research is being performed at the Naval Research Laboratory and at Cornell University. If the answers to several key physics and engineering questions are favorable, pulsed power accelerators will be able to provide an efficient and inexpensive approach to high target gain and eventual power production applications

  4. Pulsed fission/fusion hybrid engines

    Hudson, G.C.

    1979-01-01

    Research into high-thrust, high-specific impulse rocket engines using energy from nuclear reactions which has been conducted at this organization will be discussed. The engines are all conceptual in nature, yet are within the realization of conventional or near-term technology. The engine concepts under study at Foundation, Inc. are designed to obviate or minimize these negative effects of the ORION scheme. By using non-chemical triggers to initiate a non-breakeven fusion reaction at the core of a target composed of both fission and fusion fuel, it should be possible to employ the fusion neutrons thus produced to begin a fission reaction in U-235 or Pu-239. Since the density of the target can be increased by as much as a factor of 250 through compression of the pellet, the amount of fission material necessary to produce a critical mass can be greatly reduced. (This also means that the amount of fission products produced for a giventhrust level is also reduced from the ORION levels.) Coupling this eeffect to the large number of 14 MeV fusion neutrons produced early in the compression process and subsequently to the heating of some additional fusion fuel surrounding the critical mass leads to the very efficient burnup of the target. This insures both high yield from the target as well as low cost per MJ energy released. Finally, the use of such small pellets allows the scale of the energy released to be tailored to a level usable in rocket engines of a few tens of tons thrust level. (orig.) [de

  5. Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas

    Gentile, C.A.; Blanchard, W.R.; Kozub, T.; Priniski, C.; Zatz, I.; Obenschain, S.

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (∼ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a 'gas shield' may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

  6. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. The authors show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  7. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.; Longhurst, G.R.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. We will show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  8. A fusion engineering program for Canada

    Billington, I.J.

    In 1980 the National Research Council asked DSMA ATCON Ltd., in collaboration with Ontario Hydro, the University of Toronto, and McMaster University, to evaluate concepts for a national fusion engineering program, to define a facility that could be constructed in Canada to meet the program goals, and to suggest a strategy for encouraging industrial participation. The central element of the proposed fusion engineering and development program is tritium technology, with additional emphasis on the broader field of all hydrogen isotopes and their interactions with materials. The Canadian program in the initial phase would concentrate on fusion fuel systems, materials development, equipment development, and safety and the environment. A preliminary concept for the facility required has been developed, and key organizational activities identified. The total program costs should be $1 million in the first year, rising to a steady state of $5 million from the fourth year onward. The capital cost of the research facility is estimated to be $20 million spread over three years, and its operating budget around $7 million. The program as envisioned would make use of Canada's existing tritium resources and handling experience to contribute to worldwide fusion research

  9. FMIT - the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    Liska, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A joint effort by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has produced a preliminary design for a Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) that uses a high-power linear accelerator to fire a deuteron beam into a high-speed jet of molten lithium. The result is a continuous energy spectrum of neutrons with a 14-MeV average energy which can irradiate material samples to projected end-of-life levels in about 3 years, with a total accumulated fluence of 10 21 to 10 22 n/cm 2

  10. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  11. Remote operations in a Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF)

    Doggett, J.N.

    1975-01-01

    The proposed Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF) has been designed for the test and evaluation of materials that will be exposed to the hostile radiation environment created by fusion reactors. Because the FERF itself must create a very hostile radiation environment, extensive remote handling procedures will be required as part of its routine operations as well as for both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance. This report analyzes the remote-handling implications of a vertical- rather than horizontal-orientation of the FERF magnet, describes the specific remote-handling facilities of the proposed FERF installation and compares the FERF remote-handling system with several other existing and proposed facilities. (U.S.)

  12. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    2016-10-21

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 17 October 2016 – 26 October 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Liquid Rocket Engine Testing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Liquid Rocket Engine Testing SFTE Symposium 21 October 2016 Jake Robertson, Capt USAF AFRL...Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance 16493 Liquid Rocket Engine TestingEngines and their components are extensively static-tested in development • This

  13. Alternative fusion concepts: engineering and utility considerations

    Gough, W.C.; Amherd, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    Alternative systems are described to be an integral part of the total fusion effort, making use of many developments of the mainline efforts but also contributing on a broad scale to improved understanding of fusion plasmas, technology and engineering. We hypothesize that the rationale for supporting alternative concepts will shift from physics related justifications to the perceived benefits for commercial use. Three principal factors are used to describe the commercialization potential of energy systems: technological risk, perceived benefit, and capital requirements. R and D can reduce the risk of a technology option, but perceived benefit and capital availability are largely governed by non-R and D elements. Hence, power station decision criteria as determined by electric-utility executives are presented, and a balance among the three commercialization factors described. An outline of past and on-going alternative concept reactor study endeavors is given and a suggestion for rapidly developing the physics base of the concepts is described

  14. Trends of researches for fusion engineering research facility (FERF)

    Ozawa, Yasutomo; Enoto, Takeaki

    1975-01-01

    The role of a fusion neutron radiation test facility in the development of a scientific feasibility experimental reactor or demonstration fusion power reactor plant would be analogous to the role of the materials testing and experimental reactors in the development of fission power reactor. While the material testing fission reactor has been developed after successful operation of fission reactors, in the case of fusion reactor development it is desirable to realize the fusion engineering research facility (FERF) in-phase to the development of SFX and/or demonstration fusion power reactor plants. Here so called FERF in near future is the Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor which provides the high-intensity and high-energy neutron and plasma source whether the net power output is produced or not. From the point of direct attainment to SFX, we would like to emphasize that FEFE is the royal road leading to the goal of successful achievement of CTR program and could be useful for the experiment on impurity effects caused by neutron and plasma irradiations onto the wall material for SFX. Further, we rather suppose that hybrid FERF-fission assembly could be fairly and easily realizable in near future. (auth.)

  15. Vacuum engineering for fusion research and fusion reactors

    Pittenger, L.C.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are described: (1) surface pumping by cryogenic condensation, (2) operation of large condensing cryopumps, (3) pumping for large fusion experiments, and (4) vacuum technology for fusion reactors

  16. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Gentile, C.; Parsells, R.; Rule, K.; Strykowsky, R.; Viola, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D and D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D and D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget

  17. HFR irradiation testing of fusion materials

    Conrad, R.; von der Hardt, P.; Loelgen, R.; Scheurer, H.; Zeisser, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present and future role of the High Flux Reactor Petten for fusion materials testing has been assessed. For practical purposes the Tokamak-based fusion reactor is chosen as a point of departure to identify material problems and materials data needs. The identification is largely based on the INTOR and NET design studies, the reported programme strategies of Japan, the U.S.A. and the European Communities for technical development of thermonuclear fusion reactors and on interviews with several experts. Existing and planned irradiation facilities, their capabilities and limitations concerning materials testing have been surveyed and discussed. It is concluded that fission reactors can supply important contributions for fusion materials testing. From the point of view of future availability of fission testing reactors and their performance it appears that the HFR is a useful tool for materials testing for a large variety of materials. Prospects and recommendations for future developments are given

  18. Data Fusion for Enhanced Aircraft Engine Prognostics and Health Management

    Volponi, Al

    2005-01-01

    Aircraft gas-turbine engine data is available from a variety of sources, including on-board sensor measurements, maintenance histories, and component models. An ultimate goal of Propulsion Health Management (PHM) is to maximize the amount of meaningful information that can be extracted from disparate data sources to obtain comprehensive diagnostic and prognostic knowledge regarding the health of the engine. Data fusion is the integration of data or information from multiple sources for the achievement of improved accuracy and more specific inferences than can be obtained from the use of a single sensor alone. The basic tenet underlying the data/ information fusion concept is to leverage all available information to enhance diagnostic visibility, increase diagnostic reliability and reduce the number of diagnostic false alarms. This report describes a basic PHM data fusion architecture being developed in alignment with the NASA C-17 PHM Flight Test program. The challenge of how to maximize the meaningful information extracted from disparate data sources to obtain enhanced diagnostic and prognostic information regarding the health and condition of the engine is the primary goal of this endeavor. To address this challenge, NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, and Pratt & Whitney have formed a team with several small innovative technology companies to plan and conduct a research project in the area of data fusion, as it applies to PHM. Methodologies being developed and evaluated have been drawn from a wide range of areas including artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, statistical estimation, and fuzzy logic. This report will provide a chronology and summary of the work accomplished under this research contract.

  19. Nuclear engineering questions: power, reprocessing, waste, decontamination, fusion

    Walton, R.D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the chemical engineering symposium on nuclear questions. Specific questions addressed by the speakers included: nuclear power - why and how; commercial reprocessing - permanent death or resurrection; long-term management of commercial high-level wastes; long-term management of defense high-level waste; decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering aspects of laser fusion I; and engineering aspects of laser fusion II. Individual papers have been input to the Energy Data Base previously

  20. Conceptual design study of a scyllac fusion test reactor

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-07-01

    The report describes a conceptual design study of a fusion test reactor based on the Scyllac toroidal theta-pinch approach to fusion. It is not the first attempt to describe the physics and technology required for demonstrating scientific feasibility of the approach, but it is the most complete design in the sense that the physics necessary to achieve the device goals is extrapolated from experimentally tested MHD theories of toroidal systems,and it uses technological systems whose engineering performance has been carefully calculated to ensure that they meet the machine requirements

  1. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  2. Tokamak engineering test reactor

    Conn, R.W.; Jassby, D.L.

    1975-07-01

    The design criteria for a tokamak engineering test reactor can be met by operating in the two-component mode with reacting ion beams, together with a new blanket-shield design based on internal neutron spectrum shaping. A conceptual reactor design achieving a neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m 2 is presented. The tokamak has a major radius of 3.05 m, the plasma cross-section is noncircular with a 2:1 elongation, and the plasma radius in the midplane is 55 cm. The total wall area is 149 m 2 . The plasma conditions are T/sub e/ approximately T/sub i/ approximately 5 keV, and ntau approximately 8 x 10 12 cm -3 s. The plasma temperature is maintained by injection of 177 MW of 200-keV neutral deuterium beams; the resulting deuterons undergo fusion reactions with the triton-target ions. The D-shaped toroidal field coils are extended out to large major radius (7.0 m), so that the blanket-shield test modules on the outer portion of the torus can be easily removed. The TF coils are superconducting, using a cryogenically stable TiNb design that permits a field at the coil of 80 kG and an axial field of 38 kG. The blanket-shield design for the inner portion of the torus nearest the machine center line utilizes a neutron spectral shifter so that the first structural wall behind the spectral shifter zone can withstand radiation damage for the reactor lifetime. The energy attenuation in this inner blanket is 8 x 10 -6 . If necessary, a tritium breeding ratio of 0.8 can be achieved using liquid lithium cooling in the []outer blanket only. The overall power consumption of the reactor is about 340 MW(e). A neutron wall loading greater than 1 MW/m 2 can be achieved by increasing the maximum magnetic field or the plasma elongation. (auth)

  3. Pistons and engine testing

    GmbH, Mahle

    2012-01-01

    The ever-increasing demands placed on combustion engines are just as great when it comes to this centerpiece - the piston. Achieving less weight or friction, or even greater wear resistance, requires in-depth knowledge of the processes taking place inside the engine, suitable materials, and appropriate design and machining processes for pistons, including the necessary testing measures. It is no longer possible for professionals in automotive engineering to manage without specific know-how of this kind, whether they work in the field of design, development, testing, or maintenance. This techni

  4. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1989-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particularly in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metallic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite used in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapor pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  5. Metal/graphite - composites in fusion engineering

    Staffler, R.; Kneringer, G.; Kny, E.; Reheis, N.

    1995-01-01

    Metal/graphite composites have been well known in medical industry for many years. X-ray tubes used in modern radiography, particulary in computerized tomography are equipped with rotating targets able to absorb a maximum of heat in a given time. Modern rotating targets consist of a refractory metal/graphite composite. Today the use of graphite as a plasma facing material is one predominant concept in fusion engineering. Depending on the thermal load, the graphite components have to be directly cooled (i.e. divertor plates) or inertially cooled (i.e. firstwall tiles). In case of direct cooling a metallurgical joining such as high temperature brazing between graphite and a metalic cooling structure shows the most promising results /1/. Inertially cooled graphite tiles have to be joined to a metallic backing plate in order to get a stable attachment to the supporting structure. The main requirements on the metallic partner of a metal/graphite composite and in the first wall area are: high melting point, high thermal strength, high thermal conductivity, low vapour pressure and a thermal expansion matching that of graphite. These properties are typical for the refractory metals such as molybdenum, tungsten and their alloys. (author)

  6. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume 1. Mission and program summary

    1981-10-01

    This volume presents, in summary form, a recommended approach to implementing the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980. These recommendations constitute the findings of the FED Technical Management Board (TMB). The TMB and the affiliated technical managers gave particular scrutiny to elucidating the role of FED in fusion development and to defining the device mission

  7. Pistons and engine testing

    2016-01-01

    The ever-increasing demands placed on combustion engines are just as great when it comes to this centerpiece—the piston. Achieving less weight or friction, or even greater wear resistance, requires in-depth knowledge of the processes taking place inside the engine, suitable materials, and appropriate design and manufacturing processes for pistons, including the necessary testing measures. It is no longer possible for professionals in automotive engineering to manage without specific expertise of this kind, whether they work in the field of design, development, testing, or maintenance. This technical book answers these questions in detail and in a very clear and comprehensible way. In this second, revised edition, every chapter has been revised and expanded. The chapter on “Engine testing”, for example, now include extensive results in the area of friction power loss measurement and lube oil consumption measurement. Contents Piston function, requirements, and types Design guidelines Simulation of the ope...

  8. R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility

    1980-10-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule

  9. First-wall and blanket engineering development for magnetic-fusion reactors

    Baker, C.; Herman, H.; Maroni, V.; Turner, L.; Clemmer, R.; Finn, P.; Johnson, C.; Abdou, M.

    1981-01-01

    A number of programs in the USA concerned with materials and engineering development of the first wall and breeder blanket systems for magnetic-fusion power reactors are described. Argonne National Laboratory has the lead or coordinating role, with many major elements of the research and engineering tests carried out by a number of organizations including industry and other national laboratories

  10. Special Section on Fusion Laser Engineering

    Murray, J. R.; Soures, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) now under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains a large frequency-tripled neodymium glass laser system designed to deliver approximately 2 megajoules of ultraviolet laser light in nanosecond pulses to targets for the study of high-energy-density physics and inertial confinement fusion. When all 192 laser beams are operational in 2008 it will dwarf any currently operating laser system, and even with only four beams now operating it is among the largest and most energetic of such systems. This special section is a collection of papers covering important issues in the optical engineering of large lasers such as NIF. A number of other papers on NIF engineering issues can be found in the Proceedings of SPIE, volume 5341. The first paper by Miller, Moses, and Wuest is an overview of the NIF project and the applications for which the facility was designed. The following papers discuss specific issues in greater depth. Spaeth, et al., discuss the NIF laser architecture, the effect of optical performance specifications on the focal spot size, and some aspects of cleanliness in large laser systems. Bonnano discusses the strategy for assembling NIF from ''line-replaceable units'' (LRU) that are assembled in a cleanroom and transported to the laser system in sealed containers that mate with the laser enclosures and allow clean installations without maintaining cleanroom standards throughout the facility. Zacharias, et al., discuss the alignment and wavefront control systems that allow beams to strike the target within ±50 microns after a beam path of about 350 meters. Shaw, et al., discuss a laser performance operations model that is used to set up the laser for a shot, and compare the predictions of the model to data from the first four operating beams. Ermolaeva, et al. discuss the design and performance of a custom optical fiber that was developed for use in NIF ultraviolet diagnostics. Finally, Honig discusses

  11. Space Electronic Test Engineering

    Chambers, Rodney D.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch at NASA Glenn Research center has the important duty of controlling electronic test engineering services. These services include test planning and early assessment of Space projects, management and/or technical support required to safely and effectively prepare the article and facility for testing, operation of test facilities, and validation/delivery of data to customer. The Space Electronic Test Engineering Branch is assigned electronic test engineering responsibility for the GRC Space Simulation, Microgravity, Cryogenic, and Combustion Test Facilities. While working with the Space Power and Propulsion Test Engineering Branch I am working on several different assignments. My primary assignment deals with an electrical hardware unit known as Sunny Boy. Sunny Boy is a DC load Bank that is designed for solar arrays in which it is used to convert DC power form the solar arrays into AC power at 60 hertz to pump back into the electricity grid. However, there are some researchers who decided that they would like to use the Sunny Boy unit in a space simulation as a DC load bank for a space shuttle or even the International Space Station hardware. In order to do so I must create a communication link between a computer and the Sunny Boy unit so that I can preset a few of the limits (such power, set & constant voltage levels) that Sunny Boy will need to operate using the applied DC load. Apart from this assignment I am also working on a hi-tech circuit that I need to have built at a researcher s request. This is a high voltage analog to digital circuit that will be used to record data from space ion propulsion rocket booster tests. The problem that makes building this circuit so difficult is that it contains high voltage we must find a way to lower the voltage signal before the data is transferred into the computer to be read. The solution to this problem was to transport the signal using infrared light which will lower

  12. Electrical energy and cost for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Pence, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    An operational scenario has been developed for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) based on the System Requirements, our experience with existing systems, and discussions with the project engineers and designers who are responsible for the systems. This scenario was used to predict the amount of electrical energy needed for running the facility. A generic type listing is included for the equipment considered in each system

  13. Electrical energy and cost for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Pence, G.A.

    1983-02-01

    An operational scenario for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility has been developed based on System Requirements, experience with existing systems, and discussions with project engineers and designers who are responsible for the systems. This scenario was used to project the electrical energy required for the facility. Each system is listed showing the equipment that has been considered, the amount of power requested, and in most cases, the power that it is now connected

  14. Integral test of JENDL fusion file

    Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Integral test of JENDL Fusion File (J-FF) is performed through analyses of available benchmark experiments. As a result, good agreement between the calculated results with J-FF and the measured data is observed as a whole. Thus, J-FF is qualified to be used for nuclear design of fusion reactors. Owing to the high quality evaluation of J-FF, cross section data in J-FF for many nuclides are recommended to be assigned as data in FENDL/E-2.0 in the IAEA Consultants` Meeting held at Karlsruhe, Germany, 24-28 June, 1996. (author)

  15. Engineering improvements for the ITER fusion reactor

    Moreno villar, A.; Albisu, F.

    1996-01-01

    The engineering and design phase (EDA) of the ITER project is being carried out jointly by the European Union, United States, Japan and the Russian Federation. the EU Home Team has contracted the European consortium, EFET, to undertake studies, design tasks and other services relating to the industry's contribution to the overall design of the project. The industry's contribution materializes through work orders within the framework of the contract. This paper summarises the tasks in which EFET participates, especially the ones on which IBERTEF AIE- a company formed by Empresarios Agrupados and SE NER-, collaborates. Up to June 1995, IBERTEF has carried out or is carrying out engineering works in the following tasks: TaskD/: Conceptual design and calculation of the vacuum chamber. Task D8: Structural design of the shielding blanket support. Task D21: Tokamak building crane. Task D51: Power supply schemes. Task CTA T4: Divertor region test platform: Task S22 TD 05: Heavy lifting transporter. Task D71 A-04: Safety design guidelines support. Task G16 TD 17: Design and development of the shielding blanket. Task S74 TD 05: Remote maintenance manual. Task D230: Design of buildings. Task D231: Cost estimate and construction plan for buildings. (Author)

  16. Small Engine & Accessory Test Area

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Small Engine and Accessories Test Area (SEATA) facilitates testaircraft starting and auxiliary power systems, small engines and accessories. The SEATA consists...

  17. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing Overview

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Objectives and motivation for testing. Technology, Research and Development Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), evolutionary. Representative Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE) test compaigns. Apollo, shuttle, Expandable Launch Vehicles (ELV) propulsion. Overview of test facilities for liquid rocket engines. Boost, upper stage (sea-level and altitude). Statistics (historical) of Liquid Rocket Engine Testing. LOX/LH, LOX/RP, other development. Test project enablers: engineering tools, operations, processes, infrastructure.

  18. Engineering computations at the national magnetic fusion energy computer center

    Murty, S.

    1983-01-01

    The National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center (NMFECC) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE). The NMFECC headquarters is located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Its purpose is to apply large-scale computational technology and computing techniques to the problems of controlled thermonuclear research. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC also maintains a large collection of computer codes in mathematics, physics, and engineering that is shared by the entire MFE research community. This review provides a broad perspective of the NMFECC, and a list of available codes at the NMFECC for engineering computations is given

  19. Mirror fusion test facility plasma diagnostics system

    Thomas, S.R. Jr.; Coffield, F.E.; Davis, G.E.; Felker, B.

    1979-01-01

    During the past 25 years, experiments with several magnetic mirror machines were performed as part of the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Program at LLL. The latest MFE experiment, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), builds on the advances of earlier machines in initiating, stabilizing, heating, and sustaining plasmas formed with deuterium. The goals of this machine are to increase ion and electron temperatures and show a corresponding increase in containment time, to test theoretical scaling laws of plasma instabilities with increased physical dimensions, and to sustain high-beta plasmas for times that are long compared to the energy containment time. This paper describes the diagnostic system being developed to characterize these plasma parameters

  20. Mechanical-engineering aspects of mirror-fusion technology

    Fisher, D.K.; Doggett, J.N.

    1982-01-01

    The mirror approach to magnetic fusion has evolved from the original simple mirror cell to today's mainline effort: the tandem-mirror machine with thermal barriers. Physics and engineering research is being conducted throughout the world, with major efforts in Japan, the USSR, and the US. At least one facility under construction (MFTF-B) will approach equivalent energy breakeven in physics performance. Significant mechanical engineering development is needed, however, before a demonstration reactor can be constructed. The principal areas crucial to mirror reactor development include large high-field superconducting magnets, high-speed continuous vacuum-pumping systems, long-pulse high-power neutral-beam and rf-plasma heating systems, and efficient high-voltage high-power direct converters. Other areas common to all fusion systems include tritium handling technology, first-wall materials development, and fusion blanket design

  1. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: experimental capabilities and test matrix

    Opperman, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the experimental capabilities of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) and reference material specimen test matrices. The description of the experimental capabilities and the test matrices has been updated to match the current single test cell facility ad assessed experimenter needs. Sufficient detail has been provided so that the user can plan irradiation experiments and conceptual hardware. The types of experiments, irradiation environment and support services that will be available in FMIT are discussed

  2. The preliminary research for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the solution to the production of bioactive substance using biotransformation process from core technology of biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology. And, this strategy will provide core technology for development of drugs as new concept and category. Research scopes and contents of project include 1) The development of mutant for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 2) The development of host for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 3) The preliminary study for biosynthetic engineering of isoflavone by radiation fusion technology. The results are as follows. Isoflavone compounds(daidzein, hydroxylated isoflavone) were analyzed by GC-MS. The study of radiation doses and p-NCA high-throughput screening for mutant development were elucidated. And, it was carried out the study of radiation doses for host development. Furthermore, the study of redox partner and construction of recombinant strain for region-specific hydroxylation(P450, redox partner). In addition, the biological effect of 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone as an anti-obesity agent was elucidated in this study.

  3. The ICRH tokamak fusion test reactor

    Perkins, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor where the ion are maintained at Tsub(i) approximately 20keV>Tsub(e) approximately 7keV by ion-cyclotron resonance heating is shown to produce an energy amplification of Q>2 provided the principal ion energy loss channel is via collisional transfer to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power and requires a 50MHz radio-frequency generator capable of 50MW peak power; it is otherwise compatible with the conceptual design for the Princeton TFTR. The required n tausub(E) values for electrons and ions are respectively ntausub(Ee)>1.5.10 13 cm -3 -sec and ntausub(Ei)>4.10 13 cm -3 -sec. The principal areas where research is needed to establish this concept are: tokamak transport calculations, ICRH physics, trapped-particle instability energy losses, tokamak equilibria with high values of βsub(theta), and, of course, impurities

  4. Engineering aspects of particle-beam fusion systems

    Cook, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy is supporting research directed toward demonstration of DT fuel ignition in an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsule. As part of the ICF effort, two major Particle Beam Fusion Accelerators (PBFA I and II) are being developed at Sandia National Laboratories with the objective of providing energetic light ion beams of sufficient power density for target implosion. Supporting light ion beam research is being performed at the Naval Research Laboratory and at Cornell University. If the answers to several key physics and engineering questions are favorable, pulsed power accelerators will be able to provide an efficient and inexpensive approach to high target gain and eventual power production applications

  5. Conceptual design of a fission-based integrated test facility for fusion reactor components

    Watts, K.D.; Deis, G.A.; Hsu, P.Y.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Miller, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    The testing of fusion materials and components in fission reactors will become increasingly important because of lack of fusion engineering test devices in the immediate future and the increasing long-term demand for fusion testing when a fusion reactor test station becomes available. This paper presents the conceptual design of a fission-based Integrated Test Facility (ITF) developed by EG and G Idaho. This facility can accommodate entire first wall/blanket (FW/B) test modules such as those proposed for INTOR and can also accommodate smaller cylindrical modules similar to those designed by Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) and Westinghouse. In addition, the facility can be used to test bulk breeder blanket materials, materials for tritium permeation, and components for performance in a nuclear environment. The ITF provides a cyclic neutron/gamma flux as well as the numerous module and experiment support functions required for truly integrated tests

  6. Engineering Status of the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    Heitzenroeder, Philip J.; Meade, Dale; Thome, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    FIRE is a compact, high field tokamak being studied as an option for the next step in the US magnetic fusion energy program. FIRE's programmatic mission is to attain, explore, understand, and optimize alpha-dominated plasmas to provide the knowledge necessary for the design of attractive magnetic fusion energy systems. This study began in 1999 with broad participation of the US fusion community, including several industrial participants. The design under development has a major radius of 2 m, a minor radius of 0.525 m, a field on axis of 10T and capability to operate at 12T with upgrades to power supplies. Toroidal and poloidal field magnets are inertially cooled with liquid nitrogen. An important goal for FIRE is a total project cost in the $1B range. This paper presents an overview of the engineering details which were developed during the FIRE preconceptual design study in FY99 and 00

  7. Engineering spinal fusion: evaluating ceramic materials for cell based tissue engineered approaches

    Wilson, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis was to advance the development of tissue engineered posterolateral spinal fusion by investigating the potential of calcium phosphate ceramic materials to support cell based tissue engineered bone formation. This was accomplished by developing several novel model

  8. Decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) will complete its experimental lifetime with a series of deuterium-tritium pulses in 1994. As a result, the machine structures will become radioactive, and vacuum components will also be contaminated with tritium. Dose rate levels will range from less than 1 mr/h for external structures to hundreds of mr/h for the vacuum vessel. Hence, decommissioning operations will range from hands on activities to the use of remotely operated equipment. After 21 months of cool down, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) operations will commence and continue for approximately 15 months. The primary objective is to render the test cell complex re-usable for the next machine, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). This paper presents an overview of decommissioning TFTR and discusses the D and D objectives

  9. Diamond Wire Cutting of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Robert Parsells

    2003-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. As a result, decommissioning commenced in October 1999. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The deuterium-tritium experiments resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 MeV neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies, while dose rates approach 50 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size of the tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) decided to investigate an alternate, innovative approach for dismantlement of the TFTR vacuum vessel: diamond wire cutting technology. In August 1999, this technology was successfully demonstrated and evaluated on vacuum vessel surrogates. Subsequently, the technology was improved and redesigned for the actual cutting of the vacuum vessel. Ten complete cuts were performed in a 6-month period to complete the removal of this unprecedented type of DandD (Decontamination and Decommissioning) activity

  10. Ion beam pellet fusion as a CTR neutron test source

    Arnold, R.; Martin, R.

    1975-07-01

    Pellet fusion, driven by nanosecond pulses containing α particles with 200 MeV energy, is being developed as a neutron source. A prototype system is in the conceptual design stage. During the coming year, engineering design of required accelerator components, storage rings, and pellet configurations, as well as experiments on energy deposition mechanisms, should be accomplished. Successful construction and tests of prototype rings, followed by two years of full scale system construction, would give a source producing a useful flux of fusion neutrons for materials testing. The system as currently envisioned would employ 100 small superconducting high field storage rings (15 cm radius, 140 kG field) which would be synchronously filled with circulating 1 nsec pulses from a 200 MeV linear accelerator over a period of 3 x 10 -4 sec. These ion pulses would all be simultaneously extracted, forming a total current of 10 kA, and focussed from all directions on a deuterium and tritium (DT) pellet with 0.17 mm radium, surrounded by a heavier (metal) coating to increase confinement time and aid compression efficiency. The overall repetition rate, limited principally by physical transport of the pellets, could reach 100/sec. Spacing between pellet and focussing elements would be about 1 m. The predominant engineering problems are the fast extraction mechanism and beam transport devices for the storage rings. Additional theoretical and experimental studies are required on the crucial energy deposition and transport mechanisms in pellets with ion beam heating before firm estimates can be given. Preliminary estimates suggest fusion neutron yields of at least 10 14 /sec and possibly 10 16 /sec are possible, with optimal pellet dynamics, but without the necessity for any large advances in the state-of-the-art in accelerator and storage ring design. (auth)

  11. Potential mirror concepts for radiation testing of fusion reactor materials

    Miley, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Studies under the University of Illinois PROMETHEUS (Plasma Reactor Optimized for Materials Experimentation for Thermonuclear Energy Usage) project are described that started in 1971 with the realization that a practical fusion-plasma neutron source was feasible with a net-power input (rather than production). The basic objectives were similar to those in later FERF (Fusion Engineering Research Facility) studies: namely, to maximize the neutron flux and usable experimental volume; to include the flexibility to handle a variety of both materials and engineering experiments; to minimize capital and operating costs; and to utilize near- term technology. The PROMETHEUS design provides a neutron flux of approximately 5x10 14 n/cm 2 s by injection of approximately 30 MW of neutral-beams into a 20 cm radius mirror-confined plasma. Charge-exchange bombardment of the first wall is viewed as a key problem in the design and is discussed in some detail. To gain yet higher neutron fluxes for accelerated testing, two alternate designs have been studied: a 'Twin-beam' injection device and a field reversed mirror concept. The latter potentially offers fluxes approaching 10 16 n/cm 2 s but involves more speculative technology. (Auth.)

  12. Role of fission-reactor-testing capabilities in the development of fusion technology

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.; Takata, M.L.; Watts, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Testing of fusion materials and components in fission reactors will be increasingly important in the future due to the near-term lack of fusion engineering test devices, and the long-term high demand for testing when fusion reactors become available. Fission testing is capable of filling many gaps in fusion reactor design information, and thus should be aggressively pursued. EG and G Idaho has investigated the application of fission testing in three areas, which are discussed in this paper. First, we investigated radiation damage to magnet insulators. This work is now continuing with the use of an improved test capsule. Second, a study was performed which indicated that a fission-suppressed hybrid blanket module could be effectively tested in a reactor such as the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), closely reproducing the predicted performance in a fusion environment. Finally, we explored a conceptual design for a fission-based Integrated Test Facility (ITF), which can accommodate entire First Wall/Blanket (FW/B) modules for testing in a nuclear environment, simultaneously satisfying many of the FW/B test requirements. This ITF can provide a cyclic neutron/gamma flux, as well as the necessary module support functions

  13. Some applications of fission-based testing capabilities in the development of fusion technology

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.; Takata, M.L.; Watts, K.D.

    1981-10-01

    The testing of fusion materials and components in fission reactors will be increasingly important in the future due to the near-term lack of fusion engineering test devices, and the long-term high demand for fusion testing when they do become available. Fission testing is capable of filling many gaps in fusion reactor design information, and should be aggressively pursued. EG and G Idaho has investigated the application of fission testing in three areas, which are discussed in this paper. First, work was performed on the irradiation of magnet insulators. This work is continuing with an improved test environment. Second, a study was performed which indicated that a fission-suppressed hybrid blanket module could be effectively tested in a reactor such as the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), closely reproducing the predicted performance in a fusion environment. Finally, a conceptual design is presented for a fission-based Integrated Test Facility (ITF), which can accommodate entire wall/blanket (FW/B) modules for testing in a nuclear environment, simultaneously satisfying many of the FW/B test requirements. This ITF can provide a cyclic neutron/gamma flux, as well as the necessary module support functions

  14. Maintenance Decision Based on Data Fusion of Aero Engines

    Huawei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance has gained a great importance as a support function for ensuring aero engine reliability and availability. Cost-effectiveness and risk control are two basic criteria for accurate maintenance. Given that aero engines have much condition monitoring data, this paper presents a new condition-based maintenance decision system that employs data fusion for improving accuracy of reliability evaluation. Bayesian linear model has been applied, so that the performance degradation evaluation of aero engines could be realized. A reliability evaluation model has been presented based on gamma process, which achieves the accurate evaluation by information fusion. In reliability evaluation model, the shape parameter is estimated by the performance degradation evaluation result, and the scale parameter is estimated by failure, inspection, and repair information. What is more, with such reliability evaluation as input variables and by using particle swarm optimization (PSO, a stochastic optimization of maintenance decision for aircraft engines has been presented, in which the effectiveness and the accuracy are demonstrated by a numerical example.

  15. Engineering options for the U.S. Fusion Demo

    Tillack, M.S.; El-Guebaly, L.; Wong, C.

    1995-01-01

    Through its successful operation, the US Fusion Demo must be sufficiently convincing that a utility or independent power producer will choose to purchase one as its next electric generating plant. A fusion power plant which is limited to the use of currently-proven technologies is unlikely to be sufficiently attractive to a utility unless fuel shortages and regulatory restrictions are far more crippling to competing energy sources than currently anticipated. In that case, the task of choosing an appropriate set of engineering technologies today involves trade-offs between attractiveness and technical risk. The design space for an attractive tokamak fusion power core is not unlimited; previous studies have shown that advanced low-activation ferritic steel, vanadium alloy, or SiC/SiC composites are the only candidates the authors have for the primary in-vessel structural material. An assessment of engineering design options has been performed using these three materials and the associated in-vessel component designs which are compatible with them

  16. Fusion power: the transition from fundamental science to fusion reactor engineering

    Post, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    The historical development of fusion research is outlined. The basics of fusion power along with fuel cost and advantages of fusion are discussed. Some quantitative requirements for fusion power are described. (MOW)

  17. Solar-Thermal Engine Testing

    Tucker, Stephen; Salvail, Pat; Haynes, Davy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A solar-thermal engine serves as a high-temperature solar-radiation absorber, heat exchanger, and rocket nozzle. collecting concentrated solar radiation into an absorber cavity and transferring this energy to a propellant as heat. Propellant gas can be heated to temperatures approaching 4,500 F and expanded in a rocket nozzle, creating low thrust with a high specific impulse (I(sub sp)). The Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) solar-thermal engine is made of 100 percent chemical vapor deposited (CVD) rhenium. The engine 'module' consists of an engine assembly, propellant feedline, engine support structure, thermal insulation, and instrumentation. Engine thermal performance tests consist of a series of high-temperature thermal cycles intended to characterize the propulsive performance of the engines and the thermal effectiveness of the engine support structure and insulation system. A silicone-carbide electrical resistance heater, placed inside the inner shell, substitutes for solar radiation and heats the engine. Although the preferred propellant is hydrogen, the propellant used in these tests is gaseous nitrogen. Because rhenium oxidizes at elevated temperatures, the tests are performed in a vacuum chamber. Test data will include transient and steady state temperatures on selected engine surfaces, propellant pressures and flow rates, and engine thrust levels. The engine propellant-feed system is designed to Supply GN2 to the engine at a constant inlet pressure of 60 psia, producing a near-constant thrust of 1.0 lb. Gaseous hydrogen will be used in subsequent tests. The propellant flow rate decreases with increasing propellant temperature, while maintaining constant thrust, increasing engine I(sub sp). In conjunction with analytical models of the heat exchanger, the temperature data will provide insight into the effectiveness of the insulation system, the structural support system, and the overall engine performance. These tests also provide experience on operational

  18. Controlled nuclear fusion, a challenge on the engineer. Pt. 4

    Frey, H.

    1978-01-01

    A very important and complex subject, on which the engineer together with the physicist must meditate very intensely, concerns the practicableness, the operation safety and the economy of the electrotechnical components and systems as are required in the actual reactor scale. There upon it depends essentially according to which plasma-physical concept - magnetic inclusion or inertia inclusion - a fusion reactor could work in the future. The blanket structure, the breeding of the tritium connected therewith and the electrotechnical problems, which are recognized at the transmission of plasma-physical concepts into actual reactor scales and at the adaptation to reactor requirements are discussed in this contribution. (orig.) 891 HP 892 AG [de

  19. Conceptual design report for a Fusion Engineering Device sector-handling machine and movable manipulator system

    Watts, K.D.; Masson, L.S.; McPherson, R.S.

    1982-10-01

    Design requirements, trade studies, design descriptions, conceptual designs, and cost estimates have been completed for the Fusion Engineering Device sector handling machine, movable manipulator system, subcomponent handling machine, and limiter blade handling machine. This information will be used by the Fusion Engineering Design Center to begin to determine the cost and magnitude of the effort required to perform remote maintenance on the Fusion Engineering Device. The designs presented are by no means optimum, and the costs estimates are rough-order-of-magnitude

  20. Overview on Fusion Nuclear Technology Experimental Testing

    Entler, Slavomír; Kysela, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2016), č. článku 021018. ISSN 2332-8983 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * corrosion * thermohydraulic * LiPb * HHF * ITER Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  1. Turbine Engine Testing.

    1981-01-01

    English climate. (c) Functional Testing Functional testing is a ’catch all’ title for the multitude of tests required to examine and confirm or correct the...rage I I I , I ’s slot envs Atar ONK propulsent les Miraiges IV de la levce A~rientic Strat~giqiie l-vanlaisc, tanilis tilit leg mcters Atar 91K50 sent...moignent. Irtuwi Atar 9 ~K50 est tine version MANv~ du motenr Atar 9K proptilsant le hirdaceur vi1 *c ~Ik (lttur 11 et dest in 5 6qtiiper I ’avion polyvalent

  2. Anomaly Detection for Resilient Control Systems Using Fuzzy-Neural Data Fusion Engine

    Ondrej Linda; Milos Manic; Timothy R. McJunkin

    2011-08-01

    Resilient control systems in critical infrastructures require increased cyber-security and state-awareness. One of the necessary conditions for achieving the desired high level of resiliency is timely reporting and understanding of the status and behavioral trends of the control system. This paper describes the design and development of a neural-network based data-fusion system for increased state-awareness of resilient control systems. The proposed system consists of a dedicated data-fusion engine for each component of the control system. Each data-fusion engine implements three-layered alarm system consisting of: (1) conventional threshold-based alarms, (2) anomalous behavior detector using self-organizing maps, and (3) prediction error based alarms using neural network based signal forecasting. The proposed system was integrated with a model of the Idaho National Laboratory Hytest facility, which is a testing facility for hybrid energy systems. Experimental results demonstrate that the implemented data fusion system provides timely plant performance monitoring and cyber-state reporting.

  3. Construction and testing of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnets

    Kozman, T.; Shimer, D.; VanSant, J.; Zbasnik, J.

    1986-08-01

    This paper describes the construction and testing of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility superconducting magnet set. Construction of the first Yin Yang magnet was started in 1978. And although this particular magnet was later modified, the final construction of these magnets was not completed until 1985. When completed these 42 magnets weighed over 1200 tonnes and had a maximum stored energy of approximately 1200 MJ at full field. Together with power supplies, controls and liquid nitrogen radiation shields the cost of the fabrication of this system was over $100M. General Dynamics/Convair Division was responsible for the system design and the fabrication of 20 of the magnets. This contract was the largest single procurement action at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. During the PACE acceptance tests, the 26 major magnets were operated at full field for more than 24 hours while other MFTF subsystems were tested. From all of the data, the magnets operated to the performance specifications. For physics operation in the future, additional helium and nitrogen leak checking and repair will be necessary. In this report we will discuss the operation and testing of the MFTF Magnet System, the world's largest superconducting magnet set built to date. The topics covered include a schedule of the major events, summary of the fabrication work, summary of the installation work, summary of testing and test results, and lessons learned

  4. Hybrid testing of lumbar CHARITE discs versus fusions.

    Panjabi, Manohar; Malcolmson, George; Teng, Edward; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Henderson, Gweneth; Serhan, Hassan

    2007-04-20

    An in vitro human cadaveric biomechanical study. To quantify effects on operated and other levels, including adjacent levels, due to CHARITE disc implantations versus simulated fusions, using follower load and the new hybrid test method in flexion-extension and bilateral torsion. Spinal fusion has been associated with long-term accelerated degeneration at adjacent levels. As opposed to the fusion, artificial discs are designed to preserve motion and diminish the adjacent-level effects. Five fresh human cadaveric lumbar specimens (T12-S1) underwent multidirectional testing in flexion-extension and bilateral torsion with 400 N follower load. Intact specimen total ranges of motion were determined with +/-10 Nm unconstrained pure moments. The intact range of motion was used as input for the hybrid tests of 5 constructs: 1) CHARITE disc at L5-S1; 2) fusion at L5-S1; 3) CHARITE discs at L4-L5 and L5-S1; 4) CHARITE disc at L4-L5 and fusion at L5-S1; and 5) 2-level fusion at L4-L5-S1. Using repeated-measures single factor analysis of variance and Bonferroni statistical tests (P < 0.05), intervertebral motion redistribution of each construct was compared with the intact. In flexion-extension, 1-level CHARITE disc preserved motion at the operated and other levels, while 2-level CHARITE showed some amount of other-level effects. In contrast, 1- and 2-level fusions increased other-level motions (average, 21.0% and 61.9%, respectively). In torsion, both 1- and 2-level discs preserved motions at all levels. The 2-level simulated fusion increased motions at proximal levels (22.9%), while the 1-level fusion produced no significant changes. In general, CHARITE discs preserved operated- and other-level motions. Fusion simulations affected motion redistribution at other levels, including adjacent levels.

  5. Fusion technology development: first wall/blanket system and component testing in existing nuclear facilities

    Hsu, P.Y.S.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Judd, J.L.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Millsap, D.A.; Scott, A.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1980-12-01

    A novel concept to produce a reasonable simulation of a fusion first wall/blanket test environment employing an existing nuclear facility, the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, is presented. Preliminary results show that an asymmetric, nuclear test environment with surface and volumetric heating rates similar to those expected in a fusion first wall/blanket or divertor chamber surface appears feasible. The proposed concept takes advantage of nuclear reactions within the annulus of an existing test space (15 cm in diameter and approximately 100 cm high) to provide an energy flux to the surface of a test module. The principal reaction considered involves 3 He in the annulus as follows: n + 3 He → p + t + 0.75 MeV. Bulk heating in the test module is accomplished by neutron thermalization, gamma heating, and absorption reactions involving 6 Li in the blanket breeding region. The concept can be extended to modified core configurations that will accommodate test modules of different sizes and types. It makes possible development testing of first wall/blanket systems and other fusion components on a scale and in ways not otherwise available until actual high-power fusion reactors are built

  6. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. Final conceptual design report

    1976-02-01

    The TFTR is the first U.S. magnetic confinement device planned to demonstrate the fusion of D-T at reactor power levels. This report addresses the physics objectives and the engineering goals of the TFTR project. Technical, cost, and schedule aspects of the project are included

  7. Modeling Xenon Purification Systems in a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine

    Hopkins, Ann; Gentile, Charles

    2011-10-01

    A Laser Inertial Fusion Engine (LIFE) is a proposed method to employ fusion energy to produce electricity for consumers. However, before it can be built and used as such, each aspect of a LIFE power plant must first be meticulously planned. We are in the process of developing and perfecting models for an exhaust processing and fuel recovery system. Such a system is especially essential because it must be able to recapture and purify expensive materials involved in the reaction so they may be reused. One such material is xenon, which is to be used as an intervention gas in the target chamber. Using Aspen HYSYS, we have modeled several subsystems for exhaust processing, including a subsystem for xenon recovery and purification. After removing hydrogen isotopes using lithium bubblers, we propose to use cryogenic distillation to purify the xenon from remaining contaminants. Aspen HYSYS allows us to analyze predicted flow rates, temperatures, pressures, and compositions within almost all areas of the xenon purification system. Through use of Aspen models, we hope to establish that we can use xenon in LIFE efficiently and in a practical manner.

  8. Scope and status of the USA Engineering Test Facility including relevant TFTR research and development

    Becraft, W.R.; Reardon, P.J.

    1980-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion program would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The progress toward the design and construction of the ETF will reflect the significant achievements of past, present, and future experimental tokamak devices. Some of the features of this foundation of experimental results and relevant engineering designs and operation will derive from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project, now nearing the completion of its construction phase. The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. In order to initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper describes the design status of the ETF and discusses some highlights of the TFTR R and D work

  9. Scope and status of the USA Engineering Test Facility including relevant TFTR research and development

    Becraft, W.R.; Reardon, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The vehicle by which the fusion programme would move into the engineering testing phase of fusion power development is designated the Engineering Test Facility (ETF). The progress toward the design and construction of the ETF will reflect the significant achievements of past, present, and future experimental tokamak devices. Some of the features of this foundation of experimental results and relevant engineering designs and operation will derive from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project, now nearing the completion of its construction phase. The ETF would provide a test-bed for reactor components in the fusion environment. To initiate preliminary planning for the ETF decision, the Office of Fusion Energy (OFE) established the ETF Design Center activity to prepare the design of the ETF. This paper describes the design status of the ETF and discusses some highlights of the TFTR R and D work. (author)

  10. Physics and engineering assessments of spherical torus component test facility

    Peng, Y.-K.M.; Neumeyer, C.A.; Kessel, C.; Rutherford, P.; Mikkelsen, D.; Bell, R.; Menard, J.; Gates, D.; Schmidt, J.; Synakowski, E.; Grisham, L.; Fogarty, P.J.; Strickler, D.J.; Burgess, T.W.; Tsai, J.; Nelson, B.E.; Sabbagh, S.; Mitarai, O.; Cheng, E.T.; El-Guebaly, L.

    2005-01-01

    A broadly based study of the fusion engineering and plasma science conditions of a Component Test Facility (CTF), using the Spherical Torus or Spherical Tokamak (ST) configuration, have been carried out. The chamber systems testing conditions in a CTF are characterized by high fusion neutron fluxes Γ n > 4.4x10 13 n/s/cm 2 , over size scales > 10 5 cm 2 and depth scales > 50 cm, delivering > 3 accumulated displacement per atom (dpa) per year. The desired chamber conditions can be provided by a CTF with R 0 1.2 m, A = 1.5, elongation ∼ 3.2, I p ∼ 9 MA, B T ∼ 2.5 T, producing a driven fusion burn using 36 MW of combined neutral beam and RF power. Relatively robust ST plasma conditions are adequate, which have been shown achievable [4] without active feedback manipulation of the MHD modes. The ST CTF will test the single-turn, copper alloy center leg for the toroidal field coil without an induction solenoid and neutron shielding, and require physics data on solenoid-free plasma current initiation, ramp-up, and sustainment to multiple MA level. A new systems code that combines the key required plasma and engineering science conditions of CTF has been prepared and utilized as part of this study. The results show high potential for a family of lowercost CTF devices to suit a variety of fusion engineering science test missions. (author)

  11. Fusion Engineering Device (FED) first wall/shield design

    Sager, P.H.; Fuller, G.; Cramer, B.; Davisson, J.; Haines, J.; Kirchner, J.

    1981-01-01

    The torus of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is comprised of the bulk shield and its associated spool lstructure and support system, the first wall water-cooled panel and armor systems, and the pumped limiter. The bulk shielding is provided by ten shield sectors that are installed in the spool structure in such a way as to permit extraction of the sectors through the openings between adjacent toroidal field coils with a direct radial movement. The first wall armor is installed on the inboard and top interior walls of these sectors, and the water-cooled panels are installed on the outboard interior walls and the pumped limiter in the bottom of the sectors. The overall design of the first wall and shield system is described in this paper

  12. Vacuum vessel for the tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Gerich, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    In 1980, the US Department of Energy gave the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory approval to design and build a tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) to support the goals of the National Mirror Program. We designed the MFTF-B vacuum vessel both to maintain the required ultrahigh vacuum environment and to structurally support the 42 superconducting magnets plus auxiliary internal and external equipment. During our design work, we made extensive use of both simple and complex computer models to arrive at a cost-effective final configuration. As part of this work, we conducted a unique dynamic analysis to study the interaction of the 32,000-tonne concrete-shielding vault with the 2850-tonne vacuum vessel system. To maintain a vacuum of 2 x 10 -8 torr during the physics experiments inside the vessel, we designed a vacuum pumping system of enormous capacity. The vacuum vessel (4200-m 3 internal volume) has been fabricated and erected, and acceptance tests have been completed at the Livermore site. The rest of the machine has been assembled, and individual systems have been successfully checked. On October 1, 1985, we began a series of integrated engineering tests to verify the operation of all components as a complete system

  13. Tests of vacuum interrupters for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Warren, R.; Parsons, M.; Honig, E.; Lindsay, J.

    1979-04-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project at Princeton University requires the insertion of a resistor in an excited ohmic-heating coil circuit to produce a plasma initiation pulse (PIP). It is expected that the maximum duty for the switching system will be an interruption of 24 kA with an associated recovery voltage of 25 kV. Vacuum interrupters were selected as the most economical means to satisfy these requirements. However, it was felt that some testing of available systems should be performed to determine their reliability under these conditions. Two interrupter systems were tested for over 1000 interruptions each at 24 kA and 25 kV. One system employed special Westinghouse type WL-33552 interrupters in a circuit designed by LASL. This circuit used a commercially available actuator and a minimum size counterpulse bank and saturable reactor. The other used Toshiba type VGB2-D20 interrupters actuated by a Toshiba mechanism in a Toshiba circuit using a larger counterpulse bank and saturable reactor

  14. Introduction to nuclear test engineering

    O'Neal, W.C.; Paquette, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    The basic information in this report is from a vu-graph presentation prepared to acquaint new or prospective employees with the Nuclear Test Engineering Division (NTED). Additional information has been added here to enhance a reader's understanding when reviewing the material after hearing the presentation, or in lieu of attending a presentation

  15. Dictionary materials engineering, materials testing

    1994-01-01

    This dictionary contains about 9,500 entries in each part of the following fields: 1) Materials using and selection; 2) Mechanical engineering materials -Metallic materials - Non-metallic inorganic materials - Plastics - Composites -Materials damage and protection; 3) Electrical and electronics materials -Conductor materials - Semiconductors - magnetic materials - Dielectric materials - non-conducting materials; 4) Materials testing - Mechanical methods - Analytical methods - Structure investigation - Complex methods - Measurement of physical properties - Non-destructive testing. (orig.) [de

  16. Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities

    Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses

  17. Development of an Information Fusion System for Engine Diagnostics and Health Management

    Volponi, Allan J.; Brotherton, Tom; Luppold, Robert; Simon, Donald L.

    2004-01-01

    Aircraft gas-turbine engine data are available from a variety of sources including on-board sensor measurements, maintenance histories, and component models. An ultimate goal of Propulsion Health Management (PHM) is to maximize the amount of meaningful information that can be extracted from disparate data sources to obtain comprehensive diagnostic and prognostic knowledge regarding the health of the engine. Data Fusion is the integration of data or information from multiple sources, to achieve improved accuracy and more specific inferences than can be obtained from the use of a single sensor alone. The basic tenet underlying the data/information fusion concept is to leverage all available information to enhance diagnostic visibility, increase diagnostic reliability and reduce the number of diagnostic false alarms. This paper describes a basic PHM Data Fusion architecture being developed in alignment with the NASA C17 Propulsion Health Management (PHM) Flight Test program. The challenge of how to maximize the meaningful information extracted from disparate data sources to obtain enhanced diagnostic and prognostic information regarding the health and condition of the engine is the primary goal of this endeavor. To address this challenge, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) and Pratt & Whitney (P&W) have formed a team with several small innovative technology companies to plan and conduct a research project in the area of data fusion as applied to PHM. Methodologies being developed and evaluated have been drawn from a wide range of areas including artificial intelligence, pattern recognition, statistical estimation, and fuzzy logic. This paper will provide a broad overview of this work, discuss some of the methodologies employed and give some illustrative examples.

  18. Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

    2010-12-07

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  19. Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    Latkowski, J.F.; Kramer, K.J.; Abbott, R.P.; Morris, K.R.; DeMuth, J.; Divol, L.; El-Dasher, B.; Lafuente, A.; Loosmore, G.; Reyes, S.; Moses, G.A.; Fratoni, M.; Flowers, D.; Aceves, S.; Rhodes, M.; Kane, J.; Scott, H.; Kramer, R.; Pantano, C.; Scullard, C.; Sawicki, R.; Wilks, S.; Mehl, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  20. Remote-handling demonstration tests for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility

    Shen, E.J.; Hussey, M.W.; Kelly, V.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is to create a fusion-like environment for fusion materials development. Crucial to the success of FMIT is the development and testing of remote handling systems required to handle materials specimens and maintenance of the facility. The use of full scale mock-ups for demonstration tests provides the means for proving these systems

  1. Tokamak fusion test reactor FELIX plate experiment

    Hua, T.O.; Nygren, R.E.; Turner, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    For a conducting material exposed to both a time-varying and a static magnetic field, such as a limiter blade in a tokamak, the induced eddy currents and the deflection arising from those eddy currents can be strongly coupled. The coupling effects reduce the currents and deflections markedly, sometimes an order of magnitude, from the values predicted if coupling is neglected. A series of experiments to study current-deflection coupling were performed using the Fusion Electromagnetic Inductance Experiment (FELIX) facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness resulting from the coupling are discussed, and analytical expressions for induced eddy current and rigid body rotation in the FELIX plate experiment are compared with the experimental results. Predictions for the degree of coupling based on various parameters are made using the analytical model

  2. Near term, low cost, 14 MeV fusion neutron irradiation facility for testing the viability of fusion structural materials

    Kulcinski, Gerald L., E-mail: glkulcin@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Radel, Ross F. [Phoenix Nuclear Labs LLC, Monona, WI (United States); Davis, Andrew [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-11-01

    For over 50 years, engineers have been looking for an irradiation facility that can provide a fusion reactor appropriate neutron spectrum over a significant volume to test fusion reactor materials that is relatively inexpensive and can be built in a minimum of time. The 14 MeV neutron irradiation facility described here can nearly exactly duplicate the neutron spectrum typical of a DT fusion reactor first wall at damage rates of ≈4 displacements per atom and 40 appm He generated over a 2 l volume per full power year of operation. The projected cost of this multi-beam facility is estimated at ≈$20 million and it can be built in <4 years. A single-beam prototype, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is already being built to produce medical isotopes. The neutrons are produced by a 300 keV deuterium beam accelerated into 4 kPa (30 Torr) tritium target. The total tritium inventory is <2 g and <0.1 g of T{sub 2} is consumed per year. The core technology proposed has already been fully demonstrated, and no new plasma physics or materials innovations will be required for the test facility to become operational.

  3. Development of lithium target system in engineering validation and engineering design activity of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF/EVEDA)

    Wakai, Eiichi; Kondo, Hiroo; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Ida, Mizuho; Kanemura, Takuji; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Fujishiro, Kouji; Edao, Yuuki; Niitsuma, Shigeto; Kimura, Haruyuki; Fukada, Satoshi; Hiromoto, Tetsushi; Shigeharu, Satoshi; Yagi, Jyuro; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Hirakawa, Yasushi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki; Horiike, Hiroshi; Hoashi, Eiji; Suzuki, Sachiko; Yamaoka, Nobuo; Serizawa, Hisashi; Kawahito, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Takeo, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    Engineering validation and engineering design activity (EVEDA) for the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) has been conducted since 2007. Research and development of the Lithium target facility is an important part of this activity. We constructed a world largest liquid Lithium test loop with a capacity of 5000 L in 2010 and successfully completed the first stage validation tests (functional tests of components and Lithium flow test (flow velocity 15 m/s at the target). In the present article, recent results of the EVEDA activity for the Lithium target facility and related technologies on liquid Lithium are reviewed. (author)

  4. Electrical energy and cost for the mirror fusion test facility

    Pence, G.

    1983-01-01

    An operational scenario has been developed for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) based on the System Requirements, our experience with existing systems, and discussions with the project engineers and designers who are responsible for the systems. This scenario was used to predict the amount of electrical energy needed for running the facility. A generic type listing is included for the equipment considered in each system. A figure shows the anticipated power drain during a five-minute shot sequence from the 115-kV substation, and from the 230-kV and direct feed substations. At this time, the three major substations that will be used for the MFTF-B are billed under three different rate schedules. A table lists these schedules and what they are anticipated as being when the facility becomes operational. The system availability, which is expected to be 0.7 or better, has not been factored into these calculations. This gives a worst case cost for the MFTF-B. Based on this study, it appears that our energy bill will be over $500 000 per month, on the average. This expenditure will constitute a significant portion of the budget needed to operate the MFTF-B. As the systems are refined, and a more accurate picture is obtained as to the size and operational cycles of the equipment, this report will be updated

  5. Fusion power by magnetic confinement: plans and the associated need for nuclear engineers

    Hirsch, R.L.; Beard, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    An essential ingredient in the fusion development plan will be the training of appropriate scientific and technical manpower. In examining the need for fusion-trained nuclear engineers, it is projected that an additional 120 to 250 engineers at the MS and PhD levels will be needed between now and 1980. To be most effective, these graduates must not only be trained in the ''classic'' physical, nuclear, mechanical, and electrical sciences, but they will need specialized training in fusion plasma physics and fusion materials science. To help develop the appropriate educational programs, close cooperation between U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) headquarters, ERDA laboratories, private industry, and the universities will be essential. An emerging need for a carefully structured ''fusion technology'' option in nuclear engineering departments is plainly evident and is already beginning to be developed at leading institutions

  6. Conceptual design of a mirror reactor for a fusion engineering research facility (FERF)

    Batzer, T.H.; Burleigh, R.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Dexter, W.L.; Hamilton, G.W.; Harvey, A.R.; Hickman, R.G.; Hoffman, M.A.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Moir, R.W.; Nelson, R.L.; Pittenger, L.C.; Smith, B.H.; Taylor, C.E.; Werner, R.W.; Wilcox, T.P.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a small mirror fusion reactor for a Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF). The reactor produces 3.4 MW of fusion power and a useful neutron flux of about 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 . Superconducting ''yin-yang'' coils are used, and the plasma is sustained by injection of energetic neutral D 0 and T 0 . Conceptual layouts are given for the reactor, its major components, and supporting facilities. (author)

  7. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  8. Safety considerations in the design of the fusion engineering device

    Barrett, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Safety considerations play a significant role in the design of a near-term Fusion Engineering Device (FED). For the safety of the general public and the plant workers, the radiation environment caused by the reacting plasma and the potential release of tritium fuel are the dominant considerations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and guidelines for radiation protection have been reviewed and are being applied to the device design. Direct radiation protection is provided by the device shield and the reactor building walls. Radiation from the activated device components and the tritium fuel is to be controlled with shielding, contamination control, and ventilation. The potential release of tritium from the plant has influenced the selection of reactor building and plant designs and specifications. The safety of the plant workers is affected primarily by the radiation from the activated device components and from plasma chamber debris. The highly activated device components make it necessary to design many of the maintenance activities in the reactor building for totally remote operation. The hot cell facility has evolved as a totally remote maintenance facility due to the high radiation levels of the device components. Safety considerations have had substantial impacts on the design of FED. Several examples of safety-related design impacts are discussed in the paper. Feasible solutions have been identified for all outstanding safety-related items, and additional optimization of these solutions is anticipated in future design studies

  9. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: a facility for fusion-materials qualification

    Trego, A.L.; Hagan, J.W.; Opperman, E.K.; Burke, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will provide a unique testing environment for irradiation of structural and special purpose materials in support of fusion power systems. The neutron source will be produced by a deuteron-lithium stripping reaction to generate high energy neutrons to ensure damage similar to that of a deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum. The facility design is now ready for the start of construction and much of the supporting lithium system research has been completed. Major testing of key low energy end components of the accelerator is about to commence. The facility, its testing role, and the status and major aspects of its design and supporting system development are described

  10. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  11. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    Sharafat, Shahram; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Anderson, Michael; Williams, Brian; Blanchard, Jake; Snead, Lance; HAPL Team

    2005-12-01

    The high average power laser program is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first wall (FW) will be subject to high energy density radiation and high doses of high energy helium implantation. Tungsten has been identified as the candidate material for a FW armor. The fundamental concern is long term thermo-mechanical survivability of the armor against the effects of high temperature pulsed operation and exfoliation due to the retention of implanted helium. Even if a solid tungsten armor coating would survive the high temperature cyclic operation with minimal failure, the high helium implantation and retention would result in unacceptable material loss rates. Micro-engineered materials, such as castellated structures, plasma sprayed nano-porous coatings and refractory foams are suggested as a first wall armor material to address these fundamental concerns. A micro-engineered FW armor would have to be designed with specific geometric features that tolerate high cyclic heating loads and recycle most of the implanted helium without any significant failure. Micro-engineered materials are briefly reviewed. In particular, plasma-sprayed nano-porous tungsten and tungsten foams are assessed for their potential to accommodate inertial fusion specific loads. Tests show that nano-porous plasma spray coatings can be manufactured with high permeability to helium gas, while retaining relatively high thermal conductivities. Tungsten foams where shown to be able to overcome thermo-mechanical loads by cell rotation and deformation. Helium implantation tests have shown, that pulsed implantation and heating releases significant levels of implanted helium. Helium implantation and release from tungsten was modeled using an expanded kinetic rate theory, to include the effects of pulsed implantations and thermal cycles. Although, significant challenges remain micro-engineered materials are shown to constitute potential

  12. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    Sharafat, Shahram; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Anderson, Michael; Williams, Brian; Blanchard, Jake; Snead, Lance

    2005-01-01

    The high average power laser program is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first wall (FW) will be subject to high energy density radiation and high doses of high energy helium implantation. Tungsten has been identified as the candidate material for a FW armor. The fundamental concern is long term thermo-mechanical survivability of the armor against the effects of high temperature pulsed operation and exfoliation due to the retention of implanted helium. Even if a solid tungsten armor coating would survive the high temperature cyclic operation with minimal failure, the high helium implantation and retention would result in unacceptable material loss rates. Micro-engineered materials, such as castellated structures, plasma sprayed nano-porous coatings and refractory foams are suggested as a first wall armor material to address these fundamental concerns. A micro-engineered FW armor would have to be designed with specific geometric features that tolerate high cyclic heating loads and recycle most of the implanted helium without any significant failure. Micro-engineered materials are briefly reviewed. In particular, plasma-sprayed nano-porous tungsten and tungsten foams are assessed for their potential to accommodate inertial fusion specific loads. Tests show that nano-porous plasma spray coatings can be manufactured with high permeability to helium gas, while retaining relatively high thermal conductivities. Tungsten foams where shown to be able to overcome thermo-mechanical loads by cell rotation and deformation. Helium implantation tests have shown, that pulsed implantation and heating releases significant levels of implanted helium. Helium implantation and release from tungsten was modeled using an expanded kinetic rate theory, to include the effects of pulsed implantations and thermal cycles. Although, significant challenges remain micro-engineered materials are shown to constitute potential

  13. Virtual Turbine Engine Test Bench Using MGET Test Device

    Kho, Seonghee; Kong, Changduk; Ki, Jayoung

    2015-05-01

    Test device using virtual engine simulator can help reduce the number of engine tests through tests similar to the actual engine tests and repeat the test under the same condition, and thus reduce the engine maintenance and operating costs [1]. Also, as it is possible to easily implement extreme conditions in which it is hard to conduct actual tests, it can prevent engine damages that may happen during the actual engine test under such conditions. In this study, an upgraded MGET test device was developed that can conduct both real and virtual engine test by applying real-time engine model to the existing MGET test device that was developed and has been sold by the Company. This newly developed multi-purpose MGET test device is expected to be used for various educational and research purposes.

  14. Consideration on nuclear fusion in plasma by the magnetic confinement as a heat engine

    Tsuji, Yoshio

    1990-01-01

    In comparing nuclear fusion in plasma by the magnetic confinement with nuclear fission and chemical reactions, the power density and the function of a heat engine are discussed using a new parameter G introduced as an eigenvalue of a reaction and the value of q introduced to estimate the thermal efficiency of a heat engine. It is shown that the fusion reactor by the magnetic confinement is very difficult to be a modern heat engine because of the lack of some indispensable functions as a modern heat engine. The value of G and q have the important role in the consideration. (author)

  15. Ultrasonic testing standard of fusion joint for polythylene(PE) pipeline

    Lee, Euy Jong; Hur, Sam Suk; Chae, Gug Byeong

    2006-01-01

    The polyethylene(PE) pipes are widely used to transport city gas worldwide with steel pipes. Generally, Steel pipe are used for high pressure line and PE pipe for low pressure line whose pressure is less than 4 kg/m 2 . The steel pipe line are subject to 100 percent Radiographic Testing(RT) during installation stage, on the contrary, there has been no the established testing method for the welding fusion joint of polyethylene pipes, so all quality control is limited only Visual Testing(VT) or management of Fusion welding equipment. Even though PE pipeline is exposed to lower pressure than steel pipeline, the gas leakage from PE pipe may result in almost the same serious consequence from steel pipeline. So, it is necessary to develop the reliable testing standard for PE pipeline from the point of view of NDT engineers.

  16. Fusion materials irradiation test facility: description and status

    Trego, A.L.; Parker, E.F.; Hagan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility will generate a high-flux, high-energy neutron source that will provide a fusion-like radiation environment for fusion reactor materials development. The neutrons will be produced in a nuclear stripping reaction by impinging a 35 MeV beam of deuterons from an Alvarez-type linear accelerator on a flowing lithium target. The target will be located in a test cell which will provide an irradiation volume of over 750l within which 10 cm 3 will have an average neutron flux of greater than 1.4 x 10 15 n/cm 2 -s and 500 cm 3 an average flux of greater than 2.2 by 10 14 n/cm 2- s with an expected availability factor greater than 65%. The projected fluence within the 10 cm 3 high flux region of FMIT will effect damage upon the materials test specimens to 30 dpa (displacements per atom) for each 90 day irradiation period. This irradiation flux volume will be at least 500 times larger than that of any other facility with comparable neutron energy and will fully meet the fusion materials damage research objective of 100 dpa within three years for the first round of tests

  17. Cryogenic systems for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Slack, D.S.; Chronis, W.C.; Nelson, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper will include an in-depth discussion of the design, fabrication, and operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) cryogenic system located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Each subsystem will be discussed to present a basic composite of the entire facility

  18. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injection system vacuum chamber

    Pedrotti, L.R.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the components of the Neutral Beam Lines of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will be enclosed in a 50 cubic meter box-shaped vacuum chamber. The chamber will have a number of unorthodox features to accomodate both neutral beam and TFTR requirements. The design constraints, and the resulting chamber design, are presented

  19. Developments in bone tissue engineering research for spinal fusion

    van Gaalen, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Many orthopaedic procedures require fusion of a bony defect. Sometimes a bone graft is needed for this fusion. Autograft bone is considered the golden standard. The harvesting of this bone is time consuming and may have serious side effects, such as chronic donor site pain. Available alternatives

  20. Tritium experience in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Skinner, C.H.; Blanchard, W.; Hosea, J.; Mueller, D.; Nagy, A.; Hogan, J.

    1998-01-01

    Tritium management is a key enabling element in fusion technology. Tritium fuel was used in 3.5 years of successful deuterium-tritium (D-T) operations in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The D-T campaign enabled TFTR to explore the transport, alpha physics, and MHD stability of a reactor core. It also provided experience with tritium retention and removal that highlighted the importance of these issues in future D-T machines. In this paper, the authors summarize the tritium retention and removal experience in TFTR and its implications for future reactors

  1. Technology issues for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The approach for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor has evolved from a conservative plan based on cutting up and burying all of the systems, to one that considers the impact tritium contamination will have on waste disposal, how large size components may be used as their own shipping containers, and even the possibility of recycling the materials of components such as the toroidal field coils and the tokamak structure. In addition, the project is more carefully assessing the requirements for using remotely operated equipment. Finally, valuable cost database is being developed for future use by the fusion community

  2. Assessment of the critical engineering data needs for the commercialization of magnetic confinement fusion

    Waganer, L.M.; Zuckerman, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of twenty-two recent conceptual fusion reactor designs was conducted to ascertain both generic and specific engineering data needs critical for the commercialization of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Design experts or advocates for each concept were queried as to the more critical engineering issues and data needs affecting the achievement of commercialization. For each concept, the technical issues were identified and the data needs quantified. Issues and data needs were then ranked based upon the experts' perceptions of the relative importance of each to the concept. The issues encompassed all aspects of the fusion reactor plant design including materials, performance, maintainability, operability, cost, safety and resources

  3. Leak testing and repair of fusion devices

    Kozman, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The leak testing, reporting and vacuum leak repair techniques of the MFTF yin-yang number one magnet system, the world's largest superconducting magnet system, are discussed. Based on this experience, techniques will be developed for testing and repairing leaks on the 42 MFTF-B magnets. The leak-hunting techniques for the yin-yang magnet systems were applied to two helium circuits (the coil bundle and guard vacuum; both require helium flow for magnet cooldown), their associated piping, liquid nitrogen radiation shields, and piping. Additionally, during MFTF-B operation there will be warm water plasma shields and piping that require leak checking

  4. ITER: a technology test bed for a fusion reactor

    Huguet, M.; Green, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The ITER Project aims to establish nuclear fusion as an energy source that has potential safety and environmental advantages, and to develop the technologies required for a fusion reactor. ITER is a collaborative project between the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States of America. During the current phase of the Project, an R and D programme of about 850 million dollars is underway to develop the technologies required for ITER. This technological effort should culminate in the construction of the components and systems of the ITER machine and its auxiliaries. The main areas of technological development include the first wall and divertor technology, the blanket technology and tritium breeding, superconducting magnet technology, pulsed power technology and remote handling. ITER is a test bed and an essential step to establish the technology of future fusion reactors. Many of the ITER technologies are of potential interest to other fields and their development is expected to benefit the industries involved. (author)

  5. First AC loss test and analysis of a Bi2212 cable-in-conduit conductor for fusion application

    Qin, Jinggang; Shi, Yi; Wu, Yu; Li, Jiangang; Wang, Qiuliang; He, Yuxiang; Dai, Chao; Liu, Fang; Liu, Huajun; Mao, Zhehua; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao; Devred, Arnaud

    2018-01-01

    The main goal of the Chinese fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) is to build a fusion engineering tokamak reactor with a fusion power of 50-200 MW, and plan to test the breeding tritium during the fusion reaction. This may require a maximum magnetic field of the central solenoid and toroidal field coils up to 15 T. New magnet technologies should be developed for the next generation of fusion reactors with higher requirements. Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi2212) is considered as a potential and promising superconductor for the magnets in the CFETR. R&D activities are ongoing at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences for demonstration of the feasibility of a CICC based on Bi2212 round wire. One sub-size conductor cabled with 42 wires was designed, manufactured and tested with limited strand indentation during cabling and good transport performance. In this paper, the first test results and analysis on the AC loss of Bi2212 round wires and cabled conductor samples are presented. Furthermore, the impact of mechanical load on the AC loss of the sub-size conductor is investigated to represent the operation conditions with electromagnetic loads. The first tests provide an essential basis for the validation of Bi2212 CICC and its application in fusion magnets.

  6. Fusion blanket testing in MFTF-α + T

    Kleefeldt, K.

    1985-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility-α + T (MFTF-α + T) is an upgraded version of the current MFTF-B test facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and is designed for near-term fusion-technology-integrated tests at a neutron flux of 2 MW/m 2 . Currently, the fusion community is screening blanket and related issues to determine which ones can be addressed using MFTF-α + T. In this work, the minimum testing needs to address these issues are identified for the liquid-metal-cooled blanket and the solid-breeder blanket. Based on the testing needs and on the MFTF-α + T capability, a test plan is proposed for three options; each option covers a six to seven year testing phase. The options reflect the unresolved question of whether to place the research and development (R and D) emphasis on liquid-metal or solid-breeder blankets. In each case, most of the issues discussed can be addressed to a reasonable extent in MFTF-α+T

  7. Superconductors for fusion magnets tested under pulsed field in SULTAN

    Bruzzone, P.; Bottura, L.; Katheder, H.; Blau, B.; Rohleder, I.; Vecsey, G.

    1995-01-01

    The SULTAN III test facility has been upgraded with a pair of pulsed field coils to carry out AC losses and stability experiments under full operating loads on large size, fusion conductors for ITER. A fast data aquisition system records the conductor behaviour under fast field transient. The commissioning results of the pulsed coils and instrumentation are critically discussed and the test capability of the set up is assessed. (orig.)

  8. Engineering test facility design definition

    Bercaw, R. W.; Seikel, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF) is the major focus of the Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Program to facilitate commercialization and to demonstrate the commercial operability of MHD/steam electric power. The ETF will be a fully integrated commercial prototype MHD power plant with a nominal output of 200 MW sub e. Performance of this plant is expected to meet or surpass existing utility standards for fuel, maintenance, and operating costs; plant availability; load following; safety; and durability. It is expected to meet all applicable environmental regulations. The current design concept conforming to the general definition, the basis for its selection, and the process which will be followed in further defining and updating the conceptual design.

  9. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Rule, K.; Viola, M.; Williams, M.; Strykowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling

  10. Software engineers and nuclear engineers: teaming up to do testing

    Kelly, D.; Cote, N.; Shepard, T.

    2007-01-01

    The software engineering community has traditionally paid little attention to the specific needs of engineers and scientists who develop their own software. Recently there has been increased recognition that specific software engineering techniques need to be found for this group of developers. In this case study, a software engineering group teamed with a nuclear engineering group to develop a software testing strategy. This work examines the types of testing that proved to be useful and examines what each discipline brings to the table to improve the quality of the software product. (author)

  11. Engine Test Cell Aeroacoustics and Recommendations

    Tam, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Ground testing of turbojet engines in test cells necessarily involves very high acoustic amplitudes, often enough and severe enough that testing is interrupted and facility hardware and test articles are damaged...

  12. A Novel Data Hierarchical Fusion Method for Gas Turbine Engine Performance Fault Diagnosis

    Feng Lu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas path fault diagnosis involves the effective utilization of condition-based sensor signals along engine gas path to accurately identify engine performance failure. The rapid development of information processing technology has led to the use of multiple-source information fusion for fault diagnostics. Numerous efforts have been paid to develop data-based fusion methods, such as neural networks fusion, while little research has focused on fusion architecture or the fusion of different method kinds. In this paper, a data hierarchical fusion using improved weighted Dempster–Shaffer evidence theory (WDS is proposed, and the integration of data-based and model-based methods is presented for engine gas-path fault diagnosis. For the purpose of simplifying learning machine typology, a recursive reduced kernel based extreme learning machine (RR-KELM is developed to produce the fault probability, which is considered as the data-based evidence. Meanwhile, the model-based evidence is achieved using particle filter-fuzzy logic algorithm (PF-FL by engine health estimation and component fault location in feature level. The outputs of two evidences are integrated using WDS evidence theory in decision level to reach a final recognition decision of gas-path fault pattern. The characteristics and advantages of two evidences are analyzed and used as guidelines for data hierarchical fusion framework. Our goal is that the proposed methodology provides much better performance of gas-path fault diagnosis compared to solely relying on data-based or model-based method. The hierarchical fusion framework is evaluated in terms to fault diagnosis accuracy and robustness through a case study involving fault mode dataset of a turbofan engine that is generated by the general gas turbine simulation. These applications confirm the effectiveness and usefulness of the proposed approach.

  13. Fusion performance analysis of plasmas with reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Ruskov, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V.; McCune, D.C.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Synakowski, E.J.; Goeler, S. von; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    A case for substantial loss of fast ions degrading the performance of tokamak fusion test reactor plasmas [Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)] with reversed magnetic shear (RS) is presented. The principal evidence is obtained from an experiment with short (40 - 70 ms) tritium beam pulses injected into deuterium beam heated RS plasmas [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 924 (1999)]. Modeling of this experiment indicates that up to 40% beam power is lost on a time scale much shorter than the beam - ion slowing down time. Critical parameters which connect modeling and experiment are: The total 14 MeV neutron emission, its radial profile, and the transverse stored energy. The fusion performance of some plasmas with internal transport barriers is further deteriorated by impurity accumulation in the plasma core. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  14. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: an intermediate device to a mirror fusion reactor

    Karpenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) now under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory represents more than an order-of-magnitude step from earlier magnetic-mirror experiments toward a future mirror fusion reactor. In fact, when the device begins operating in 1986, the Lawson criteria of ntau = 10 14 cm -3 .s will almost be achieved for D-T equivalent operation, thus signifying scientific breakeven. Major steps have been taken to develop MFTF-B technologies for tandem mirrors. Steady-state, high-field, superconducting magnets at reactor-revelant scales are used in the machine. The 30-s beam pulses, ECRH, and ICRH will also introduce steady-state technologies in those systems

  15. Simulation and material testing of jet engines

    Tariq, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA software engine simulator version U 1.7a beta has been used for simulation and material testing of jet engines. Specifications of Modem Jet Engines are stated, and then engine simulator is applied on these specifications. This simulator can simulate turbojet, afterburner, turbofan and ram jet. The material of many components of engine may be varied. Conventional and advanced materials for jet engines can be simulated and tested. These materials can be actively cooled to increase the operating temperature limit. As soon as temperature of any engine component exceeds the temperature limit of material, a warning message flashes across screen. Temperature Limits Exceeded. This flashing message remainst here until necessaryc hangesa re carried out in engine operationp rocedure. Selection Criteria of Engines is stated for piston prop, turboprop, turbofan, turbojet, and turbojet with afterburner and Ramjet. Several standard engines are modeled in Engine Simulator. These engines can. be compared by several engineering specifications. The design, modeling, simulation and testing of engines helps to better understand different types of materials used in jet engines. (author)

  16. Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D ampersand D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D ampersand D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D ampersand D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates

  17. Cryogenic systems for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Slack, D.S.; Nelson, R.L.; Chronis, W.C.

    1985-08-01

    This paper includes an in-depth discussion of the design, fabrication, and operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) cryogenic system located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Each subsystem discussed to present a basic composite of the entire facility. The following subsystems are included: 500kW nitrogen reliquefier, subcoolers, and distribution system; 15kW helium refrigerator/liquefier and distribution system; helium recovery and storage system; rough vacuum and high vacuum systems

  18. Design and testing of the 2 MV heavy ion injector for the Fusion Energy Research Program

    Abraham, W.; Benjegerdes, R.; Reginato, L.; Stoker, J.; Hipple, R.; Peters, C.; Pruyn, J.; Vanecek, D.; Yu, S.

    1995-04-01

    The Fusion Energy Research Group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has constructed and tested a pulsed 2 MV injector that produces a driver size beam of potassium ions. This paper describes the engineering aspects of this development which were generated in a closely coupled effort with the physics staff. Details of the ion source and beam transport physics are covered in another paper at this conference. This paper discusses the design details of the pulse generator, the ion source, the extractor, the diode column, and the electrostatic quadrupole column. Included will be the test results and operating experience of the complete injector

  19. IFMIF [International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility], an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing: Materials testing capabilities

    Mann, F.M.

    1988-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is proposed as an advanced accelerator-based neutron source for high-flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. At the extended facility, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1-A beam of 35-MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high-flux (>10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-s) testing in IFMITF would be over a liter, a factor of about three larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35-MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1A or more. Such an increase can be accomplished by funneling beams of deuterium ions from the radio-frequency quadruple into a linear accelerator and by taking advantage of recent developments in accelerator technology. Multiple beams and large total current allow great variety in available testing. For example, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Fusion

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  1. Inductive learning as a fusion engine for mine detection

    Kercel, S.W.; Dress, W.B.

    1997-08-01

    Semiotics is defined by some researchers as {open_quotes}the study of the appearance (visual or otherwise) meaning, and use of symbols and symbol systems.{close_quotes} Semiotic fusion of data from multiple sensory sources is a potential solution to the problem of landmine detection. This turns out to be significant, because notwithstanding the diversity of sensor technologies being used to attack the problem, there is no single effective landmine sensor technology. The only practical, general-purpose mine detector presently available is the trained dog. Most research into mine-detection technology seeds to emulate the dog`s seemingly uncanny abilities. An ideal data-fusion system would mimic animal reaction, with the brain`s perceptive power melding multiple sensory cues into an awareness of the size and location of a mine. Furthermore, the fusion process should be adaptive, with the skill at combining cues into awareness improving with experience. Electronic data-fusion systems reported in the countermine literature use conventional vector-based pattern recognition methods. Although neural nets are popular, they have never satisfactorily met the challenge. Despite years of investigation, nobody has ever found a vector space representation that reliably characterizes mine identity. This strongly suggests that the features have not been found because researchers have been looking for the wrong characteristics. It is worth considering that dogs probably do not represent data as mathematical number lists, but they almost certainly represent data via semiotic structures.

  2. Approach to testing fusion components in existing nuclear facilities

    Hsu, P.Y.; Miller, L.G.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Kulcinski, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    The concept presented makes use of the fast spectrum in the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Preliminary results show that an asymmetric, nuclear test environment with particle and radiant energy fluxes impinging on a first wall/blanket or divertor surface appears feasible in a neutron/gamma field not greatly different from that seen by a representative first wall/blanket module

  3. New tritium monitor for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    At DT-fueled fusion reactors, there will be a need for tritium monitors that can simultaneously measure in real time the concentrations of HTO, HT and the activated air produced by fusion neutrons. Such a monitor has been developed, tested and delivered to the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for use at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). It uses semipermeable membranes to achieve the removal of HTO from the sampled air for monitoring and a catalyst to convert the HT to HTO, also for removal and monitoring. The remaining air, devoid of tritium, is routed to a third detector for monitoring the activated air. The sensitivities are those that would be expected from tritium instruments employing conventional flow-through ionization chambers: 1 to 3 μCi/m 3 . Its discriminating ability is approximately 10 -3 for any of the three components (HTO, HT and activated air) in any of the other two channels. For instance, the concentration of HT in the HTO channel is 10 -3 times its original concentration in the sampled air. This will meet the needs of TFTR

  4. Decontamination and decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Walton, G.R.; Perry, E.D.; Commander, J.C.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is scheduled to complete its end-of-life deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in September 1994. The D-T operation will result in the TFTR machine structure becoming activated, and plasma facing and vacuum components will be contaminated with tritium. The resulting machine activation levels after a two year cooldown period will allow hands on dismantling for external structures, but require remote dismantling for the vacuum vessel. The primary objective of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Project is to provide a facility for construction of a new Department of Energy (DOE) experimental fusion reactor by March 1998. The project schedule calls for a two year shutdown period when tritium decontamination of the vacuum vessel, neutral beam injectors and other components will occur. Shutdown will be followed by an 18 month period of D ampersand D operations. The technical objectives of the project are to: safely dismantle and remove components from the test cell complex; package disassembled components in accordance with applicable regulations; ship packages to a DOE approved disposal or material recycling site; and develop expertise using remote disassembly techniques on a large scale fusion facility. This paper discusses the D ampersand D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, and the technical plan that will be implemented

  5. Data fusion: a new concept in non-destructive testing

    Georgel, B.; Lavayssiere, B.

    1995-01-01

    Non-destructive testing of some components (made of austenitic steel, or of a complex shape for example) requires quite often the use of several methods such as X-ray, ultrasonics, Eddy Currents. Then, a skilled operator is able to perform the expertise of the specimen. The main goal of this paper is to show that 3D diagnosis may be improved in term of reliability and precision by fusion of several NDT techniques. A data fusion algorithm is more that trying to improve the visualisation or the rendering of NDT data sets. It consists for each volume element, in computing a new value representing the combined information and in formulating a diagnosis on this basis. To achieve such a goal, know-how in modeling of physical phenomena and in applied mathematics is crucial. (authors). 4 refs., 2 figs

  6. Tandem mirror magnet system for the mirror fusion test facility

    Bulmer, R.H.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) will be a large magnetic fusion experimental facility containing 22 supercounducting magnets including solenoids and C-coils. State-of-the-art technology will be used extensively to complete this facility before 1985. Niobium titanium superconductor and stainless steel structural cases will be the principle materials of construction. Cooling will be pool boiling and thermosiphon flow of 4.5 K liquid helium. Combined weight of the magnets will be over 1500 tonnes and the stored energy will be over 1600 MJ. Magnetic field strength in some coils will be more than 8 T. Detail design of the magnet system will begin early 1981. Basic requirements and conceptual design are disclosed in this paper

  7. Long-term ETR/INTOR magnet testing in support of the demonstration fusion reactor

    Herring, J.S.; Shah, V.N.; Rouhani, S.Z.

    1983-01-01

    This study considers ways that the proposed Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), or the proposed International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR), can be used for magnet performance tests that would be useful for the design and operation of the Demonstration Tokamak Power Plant (DEMO). Such testing must not interfere with the main function of the ETR/INTOR as an integrated fusion reactor. A performance test plan for the ETR/INTOR magnets is proposed and appropriate tests on the magnets is proposed and appropriate tests on the magnets for each phase of the ETR/INTOR operation are described. The suggested tests would verify design requirements and monitor long-term changes due to radiation. This paper also summarizes the design and operational performance of existing superconducting magnets and identifies the known failures and their predominant causes

  8. Implosion and staging systems for a Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor

    Gribble, R.F.; Linford, R.K.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1976-01-01

    The implosion heating and adiabatic compression processes will be separated in future theta pinch devices. The circuit to achieve the fast implosion heating and power crowbar (staging) for the Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor is described here. The plasma is very tightly coupled to the circuit and presents a varying inductive load. Computer-aided circuit designs which achieve a programmed magnetic field waveform are described. The field approximates a two-step waveform, on-off-on, which is ideal for achieving the large initial plasma radius needed for stability. The components for the circuits have been developed and are being tested in experiments at Los Alamos

  9. Implosion and staging systems for a Scyllac fusion test reactor

    Gribble, R.F.; Linford, R.K.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1975-01-01

    The implosion heating and adiabatic compression processes will be separated in future theta pinch devices. The circuit to achieve the fast implosion heating and power crowbar (staging) for the Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor is described here. The plasma is very tightly coupled to the circuit and presents a varying inductive load. Computer-aided circuit designs which achieve a programmed magnetic field waveform are described. The field approximates a two-step waveform, on-off-on, which is ideal for achieving the large initial plasma radius needed for stability. The components for the circuits have been developed and are being tested in experiments at Los Alamos. (auth)

  10. Maintenance of fission and fusion reactors. 10. workshop on fusion reactor engineering

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This report contains copies of OHP presented at the title meeting. The presented topics are as follows, maintenance of nuclear power plants and ITER, exchange of shroud in BWR type reactors, deterioration of fission and fusion reactor materials, standards of pressure vessels, malfunction diagnosis method with neural network. (J.P.N.)

  11. Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor D-T results

    Meade, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    Temperatures, densities and confinement of deuterium plasmas confined in tokamaks have been achieved within the last decade that are approaching those required for a D-T reactor. As a result, the unique phenomena present in a D-T reactor plasma (D-T plasma confinement, α confinement, α heating and possible α-driven instabilities) can now be studied in the laboratory. Recent experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been the first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas with reactor fuel concentrations of tritium. The injection of about 20MW of tritium and 14MW of deuterium neutral beams into the TFTR produced a plasma with a T-to-D density ratio of about 1 and yielding a maximum fusion power of about 9.2MW. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma was about 1.8MWm -3 , approximating that expected in a D-T fusion reactor. A TFTR plasma with a T-to-D density ratio of about 1 was found to have about 20% higher energy confinement time than a comparable D plasma, indicating a confinement scaling with average ion mass A of τ E ∝A 0.6 . The core ion temperature increased from 30 to 37keV owing to a 35% improvement of ion thermal conductivity. Using the electron thermal conductivity from a comparable deuterium plasma, about 50% of the electron temperature increase from 9 to 10.6keV can be attributed to electron heating by the α particles. The approximately 5% loss of α particles, as observed on detectors near the bottom edge of the plasma, was consistent with classical first orbit loss without anomalous effects. Initial measurements have been made of the confined high energy α particles and the resultant α ash density. At fusion power levels of 7.5MW, fluctuations at the toroidal Alfven eigen-mode frequency were observed by the fluctuation diagnostics. However, no additional α loss due to the fluctuations was observed. (orig.)

  12. Overview of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) design

    Steiner, D.; Flanagan, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The device has a major radius of 5.0 m with a plasma minor radius of 1.3 m elongated by 1.6. Capability is provided for operating the toroidal field coils up to 10 T, but the bulk of the operations are designed for 8 T. At 8-T conditions the fusion power is approx. 180 MW (neutron wall loading approx. 0.4 MW/m 2 ) and a plasma Q of approx. 5 is expected. At 10-T conditions, which are expected to be limited to about 10% of the total operations, the fusion power is approx. 450 MW (approx. 1.0 MW/m 2 ) and ignition is expected

  13. Overview of the fusion engineering device (FED) design

    Steiner, D.; Flanagan, C.A.

    1981-10-01

    The device has a major radius of 5.0 m with a plasma minor radius of 1.3 m elongated by 1.6. Capability is provided for operating the toroidal field coils up to 10 T, but the bulk of the operations are designed for 8 T. At 8-T conditions, the fusion power is approx. 180 MW (neutron wall loading approx. 0.4 MW/m 2 ) and a plasma Q of approx. 5 is expected. At 10-T conditions, which are expected to be limited to about 10% of the total operations, the fusion power is approx. 450 MW (approx. 1.0 MW/m 2 ) and ignition is expected

  14. Deuterium-tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test reactor

    Hosea, J.; Adler, J.H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.

    1994-09-01

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) experimental program on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is underway and routine tritium operations have been established. The technology upgrades made to the TFTR facility have been demonstrated to be sufficient for supporting both operations and maintenance for an extended D-T campaign. To date fusion power has been increased to ∼9 MW and several physics results of importance to the D-T reactor regime have been obtained: electron temperature, ion temperature, and plasma stored energy all increase substantially in the D-T regime relative to the D-D regime at the same neutral beam power and comparable limiter conditioning; possible alpha electron heating is indicated and energy confinement improvement with average ion mass is observed; and alpha particle losses appear to be classical with no evidence of TAE mode activity up to the PFUS ∼6 MW level. Instability in the TAE mode frequency range has been observed at PFUS > 7 MW and its effect on performance in under investigation. Preparations are underway to enhance the alpha particle density further by increasing fusion power and by extending the neutral beam pulse length to permit alpha particle effects of relevance to the ITER regime to be more fully explored

  15. Design of a high-flux test assembly for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Material Test Facility (FMIT) will provide a high flux fusion-like neutron environment in which a variety of structural and non-structural materials irradiations can be conducted. The FMIT experiments, called test assemblies, that are subjected to the highest neutron flux magnitudes and associated heating rates will require forced convection liquid metal cooling systems to remove the neutron deposited power and maintain test specimens at uniform temperatures. A brief description of the FMIT facility and experimental areas is given with emphasis on the design, capabilities and handling of the high flux test assembly

  16. Engineering and Functional Characterization of Fusion Genes Identifies Novel Oncogenic Drivers of Cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Oncogenic gene fusions drive many human cancers, but tools to more quickly unravel their functional contributions are needed. Here we describe methodology permitting fusion gene construction for functional evaluation. Using this strategy, we engineered the known fusion oncogenes, BCR-ABL1, EML4-ALK, and ETV6-NTRK3, as well as 20 previously uncharacterized fusion genes identified in TCGA datasets.

  17. Engineered Barrier Test Facility status report, 1984

    Phillips, S.J.; Adams, M.R.; Gilbert, T.W.; Meinhardt, C.C.; Mitchell, R.M.; Waugh, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    This report provides a general summary of activities completed to date at the Hanford Engineered Barrier Test Facility. This facility is used to test and compare construction practices and performance of alternative designs of engineered barrier cover systems. These cover systems are being evaluated for potential use for isolation and confinement of buried waste disposal structures

  18. Development of large insulator rings for the TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor

    Brown, T.; Tobin, A.

    1977-01-01

    Research and development leading to the manufacture of large ceramic insulator rings for the TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor). Material applictions, fabrication approach and testing activities are highlighted

  19. Interrupter and hybrid-switch testing for fusion devices

    Parsons, W.M.; Warren, R.W.; Honig, E.M.; Lindsay, J.D.G.; Bellamo, P.; Cassel, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses recent and ongoing switch testing for fusion devices. The first part describes testing for the TFTR ohmic-heating circuit. In this set of tests, which simulated the stresses produced during a plasma initiation pulse, circuit breakers were required to interrupt a current of 24 kA with an associated recovery voltage of 25 kV. Two interrupter systems were tested for over 1000 operations each, and both appear to satisfy TFTR requirements. The second part discusses hybrid-switch development for superconducting coil protection. These switching systems must be capable of carrying large currents on a continuous basis as well as performing interruption duties. The third part presents preliminary results on an early-counterpulse technique applied to vacuum interrupters. Implementation of this technique has resulted in large increases in interruptible current as well as a marked reduction in contact erosion

  20. Role of well testing in civil engineering

    Banks, D.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose of well testing is to derive a value of the permeability of the geologic medium or to measure the velocity or quantity of fluid flow. The types of tests typically employed on civil engineering projects are simple borehole tests, packer or pressure tests in boreholes, permeameter tests, well pumping tests, and in-hole tests using well flow meters or tracer tests. New problem areas which demand new approaches are mentioned

  1. Seismic analysis of the mirror fusion test facility shielding vault

    Gabrielsen, B.L.; Tsai, K.

    1981-04-01

    This report presents a seismic analysis of the vault in Building 431 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which houses the mirror Fusion Test Facility. The shielding vault structure is approximately 120 ft long by 80 ft wide and is constructed of concrete blocks approximately 7 x 7 x 7 ft. The north and south walls are approximately 53 ft high and the east wall is approximately 29 ft high. These walls are supported on a monolithic concrete foundation that surrounds a 21-ft deep open pit. Since the 53-ft walls appeared to present the greatest seismic problem they were the first investigated

  2. Shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Wilcox, A.D.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1983-03-01

    The shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility is based upon one-, two- and three-dimensional transport calculations with experimental measurements utilized to refine the nuclear data including the neutron cross sections from 20 to 50 MeV and the gamma ray and neutron source terms. The high energy neutrons and deuterons produce activation products from the numerous reactions that are kinematically allowed. The analyses for both beam-on and beam-off (from the activation products) conditions have required extensive nuclear data libraries and the utilization of Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates, point kernel and auxiliary computer codes

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic research in fusion blanket engineering and metallurgical processing

    Tokuhiro, A.

    1991-11-01

    A review of recent research activities in liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics (LM-MHDs) is presented in this article. Two major reserach areas are discussed. The first topic involves the thermomechanical design issues in a proposed tokamak fusion reactor. The primary concerns are in the magneto-thermal-hydraulic performance of a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. The second topic involves the application of MHD in material processing in the metallurgical and semiconductor industries. The two representative applications are electromagnetic stirring (EMS) of continuously cast steel and the Czochralski (CZ) method of crystal growth in the presence of a magnetic field. (author) 24 figs., 10 tabs., 136 refs

  4. Engineering design of the Nova Laser Facility for inertial-confinement fusion

    Simmons, W.W.; Godwin, R.O.; Hurley, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The design of the Nova Laser Facility for inertial confinement fusion experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented from an engineering perspective. Emphasis is placed upon design-to-performance requirements as they impact the various subsystems that comprise this complex experimental facility

  5. Advanced Turbine Engine Seal Test

    1976-07-01

    Transpiration- Cooled Shroud Segments. 67. ATEST Shroud Rub Pin Heights and Mid-Chord Runout . 68. Locations of Nine-Point Runout Check on Shroud Surface...69. ATEST Shroud Leading Edge Runout . 70. ATEST Shroud Trailing Edge Runout . 71. ATEST Shroud Support Posttest Runout . 72. ATEST Shroud Flow Zones...at General Electric on many prior engines with good success. It Involves the use of a grinding wheel in conjunction with a cutting fluid which is

  6. Creation of new growth engine through proliferating radiation fusion technology

    Byun, Myung Woo

    2008-01-01

    Radiation technology is being used for the decontamination of foods, the breeding of crops and flowers, the sterilization of medical devices, recycling and conservation of wastes and the development of advanced functional materials. The economical scales of radiational industries were higher than 148 billion $ in United States and 64.5 billion $ in Japan, but only 0.15 billion $ in Korea. To promote the radiation industry, the Korean government has legislated the general plans for the promotion of atomic energy and established the Advanced Radiation Technology Institute in Jeongeup. Radiation Fusion Technology (RFT) is an advanced technology which integrates Information Technology, Nano Technology, Bio Technology, Environmental Technology, Space Technology, based on Radiation Technology. RFT is developing highly value-added products and theses outcomes will be industrialized in RFT business valley

  7. Storage and Containment of Nuclear Targets for Pulsed Fission-Fusion Testing

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The combined fission-fusion fuel target is the heart of an engine concept that can open the solar system to fast and efficient human exploration. This is a unique...

  8. Proposed rf system for the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    Fazio, M.V.; Johnson, H.P.; Hoffert, W.J.; Boyd, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary rf system design for the accelerator portion of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is in progress. The 35-MeV, 100-mA, cw deuteron beam will require 6.3 MW rf power at 80 MHz. Initial testing indicates the EIMAC 8973 tetrode is the most suitable final amplifier tube for each of a series of 15 amplifier chains operating at 0.5-MW output. To satisfy the beam dynamics requirements for particle acceleration and to minimize beam spill, each amplifier output must be controlled to +-1 0 in phase and the field amplitude in the tanks must be held within a 1% tolerance. These tolerances put stringent demands on the rf phase and amplitude control system

  9. VNS: A volumetric neutron source for fusion nuclear technology testing and development

    Abdou, M.A.; Peng, Y.K.; Ying, A.Y.

    1994-01-01

    Recent progress in fusion plasma research and the initiation of the Engineering Design Activity for ITER provide incentives to seriously explore technically sound and logically consistent pathways toward development of fusion as a practical and attractive energy source. A critical goal is the successful construction and operation of a fusion power demonstration plant (DEMO). Major world program strategies call for DEMO operation by the year 2025. Such a date is important in order for fusion to play a significant role in the energy supply market in the second half of the twenty-first century. Without such a DEMO goal, it will be very hard to justify major financial commitments in the near term for major projects such as ITER. The major question is whether a DEMO goal by the year 2025 is attainable from a technical standpoint. This has been the central question being addressed in a study, called VENUS. Results to date show that a DEMO by the year 2025 can be realized if three major facilities begin operation in parallel by the year 2005. These facilities are: (1) ITER, (2) VNS, and (3) IFMIF. Results show that VNS is a necessary element toward DEMO in a strategy consistent with present world program plans. The key requirements to test and develop fusion nuclear components (e.g. blanket) are 1 MW/m 2 neutron wall load, >10 m 2 of test area at the first wall, steady state or long burn plasma operation, fluence of ∼6MWy/m 2 at the first wall in ∼10-12 year period, and duty cycle x availability factor of ∼0.3. Results of the study show that an attractive design envelope for VNS that satisfies the nuclear testing and development requirements exists. Within this design envelope, the most attractive design points for VNS appear to be driven plasma (Q∼1) in tokamak configuration with normal toroidal-field copper coils, major radius 1.5-2.0m, fusion power ∼100MW, and neutron wall load ∼1.5MW/m 2

  10. Fusion power core engineering for the ARIES-ST power plant

    Tillack, M.S.; Wang, X.R.; Pulsifer, J.; Malang, S.; Sze, D.K.; Billone, M.; Sviatoslavsky, I.

    2003-01-01

    ARIES-ST is a 1000 MWe fusion power plant based on a low aspect ratio 'spherical torus' (ST) plasma. The ARIES-ST power core was designed to accommodate the unique features of an ST power plant, to meet the top-level requirements of an attractive fusion energy source, and to minimize extrapolation from the fusion technology database under development throughout the world. The result is an advanced helium-cooled ferritic steel blanket with flowing PbLi breeder and tungsten plasma-interactive components. Design improvements, such as the use of SiC inserts in the blanket to extend the outlet coolant temperature range were explored and the results are reported here. In the final design point, the power and particle loads found in ARIES-ST are relatively similar to other advanced tokamak power plants (e.g. ARIES-RS [Fusion Eng. Des. 38 (1997) 3; Fusion Eng. Des. 38 (1997) 87]) such that exotic technologies were not required in order to satisfy all of the design criteria. Najmabadi and the ARIES Team [Fusion Eng. Des. (this issue)] provide an overview of ARIES-ST design. In this article, the details of the power core design are presented together with analysis of the thermal-hydraulic, thermomechanical and materials behavior of in-vessel components. Detailed engineering analysis of ARIES-ST TF and PF systems, nuclear analysis, and safety are given in the companion papers

  11. Space Shuttle Main Engine Public Test Firing

    2000-01-01

    A new NASA Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) roars to the approval of more than 2,000 people who came to John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., on July 25 for a flight-certification test of the SSME Block II configuration. The engine, a new and significantly upgraded shuttle engine, was delivered to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for use on future shuttle missions. Spectators were able to experience the 'shake, rattle and roar' of the engine, which ran for 520 seconds - the length of time it takes a shuttle to reach orbit.

  12. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon

    2014-01-01

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity

  13. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity.

  14. A Foreign Object Damage Event Detector Data Fusion System for Turbofan Engines

    Turso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2004-01-01

    A Data Fusion System designed to provide a reliable assessment of the occurrence of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in a turbofan engine is presented. The FOD-event feature level fusion scheme combines knowledge of shifts in engine gas path performance obtained using a Kalman filter, with bearing accelerometer signal features extracted via wavelet analysis, to positively identify a FOD event. A fuzzy inference system provides basic probability assignments (bpa) based on features extracted from the gas path analysis and bearing accelerometers to a fusion algorithm based on the Dempster-Shafer-Yager Theory of Evidence. Details are provided on the wavelet transforms used to extract the foreign object strike features from the noisy data and on the Kalman filter-based gas path analysis. The system is demonstrated using a turbofan engine combined-effects model (CEM), providing both gas path and rotor dynamic structural response, and is suitable for rapid-prototyping of control and diagnostic systems. The fusion of the disparate data can provide significantly more reliable detection of a FOD event than the use of either method alone. The use of fuzzy inference techniques combined with Dempster-Shafer-Yager Theory of Evidence provides a theoretical justification for drawing conclusions based on imprecise or incomplete data.

  15. Enhancement of Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor performance by lithium conditioning

    Mansfield, D.K.; Hill, K.W.; Strachan, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Scott, S.D.; Budny, R.; Marmar, E.S.; Snipes, J.A.; Terry, J.L.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.E.; Bitter, M.; Bush, C.E.; Chang, Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Ernst, D.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Herrmann, H.W.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Levinton, F.M.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mueller, D.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Roquemore, A.L.; Skinner, C.H.; Stevenson, T.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; von Halle, A.; von Goeler, S.; Wong, K.L.; Zweben, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Wall conditioning in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [K. M. McGuire et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)] by injection of lithium pellets into the plasma has resulted in large improvements in deuterium endash tritium fusion power production (up to 10.7 MW), the Lawson triple product (up to 10 21 m -3 s keV), and energy confinement time (up to 330 ms). The maximum plasma current for access to high-performance supershots has been increased from 1.9 to 2.7 MA, leading to stable operation at plasma stored energy values greater than 5 MJ. The amount of lithium on the limiter and the effectiveness of its action are maximized through (1) distributing the Li over the limiter surface by injection of four Li pellets into Ohmic plasmas of increasing major and minor radius, and (2) injection of four Li pellets into the Ohmic phase of supershot discharges before neutral-beam heating is begun. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  16. Engineering model cryocooler test results

    Skimko, M.A.; Stacy, W.D.; McCormick, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that recent testing of diaphragm-defined, Stirling-cycle machines and components has demonstrated cooling performance potential, validated the design code, and confirmed several critical operating characteristics. A breadboard cryocooler was rebuilt and tested from cryogenic to near-ambient cold end temperatures. There was a significant increase in capacity at cryogenic temperatures and the performance results compared will with code predictions at all temperatures. Further testing on a breadboard diaphragm compressor validated the calculated requirement for a minimum axial clearance between diaphragms and mating heads

  17. ARIES-I Fusion-Power-Core Engineering

    Sharafat, S.; Najmabadi, F.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional project, the goal of which is to determine the economic, safety, and environmental potential of tokamak fusion reactors. The ARIES-I steady-state tokamak reactor is a conceptual, DT-burning, 1000 MWe reactor with a major radius of 6.75 m, a minor radius of 1.5 m, and an average neutron wall loading of 2.5 MW/m 2 . The ARIES-I plasma operates in the first MHD stability regime with a toroidal beta of 1.9%. The choice to operate in the first stability regime, with a high aspect ratio and with a low plasma current, leads to the need for high magnetic field to achieve adequate fusion power density (β 2 B 4 ). The toroidal field at the plasma center is 11 T and the maximum field at the coil is 21 T. Nonetheless, it is found that the maximum stress in the structural material of these magnets is ∝700 MPa and industrially available alloys can be used. The impurity-control and particle-exhaust system is based on a high recycling double-null divertor system. The low-activation silicon-carbide (SiC) composite is used as structural material. The breeder material, Li 2 ZrO 3 , and the multiplier material, Be, are both sphere-packed between poloidally nested SiC-composite shells. The divertor plates consist of SiC-composite tube shells protected with 2 mm-thick tungsten armor. The first wall, blanket, shield, and divertor are all helium cooled with an inlet coolant temperature of 350deg C at a pressure of 10 MPa. The high helium-outlet temperature of 650deg C ensures a relatively high gross thermal efficiency of 49%. The ARIES-I design has demonstrated that tokamak reactors have the potential to achieve a high level of safety coupled with a Class-C waste-disposal rating. (orig.)

  18. Engineering test station for TFTR blanket module experiments

    Jassby, D.L.; Leinoff, S.

    1979-12-01

    A conceptual design has been carried out for an Engineering Test Station (ETS) which will provide structural support and utilities/instrumentation services for blanket modules positioned adjacent to the vacuum vessel of the TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor). The ETS is supported independently from the Test Cell floor. The ETS module support platform is constructed of fiberglass to eliminate electromagnetic interaction with the pulsed tokamak fields. The ETS can hold blanket modules with dimensions up to 78 cm in width, 85 cm in height, and 105 cm in depth, and with a weight up to 4000 kg. Interfaces for all utility and instrumentation requirements are made via a shield plug in the TFTR igloo shielding. The modules are readily installed or removed by means of TFTR remote handling equipment

  19. Tritium pellet injector design for tokamak fusion test reactor

    Fisher, P.W.; Baylor, L.R.; Bryan, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    A tritium pellet injector (TPI) system has been designed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Q approx. 1 phase of operation. The injector gun utilizes a radial design with eight independent barrels and a common extruder to minimize tritium inventory. The injection line contains guide tubes with intermediate vacuum pumping stations and fast valves to minimize propellant leakage to the torus. The vacuum system is designed for tritium compatibility. The entire injector system is contained in a glove box for secondary containment protection against tritium release. Failure modes and effects have been analyzed, and structural analysis has been performed for most intense predicted earthquake conditions. Details of the design and operation of this system are presented in this paper

  20. Data triggered data processing at the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Jackson, R.J.; Balch, T.R.; Preckshot, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    A primary characteristic of most batch systems is that the input data files must exist before jobs are scheduled. On the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory the authors schedule jobs to process experimental data to be collected during a five minute shot cycle. The data driven processing system emulates a coarsely granular data flow architecture. Processing jobs are scheduled before the experimental data is collected. Processing jobs ''fire'', or execute, as input data becomes available. Similar to UNIX ''pipes'', data produced by upstream processing nodes may be used as inputs by following nodes. Users, working on the networked SUN workstations, specify data processing templates which define processes and their data dependencies. Data specifications indicate the source of data; actual associations with specific data instantiations are made when the jobs are scheduled. The authors report here on details of diagnostic data processing and their experiences

  1. Seismic analysis of the mirror fusion test facility building

    Coats, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes a seismic analysis of the present Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) building at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The analysis was conducted to evaluate how the structure would withstand the postulated design-basis earthquake (DBE). We discuss the methods of analysis used and results obtained. Also presented are a detailed description of the building, brief discussions of site geology, seismicity, and soil conditions, the approach used to postulate the DBE, and two methods for incorporating the effects of ductility. Floor spectra for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th floors developed for preliminary equipment design are also included. The results of the analysis, based on best-estimate equipment loadings, indicate additional bracing and upgrading of connection details are required for the structure to survive the postulated design-basis earthquake. Specific recommendations are made

  2. Altitude Testing of Large Liquid Propellant Engines

    Maynard, Bryon T.; Raines, Nickey G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration entered a new age on January 14, 2004 with President Bush s announcement of the creation the Vision for Space Exploration that will take mankind back to the Moon and on beyond to Mars. In January, 2006, after two years of hard, dedicated labor, engineers within NASA and its contractor workforce decided that the J2X rocket, based on the heritage of the Apollo J2 engine, would be the new engine for the NASA Constellation Ares upper stage vehicle. This engine and vehicle combination would provide assured access to the International Space Station to replace that role played by the Space Shuttle and additionally, would serve as the Earth Departure Stage, to push the Crew Excursion Vehicle out of Earth Orbit and head it on a path for rendezvous with the Moon. Test as you fly, fly as you test was chosen to be the guiding philosophy and a pre-requisite for the engine design, development, test and evaluation program. An exhaustive survey of national test facility assets proved the required capability to test the J2X engine at high altitude for long durations did not exist so therefore, a high altitude/near space environment testing capability would have to be developed. After several agency concepts the A3 High Altitude Testing Facility proposal was selected by the J2X engine program on March 2, 2007 and later confirmed by a broad panel of NASA senior leadership in May 2007. This facility is to be built at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center located near Gulfport, Mississippi. 30 plus years of Space Shuttle Main Engine development and flight certification testing makes Stennis uniquely suited to support the Vision For Space Exploration Return to the Moon. Propellant handling infrastructure, engine assembly facilities, a trained and dedicated workforce and a broad and varied technical support base will all ensure that the A3 facility will be built on time to support the schedule needs of the J2X engine and the ultimate flight

  3. An anti-HIV microbicide engineered in commensal bacteria: secretion of HIV-1 fusion inhibitors by lactobacilli

    Pusch, O.; Kalyanaraman, R.; Tucker, L.D.; Wells, J.; Rmanratnam, B.; Boden, D.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: To engineer Lactobacillus spp. to secrete HIV-1 fusion inhibitors with potent neutralizing activity against primary HIV-1 isolates. Methods: HIV-1 fusion inhibitors (FI-1, FI-2, and FI-3) were introduced into the previously developed shuttle vector pTSV2 and transformed in L. plantarum

  4. Contributions to the 14th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on fusion engineering

    Navarro, A.P.; Almoguera, L.; Alonso Gozalo, J.; Alonso Candenas, J.; Blaumoser, M.

    1992-01-01

    Three communications about the TJ-II device, under construction at CIEMAT with preferential support from EURATOM, were presented to the 14th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering and are collected in this report. The first one describes in detail the device and its present status of design and construction. The remaining two deal with the two most critical components of the project: the vacuum vessel and the central hard conductor. (author) 16 fig. 16 ref

  5. The fusion of biology, computer science, and engineering: towards efficient and successful synthetic biology.

    Linshiz, Gregory; Goldberg, Alex; Konry, Tania; Hillson, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a nascent field that emerged in earnest only around the turn of the millennium. It aims to engineer new biological systems and impart new biological functionality, often through genetic modifications. The design and construction of new biological systems is a complex, multistep process, requiring multidisciplinary collaborative efforts from "fusion" scientists who have formal training in computer science or engineering, as well as hands-on biological expertise. The public has high expectations for synthetic biology and eagerly anticipates the development of solutions to the major challenges facing humanity. This article discusses laboratory practices and the conduct of research in synthetic biology. It argues that the fusion science approach, which integrates biology with computer science and engineering best practices, including standardization, process optimization, computer-aided design and laboratory automation, miniaturization, and systematic management, will increase the predictability and reproducibility of experiments and lead to breakthroughs in the construction of new biological systems. The article also discusses several successful fusion projects, including the development of software tools for DNA construction design automation, recursive DNA construction, and the development of integrated microfluidics systems.

  6. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests

    Ramirez, A.L.; Beatty, J.; Buscheck, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents selected preliminary results obtained during the first 54 days of the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The test described is a precursor to the Engineered Barrier Systems Field Tests (EBSFT). The EBSFT will consist of in situ tests of the geohydrologic and geochemical environment in the near field (within a few meters) of heaters emplaced in welded tuff to simulate the thermal effects of waste packages. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The paper discusses the evolution of hydrothermal behavior during the prototype test, including rock temperatures, changes in rock moisture content, air permeability of fractures, gas pressures, and rock mass gas-phase humidity. 10 refs., 12 figs

  7. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    1981-12-01

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs.

  8. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    1981-12-01

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs

  9. Design of the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] maintenance manipulator

    Loesser, G. D.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Bohme, G.; Selig, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plans to generate a total of 3 x 10 21 neutrons during its deuterium-tritium run period in 1900. This will result in high levels of radiation, especially within the TFTR vacuum vessel. The maintenance manipulator's mission is to assist TFTR in meeting Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's personnel radiation exposure criteria and in maintaining as-low-as-reasonably-achievable principals by limiting the radiation exposure received by operating and maintenance personnel. The manipulator, which is currently being fabricated and tested by Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, is designed to perform limited, but routine and necessary, functions within the TFTR vacuum torus after activation levels within the torus preclude such functions being performed by personnel. These functions include visual inspection, tile replacement, housekeeping tasks, diagnostic calibrations, and leak detection. To meet its functional objectives, the TFTR maintenance manipulator is required to be operable in TFTR's very high vacuum environment (typically 2 x 10 -8 Torr). It must also be bakeable at 150 degree C and able to withstand the radiation environment

  10. Initial testing of the tritium systems at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Anderson, J.L.; Sissingh, R.A.P.; Gentile, C.A.; Rossmassler, R.L.; Walters, R.T.; Voorhees, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton will start its D-T experiments in late 1993, introducing and operating the tokamak with tritium in order to begin the study of burning plasma physics in D-T. Trace tritium injection experiments, using small amounts of tritium will begin in the fall of 1993. In preparation for these experiments, a series of tests with low concentrations of tritium inn deuterium have been performed as an initial qualification of the tritium systems. These tests began in April 1993. This paper describes the initial testing of the equipment in the TFTR tritium facility

  11. The operator interface for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Lang, N.C.

    1986-12-01

    The uncertain and most likely changing nature of a large experimental facility like MFTF, as well as its large number of control and monitor points, ruled against the traditional hardware approach involving walls of knobs, dials, oscilloscopes, and strip chart recorders. Rather, from the beginning, project management specified computer control of all systems, and operation of the complete MFTF under an integrated computer control system became a major engineering goal. The Integrated Controls and Diagnostics (ICADS) group was charged with the design and implementation of this control system. We designed a control system with an extremely flexible operator interface which uses computer generated CRT displays for output and pointing devices such as touch sensitive CRT overlays, mice, and joysticks for input. Construction of MFTF was completed at the end of 1985 within the project budget of $241.6M and was followed immediately by a 5 month long acceptance test. During this period (known as PACE test) operators, engineers, and physicists successfully used our computer control system daily to test MFTF. Much of their willingness to forsake the traditional hands-on hardware approach to testing was a result of the powerful and flexible operator interface to the MFTF control system. In this paper, we describe the operator interface with emphasis on the displays, the touch screens, and the mouse. We also report the experiences of users and, in particular, stress those aspects of the user interface they strongly liked and disliked

  12. Energy Logic (EL): a novel fusion engine of multi-modality multi-agent data/information fusion for intelligent surveillance systems

    Rababaah, Haroun; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2009-04-01

    The rapidly advancing hardware technology, smart sensors and sensor networks are advancing environment sensing. One major potential of this technology is Large-Scale Surveillance Systems (LS3) especially for, homeland security, battlefield intelligence, facility guarding and other civilian applications. The efficient and effective deployment of LS3 requires addressing number of aspects impacting the scalability of such systems. The scalability factors are related to: computation and memory utilization efficiency, communication bandwidth utilization, network topology (e.g., centralized, ad-hoc, hierarchical or hybrid), network communication protocol and data routing schemes; and local and global data/information fusion scheme for situational awareness. Although, many models have been proposed to address one aspect or another of these issues but, few have addressed the need for a multi-modality multi-agent data/information fusion that has characteristics satisfying the requirements of current and future intelligent sensors and sensor networks. In this paper, we have presented a novel scalable fusion engine for multi-modality multi-agent information fusion for LS3. The new fusion engine is based on a concept we call: Energy Logic. Experimental results of this work as compared to a Fuzzy logic model strongly supported the validity of the new model and inspired future directions for different levels of fusion and different applications.

  13. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume II

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The Nuclear Fusion Issues chapter contains a comprehensive list of engineering issues for fusion reactor nuclear components. The list explicitly defines the uncertainties associated with the engineering option of a fusion reactor and addresses the potential consequences resulting from each issue. The next chapter identifies the fusion nuclear technology testing needs up to the engineering demonstration stage

  14. Irradiation capsule for testing magnetic fusion reactor first-wall materials at 60 and 2000C

    Conlin, J.A.

    1985-08-01

    A new type of irradiation capsule has been designed, and a prototype has been tested in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) for low-temperature irradiation of Magnetic Fusion Reactor first-wall materials. The capsule meets the requirements of the joint US/Japanese collaborative fusion reactor materials irradiation program for the irradiation of first-wall fusion reactor materials at 60 and 200 0 C. The design description and results of the prototype capsule performance are presented

  15. Tritium pellet injector for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Gouge, M.J.; Baylor, L.R.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Foust, C.R.; Milora, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma phase. An existing deuterium pellet injector (DPI) was modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed for frozen pellets ranging in size from 3 to 4 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at tritium pellet speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller (PLC). The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were also made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellets. Results of the testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI has been installed and operated on TFTR in support of the CY-92 deuterium plasma run period. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and tritium gloveboxes and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability

  16. New technology and neo-science on the nuclear fusion reactor engineering. ITER and super high speed phenomena

    1996-12-01

    This research meeting has been held under cooperation of the ''nuclear fusion reactor engineering research group'' and ''nuclear fusion reactor materials research group'' of the Yayoi Research Group. This meeting was planned and conducted for 2 days under the following predominant thema: Present status of research on thermo-nuclear fusion experimental reactor engineering design (ITER/EDA) and its promoting method in Japan, and a new scientific side in the research and development of nuclear fusion reactor materials or the super high speed phenomena. In the former item, the following reports were published: Creative period of R and D on the nuclear fusion reactor, present statue and future development of ITER/EDA, meanings of ITER under realization of the nuclear fusion energy, and others. And in the latter item, the following reports were published: Nuclear fusion materials engineering and system quantum engineering, dynamic imagination of atom and molecule using pulse snap shot method, laser wake field acceleration and ultra short x-ray pulse generation, development of T-cube laser in JAERI, and others. (G.K.)

  17. Ion cyclotron transmission spectroscopy in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Greene, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    The propagation of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies has been investigated experimentally in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. A small, broadband, radiofrequency (rf) magnetic probe located outside the plasma limiter, at a major radius near that of the plasma center, was excited with a low power, frequency swept source (1--200 MHz). Waves propagating to a distant location were detected with a second, identical probe. The rf transmission spectrum revealed a region of attenuation over a band of frequencies for which the minority fundamental resonance was located between the outer plasma edge and the major radius of the probe location. Distinct, non-overlapping attenuation bands were observed from hydrogen and helium-3 minority species; a distinct tritium band should be observed in future DT experiments. Rapid spectrum acquisition during a helium-3 gas puff experiment showed that the wave attenuation involved the plasma core and was not a surface effect. A model in which the received power varied exponentially with the minority density, averaged over the resonance region, fit the time evolution of the probe signal relatively well. Estimation of a 1-d tunneling parameter from the experimental observations is discussed. Minority concentrations of less than 0.5 % can be resolved with this measurement.

  18. Ion cyclotron transmission spectroscopy in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Greene, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    The propagation of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies has been investigated experimentally in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. A small, broadband, radiofrequency (rf) magnetic probe located outside the plasma limiter, at a major radius near that of the plasma center, was excited with a low power, frequency swept source (1--200 MHz). Waves propagating to a distant location were detected with a second, identical probe. The rf transmission spectrum revealed a region of attenuation over a band of frequencies for which the minority fundamental resonance was located between the outer plasma edge and the major radius of the probe location. Distinct, non-overlapping attenuation bands were observed from hydrogen and helium-3 minority species; a distinct tritium band should be observed in future DT experiments. Rapid spectrum acquisition during a helium-3 gas puff experiment showed that the wave attenuation involved the plasma core and was not a surface effect. A model in which the received power varied exponentially with the minority density, averaged over the resonance region, fit the time evolution of the probe signal relatively well. Estimation of a 1-d tunneling parameter from the experimental observations is discussed. Minority concentrations of less than 0.5 % can be resolved with this measurement

  19. Development and testing ov danadium alloys for fusion applications

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-10-01

    V base alloys have advantages for fusion reactor first-wall and blanket structure. To screen candidate alloys and optimize a V-base alloy, physical and mechanical properties of V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti, and V-Ti- Si alloys were studied before and after irradiation in Li environment in fast fission reactors. V-4Cr-4Ti containing 500-1000 wppM Si and <1000 wppM O+N+C was investigated as the most promising alloy, and more testing is being done. Major results of the work are presented in this paper. The reference V-4Cr-4Ti had the most attractive combination of the mechanical and physical properties that are prerequisite for first-wall and blanket structures: good thermal creep, good tensile strength/ductility, high impact energy, excellent resistance to swelling, and very low ductile-brittle transition temperature before and after irradiation. The alloy was highly resistant to irradiation-induced embrittlement in Li at 420-600 C, and the effects of dynamically charged He on swelling and mechanical properties were insignificant. However, several important issues remain unresolved: welding, low-temperature irradiation, He effect at high dose and high He concentration, irradiation creep, and irradiation performance in air or He. Initial results of investigation of some of these issues are also given.

  20. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and 3 He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n) 3 He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the 3 He(d,p) 4 He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling

  1. Recent developments in engineering and technology concepts for prospective tokamak fusion reactors

    Ford, G.W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The tokamak has become the most developed magnetic fusion system and it appears likely that break-even and possibly ignition will first be demonstrated in existing machines of this type. Yet larger tokamaks could also demonstrate the essential technologies for the production of useful power. World-wide, well over a hundred tritium-breeder/heat-removal blanket concepts have been devised and preliminary engineering design studies undertaken, but the effort deployed on breeding and power recovery systems has been very small compared with that assigned to plasma research and development. The European Communities' NET (Next European Torus) project may offer an opportunity to redress this imbalance. The NET pre-design stage now in progress for some three years has selected many of the best features of plasma and nuclear design from the world's total efforts in these fields, and the NET concept is described in this paper as exemplifying where magnetic fusion power reactor technology stands today. It is concluded that although there are numerous more advanced types of magnetic confinement fusion reactor at early stages of their physics development, the tokamak offers the best opportunity for the early demonstration of fusion power

  2. High-voltage engineering and testing

    Ryan, Hugh M

    2013-01-01

    This 3rd edition of High Voltage Engineering Testing describes strategic developments in the field and reflects on how they can best be managed. All the key components of high voltage and distribution systems are covered including electric power networks, UHV and HV. Distribution systems including HVDC and power electronic systems are also considered.

  3. Development of large insulator rings for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Brown, T.; Tobin, A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses research and development leading to the manufacture of large ceramic insulator rings for the TFTR (TOKAMAK Fusion Test Reactor). Material applications, fabrication approach and testing activities are highlighted

  4. Conceptual studies of plasma engineering test facility

    Hiraoka, Toru; Tazima, Teruhiko; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Kasai, Masao; Shinya, Kichiro

    1979-04-01

    Conceptual studies have been made of a Plasma Engineering Test Facility, which is to be constructed following JT-60 prior to the experimental power reactor. The physical aim of this machine is to examine self-ignition conditions. This machine possesses all essential technologies for reactor plasma, i.e. superconducting magnet, remote maintenance, shielding, blanket test modules, tritium handling. Emphasis in the conceptual studies was on structural consistency of the machine and whether the machine would be constructed practically. (author)

  5. Doublet III construction and engineering test

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Progress during FY-78 on the construction and operation of the Doublet III is reported. Detailed discussions about the installation and testing of various components and subsystems, including the B-coil, E-coil, F-coils and support structure, vacuum vessel, vacuum pumping system, limiter, thermal insulation blanket, control system, B-coil power system, E-coil power system, F-coil power system, and motor-generator, are presented. A brief review of the engineering test operation is given

  6. Engineered aggregation inhibitor fusion for production of highly amyloidogenic human islet amyloid polypeptide.

    Mirecka, Ewa Agnieszka; Gremer, Lothar; Schiefer, Stephanie; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Stoldt, Matthias; Willbold, Dieter; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is the major component of pancreatic amyloid deposits in type 2 diabetes. The structural conversion of IAPP from a monomeric state into amyloid assemblies is the subject of intense research. Recombinant production of IAPP is, however, difficult due to its extreme aggregation propensity. Here we describe a novel strategy for expression of IAPP in Escherichia coli, based on an engineered protein tag, which sequesters IAPP monomers and prevents IAPP aggregation. The IAPP-binding protein HI18 was selected by phage display from a β-wrapin library. Fusion of HI18 to IAPP enabled the soluble expression of the construct. IAPP was cleaved from the fusion construct and purified to homogeneity with a yield of 3mg of isotopically labeled peptide per liter of culture. In the monomeric state, IAPP was largely disordered as evidenced by far-UV CD and liquid-state NMR spectroscopy but competent to form amyloid fibrils according to atomic force microscopy. These results demonstrate the ability of the engineered β-wrapin HI18 for shielding the hydrophobic sequence of IAPP during expression and purification. Fusion of aggregation-inhibiting β-wrapins is a suitable approach for the recombinant production of aggregation-prone proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Flux-Fusion Anomaly Test and Bosonic Topological Crystalline Insulators

    Michael Hermele

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a method, dubbed the flux-fusion anomaly test, to detect certain anomalous symmetry fractionalization patterns in two-dimensional symmetry-enriched topological (SET phases. We focus on bosonic systems with Z_{2} topological order and a symmetry group of the form G=U(1⋊G^{′}, where G^{′} is an arbitrary group that may include spatial symmetries and/or time reversal. The anomalous fractionalization patterns we identify cannot occur in strictly d=2 systems but can occur at surfaces of d=3 symmetry-protected topological (SPT phases. This observation leads to examples of d=3 bosonic topological crystalline insulators (TCIs that, to our knowledge, have not previously been identified. In some cases, these d=3 bosonic TCIs can have an anomalous superfluid at the surface, which is characterized by nontrivial projective transformations of the superfluid vortices under symmetry. The basic idea of our anomaly test is to introduce fluxes of the U(1 symmetry and to show that some fractionalization patterns cannot be extended to a consistent action of G^{′} symmetry on the fluxes. For some anomalies, this can be described in terms of dimensional reduction to d=1 SPT phases. We apply our method to several different symmetry groups with nontrivial anomalies, including G=U(1×Z_{2}^{T} and G=U(1×Z_{2}^{P}, where Z_{2}^{T} and Z_{2}^{P} are time-reversal and d=2 reflection symmetry, respectively.

  8. Synchrotron radiation losses in Engineering Test Reactors (ETRs)

    Uckan, N.A.

    1987-11-01

    In next-generation Engineering Test Reactors (ETRs), one major objective is envisioned to be a long-pulse or steady-state burn using noninductive current drive. At the high temperatures needed for efficient current drive, synchrotron radiation could represent a large power loss, especially if wall reflectivity (R) is very low. Many INTOR-class ETR designs [Fusion Engineering Reactor (FER), Next European Torus (NET), OTR, Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER), etc.] call for carbon-covered surfaces for which wall reflectivity is uncertain. Global radiation losses are estimated for these devices using empirical expressions given by Trubnikov (and others). Various operating scenarios are evaluated under the assumption that the plasma performance is limited by either the density limit (typical of the ignition phase) or the beta limit (typical of the current drive phase). For a case with ≥90% wall reflectivity, synchrotron radiation is not a significant contribution to the overall energy balance (the ratio of synchrotron to alpha power is less than 10 to 20%, even at ∼ 30 keV) and thus should not adversely alter performance in these devices. In extreme cases with 0% wall reflectivity, the ratio of synchrotron radiation to alpha power may approach 30 to 60% (depending on the device and limiting operating scenario), adversely affecting the performance characteristics. 12 refs., 7 tabs

  9. Engineering Abstractions in Model Checking and Testing

    Achenbach, Michael; Ostermann, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstractions are used in model checking to tackle problems like state space explosion or modeling of IO. The application of these abstractions in real software development processes, however, lacks engineering support. This is one reason why model checking is not widely used in practice yet...... and testing is still state of the art in falsification. We show how user-defined abstractions can be integrated into a Java PathFinder setting with tools like AspectJ or Javassist and discuss implications of remaining weaknesses of these tools. We believe that a principled engineering approach to designing...... and implementing abstractions will improve the applicability of model checking in practice....

  10. Bond strength tests between silicon wafers and duran tubes (fusion bonded fluidic interconnects)

    Fazal, I.; Berenschot, Johan W.; de Boer, J.H.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2005-01-01

    The fusion bond strength of glass tubes with standard silicon wafers is presented. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and those coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are presented. Results obtained are discussed in terms of homogeneity and strength of fusion bond. High pressure testing

  11. Construction and evaluation of an exopolysaccharide-producing engineered bacterial strain by protoplast fusion for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    Sun, Shanshan; Luo, Yijing; Cao, Siyuan; Li, Wenhong; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Jiang, Lingxi; Dong, Hanping; Yu, Li; Wu, Wei-Min

    2013-09-01

    Enterobacter cloacae strain JD, which produces water-insoluble biopolymers at optimal temperature of 30°C, and a thermophilic Geobacillus strain were used to construct an engineered strain for exopolysaccharide production at high temperatures by protoplast fusion. The obtained fusant strain ZR3 produced exopolysaccharides at up to 45°C with optimal growth temperature at 35°C. The fusant produced exopolysaccharides of approximately 7.5 g/L or more at pH between 7.0 and 9.0. The feasibility of the enhancement of crude oil recovery with the fusant was tested in a sand-packed column at 40°C. The results demonstrated that bioaugmentation of the fusant was promising approach for MEOR. Mass growth of the fusant was confirmed in fermentor tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. AJ26 rocket engine testing news briefing

    2010-01-01

    NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (center) stands in front of a 'pathfinder' rocket engine with Orbital Sciences Corp. President and Chief Operating Officer J.R. Thompson (left) and Aerojet President Scott Seymour during a Feb. 24 news briefing at the south Mississippi facility. The leaders appeared together to announce a partnership for testing Aerojet AJ26 rocket engines at Stennis. The engines will be used to power Orbital's Taurus II space vehicles to provide commercial cargo transportation missions to the International Space Station for NASA. During the event, the Stennis partnership with Orbital was cited as an example of the new direction of NASA to work with commercial interests for space travel and transport.

  13. Quality engineering in FFTF irradiation tests

    Caplinger, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    The design and fabrication of an irradiation test for the Fast Flux Test Facility are planned, controlled and documented in accordance with the Department of Energy standards. Tests built by Westinghouse Hanford Company are further controlled and guided by a series of increasingly specific documents, including guidelines for program control, procedures for engineering operations, standard practices and detailed operating procedures. In response to this guidance, a series of five documents is prepared covering each step of the experiment from conception through fabrication and assembly. This paper describes the quality assurance accompanying these five steps

  14. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90... Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and II engines and 2-mode test cycle for Class I-A, III, IV, and V engines when testing spark-ignition engines...

  15. Program plan for the DOE Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program. Volume I. Summary, objectives and management. Revision 2

    1982-08-01

    This document defines a plan for conducting selected aspects of the engineering testing required for magnetic fusion reactor FWBS components and systems. The ultimate product of this program is an established data base that contributes to a functional, reliable, maintainable, economically attractive, and environmentally acceptable commercial fusion reactor first wall, blanket, and shield system. This program plan updates the initial plan issued in November of 1980 by the DOE/Office of Fusion Energy (unnumbered report). The plan consists of two parts. Part I is a summary of activities, responsibilities and program management including reporting and interfaces with other programs. Part II is a compilation of the Detailed Technical Plans for Phase I (1982 to 1984) developed by the participants during Phase 0 of the program

  16. Fusion Engineering Device. Volume VI. Complementary development plan for engineering development

    1981-10-01

    The basic approach followed in this volume is to define key technical issues for several fusion reactor technologies and to device program strategies to resolve each of these issues. Particular attention has been paid to elucidating the role of FED vis-a-vis complementary (non-FED) facilities in this process. The remainder of this chapter consists of summaries of the major conclusions of the technology plans in each of the areas studied, i.e., plasma heating, magnetics, nuclear, and systems considerations

  17. Antibody-cytokine fusion proteins for treatment of cancer: engineering cytokines for improved efficacy and safety.

    Young, Patricia A; Morrison, Sherie L; Timmerman, John M

    2014-10-01

    The true potential of cytokine therapies in cancer treatment is limited by the inability to deliver optimal concentrations into tumor sites due to dose-limiting systemic toxicities. To maximize the efficacy of cytokine therapy, recombinant antibody-cytokine fusion proteins have been constructed by a number of groups to harness the tumor-targeting ability of monoclonal antibodies. The aim is to guide cytokines specifically to tumor sites where they might stimulate more optimal anti-tumor immune responses while avoiding the systemic toxicities of free cytokine therapy. Antibody-cytokine fusion proteins containing interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, IL-21, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and interferons (IFNs) α, β, and γ have been constructed and have shown anti-tumor activity in preclinical and early-phase clinical studies. Future priorities for development of this technology include optimization of tumor targeting, bioactivity of the fused cytokine, and choice of appropriate agents for combination therapies. This review is intended to serve as a framework for engineering an ideal antibody-cytokine fusion protein, focusing on previously developed constructs and their clinical trial results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A fluorescent cassette-based strategy for engineering multiple domain fusion proteins

    Khorchid Ahmad

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The engineering of fusion proteins has become increasingly important and most recently has formed the basis of many biosensors, protein purification systems, and classes of new drugs. Currently, most fusion proteins consist of three or fewer domains, however, more sophisticated designs could easily involve three or more domains. Using traditional subcloning strategies, this requires micromanagement of restriction enzymes sites that results in complex workaround solutions, if any at all. Results Therefore, to aid in the efficient construction of fusion proteins involving multiple domains, we have created a new expression vector that allows us to rapidly generate a library of cassettes. Cassettes have a standard vector structure based on four specific restriction endonuclease sites and using a subtle property of blunt or compatible cohesive end restriction enzymes, they can be fused in any order and number of times. Furthermore, the insertion of PCR products into our expression vector or the recombination of cassettes can be dramatically simplified by screening for the presence or absence of fluorescence. Conclusions Finally, the utility of this new strategy was demonstrated by the creation of basic cassettes for protein targeting to subcellular organelles and for protein purification using multiple affinity tags.

  19. Identification of future engineering-development needs of alternative concepts for magnetic-fusion energy

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    A qualitative identification of future engineering needs of alternative fusion concepts (AFCs) is presented. These needs are assessed relative to the similar needs of the tokamak in order to emphasize differences in required technology with respect to the well documented mainline approach. Although nearly thirty AFCs can be identified as being associated with some level of reactor projection, redirection, refocusing, and general similarities can be used to generate a reduced AFC list that includes only the bumpy tori, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and compact toroids. Furthermore, each AFC has the potential of operating as a conventional (low power density, superconducting magnets) or a compact, high-power-density (HPD) system. Hence, in order to make tractable an otherwise difficult task, the future engineering needs for the AFCs are addressed here for conventional versus compact approaches, with the latter being treated as a generic class and the former being composed of bumpy tori, stellarators, reversed-field pinches, and compact toroids

  20. An engineered split M.HhaI-zinc finger fusion lacks the intended methyltransferase specificity

    Meister, Glenna E.; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Ostermeier, Marc

    2008-01-01

    The ability to site-specifically methylate DNA in vivo would have wide applicability to the study of basic biomedical problems as well as enable studies on the potential of site-specific DNA methylation as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of diseases. Natural DNA methyltransferases lack the specificity required for these applications. Nomura and Barbas [W. Nomura, C.F. Barbas 3rd, In vivo site-specific DNA methylation with a designed sequence-enabled DNA methylase, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129 (2007) 8676-8677] have reported that an engineered DNA methyltransferase comprised of fragments of M.HhaI methyltransferase and zinc finger proteins has very high specificity for the chosen target site. Our analysis of this engineered enzyme shows that the fusion protein methylates target and non-target sites with similar efficiency

  1. Bulk-shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1982-07-01

    The accelerator-based Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility will provide a high-fluence, fusion-like radiation environment for the testing of materials. While the neutron spectrum produced in the forward direction by the 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a flowing lithium target is characterized by a broad peak around 14 MeV, a high energy tail extends up to about 50 MeV. Some shield design considerations are reviewed

  2. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89... Procedures § 89.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Emissions shall be measured using one of the test cycles specified...) through (a)(4) of this section. These cycles shall be used to test engines on a dynamometer. (1) The 8...

  3. Multidirectional testing of one- and two-level ProDisc-L versus simulated fusions.

    Panjabi, Manohar; Henderson, Gweneth; Abjornson, Celeste; Yue, James

    2007-05-20

    An in vitro human cadaveric biomechanical study. To evaluate intervertebral rotation changes due to lumbar ProDisc-L compared with simulated fusion, using follower load and multidirectional testing. Artificial discs, as opposed to the fusions, are thought to decrease the long-term accelerated degeneration at adjacent levels. A biomechanical assessment can be helpful, as the long-term clinical evaluation is impractical. Six fresh human cadaveric lumbar specimens (T12-S1) underwent multidirectional testing in flexion-extension, bilateral lateral bending, and bilateral torsion using the Hybrid test method. First, intact specimen total range of rotation (T12-S1) was determined. Second, using pure moments again, this range of rotation was achieved in each of the 5 constructs: A) ProDisc-L at L5-S1; B) fusion at L5-S1; C) ProDisc-L at L4-L5 and fusion at L5-S1; D) ProDisc-L at L4-L5 and L5-S1; and E) 2-level fusion at L4-L5 to L5-S1. Significant changes in the intervertebral rotations due to each construct were determined at the operated and nonoperated levels using repeated measures single factor ANOVA and Bonferroni statistical tests (P < 0.05). Adjacent-level effects (ALEs) were defined as the percentage changes in intervertebral rotations at the nonoperated levels due to the constructs. One- and 2-level ProDisc-L constructs showed only small ALE in any of the 3 rotations. In contrast, 1- and 2-level fusions showed increased ALE in all 3 directions (average, 7.8% and 35.3%, respectively, for 1 and 2 levels). In the disc plus fusion combination (construct C), the ALEs were similar to the 1-level fusion alone. In general, ProDisc-L preserved physiologic motions at all spinal levels, while the fusion simulations resulted in significant ALE.

  4. 40 CFR 1065.405 - Test engine preparation and maintenance.

    2010-07-01

    ... has undergone a stabilization step (or in-use operation). If the engine has not already been... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test engine preparation and...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Selection, Preparation, and Maintenance § 1065...

  5. Combined development of international nuclear fusion test reactors

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Ambassadors of the four most important partners (Common Market, Japan, USA and USSR) in the IAEA sponsored INTOR project, met on the 15 and 16 March 1987 in Vienna under the auspices of the IAEA. A press release was issued acknowledging the considerable technical progress made in magnetic nuclear fusion research. Future design concepts, assistance in research and development work and other activities towards the provision of an international experimental thermonuclear reactor were discussed. (G.T.H.)

  6. Miniature tensile test specimens for fusion reactor irradiation studies

    Klueh, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Three miniature sheet-type tensile specimens and a miniature rod-type specimen are being used to determine irradiated tensile properties for alloy development for fusion reactors. The tensile properties of type 316 stainless steel were determined with these different specimens, and the results were compared. Reasonably good agreement was observed. However, there were differences that led to recommendations on which specimens are preferred. 4 references, 9 figures, 6 tables

  7. Overview of the main challenges for the engineering design of the test facilities system of IFMIF

    Molla, J.; Nakamura, K.

    2009-01-01

    High intense radiation fields were demanded to IFMIF to address the lack of information on effects in materials due to radiation fields with fusion reactor features. Such intense radiation fields will also produce a number of unwanted effects in exposed materials and components. The main difficulties to achieve a reliable engineering design of the Test Facilities System during the Engineering Validation and the Engineering Design phase of IFMIF now under development are reviewed in this paper. The most challenging activities will be the design of the high flux test module, the creep fatigue test module, the test cell and the remote handling system. The intense radiation fields in the irradiation area and the high availability required for IFMIF (70%) are the main reasons for these difficulties.

  8. Mission statement for the Engineering Test Facility

    1979-10-01

    This Mission Statement defines the ETF activity during its operating life. The results of those operations must provide the data, knowledge, experience, and confidence to continue to the next steps beyond ETF in making fusion power a viable energy option. The results from the ETF mission (operations are assumed to start early in the 1990's) are to bridge the gap between the base of magnetic fusion knowledge at the start of operations and that reqired to design the EPR/DEMO devices

  9. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine test cycle. (a) The 5-mode cycle specified in Table 2 in appendix A to this subpart shall be followed...

  10. Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat

    Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.

    2011-01-01

    Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B and PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface 2 shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN 2 cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

  11. Copper benchmark experiment for the testing of JEFF-3.2 nuclear data for fusion applications

    Angelone, M.; Flammini, D.; Loreti, S.; Moro, F.; Pillon, M.; Villar, R.; Klix, A.; Fischer, U.; Kodeli, I.; Perel, R.L.; Pohorecky, W.

    2017-01-01

    A neutronics benchmark experiment on a pure Copper block (dimensions 60 × 70 × 70 cm3) aimed at testing and validating the recent nuclear data libraries for fusion applications was performed in the frame of the European Fusion Program at the 14 MeV ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG). Reaction rates, neutron flux spectra and doses were measured using different experimental techniques (e.g. activation foils techniques, NE213 scintillator and thermoluminescent detectors). This paper first sum...

  12. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Buscheck, T.; Carlson, R.; Daily, W.; Lee, K.; Lin, Wunan; Mao, Nai-hsien; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Wang, H.; Watwood, D.

    1991-08-01

    This final report represents a summary of data and interpretations obtained from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Test (PEBSFT) performed in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test Site. The PEBSFT was conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for future field tests that will be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facilities (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the test was to provide a basis for determining whether tests planned for the ESF have the potential to be successful. Chapter 1 on high frequency electromagnetic tomography discusses the rock mass electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate changes that were measured to characterize the water distribution in the near field of a simulated waste container. The data are used to obtain quantitative estimates of how the moisture content in the rock mass changes during heating and to infer properties of the spatial variability of water distribution, leading to conclusions about the role of fractures in the system. Chapter 2 discusses the changes in rock moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe. Chapter 3 permeability tests discusses the characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the borehole. The air permeability testing apparatus, the testing procedures, and the data analysis are presented. Chapter 4 describes the moisture collection system installed in the heater borehole to trap and measure the moisture volumes. Chapter 5 describes relative humidity measurements made with the thermocouple psychrometer and capacitance sensors. Chapter 6 discusses gas pressure measurements in the G-Tunnel, addressing the calibration and installation of piezoresistive-gaged transducers. Chapter 7 describes the calibration and installation of thermocouples for temperature measurements. Chapter 8 discusses the results of the PEBSFT

  13. Evaluation of a nonevaporable getter pump for tritium handling in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Singleton, M.F.; Griffith, C.M.

    1978-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has tested and evaluated a commercially available getter pump for use with tritium in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The pump contains Zr(84%)--Al in cartridge form with a concentric heating unit. It performed well in all tests, except for frequent heater failures

  14. Development and testing of the improved focusing quadrupole for heavy ion fusion accelerators

    Manahan, R R; Martovetsky, N N; Meinke, R B; Chiesa, L; Lietzke, A F; Sabbi, G L; Seidl, P A

    2003-10-23

    An improved version of the focusing magnet for a Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) accelerator was designed, built and tested in 2002-2003. This quadrupole has higher focusing power and lower error field than the previous version of the focusing quadrupoles successfully built and tested in 2001. We discuss the features of the new design, selected fabrication issues and test results.

  15. Integral data testing of JENDL-3.2 for fusion reactor and shielding applications

    Oyama, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    Integral data testing of JENDL-3.2 is being performed in the activities of two working groups of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The continuous and group-wise libraries prepared from JENDL-3.2 are planned to be tested by the working groups. In this paper, the continuous library FSXLIB-J3R2 processed from JENDL-3.2 for MCNP was tested for fission and fusion neutrons using data of integral experiments and compared to the results of JENDL-3.1. The results of integral data testing of JENDL-3.2 for fusion and shielding application are reviewed. (author)

  16. Combining cognitive engineering and information fusion architectures to build effective joint systems

    Sliva, Amy L.; Gorman, Joe; Voshell, Martin; Tittle, James; Bowman, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    The Dual Node Decision Wheels (DNDW) architecture concept was previously described as a novel approach toward integrating analytic and decision-making processes in joint human/automation systems in highly complex sociotechnical settings. In this paper, we extend the DNDW construct with a description of components in this framework, combining structures of the Dual Node Network (DNN) for Information Fusion and Resource Management with extensions on Rasmussen's Decision Ladder (DL) to provide guidance on constructing information systems that better serve decision-making support requirements. The DNN takes a component-centered approach to system design, decomposing each asset in terms of data inputs and outputs according to their roles and interactions in a fusion network. However, to ensure relevancy to and organizational fitment within command and control (C2) processes, principles from cognitive systems engineering emphasize that system design must take a human-centered systems view, integrating information needs and decision making requirements to drive the architecture design and capabilities of network assets. In the current work, we present an approach for structuring and assessing DNDW systems that uses a unique hybrid DNN top-down system design with a human-centered process design, combining DNN node decomposition with artifacts from cognitive analysis (i.e., system abstraction decomposition models, decision ladders) to provide work domain and task-level insights at different levels in an example intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) system setting. This DNDW structure will ensure not only that the information fusion technologies and processes are structured effectively, but that the resulting information products will align with the requirements of human decision makers and be adaptable to different work settings .

  17. Fusion fuel blanket technology

    Hastings, I.J.; Gierszewski, P.

    1987-05-01

    The fusion blanket surrounds the burning hydrogen core of a fusion reactor. It is in this blanket that most of the energy released by the nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium is converted into useful product, and where tritium fuel is produced to enable further operation of the reactor. As fusion research turns from present short-pulse physics experiments to long-burn engineering tests in the 1990's, energy removal and tritium production capabilities become important. This technology will involve new materials, conditions and processes with applications both to fusion and beyond. In this paper, we introduce features of proposed blanket designs and update and status of international research. In focusing on the Canadian blanket technology program, we discuss the aqueous lithium salt blanket concept, and the in-reactor tritium recovery test program

  18. Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT)

    Ramirez, A.L.; Wilder, D.G.

    1991-02-01

    This progress report presents the interpretation of data obtained (up to November 1, 1988) from the Prototype Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (PEBSFT) that are being performed for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) in G-Tunnel within the Nevada Test site. The PEBSFTs are being conducted to evaluate the applicability of measurement techniques, numerical models, and procedures developed for the field tests for future investigations that will be conducted in the Exploratory Shaft Facilities, at a potential high-level radioactive waste repository site in Yucca Mountain. The primary objective of the tests is to provide the basis for determining whether tests planned for Yucca Mountain have the potential to be successful. Thirteen chapters discuss the following: mapping the electromagnetic permittivity and attenuation rate of the rock mass; changes in moisture content detected by the neutron logging probe; characterization of the in-situ permeability of the fractured tuff around the heater borehole; electrical resistance heater installed in a 30-cm borehole; relative humidity measurements; the operation, design, construction, calibration, and installation of a microwave circuit that might provide partial pressure information at temperatures in excess of 200 degree C (392 degree F); pressure and temperature measurements in the G-Tunnel; the moisture collection system, which attempts to collect steam that migrates into the heater borehole; The borehole television and borescope surveys that were performed to map the location, orientation, and aperture of the fractures intersecting the boreholes; preliminary scoping calculations of the hydrothermal conditions expected for this prototype test; the Data Acquisition System; and the results of the PEBSFT, preliminary interpretations of these results, and plans for the remainder of the test. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  19. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  20. GES [Ground Engineering System] test site preparation

    Cox, C.M.; Mahaffey, M.K.; Miller, W.C.; Schade, A.R.; Toyoda, K.G.

    1987-10-01

    Activities are under way at Hanford to convert the 309 containment building and its associated service wing to a nuclear test facility for the Ground Engineering System (GES) test. Conceptual design is about 80% complete, encompassing facility modifications, a secondary heat transport system, a large vacuum system, a test article cell and handing system, control and data handling systems, and safety andl auxiliary systems. The design makes extensive use of existing equipment to minimize technical risk and cost. Refurbishment of this equipment is 25% complete. Cleanout of some 1000 m 3 of equipment from the earlier reactor test in the facility is 85% complete. An Environmental Assessment was prepared and revised to incorporate Department of Energy (DOE) comments. It is now in the DOE approval chain, where a Finding of No Significant Impact is expected. During the next year, definite design will be well advanced, long-lead procurements will be initiated, construction planning will be completed, an operator training plan will be prepared, and the site (preliminary) safety analysis report will be drafted

  1. Application of the level set method for multi-phase flow computation in fusion engineering

    Luo, X-Y.; Ni, M-J.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M.

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulation of multi-phase flow is essential to evaluate the feasibility of a liquid protection scheme for the power plant chamber. The level set method is one of the best methods for computing and analyzing the motion of interface among the multi-phase flow. This paper presents a general formula for the second-order projection method combined with the level set method to simulate unsteady incompressible multi-phase flow with/out phase change flow encountered in fusion science and engineering. The third-order ENO scheme and second-order semi-implicit Crank-Nicholson scheme is used to update the convective and diffusion term. The numerical results show this method can handle the complex deformation of the interface and the effect of liquid-vapor phase change will be included in the future work

  2. 14 CFR 33.91 - Engine system and component tests.

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.91 Engine system and..., reliability, and durability. (c) Each unpressurized hydraulic fluid tank may not fail or leak when subjected... hydraulic fluid tank must meet the requirements of § 33.64. (d) For an engine type certificated for use in...

  3. Fusion Canada issue 13

    1991-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Canada's plans to participate in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA), bilateral meetings with Canada and the U.S., committee meeting with Canada-Europe, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on Plasma Biasing experiments and boronized graphite tests, fusion materials research at the University of Toronto using a dual beam accelerator and a review of the CFFTP and the CCFM. 2 figs

  4. The high-density Z-pinch as a pulsed fusion neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testing

    Krakowski, R.A.; Sethian, J.D.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The dense Z-pinch (DZP) is one of the earliest and simplest plasma heating and confinement schemes. Recent experimental advances based on plasma initiation from hair-like (10s μm in radius) solid hydrogen filaments have so far not encountered the usually devastating MHD instabilities that plagued early DZP experiments. These encouraging results along with debt of a number of proof-of principle, high-current (1--2 MA in 10--100 ns) experiments have prompted consideration of the DZP as a pulsed source of DT fusion neutrons of sufficient strength (/dot S//sub N/ ≥ 10 19 n/s) to provide uncollided neutron fluxes in excess of I/sub ω/ = 5--10 MW/m 2 over test volumes of 10--30 litre or greater. While this neutron source would be pulsed (100s ns pulse widths, 10--100 Hz pulse rate), giving flux time compressions in the range 10 5 --10 6 , its simplicity, near-time feasibility, low cost, high-Q operation, and relevance to fusion systems that may provide a pulsed commercial end-product (e.g., inertial confinement or the DZP itself) together create the impetus for preliminary considerations as a neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testings. The results of a preliminary parametric systems study (focusing primarily on physics issues), conceptual design, and cost versus performance analyses are presented. The DZP promises an expensive and efficient means to provide pulsed DT neutrons at an average rate in excess of 10 19 n/s, with neutron currents I/sub ω/ /approx lt/ 10 MW/m 2 over volumes V/sub exp/ ≥ 30 litre using single-pulse technologies that differ little from those being used in present-day experiments. 34 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  5. An experiment to test centrifugal confinement for fusion

    Ellis, R.F.; Hassam, A.B.; Messer, S.; Osborn, B.R.

    2001-01-01

    The basic idea of centrifugal confinement is to use centrifugal forces from supersonic rotation to augment conventional magnetic confinement. Optimizing this 'knob' results in a fusion device that features four advantages: steady state, no disruptions, superior cross-field confinement, and a simpler coil configuration. The idea rests on two prongs: first, centrifugal forces can confine plasmas to desired regions of shaped magnetic fields; second, the accompanying large velocity shear can stabilize even magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. A third feature is that the velocity shear also viscously heats the plasma; no auxiliary heating is necessary to reach fusion temperatures. Regarding transport, the velocity shear can also quell microturbulence, leading to fully classical confinement, as there are no neoclassical effects. Classical parallel electron transport then sets the confinement time. These losses are minimized by a large Pastukhov factor resulting from the deep centrifugal potential well: at Mach 4-5, the Lawson criterion is accessible. One key issue is whether velocity shear will be sufficient by itself to stabilize MHD interchanges. Numerical simulations indicate that laminar equilibria can be obtained at Mach numbers of 4-5 but that the progression toward laminarity with increasing Mach number is accompanied by residual convection from the interchanges. The central goal of the Maryland Centrifugal Torus (MCT) [R. F. Ellis et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 48 (1998)] is to obtain MHD stability from velocity shear. As an assist to accessing laminarity, MCT will incorporate two unique features: plasma elongation and toroidal magnetic field. The former raises velocity shear efficiency, and modest magnetic shear should suppress residual convection

  6. Stability tests of the Westinghouse coil in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility

    Dresner, L.; Fehling, D.T.; Lubell, M.S.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; McManamy, T.J.; Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.

    1987-09-01

    The Westinghouse coil is one of three forced-flow coils in the six-coil toroidal array of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is wound with an 18-kA, Nb 3 Sn/Cu, cable-in-conduit superconductor structurally supported by aluminum plates and cooled by 4-K, 15-atm supercritical helium. The coil is instrumented to permit measurement of helium temperature, pressure, and flow rate; structure temperature and strain; field; and normal zone voltage. A resistive heater has been installed to simulate nuclear heating, and inductive heaters have been installed to facilitate stability testing. The coil has been tested both individually and in the six-coil array. The tests covered charging to full design current and field, measuring the current-sharing threshold temperature using the resistive heaters, and measuring the stability margin using the pulsed inductive heaters. At least one section of the conductor exhibits a very broad resistive transition (resistive transition index = 4). The broad transition, though causing the appearance of voltage at relatively low temperatures, does not compromise the stability margin of the coil, which was greater than 1.1 J/cm 3 of strands. In another, nonresistive location, the stability margin was between 1.7 and 1.9 J/cm 3 of strands. The coil is completely stable in operation at 100% design current in both the single- and six-coil modes

  7. The SPHINX reactor for engineering tests

    Adamov, E.O.; Artamkin, K.N.; Bovin, A.P.; Bulkin, Y.M.; Kartashev, E.F.; Korneev, A.A.; Stenbok, I.A.; Terekhov, A.S.; Khmel'Shehikov, V.V.; Cherkashov, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    A research reactor known as SPHINX is under development in the USSR. The reactor will be used mainly to carry out tests on mock-up power reactor fuel assemblies under close-to-normal parameters in experimental loop channels installed in the core and reflector of the reactor, as well as to test samples of structural materials in ampoule and loop channels. The SPHINX reactor is a channel-type reactor with light-water coolant and moderator. Maximum achievable neutron flux density in the experimental channels (cell composition 50% Fe, 50% H 2 O) is 1.1 X 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 · s for fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.7 X 10 15 for thermal neutrons at a reactor power of 200 MW. The design concepts used represent a further development of the technical features which have met with approval in the MR and MIR channel-type engineering test reactors currently in use in the USSR. The 'in-pond channel' construction makes the facility flexible and eases the carrying out of experimental work while keeping discharges of radioactivity into the environment to a low level. The reactor and all associated buildings and constructions conform to modern radiation safety and environmental protection requirements

  8. Laboratory Test of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines

    2016-02-04

    Control Module (ECM) torque horsepower engine speed boost turbocharger throttle injector power curve...13 2.4 Calibration ............................................................................. 14...Control Units (ECU). Originally, diesel engines were naturally aspirated, but most have evolved to include forced induction devices (turbochargers

  9. 40 CFR 91.409 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    2010-07-01

    ... at rated speed and maximum power for 25 to 30 minutes; (iv) Option. For four-stroke engines, where... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine dynamometer test run. 91.409... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.409...

  10. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... Diesel engine test cycle. (a) The following 13-mode cycle shall be followed in dynamometer operation... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for...

  11. Conceptual design of an electrical power module for the tokamak fusion test reactor

    Jassby, D.L.; Bullis, R.; Sedgeley, D.; Caldwell, C.S.; Pettus, W.G.; Schluderberg, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    The TFTR Engineering Test Station (ETS) can support blanket modules with a fusion-neutron view area of 0.5 m/sup 2/. If the TFTR magnetic systems and beam injectors can operate with pulse lengths of 5 s, once every 300 s, the time-averaged neutron power incident on a module will be 1.5 kW, which can be enhanced by a suitable blanket energy multiplier. A preliminary conceptual design of a dual-loop steam-generating power system that can be housed in the ETS has been carried out. The optimal heat transfer fluid in the primary loop is an organic liquid, which allows an operating temperature of 700/degree/F at low pressure. The primary coolant must be preheated electrically to operating temperature. A ballast tank levels the temperature at the steam generator, so that the secondary loop is in steady-state operation. With a natural-uranium blanket multiplier, the time-averaged net electrical power is 1.2 kW(e). 8 refs

  12. High field, low current operation of engineering test reactors

    Schwartz, J.; Cohn, D.R.; Bromberg, L.; Williams, J.E.C.

    1987-06-01

    Steady state engineering test reactors with high field, low current operation are investigated and compared to high current, lower field concepts. Illustrative high field ETR parameters are R = 3 m, α ∼ 0.5 m, B ∼ 10 T, β = 2.2% and I = 4 MA. For similar wall loading the fusion power of an illustrative high field, low current concept could be about 50% that of a lower field device like TIBER II. This reduction could lead to a 50% decrease in tritium consumption, resulting in a substantial decrease in operating cost. Furthermore, high field operation could lead to substantially reduced current drive requirements and cost. A reduction in current drive source power on the order of 40 to 50 MW may be attainable relative to a lower field, high current design like TIBER II implying a possible cost savings on the order of $200 M. If current drive is less efficient than assumed, the savings could be even greater. Through larger β/sub p/ and aspect ratio, greater prospects for bootstrap current operation also exist. Further savings would be obtained from the reduced size of the first wall/blanket/shield system. The effects of high fields on magnet costs are very dependent on technological assumptions. Further improvements in the future may lie with advances in superconducting and structural materials

  13. Initial testing of a variable-stroke Stirling engine

    Thieme, L. G.

    1985-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems Program, NASA Lewis Research Center is evaluating variable-stroke control for Stirling engines. The engine being tested is the Advenco Stirling engine; this engine was manufactured by Philips Research Laboratories of the Netherlands and uses a variable-angle swash-plate drive to achieve variable stroke operation. The engine is described, initial steady-state test data taken at Lewis are presented, a major drive system failure and subsequent modifications are described. Computer simulation results are presented to show potential part-load efficiency gains with variable-stroke control.

  14. Off reactor testings. Technological engineering applicative research

    Doca, Cezar

    2001-01-01

    By the end of year 2000 over 400 nuclear electro-power units were operating world wide, summing up a 350,000 MW total capacity, with a total production of 2,300 TWh, representing 16% of the world's electricity production. Other 36 units, totalizing 28,000 MW, were in construction, while a manifest orientation towards nuclear power development was observed in principal Asian countries like China, India, Japan and Korea. In the same world's trend one find also Romania, the Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 generating electrical energy into the national system beginning with 2 December 1996. Recently, the commercial contract was completed for finishing the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 and launching it into operation by the end of year 2004. An important role in developing the activity of research and technological engineering, as technical support for manufacturing the CANDU type nuclear fuel and supplying with equipment the Cernavoda units, was played by the Division 7 TAR of the INR Pitesti. Qualification testings were conducted for: - off-reactor CANDU type nuclear fuel; - FARE tools, pressure regulators, explosion proof panels; channel shutting, as well as functional testing for spare pushing facility as a first step in the frame of the qualification tests for the charging/discharging machine (MID) 4 and 5 endings. Testing facilities are described, as well as high pressure hot/cool loops, measuring chains, all of them fulfilling the requirements of quality assurance. The nuclear fuel off-reactor tests were carried out to determine: strength; endurance; impact, pressure fall and wear resistance. For Cernavoda NPP equipment testings were carried out for: the explosion proof panels, pressure regulators, behaviour to vibration and wear of the steam generation tubings, effects of vibration upon different electronic component, channel shutting (for Cernavoda Unit 2), MID operating at 300 and 500 cycles. A number of R and D programs were conducted in the frame of division 7 TAR of INR

  15. TEST FUSION IN ADULT FORAMINIFERA: A REVIEW WITH NEW OBSERVATIONS OF AN EARLY EOCENE NUMMULITES SPECIMEN

    Ferràndez-Cañadell, Carles; Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann; Wöger, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In foraminifera, so-called “double tests” usually arise due to abnormal growth originating mainly from twinning, but may also be caused by irregularities in the early chambers and by regeneration after test injury that modifies the direction of growth. A fourth cause of double tests has only rarely been reported: the fusion of the tests of two adult individuals. We studied an early Eocene Nummulites double test consisting of two adult individuals that fused after an extended period of independent growth. The specimen was studied using computed tomography with micrometric resolution (micro-CT) that allowed bi- and three-dimensional visualization of the internal structure. Before fusion each individual test had 30–36 chambers, which, by comparison with growth rates in recent nummulitids, implies at least three months of independent growth. After fusion, the compound test grew in two spirals that fused after about one whorl and then continued in a single spiral. To fuse their tests, either adult individuals have to be forced to do so or the allorecognition (ability to distinguish between self and another individual) mechanisms must fail. A possible explanation for the merged Nummulites tests in this study is forced fusion in attached individuals after surviving ingestion and digestion by a metazoan. Alternatively, environmental stress could lead to a failure of allorecognition mechanisms and/or foraminiferal motility. Once fused, subsequent growth seems to be determined mainly by the relative orientation of individual tests. In any case, the frequency in which adult fusion occurs remains unknown. PMID:26166916

  16. Engineered Barrier Testing at the INEEL Engineered Barriers Test Facility: FY-1997 and FY-1998

    Keck, K. N.; Porro, I.

    1998-01-01

    Engineered barriers of two designs are being tested at the Engineered Barriers Test Facility (EBTF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This report describes the test facility, barrier designs, and instruments used to monitor the test plots. Wetting tests conducted on the test plots in FY-97 are described and data collected from monitoring the test plots before, during and after the wetting tests are used to evaluate the performance of the covers during FY-97 and FY-98. Replicates of two engineered barrier designs were constructed in the EBTF cells. The first design comprises a thick, vegetated soil cover. The second design incorporates a capillary/biobarrier within the vegtated soil cover. The capillary barrier uses the textural break between an upper, fine textured soil and a lower, coarser-textured gravel layer to inhibit drainage under unsaturated conditions while increasing soil moisture storage in the root zone. Evaporation and transpiration by plants (although the test plots have not yet been vegetated) are used to recycle water stored in the soil back to the atmosphere. A geotextile fabric is used to maintain separation of the soil and gravel layers. A thick layer of cobbles beneath the gravel layer serves as a biobarrier to prevent intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into underlying waste (there is no waste in the test plots). Each test plot was instrumented with time domain reflectometry probes and neutron probe access tubes to measure moisture contents, tensiometers, heat dissipation sensors, and thermocouple psychrometers to measure matric potentials, thermocouples to measure soil temperature, and ion-exchange resin beads to monitor tracer movement. Each drainage sump is equipped with a tipping bucket instrument and pressure transducer to measure drainage. Precipitation is measured using a heated rain gauge located at the EBTF. Instrument calibration equation coefficients are presented, and data reduction

  17. A remote monitoring system of environmental electromagnetic field in magnetic confinement fusion test facilities

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Takami, Shigeyuki; Wang, Jianqing; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    A remote, continuous environmental electromagnetic field monitoring system for use in magnetic confinement fusion test facilities is developed. Using this system, both the static magnetic field and the high frequency electromagnetic field could be measured. The required frequency range of the measurement system is from 25 to 100 MHz for the ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) heating system. The outputs from the measurement instruments are measured simultaneously by custom-built software using a laptop-type personal computer connected to a local area network. In this way, the electromagnetic field strength could be monitored from a control room located about 200 m from the fusion device building. Examples of measurement data from the vicinity of a high-frequency generator and amplifier and the leakage static magnetic field from a fusion test device are presented. (author)

  18. Engine Performance Test of the 1975 Chrysler - Nissan Model CN633 Diesel Engine

    1975-09-01

    An engine test of the Chrysler-Nissan Model CN633 diesel engine was performed to determine its steady-state fuel consumption and emissions (HC, CO, NOx) maps. The data acquired are summarized in this report.

  19. Evaluating and planning the radioactive waste options for dismantling the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Rule, K.; Scott, J.; Larson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a kind tritium fusion research reactor, and is planned to be decommissioned within the next several years. This is the largest fusion reactor in the world and as a result of deuterium-tritum reactions is tritium contaminated and activated from 14 Mev neutrons. This presents many unusual challenges when dismantling, packaging and disposing its components and ancillary systems. Special containers are being designed to accommodate the vacuum vessel, neutral beams, and tritium delivery and processing systems. A team of experienced professionals performed a detailed field study to evaluate the requirements and appropriate methods for packaging the radioactive materials. This team focused on several current and innovative methods for waste minimization that provides the oppurtunmost cost effective manner to package and dispose of the waste. This study also produces a functional time-phased schedule which conjoins the waste volume, weight, costs and container requirements with the detailed project activity schedule for the entire project scope. This study and project will be the first demonstration of the decommissioning of a tritium fusion test reactor. The radioactive waste disposal aspects of this project are instrumental in demonstrating the viability of a fusion power reactor with regard to its environmental impact and ultimate success.

  20. Two methodologies for physical penetration testing using social engineering

    Dimkov, T.; van Cleeff, A.; Pieters, Wolter; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2010-01-01

    Penetration tests on IT systems are sometimes coupled with physical penetration tests and social engineering. In physical penetration tests where social engineering is allowed, the penetration tester directly interacts with the employees. These interactions are usually based on deception and if not

  1. Operation of the cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Chronis, W.C.; Slack, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to cool the entire MFTF-B system from ambient to operating temperature in less than 10 days. The system was successfully operated in the recent plant and capital equipment (PACE) acceptance tests, and results from these tests helped us correct problem areas and improve the system

  2. International fusion materials irradiation facility and neutronic calculations for its test modules

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.

    1997-01-01

    The International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a projected high intensity neutron source for material testing. Neutron transport calculations for the IFMIF project are performed for variety of here explained reasons. The results of MCNP neutronic calculations for IFMIF test modules with NaK and He cooled high flux test cells are presented in this paper. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Testing of low Z coated limiters in tokamak fusion devices

    Whitely, J.B.; Mullendore, A.W.; Langley, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Extensive testing on a laboratory scale has been used to select those coatings most suitable for this environment. From this testing which included pulsed electron beam heating, low energy ion bombardment and arcing, chemical vapor deposited coating of TiB 2 and TiC on Poco graphite substrates have been selected and tested as limiters in ISX. Both limiter materials gave clean, stable, reproducible tokamak discharges the first day of operation. After one weeks exposure, the TiC limiter showed only superficial damage with no coating failure. The TiB 2 limiter had some small areas of coating failure. TiC coated graphite limiters have also been briefly tested in the tokamaks Alcator and PDX with favorable results

  4. Directions for possible upgrades of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF)

    Damm, C.C.; Coensgen, F.H.; Devoto, R.S.; Molvik, A.W.; Porter, G.D.; Shearer, J.W.; Stallard, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) may be upgraded by extending the time of plasma sustenance in an approach to steady-state operation and/or by increasing the neutral-beam injection energy. Some parameter bounds for these upgrades are discussed as they relate to a definition of the required neutral-beam development

  5. Manufacturing cost study on the ion sources for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    A study of the cost of manufacturing 48 ion sources for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility is described. The estimate is built up from individual part costs and assembly operation times for the 80 kV prototype source constructed by LLL and described by LLL drawings furnished during December 1978. Recommendations for cost reduction are made

  6. Engine testing the design, building, modification and use of powertrain test facilities

    MARTYR, A J

    2012-01-01

    Engine Testing is a unique, well-organized and comprehensive collection of the different aspects of engine and vehicle testing equipment and infrastructure for anyone involved in facility design and management, physical testing and the maintenance, upgrading and trouble shooting of testing equipment. Designed so that its chapters can all stand alone to be read in sequence or out of order as needed, Engine Testing is also an ideal resource for automotive engineers required to perform testing functions whose jobs do not involve engine testing on a regular basis. This recognized standard refer

  7. Saturation of alpha particle driven instability in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Chen, Y.; White, R.B.; Berk, H.L.

    1999-01-01

    A nonlinear theory of kinetic instabilities near threshold [Berk et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 23, 842 (1997)] is applied to calculate the saturation level of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE), and to be compared with the predictions of δf method calculations (Y. Chen, Ph.D. thesis, Princeton University, 1998). Good agreement is observed between the predictions of both methods and the predicted saturation levels are comparable to experimentally measured amplitudes of the TAE oscillations in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)]. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  8. The role of inertial containment fusion in replacing nuclear tests

    Schaper, Annette [Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear weapon physicists need to understand the process of a nuclear explosion, and their major experimental tools had been nuclear tests. Since a couple of years, the established nuclear weapon states observe a testing moratorium. Nevertheless, they still want to keep their nuclear arsenals, and consequently to ensure the reliability, safety, and security of their nuclear warheads. For this purpose, they use experimental tools that replace nuclear tests, among them ICF. ICF plays a central role in the so-called ''stockpile stewardship program'' that the U.S. has implemented when it participated in the negotiations on a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. Several questions arise and are discussed in the presentation: Does ICF allow to simulate the extreme conditions of a nuclear explosion? Which are the functions of nuclear testing that ICF can replace and which are beyond its capabilities? Would ICF be a useful tool for the design of new nuclear warheads? Why are so huge sums spent on ICF in a military context although the usefulness for nuclear weapons seems rather limited?.

  9. Long-pulse beamlines for the mirror fusion test facility

    Stone, R.R.; Goldner, A.I.; Poulsen, P.

    1984-01-01

    We have recently obtained test results indicating that a beam of pure full-energy deuterium particles can be delivered to the plasma targets in MFTF-B. We used a close-coupled separator magnet with the ion source to separate the impurities from the full-energy deuterium particles. Our completed studies show that the usual iron-core sweep magnet and shielding used in neutral beamlines can be eliminated and the gas flow out of the beamline decreased. This design also reduces beam losses. We will use smooth-bore OFHC tube arrays brazed to manifolds for the active heat transfer surfaces. Tests indicate that both burnout and life requirements are met by this design. In this paper, we present test results and discuss the MFTF-B long-pulse beamline configuration

  10. Initial tests of thermoacoustic space power engine

    Backhaus, S.N.

    2002-01-01

    Future NASA deep-space missions will require radioisotope-powered electric generators that are just as reliable as current RTGs, but more efficient and of higher specific power (Wikg). Thennoacoustic engines at the -1-kW scale have converted high-temperature heat into acoustic, or PV, power without moving parts at 30% efficiency. Consisting of only tubes and a few heat exchangers, thennoacoustic engines are low mass and promise to be highly reliable. Coupling a thennoacoustic engine to a low mass, highly reliable and efficient linear alternator will create a heat-driven electric generator suitable for deep-space applications. Conversion efficiency data will be presented on a demonstration thennoacoustic engine designed for the 1 00-Watt power range.

  11. Radio-frequency-assisted current startup in the Fusion Engineering Device

    Borowski, S.K.; Kammash, T.; Martin Peng, Y.K.

    1984-01-01

    Auxiliary radio-frequency (RF) heating of electrons before and during the current rise phase of a large tokamak, such as the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) (R 0 = 4.8 m, a = 1.3 m, sigma = 1.6, B(R 0 ) = 3.62 T), is examined as a means of reducing both the initiation loop voltage and resistive flux expenditure during startup. Prior to current initiation, 1 to 2 MW of electron cyclotron resonance heating power at about90 GHz is used to create a small volume of high conductivity plasma (T /sub e/ approx. = 100 eV, n /sub e/ approx. = 10 19 m -3 ) near the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) region. This plasma conditioning, referred to as preheating, permits a small radius (a 0 approx. = 0.2 to 0.4 m) current channel to be established with a relatively low initial loop voltage (less than or equal to 25 V as opposed to about 100 V without rf assist). During the subsequent plasma expansion and current rise phase, a combination of rf heating (up to 5 MW) and linear current ramping leads to a substantial savings in voltseconds by (a) minimizing the resistive flux consumption and (b) producing broad current density profiles. (With such broad profiles, the internal flux requirements are maintained at or near the flat profile limit.)

  12. Engineering and physics of high-power-density, compact, reversed-field-pinch fusion reactors

    Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R.W.; Krakowski, R.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Steiner, D.

    1989-01-01

    The technical feasibility and key developmental issues of compact, high-power-density Reversed-Field-Pinch (RFP) reactors are the primary results of the TITAN RFP reactor study. Two design approaches emerged, TITAN-I and TITAN-II, both of which are steady-state, DT-burning, circa 1000 MWe power reactors. The TITAN designs are physically compact and have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW m 2 . Detailed analyses indicate that: a) each design is technically feasible; b) attractive features of compact RFP reactors can be realized without sacrificing the safety and environmental potential of fusion; and c) major features of this particular embodiment of the RFP reactor are retained in a design window of neutron wall loading ranging from 10 to 20 MW/m 2 . A major product of the TITAN study is the identification and quantification of major engineering and physics requirements for this class of RFP reactors. These findings are the focus of this paper. (author). 26 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  13. Two-dimensional cross-section and SED uncertainty analysis for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Urban, W.T.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of two-dimensional cross-section and secondary-energy-distribution (SED) sensitivity was implemented by developing a two-dimensional sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code, SENSIT-2D. Analyses of the Fusion Engineering Design (FED) conceptual inboard shield indicate that, although the calculated uncertainties in the 2-D model are of the same order of magnitude as those resulting from the 1-D model, there might be severe differences. The more complex the geometry, the more compulsory a 2-D analysis becomes. Specific results show that the uncertainty for the integral heating of the toroidal field (TF) coil for the FED is 114.6%. The main contributors to the cross-section uncertainty are chromium and iron. Contributions to the total uncertainty were smaller for nickel, copper, hydrogen and carbon. All analyses were performed with the Los Alamos 42-group cross-section library generated from ENDF/B-V data, and the COVFILS covariance matrix library. The large uncertainties due to chromium result mainly from large convariances for the chromium total and elastic scattering cross sections

  14. Fusion reactor materials

    none,

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics.

  15. Fusion reactor materials

    1989-01-01

    This paper discuses the following topics on fusion reactor materials: irradiation, facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; materials engineering and design requirements; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics

  16. Proceedings of the IEA-technical workshop on the test cell system for an international fusion materials irradiation facility, Karlsruhe, Germany, July 3-6, 1995. IEA-implementing agreement for a programme of research and development on fusion materials

    Moeslang, A.; Lindau, R.

    1995-09-01

    After a Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) study on an International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been launched under the auspices of the IEA, working groups and relevant tasks have been defined and agreed in an IEA-workshop that was held September 26-29 1994 at Karlsruhe. For the Test Cell System 11 tasks were identified which can be grouped into the three major fields neutronics, test matrix/users and test cell engineering. In order to discuss recently achieved results and to coordinate necessary activities for an effective design integration, a technical workshop on the Test Cell System was initiated. This workshop was organized on July 3-6 1995 by the Institute for Materials Research I at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and attended by 20 specialists working in the fields neutronics, fusion materials R and D and test cell engineering in the European Union, Japan, and the United States of America. The presentations and discussions during this workshop have shown together with the elaborated lists of action items, that has been achieved in all three fields, and that from the future IFMIF experimental program for a number of materials a database covering widerspread loading conditions up to DEMO-reactor relevant end-of-life damage levels can be expected. (orig.)

  17. Test plan for engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    This test plan describes experimental details of an engineering-scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration to be performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in fiscal year (FY)-93. This demonstration will investigate, in the engineering scale, the feasibility of using electrostatic enclosures and devices to control the spread of contaminants during transuranic waste handling operations. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the FY-93 experiments are included in this plan

  18. Is there hope for fusion?

    Fowler, T.K.

    1990-01-01

    From the outset in the 1950's, fusion research has been motivated by environmental concerns as well as long-term fuel supply issues. Compared to fossil fuels both fusion and fission would produce essentially zero emissions to the atmosphere. Compared to fission, fusion reactors should offer high demonstrability of public protection from accidents and a substantial amelioration of the radioactive waste problem. Fusion still requires lengthy development, the earliest commercial deployment being likely to occur around 2025--2050. However, steady scientific progress is being made and there is a wide consensus that it is time to plan large-scale engineering development. A major international effort, called the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is being carried out under IAEA auspices to design the world's first fusion engineering test reactor, which could be constructed in the 1990's. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Environmental Testing of the NEXT PM1R Ion Engine

    Snyder, John S.; Anderson, John R.; VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Soulas, George C.

    2007-01-01

    The NEXT propulsion system is an advanced ion propulsion system presently under development that is oriented towards robotic exploration of the solar system using solar electric power. The subsystem includes an ion engine, power processing unit, feed system components, and thruster gimbal. The Prototype Model engine PM1 was subjected to qualification-level environmental testing in 2006 to demonstrate compatibility with environments representative of anticipated mission requirements. Although the testing was largely successful, several issues were identified including the fragmentation of potting cement on the discharge and neutralizer cathode heater terminations during vibration which led to abbreviated thermal testing, and generation of particulate contamination from manufacturing processes and engine materials. The engine was reworked to address most of these findings, renamed PM1R, and the environmental test sequence was repeated. Thruster functional testing was performed before and after the vibration and thermal-vacuum tests. Random vibration testing, conducted with the thruster mated to the breadboard gimbal, was executed at 10.0 Grms for 2 min in each of three axes. Thermal-vacuum testing included three thermal cycles from 120 to 215 C with hot engine re-starts. Thruster performance was nominal throughout the test program, with minor variations in a few engine operating parameters likely caused by facility effects. There were no significant changes in engine performance as characterized by engine operating parameters, ion optics performance measurements, and beam current density measurements, indicating no significant changes to the hardware as a result of the environmental testing. The NEXT PM1R engine and the breadboard gimbal were found to be well-designed against environmental requirements based on the results reported herein. The redesigned cathode heater terminations successfully survived the vibration environments. Based on the results of this test

  20. Assessment of NDE Methods on Inspection of HDPE Butt Fusion Piping Joints for Lack of Fusion with Validation from Mechanical Testing

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Doctor, Steven R.; Moran, Traci L.; Watts, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Studies at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, are being conducted to evaluate nondestructive examinations (NDE) coupled with mechanical testing of butt fusion joints in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe for assessing lack of fusion. The work provides information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of volumetric inspection techniques of HDPE butt fusion joints in Section III, Division 1, Class 3, buried piping systems in nuclear power plants. This paper describes results from preliminary assessments using ultrasonic and microwave nondestructive techniques and mechanical testing with the high-speed tensile impact test and the side-bend test for determining joint integrity. A series of butt joints were fabricated in 3408, 12-in. IPS DR-11 HDPE material by varying the fusion parameters to create good joints and joints containing a range of lack-of-fusion conditions. Six of these butt joints were volumetrically examined with time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD), phased-array (PA) ultrasound, and the Evisive microwave system. The outer-diameter weld beads were removed for the microwave inspection. In two of the four pipes, both the outer and inner weld beads were removed and the pipe joints re-evaluated. The pipes were sectioned and the joints destructively evaluated with the side-bend test by cutting portions of the fusion joint into slices that were planed and bent. The last step in this limited study will be to correlate the fusion parameters, nondestructive, and destructive evaluation results to validate the effectiveness of what each NDE technology detects and what each does not detect. The results of the correlation will be used in identifying any future work that is needed.

  1. 40 CFR 89.407 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    2010-07-01

    ... supplied to the engine, the fuel temperature, the intake air humidity, and the observed barometric pressure... permitted to precondition the engine at rated speed and maximum horsepower until the oil and water... completion of the test. (3) It is permissible to change filter elements between test modes. (4) A leak check...

  2. Phase 1 Development Testing of the Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine

    Case, Nicholas L.; Eddleman, David E.; Calvert, Marty R.; Bullard, David B.; Martin, Michael A.; Wall, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Development Breadboard Engine (BBE) is a pressure-fed liquid oxygen/pump-fed liquid hydrogen (LOX/LH2) expander cycle engine that was built and operated by NASA at Marshall Space Flight Center's East Test Area. The breadboard engine was conceived as a technology demonstrator for the additive manufacturing technologies for an advanced upper stage prototype engine. The components tested on the breadboard engine included an ablative chamber, injector, main fuel valve, turbine bypass valve, a main oxidizer valve, a mixer and the fuel turbopump. All parts minus the ablative chamber were additively manufactured. The BBE was successfully hot fire tested seven times. Data collected from the test series will be used for follow on demonstration tests with a liquid oxygen turbopump and a regeneratively cooled chamber and nozzle.

  3. Stand for testing the electrical race car engine

    Baier, M.; Franiasz, J.; Mierzwa, P.; Wylenzek, D.

    2015-11-01

    An engine test stand created especially for research of electrical race car is described in the paper. The car is an aim of Silesian Greenpower project whose participants build and test electrical vehicles to take part in international races in Great Britain. The engine test stand is used to test and measure the characteristics of vehicles and their engines. It has been designed particularly to test the electric cars engineered by students of Silesian Greenpower project. The article contains a description how the test stand works and shows its versatility in many areas. The paper presents both construction of the test stand, control system and sample results of conducted research. The engine test stand was designed and modified using PLM Siemens NX 8.5. The construction of the test stand is highly modular, which means it can be used both for testing the vehicle itself or for tests without the vehicle. The test stand has its own wheel, motor, powertrain and braking system with second engine. Such solution enables verifying various concepts without changing the construction of the vehicle. The control system and measurement system are realized by enabling National Instruments product myRIO (RIO - Reconfigurable Input/Output). This controller in combination with powerful LabVIEW environment performs as an advanced tool to control torque and speed simultaneously. It is crucial as far as the test stand is equipped in two motors - the one being tested and the braking one. The feedback loop is realized by an optical encoder cooperating with the rotor mounted on the wheel. The results of tests are shown live on the screen both as a chart and as single values. After performing several tests there is a report generated. The engine test stand is widely used during process of the Silesian Greenpower vehicle design. Its versatility enables powertrain testing, wheels and tires tests, thermal analysis and more.

  4. Recent fusion research in the National Institute for Fusion Science

    Komori, Akio; Sakakibara, Satoru; Sagara, Akio; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), which was established in 1989, promotes academic approaches toward the exploration of fusion science for steady-state helical reactor and realizes the establishment of a comprehensive understanding of toroidal plasmas as an inter-university research organization and a key center of worldwide fusion research. The Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Science Project, and the Fusion Engineering Project are organized for early realization of net current free fusion reactor, and their recent activities are described in this paper. The LHD has been producing high-performance plasmas comparable to those of large tokamaks, and several new findings with regard to plasma physics have been obtained. The numerical simulation science project contributes understanding and systemization of the physical mechanisms of plasma confinement in fusion plasmas and explores complexity science of a plasma for realization of the numerical test reactor. In the fusion engineering project, the design of the helical fusion reactor has progressed based on the development of superconducting coils, the blanket, fusion materials and tritium handling. (author)

  5. The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Tritium Facility

    Gentile, C.A.; LaMarche, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The TFTR tritium operations staff has successfully received, stored, handled, and processed over five hundred thousand curies of tritium for the purpose of supporting D-T (Deuterium-Tritium) operations at TFTR. Tritium operations personnel nominally provide continuous round the clock coverage (24 hours/day, 7 days/week) in shift complements consisting of I supervisor and 3 operators. Tritium Shift Supervisors and operators are required to have 5 years of operational experience in either the nuclear or chemical industry and to become certified for their positions. The certification program provides formal instruction, as well as on the job training. The certification process requires 4 to 6 months to complete, which includes an oral board lasting up to 4 hours at which time the candidate is tested on their knowledge of Tritium Technology and TFTR Tritium systems. Once an operator is certified, the training process continues with scheduled training weeks occurring once every 5 weeks. During D-T operations at TFTR the operators must evacuate the tritium area due to direct radiation from TFTR D-T pulses. During '' time operators maintain cognizance over tritium systems via a real time TV camera system. Operators are able to gain access to the Tritium area between TFTR D-T pulses, but have been excluded from die tritium area during D-T pulsing for periods up to 30 minutes. Tritium operators are responsible for delivering tritium gas to TFRR as well as processing plasma exhaust gases which lead to the deposition of tritium oxide on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). Once a DMSB is loaded, the operations staff remove the expended DMSB, and replace it with a new DMSB container. The TFIR tritium system is operated via detailed procedures which require operator sign off for system manipulation. There are >300 procedures controlling the operation of the tritium systems

  6. Study on the impact of the engineering energy gain and the FPC mass power density on the generation cost of fusion power plant

    Huang Desuo; Wu Yican

    2004-01-01

    The impact of the engineering energy gain and the fusion-power-core (FPC) mass power density (MPD) on the generation cost of fusion power plant are analyzed based on the economic elasticity approach in this paper. From the functions describing the relationship of the generation cost with the engineering energy gain and the MPD, the elasticity coefficients of the generation cost with the engineering energy gain and the MPD have been derived respectively to analyze their sensitivity to the generation cost and the MPD to the generation cost decreases with increasing the engineering energy gain or the MPD. (authors)

  7. First-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine

    2001-01-01

    Thousands of people watch the first-ever evening public engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. The spectacular test marked Stennis Space Center's 20th anniversary celebration of the first Space Shuttle mission.

  8. Preparations for deuterium--tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L.A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Biglow, T.S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M.J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Jaeger, E.F.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Kwon, S.; Labik, G.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Laughlin, M.J.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F.M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D.E.; Marchlik, M.; Marmar, E.S.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mastrocola, V.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.P.; Majeski, R.; Mauel, M.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Milora, S.L.; Monticello, D.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Nishitani, T.; Norris, M.; O'Connor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S.F.; Pavlov, Y.I.; Pearson, G.; Perkins, F.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Pitcher, S.; Popovichev, S.; Qualls, A.L.; Raftopoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, R.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Redi, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinert TM system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium--deuterium (D--D) run to simulate expected deuterium--tritium (D--T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D--T experiments using D--D have been performed. The physics objectives of D--T operation are production of ∼10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium--tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D--T experiments are reviewed

  9. Definition study for variable cycle engine testbed engine and associated test program

    Vdoviak, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    The product/study double bypass variable cycle engine (VCE) was updated to incorporate recent improvements. The effect of these improvements on mission range and noise levels was determined. This engine design was then compared with current existing high-technology core engines in order to define a subscale testbed configuration that simulated many of the critical technology features of the product/study VCE. Detailed preliminary program plans were then developed for the design, fabrication, and static test of the selected testbed engine configuration. These plans included estimated costs and schedules for the detail design, fabrication and test of the testbed engine and the definition of a test program, test plan, schedule, instrumentation, and test stand requirements.

  10. Spinal fusion for chronic low back pain: systematic review on the accuracy of tests for patient selection

    Willems, P.C.P.H.; Staal, J.B.; Walenkamp, G.H.; Bie, R.A. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Spinal fusion is a common but controversial treatment for chronic low back pain (LBP) with outcomes similar to those of programmed conservative care. To improve the results of fusion, tests for patient selection are used in clinical practice. PURPOSE: To determine the prognostic

  11. Engineering a pharmacologically superior form of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor by fusion with gelatin-like-protein polymer.

    Huang, Yan-Shan; Wen, Xiao-Fang; Wu, Yi-Liang; Wang, Ye-Fei; Fan, Min; Yang, Zhi-Yu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Lin-Fu

    2010-03-01

    The plasma half-life of therapeutic proteins is a critical factor in many clinical applications. Therefore, new strategies to prolong plasma half-life of long-acting peptides and protein drugs are in high demand. Here, we designed an artificial gelatin-like protein (GLK) and fused this hydrophilic GLK polymer to granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to generate a chimeric GLK/G-CSF fusion protein. The genetically engineered recombinant GLK/G-CSF (rGLK/G-CSF) fusion protein was purified from Pichia pastoris. In vitro studies demonstrated that rGLK/G-CSF possessed an enlarged hydrodynamic radius, improved thermal stability and retained full bioactivity compared to unfused G-CSF. Following a single subcutaneous administration to rats, the rGLK/G-CSF fusion protein displayed a slower plasma clearance rate and stimulated greater and longer lasting increases in circulating white blood cells than G-CSF. Our findings indicate that fusion with this artificial, hydrophilic, GLK polymer provides many advantages in the construction of a potent hematopoietic factor with extended plasma half-life. This approach could be easily applied to other therapeutic proteins and have important clinical applications. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Engineering of a parainfluenza virus type 5 fusion protein (PIV-5 F): development of an autonomous and hyperfusogenic protein by a combinational mutagenesis approach.

    Terrier, O; Durupt, F; Cartet, G; Thomas, L; Lina, B; Rosa-Calatrava, M

    2009-12-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is accomplished by fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane. For the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV-5), this fusion involves an attachment protein (HN) and a class I viral fusion protein (F). We investigated the effect of 20 different combinations of 12 amino-acid substitutions within functional domains of the PIV-5 F glycoprotein, by performing cell surface expression measurements, quantitative fusion and syncytia assays. We found that combinations of mutations conferring an autonomous phenotype with mutations leading to an increased fusion activity were compatible and generated functional PIV-5 F proteins. The addition of mutations in the heptad-repeat domains led to both autonomous and hyperfusogenic phenotypes, despite the low cell surface expression of the corresponding mutants. Such engineering approach may prove useful not only for deciphering the fundamental mechanism behind viral-mediated membrane fusion but also in the development of potential therapeutic applications.

  13. Detailed benchmark test of JENDL-4.0 iron data for fusion applications

    Konno, Chikara, E-mail: konno.chikara@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-Mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Wada, Masayuki [Japan Computer System, Mito, 310-0805 (Japan); Kondo, Keitaro; Ohnishi, Seiki; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Sato, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-Mura, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    The major revised version of Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL), JENDL-4.0, was released in May, 2010. As one of benchmark tests, we have carried out a benchmark test of JENDL-4.0 iron data, which are very important for radiation shielding in fusion reactors, by analyzing the iron fusion neutronics integral experiments (in situ and Time-of-Flight (TOF) experiments) at JAEA/FNS. It is demonstrated that the problems of the iron data in the previous version of JENDL, JENDL-3.3, are solved in JENDL-4.0; the first inelastic scattering cross section data of {sup 57}Fe and the angular distribution of the elastic scattering of {sup 56}Fe. The iron data in JENDL-4.0 are comparable to or are partly better than those in ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.

  14. TASKA-M - a low cost, near term tandem mirror device for fusion technology testing

    Badger, B.; Corradini, M.L.; El-Guebaly, L.; Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Larsen, E.M.; Maynard, C.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Peterson, R.R.; Plute, K.E.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Scharer, J.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Sze, D.K.; Vogelsang, W.F.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Leppelmeier, G.W.; Grover, J.M.; Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.; Borie, E.; Taczanowski, S.; Arendt, F.; Dittrich, H.G.; Fett, T.; Haferkamp, B.; Heinz, W.; Hoelzchen, E.; Kleefeldt, K.; Klingelhoefer, R.; Komarek, P.; Kuntze, M.; Leiste, H.G.; Link, W.; Malang, S.; Manes, B.M.; Maurer, W.; Michael, I.; Mueller, R.A.; Neffe, G.; Schramm, K.; Suppan, A.; Weinberg, D.

    1984-04-01

    TASKA-M (Modifizierte Tandem Spiegelmaschine Karlsruhe) is a study of a dedicated fusion technology device based on the mirror principle, in continuation of the 1981/82 TASKA study. The main objective is to minimize cost while retaining key requirements of neutron flux and fluence for blanket and material development and for component testing in a nuclear environment. Direct costs are reduced to about 400 M$ by dropping reactor-relevant aspects not essential to technology testing: No thermal barrier and electrostatic plugging of the plasma; fusion power of 7 MW at an injected power of 44 MW; tritium supply from external sources. All technologies for operating the machine are expected to be available by 1990; the plasma physics relies on microstabilization in a sloshing ion population. (orig.) [de

  15. J-2 Engine ready to go into test stand

    1965-01-01

    Two technicians watch carefully as cables prepare to lift a J-2 engine into a test stand. The J-2 powered the second stage and the third stage of the Saturn V moon rocket. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  16. Source-to-incident flux relation for a tokamak fusion test reactor blanket module

    Imel, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    The source-to-incident 14-MeV flux relation for a blanket module on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor is derived. It is shown that assumptions can be made that allow an analytical expression to be derived, using point kernel methods. In addition, the effect of a nonuniform source distribution is derived, again by relatively simple point kernel methods. It is thought that the methodology developed is valid for a variety of blanket modules on tokamak reactors

  17. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    Efthimion, P.C.; Goeler, S. von; Houlberg, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  18. Observation of neoclassical transport in reverse shear plasmas on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    Efthimion, P.C.; Von Goeler, S.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    Perturbative experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have investigated the transport of multiple ion species in reverse shear plasmas. The profile evolution of trace tritium and helium, and intrinsic carbon indicate the formation of core particle transport barriers in ERS plasmas. There is an order of magnitude reduction in the particle diffusivity inside the reverse shear region. The diffusivities for these species in ERS plasmas agree with neoclassical theory. (author)

  19. Gettering high energy plasma in the end loss region of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Goldner, A.I.; Margolies, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    The ions escaping from the end loss fan of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) neutralize when they hit the surface of the end dome. If the neutrals then bounce back into the oncoming plasma, they are likely to reionize, drawing power from the center of the plasma and reducing the overall electron temperature. In this paper we describe two methods for reducing the reionization rate and a computer code for estimating their effectiveness

  20. F-1 Engine for Saturn V Undergoing a Static Test

    1964-01-01

    The flame and exhaust from the test firing of an F-1 engine blast out from the Saturn S-IB Static Test Stand in the east test area of the Marshall Space Flight Center. A Cluster of five F-1 engines, located in the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V vehicle, provided over 7,500,000 pounds of thrust to launch the giant rocket. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multistage, multiengine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  1. MANUFACTURING AND TESTING OF A V-TYPE STIRLING ENGINE

    B. Demir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a V-type Stirling engine with 163 cc total swept volume was designed and manufactured. Air was used as working fluid. Performance tests were conducted at the range of 1-3 bar charge pressure and within the range of hot source temperature 700-1050 °C. Experimental results are given. Variation of engine power and torque with hot source temperature at various air charge pressure are tested. Also variation of engine torque with engine speed for different air charge pressure are tested. According to experimental analysis, the maximum engine power was obtained as 21.334 W at 1050 ˚C hot source temperature and 1.5 bars charge pressure.

  2. The accomplishment of the Engineering Design Activities of IFMIF/EVEDA: The European-Japanese project towards a Li(d,xn) fusion relevant neutron source

    Knaster, J.; Ibarra, A.; Abal, J.; Abou-Sena, A.; Arbeiter, F.; Arranz, F.; Arroyo, J. M.; Bargallo, E.; Beauvais, P.-Y.; Bernardi, D.; Casal, N.; Carmona, J. M.; Chauvin, N.; Comunian, M.; Delferriere, O.; Delgado, A.; Diaz-Arocas, P.; Fischer, U.; Frisoni, M.; Garcia, A.; Garin, P.; Gobin, R.; Gouat, P.; Groeschel, F.; Heidinger, R.; Ida, M.; Kondo, K.; Kikuchi, T.; Kubo, T.; Le Tonqueze, Y.; Leysen, W.; Mas, A.; Massaut, V.; Matsumoto, H.; Micciche, G.; Mittwollen, M.; Mora, J. C.; Mota, F.; Nghiem, P. A. P.; Nitti, F.; Nishiyama, K.; Ogando, F.; O'hira, S.; Oliver, C.; Orsini, F.; Perez, D.; Perez, M.; Pinna, T.; Pisent, A.; Podadera, I.; Porfiri, M.; Pruneri, G.; Queral, V.; Rapisarda, D.; Roman, R.; Shingala, M.; Soldaini, M.; Sugimoto, M.; Theile, J.; Tian, K.; Umeno, H.; Uriot, D.; Wakai, E.; Watanabe, K.; Weber, M.; Yamamoto, M.; Yokomine, T.

    2015-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), presently in its Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (EVEDA) phase under the frame of the Broader Approach Agreement between Europe and Japan, accomplished in summer 2013, on schedule, its EDA phase with the release of the engineering design report of the IFMIF plant, which is here described. Many improvements of the design from former phases are implemented, particularly a reduction of beam losses and operational costs thanks to the superconducting accelerator concept, the re-location of the quench tank outside the test cell (TC) with a reduction of tritium inventory and a simplification on its replacement in case of failure, the separation of the irradiation modules from the shielding block gaining irradiation flexibility and enhancement of the remote handling equipment reliability and cost reduction, and the water cooling of the liner and biological shielding of the TC, enhancing the efficiency and economy of the related sub-systems. In addition, the maintenance strategy has been modified to allow a shorter yearly stop of the irradiation operations and a more careful management of the irradiated samples. The design of the IFMIF plant is intimately linked with the EVA phase carried out since the entry into force of IFMIF/EVEDA in June 2007. These last activities and their on-going accomplishment have been thoroughly described elsewhere (Knaster J et al [19]), which, combined with the present paper, allows a clear understanding of the maturity of the European-Japanese international efforts. This released IFMIF Intermediate Engineering Design Report (IIEDR), which could be complemented if required concurrently with the outcome of the on-going EVA, will allow decision making on its construction and/or serve as the basis for the definition of the next step, aligned with the evolving needs of our fusion community.

  3. Uprated OMS Engine Status-Sea Level Testing Results

    Bertolino, J. D.; Boyd, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The current Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Engine (OME) is pressure fed, utilizing storable propellants. Performance uprating of this engine, through the use of a gas generator driven turbopump to increase operating pressure, is being pursued by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Component level design, fabrication, and test activities for this engine system have been on-going since 1984. More recently, a complete engine designated the Integrated Component Test Bed (ICTB), was tested at sea level conditions by Aerojet. A description of the test hardware and results of the sea level test program are presented. These results, which include the test condition operating envelope and projected performance at altitude conditions, confirm the capability of the selected Uprated OME (UOME) configuration to meet or exceed performance and operational requirements. Engine flexibility, demonstrated through testing at two different operational mixture ratios, along with a summary of projected Space Shuttle performance enhancements using the UOME, are discussed. Planned future activities, including ICTB tests at simulated altitude conditions, and recommendations for further engine development, are also discussed.

  4. 40 CFR 86.1337-96 - Engine dynamometer test run.

    2010-07-01

    .... Plug the canister port that is normally connected to the fuel tank. (ii) Prepare the engine... test should be performed. (2) Connect evacuated sample collection bags to the dilute exhaust and... turned off, turn off the engine cooling fan(s) if used, and the CVS blower (or disconnect the exhaust...

  5. Tests Of A Stirling-Engine Power Converter

    Dochat, George

    1995-01-01

    Report describes acceptance tests of power converter consisting of pair of opposed free-piston Stirling engines driving linear alternators. Stirling engines offer potential for extremely long life, high reliability, high efficiency at low hot-to-cold temperature ratios, and relatively low heater-head temperatures.

  6. ORNL TNS Program: plasma engineering considerations and innovations for a medium field tokamak fusion reactor

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Rome, J.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1977-12-01

    Recent plasma engineering studies have ascertained a viable concept for The Next Step (TNS) reactor based on medium toroidal fields between 4 T and 7 T at the plasma center, plasma anti β values up to 10%, and averaged densities between 0.6 x 10 14 cm -3 and 2.5 x 10 14 cm -3 . Plasma engineering innovations that can substantially reduce the size, cost, and complexity of the TNS reactor have been explored and are summarized. It is shown that the previously anticipated requirement of high pellet velocities can be substantially reduced; the toroidal field (TF) ripple requirements may be relaxed to reduce the number of TF coils and improve machine access; hybrid equilibrium field (EF) coils have been shown to require building only small interior coils and to reduce the power supply required by the exterior coils; proper approaches of microwave plasma preheating may reduce the peak loop voltage for start-up by an order of magnitude. The medium-field TNS reactor concepts and the plasma engineering innovations discussed should be applicable to other designs of tokamak reactors; some of the suggested innovations will be tested in upcoming experiments

  7. The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine

    Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

    2008-12-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission

  8. Engineering challenges encountered in the design of the ELMO BUMPY TORUS proof-of-principle fusion device

    Dillow, C.F.; Imster, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper first provides a summary of the history and current status of the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) fusion concept. A brief description of the EBT-P is then provided in which the many unique features of this fusion device are highlighted. This description will provide the technical background for the following discussions of some of the more challenging mechanical engineering problems encountered to date in the evolution of the EBT-P design. The problems discussed are: optimization of the device primary structure design, optimization of the superconducting magnet x-ray shield design, design of the liquid helium supply and distribution system, and selection of high vacuum seals and pumps and their protection from the high power microwave environment. The common challenge in each of these design issues was to assure adequate performance at minimum cost

  9. Applying the design-build-test paradigm in microbiome engineering.

    Pham, Hoang Long; Ho, Chun Loong; Wong, Adison; Lee, Yung Seng; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2017-12-01

    The recently discovered roles of human microbiome in health and diseases have inspired research efforts across many disciplines to engineer microbiome for health benefits. In this review, we highlight recent progress in human microbiome research and how modifications to the microbiome could result in implications to human health. Furthermore, we discuss the application of a 'design-build-test' framework to expedite microbiome engineering efforts by reviewing current literature on three key aspects: design principles to engineer the human microbiome, methods to engineer microbiome with desired functions, and analytical techniques to examine complex microbiome samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Engineering human cell spheroids to model embryonic tissue fusion in vitro.

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions drive embryonic fusion events during development and upon perturbation can result in birth defects. Cleft palate and neural tube defects can result from genetic defects or environmental exposures during development, yet very little is known abo...

  11. Assessment of the quality of test results from selected civil engineering material testing laboratories in Tanzania

    Mbawala, SJ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Civil and geotechnical engineering material testing laboratories are expected to produce accurate and reliable test results. However, the ability of laboratories to produce accurate and reliable test results depends on many factors, among others...

  12. Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The on-ground and Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System (DiRETHMS) provides a system architecture and software tools for performing diagnostics...

  13. Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging the Phase I achievements of the Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System (DiRETHMS) including its software toolsets and system building...

  14. Performance test of personal RF monitor for area monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion facility

    Tanaka, M.; Uda, T.; Wang, J.; Fujiwara, O.

    2012-01-01

    For safety management at a magnetic confinement fusion-test facility, protection from not only ionising radiation, but also non-ionising radiation such as the leakage of static magnetic and electromagnetic fields is an important issue. Accordingly, the use of a commercially available personal RF monitor for multipoint area monitoring is proposed. In this study, the performance of both fast- and slow-type personal RF monitors was investigated by using a transverse electromagnetic cell system. The range of target frequencies was between 10 and 300 MHz, corresponding to the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a fusion device. The personal RF monitor was found to have good linearity, frequency dependence and isotropic response. However, the time constant for the electric field sensor of the slow-type monitor was much longer than that for the fast-type monitor. Considering the time-varying field at the facility, it is found that the fast-type monitor is suitable for multipoint monitoring at magnetic confinement fusion test facilities. (authors)

  15. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor D-T modifications and operations

    1992-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, in support of the Department of Energy's proposal for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) D-T program. The objective of the proposed D-T program is to take the initial step in studying the effects of alpha particle heating and transport in a magnetic fusion device. These studies would enable the successful completion of the original TFTR program objectives, and would support the research and development needs of the Burning Plasma Experiment, BPX (formerly the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT)) and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in the areas of alpha particle physics, tritium retention, alpha particle diagnostic development, and tritium handling

  16. Development of the rf linear accelerator test bed for heavy-ion fusion

    Watson, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The amount of absorbed energy required by high gain deuterium-tritium targets for inertial confinement fusion reactors is now projected to be greater than 1 Megajoule. It has become apparent that a heavy ion fusion driver is the preferred choice in this scenario. To demonstrate this accelerator-based option, the national program has established two test beds: one at Argonne for the rf linac/storage ring approach, and one at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory developing an induction linac. The Argonne Beam Development Facility (BDF) would consist of a 40 mA rf linac for Xe + 8 , a storage ring, and a 10 GeV synchrotron. The design and status of the BDF is described as well as future program options to demonstrate as many solutions as possible of the issues involved in this approach

  17. Engineering testing requirements in FED/INTOR

    Abdou, M.A.; Nygren, R.E.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.A.; Wire, G.; Oppermann, E.; Puigh, R.; Gold, R.E.

    1982-10-01

    The FED/INTOR critical issues activity has addressed three key testing requirements that have the largest impact on the design, operation and cost of FED/INTOR. These are: (1) the total testing time (fluence) during the device lifetime, (2) the minimum number of back-to-back cycles, and (3) the neutron wall load (power density in the first wall/blanket). The testing program activities were structured into three tasks in order to define the benefits, and in some cases, costs and risks of these testing requirements. The three tasks were carried out with wide participation of experts from a number of organizations in the United States. Similar effort was performed by Japan, the European Community and the Soviet Union

  18. Mechanical behavior of the mirror fusion test Facility superconducting magnet coils

    Horvath, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical response to winding and electromagnetic loads of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) superconducting coil pack is presented. The 375-ton (3300 N) MFTF Yin-Yang magnet, presently the world's largest superconducting magnet, is scheduled for acceptance cold-testing in May of 1981. The assembly is made up of two identical coils which together contain over 15 miles (24 km) of superconductor wound in 58 consecutive layers of 24 turns each. Topics associated with mechanical behavior include physical properties of the coil pack and its components, winding pre-load effects, finite element analysis, magnetic load redistribution, and the design impact of predicted conductor motion

  19. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    M.E. Lumia; C.A. Gentile

    2002-01-01

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed

  20. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Lumia, M E

    2002-01-01

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  1. Local control station for development, testing and maintenance of mirror fusion facility subsystem controls

    Ables, E.; Kelly, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    A Local Control Station (LCS) was designed and built to provide a simplified ad easily configurable means of controlling any Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) subsystem for the purpose of development, testing and maintenance of the subsystem. All MFTF-B Subsystems incorporate at least one Local Control Computer (LCC) that is connected to and accepts high level commands from one of the Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System (SCDS) computers. The LCS connects directly to the LCC in place of SCDS. The LCS communicates with the subsystem hardware using the same SCDS commands that the local control computer recognizes and as such requires no special configuration of the LCC

  2. Built-In Test Engine For Memory Test

    McEvoy, Paul; Farrell, Ronan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we will present an on-chip method for testing high performance memory devices, that occupies minimal area and retains full flexibility. This is achieved through microcode test instructions and the associated on-chip state machine. In addition, the proposed methodology will enable at-speed testing of memory devices. The relevancy of this work is placed in context with an introduction to memory testing and the techniques and algorithms generally used today.

  3. History and Benefits of Engine Level Testing Throughout the Space Shuttle Main Engine Program

    VanHooser, Katherine; Kan, Kenneth; Maddux, Lewis; Runkle, Everett

    2010-01-01

    Rocket engine testing is important throughout a program s life and is essential to the overall success of the program. Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) testing can be divided into three phases: development, certification, and operational. Development tests are conducted on the basic design and are used to develop safe start and shutdown transients and to demonstrate mainstage operation. This phase helps form the foundation of the program, demands navigation of a very steep learning curve, and yields results that shape the final engine design. Certification testing involves multiple engine samples and more aggressive test profiles that explore the boundaries of the engine to vehicle interface requirements. The hardware being tested may have evolved slightly from that in the development phase. Operational testing is conducted with mature hardware and includes acceptance testing of flight assets, resolving anomalies that occur in flight, continuing to expand the performance envelope, and implementing design upgrades. This paper will examine these phases of testing and their importance to the SSME program. Examples of tests conducted in each phase will also be presented.

  4. Environmental Testing of the NEXT PM1 Ion Engine

    Synder, John S.; Anderson, John R.; VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Soulas, George C.

    2008-01-01

    The NEXT propulsion system is an advanced ion propulsion system presently under development that is oriented towards robotic exploration of the solar system using solar electric power. The Prototype Model engine PM1 was subjected to qualification-level environmental testing to demonstrate compatibility with environments representative of anticipated mission requirements. Random vibration testing, conducted with the thruster mated to the breadboard gimbal, was executed at 10.0 Grms for 2 minutes in each of three axes. Thermal-vacuum testing included a deep cold soak of the engine to temperatures of -168 C and thermal cycling from -120 to 203 C. Although the testing was largely successful, several issues were identified including the fragmentation of potting cement on the discharge and neutralizer cathode heater terminations during vibration which led to abbreviated thermal testing, and generation of particulate contamination from manufacturing processes and engine materials. Thruster performance was nominal throughout the test program, with minor variations in some engine operating parameters likely caused by facility effects. In general, the NEXT PM1 engine and the breadboard gimbal were found to be well-designed against environmental requirements based on the results reported herein. After resolution of the findings from this test program the hardware environmental qualification program can proceed with confidence.

  5. Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report

    Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen B.K.; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John G.H.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S.K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

  6. Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report

    Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-12-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

  7. Fusion Energy Update

    Whitson, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    Fusion Energy Update (CFU) provides monthly abstracting and indexing coverage of current scientific and technical reports, journal articles, conference papers and proceedings, books, patents, theses, and monographs for all sources on fusion energy. All information announced in CFU, plus additional backup information, is included in the energy information data base of the Department of Energy's Technical Information Center. The subject matter covered by CFU includes plasma physics, the physics and engineering of blankets, magnet coils and fields, power supplies and circuitry, cooling systems, fuel systems, radiation hazards, power conversion systems, inertial confinement systems, and component development and testing

  8. Lean mixture engine testing and evaluation program. [for automobile engine pollution and fuel performances

    Dowdy, M. W.; Hoehn, F. W.; Griffin, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental results for fuel consumption and emissions are presented for a 350 CID (5.7 liter) Chevrolet V-8 engine modified for lean operation with gasoline. The lean burn engine achieved peak thermal efficiency at an equivalence ratio of 0.75 and a spark advance of 60 deg BTDC. At this condition the lean burn engine demonstrated a 10% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption compared with the stock engine; however, NOx and hydrocarbon emissions were higher. With the use of spark retard and/or slightly lower equivalence ratios, the NOx emissions performance of the stock engine was matched while showing a 6% reduction in brake specific fuel consumption. Hydrocarbon emissions exceeded the stock values in all cases. Diagnostic data indicate that lean performance in the engine configuration tested is limited by ignition delay, cycle-to-cycle pressure variations, and cylinder-to-cylinder distribution.

  9. Alvar engine. An engine with variable compression ratio. Experiments and tests

    Erlandsson, Olof

    1998-09-01

    This report is focused on tests with Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) engines, according to the Alvar engine principle. Variable compression ratio means an engine design where it is possible to change the nominal compression ratio. The purpose is to increase the fuel efficiency at part load by increasing the compression ratio. At maximum load, and maybe supercharging with for example turbocharger, it is not possible to keep a high compression ratio because of the knock phenomena. Knock is a shock wave caused by self-ignition of the fuel-air mix. If knock occurs, the engine will be exposed to a destructive load. Because of the reasons mentioned it would be an advantage if it would be possible to change the compression ratio continuously when the load changes. The Alvar engine provides a solution for variable compression ratio based on well-known engine components. This paper provides information about efficiency and emission characteristics from tests with two Alvar engines. Results from tests with a phase shift mechanism (for automatic compression ratio control) for the Alvar engine are also reviewed Examination paper. 5 refs, 23 figs, 2 tabs, 5 appendices

  10. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    Garrison, L. M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov; Egle, B. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Zenobia, S. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA–500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 10{sup 14} ions/(cm{sup 2} s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  11. Superconductivity Engineering and Its Application for Fusion 3.Superconducting Technology as a Gateway to Future Technology

    Asano, Katsuhiko

    Hopes for achieving a new source of energy through nuclear fusion rest on the development of superconducting technology that is needed to make future equipments more energy efficient as well as increase their performance. Superconducting technology has made progress in a wide variety of fields, such as energy, life science, electronics, industrial use and environmental improvement. It enables the actualization of equipment that was unachievable with conventional technology, and will sustain future “IT-Based Quality Life Style”, “Sustainable Environmental” and “Advanced Healthcare” society. Besides coil technology with high magnetic field performance, superconducting electoronics or device technology, such as SQUID and SFQ-circuit, high temperature superconducting material and advanced cryogenics technology might be great significance in the history of nuclear fusion which requires so many wide, high and ultra technology. Superconducting technology seems to be the catalyst for a changing future society with nuclear fusion. As society changes, so will superconducting technology.

  12. Genetic engineering with tobacco protoplasts. [Hybridization by fusion of leaf protoplasts

    Smith, H H

    1976-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization by fusion of leaf protoplasts of Nicotiana glauca (GG) and N. langsdorffii (LL) was confirmed and extended. Enzymatic digestion of leaf tissues to obtain protoplats was followed by fusion with the aid of polyethylene glycol. The hybrid calli were selected by their better growth on defined culture media. Mature hybrid plants were identified by their morphology and tumor formation. Cytological examination revealed a range in chromosome numbers from 56 to 64 rather than the amphiploid GGLL number of 42. About 75 percent of the hybrids were fertile. The potential range in combining widely disparate genotypes by somatic cell fusion was demonstrated by fusing tobacco GGLL protoplasts with human HeLa cells. The HeLa nucleus was observed inside the plant protoplasts, thus forming an interkingdom heterokaryon.

  13. Neutronic design of pulse operation simulating device for in-pile functional test of fusion blanket by MCNP

    Nagao, Yoshiharu; Nakamichi, Masaru; Kawamura, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The pulse operation of a fusion reactor can be simulated in a fission reactor by controlling the neutron flux entering a test section by using a rotating 'hollow cylinder with window' made of hafnium. The rotating cylinder is installed between the test section and the fixed outer neutron absorber cylinder and is also made of hafnium with an opening in the direction to the core center. For gathering engineering data for the tritium breeding blanket such as characteristics of temperature change, tritium release and recovery, etc., it is desirable that the ratio of minimum to maximum thermal neutron fluxes is greater than 1:10. Design calculations were performed for the test assembly which considered local neutronic effects and the mechanical constraints of the device. From the results of these calculations, the ratio of minimum to maximum thermal neutron flux under irradiation would be about 1:10 using a pulse operation simulating device which has a thickness of 6.5 mm and a 150deg window angle for the rotating hollow cylinder and 5.0 mm in thickness of fixed neutron absorber. (author)

  14. Preparations for deuterium tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, G.

    1994-04-01

    The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinet trademark system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium-deuterium (D-D) run to simulate expected deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D-T experiments using D-D have been performed. The physics objectives of D-T operation are production of ∼ 10 megawatts (MW) of fusion power, evaluation of confinement and heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas, evaluation of α-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined α-particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D-T experiments are reviewed

  15. SUPER-FMIT, an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing

    Burke, R.J.; Holmes, J.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Mann, F.M.; Miles, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    The SUPER-FMIT facility is proposed as an advanced accelerator based neutron source for high flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. There, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1 ampere beam of 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high flux (> 10 14 n/cm 2 -s) testing in SUPER-FMIT would be 14 liters, about a factor of 30 larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35 MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1.0 amperes or more. Such a large increase can be accomplished by acceleration of multiple beams of molecular deuterium ions (D 2 +) to 70 MeV in a common accelerator sructure. The availability of multiple beams and large total current allows great variety in the testing that can be done. For example, fluxes greater than 10 16 n/cm 2 -s, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring of spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved

  16. Spacecraft Testing Programs: Adding Value to the Systems Engineering Process

    Britton, Keith J.; Schaible, Dawn M.

    2011-01-01

    Testing has long been recognized as a critical component of spacecraft development activities - yet many major systems failures may have been prevented with more rigorous testing programs. The question is why is more testing not being conducted? Given unlimited resources, more testing would likely be included in a spacecraft development program. Striking the right balance between too much testing and not enough has been a long-term challenge for many industries. The objective of this paper is to discuss some of the barriers, enablers, and best practices for developing and sustaining a strong test program and testing team. This paper will also explore the testing decision factors used by managers; the varying attitudes toward testing; methods to develop strong test engineers; and the influence of behavior, culture and processes on testing programs. KEY WORDS: Risk, Integration and Test, Validation, Verification, Test Program Development

  17. MCO Engineering Test Report Fuel Basket Handling Grapple Acceptance Test

    CHENAULT, D.M.

    2000-01-01

    Acceptance testing of the production SNF Fuel Basket lift grapples to the required 150 percent maximum lift load is documented herein. The report shows the results affirming the proof test passage. The primary objective of this test was to confirm the load rating of the grapple per applicable requirements of ANSI 14 6 American National Standard For Radioactive Materials Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10,000 pounds (4500kg) or More. The above Standard requires a load test of 150% of the design load which must be held for a minimum of 10 minutes followed by a Liquid Penetrant or Magnetic Particle examination of critical areas and welds in accordance with the ANSI/ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code 1989 Section 111 Division 1 section NF 5350

  18. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year

  19. The Design and Testing of a Miniature Turbofan Engine

    Cosentino, Gary B.; Murray, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Off-the-shelf jet propulsion in the 50 - 500 lb thrust class sparse. A true twin-spool turbofan in this range does not exist. Adapting an off-the-shelf turboshaft engine is feasible. However the approx.10 Hp SPT5 can t quite make 50 lbs. of thrust. Packaging and integration is challenging, especially the exhaust. Building on our engine using a 25 Hp turboshaft seems promising if the engine becomes available. Test techniques used, though low cost, adequate for the purpose.

  20. Human factors evaluation of the engineering test reactor control room

    Banks, W.W.; Boone, M.P.

    1981-03-01

    The Reactor and Process Control Rooms at the Engineering Test Reactor were evaluated by a team of human factors engineers using available human factors design criteria. During the evaluation, ETR, equipment and facilities were compared with MIL-STD-1472-B, Human Engineering design Criteria for Military Systems. The focus of recommendations centered on: (a) displays and controls; placing displays and controls in functional groups; (b) establishing a consistent color coding (in compliance with a standard if possible); (c) systematizing annunciator alarms and reducing their number; (d) organizing equipment in functional groups; and (e) modifying labeling and lines of demarcation

  1. A Hydrogen Containment Process for Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground testing

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a new total hydrogen containment process to enable the testing required for NTP engine development. This H2 removal process comprises of two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a shell-and-tube type of heat exchanger. This new process is demonstrated by simulation of the steady state operation of the engine firing at nominal conditions.

  2. Vent rate of superconducting magnets during quench in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Slack, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    When a superconducting magnet goes normal, resistive heating in the conductor evaporates surrounding LHe, which must be vented. The nature and speed at which the magnet goes normal and He is vented are not subject to rigorous analysis. This paper presents vent data from an existing magnet. An approximate mathematical model is derived and fitted to the data to permit scaling of vent requirements to larger size magnets. The worst case models of the vent employed in Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) cryogenic system design are also presented

  3. Genetically engineered endostatin-lidamycin fusion proteins effectively inhibit tumor growth and metastasis

    Jiang, Wen-guo; Zhen, Yong-su; Lu, Xin-an; Shang, Bo-yang; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Sheng-hua; Zhou, Daifu; Li, Liang; Li, Yi; Luo, Yongzhang

    2013-01-01

    Endostatin (ES) inhibits endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tube formation. It also shows antiangiogenesis and antitumor activities in several animal models. Endostatin specifically targets tumor vasculature to block tumor growth. Lidamycin (LDM), which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a non-covalently bound apo-protein (LDP), is a member of chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics with extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Therefore, we reasoned that endostatin-lidamycin (ES-LDM) fusion proteins upon energizing with enediyne chromophore may obtain the combined capability targeting tumor vasculature and tumor cell by respective ES and LDM moiety. In this study, we designed and obtained two new endostatin-based fusion proteins, endostatin-LDP (ES-LDP) and LDP-endostatin (LDP-ES). In vitro, the antiangiogenic effect of fusion proteins was determined by the wound healing assay and tube formation assay and the cytotoxicity of their enediyne-energized analogs was evaluated by CCK-8 assay. Tissue microarray was used to analyze the binding affinity of LDP, ES or ES-LDP with specimens of human lung tissue and lung tumor. The in vivo efficacy of the fusion proteins was evaluated with human lung carcinoma PG-BE1 xenograft and the experimental metastasis model of 4T1-luc breast cancer. ES-LDP and LDP-ES disrupted the formation of endothelial tube structures and inhibited endothelial cell migration. Evidently, ES-LDP accumulated in the tumor and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis. ES-LDP and ES show higher binding capability than LDP to lung carcinoma; in addition, ES-LDP and ES share similar binding capability. Furthermore, the enediyne-energized fusion protein ES-LDP-AE demonstrated significant efficacy against lung carcinoma xenograft in athymic mice. The ES-based fusion protein therapy provides some fundamental information for further drug development. Targeting both tumor vasculature and tumor cells by endostatin

  4. Comparison of nuclear irradiation parameters of fusion breeder materials in high flux fission test reactors and a fusion power demonstration reactor

    Fischer, U.; Herring, S.; Hogenbirk, A.; Leichtle, D.; Nagao, Y.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Ying, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear irradiation parameters relevant to displacement damage and burn-up of the breeder materials Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 have been evaluated and compared for a fusion power demonstration reactor and the high flux fission test reactor (HFR), Petten, the advanced test reactor (ATR, INEL) and the Japanese material test reactor (JMTR, JAERI). Based on detailed nuclear reactor calculations with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and binary collision approximation (BCA) computer simulations of the displacement damage in the polyatomic lattices with MARLOWE, it has been investigated how well the considered HFRs can meet the requirements for a fusion power reactor relevant irradiation. It is shown that a breeder material irradiation in these fission test reactors is well suited in this regard when the neutron spectrum is well tailored and the 6 Li-enrichment is properly chosen. Requirements for the relevant nuclear irradiation parameters such as the displacement damage accumulation, the lithium burn-up and the damage production function W(T) can be met when taking into account these prerequisites. Irradiation times in the order of 2-3 full power years are necessary for the HFR to achieve the peak values of the considered fusion power Demo reactor blanket with regard to the burn-up and, at the same time, the dpa accumulation

  5. Data Fusion Modeling for an RT3102 and Dewetron System Application in Hybrid Vehicle Stability Testing

    Zhibin Miao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available More and more hybrid electric vehicles are driven since they offer such advantages as energy savings and better active safety performance. Hybrid vehicles have two or more power driving systems and frequently switch working condition, so controlling stability is very important. In this work, a two-stage Kalman algorithm method is used to fuse data in hybrid vehicle stability testing. First, the RT3102 navigation system and Dewetron system are introduced. Second, a modeling of data fusion is proposed based on the Kalman filter. Then, this modeling is simulated and tested on a sample vehicle, using Carsim and Simulink software to test the results. The results showed the merits of this modeling.

  6. Present status of nuclear fusion research and development

    Discussions are included on the following topics: (1) plasma confinement theoretical research, (2) torus plasma research, (3) plasma measurement research, (4) technical development of equipment, (5) plasma heating, (6) vacuum wall surface phenomena, (7) critical plasma test equipment design, (8) noncircular cross-sectional torus test equipment design, (9) nuclear fusion reactor design, (10) nuclear fusion reactor engineering, (11) summary of nuclear fusion research in foreign countries, and (12) long range plan in Japan

  7. Modeling and fuzzy control of the engine coolant conditioning system in an IC engine test bed

    Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Shirazi, Farzad A.; Javaheri, Ahmad; Nava, Ghodrat Hamze

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical and thermodynamical performance of internal combustion engines is significantly affected by the engine working temperature. In an engine test bed, the internal combustion engines are tested in different operating conditions using a dynamometer. It is required that the engine temperature be controlled precisely, particularly in transient states. This precise control can be achieved by an engine coolant conditioning system mainly consisting of a heat exchanger, a control valve, and a controller. In this study, constitutive equations of the system are derived first. These differential equations show the second- order nonlinear time-varying dynamics of the system. The model is validated with the experimental data providing satisfactory results. After presenting the dynamic equations of the system, a fuzzy controller is designed based on our prior knowledge of the system. The fuzzy rules and the membership functions are derived by a trial and error and heuristic method. Because of the nonlinear nature of the system the fuzzy rules are set to satisfy the requirements of the temperature control for different operating conditions of the engine. The performance of the fuzzy controller is compared with a PI one for different transient conditions. The results of the simulation show the better performance of the fuzzy controller. The main advantages of the fuzzy controller are the shorter settling time, smaller overshoot, and improved performance especially in the transient states of the system

  8. Analysis and test of insulated components for rotary engine

    Badgley, Patrick R.; Doup, Douglas; Kamo, Roy

    1989-01-01

    The direct-injection stratified-charge (DISC) rotary engine, while attractive for aviation applications due to its light weight, multifuel capability, and potentially low fuel consumption, has until now required a bulky and heavy liquid-cooling system. NASA-Lewis has undertaken the development of a cooling system-obviating, thermodynamically superior adiabatic rotary engine employing state-of-the-art thermal barrier coatings to thermally insulate engine components. The thermal barrier coating material for the cast aluminum, stainless steel, and ductile cast iron components was plasma-sprayed zirconia. DISC engine tests indicate effective thermal barrier-based heat loss reduction, but call for superior coefficient-of-thermal-expansion matching of materials and better tribological properties in the coatings used.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A PRE-PROTOTYPE RAMGEN ENGINE

    Aaron Koopman

    2003-07-01

    The research and development effort of a new kind of compressor and engine is presented. The superior performance of these two products arises from the superior performance of rotating supersonic shock-wave compression. Several tasks were performed in compliance with the DOE award objectives. A High Risk Technology review was conducted and evaluated by a team of 20 senior engineers and scientists representing various branches of the federal government. The conceptual design of a compression test rig, test rotors, and test cell adaptor was completed. The work conducted lays the foundation for the completed design and testing of the compression test rig, and the design of a supersonic shock-wave compressor matched to a conventional combustor and turbine.

  10. (Fusion energy research)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer.

  11. [Fusion energy research

    Phillips, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY88); tokamak fusion test reactor; Princeton beta Experiment-Modification; S-1 Spheromak; current drive experiment; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical plasma; tokamak modeling; compact ignition tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; Engineering Department; Project Planning and Safety Office; quality assurance and reliability; and technology transfer

  12. 14 CFR 33.96 - Engine tests in auxiliary power unit (APU) mode.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine tests in auxiliary power unit (APU... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.96 Engine tests in auxiliary power unit (APU) mode. If the engine is designed with a propeller brake which...

  13. Tests of the Daimler D-IVa Engine at a High Altitude Test Bench

    Noack, W G

    1920-01-01

    Reports of tests of a Daimler IVa engine at the test-bench at Friedrichshafen, show that the decrease of power of that engine, at high altitudes, was established, and that the manner of its working when air is supplied at a certain pressure was explained. These tests were preparatory to the installation of compressors in giant aircraft for the purpose of maintaining constant power at high altitudes.

  14. Software for Preprocessing Data from Rocket-Engine Tests

    Cheng, Chiu-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Three computer programs have been written to preprocess digitized outputs of sensors during rocket-engine tests at Stennis Space Center (SSC). The programs apply exclusively to the SSC E test-stand complex and utilize the SSC file format. The programs are the following: Engineering Units Generator (EUGEN) converts sensor-output-measurement data to engineering units. The inputs to EUGEN are raw binary test-data files, which include the voltage data, a list identifying the data channels, and time codes. EUGEN effects conversion by use of a file that contains calibration coefficients for each channel. QUICKLOOK enables immediate viewing of a few selected channels of data, in contradistinction to viewing only after post-test processing (which can take 30 minutes to several hours depending on the number of channels and other test parameters) of data from all channels. QUICKLOOK converts the selected data into a form in which they can be plotted in engineering units by use of Winplot (a free graphing program written by Rick Paris). EUPLOT provides a quick means for looking at data files generated by EUGEN without the necessity of relying on the PV-WAVE based plotting software.

  15. Deuterium-tritium plasmas in novel regimes in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Bell, M.G.; Beer, M.

    1997-02-01

    Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have explored several novel regimes of improved tokamak confinement in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas, including plasmas with reduced or reversed magnetic shear in the core and high-current plasmas with increased shear in the outer region (high-l i ). New techniques have also been developed to enhance the confinement in these regimes by modifying the plasma-limiter interaction through in-situ deposition of lithium. In reversed-shear plasmas, transitions to enhanced confinement have been observed at plasma currents up to 2.2 MA (q a ∼ 4.3), accompanied by the formation of internal transport barriers, where large radial gradients develop in the temperature and density profiles. Experiments have been performed to elucidate the mechanism of the barrier formation and its relationship with the magnetic configuration and with the heating characteristics. The increased stability of high-current, high-l i plasmas produced by rapid expansion of the minor cross-section, coupled with improvement in the confinement by lithium deposition has enabled the achievement of high fusion power, up to 8.7 MW, with D-T neutral beam heating. The physics of fusion alpha-particle confinement has been investigated in these regimes, including the interactions of the alphas with endogenous plasma instabilities and externally applied waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In D-T plasmas with q 0 > 1 and weak magnetic shear in the central region, a toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability driven purely by the alpha particles has been observed for the first time. The interactions of energetic ions with ion Bernstein waves produced by mode-conversion from fast waves in mixed-species plasmas have been studied as a possible mechanism for transferring the energy of the alphas to fuel ions

  16. Heat pulse propagation studies on DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Austin, M. E.; Groebner, R.; Manickam, J.; Rice, B.; Schmidt, G.; Snider, R.

    2000-12-01

    Sawtooth phenomena have been studied on DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D. Meade and the TFTR Group, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion, Washington, DC, 1990 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1991), Vol. 1, pp. 9-24]. In the experiments the sawtooth characteristics were studied with fast electron temperature (ECE) and soft x-ray diagnostics. For the first time, measurements of a strong ballistic electron heat pulse were made in a shaped tokamak (DIII-D) [J. Luxon and DIII-D Group, in Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Kyoto (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159] and the "ballistic effect" was stronger than was previously reported on TFTR. Evidence is presented in this paper that the ballistic effect is related to the fast growth phase of the sawtooth precursor. Fast, 2 ms interval, measurements on DIII-D were made of the ion temperature evolution following sawteeth and partial sawteeth to document the ion heat pulse characteristics. It is found that the ion heat pulse does not exhibit the very fast, "ballistic" behavior seen for the electrons. Further, for the first time it is shown that the electron heat pulses from partial sawtooth crashes (on DIII-D and TFTR) are seen to propagate at speeds close to those expected from the power balance calculations of the thermal diffusivities whereas heat pulses from fishbones propagate at rates more consistent with sawtooth induced heat pulses. These results suggest that the fast propagation of sawtooth-induced heat pulses is not a feature of nonlinear transport models, but that magnetohydrodynamic events can have a strong effect on electron thermal transport.

  17. Pratt & Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) Engine Test in 40x80ft w.t.: Engineers Peter

    1993-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) Engine Test in 40x80ft w.t.: Engineers Peter Zell (left) and Dr Clifton Horne (right) are shown preparing a laser light sheet for a flow visualization test. Shown standing in the nacelle of the ADP is John Girvin, senior test engineer for Pratt & Whitney.

  18. Investigation of high flux test module for the international fusion materials irradiation facilities (IFMIF)

    Miyashita, Makoto; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2007-03-01

    This report describes investigation on structure of a high neutron flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facilities (IFMIF). The HFTM is aimed for neutron irradiation of a specimen in a high neutron flux domain of the test cell for irradiation ground of IFMIF. We investigated the overall structure of the HFTM that was able to include specimens in a rig and thermocouple arrangement, an interface of control signal and support structure. Moreover, pressure and the amount of the bend in the module vessel (a rectangular section pressure vessel) were calculated. The module vessel did a rectangular section from limitation of a high neutron flux domain. Also, we investigated damage of thermocouples under neutron irradiation, which was a temperature sensor of irradiation materials temperature control demanded high precision. Based on these results, drawings on the HTFM structure. (author)

  19. Tools and methods for implementing the control systems on the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Minor, E.G.; Labiak, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Installation of the major hardware subsystems for MFTF is nearing completion. These subsystems include the Fusion Chamber System, the eighty KV Neutral Beam System, the Superconducting Magnet System, and the Personnel Safety System. The Local Controls group has undertaken a uniform aproach to implementing the control systems for all of these hardware subsystems. This approach has two major aspects: (1) to provide a stand-alone computer control system with a remote, portable terminal so that computer control can be provided at the site of the hardware for initial testing, (2) to provide hardware simulators so that the complicated MFTF computer control system can be tested independent of the hardware. The software and hardware tools which were developed to carry out this plan will be described. Our experiences with bringing up subsystems containing up to 900 separate channels of control and status will also be described

  20. The Mirror Fusion Test Facility cryogenic system: Performance, management approach, and present equipment status

    Slack, D.S.; Chronis, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a 14-kW, 4.35-K helium refrigeration system that proved to be highly successful and cost-effective. All operating objectives were met, while remaining within a few percent of initial cost and schedule plans. The management approach used in MFTF allowed decisions to be made quickly and effectively, and it helped keep costs down. Manpower levels, extent and type of industrial participation, key aspects of subcontractor specifications, and subcontractor interactions are reviewed, as well as highlights of the system tests, operation, and present equipment status. Organizations planning large, high-technology systems may benefit from this experience with the MFTF cryogenic system

  1. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Cryogen System Engineering Checkout Test

    Olsen, A. D; Cady, E. C.; Jenkins, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    The Solar Thermal Upper Stage technology (STUSTD) program is a solar thermal propulsion technology program cooperatively sponsored by a Boeing led team and by NASA MSFC. A key element of its technology program is development of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage and supply system which employs multi-layer insulation, liquid acquisition devices, active and passive thermodynamic vent systems, and variable 40W tank heaters to reliably provide near constant pressure H2 to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity of space operation. The LH2 storage and supply system is designed to operate as a passive, pressure fed supply system at a constant pressure of about 45 psia. During operation of the solar thermal engine over a small portion of the orbit the LH2 storage and supply system propulsively vents through the enjoy at a controlled flowrate. During the long coast portion of the orbit, the LH2 tank is locked up (unvented). Thus, all of the vented H2 flow is used in the engine for thrust and none is wastefully vented overboard. The key to managing the tank pressure and therefore the H2 flow to the engine is to manage and balance the energy flow into the LH2 tank with the MLI and tank heaters with the energy flow out of the LH2 tank through the vented H2 flow. A moderate scale (71 cu ft) LH2 storage and supply system was installed and insulated at the NASA MSFC Test Area 300. The operation of the system is described in this paper. The test program for the LH2 system consisted of two parts: 1) a series of engineering tests to characterize the performance of the various components in the system: and 2) a 30-day simulation of a complete LEO and GEO transfer mission. This paper describes the results of the engineering tests, and correlates these results with analytical models used to design future advanced Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicles.

  2. In-situ Tritium Measurements of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Bumper Limiter Tiles Post D-T Operations

    C.A. Gentile; C.H. Skinner; K.M. Young; M. Nishi; S. Langish; et al

    1999-01-01

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) Engineering and Research Staff in collaboration with members of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Tritium Engineering Laboratory have commenced in-situ tritium measurements of the TFTR bumper limiter. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) operated with tritium from 1993 to 1997. During this time ∼ 53,000 Ci of tritium was injected into the TFTR vacuum vessel. After the cessation of TFTR plasma operations in April 1997 an aggressive tritium cleanup campaign lasting ∼ 3 months was initiated. The TFTR vacuum vessel was subjected to a regimen of glow discharge cleaning (GDC) and dry nitrogen and ''moist air'' purges. Currently ∼ 7,500 Ci of tritium remains in the vacuum vessel largely contained in the limiter tiles. The TFTR limiter is composed of 1,920 carbon tiles with an average weight of ∼ 600 grams each. The location and distribution of tritium on the TFTR carbon tiles are of considerable interest. Future magnetically confined fusion devices employing carbon as a limiter material may be considerably constrained due to potentially large tritium inventories being tenaciously held on the surface of the tiles. In-situ tritium measurements were conducted in TFTR bay L during August and November 1998. During the bay L measurement campaign open wall ion chambers and ultra thin thermoluminscent dosimeters (TLD) affixed to a boom and end effector were deployed into the vacuum vessel. The detectors were designed to make contact with the surface of the bumper limiter tile and to provide either real time (ion chamber) or passive (TLD) indication of the surface tritium concentration. The open wall ion chambers were positioned onto the surface of the tile in a manner which employed the surface of the tile as one of the walls of the chamber. The ion chambers, which are (electrically) gamma insensitive, were landed at four positions per tile. The geometry for landing the TLD's provided measurement at 24

  3. Assessment of the gas dynamic trap mirror facility as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations

    Fischer, U.; Moeslang, A.; Ivanov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The gas dynamic trap (GDT) mirror machine has been proposed by the Budker Institute of nuclear physics, Novosibirsk, as a volumetric neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. On the basis of the GDT plasma confinement concept, 14 MeV neutrons are generated at high production rates in the two end sections of the axially symmetrical central mirror cell, serving as suitable irradiation test regions. In this paper, we present an assessment of the GDT as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. This includes comparisons to irradiation conditions in fusion reactor systems (ITER, Demo) and the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), as well as a conceptual design for a helium-cooled tubular test assembly elaborated for the largest of the two test zones taking proper account of neutronics, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical aspects. This tubular test assembly incorporates ten rigs of about 200 cm length used for inserting instrumented test capsules with miniaturized specimens taking advantage of the 'small specimen test technology'. The proposed design allows individual temperatures in each of the rigs, and active heating systems inside the capsules ensures specimen temperature stability even during beam-off periods. The major concern is about the maximum achievable dpa accumulation of less than 15 dpa per full power year on the basis of the present design parameters of the GDT neutron source. A design upgrading is proposed to allow for higher neutron wall loadings in the material test regions

  4. Stennis Holds Last Planned Space Shuttle Engine Test

    2009-01-01

    With 520 seconds of shake, rattle and roar on July 29, 2009 NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center marked the end of an era for testing the space shuttle main engines that have powered the nation's Space Shuttle Program for nearly three decades.

  5. Two methodologies for physical penetration testing using social engineering

    Dimkov, T.; Pieters, Wolter; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2009-01-01

    During a penetration test on the physical security of an organization, if social engineering is used, the penetration tester directly interacts with the employees. These interactions are usually based on deception and if not done properly can upset the employees, violate their privacy or damage

  6. Engineering development testing of the GPHS-RTG converter

    Cockfield, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The GPHS-RTG will provide electrical power for the Galileo orbiter and for the two spacecraft of the International Solar Polar Mission. The GPHS-RTG consists of two primary assemblies: the General Purpose Heat Source, and the converter. This paper deals only with the converter, and highlights engineering tests that provide support for its design development

  7. Product evaluation of in situ vitrification engineering, Test 4

    Loehr, C.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Bates, S.O.

    1991-09-01

    This report is one of several that evaluates the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Engineering-Scale Test 4 (ES-4). This document describes the chemical and physical composition, microstructure, and leaching characteristics of ES-4 product samples; these data provide insight into the expected performance of a vitrified product in an ISV buried waste application similar to that studied in ES-4

  8. Operation of the tokamak fusion test reactor tritium systems during initial tritium experiments

    Anderson, J.L.; Gentile, C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kozub, T.; LaMarche, P.; Murray, H.; Nagy, A.; Raftopoulos, S.; Rossmassler, R.; Sissingh, R.; Swanson, J.; Tulipano, F.; Viola, M.; Voorhees, D.; Walters, R.T.

    1995-01-01

    The high power D-T experiments on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory commenced in November 1993. During initial operation of the tritium systems a number of start-up problems surfaced and had to be corrected. These were corrected through a series of system modifications and upgrades and by repair of failed or inadequate components. Even as these operational concerns were being addressed, the tritium systems continued to support D-T operations on the tokamak. During the first six months of D-T operations more than 107kCi of tritium were processed successfully by the tritium systems. D-T experiments conducted at TFTR during this period provided significant new data. Fusion power in excess of 9MW was achieved in May 1994. This paper describes some of the early start-up issues, and reports on the operation of the tritium system and the tritium tracking and accounting system during the early phase of TFTR D-T experiments. (orig.)

  9. A spheromak ignition experiment reusing Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) equipment

    Fowler, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    Based on available experimental results and theory, a scenario is presented to achieve ohmic ignition in a spheromak by slow (∼ 10 sec.) helicity injection using power from the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) substation. Some of the other parts needed (vacuum vessel, coils, power supplies, pumps, shielded building space) might also be obtained from MFTF or other salvage, as well as some components needed for intermediate experiments for additional verification of the concept (especially confinement scaling). The proposed ignition experiment would serve as proof-of-principle for the spheromak DT fusion reactor design published by Hagenson and Krakowski, with a nuclear island cost about ten times less than a tokamak of comparable power. Designs at even higher power density and lower cost might be possible using Christofilos' concept of a liquid lithium blanket. Since all structures would be protected from neutrons by the lithium blanket and the tritium inventory can be reduced by continuous removal from the liquid blanket, environmental and safety characteristics appear to be favorable

  10. New engine method for biodiesel cetane number testing

    Pešić Radivoje B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Substitution of fossil fuels with fuels that come from part renewable sources has been a subject of many studies and researches in the past decade. Considering the higher cost and limits of production resources, a special attention is focused on raising the energy efficiency of biofuel usage, mainly through optimization of the combustion process. Consequently, in biofuel applications, there is a need for determination of auto-ignition quality expressed by cetane number as a dominant characteristic that influences combustion parameters. The fact that the method for cetane number determination is comparative in nature has led us to try to develop substitute engine method for cetane number determination, by the use of the available laboratory equipment and serial, mono-cylinder engine with direct injection, DMB LDA 450. Description of the method, results of optimization of engine’s working parameters for conduction of the test and method’s Accuracy estimation are given in the paper. The paper also presents the results of domestic biodiesel fuels cetane number testing with the application of described engine method, developed at the Laboratory for internal combustion engines and fuels and lubricants of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering from Kragujevac, Serbia.

  11. Optical Methods For Automatic Rating Of Engine Test Components

    Pritchard, James R.; Moss, Brian C.

    1989-03-01

    In recent years, increasing commercial and legislative pressure on automotive engine manufacturers, including increased oil drain intervals, cleaner exhaust emissions and high specific power outputs, have led to increasing demands on lubricating oil performance. Lubricant performance is defined by bench engine tests run under closely controlled conditions. After test, engines are dismantled and the parts rated for wear and accumulation of deposit. This rating must be consistently carried out in laboratories throughout the world in order to ensure lubricant quality meeting the specified standards. To this end, rating technicians evaluate components, following closely defined procedures. This process is time consuming, inaccurate and subject to drift, requiring regular recalibration of raters by means of international rating workshops. This paper describes two instruments for automatic rating of engine parts. The first uses a laser to determine the degree of polishing of the engine cylinder bore, caused by the reciprocating action of piston. This instrument has been developed to prototype stage by the NDT Centre at Harwell under contract to Exxon Chemical, and is planned for production within the next twelve months. The second instrument uses red and green filtered light to determine the type, quality and position of deposit formed on the piston surfaces. The latter device has undergone feasibility study, but no prototype exists.

  12. Potential Errors and Test Assessment in Software Product Line Engineering

    Hartmut Lackner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Software product lines (SPL are a method for the development of variant-rich software systems. Compared to non-variable systems, testing SPLs is extensive due to an increasingly amount of possible products. Different approaches exist for testing SPLs, but there is less research for assessing the quality of these tests by means of error detection capability. Such test assessment is based on error injection into correct version of the system under test. However to our knowledge, potential errors in SPL engineering have never been systematically identified before. This article presents an overview over existing paradigms for specifying software product lines and the errors that can occur during the respective specification processes. For assessment of test quality, we leverage mutation testing techniques to SPL engineering and implement the identified errors as mutation operators. This allows us to run existing tests against defective products for the purpose of test assessment. From the results, we draw conclusions about the error-proneness of the surveyed SPL design paradigms and how quality of SPL tests can be improved.

  13. Industry's role in inertial fusion

    Glass, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is an address to the Tenth Symposium on Fusion Engineering. The speaker first addressed the subject of industry's role in inertial fusion three years earlier in 1980, outlining programs that included participation in the Shiva construction project, and the industrial participants' program set up in the laser fusion program to bring industrial scientists and engineers into the laboratory to work on laser fusion. The speaker is now the president of KMS Fusion, Inc., the primary industrial participant in the inertial fusion program. The outlook for fusion energy and the attitude of the federal government toward the fusion program is discussed

  14. Engineering of a Potent Recombinant Lectin-Toxin Fusion Protein to Eliminate Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Tateno, Hiroaki; Saito, Sayoko

    2017-07-10

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) in regenerative medicine is hindered by their tumorigenic potential. Previously, we developed a recombinant lectin-toxin fusion protein of the hPSC-specific lectin rBC2LCN, which has a 23 kDa catalytic domain (domain III) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (rBC2LCN-PE23). This fusion protein could selectively eliminate hPSCs following its addition to the cell culture medium. Here we conjugated rBC2LCN lectin with a 38 kDa domain of exotoxin A containing domains Ib and II in addition to domain III (PE38). The developed rBC2LCN-PE38 fusion protein could eliminate 50% of 201B7 hPSCs at a concentration of 0.003 μg/mL (24 h incubation), representing an approximately 556-fold higher activity than rBC2LCN-PE23. Little or no effect on human fibroblasts, human mesenchymal stem cells, and hiPSC-derived hepatocytes was observed at concentrations lower than 1 μg/mL. Finally, we demonstrate that rBC2LCN-PE38 selectively eliminates hiPSCs from a mixed culture of hiPSCs and hiPSC-derived hepatocytes. Since rBC2LCN-PE38 can be prepared from soluble fractions of E. coli culture at a yield of 9 mg/L, rBC2LCN-PE38 represents a practical reagent to remove human pluripotent stem cells residing in cultured cells destined for transplantation.

  15. Energy sweepstakes: fusion gets a chance

    Robinson, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Congress plans to speed up the magnetic-fusion program by shifting the emphasis from plasma research to fusion-reactor engineering. The bill doubles the overall fusion budget over the next five years in order to construct a Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by 1990. A review panel of scientists suggested limiting the cost to under $1 billion and holding the increase until late 1983. The panel also suggested waiting until 1990 to set a date for demonstrating a competitive commercial reactor even though progress made in the 1970s could bring a realistic date as close as 2000. The new policy evolves from the debate between tokamak hawks, who want to take the best prospect to commercialization immediately, and the doves, who want to wait to see if the best possible concept turns out to be the magnetic mirror or some other contender. The Engineering Test Facility (ETF) represents a compromise of these positions

  16. Test/QA plan for the verification testing of diesel exhaust catalysts, particulate filters and engine modification control technologies for highway and nonroad use diesel engines

    This ETV test/QA plan for heavy-duty diesel engine testing at the Southwest Research Institute’s Department of Emissions Research (DER) describes how the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), as listed in 40 CFR Part 86 for highway engines and 40 CFR Part 89 for nonroad engines, will be ...

  17. Present status of high temperature engineering test and research, 1994

    1994-10-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors have excellent features such as the generation of high temperature close to 1000degC, very high inherent safety and high fuel burnup. By the advanced basic research under high temperature irradiation condition, the creation of various new technologies which become the momentum of future technical innovation can be expected. The construction of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) was decided in 1987, which aims at the thermal output of 30 MW and the coolant temperature at reactor exit of 950degC. The initial criticality is scheduled in 1998. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the high temperature engineering test and research, and plans the safety verifying test of the HTTR, the test of connecting heat utilization plants and so on. In this report, mainly the results obtained for one year from May, 1993 are summarized. The outline of the high temperature engineering test and development of the HTTR technologies are reported. (K.I.)

  18. A miniaturized test method for the mechanical characterization of structural materials for fusion reactors

    Gondi, P.; Montanari, R.; Sili, A.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with a non-destructive method for mechanical tests which is based on the indentation of materials at a constant rate by means of a cylinder with a small radius and penetrating flat surface. The load versus penetration depth curves obtained using this method have shown correspondences with those of tensile tests and have given indications about the mechanical properties on a reduced scale. In this work penetration tests have been carried out on various kinds of Cr martensitic steels (MANET-2, BATMAN and modified F82H) which are of interest for first wall and structural applications in future fusion reactors. The load versus penetration depth curves have been examined with reference to data obtained in tensile tests and to microhardness measurements. Penetration tests have been performed at various temperature (from -180 to 100 C). Conclusions, which can be drawn for the ductile to brittle transition, are discussed for MANET-2 steel. Preliminary results obtained on BATMAN and modified F82H steels are reported. The characteristics of the indenter imprints have been studied by scanning electron microscopy. (orig.)

  19. Resolution of Disulfide Heterogeneity in Nogo Receptor 1 Fusion Proteins by Molecular Engineering

    P Weinreb; D Wen; F Qian; C Wildes; E Garber; L Walus; M Jung; J Wang; J Relton; et al.

    2011-12-31

    NgRI (Nogo-66 receptor) is part of a signalling complex that inhibits axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Truncated soluble versions of NgRI have been used successfully to promote axon regeneration in animal models of spinal-cord injury, raising interest in this protein as a potential therapeutic target. The LRR (leucine-rich repeat) regions in NgRI are flanked by N- and C-terminal disulfide-containing 'cap' domains (LRRNT and LRRCT respectively). In the present work we show that, although functionally active, the NgRI(310)-Fc fusion protein contains mislinked and heterogeneous disulfide patterns in the LRRCT domain, and we report the generation of a series of variant molecules specifically designed to prevent this heterogeneity. Using these variants we explored the effects of modifying the NgRI truncation site or the spacing between the NgRI and Fc domains, or replacing cysteines within the NgRI or IgG hinge regions. One variant, which incorporates replacements of Cys{sup 266} and Cys{sup 309} with alanine residues, completely eliminated disulfide scrambling while maintaining functional in vitro and in vivo efficacy. This modified NgRI-Fc molecule represents a significantly improved candidate for further pharmaceutical development, and may serve as a useful model for the optimization of other IgG fusion proteins made from LRR proteins.

  20. 40 CFR 1048.301 - When must I test my production-line engines?

    2010-07-01

    ... engines? 1048.301 Section 1048.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW, LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.301 When must I test my production-line engines? (a) If you produce engines...

  1. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers. Final report

    Kalish, Y. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States)

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  2. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers

    Kalish, Y. (Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States))

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  3. Long- and short-term trends in vessel conditioning of TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    LaMarche, P.H.; Dylla, H.F.; Bell, M.G.

    1986-10-01

    We have investigated trends in the conditioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) vacuum vessel during the May 1984 to April 1985 run period. The initial conditioning of the vessel, consisting of glow discharge cleaning (GDC) and pulse discharge cleaning (PDC) in concert with a 150 0 C vessel bakeout, is necessary to assure plasma operation after atmospheric venting. A long-term conditioning process, ascribed to limiter conditioning, effectively improves operational conditions during the course of the run. Over several thousand high power plasma discharges, the improvement was documented by using standard parameter (fiducial) plasma discharges. Several techniques demonstrated short-term improvements in vessel conditioning during this time period, including: Cr gettering and programming the plasma position relative to the limiter contact area

  4. Coil winder for the magnet of the mirror fusion test facility

    Ling, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    A coil winder was designed for the purpose of fabricating the superconducting magnets of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility. The superconducting magnets are a displaced ying-yang pair, each having major and minor radii of 2.5 and 0.75 m, respectively, and cross section of 0.42 m by about 1.03 m. The superconductor cross section is a square, 13 mm on a side, and consists of a core of niobium-titanium embedded copper and a solid copper stabilizer. Conceptual studies made at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory of the coil winder resulted in concept drawings and a procurement specification. Final design was made by the contractor, and the coil winder is now in fabrication. This paper describes the performance requirements of the winder, and the evolution of its design from conceptual stage to completion

  5. Field-reversal experiments in the mirror fusion test facility (MFTF)

    Shearer, J.W.; Condit, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed consideration of several aspects of a field-reversal experiment was begun in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF): Model calculations have provided some plausible parameters for a field-reversed deuterium plasma in the MFTF, and a buildup calculation indicates that the MFTF neutral-beam system is marginally sufficient to achieve field reversal by neutral injection alone. However, the many uncertainties indicate the need for further research and development on alternate buildup methods. A discussion of experimental objectives is presented and important diagnostics are listed. The range of parameter space accessible with the MFTF magnet design is explored, and we find that with proper aiming of the neutral beams, meaningful experiments can be performed to advance toward these objectives. Finally, it is pointed out that if we achieve enhanced n tau confinement by means of field reversal, then quasi-steady-state operation of MFTF is conceivable

  6. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility lithium system: a design and development status

    Brackenbury, P.J.; Bazinet, G.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The design and development of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system is outlined. This unique liquid lithium recirculating system, the largest of its kind in the world, is described with emphasis on the liquid lithium target assembly and other important components necessary to provide lithium flow to the target. The operational status and role of the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) in the design of the FMIT lithium system are discussed. Safety aspects of operating the FMIT lithium system in a highly radioactive condition are described. Potential spillage of the lithium is controlled by cell liners, by argon flood systems and by remote maintenance features. Lithium chemistry is monitored and controlled by a side-stream loop, where impurities measured by instruments are collected by hot and cold traps

  7. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility lithium system: a design and development status

    Brackenbury, P.J.; Bazinet, G.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The design and development of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system is outlined. This unique liquid lithium recirculating system, the largest of its kind in the world, is described with emphasis on the liquid lithium target assembly and other important components necessary to provide lithium flow to the target. The operational status and role of the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) in the design of the FMIT lithium system are discussed. Safety aspects of operating the FMIT lithium system in a highly radioactive condition are described. Potential spillage of the lithium is controlled by cell liners, by argon flood systems and by remote maintenance features. Lithium chemistry is monitored and controlled by a side-stream loop, where impurities measured by instruments are collected by hot and cold traps.

  8. A spallation-based irradiation test facility for fusion and future fission materials

    Samec, K.; Fusco, Y.; Kadi, Y.; Luis, R.; Romanets, Y.; Behzad, M.; Aleksan, R.; Bousson, S.

    2014-01-01

    The EU's FP7 TIARA program for developing accelerator-based facilities has recently demonstrated the unique capabilities of a compact and powerful spallation source for irradiating advanced nuclear materials. The spectrum and intensity of the neutron flux produced in the proposed facility fulfils the requirements of the proposed DEMO fusion reactor, ADS reactors and also Gen III / IV reactors. Test conditions can be modulated, covering temperature from 400 to 550 deg. C, liquid metal corrosion, cyclical or static stress up to 500 MPa and neutron/proton irradiation damage of up to 25 DPA per annum over a volume occupying one litre. The entire 'TMIF' facility fits inside a cube 2 metres on a side, and is dimensioned for an accelerator beam power of 100 kW, thus reducing costs and offering great versatility and flexibility. (authors)

  9. Electron cyclotron measurements with the fast scanning heterdyne radiometer on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; McCarthy, M.P.; Fredd, E.A.; Cutler, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three fast scanning heterodyne receivers, swept between 75-110 GHz, 110-170 GHz, and 170-210 GHz, have measured electron cyclotron emission on the horizontal midplane of the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) plasma. A second harmonic microwave mixer in the 170-210 GHz receiver allows the use of a 75-110 GHz backward wave oscillator as a swept local oscillator. Electron temperature profile evolution data with a time resolution of 2 msec and a profile acquisition rate of 250 Hz are presented for gas-fuelled and pellet-fuelled ohmic and neutral beam heated plasmas with toroidal fields up to 5.2 tesla. Recent results from a swept mode absolute calibration technique which can improve the accuracy and data collection efficiency during in-situ calibration are also presented

  10. Research on oral test modeling based on multi-feature fusion

    Shi, Yuliang; Tao, Yiyue; Lei, Jun

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the spectrum of speech signal is taken as an input of feature extraction. The advantage of PCNN in image segmentation and other processing is used to process the speech spectrum and extract features. And a new method combining speech signal processing and image processing is explored. At the same time of using the features of the speech map, adding the MFCC to establish the spectral features and integrating them with the features of the spectrogram to further improve the accuracy of the spoken language recognition. Considering that the input features are more complicated and distinguishable, we use Support Vector Machine (SVM) to construct the classifier, and then compare the extracted test voice features with the standard voice features to achieve the spoken standard detection. Experiments show that the method of extracting features from spectrograms using PCNN is feasible, and the fusion of image features and spectral features can improve the detection accuracy.

  11. Dielectronic satellite spectra of hydrogenlike iron from TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Decaux, V.; Bitter, M.; Hsuan, H.; von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Taylor, G.; Park, H.; Bhalla, C.P.

    1990-08-01

    Spectra of hydrogenlike iron, Fe26, have been observed from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas with a high-resolution crystal spectrometer. The experimental arrangement permits simultaneous observation of the Fe26 Ly-α 1 and Ly-α 2 lines and the associated dielectronic satellites, which are due to transitions 1snl-2pnl' with n ≥ 2, as well as the heliumlike 1s 2 ( 1 S 0 )-1s4p( 1 P 1 )and both hydrogenlike Ly-β 1 and Ly-β 2 lines from chromium. Relative wavelengths and line intensities can be determined very accurately. The spectral data are in very good agreement with theoretical calculations. The observed spectra have also been used to estimate the total dielectronic recombination rate coefficient of Fe26. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Supervisory control and diagnostics system for the mirror fusion test facility: overview and status 1980

    McGoldrick, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a complex facility requiring a highly-computerized Supervisory Control and Diagnostics System (SCDS) to monitor and provide control over ten subsystems; three of which require true process control. SCDS will provide physicists with a method of studying machine and plasma behavior by acquiring and processing up to four megabytes of plasma diagnostic information every five minutes. A high degree of availability and throughput is provided by a distributed computer system (nine 32-bit minicomputers on shared memory). Data, distributed across SCDS, is managed by a high-bandwidth Distributed Database Management System. The MFTF operators' control room consoles use color television monitors with touch sensitive screens; this is a totally new approach. The method of handling deviations to normal machine operation and how the operator should be notified and assisted in the resolution of problems has been studied and a system designed

  13. Program user's manual: cryogen system for the analysis for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    1979-04-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility being designed and constructed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory requires a liquid helium liquefaction, storage, distribution, and recovery system and a liquid nitrogen storage and distribution system. To provide a powerful analytical tool to aid in the design evolution of this system through hardware, a thermodynamic fluid flow model was developed. This model allows the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to verify that the design meets desired goals and to play what if games during the design evolution. For example, what if the helium flow rate is changed in the magnet liquid helium flow loop; how does this affect the temperature, fluid quality, and pressure. This manual provides all the information required to run all or portions of this program as desired. In addition, the program is constructed in a modular fashion so changes or modifications can be made easily to keep up with the evolving design

  14. Development of a Plasma Streaming System for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Holdsworth, T.; Clark, R.N.; McCotter, R.E.; Rossow, T.L.; Cruz, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Plasma Streaming System (PSS) is an essential portion of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), scheduled for completion in October 1981. The PSS will develop a plasma density of at least 2 x 10 12 particles/cm 3 at the MFTF magnet centerline by injecting particles along the field lines. The plasma will have a midplane plasma radius as large as 40 cm with variable plasma particle energy and beam geometry. Minimum amounts of impurities will be injected, with emphasis on minimizing high Z materials. Each of the 60 PSS units will consist of a gun magnet assembly (GMA) and a power supply. Each GMA consists of a plasma streaming gun, a pulse magnet that provides variable beam shaping, and a fast reaction pulse gas valve

  15. A spallation-based irradiation test facility for fusion and future fission materials

    Samec, K; Kadi, Y; Luis, R; Romanets, Y; Behzad, M; Aleksan, R; Bousson, S

    2014-01-01

    The EU’s FP7 TIARA program for developing accelerator-based facilities has recently demonstrated the unique capabilities of a compact and powerful spallation source for irradiating advanced nuclear materials. The spectrum and intensity of the neutron flux produced in the proposed facility fulfils the requirements of the DEMO fusion reactor for ITER, ADS reactors and also Gen III / IV reactors. Test conditions can be modulated, covering temperature from 400 to 550°C, liquid metal corrosion, cyclical or static stress up to 500 MPa and neutron/proton irradiation damage of up to 25 DPA per annum. The entire “TMIF” facility fits inside a cube 2 metres on a side, and is dimensioned for an accelerator beam power of 100 kW, thus reducing costs and offering great versatility and flexibility.

  16. Design and study of Engineering Test Facility - Helium Circulator

    Jiang Huijing; Ye Ping; Zhao Gang; Geng Yinan; Wang Jie

    2015-01-01

    Helium circulator is one of the key equipment of High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Pebble-bed Module (HTR-PM). In order to simulate most normal and accident operating conditions of helium circulator in HTR-PM, a full scale, rated flow rate and power, engineering test loop, which was called Engineering Test Facility - Helium Circulator (ETF-HC), was designed and established. Two prototypes of helium circulator, which was supported by Active Magnetic Bearing (AMB) or sealed by dry gas seals, would be tested on ETF-HC. Therefore, special interchangeable design was under consideration. ETF-HC was constructed compactly, which consisted of eleven sub-systems. In order to reduce the flow resistance of the circuit, special ducts, elbows, valves and flowmeters were selected. Two stages of heat exchange loops were designed and a helium - high pressure pure water heat exchanger was applied to ensure water wouldn't be vaporized while simulating accident conditions. Commissioning tests were carried out and operation results showed that ETF-HC meets the requirement of helium circulator operation. On this test facility, different kinds of experiments were supposed to be held, including mechanical and aerodynamic performance tests, durability tests and so on. These tests would provide the features and performance of helium circulator and verify its feasibility, availability and reliability. (author)

  17. Mechanisms Engineering Test Loop - Phase 1 Status Report

    Kultgen, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hvasta, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lisowski, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Toter, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Borowski, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents the current status of the Mechanisms Engineering Test Loop (METL) as of the end of FY2016. Currently, METL is in Phase I of its design and construction. Once operational, the METL facility will test small to intermediate-scale components and systems in order to develop advanced liquid metal technologies. Testing different components in METL is essential for the future of advanced fast reactors as it will provide invaluable performance data and reduce the risk of failures during plant operation.

  18. Design of Fire/Gas Penetration Seals and fire exposure tests for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor experimental areas

    Cavalluzzo, S.

    1983-01-01

    A Fire/Gas Penetration Seal is required in every penetration through the walls and ceilings into the Test Cell housing the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), as well as other adjacent areas to protect the TFTR from fire damage. The penetrations are used for field coil lead stems, diagnostics systems, utilities, cables, trays, mechanical devices, electrical conduits, vacuum liner, air conditioning ducts, water pipes, and gas pipes. The function of the Fire/Gas Penetration Seals is to prevent the passage of fire and products of combustion through penetrations for a period of time up to three hours and remain structurally intact during fire exposure. The Penetration Seal must withstand, without rupture, a fire hose water stream directed at the hot surface. There are over 3000 penetrations ranging in size from several square inches to 100 square feet, and classified into 90 different types. The material used to construct the Fire/Gas Penetration Seals consist of a single and a two-component room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber compound. Miscellaneous materials such as alumina silica refractory fibers in board, blanket and fiber forms are also used in the construction and assembly of the Seals. This paper describes some of the penetration seals and the test procedures used to perform the three-hour fire exposure tests to demonstrate the adequacy of the seals

  19. Challenges of nuclear fusion

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    After 30 years of research and development in many countries, the magnetic confinement fusion experiments finally seem to be getting close to the original first goal: the point of ''scientific break-even''. Plans are being made for a generation of experiments and tests with actual controlled thermonuclear fusion conditions. Therefore engineers and material scientists are hard at work to develop the required technology. In this paper the principal elements of a generic fusion reactor are described briefly to introduce the reader to the nature of the problems at hand. The main portion of the presentation summarises the recent advances made in this field and discusses the major issues that still need to be addressed in regard to materials and technology for fusion power. Specific examples are the problems of the first wall and other components that come into direct contact with the plasma, where both lifetime and plasma contamination are matters of concern. Equally challenging are the demands on structural materials and on the magnetic-field coils, particularly in connection with the neutron-radiation environment of fusion reactors. Finally, the role of ceramics must be considered, both for insulators and for fuel breeding purposes. It is evident that we still have a formidable task before us, but at this point none of the problems seem to be insoluble. (author)

  20. Analysis of the tritium-water (T-H2O) system for a fusion material test facility

    Hassanein, A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.; Reed, C.B.

    1992-04-01

    The need for a high flux, high energy neutron test facility to evaluate performance of fusion reactor materials is urgent. An accelerator based D-Li source is generally accepted as the most reasonable approach to a high flux neutron source in the near future. The idea is to bombard a high energy (35 MeV) deuteron beam into a lithium target to produce high energy neutrons to simulate the fusion environment. More recently it was proposed to use a 21 MeV triton beam incident on a water jet target to produce the required neutron source for testing and simulating fusion material environments. The advantages of such a system are discussed. Major concerns regarding the feasibility of this system are also highlighted

  1. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  2. Test-Driven, Model-Based Systems Engineering

    Munck, Allan

    Hearing systems have evolved over many years from simple mechanical devices (horns) to electronic units consisting of microphones, amplifiers, analog filters, loudspeakers, batteries, etc. Digital signal processors replaced analog filters to provide better performance end new features. Central....... This thesis concerns methods for identifying, selecting and implementing tools for various aspects of model-based systems engineering. A comprehensive method was proposed that include several novel steps such as techniques for analyzing the gap between requirements and tool capabilities. The method...... was verified with good results in two case studies for selection of a traceability tool (single-tool scenario) and a set of modeling tools (multi-tool scenarios). Models must be subjected to testing to allow engineers to predict functionality and performance of systems. Test-first strategies are known...

  3. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER). Volume 4: Supplementary engineering data

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the Magnetohydrodynamic Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD is summarized. Main elements of the design are identified and explained, and the rationale behind them is reviewed. Major systems and plant facilities are listed and discussed. Construction cost and schedule estimates, and identification of engineering issues that should be reexamined are also given. The latest (1980-1981) information from the MHD technology program are integrated with the elements of a conventional steam power electric generating plant. Supplementary Engineering Data (Issues, Background, Performance Assurance Plan, Design Details, System Design Descriptions and Related Drawings) is presented.

  4. Design and Testing of the Fusion Virtual Assembly System FVAS1.0

    Pengcheng Long; Songlin Liu; Yican Wu

    2006-01-01

    Virtual assembly (VA), utilizing virtual reality (VR) technologies to plan and evaluate assembly process, retains the benefits (time-saving, inexpensive and no hazardous) of VR technologies and conquers the shortcoming of physical prototypes, such as long circle, high cost, low precision, and so on. Presented in this paper is the Fusion Virtual Assembly System FVAS 1.0 that makes possible engineering application for assemblies of large-scale complex nuclear facilities. FVAS 1.0 is designed to support the planning, evaluation and demonstration of assembly process, and training assemblers, and to work on PC (personal computer) platform. In this paper, architecture and main features of FVAS are introduced firstly. Then, design of the key sections (such as collision detection, virtual roaming) are described in detail. Finally, some successful application cases are presented. To enhance the real-time performance for large-scale nuclear facilities simulation, a policy based on separation of display scene and collision detection scene has been adopted. The display scene can be predigested to reduce the time of scene refreshment, and the collision detection performance is greatly improved by using the mature interference check ability of commercial CAD systems. Convenient observation mechanism brings more practicability. So a multi-viewpoints roaming scheme has been utilized to facilitate users' assembly operation. Users can obtain much optical information from multiple angles by switching between multi-viewpoints. The ESAT superconducting tokamak is characterized by large volume, complicated constitution and high assembly precision, e.g. the strict precision requirement in the assembly for the three tori (the tori of vacuum vessel, thermal shield, and toroidal coil). FVAS 1.0 has succeeded in demonstrating the assembly process of ESAT components. Furthermore, FVAS 1.0 has been applied to evaluate FDS-I (Fusion-Driven Sub-critical system) concept from assembly point of

  5. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers

  6. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng, E-mail: qschen@ujs.edu.cn

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • To develop a novel instrumental intelligent test methodology for food sensory analysis. • A novel data fusion was used in instrumental intelligent test methodology. • Linear and nonlinear tools were comparatively used for modeling. • The instrumental test methodology can be imitative of human test behavior. - Abstract: Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers.

  7. Development scenario for laser fusion

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Hovingh, J.; Buntzen, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    This scenario proposes establishment of test and engineering facilities to (1) investigate the technological problems associated with laser fusion, (2) demonstrate fissile fuel production, and (3) demonstrate competitive electrical power production. Such facilities would be major milestones along the road to a laser-fusion power economy. The relevant engineering and economic aspects of each of these research and development facilities are discussed. Pellet design and gain predictions corresponding to the most promising laser systems are presented for each plant. The results show that laser fusion has the potential to make a significant contribution to our energy needs. Beginning in the early 1990's, this new technology could be used to produce fissile fuel, and after the turn of the century it could be used to generate electrical power

  8. A Systems Engineering Approach to Quality Assurance for Aerospace Testing

    Shepherd, Christena C.

    2015-01-01

    On the surface, it appears that AS91001 has little to say about how to apply a Quality Management System (QMS) to major aerospace test programs (or even smaller ones). It also appears that there is little in the quality engineering Body of Knowledge (BOK)2 that applies to testing, unless it is nondestructive examination (NDE), or some type of lab or bench testing associated with the manufacturing process. However, if one examines: a) how the systems engineering (SE) processes are implemented throughout a test program; and b) how these SE processes can be mapped to the requirements of AS9100, a number of areas for involvement of the quality professional are revealed. What often happens is that quality assurance during a test program is limited to inspections of the test article; what could be considered a manufacturing al fresco approach. This limits the quality professional and is a disservice to the programs and projects, since there are a number of ways that quality can enhance critical processes, and support efforts to improve risk reduction, efficiency and effectiveness.

  9. Bone tissue engineering for spine fusion : An experimental study on ectopic and orthotopic implants in rats

    van Gaalen, SM; Dhert, WJA; van den Muysenberg, A; Oner, FC; van Blitterswijk, C; Verbout, AJ; de Bruijn, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Alternatives to the use of autologous bone as a bone graft in spine surgery are needed. The purpose of this study was to examine tissue-engineered bone constructs in comparison with control scaffolds without cells in a posterior spinal implantation model in rats. Syngeneic bone marrow cells were

  10. Balancing Efficiency and Effectiveness for Fusion-Based Search Engines in the "Big Data" Environment

    Li, Jieyu; Huang, Chunlan; Wang, Xiuhong; Wu, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In the big data age, we have to deal with a tremendous amount of information, which can be collected from various types of sources. For information search systems such as Web search engines or online digital libraries, the collection of documents becomes larger and larger. For some queries, an information search system needs to…

  11. Copper benchmark experiment for the testing of JEFF-3.2 nuclear data for fusion applications

    Angelone M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A neutronics benchmark experiment on a pure Copper block (dimensions 60 × 70 × 70 cm3 aimed at testing and validating the recent nuclear data libraries for fusion applications was performed in the frame of the European Fusion Program at the 14 MeV ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG. Reaction rates, neutron flux spectra and doses were measured using different experimental techniques (e.g. activation foils techniques, NE213 scintillator and thermoluminescent detectors. This paper first summarizes the analyses of the experiment carried-out using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the European JEFF-3.2 library. Large discrepancies between calculation (C and experiment (E were found for the reaction rates both in the high and low neutron energy range. The analysis was complemented by sensitivity/uncertainty analyses (S/U using the deterministic and Monte Carlo SUSD3D and MCSEN codes, respectively. The S/U analyses enabled to identify the cross sections and energy ranges which are mostly affecting the calculated responses. The largest discrepancy among the C/E values was observed for the thermal (capture reactions indicating severe deficiencies in the 63,65Cu capture and elastic cross sections at lower rather than at high energy. Deterministic and MC codes produced similar results. The 14 MeV copper experiment and its analysis thus calls for a revision of the JEFF-3.2 copper cross section and covariance data evaluation. A new analysis of the experiment was performed with the MCNP5 code using the revised JEFF-3.3-T2 library released by NEA and a new, not yet distributed, revised JEFF-3.2 Cu evaluation produced by KIT. A noticeable improvement of the C/E results was obtained with both new libraries.

  12. Integral tests of coupled multigroup neutron and gamma cross sections with fission and fusion sources

    Schriewer, J.; Hehn, G.; Mattes, M.; Pfister, G.; Keinert, J.

    1978-01-01

    Calculations were made for different benchmark experiments in order to test the coupled multigroup neutron and gamma library EURLIB-3 with 100 neutron groups and 20 gamma groups. In cooperation with EURATOM, Ispra, we produced this shielding library recently from ENDF/B-IV data for application in fission and fusion technology. Integral checks were performed for natural lithium, carbon, oxygen, and iron. Since iron is the most important structural material in nuclear technology, we started with calculations of iron benchmark experiments. Most of them are integral experiments of INR, Karlsruhe, but comparisons were also done with benchmark experiments from USA and Japan. For the experiments with fission sources we got satisfying results. All details of the resonances cannot be checked with flux measurements and multigroup cross sections used. But some averaged resonance behaviour of the measured and calculated fluxes can be compared and checked within the error limits given. We get greater differences in the calculations of benchmark experiments with 14 MeV neutron sources. For iron the group cross sections of EURLIB-3 produce an underestimation of the neutron flux in a broad energy region below the source energy. The conclusion is that the energy degradation by inelastic scattering is too strong. For fusion application the anisotropy of the inelastic scatter process must be taken into account, which isn't done by the processing codes at present. If this effect isn't enough, additional corrections have to be applied to the inelastic cross sections of iron in ENDF/B-IV. (author)

  13. Copper benchmark experiment for the testing of JEFF-3.2 nuclear data for fusion applications

    Angelone, M.; Flammini, D.; Loreti, S.; Moro, F.; Pillon, M.; Villar, R.; Klix, A.; Fischer, U.; Kodeli, I.; Perel, R. L.; Pohorecky, W.

    2017-09-01

    A neutronics benchmark experiment on a pure Copper block (dimensions 60 × 70 × 70 cm3) aimed at testing and validating the recent nuclear data libraries for fusion applications was performed in the frame of the European Fusion Program at the 14 MeV ENEA Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG). Reaction rates, neutron flux spectra and doses were measured using different experimental techniques (e.g. activation foils techniques, NE213 scintillator and thermoluminescent detectors). This paper first summarizes the analyses of the experiment carried-out using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code and the European JEFF-3.2 library. Large discrepancies between calculation (C) and experiment (E) were found for the reaction rates both in the high and low neutron energy range. The analysis was complemented by sensitivity/uncertainty analyses (S/U) using the deterministic and Monte Carlo SUSD3D and MCSEN codes, respectively. The S/U analyses enabled to identify the cross sections and energy ranges which are mostly affecting the calculated responses. The largest discrepancy among the C/E values was observed for the thermal (capture) reactions indicating severe deficiencies in the 63,65Cu capture and elastic cross sections at lower rather than at high energy. Deterministic and MC codes produced similar results. The 14 MeV copper experiment and its analysis thus calls for a revision of the JEFF-3.2 copper cross section and covariance data evaluation. A new analysis of the experiment was performed with the MCNP5 code using the revised JEFF-3.3-T2 library released by NEA and a new, not yet distributed, revised JEFF-3.2 Cu evaluation produced by KIT. A noticeable improvement of the C/E results was obtained with both new libraries.

  14. The tokamak fusion test reactor tritium systems test contractor operational readiness review

    Gentile, C.A.; Levine, J.; Norris, M.; Rehill, F.; Such, C.

    1993-01-01

    In preparation for D-T operations at TFTR, the TFTR project has successfully completed the C-ORR process which has led to the introduction of 200 curies of tritium to the site. Preparations for the C-ORR began approximately 2 years ago. During July 1992 a one-week Site Assistance Review was conducted by the C-ORR , and C-ORR Team consisting of 12 persons, all of whom were outside experts, many of whom were from other facilities within the DOE complex. During the July 1992 Site Assistance Review 201 findings were documented which fell into one of three categories. All of the 109 category one findings which were generated were required to be resolved prior to the introduction of tritium to the TFTR site. On April 5, 1993, the TFTR Tritium System Test C-ORR commenced. The results of the C-ORR as documented in the final report by the C-ORR was that category 1 findings were resolved, and it was the recommendation of the C-ORR Team to the PPPL ES ampersand H Board that TFTR initiate the Tritium Systems Test. DOE (Chicago Operations, Princeton Area Office) concurred with the C-ORR final report and on April 29, 1993, at 12:15 pm tritium was introduced to the TFTR site

  15. Present status of irradiation tests on tritium breeding blanket for fusion reactor

    Futamura, Yoshiaki; Sagawa, Hisashi; Shimakawa, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Kawamura, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    To develop a tritium breeding blanket for a fusion reactor, irradiation tests in fission reactors are indispensable for obtaining data on irradiation effects on materials, and neutronics/thermal characteristics and tritium production/recovery performance of the blanket. Various irradiation tests have been conducted in the world, especially to investigate tritium release characteristics from tritium breeding and neutron multiplier materials, and materials integrity under irradiation. In Japan, VOM experiments at JRR-2 for ceramic breeders and experiments at JMTR for ceramic breeders and beryllium as a neutron multiplier have been performed. Several universities have also investigated ceramic breeders. In the EC, the EXOTIC experiments at HFR in the Netherlands and the SIBELIUS, the LILA, the LISA and the MOZART experiments for ceramic breeders have carried out. In Canada, NRU has been used for the CRITIC experiments. The TRIO experiments at ORR(ORNL), experiments at RTNS-II, FUBR and ATR have been conducted in the USA. The last two are experiments with high neutron fluence aiming at investigating materials integrity under irradiation. The BEATRIX-I and -II experiments have proceeded under international collaboration of Japan, Canada, the EC and the USA. This report shows the present status of these irradiation tests following a review of the blanket design in the ITER CDA(Conceptual Design Activity). (author)

  16. Instrumental intelligent test of food sensory quality as mimic of human panel test combining multiple cross-perception sensors and data fusion.

    Ouyang, Qin; Zhao, Jiewen; Chen, Quansheng

    2014-09-02

    Instrumental test of food quality using perception sensors instead of human panel test is attracting massive attention recently. A novel cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion imitating multiple mammal perception was proposed for the instrumental test in this work. First, three mimic sensors of electronic eye, electronic nose and electronic tongue were used in sequence for data acquisition of rice wine samples. Then all data from the three different sensors were preprocessed and merged. Next, three cross-perception variables i.e., color, aroma and taste, were constructed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) which were used as the input of models. MLR, back-propagation artificial neural network (BPANN) and support vector machine (SVM) were comparatively used for modeling, and the instrumental test was achieved for the comprehensive quality of samples. Results showed the proposed cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion presented obvious superiority to the traditional data fusion methodologies, also achieved a high correlation coefficient (>90%) with the human panel test results. This work demonstrated that the instrumental test based on the cross-perception multi-sensors data fusion can actually mimic the human test behavior, therefore is of great significance to ensure the quality of products and decrease the loss of the manufacturers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Testing of the rectangular pivot-point bellows for the PPPL tokamak fusion test reactor

    Haughian, J.; Lou, K.; Greer, J.; Fong, M.; Scalise, D.T.

    1983-12-01

    The Neutral Beam Pivot Point Bellows (PPB) is installed in the duct which connects the Neutral Beam Enclosure to the Torus. This bellows, located at the pivot point, must fit the severely limited space available at the pivot-point location. Consequently, it has to be made rectangular in cross section with a large inside area for beam access. This leads to small convolutions with high stress concentrations. The function of the bellows is to permit change in the angular positioning of the neutral beam line with respect to the Tokamak, to isolate the Neutral Beam Line from the deflection of the Torus during bake out, and to allow for all misalignments. Internally the bellows will have a vacuum along with such gases such as hydrogen or deuterium. Tests parameters are described

  18. Collimator type monochromator as a possible impurities monitor for fusion plasmas. Preliminary tests on the Tokamak TM-1-MH

    Musa, G.; Lungu, C.P.; Badalec, J.; Jakubka, K.; Kopecky, V.; Stoeckel, J.; Zacek, F.

    1984-09-01

    A collimator type monochromator has been tested for the first time as the impurity monitor on Tokamak. The possibility to use this type of monochromator in fusion devices is analyzed and a monoslit device is proposed as a convenient monitor for impurities. (authors)

  19. Scientific investigation plan for initial engineered barrier system field tests

    Wunan Lin.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) is to describe tests known as Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) and identified by Work Breakdown Structure as WBS 1.2.2.2.4. The IEBSFT are precursors to the Engineered Barrier System Field Test (EBSFT), WBS 1.2.2.2.4, to be conducted in the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The EBSFT and IEBSFT are designed to provide information on the interaction between waste packages (simulated by heated containers) and the surrounding rock mass, its vadose water, and infiltrated water. Heater assemblies will be installed in drifts or boreholes openings and heated to measure moisture movement during heat-up and subsequent cool-down of the rock mass. In some of the tests, infiltration of water into the heated rock mass will be studied. Throughout the heating and cooling cycle, instruments installed in the rock will monitor such parameters as temperature, moisture content, concentration of some chemical species, and stress and strain. Rock permeability measurements, rock and fluid (water and gas) sampling, and fracture pattern measurements will also be made before and after the test

  20. Conceptual design and issues of the laser inertial fusion test (LIFT) reactor—targets and chamber systems

    Norimatsu, T.; Kozaki, Y.; Shiraga, H.; Fujita, H.; Okano, K.; Members of LIFT Design Team

    2017-11-01

    We present the conceptual design of an experimental laser fusion plant known as the laser inertial fusion test (LIFT) reactor. The conceptual design aims at technically connecting a single-shot experiment and a commercial power plant. The LIFT reactor is designed on a three-phase scheme, where each phase has specific goals and the dedicated chambers of each phase are driven by the same laser. Technical issues related to the chamber technology including radiation safety to repeat burst mode operation are discussed in this paper.

  1. Predictive tests to evaluate oxidative potential of engineered nanomaterials

    Ghiazza, Mara; Carella, Emanuele; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Corazzari, Ingrid; Viola, Franca; Fenoglio, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress constitutes one of the principal injury mechanisms through which particulate toxicants (asbestos, crystalline silica, hard metals) and engineered nanomaterials can induce adverse health effects. ROS may be generated indirectly by activated cells and/or directly at the surface of the material. The occurrence of these processes depends upon the type of material. Many authors have recently demonstrated that metal oxides and carbon-based nanoparticles may influence (increasing or decreasing) the generation of oxygen radicals in a cell environment. Metal oxide, such as iron oxides, crystalline silica, and titanium dioxide are able to generate free radicals via different mechanisms causing an imbalance within oxidant species. The increase of ROS species may lead to inflammatory responses and in some cases to the development of cancer. On the other hand carbon-based nanomaterials, such as fullerene, carbon nanotubes, carbon black as well as cerium dioxide are able to scavenge the free radicals generated acting as antioxidant. The high numbers of new-engineered nanomaterials, which are introduced in the market, are exponentially increasing. Therefore the definition of toxicological strategies is urgently needed. The development of acellular screening tests will make possible the reduction of the number of in vitro and in vivo tests to be performed. An integrated protocol that may be used to predict the oxidant/antioxidant potential of engineered nanoparticles will be here presented.

  2. Predictive tests to evaluate oxidative potential of engineered nanomaterials

    Ghiazza, Mara; Carella, Emanuele; Corazzari, Ingrid; Fenoglio, Ivana; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Viola, Franca

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress constitutes one of the principal injury mechanisms through which particulate toxicants (asbestos, crystalline silica, hard metals) and engineered nanomaterials can induce adverse health effects. ROS may be generated indirectly by activated cells and/or directly at the surface of the material. The occurrence of these processes depends upon the type of material. Many authors have recently demonstrated that metal oxides and carbon-based nanoparticles may influence (increasing or decreasing) the generation of oxygen radicals in a cell environment. Metal oxide, such as iron oxides, crystalline silica, and titanium dioxide are able to generate free radicals via different mechanisms causing an imbalance within oxidant species. The increase of ROS species may lead to inflammatory responses and in some cases to the development of cancer. On the other hand carbon-based nanomaterials, such as fullerene, carbon nanotubes, carbon black as well as cerium dioxide are able to scavenge the free radicals generated acting as antioxidant. The high numbers of new-engineered nanomaterials, which are introduced in the market, are exponentially increasing. Therefore the definition of toxicological strategies is urgently needed. The development of acellular screening tests will make possible the reduction of the number of in vitro and in vivo tests to be performed. An integrated protocol that may be used to predict the oxidant/antioxidant potential of engineered nanoparticles will be here presented.

  3. A Michelson interferometer/polarimeter on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR)

    Park, H.K.; Mansfield, D.K.; Johnson, L.C.; Ma, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    A multichannel interferometer/polarimeter for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been developed in order to study the time dependent plasma current density (J/sub p/) and electron density (n/sub e/) profile simultaneously. The goal of the TFTR is demonstration of breakeven via dueuterium and tritium (DT) plasma. In order to be operated and maintained during DT operation phase, the system is designed based on the Michelson geometry which possesses intrinsic standing wave problems. So far, there has been no observable signals due to these standing waves. However, a standing wave resulted from the beam path design to achieve a optimum use of the laser power was found. This standing wave has not prevented initial 10 channel interferometer operation. However, a single channel polarimeter test indicated this standing wave was fatal for Faraday notation measurements. Techniques employing 1/2 wave plates and polarizers have been applied to eliminate this standing wave problem. The completion of 10 channel Faraday rotation measurements may be feasible in the near future

  4. Remote maintenance of in-vessel components in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Loesser, G.D.; Heitzenroeder, P.; Kungl, D.; Dylla, H.F.; Cerdan, G.

    1990-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will generate a total of 3 x 10 21 neutrons during its planned D-T operational period. A maintenance manipulator has been designed and tested to minimize personnel radiation during in-vessel maintenance activities. Its functions include visual inspection, first-wall tile replacement, cleaning, diagnostics calibrations and leak detection. To meet these objectives, the TFTR maintenance manipulator is required to be operable in the TFTR high vacuum environment, typically -8 torr, ( -6 Pa). Geometrically, the manipulator must extend 180 0 in either direction around the torus to assure complete coverage of the vessel first-wall. The manipulator consists of a movable carriage, and movable articulated link sections which are driven by electrical actuators. The boom has vertical load capacity of 455 kg and lateral load capacity of 46 kg. The boom can either be fitted with a general inspection arm or dextrous slave arms. The general inspection arm is designed to hold the leak detector and an inspection camera; it is capable of rotation along two axes and has a linkage system which permits motion normal to the vacuum vessel wall. All systems except the dextrous slave arms are operable in a vacuum. (author)

  5. Energy storage, compression, and switching in a theta-pinch fusion test reactor

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1976-01-01

    A new 488 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage and transfer system is being proposed for a Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor. The 1280 module system uses vacuum interrupters to switch 26 kA storage currents in 0.7 ms through a capacitive transfer circuit at 60 kV to the compression coils in the machine. Many of the components of the system have been built and tested and a prototype section of the machine is planned. Prototype coils with 381 kJ at 26 kA currents will be built by industry using advanced superconducting wire. The wire uses a Cu and Cu--Ni matrix around filaments of Nb--Ti to minimize eddy current losses. These wires are presently used in a 10 kA braided conductor for 300 kJ pre-prototype coils, and can withstand field changes of approximately 10 7 gauss/sec without inducing normal transitions. Three such 300 kJ coils are being constructed in industry for the LASL program

  6. 40 CFR 90.1204 - Maintenance, aging and testing of engines.

    2010-07-01

    ... engines. 90.1204 Section 90.1204 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... sample unless that engine experiences catastrophic mechanical failure or safety concerns requiring major... for engines with the amount of service and age of the test engine. (d) After aging each engine to at...

  7. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD, is summarized. Main elements of the design, systems, and plant facilities are illustrated. System design descriptions are included for closed cycle cooling water, industrial gas systems, fuel oil, boiler flue gas, coal management, seed management, slag management, plant industrial waste, fire service water, oxidant supply, MHD power ventilating

  8. Public views evening engine test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine

    2001-01-01

    Over the past year, more than 20,000 people came to Stennis Space Center to witness the 'shake, rattle and roar' of one of the world's most sophisticated engines. Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi is NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing. StenniSphere, the visitor center for Stennis Space Center, hosted more than 250,000 visitors in its first year of operation. Of those visitors, 26.4 percent were from Louisiana.

  9. The chicken embryo as an efficient model to test the function of muscle fusion genes in amniotes.

    Daniel Sieiro

    Full Text Available The fusion of myoblasts into multinucleated myotubes is a crucial step of muscle growth during development and of muscle repair in the adult. While multiple genes were shown to play a role in this process, a vertebrate model where novel candidates can be tested and analyzed at high throughput and relative ease has been lacking. Here, we show that the early chicken embryo is a fast and robust model in which functional testing of muscle fusion candidate genes can be performed. We have used known modulators of muscle fusion, Rac1 and Cdc42, along with the in vivo electroporation of integrated, inducible vectors, to show that the chicken embryo is a suitable model in which their function can be tested and quantified. In addition to nuclei content, specific characteristics of the experimental model allow a fine characterization of additional morphological features that are nearly impossible to assess in other model organisms. This study should establish the chicken embryo as a cheap, reliable and powerful model in which novel vertebrate muscle fusion candidates can be evaluated.

  10. Control of silicification by genetically engineered fusion proteins: Silk–silica binding peptides

    Zhou, Shun; Huang, Wenwen; Belton, David J.; Simmons, Leo O.; Perry, Carole C.; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, an artificial spider silk gene, 6mer, derived from the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk gene, was fused with different silica-binding peptides (SiBPs), A1, A3 and R5, to study the impact of the fusion protein sequence chemistry on silica formation and the ability to generate a silk–silica composite in two different bioinspired silicification systems: solution–solution and solution– solid. Condensed silica nanoscale particles (600–800 nm) were formed in the presence of the recombinant silk and chimeras, which were smaller than those formed by 15mer-SiBP chimeras [1], revealing that the molecular weight of the silk domain correlated to the sizes of the condensed silica particles in the solution system. In addition, the chimeras (6mer-A1/A3/R5) produced smaller condensed silica particles than the control (6mer), revealing that the silica particle size formed in the solution system is controlled by the size of protein assemblies in solution. In the solution–solid interface system, silicification reactions were performed on the surface of films fabricated from the recombinant silk proteins and chimeras and then treated to induce β-sheet formation. A higher density of condensed silica formed on the films containing the lowest β-sheet content while the films with the highest β-sheet content precipitated the lowest density of silica, revealing an inverse correlation between the β-sheet secondary structure and the silica content formed on the films. Intriguingly, the 6mer-A3 showed the highest rate of silica condensation but the lowest density of silica deposition on the films, compared with 6mer-A1 and -R5, revealing antagonistic crosstalk between the silk and the SiBP domains in terms of protein assembly. These findings offer a path forward in the tailoring of biopolymer–silica composites for biomaterial related needs. PMID:25462851

  11. 40 CFR 1045.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    2010-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1045.305 Section 1045.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION PROPULSION MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS Testing Production-line Engines § 1045.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines...

  12. 40 CFR 1048.305 - How must I prepare and test my production-line engines?

    2010-07-01

    ... production-line engines? 1048.305 Section 1048.305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW, LARGE NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Testing Production-line Engines § 1048.305 How must I prepare and test my production-line engines? This...

  13. 40 CFR 1051.301 - When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines?

    2010-07-01

    ... vehicles or engines? 1051.301 Section 1051.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM RECREATIONAL ENGINES AND VEHICLES Testing Production-Line Vehicles and Engines § 1051.301 When must I test my production-line vehicles or engines? (a...

  14. 40 CFR 1045.301 - When must I test my production-line engines?

    2010-07-01

    ... engines? 1045.301 Section 1045.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM SPARK-IGNITION PROPULSION MARINE ENGINES AND VESSELS Testing Production-line Engines § 1045.301 When must I test my production-line engines? (a) If you produce...

  15. Environmental assessment for Breeder Reprocessing Engineering Test (BRET): Revision 1

    Lerch, R.E.

    1989-03-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) is for the proposed installation and operation of an integrated breeder fuel reprocessing test system in the shielded cells of the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford and the associated modifications to the FMEF to accommodate BRET. These modifications would begin in FY-1986 subject to Congressional authorization. Hot operations would be scheduled to start in the early 1990's. The system, called the Breeder Reprocessing Engineering Test (BRET), is being designed to provide a test capability for developing the demonstrating fuel reprocessing, remote maintenance, and safeguards technologies for breeder reactor fuels. This EA describes (1) the action being proposed, (2) the existing environment which would be affected, (3) the potential environmental impacts from normal operations and severe accidents from the proposed action, (4) potential conflicts with federal, state, regional, and/or local plans for the area, and (5) environmental implications of alternatives considered to the proposed action. 41 refs., 10 figs., 31 tabs

  16. Thermal Environmental Testing of NSTAR Engineering Model Ion Thrusters

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.; Becker, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium program will fly a xenon ion propulsion system on the Deep Space 1 Mission. Tests were conducted under NASA's Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) Program with 3 different engineering model ion thrusters to determine thruster thermal characteristics over the NSTAR operating range in a variety of thermal environments. A liquid nitrogen-cooled shroud was used to cold-soak the thruster to -120 C. Initial tests were performed prior to a mature spacecraft design. Those results and the final, severe, requirements mandated by the spacecraft led to several changes to the basic thermal design. These changes were incorporated into a final design and tested over a wide range of environmental conditions.

  17. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) Implementation in Rocket Engine Testing

    Figueroa, Fernando; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Franzl, Richard; Walker, Mark; Kapadia, Ravi; Venkatesh, Meera

    2010-01-01

    A pilot operational ISHM capability has been implemented for the E-2 Rocket Engine Test Stand (RETS) and a Chemical Steam Generator (CSG) test article at NASA Stennis Space Center. The implementation currently includes an ISHM computer and a large display in the control room. The paper will address the overall approach, tools, and requirements. It will also address the infrastructure and architecture. Specific anomaly detection algorithms will be discussed regarding leak detection and diagnostics, valve validation, and sensor validation. It will also describe development and use of a Health Assessment Database System (HADS) as a repository for measurements, health, configuration, and knowledge related to a system with ISHM capability. It will conclude with a discussion of user interfaces, and a description of the operation of the ISHM system prior, during, and after testing.

  18. Beryllium data base for in-pile mockup test on blanket of fusion reactor, (1)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi; Ishitsuka, Etsuo (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment); Sakamoto, Naoki; Kato, Masakazu; Takatsu, Hideyuki.

    1992-11-01

    Beryllium has been used in the fusion blanket designs with ceramic breeder as a neutron multiplier to increase the net tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The properties of beryllium, that is physical properties, chemical properties, thermal properties, mechanical properties, nuclear properties, radiation effects, etc. are necessary for the fusion blanket design. However, the properties of beryllium have not been arranged for the fusion blanket design. Therefore, it is indispensable to check and examine the material data of beryllium reported previously. This paper is the first one of the series of papers on beryllium data base, which summarizes the reported material data of beryllium. (author).

  19. The development of a Flight Test Engineer's Workstation for the Automated Flight Test Management System

    Tartt, David M.; Hewett, Marle D.; Duke, Eugene L.; Cooper, James A.; Brumbaugh, Randal W.

    1989-01-01

    The Automated Flight Test Management System (ATMS) is being developed as part of the NASA Aircraft Automation Program. This program focuses on the application of interdisciplinary state-of-the-art technology in artificial intelligence, control theory, and systems methodology to problems of operating and flight testing high-performance aircraft. The development of a Flight Test Engineer's Workstation (FTEWS) is presented, with a detailed description of the system, technical details, and future planned developments. The goal of the FTEWS is to provide flight test engineers and project officers with an automated computer environment for planning, scheduling, and performing flight test programs. The FTEWS system is an outgrowth of the development of ATMS and is an implementation of a component of ATMS on SUN workstations.

  20. Development Testing of 1-Newton ADN-Based Rocket Engines

    Anflo, K.; Gronland, T.-A.; Bergman, G.; Nedar, R.; Thormählen, P.

    2004-10-01

    With the objective to reduce operational hazards and improve specific and density impulse as compared with hydrazine, the Research and Development (R&D) of a new monopropellant for space applications based on AmmoniumDiNitramide (ADN), was first proposed in 1997. This pioneering work has been described in previous papers1,2,3,4 . From the discussion above, it is clear that cost savings as well as risk reduction are the main drivers to develop a new generation of reduced hazard propellants. However, this alone is not enough to convince a spacecraft builder to choose a new technology. Cost, risk and schedule reduction are good incentives, but a spacecraft supplier will ask for evidence that this new propulsion system meets a number of requirements within the following areas: This paper describes the ongoing effort to develop a storable liquid monopropellant blend, based on AND, and its specific rocket engines. After building and testing more than 20 experimental rocket engines, the first Engineering Model (EM-1) has now accumulated more than 1 hour of firing-time. The results from test firings have validated the design. Specific impulse, combustion stability, blow-down capability and short pulse capability are amongst the requirements that have been demonstrated. The LMP-103x propellant candidate has been stored for more than 1 year and initial material compatibility screening and testing has started. 1. Performance &life 2. Impact on spacecraft design &operation 3. Flight heritage Hereafter, the essential requirements for some of these areas are outlined. These issues are discussed in detail in a previous paper1 . The use of "Commercial Of The Shelf" (COTS) propulsion system components as much as possible is essential to minimize the overall cost, risk and schedule. This leads to the conclusion that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 5 has been reached for the thruster and propellant. Furthermore, that the concept of ADN-based propulsion is feasible.

  1. Control of silicification by genetically engineered fusion proteins: silk-silica binding peptides.

    Zhou, Shun; Huang, Wenwen; Belton, David J; Simmons, Leo O; Perry, Carole C; Wang, Xiaoqin; Kaplan, David L

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, an artificial spider silk gene, 6mer, derived from the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk gene, was fused with different silica-binding peptides (SiBPs), A1, A3 and R5, to study the impact of the fusion protein sequence chemistry on silica formation and the ability to generate a silk-silica composite in two different bioinspired silicification systems: solution-solution and solution-solid. Condensed silica nanoscale particles (600-800 nm) were formed in the presence of the recombinant silk and chimeras, which were smaller than those formed by 15mer-SiBP chimeras, revealing that the molecular weight of the silk domain correlated to the sizes of the condensed silica particles in the solution system. In addition, the chimeras (6mer-A1/A3/R5) produced smaller condensed silica particles than the control (6mer), revealing that the silica particle size formed in the solution system is controlled by the size of protein assemblies in solution. In the solution-solid interface system, silicification reactions were performed on the surface of films fabricated from the recombinant silk proteins and chimeras and then treated to induce β-sheet formation. A higher density of condensed silica formed on the films containing the lowest β-sheet content while the films with the highest β-sheet content precipitated the lowest density of silica, revealing an inverse correlation between the β-sheet secondary structure and the silica content formed on the films. Intriguingly, the 6mer-A3 showed the highest rate of silica condensation but the lowest density of silica deposition on the films, compared with 6mer-A1 and -R5, revealing antagonistic crosstalk between the silk and the SiBP domains in terms of protein assembly. These findings offer a path forward in the tailoring of biopolymer-silica composites for biomaterial related needs. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Developments on the RF system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility accelerator

    Fazio, M.V.; Johnson, H.P.; Riggin, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The rf system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator is currently in the design phase at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The 35-MeV, 100-mA deuteron beam will require approximately 6 MW of rf power at 80 MHz. The EIMAC 8973 power tetrode, capable of a 600-kW cw output, has been chosen as the final amplifier tube for each of 15 amplifier chains. The final power stage of each chain is designed to perform as a linear Class B amplifier. Each low-power rf system (less than or equal to 100W) is to be phase, amplitude, and frequency controlled to provide a drive signal for each high-power amplifier. Beam dynamics for particle acceleration and for minimal beam spill require each rf amplifier output to be phase controlled to +-1 0 . The amplitude of the accelerating field must be held to +-1%. A varactor-tuned electronic phase shifter and a linear phase detector are under development for use in this system. To complement hardware development, analog computer simulations are being performed to optimize the closed-loop control characteristics of the system

  3. Test of 60 kA coated conductor cable prototypes for fusion magnets

    Uglietti, D.; Bykovsky, N.; Sedlak, K.; Stepanov, B.; Wesche, R.; Bruzzone, P.

    2015-12-01

    Coated conductors could be promising materials for the fabrication of the large magnet systems of future fusion devices. Two prototype conductors (flat cables in steel conduits), each about 2 m long, were manufactured using coated conductor tapes (4 mm wide) from Super Power and SuperOx, with a total tape length of 1.6 km. Each flat cable is assembled from 20 strands, each strand consisting of a stack of 16 tapes surrounded by two half circular copper profiles, twisted and soldered. The tapes were measured at 12 T and 4.2 K and the results of the measurements were used for the assessment of the conductor electromagnetic properties at low temperature and high field. The two conductors were assembled together in a sample that was tested in the European Dipole (EDIPO) facility. The current sharing temperatures of the two conductors were measured at background fields from 8 T up to 12 T and for currents from 30 kA up to 70 kA: the measured values are within a few percent of the values expected from the measurements on tapes (short samples). After electromagnetic cycling, T cs at 12 T and 50 kA decreased from about 12 K to 11 K (about 10%), corresponding to less than 3% of I c.

  4. Large superconductors and joints for fusion magnets: From conceptual design to testing at full scale

    Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J. L.; Decool, P.; Libeyre, P.; Turck, B.

    2001-02-01

    A new kind of superconductor, using the cable-in-conduit concept, is emerging, mainly in the context of fusion activity. At present no large Nb3Sn magnet in the world is operating using this concept. The difficulty of this technology, which has now been studied for 20 years, is that it requires major advances in several interconnected new fields, such as handling a large number (1000) of superconducting strands, high current conductors (50 kA), forced flow cryogenics, Nb3Sn technology, low loss conductors in pulsed operation, high current connections and high voltage insulation (10 kV), as well as demonstration of its economical and industrial feasibility. CEA has been very much involved, during the past ten years, in this development, which took place in the framework of the NET and ITER technological programmes. One major milestone was reached in 1998-1999 with the successful tests by Euratom-CEA of three full size conductor and connection samples in the SULTAN facility in Switzerland.

  5. Testing nonlocal models of electron thermal conduction for magnetic and inertial confinement fusion applications

    Brodrick, J. P.; Kingham, R. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, M. V.; Chankin, A. V.; Omotani, J. T.; Umansky, M. V.; Del Sorbo, D.; Dudson, B.; Parker, J. T.; Kerbel, G. D.; Sherlock, M.; Ridgers, C. P.

    2017-09-01

    Three models for nonlocal electron thermal transport are here compared against Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) codes to assess their accuracy in situations relevant to both inertial fusion hohlraums and tokamak scrape-off layers. The models tested are (i) a moment-based approach using an eigenvector integral closure (EIC) originally developed by Ji, Held, and Sovinec [Phys. Plasmas 16, 022312 (2009)]; (ii) the non-Fourier Landau-fluid (NFLF) model of Dimits, Joseph, and Umansky [Phys. Plasmas 21, 055907 (2014)]; and (iii) Schurtz, Nicolaï, and Busquet's [Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] multigroup diffusion model (SNB). We find that while the EIC and NFLF models accurately predict the damping rate of a small-amplitude temperature perturbation (within 10% at moderate collisionalities), they overestimate the peak heat flow by as much as 35% and do not predict preheat in the more relevant case where there is a large temperature difference. The SNB model, however, agrees better with VFP results for the latter problem if care is taken with the definition of the mean free path. Additionally, we present for the first time a comparison of the SNB model against a VFP code for a hohlraum-relevant problem with inhomogeneous ionisation and show that the model overestimates the heat flow in the helium gas-fill by a factor of ˜2 despite predicting the peak heat flux to within 16%.

  6. Laser-Plasma Interactions on NIKE and the Fusion Test Facility

    Phillips, Lee; Weaver, James

    2008-11-01

    Recent proposed designs for a Fusion Test Facility (FTF) (Obenchain et al., Phys. Plasmas 13 056320 (2006)) for direct-drive ICF targets for energy applications involve high implosion velocities combined with higher laser irradiances. The use of high irradiances increases the likelihood of deleterious laser plasma instabilities (LPI) but the proposed use of a 248 nm KrF laser to drive these targets is expected to minimize the LPI risk. We examine, using simulation results from NRL's FAST hydrocode, the proposed operational regimes of the FTF in relation to the thresholds for the SRS, SBS, and 2-plasmon instabilities. Simulations are also used to help design and interpret ongoing experiments being conducted at NRL's NIKE facility for the purpose of generating and studying LPI. Target geometries and laser pulseshapes were devised in order to create plasma conditions with long scalelengths and low electron temperatures that allow the growth of parametric instabilities. These simulations include the effects of finite beam angles through the use of raytracing.

  7. Electron temperature profiles in high power neutral-beam-heated TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas

    Taylor, G.; Grek, B.; Stauffer, F.J.; Goldston, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Wieland, R.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1987-09-01

    In 1986, the maximum neutral beam injection (NBI) power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was increased to 20 MW, with three beams co-parallel and one counter-parallel to I/sub p/. TFTR was operated over a wide range of plasma parameters; 2.5 19 19 m -3 . Data bases have been constructed with over 600 measured electron temperature profiles from multipoint TV Thomson scattering which span much of this parameter space. We have also examined electron temperature profile shapes from electron cyclotron emission at the fundamental ordinary mode and second harmonic extraordinary mode for a subset of these discharges. In the light of recent work on ''profile consistency'' we have analyzed these temperature profiles in the range 0.3 < (r/a) < 0.9 to determine if a profile shape exists which is insensitive to q/sub cyl/ and beam-heating profile. Data from both sides of the temperature profile [T/sub e/(R)] were mapped to magnetic flux surfaces [T/sub e/(r/a)]. Although T/sub e/(r/a), in the region where 0.3 < r/a < 0.9 was found to be slightly broader at lower q/sub cyl/, it was found to be remarkably insensitive to β/sub p/, to the fraction of NBI power injected co-parallel to I/sub p/, and to the heating profile going from peaked on axis, to hollow. 10 refs., 8 figs

  8. Design of deuterium and tritium pellet injector systems for Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Wysor, R.B.; Baylor, L.R.; Bryan, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    Three pellet injector designs developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are planned for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) to reach the goal of a tritium pellet injector by 1988. These are the Repeating Pneumatic Injector (RPI), the Deuterium Pellet Injector (DPI) and the Tritium Pellet Injector (TPI). Each of the pellet injector designs have similar performance characteristics in that they deliver up to 4-mm-dia pellets at velocities up to 1500 m/s with a dsign goal to 2000 m/s. Similar techniques are utilized to freeze and extrude the pellet material. The injector systems incorporate three gun concepts which differ in the number of gun barrels and the method of forming and chambering the pellets. The RPI, a single barrel repeating design, has been operational on TFTR since April 1985. Fabrication and assembly are essentially complete for DPI, and TPI is presently on hold after completing about 80% of the design. The TFTR pellet injector program is described, and each of the injector systems is described briefly. Design details are discussed in other papers at this symposium

  9. Cryosorption of helium on argon frost in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beamlines

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Cropper, M.B.; Dylla, H.F.; Garzotto, V.; Dudek, L.E.; Grisham, L.R.; Martin, G.D.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Kim, J.

    1990-01-01

    Helium pumping on argon frost has been investigated on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam injectors and shown to be viable for limited helium beam operation. Maximum pumping speeds are ∼25% less than those measured for pumping of deuterium. Helium pumping efficiency is low, >20 argon atoms are required to pump each helium atom. Adsorption isotherms are exponential and exhibit a twofold increase in adsorption capacity as the cryopanel temperature is reduced from 4.3 K to 3.7 K. Pumping speed was found to be independent of cryopanel temperature over the temperature range studied. After pumping a total of 2000 Torr l of helium, the beamline base pressure rose to 2x10 -5 Torr from an initial value of 10 -8 Torr. Accompanying this three order of magnitude increase in pressure was a modest 40% decrease in pumping speed. The introduction of 168 Torr l of deuterium prior to helium injection reduced the pumping speed by a factor of two with no decrease in adsorption capacity

  10. Open-ended fusion devices and reactors

    Kawabe, T.; Nariai, H.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual design studies on fusion reactors based upon open-ended confinement schemes, such as the tandem mirror and rf plugged cusp, have been carried out in Japan. These studies may be classified into two categories: near-term devices (Fusion Engineering Test Facility), and long-term fusion power recators. In the first category, a two-component cusp neutron source was proposed. In the second category, the GAMMA-R, a tandem-mirror power reactor, and the RFC-R, an axisymetric mirror and cusp, reactor studies are being conducted at the University of Tsukuba and the Institute of Plasma Physics. Mirror Fusion Engineering Facility parameters and a schematic are shown. The GAMMA-R central-cell design schematic is also shown

  11. Testing and Development of a Shrouded Gas Turbine Engine in a Freejet Facility

    Garcia, Hector

    2000-01-01

    .... The combined cycle engine (CCE) could be incorporated into a variety of applications. The building of a new freejet facility and engine test rig at the Naval Postgraduate School enabled dynamic testing of the ongoing development of a turboramjet...

  12. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    Esposito, B; Maruccia, G; Petrizzi, L; Bignon, G; Blandin, C; Chauffriat, S; Lebrun, A; Recroix, H; Trapp, J P; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties...

  13. Preliminary site design for the SP-100 ground engineering test

    Cox, C.M.; Miller, W.C.; Mahaffey, M.K.

    1986-04-01

    In November, 1985, Hanford was selected by the Department of Energy (DOE) as the preferred site for a full-scale test of the integrated nuclear subsystem for SP-100. The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company, was assigned as the lead contractor for the Test Site. The nuclear subsystem, which includes the reactor and its primary heat transport system, will be provided by the System Developer, another contractor to be selected by DOE in late FY-1986. In addition to reactor operations, test site responsibilities include preparation of the facility plus design, procurement and installation of a vacuum chamber to house the reactor, a secondary heat transport system to dispose of the reactor heat, a facility control system, and postirradiation examination. At the conclusion of the test program, waste disposal and facility decommissioning are required. The test site must also prepare appropriate environmental and safety evaluations. This paper summarizes the preliminary design requirements, the status of design, and plans to achieve full power operation of the test reactor in September, 1990

  14. A Unique Opportunity to Test Whether Cell Fusion is a Mechanism of Breast Cancer Metastasis

    2013-07-01

    Gilgoff I, Stein J, Chan Y, Lidov HG, Bonnemann CG. Long-term persistence of donor nuclei in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient receiving bone marrow...myoblasts of muscle fibers and osteoclasts of bone.13 However, it was not appreciated until recently that fusion products may form between...fusion products such as osteoclasts and muscle fibers.13 Additional proof was provided by Duelli et al. in the context of viral-induced cell

  15. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer

    Schrading, J. Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The Knowledge-Based Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20 years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in the system. As part of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display of the entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledge base, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  16. Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations: KSC Autonomous Test Engineer

    Shrading, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    The KSC Autonomous Test Engineer (KATE) program has a long history at KSC. Now a part of the Autonomous Cryogenic Load Operations (ACLO) mission, this software system has been sporadically developed over the past 20+ years. Originally designed to provide health and status monitoring for a simple water-based fluid system, it was proven to be a capable autonomous test engineer for determining sources of failure in. the system, As part.of a new goal to provide this same anomaly-detection capability for a complicated cryogenic fluid system, software engineers, physicists, interns and KATE experts are working to upgrade the software capabilities and graphical user interface. Much progress was made during this effort to improve KATE. A display ofthe entire cryogenic system's graph, with nodes for components and edges for their connections, was added to the KATE software. A searching functionality was added to the new graph display, so that users could easily center their screen on specific components. The GUI was also modified so that it displayed information relevant to the new project goals. In addition, work began on adding new pneumatic and electronic subsystems into the KATE knowledgebase, so that it could provide health and status monitoring for those systems. Finally, many fixes for bugs, memory leaks, and memory errors were implemented and the system was moved into a state in which it could be presented to stakeholders. Overall, the KATE system was improved and necessary additional features were added so that a presentation of the program and its functionality in the next few months would be a success.

  17. Gas utilization in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor neutral beam injectors

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.; Jones, T.T.C.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of gas utilization were performed using hydrogen and deuterium beams in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam test beamline to study the feasibility of operating tritium beams with existing ion sources under conditions of minimal tritium consumption. (i) It was found that the fraction of gas molecules introduced into the TFTR long-pulse ion sources that are converted to extracted ions (i.e., the ion source gas efficiency) was higher than with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range 33%--55%, and its effect on neutralization of the extracted ions was studied. At the high end of the gas efficiency range, the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted from room-temperature molecular gas flow (similar to observations at the Joint European Torus). (ii) Beam isotope change studies were performed. No extracted hydrogen ions were observed in the first deuterium beam following a working gas change from H 2 to D 2 . There was no arc conditioning or gas injection preceding the first beam extraction attempt. (iii) Experiments were also performed to determine the reliability of ion source operation during the long waiting periods between pulses that are anticipated during tritium operation. It was found that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV could produce a clean beam pulse after a waiting period of 14 h by preceding the beam extraction with several acceleration voltage/filament warm-up pulses. It can be concluded that the operation of up to six ion sources on tritium gas should be compatible with on-site inventory restrictions established for D--T, Q = 1 experiments on TFTR

  18. Stress analysis of neutral beam pivot point bellows for tokamak fusion test reactor

    Johnson, J.J.; Benda, B.J.; Tiong, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    The neutral beam pivot point bellows serves as an airtight flexible linkage between the torus duct and the neutral beam transition duct in Princeton University's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The bellows considered here is basically rectangular in cross section with rounded corners; a unique shape. Its overall external dimensions are about 28 in. (about 711 mm) X about 35 in. (about 889 mm). The bellows is formed from 18 convolutions and is of the nested ripple type. It is about 11 in. (about 43.3 mm) in length, composed of Inconel 718, and each leaf has a thickness of 0.034 in. (.86 mm). The bellows is subjected to a series of design loading conditions -- vacuum, vacuum + 2 psi (.12 MPa), vacuum + stroke (10,000 cycles), vacuum + temperature increase + extension, extension to a stress of 120 ksi (838 MPa), and a series of rotational loading conditions induced in the bellows by alignment of the neutral beam injector. A stress analysis of the bellows was performed by the finite element method -- locations and magnitude of maximum stresses were calculated for all of the design loading conditions to check with allowable values and help guide placement of strain gauges during proof testing. A typical center convolution and end convolution were analyzed. Loading conditions were separated into symmetric and antisymmetric cases about the planes of symmetry of the cross-section. Iterative linear analyses were performed, i.e. compressive loading conditions led to predicted overlap of the leaves from linear analysis and restraints were added to prevent such overlap. This effect was found to be substantial in stress predicition and necessary to be taken into account. A total of eleven loading conditions and seven models were analyzed. The results showed peak stresses to be within allowable limits and the number of allowable cycles to be greater than the design condition

  19. Testing a Modified PCA-Based Sharpening Approach for Image Fusion

    Jan Jelének

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Image data sharpening is a challenging field of remote sensing science, which has become more relevant as high spatial-resolution satellites and superspectral sensors have emerged. Although the spectral property is crucial for mineral mapping, spatial resolution is also important as it allows targeted minerals/rocks to be identified/interpreted in a spatial context. Therefore, improving the spatial context, while keeping the spectral property provided by the superspectral sensor, would bring great benefits for geological/mineralogical mapping especially in arid environments. In this paper, a new concept was tested using superspectral data (ASTER and high spatial-resolution panchromatic data (WorldView-2 for image fusion. A modified Principal Component Analysis (PCA-based sharpening method, which implements a histogram matching workflow that takes into account the real distribution of values, was employed to test whether the substitution of Principal Components (PC1–PC4 can bring a fused image which is spectrally more accurate. The new approach was compared to those most widely used—PCA sharpening and Gram–Schmidt sharpening (GS, both available in ENVI software (Version 5.2 and lower as well as to the standard approach—sharpening Landsat 8 multispectral bands (MUL using its own panchromatic (PAN band. The visual assessment and the spectral quality indicators proved that the spectral performance of the proposed sharpening approach employing PC1 and PC2 improve the performance of the PCA algorithm, moreover, comparable or better results are achieved compared to the GS method. It was shown that, when using the PC1, the visible-near infrared (VNIR part of the spectrum was preserved better, however, if the PC2 was used, the short-wave infrared (SWIR part was preserved better. Furthermore, this approach improved the output spectral quality when fusing image data from different sensors (e.g., ASTER and WorldView-2 while keeping the proper albedo

  20. Progress of nuclear fusion research and review on development of fusion reactors

    1976-01-01

    Set up in October 1971, the ad hoc Committee on Survey of Nuclear Fusion Reactors has worked on overall fusion reactor aspects and definition of the future problems under four working groups of core, nuclear heat, materials and system. The presect volume is intended to provide reference materials in the field of fusion reactor engineering, prepared by members of the committee. Contents are broadly the following: concept of the nuclear fusion reactor, fusion core engineering, fusion reactor blanket engineering, fusion reactor materials engineering, and system problems in development of fusion reactors. (Mori, K.)

  1. Sublimator Driven Coldplate Engineering Development Unit Test Results

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.

    2010-01-01

    The Sublimator Driven Coldplate (SDC) is a unique piece of thermal control hardware that has several advantages over a traditional thermal control scheme. The principal advantage is the possible elimination of a pumped fluid loop, potentially increasing reliability and reducing complexity while saving both mass and power. Because the SDC requires a consumable feedwater, it can only be used for short mission durations. Additionally, the SDC is ideal for a vehicle with small transport distances and low heat rejection requirements. An SDC Engineering Development Unit was designed and fabricated. Performance tests were performed in a vacuum chamber to quantify and assess the performance of the SDC. The test data was then used to develop correlated thermal math models. Nonetheless, an Integrated Sublimator Driven Coldplate (ISDC) concept is being developed. The ISDC couples a coolant loop with the previously described SDC hardware. This combination allows the SDC to be used as a traditional coldplate during long mission phases and provides for dissimilar system redundancy

  2. Radiological effluents released from nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests at the Nevada Test Site 1959 through 1969: Fact Book

    Friesen, H.N.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear rocket and ramjet engine tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 25 and Area 26, about 80 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, from July 1959 through September 1969. This document presents a brief history of the nuclear rocket engine tests, information on the off-site radiological monitoring, and descriptions of the tests.

  3. Fusion technology programme

    Finken, D.

    1985-10-01

    KfK is involved in the European Fusion Programme predominantly in the NET and Fusion Technology part. The following fields of activity are covered: Studies for NET, alternative confinement concepts, and needs and issues of integral testing. Research on structural materials. Development of superconducting magnets. Gyrotron development (part of the Physics Programme). Nuclear technology (breeding materials, blanket design, tritium technology, safety and environmental aspects of fusion, remote maintenance). Reported here are status and results of work under contracts with the CEC within the NET and Technology Programme. The aim of the major part of this R and D work is the support of NET, some areas (e.g. materials, safety and environmental impact, blanket design) have a wider scope and address problems of a demonstration reactor. In the current working period, several new proposals have been elaborated to be implemented into the 85/89 Euratom Fusion Programme. New KfK contributions relate to materials research (dual beam and fast reactor irradiations, ferritic steels), to blanket engineering (MHD-effects) and to safety studies (e.g. magnet safety). (orig./GG)

  4. Cold fusion

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik

    1995-02-01

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4 He, 3 He, 3 H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4 He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  5. Cold fusion

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  6. Integrated cell and process engineering for improved transient production of a "difficult-to-express" fusion protein by CHO cells.

    Johari, Yusuf B; Estes, Scott D; Alves, Christina S; Sinacore, Marty S; James, David C

    2015-12-01

    Based on an optimized electroporation protocol, we designed a rapid, milliliter-scale diagnostic transient production assay to identify limitations in the ability of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a model "difficult-to-express" homodimeric Fc-fusion protein, Sp35Fc, that exhibited very low volumetric titer and intracellular formation of disulfide-bonded oligomeric aggregates post-transfection. As expression of Sp35Fc induced an unfolded protein response in transfected host cells, we utilized the transient assay to compare, in parallel, multiple functionally diverse strategies to engineer intracellular processing of Sp35Fc in order to increase production and reduce aggregation as two discrete design objectives. Specifically, we compared the effect of (i) co-expression of ER-resident molecular chaperones (BiP, PDI, CypB) or active forms of UPR transactivators (ATF6c, XBP1s) at varying recombinant gene load, (ii) addition of small molecules known to act as chemical chaperones (PBA, DMSO, glycerol, betaine, TMAO) or modulate UPR signaling (PERK inhibitor GSK2606414) at varying concentration, (iii) a reduction in culture temperature to 32°C. Using this information, we designed a biphasic, Sp35Fc-specific transient manufacturing process mediated by lipofection that utilized CypB co-expression at an optimal Sp35Fc:CypB gene ratio of 5:1 to initially maximize transfected cell proliferation, followed by addition of a combination of PBA (0.5 mM) and glycerol (1% v/v) at the onset of stationary phase to maximize cell specific production and eliminate Sp35Fc aggregation. Using this optimal, engineered process transient Sp35Fc production was significantly increased sixfold over a 12 day production process with no evidence of disulfide-bonded aggregates. Finally, transient production in clonally derived sub-populations (derived from parental CHO host) screened for a heritably improved capability to produce Sp35Fc was also significantly improved by the optimized

  7. 40 CFR 1051.501 - What procedures must I use to test my vehicles or engines?

    2010-07-01

    ... vehicles or engines? 1051.501 Section 1051.501 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM RECREATIONAL ENGINES AND VEHICLES Test Procedures § 1051.501 What procedures must I use to test my vehicles or engines? This section describes test...

  8. 40 CFR 86.335-79 - Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle.

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. 86....335-79 Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. (a) The following test sequence shall be followed in... operating the engine at the higher approved load setting during cycle 1 and at the lower approved load...

  9. Design of high temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Sudo, Yukio

    1994-09-01

    Construction of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is now underway to establish and upgrade basic technologies for HTGRs and to conduct innovative basic research at high temperatures. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium gas-cooled reactor with 30 MW in thermal output and outlet coolant temperature of 850degC for rated operation and 950degC for high temperature test operation. It is planned to conduct various irradiation tests for fuels and materials, safety demonstration tests and nuclear heat application tests. JAERI received construction permit of HTTR reactor facility in February 1990 after 22 months of safety review. This report summarizes evaluation of nuclear and thermal-hydraulic characteristics, design outline of major systems and components, and also includes relating R and D result and safety evaluation. Criteria for judgment, selection of postulated events, major analytical conditions for anticipated operational occurrences and accidents, computer codes used in safety analysis and evaluation of each event are presented in the safety evaluation. (author)

  10. Exploring the engineering limit of heat flux of a W/RAFM divertor target for fusion reactors

    Mao, X.; Fursdon, M.; Chang, X. B.; Zhang, J. W.; Liu, P.; Ellwood, G.; Qian, X. Y.; Qin, S. J.; Peng, X. B.; Barrett, T. R.; Liu, P.

    2018-06-01

    The design and development of a fusion reactor divertor plasma facing component (PFC) is one of the many challenging issues on the road to commercial use of fusion energy. The divertor PFC is expected to exhaust steady state heat loads in the region of 10 MW m‑2 while keeping temperatures and thermo-mechanical stresses in its structure within the allowable limits. For ITER (International Thermo-Nuclear Experimental Reactor) a water cooled W/CuCrZr divertor PFC concept has been developed. However, this concept is not necessarily assured for use in future fusion reactors mainly because the neutron radiation dose would be at least an order magnitude higher, resulting in limited thermo-mechanical performance and considerably more activated waste products. In the present study, a water cooled divertor PFC using reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel as the heat sink pipe has been designed with pressurised water reactor-like cooling conditions (pressure of 15.5 MPa, velocity of 10–20 m s‑1 and temperature of 300 °C). The PFC is made up of a number of rectangular tungsten tiles, each with an inner circular hole (so-called monoblocks), joined onto a RAFM steel pipe with copper interlayers. The thermo-mechanical performance of the PFC has been studied in detail. The heat transfer coefficient between the RAFM pipe inner surface and the water was calculated using published correlations. Geometric parameters and water velocity were optimized with finite element (FE) thermal analysis, to achieve acceptable temperatures in the structure given the target exhaust heat load of 10 MW m‑2. Under this heat load and the optimised thermal design parameters, the structure of the PFC was further assessed by mechanical analysis. We find that under these conditions the RAFM steel pipe experiences cyclic plasticity, and fails the common linear elastic ratchetting (3 Sm) rule. Nevertheless, the designed W/RAFM divertor PFU can withstand 10 MW m‑2 heat load, albeit

  11. Fusion technology status and requirements

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined

  12. Canada's Fusion Program

    Jackson, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada's fusion strategy is based on developing specialized technologies in well-defined areas and supplying these technologies to international fusion projects. Two areas are specially emphasized in Canada: engineered fusion system technologies, and specific magnetic confinement and materials studies. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project focuses on the first of these areas. It tritium and fusion reactor fuel systems, remote maintenance and related safety studies. In the second area, the Centre Canadian de fusion magnetique operates the Tokamak de Varennes, the main magnetic fusion device in Canada. Both projects are partnerships linking the Government of Canada, represented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and provincial governments, electrical utilities, universities and industry. Canada's program has extensive international links, through which it collaborates with the major world fusion programs, including participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

  13. Manufacture and test of Bi-2212 cable-in-conduit conductor

    Qin, Jing Gang; Wu, Yu; Li, Jian Gang; Dai, Chao; Liu, Fang; Liu, Hua Jun; Liu, Pei Hang; Li, Chen-shan; Hao, Qing Bin; Zhou, Chao; Liu, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The CFETR, "China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor," is a new tokamak device. Its magnet system includes the toroidal field (TF), central solenoid (CS), and poloidal field coils. The main goal of this study is to build a fusion engineering tokamak reactor with fusion power of 50-200 MW and

  14. Testing and Characterization of Engineered Forms of Monosodium Titanate (MST)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-01-01

    Engineered forms of MST and mMST were prepared at ORNL using an internal gelation process. Samples of these two materials were characterized at SRNL to examine particle size and morphology, peroxide content, tapped densities, and Na, Ti, and C content. Batch contact tests were also performed to examine the performance of the materials. The E mMST material was found to contain less than 10% of the peroxide found in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. This was also evidenced in batch contact testing with both simulated and actual waste, where little difference in performance was seen between the two engineered materials, E MST and E mMST. Based on these results, attempts were made to increase the peroxide content of the materials by post-treatment with hydrogen peroxide. The peroxide treatment resulted in a slight (∼10%) increase in peroxide content; however, the peroxide:Ti molar ratio was still much lower (∼0.1 X) than what is seen in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. Testing with simulated waste showed the performance of the peroxide treated materials was improved. Batch contact tests were also performed with an earlier (2003) prepared lot of E MST to examine the effect of ionic strength on the performance of the material. In general the results showed a decrease in removal performance with increasing ionic strength, which is consistent with previous testing with MST. A Sr loading isotherm was also determined, and the E MST material was found to reach a Sr loading as high as 13.2 wt % after 100 days of contact at a phase ratio of 20000 mL/g. At the typical MST phase ratio of 2500 mL/g (0.4 g/L), a Sr loading of 2.64 wt % was reached after 506 hours of contact. Samples of E MST and the post-peroxide treated E mMST were also tested in a column configuration using simulated waste solution. The breakthrough curves along with analysis of the sorbent beds at the conclusion of the experiments showed that the peroxide treated E mMST has a higher Sr and Np capacity, but

  15. TESTING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ENGINEERED FORMS OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE (MST)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; Hobbs, D.

    2012-05-14

    Engineered forms of MST and mMST were prepared at ORNL using an internal gelation process. Samples of these two materials were characterized at SRNL to examine particle size and morphology, peroxide content, tapped densities, and Na, Ti, and C content. Batch contact tests were also performed to examine the performance of the materials. The {sup E}mMST material was found to contain less than 10% of the peroxide found in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. This was also evidenced in batch contact testing with both simulated and actual waste, where little difference in performance was seen between the two engineered materials, {sup E}MST and {sup E}mMST. Based on these results, attempts were made to increase the peroxide content of the materials by post-treatment with hydrogen peroxide. The peroxide treatment resulted in a slight ({approx}10%) increase in peroxide content; however, the peroxide:Ti molar ratio was still much lower ({approx}0.1 X) than what is seen in a freshly prepared batch of mMST. Testing with simulated waste showed the performance of the peroxide treated materials was improved. Batch contact tests were also performed with an earlier (2003) prepared lot of {sup E}MST to examine the effect of ionic strength on the performance of the material. In general the results showed a decrease in removal performance with increasing ionic strength, which is consistent with previous testing with MST. A Sr loading isotherm was also determined, and the {sup E}MST material was found to reach a Sr loading as high as 13.2 wt % after 100 days of contact at a phase ratio of 20000 mL/g. At the typical MST phase ratio of 2500 mL/g (0.4 g/L), a Sr loading of 2.64 wt % was reached after 506 hours of contact. Samples of {sup E}MST and the post-peroxide treated {sup E}mMST were also tested in a column configuration using simulated waste solution. The breakthrough curves along with analysis of the sorbent beds at the conclusion of the experiments showed that the peroxide treated

  16. Prospects for the use of high-Tc superconductors in fusion magnets and options for their test in SULTAN

    Wesche, Rainer; Bruzzone, Pierluigi; March, Stephen; Marinucci, Claudio; Stepanov, Boris; Uglietti, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► RE-123 tapes j c ≥ 500 A/cm (77 K) would enable fusion magnets operating above 20 K. ► Quench studies indicate that the protection of RE-123 fusion magnets is a challenge. ► Possibilities to test 50 kA class HTS conductors in SULTAN have been identified. ► HTS bus bar of large thermal resistance needed to connect sample and NbTi flux pump. ► Tests in the 20–50 K range require additional changes in the SULTAN cryogenics. -- Abstract: In the last few years, the critical current densities of long commercially available REBa 2 Cu 3 O 7−x (RE-123, where RE represents Y or a rare earth element) coated conductors have reached values of 250 A/cm-width at 77 K and zero applied field. Even higher values of 600 A/cm-w (77 K, B = 0) have been demonstrated in shorter lengths. The attractive features of the use of these high-T c superconductors (HTS) are operation temperatures above 20 K and/or magnetic fields higher than those envisaged for the ITER TF coils. Possible operation conditions for HTS fusion magnets have been studied taking into consideration the possible further improvements of RE-123 coated conductors. Investigations of stability and quench behavior indicate that stability is not a problem, whereas quench detection and protection need attention. Because of the high currents necessary for fusion magnets, many tapes need to be assembled into a transposed conductor. The qualification of HTS conductors for fusion magnets would require their test at magnetic fields of 11 T and currents well above 10 kA. The possibilities to test straight HTS conductor samples in SULTAN have been considered. For a test at 4.5 K, only the development of a low resistance joint between the HTS conductor under test and the NbTi transformer of SULTAN would be necessary. Tests up to 20 K would require that the HTS sample is connected with the NbTi transformer by a conduction-cooled HTS bus bar of large thermal resistance similar to the HTS module of a current

  17. Irradiation tests of radiation resistance optical fibers for fusion diagnostic application

    Kakuta, Tsunemi; Shikama, Tatsuo; Nishitani, Takeo; Yamamoto, Shin; Nagata, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Bun; Toh, Kentaro; Hori, Junichi

    2002-11-01

    To promote development of radiation-resistant core optical fibers, the ITER-EDA (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Engineering Design Activity) recommended carrying out international round-robin irradiation tests of optical fibers to establish a reliable database for their applications in the ITER plasma diagnostics. Ten developed optical fibers were irradiation-tested in a Co-60 gamma cell, a Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). Also, some of them were irradiation tested in a fast neutron irradiation facility of FNS (Fast Neutron Source), especially to study temperature dependence of neutron-associated irradiation effects. Included were several Japanese fluorine doped fibers and one Japanese standard fiber (purified and undoped silica core), as well as seven Russian fibers. Some of Russian fibers were drawn by Japanese manufactures from Russian made pre-form rods to study effects of manufacturing processes to radiation resistant properties. The present paper will describe behaviors of growth of radiation-induced optical transmission loss in the wavelength range of 350-1750nm. Results indicate that role of displacement damages by fast neutrons are very important in introducing permanent optical transmission loss. Spectra of optical transmission loss in visible range will depend on irradiation temperatures and material parameters of optical fibers.

  18. Engineering design of IFMIF/EVEDA lithium test loop. Electro-magnetic pump and pressure drop

    Kondo, Hiroo; Furukawa, Tomohiro; Hirakawa, Yasushi; Iuchi, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Takuji; Ida, Mizuho; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Wakai, Eiichi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Horiike, H.; Yamaoka, N.; Matsushita, I.

    2011-01-01

    The Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (EVEDA) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is proceeding as one of the ITER Broader Approach (ITER-BA). A Li circulation loop for testing hydraulic stability of the Li target (high speed free-surface flow of liquid Li as a beam target) and Li purification traps are under construction in the Japan Atomic Energy Agency as a major Japanese activities in the EVEDA. This paper presents specification of an electro-magnetic pump (EMP) for the EVEDA Li Test Loop (ELTL) and evaluation of the pressure drop in the main loop of the ELTL. The EMP circulates the liquid Li at a large flow rate up to 0.05 m 3 /s (3000 l/min) under a vacuum cover gas (Ar) pressure of 10 -3 Pa, thus the evaluation of cavitation generation is a crucial issue. The EMP used in the ELTL consists of two EMPs aligned in series through a U-tube whose size of one EMP is 0.8 m square and 2.6 m in length. The calculation of the pressure drop in the main Li loop to the EMP is approx. 25 kPa at the design maximum flow rate of 0.05 m 3 /s. On the other hand the height from the EMP to a Li tank to supply Li to the EMP is designed to be 9.72 m, and secures a static pressure and the cavitation number of 18 kPa and 3.4 respectively at the maximum flow rate in a vacuum condition. As a result, it is confirmed to prevent cavitation at the inlet of the EMP in this design. (author)

  19. Engineered Barrier System Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-01-01

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M and O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01

  20. X-Pinch Plasma Generation Testing for Neutron Source Development and Nuclear Fusion

    Hossam A.Gabbar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion is a sought-out technology in which two light elements are fused together to create a heavier element and releases energy. Two primary nuclear fusion technologies are being researched today: magnetic and inertial confinement. However, a new type of nuclear fusion technology is currently being research: multi-pinch plasma beams. At the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, there is research on multi-pinch plasma beam technology as an alternative to nuclear fusion. The objective is to intersect two plasma arcs at the center of the chamber. This is a precursor of nuclear fusion using multi-pinch. The innovation portion of the students’ work is the miniaturization of this concept using high energy electrical DC pulses. The experiment achieved the temperature of 2300 K at the intersection. In comparison to the simulation data, the temperature from the simulation is 7000 K at the intersection. Additionally, energy harvesting devices, both photovoltaics and a thermoelectric generator, were placed in the chamber to observe the viable energy extraction.