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Sample records for fused salt electrolysis

  1. Fused salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ares, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose.

    1989-01-01

    Working conditions for zirconium preparation by fused salt electrolysis were studied. For such purpose, a cell was built for operation under argon atmosphere. A graphite crucible served as anode, with steel cathodes. Proper design allowed cathode rechange under the inert atmosphere. Cathodic deposits of zirconium powder occluded salts from the bath. After washing with both water and hydrochloric acid, the metallic powder was consolidated by fusion. Optimum operating conditions were found to arise from an electrolyte of 12% potassium hexafluorzirconate -88% sodium chloride, at 820 deg C and 5 A/cm 2 cathodic current density. Deposits contained 35% of metal and current efficiency reached 66%. The powder contained up to 600 ppm of chlorine and 1.700 ppm of fluorine; after fusion, those amounts decreased to 2 ppm and 3 ppm respectively, with low proportion of metallic impurities. Though oxygen proportion was 4.500 ppm, it should be lowered by improving working conditions, as well as working on an ampler scale. (Author)

  2. Titanium metal obtention by fused salts electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Ares, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose.

    1989-01-01

    Potassium fluorotitanate dissolved in fused sodium chloride or potassium chloride may be electrolyzed under an inert gas atmosphere. Solid electrolysis products are formed on the cathode which contains titanium metal, sodium chloride, lower fluorotitanates and small quantities of alkali metal fluorotitanate. The extraction of titanium from the electrolysis products may be carried out by aqueous leaching (removal of chloride salts of alkali metals and a certain amount of fluorotitanates). Titanium metal obtained is relatively pure. (Author)

  3. Electrolysis of uranium tetrafluorure fused salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Botbol, J.

    1991-01-01

    Electrolytic preparation of U has been unsuccessful because the metal formed is in easily oxidized state. Electrolytic depositions were made under various conditions from fused NaCl-KCl baths containing UF 4 . X-ray diffraction studies were made of the products. The results indicate that mixed U with several oxides phases are produced. It was concluded that the method was unlikely to be efficient for the production of U metal. (Author) [es

  4. A study on the separation of Neodymium and zirconium from impure uranium by fused-salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Joon; Lee, Seong Ho; Lee, Jae Heon; Lee, Eung Cho

    1997-01-01

    A study on the electrorefining of an impure uranium containing zirconium and neodymium at 500 deg C by KCl-LiCl fused salt electrolysis was performed. The reduction potentials of uranium and neodymium were 0.12V and 0.64V (vs. Ag/AgCl electrode), respectively. When a 1wt% Nd of uranium was added as an impurity, 0.001wt% Nd was deposited onto the cathode below 0.5V after electrolysis. When a 10.5wt% Zr of uranium was added to liquid cadmium anode as an impurity, zirconium was evaporated as ZrCl 4 at 500 deg C during electrolysis, and consequently uranium was deposited onto the cathode as a purity of 99.98wt% U. The morphology of purified uranium was appeared as dendritic structure. The activity coefficient of metallic neodymium for the displacement reaction of UCl 3 + Nd (cd) = NdCl 3 + U ( -c d) was calculated to be 3.67 x 10 -10 at 500 deg C. (author)

  5. Preparation of coherent deposits of metallic titanium and zirconium by fused salts electrolysis. Preparacion de depositos coherentes de titanio y circonio metalicos por electrolisis de sales fundidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perillo, P.M.; Botbol, J. (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Desarrollo de Procesos, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1994-01-01

    The production of coherent deposits of metallic titanium and zirconium bath composition and operating conditions were studied. The cathode was a striated iron cylinder and a graphite crucible served as anode. K[sub 2]TiF[sub 6] and K[sub 2]ZrF[sub 6] dissolved in fused NaCl at 800 degree centigree may be electrolyzed under an insert gas atmosphere. It was found that the deposits depend on the electrolytic composition of the bath while other variables in the studied values do not influence significantly. (Author) 11 refs.

  6. Use of sodium salt electrolysis in the process of continuous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents test results concerning the selection of sodium salt for the technology of continuous modification of the EN AC-AlSi12 alloy, which is based on electrolysis of sodium salts, occurring directly in a crucible with liquid alloy. Sodium ions formed as a result of the sodium salt dissociation and the electrolysis are ...

  7. Uranium metal production by molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasawa, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a promising uranium enrichment technology in the next generation. Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides into uranium metal is proposed for the preparation of uranium metal as a feed material for AVLIS plant. Considering economical performance, continuos process concept and minimizing the amount of radioactive waste, an electrolytic process for producing uranium metal directly from uranium oxides will offer potential advantages over the existing commercial process. Studies of uranium metal by electrolysis in fluoride salts (BaF 2 -LiF-UF 4 (74-11-15 w/o) at 1150-1200degC, using both a laboratory scale apparatus and an engineering scale one, and continuous casting of uranium metal were carried out in order to decide the optimum operating conditions and the design of the industrial electrolytic cells. (author)

  8. Use of sodium salt electrolysis in the process of continuous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Use of sodium salt electrolysis in the process of continuous modification of eutectic EN ... the plastic groundmass of the solid solution α (Al), have an effect on their ..... Onyia C, Okorie B, Neife S and Obayi C 2013 World J. Eng. Technol. 1 9. 35.

  9. Metal Production by Molten Salt Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grjotheim, K.; Kvande, H.; Qingfeng, Li

    Chemistry and electrochemistry of molten salts are reviewed. Technological aspects of electrolytic production of aluminium, magnesium, and other metals are comprehensively surveyed.......Chemistry and electrochemistry of molten salts are reviewed. Technological aspects of electrolytic production of aluminium, magnesium, and other metals are comprehensively surveyed....

  10. Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder

    2014-01-01

    Electrolysis is a well-established technology with many different applications. In particular, it can be used to produce hydrogen by using electricity to split water. As an increasing part of the energy system consists of fluctuating power sources such as wind and solar it becomes increasingly...... necessary to be able to store large amounts of electrical energy. One option is to do it in the form of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich synthetic compounds. This has led to increased interest in electrolysis with new cell types being developed. This entry provides an overview of the status and technological...... challenges of electrolysis systems and discusses their role in the future energy system....

  11. Neutronic study of a nuclear reactor of fused salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia B, F. B.; Francois L, J. L.

    2012-10-01

    The reactors of fused salts called Molten Salt Reactor have presented a resurgence of interest in the last decade, due to they have a versatility in particular to operate, either with a thermal or fast neutrons spectrum. The most active development was by the middle of 1950 and principles of 1970 in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In this work some developed models are presented particularly and studied with the help of the MCNPX code, for the development of the neutronic study of this reactor, starting of proposed models and from a simple and homogeneous geometry until other more complex models and approximate to more real cases. In particular the geometry conditions and criticality of each model were analyzed, the isotopic balance, as well as the concentrations of the salts and different assigned fuel types. (Author)

  12. Treatment of high salt oxidized modified starch waste water using micro-electrolysis, two-phase anaerobic aerobic and electrolysis for reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xuenong; Wang, Yulin

    2017-06-01

    A combined process of micro-electrolysis, two-phase anaerobic, aerobic and electrolysis was investigated for the treatment of oxidized modified starch wastewater (OMSW). Optimum ranges for important operating variables were experimentally determined and the treated water was tested for reuse in the production process of corn starch. The optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of micro-electrolysis, methanation reactor, aerobic process and electrolysis process were 5, 24, 12 and 3 h, respectively. The addition of iron-carbon fillers to the acidification reactor was 200 mg/L while the best current density of electrolysis was 300 A/m2. The biodegradability was improved from 0.12 to 0.34 by micro-electrolysis. The whole treatment was found to be effective with removal of 96 % of the chemical oxygen demand (COD), 0.71 L/day of methane energy recovery. In addition, active chlorine production (15,720 mg/L) was obtained by electrolysis. The advantage of this hybrid process is that, through appropriate control of reaction conditions, effect from high concentration of salt on the treatment was avoided. Moreover, the process also produced the material needed in the production of oxidized starch while remaining emission-free and solved the problem of high process cost.

  13. A basic study on fluoride-based molten salt electrolysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Kwang Bum [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Park, Byung Gi [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this project is to study on the physicochemical properties of fluoride molten salt, to develop numerical model for simulation of molten salt electrolysis, and to establish experimental technique of fluoride molten salt. Physicochemical data of fluoride molten salt are investigated and summarized. The numerical model, designated as REFIN is developed with diffusion-layer theory and electrochemical reaction kinetics. REFIN is benchmarked with published experimental data. REFIN has a capability to simulate multicomponent electrochemical system at transient conditions. Experimental device is developed to measure electrochemical properties of structural material for fluoride molten salt. Ni electrode is measured with cyclic voltammogram in the conditions of 600 .deg. C LiF-BeF{sub 2} and 700 .deg. C LiF-BeF{sub 2}. 74 refs., 23 figs., 57 tabs. (Author)

  14. Preliminary study of the electrolysis of aluminum sulfide in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1983-02-01

    A preliminary laboratory-scale study of the electrolysis of aluminum sulfide in molten salts investigated the (1) solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ in molten salts, (2) electrochemical behavior of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/, and (3) electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ with the determination of current efficiency as a function of current density. The solubility measurements show that MgCl/sub 2/-NaCl-KCl eutectic electrolyte at 1023 K can dissolve up to 3.3 mol % sulfide. The molar ratio of sulfur to aluminum in the eutectic is about one, which suggests that some sulfur remains undissolved, probably in the form of MgS. The experimental data and thermodynamic calculations suggest that Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ dissolves in the eutectic to form AlS/sup +/ species in solution. Addition of AlCl/sub 3/ to the eutectic enhances the solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/; the solubility increases with increasing AlCl/sub 3/ concentration. The electrode reaction mechanism for the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ was elucidated by using linear sweep voltammetry. The cathodic reduction of aluminum-ion-containing species to aluminum proceeds by a reversible, diffusion-controlled, three-electron reaction. The anodic reaction involves the two-electron discharge of sulfide-ion-containing species, followed by the fast dimerization of sulfur atoms to S/sub 2/. Electrolysis experiments show that Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ dissolved in molten MgCl/sub 2/-NaCl-KCl eutectic or in eutectic containing AlCl/sub 3/ can be electrolyzed to produce aluminum and sulfur. In the eutectic at 1023 K, the electrolysis can be conducted up to about 300 mA/cm/sup 2/ for the saturation solubility of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/. Although these preliminary results are promising, additional studies are needed to elucidate many critical operating parameters before the technical potential of the electrolysis can be accurately assessed. 20 figures, 18 tables.

  15. A study of metallic coatings obtained by electrolysis of molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, Michel.

    1978-06-01

    An appropriate technique has been developed for obtaining compact metallic coatings from electrolysis of molten salts. Through the use of this method, it has been possible to produce pure metal deposits which, until now, has been extremely difficult to do. The apparatus used and the main steps of the process such as dehydration of the solvant, degassing of the equipment, and starting of the electrolytic process, are first described. This is followed by a discussion of the deposits of the metals beryllium, uranium, tantalum and tungsten obtained from electrolysis of molten fluorides at temperatures between 600 and 800 0 C. The metal coatings so obtained are homogeneous and show continuity, their thicknesses varying from a few microns to a millimeter or more. They have been studied by measurements. As potential applications of this new technique, one can mention the growth of diffusion barriers and the production of cathodes for thermoionic emission. The method can also be used for electroforming. An intermetallic diffusion between the deposit and the substrate has been observed in some cases. The advantage of the technique of melt electrolysis in obtaining metal coatings of enhanced thicknesses is illustrated by taking the beryllium-nickel system as an example. It is shown that the thickness obtained is proportional to the square root of growth time and is about 6 to 8 times larger than that obtained by conventional techniques [fr

  16. Renewable and high efficient syngas production from carbon dioxide and water through solar energy assisted electrolysis in eutectic molten salts

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Hongjun; Liu, Yue; Ji, Deqiang; Li, Zhida; Yi, Guanlin; Yuan, Dandan; Wang, Baohui; Zhang, Zhonghai; Wang, Peng

    2017-01-01

    sustainable energy sources: concentrated solar light heats molten salt and solar cell supplies electricity for electrolysis. The eutectic Li0.85Na0.61K0.54CO3/nLiOH molten electrolyte is rationally designed with low melting point (<450 °C). The synthesized

  17. Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat-Regenerated Salt Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m3 H2/m3·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H2/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. The determination of UO2 and UF4 in fused fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batiste, D.J.; Lee, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The determination of uranium oxide solubilities in fused fluoride salts is important in the electrolytic preparation of uranium metal. This project was initiated to develop a method for the determination of UO 2 separately from UF 4 in UF 4 -CaF 2 -LiF fused salts. Previous methods used for the determination of UO 2 in fused fluoride salts involved inert gas fusions where oxygen was liberated as CO 2 , and hydrofluorination where oxygen was released as H 2 O; but the special equipment used for these procedures was no longer available. These methods assumed that all of the oxygen liberated was due to UO 2 and does not consider impurities from reagents and other oxygen sources that amount to a bias of approximately 0.3 wt %. This titrimetric method eliminates the bias by selectively extracting the UF 4 with a Na 2 EDTA-H 3 BO 3 solution. The remaining uranium oxide residue is treated and titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint with NBS standard K 2 Cr 2 O 7 . An aliquot of the Na 2 EDTA-H 3 BO 3 extract is also titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint, this uranium component is determined and calculated as UF 4 . 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Barium titanate coated with magnesium titanate via fused salt method and its dielectric property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Renzheng; Cui Aili; Wang Xiaohui; Li Longtu

    2003-01-01

    Barium titanate fine particles were coated homogeneously with magnesium titanate via the fused salt method. The thickness of the magnesium titanate film is 20 nm, as verified by TEM and XRD. The mechanism of the coating is that: when magnesium chloride is liquated in 800 deg. C, magnesium will replace barium in barium titanate, and form magnesium titanate film on the surface of barium titanate particles. Ceramics sintered from the coated particles show improved high frequency ability. The dielectric constant is about 130 at the frequency from 1 to 800 MHz

  20. Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat-Regenerated Salt Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Cusick, Roland D.; Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown

  1. Renewable and high efficient syngas production from carbon dioxide and water through solar energy assisted electrolysis in eutectic molten salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongjun; Liu, Yue; Ji, Deqiang; Li, Zhida; Yi, Guanlin; Yuan, Dandan; Wang, Baohui; Zhang, Zhonghai; Wang, Peng

    2017-09-01

    Over-reliance on non-renewable fossil fuel leads to steadily increasing concentration of atmospheric CO2, which has been implicated as a critical factor contributing to global warming. The efficient conversion of CO2 into useful product is highly sought after both in academic and industry. Herein, a novel conversion strategy is proposed to one-step transform CO2/H2O into syngas (CO/H2) in molten salt with electrolysis method. All the energy consumption in this system are contributed from sustainable energy sources: concentrated solar light heats molten salt and solar cell supplies electricity for electrolysis. The eutectic Li0.85Na0.61K0.54CO3/nLiOH molten electrolyte is rationally designed with low melting point (<450 °C). The synthesized syngas contains very desirable content of H2 and CO, with tuneable molar ratios (H2/CO) from 0.6 to 7.8, and with an efficient faradaic efficiency of ∼94.5%. The synthesis of syngas from CO2 with renewable energy at a such low electrolytic temperature not only alleviates heat loss, mitigates system corrosion, and heightens operational safety, but also decreases the generation of methane, thus increases the yield of syngas, which is a remarkable technological breakthrough and this work thus represents a stride in sustainable conversion of CO2 to value-added product.

  2. Renewable and high efficient syngas production from carbon dioxide and water through solar energy assisted electrolysis in eutectic molten salts

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Hongjun

    2017-07-13

    Over-reliance on non-renewable fossil fuel leads to steadily increasing concentration of atmospheric CO2, which has been implicated as a critical factor contributing to global warming. The efficient conversion of CO2 into useful product is highly sought after both in academic and industry. Herein, a novel conversion strategy is proposed to one-step transform CO2/H2O into syngas (CO/H2) in molten salt with electrolysis method. All the energy consumption in this system are contributed from sustainable energy sources: concentrated solar light heats molten salt and solar cell supplies electricity for electrolysis. The eutectic Li0.85Na0.61K0.54CO3/nLiOH molten electrolyte is rationally designed with low melting point (<450 °C). The synthesized syngas contains very desirable content of H2 and CO, with tuneable molar ratios (H2/CO) from 0.6 to 7.8, and with an efficient faradaic efficiency of ∼94.5%. The synthesis of syngas from CO2 with renewable energy at a such low electrolytic temperature not only alleviates heat loss, mitigates system corrosion, and heightens operational safety, but also decreases the generation of methane, thus increases the yield of syngas, which is a remarkable technological breakthrough and this work thus represents a stride in sustainable conversion of CO2 to value-added product.

  3. Analysis of cell performance and thermal regeneration of a lithium-tin cell having an immobilized fused-salt electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, E. J.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Cell performance and thermal regeneration of a thermally regenerative cell uses lithium and tin and a fused-salt electrolyte. The emf of the Li-Sn cell, as a function of cathode-alloy composition, is shown to resemble that of the Na-Bi cell.

  4. Process and apparatus for extraction of gases produced during operation of a fused-salt nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.; Marie, J.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of fused-salt nuclear reactors and its object is the extraction of the gases produced in the course of operation of these reactors. The process according to the invention consists in placing into position a piece of material permeable for gases and impermeable for the used fused salts, for instance, a piece of graphite, in such a way that part of the surface of this piece is in contact with the circuit of the radioactive salts and another part connected to a gas suction device. The piece could also be scavenged in its mass by a flow of inert gas. Application is contemplated in reactors using a mixture of lithium fluoride, beryllium fluoride, and uranium and/or thorium fluoride. 10 claims, 2 drawing figures

  5. Neutronic study of a nuclear reactor of fused salts; Estudio neutronico de un reactor nuclear de sales fundidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia B, F. B.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: faviolabelen@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The reactors of fused salts called Molten Salt Reactor have presented a resurgence of interest in the last decade, due to they have a versatility in particular to operate, either with a thermal or fast neutrons spectrum. The most active development was by the middle of 1950 and principles of 1970 in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In this work some developed models are presented particularly and studied with the help of the MCNPX code, for the development of the neutronic study of this reactor, starting of proposed models and from a simple and homogeneous geometry until other more complex models and approximate to more real cases. In particular the geometry conditions and criticality of each model were analyzed, the isotopic balance, as well as the concentrations of the salts and different assigned fuel types. (Author)

  6. Preparation of fused chloride salts for use in pyrochemical plutonium recovery operations at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, K.W.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The Plutonium Metal Technology Group at Los Alamos routinely uses pyrochemical processes to produce and purify plutonium from impure sources. The basic processes (metal production, metal purification, and residue treatment) involve controlling oxidation and reduction reactions between plutonium and its compounds in molten salts. Current production methods are described, as well as traditional approaches and recent developments in the preparation of solvent salts for electrorefining, molten salt extraction, lean metal (pyroredox) purification, and direct oxide reduction

  7. Preparation of fused chloride salts for use in pyrochemical plutonium recovery operations at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fife, K.W.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The Plutonium Metal Technology Group at Los Alamos routinely uses pyrochemical processes to produce and purify plutonium from impure sources. The basic processes (metal production, metal purification, and residue treatment) involve controlling oxidation and reduction reactions between plutonium and its compounds in molten salts. Current production methods are described, as well as traditional approaches and recent developments in the preparation of solvent salts for electrorefining, molten salt extraction, lean metal (pyroredox) purification, and direct oxide reduction.

  8. Development of Pyro-separation Technology Based on Molten Salt Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Joon Bo; Kim, E. H.; Yoo, J. H. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The focus of this study was to develop recovery technologies in the pyroprocessing. The unit processes of the project can be classified into two groups; electro-refining process to recover uranium and long-lived nuclides, and cathode processing to produce a metal ingot both from a salt-contained metal and from Cd-contained metal. This project has been carried out for the third phase period of the long-term nuclear R and D program, and focused on the development of key technologies of the pyroprocessing such as electrorefining, draw down and cathode processing. Mock-up system of 1 kg-U/batch was built for performance tests which were conducted to ensure the adequacy of the research and development of the pyroprocessing technology. The experiments were carried out through bench-scale inactive tests except for uranium. In particular, the sticking problem was inevitable in the US's Mark-V and PEER electrorefiner. As a result of this study, a graphite cathode was developed, which exhibited self-scraping behavior and did not need scraping step. The design of an electrorefiner could be simplified, and the throughput was enhanced due to an increased cathode area. A long-term R and D plan was established to develop pyroprocessing technology. In the near term, the results of the current project will be utilized in the next phase of the R and D plan ('07 - '10), and long-term wise, is expected to contribute to recovering fuel materials for transmutation in a Gen-IV reactor.

  9. Development of Pyro-separation Technology Based on Molten Salt Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Joon Bo; Kim, E. H.; Yoo, J. H.

    2007-06-01

    The focus of this study was to develop recovery technologies in the pyroprocessing. The unit processes of the project can be classified into two groups; electro-refining process to recover uranium and long-lived nuclides, and cathode processing to produce a metal ingot both from a salt-contained metal and from Cd-contained metal. This project has been carried out for the third phase period of the long-term nuclear R and D program, and focused on the development of key technologies of the pyroprocessing such as electrorefining, draw down and cathode processing. Mock-up system of 1 kg-U/batch was built for performance tests which were conducted to ensure the adequacy of the research and development of the pyroprocessing technology. The experiments were carried out through bench-scale inactive tests except for uranium. In particular, the sticking problem was inevitable in the US's Mark-V and PEER electrorefiner. As a result of this study, a graphite cathode was developed, which exhibited self-scraping behavior and did not need scraping step. The design of an electrorefiner could be simplified, and the throughput was enhanced due to an increased cathode area. A long-term R and D plan was established to develop pyroprocessing technology. In the near term, the results of the current project will be utilized in the next phase of the R and D plan ('07 - '10), and long-term wise, is expected to contribute to recovering fuel materials for transmutation in a Gen-IV reactor

  10. Assay of uranium in fused salt cake generated at the natural uranium metal fuel fabrication plants by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, P.C.; Bhanu, A.U.; Sahoo, S.; Iyer, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    A passive gamma-ray spectroscopic method is employed for the assay of uranium in fused salt cake, a scrap produced at the natural uranium metal fuel fabrication plants. The method makes use of NaI(TI) detector coupled with a multichannel analyser. The 1 MeV gamma-ray of 238 U was used for the calibration. The calibration curve was made by counting synthetic mixtures made of U 3 O 8 powder, the heat treatment salt and iron in the form of fine powder. The uranium content in these synthetic mixtures was kept in the range of 1-11 per cent. 23 lots of the fused salt cake taken from three different batches of the salt cake were then analysed by this method. The uranium content of fused salt cake was found to be in the range of 1.70-11.43 per cent. To compare the gamma spectrometric results with a completely independent method, chemical analysis of all the fused salt cakes were also carried out. The NDA results were found to agree within ± 17 per cent with the chemical analysis results. (author)

  11. Molten salt electrolysis device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Kazuaki; Takasawa, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    A rotational shaft is disposed vertically downwardly from an upper portion so as to be immersed in a liquid metal in a vessel, impellers for stirring the liquid metal are disposed on the lower portion of the rotational shaft, and a cylindrical body is disposed in the inside of the vessel so as to surround the impellers. When the rotational shaft is rotated, the impellers suck the liquid metal upwardly from the lower portion of the cylindrical body and flow the metal from the upper portion to cause a downwarding stream on the outside of the cylindrical body. As a result, materials reduced and deposited on the upper surface of a liquid metal cathode along with the stream of the liquid metal are precipitated effectively on the lower portion of the vessel. In addition, since a liquid metal with no deposition of uranium is always frown over from the upper portion of the cylindrical body, growth of uranium on the surface of the cathode of liquid metal is prevented, so that uranium, plutonium and transuranium elements can be recovered stably by electrolytic reduction. (N.H.)

  12. Evaluation of Li3N accumulation in a fused LiCl/Li salt matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, C. S.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrochemical conditioning of spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of final disposal is currently being demonstrated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and ongoing research in this area includes the demonstration of this process on spent oxide fuel. In conjunction with this research a pilot scale of the preprocessing stage is being designed by ANL-W to demonstrate the in situ hot cell capability of the chemical reduction stage. An impurity evaluation was completed for a Li/LiCl salt matrix in the presence of spent LWR uranium oxide fuel. A simple analysis was performed in which the sources of impurities in the salt matrix were only from the cell atmosphere. Only reactions with the lithium were considered. The levels of impurities were shown to be highly sensitive system conditions. A predominance diagram for the Li-O-N system was constructed for the device, and the general oxidation, nitridation and combined reactions were calculated as a function of oxygen and nitrogen partial pressure. These calculations and hotcell atmosphere data were used to determine the total number and type of impurities expected in the salt matrix and the mass rate for the device was determined

  13. Optimizing the space-time-yield and the specific energy consumption of molten salt electrolysis processes for the electrowinning of metals in subgroups 4 and 5 of the periodic table of elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeck, W.

    1988-04-01

    Disadvantages of molten salt electrolysis are its low space-time-yield (kg/m 3 h) combined with its high specific energy consumption (kWh/kg). These factors essentially determine how electrolysis is applied on an industrial scale. The electrolysis of tantalum was selected as an example representative for other electrolytic processes; this series of tests allow statements also on the winning of the other elements from subgroups 4 and 5 of the periodic table, and on electrolytic aluminium extraction. Optimal operating conditions for direct current electrolysis were determined in the laboratory by varying the current density and the electrolysis temperature. In order to improve the space-time-yield from an existing electrolytic cell with a given electrolyte composition beyond the optimal range of direct current electrolysis, the process of periodic current reversal is applied. In this process, the polarity is reversed for a short time at constant periodic intervals. If the forward time period and the backward time period are chosen in a suitable way, both the current efficiency and the space-time-yield can be improved without increasing the energy consumption. 59 refs., 48 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  14. Aluminothermic Reduction-Molten Salt Electrolysis Using Inert Anode for Oxygen and Al-Base Alloy Extraction from Lunar Soil Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kaiyu; Shi, Zhongning; Xu, Junli; Hu, Xianwei; Gao, Bingliang; Wang, Zhaowen

    2017-10-01

    Aluminothermic reduction-electrolysis using an inert anode process is proposed to extract oxygen and metals from Minnesota Lunar Simulant-1 (MLS-1). Effective aluminothermic reduction between dissolved MLS-1 and dissolved metal aluminum was achieved in cryolite salt media. The product phases obtained by aluminothermic reduction at 980°C for 4 h were Al, Si, and Al5FeSi, while the chemical components were 79.71 mass% aluminum, 12.03 mass% silicon, 5.91 mass% iron, and 2.35 mass% titanium. The cryolite salt containing Al2O3 was subsequently electrolyzed with Fe0.58-Ni0.42 inert anode at 960°C for 4 h. Oxygen was evolved at the anode with an anodic current efficiency of 78.28%. The results demonstrate that this two-step process is remarkably feasible for the extraterrestrial extraction of oxygen and metals. This process will help expand the existing in situ resource utilization methods.

  15. Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Y.

    2011-09-19

    There is a tremendous source of entropic energy available from the salinity difference between river water and seawater, but this energy has yet to be efficiently captured and stored. Here we demonstrate that H(2) can be produced in a single process by capturing the salinity driven energy along with organic matter degradation using exoelectrogenic bacteria. Only five pairs of seawater and river water cells were sandwiched between an anode, containing exoelectrogenic bacteria, and a cathode, forming a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell. Exoelectrogens added an electrical potential from acetate oxidation and reduced the anode overpotential, while the reverse electrodialysis stack contributed 0.5-0.6 V at a salinity ratio (seawater:river water) of 50. The H(2) production rate increased from 0.8 to 1.6 m(3)-H(2)/m(3)-anolyte/day for seawater and river water flow rates ranging from 0.1 to 0.8 mL/ min. H(2) recovery, the ratio of electrons used for H(2) evolution to electrons released by substrate oxidation, ranged from 72% to 86%. Energy efficiencies, calculated from changes in salinities and the loss of organic matter, were 58% to 64%. By using a relatively small reverse electrodialysis stack (11 membranes), only ~1% of the produced energy was needed for pumping water. Although Pt was used on the cathode in these tests, additional tests with a nonprecious metal catalyst (MoS(2)) demonstrated H(2) production at a rate of 0.8 m(3)/m(3)/d and an energy efficiency of 51%. These results show that pure H(2) gas can efficiently be produced from virtually limitless supplies of seawater and river water, and biodegradable organic matter.

  16. Direct reduction of uranium dioxide and few other metal oxides to corresponding metals by high temperature molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandas, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Molten salt based electro-reduction processes, capable of directly converting solid metal oxides to metals with minimum intermediate steps, are being studied worldwide. Production of metals apart, the process assumes importance in nuclear technology in the context of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent oxide fuels, for it serves as an intermediate step to convert spent oxide fuel to a metal alloy, which in turn can be processed by molten salt electro-refining method to gain the actinides present in it. In the context of future metal fuel fast reactor programme, the electrochemical process was studied for conversion of solid UO_2 to U metal in LiCl-1wt.% Li_2O melt at 650 °C with platinum anode at the Metal Processing Studies Section, PMPD, IGCAR. A brief overview of the work is presented in the paper

  17. Electrochemical behaviours of lanthanide fluorides in the electrolysis system with LiF-NaF-Kf salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joon-Bo, Shim; Sung-Chan, Hwang; Eung-Ho, Kim; Young-Ho, Kang; Byung-Jik, Lee; Jae-Hyung, Yoo

    2003-01-01

    As a part of partitioning studies, the experiments of cyclic voltammetry and electrolytic reduction with the liquid bismuth cathode were conducted to investigate electrochemical behaviours of lanthanide elements in the electrorefining system employing LiF-NaF-KF eutectic salt as the electrolyte. The cyclic voltammograms for NdF 3 and GdF 3 were obtained at various potential scan rates, respectively. The cathodic and anodic peak currents of the elements increased in proportion to the square root of the potential scan rate. According to changes of the potential difference between the coupled cathodic and anodic peaks, reversibilities of the reduction-oxidation reactions in this system were evaluated. In addition, further behaviours of electrochemical reaction of the elements were examined through electrolytic tests of the system using liquid bismuth as the cathode at fixed current densities. (author)

  18. Electrochemical deposition of La-Mg alloys in LaCl3-MgCl2-KCl system with molten salt electrolysis process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahoo Kumar D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La-Mg alloys of different compositions were prepared by electrolysis of LaCl3-MgCl2-KCl melts. Different phases of La-Mg alloys were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES analyses showed that chemical compositions of La-Mg alloys were consistent with phase structures of XRD pattern, and magnesium content in the alloy could be controlled by electrolysis parameters. The effects of various process parameters such as concentration of magnesium chloride in the bath, temperature of electrolysis and cathode current density on the current efficiency have been investigated. A maximum current efficiency of 85% and yield of 80% was obtained from the bath at 12.5A/cm2 current density at an operating temp 850°C.

  19. Water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Franz H. (Inventor); Grigger, David J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an electrolysis cell forming hydrogen and oxygen at space terminals. The anode terminal is porous and able to form oxygen within the cell and permit escape of the gaseous oxygen through the anode and out through a flow line in the presence of backpressure. Hydrogen is liberated in the cell at the opposing solid metal cathode which is permeable to hydrogen but not oxygen so that the migratory hydrogen formed in the cell is able to escape from the cell. The cell is maintained at an elevated pressure so that the oxygen liberated by the cell is delivered at elevated pressure without pumping to raise the pressure of the oxygen.

  20. Evaluation of Normal and Nanolayer Composite Thermal Barrier Coatings in Fused Vanadate-Sulfate Salts at 1000°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Daroonparvar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hot corrosion behavior of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, YSZ/normal Al2O3, and YSZ/nano-Al2O3 coatings was investigated in the presence of molten mixture of Na2SO4 + V2O5 at 1000°C. Microstructural characterization showed that the creation of hot corrosion products containing YVO4 crystals and monoclinic ZrO2 is primarily related to the reaction between NaVO3 and Y2O3 during hot corrosion. The lowest amount of hot corrosion products was observed in YSZ as an inner layer of YSZ/nano-Al2O3 coating. Hence, it can be concluded that the presence of nanostructured Al2O3 layer over the conventional YSZ coating can considerably reduce the infiltration of molten corrosive salts into the YSZ layer during hot corrosion which is mainly related to the compactness of nanostructured alumina layer (including nanoregions in comparison with normal alumina layer.

  1. Voltammetric behavior, biocidal effect and synthesis of some new nanomeric fused cyclic thiosemicarbazones and their mercuric(II salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.T. Makki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available New nanomeric 3-thioxo-5-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-6-methyl-9-unsubstituted/substituted-1,2,4-triazino[5,6-b]indoles (2a–c and 3-thioxo-5-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,4-triaino[5,6]-cyclobut-6-ene (3 were prepared via reaction of thiosemicarbazide with 5-unsubstitutedand/substituted-indol-2,3-diones and/or 3,4-dihydroxycyclobutane-1,2-dione in methanol–concentrated HCl at room temperature. A series of mercury(II–ligand salts e.g. compound 4b and Hg(II complexes 5a,b and 6 of cyclic Schiff base were prepared. Structures of these compounds were established by elemental analysis and spectral measurements. The redox characteristics of selected compounds were studied for use as chelating agents for stripping voltammetric determination of mercuric(II ions in aqueous media. The compounds were also screened for their use as molluscicidal agents against Biomophalaria Alexandrina Snails responsible for Bilhariziasis.

  2. High Temperature Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elder, Rachael; Cumming, Denis; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of carbon dioxide, or co-electrolysis of carbon dioxide and steam, has a great potential for carbon dioxide utilisation. A solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), operating between 500 and 900. °C, is used to reduce carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. If steam is also i...

  3. Further Studies, About New Elements Production, by Electrolysis of Cathodic Pd Thin–Long Wires, in Alcohol-Water Solutions (H, D) and Th-Hg Salts. New Procedures to Produce Pd Nano-Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Celani, F; Righi, E; Trenta, G; Catena, C; D’Agostaro, G; Quercia, P; Andreassi, V; Marini, P; Di Stefano, V; Nakamura, M; Mancini, A; Sona, P G; Fontana, F; Gamberale, L; Garbelli, D; Celia, E; Falcioni, F; Marchesini, M; Novaro, E; Mastromatteo, U

    2005-01-01

    Abstract They were continued, at National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Frascati National Laboratories-Italy, the systematic studies about detection of new elements, some even with isotopic composition different from natural one, after prolonged electrolysis of Pd wires. The electrolytic solution adopted is the, unusual, used from our experimental group since 1999. In short, it was a mixture of both heavy ethyl alcohol (C2H5OD at 90-95%) and water (D2O, at 10-5%), with Th salts at micromolar concentration and Hg at even lower concentration (both of spectroscopic purity). The liquid solutions, before use, were carefully vacuum distilled (and on line 100nm filtered) at low temperatures (30-40°C) and analysed by ICP-MS. The pH was kept quite mild (acidic at about 3-4). The cathode is Pd (99.9% purity) in the shape of long (60cm) and thin wires (diameter only 0.05mm). Before use, it is carefully cleaned and oxidised by Joule heating in air following a (complex) procedure from us continuously improved (since 1995...

  4. Solubility of uranium oxide in molten salt electrolysis bath of LiF–BaF{sub 2} with LaF{sub 3} additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alangi, Nagaraj, E-mail: nagaraj@barc.gov.in [Laser & Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai (India); Mukherjee, Jaya [Laser & Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Gantayet, L.M. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai (India)

    2016-03-15

    The solubility of UO{sub 2} in the molten mixtures of equimolar LiF–BaF{sub 2}(1:1) with LaF{sub 3} as additive was studied in the range of 1423 K–1523 K. The molten fluoride salt mixture LiF–BaF{sub 2} LaF{sub 3} was equilibrated with a sintered uranium oxide pellet at 1423 K, 1473 K, 1523 K and the salt samples were collected after equilibration. Studies were conducted in the range of 10%–50% by weight additions of LaF{sub 3} in the equimolar LiF–BaF{sub 2}(1:1) base fluoride salt bath. Solubility of UO{sub 2} increased with rise in LaF{sub 3} concentration in the molten fluoride in the temperature range of 1423 K–1523 K. At a given concentration of LaF{sub 3}, the UO{sub 2} solubility increased monotonously with temperature. With mixed solvent, when UF{sub 4} was added as a replacement of part of LaF{sub 3} in LiF–BaF{sub 2}(1:1)-10 wt% LaF{sub 3} and LiF–BaF{sub 2}(1:1)-30 wt% LaF{sub 3}, there was an enhancement of solubility of UO{sub 2}.

  5. Hydrogen by water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen production by water electrolysis (aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide) is shortly presented with theoretical aspects (thermodynamics and kinetics), and components of the electrolytic cell (structural materials, cathodes, anodes, diaphragms), and examples of industrial processes. (A.B.). 4 figs

  6. Electrolysis apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure in which electrolysis is combined with radiolysis to improve the reaction yield is proposed for the production of hydrogen and oxygen from water. An apparatus for this procedure is disclosed. High-energy electric pulses are applied between the anode and kathode of an electrolytical cell in such a way that short-wave electromagnetic radiation is generated at the same time

  7. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marini, Stefania; Salvi, Paolo; Nelli, Paolo; Pesenti, Rachele; Villa, Marco; Berrettoni, Mario; Zangari, Giovanni; Kiros, Yohannes

    2012-01-01

    A short review on the fundamental and technological issues relevant to water electrolysis in alkaline and proton exchange membrane (PEM) devices is given. Due to price and limited availability of the platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts they currently employ, PEM electrolyzers have scant possibilities of being employed in large-scale hydrogen production. The importance and recent advancements in the development of catalysts without PGMs are poised to benefit more the field of alkaline electrolysis rather than that of PEM devices. This paper presents our original data which demonstrate that an advanced alkaline electrolyzer with performances rivaling those of PEM electrolyzers can be made without PGM and with catalysts of high stability and durability. Studies on the advantages/limitations of electrolyzers with different architectures do show how a judicious application of pressure differentials in a recirculating electrolyte scheme helps reduce mass transport limitations, increasing efficiency and power density.

  8. Highly efficient high temperature electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Ebbesen, Sune; Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    2008-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of water and steam may provide an efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly production of H-2 Using electricity produced from sustainable, non-fossil energy sources. To achieve cost competitive electrolysis cells that are both high performing i.e. minimum...... internal resistance of the cell, and long-term stable, it is critical to develop electrode materials that are optimal for steam electrolysis. In this article electrolysis cells for electrolysis of water or steam at temperatures above 200 degrees C for production of H-2 are reviewed. High temperature...... electrolysis is favourable from a thermodynamic point of view, because a part of the required energy can be supplied as thermal heat, and the activation barrier is lowered increasing the H-2 production rate. Only two types of cells operating at high temperature (above 200 degrees C) have been described...

  9. Mediated water electrolysis in biphasic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Micheál D; Peljo, Pekka; Rivier, Lucie; Vrubel, Heron; Girault, Hubert H

    2017-08-30

    The concept of efficient electrolysis by linking photoelectrochemical biphasic H 2 evolution and water oxidation processes in the cathodic and anodic compartments of an H-cell, respectively, is introduced. Overpotentials at the cathode and anode are minimised by incorporating light-driven elements into both biphasic reactions. The concepts viability is demonstrated by electrochemical H 2 production from water splitting utilising a polarised water-organic interface in the cathodic compartment of a prototype H-cell. At the cathode the reduction of decamethylferrocenium cations ([Cp 2 *Fe (III) ] + ) to neutral decamethylferrocene (Cp 2 *Fe (II) ) in 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) solvent takes place at the solid electrode/oil interface. This electron transfer process induces the ion transfer of a proton across the immiscible water/oil interface to maintain electroneutrality in the oil phase. The oil-solubilised proton immediately reacts with Cp 2 *Fe (II) to form the corresponding hydride species, [Cp 2 *Fe (IV) (H)] + . Subsequently, [Cp 2 *Fe (IV) (H)] + spontaneously undergoes a chemical reaction in the oil phase to evolve hydrogen gas (H 2 ) and regenerate [Cp 2 *Fe (III) ] + , whereupon this catalytic Electrochemical, Chemical, Chemical (ECC') cycle is repeated. During biphasic electrolysis, the stability and recyclability of the [Cp 2 *Fe (III) ] + /Cp 2 *Fe (II) redox couple were confirmed by chronoamperometric measurements and, furthermore, the steady-state concentration of [Cp 2 *Fe (III) ] + monitored in situ by UV/vis spectroscopy. Post-biphasic electrolysis, the presence of H 2 in the headspace of the cathodic compartment was established by sampling with gas chromatography. The rate of the biphasic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was enhanced by redox electrocatalysis in the presence of floating catalytic molybdenum carbide (Mo 2 C) microparticles at the immiscible water/oil interface. The use of a superhydrophobic organic electrolyte salt was critical to

  10. Hydrogen Generation From Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Cohen; Stephen Porter; Oscar Chow; David Henderson

    2009-03-06

    Small-scale (100-500 kg H2/day) electrolysis is an important step in increasing the use of hydrogen as fuel. Until there is a large population of hydrogen fueled vehicles, the smaller production systems will be the most cost-effective. Performing conceptual designs and analyses in this size range enables identification of issues and/or opportunities for improvement in approach on the path to 1500 kg H2/day and larger systems. The objectives of this program are to establish the possible pathways to cost effective larger Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolysis systems and to identify areas where future research and development efforts have the opportunity for the greatest impact in terms of capital cost reduction and efficiency improvements. System design and analysis was conducted to determine the overall electrolysis system component architecture and develop a life cycle cost estimate. A design trade study identified subsystem components and configurations based on the trade-offs between system efficiency, cost and lifetime. Laboratory testing of components was conducted to optimize performance and decrease cost, and this data was used as input to modeling of system performance and cost. PEM electrolysis has historically been burdened by high capital costs and lower efficiency than required for large-scale hydrogen production. This was known going into the program and solutions to these issues were the focus of the work. The program provided insights to significant cost reduction and efficiency improvement opportunities for PEM electrolysis. The work performed revealed many improvement ideas that when utilized together can make significant progress towards the technical and cost targets of the DOE program. The cell stack capital cost requires reduction to approximately 25% of today’s technology. The pathway to achieve this is through part count reduction, use of thinner membranes, and catalyst loading reduction. Large-scale power supplies are available

  11. Analysis of Economic Efficiency of Production of Low-Concentrated Sodium Hypochlorite by Direct Electrolysis of Natural Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesenko, L. N.; Pchelnikov, I. V.; Fedotov, R. V.

    2017-11-01

    The study presents the economic efficiency of direct electrolysis of natural waters in comparison with the waters artificially prepared by electrolysis of the 3% sodium salt solution. The study used sea water (Black sea water); mineral water (underground water of the Melikhovskaya station, “Ognennaya” hole); brackish water (underground water from the Grushevskaya station of the Aksai district); 3% solution of sodium salt. As a result, the dependences characterizing the direct electrolysis of natural waters with different mineralization, economic, and energy parties are shown. The rational area of the electrolysis for each of the investigated solution is determined. The cost of a kilogram of active chlorine obtained by the direct water electrolysis: Black sea from 17.2 to 18.3 RUB/kg; the Melikhovskaya station “Ognennaya” hole - 14.3 to 15.0 Rubles/kg; 3% solution of NaCl - 30 Rubles./kg; Grushevskogo St. - 63,0-73,0 Rubles/kg.

  12. Processing of effluent salt from the direct oxide reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The production of reactive metals by Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR) process using calcium in a molten calcium salt system generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated salt mix has been carried out to electrowin calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR reactor along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in a combined DOR and electrowinning process. Many reactive metal oxides could thus be reduced in a one-step process without generating a significant amount of waste. The process has been optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and the cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Based on the information available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the presence of calcium oxide, and the back reactions occurring in-situ between the electrowon calcium and other components present in the cell, e.g. carbon, oxygen, carbon dioxide and calcium oxide, it is difficult to recover elemental calcium within the system. However, a liquid cathode or a rising cathode has been used in the past to recover calcium. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material as evidenced by the presence of calcium carbonate in the final salt. The rate of recovery for metallic calcium has to be enhanced to levels that overcome the back reactions in a system where quick removal of anodic gases is achieved. Calcium has been detected by the hydrogen evolution technique and the amount of calcia has been determined by titration. A porous ceramic sheath has been used in the cell to prevent the chemical reaction of electrowon calcium to produce oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon

  13. Water electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Tadao; Ikehara, Masahisa; Kataoka, Noboru; Ueno, Syuichi; Ishikawa, Nobuhide.

    1996-01-01

    Nissho Iwai Co. and Ebara Co. received an order for hydrogen and oxygen generating system (water electrolysis system) to be installed at Tokai-2 power station of The Japan Atomic Power Company, following the previous order at Tsuruga-1 where the gas injection from FY1996 is planned. Hydrogen gas generated by the system will be injected to coolant of boiling water reactors to improve corrosive environment. The system is being offered by a tripartite party, Nissho Iwai, Ebara, and Norsk Hydro Electrolysers of Norway (NHEL). NHEL provides a electrolyser unit, as a core of the system. Ebara provides procurement, installation, and inspection as well as total engineering work, under the basic design by NHEL which has over 60 years-experience in this field. (author)

  14. Application of mercury cathode electrolysis to fission-product separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, A.; Prigent, Y.; Van-Kote, F.

    1969-01-01

    A method involving controlled potential mercury cathode electrolysis has been developed to separate fission products. It allows the radiochemical determination of Ag, Cd, Pd, Rh, Ru, Sn, Te, Sb and Mo from solutions of fission products highly concentrated in mineral salts. The general procedure consists in three main steps: electrolytic amalgam generation, destruction of amalgams and ultimate purification of elements by other means. Electrolytic operations last about five hours. Chemical yields lie between 10 per cent and 70 per cent. (authors) [fr

  15. Functional Use Database (FUse)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are five different files for this dataset: 1. A dataset listing the reported functional uses of chemicals (FUse) 2. All 729 ToxPrint descriptors obtained from...

  16. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Luke [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-30

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium-based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  17. Direct LiT Electrolysis in a Metallic Fusion Blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Luke

    2016-01-01

    A process that simplifies the extraction of tritium from molten lithium-based breeding blankets was developed. The process is based on the direct electrolysis of lithium tritide using a ceramic Li ion conductor that replaces the molten salt extraction step. Extraction of tritium in the form of lithium tritide in the blankets/targets of fusion/fission reactors is critical in order to maintain low concentrations. This is needed to decrease the potential tritium permeation to the surroundings and large releases from unforeseen accident scenarios. Extraction is complicated due to required low tritium concentration limits and because of the high affinity of tritium for the blanket. This work identified, developed and tested the use of ceramic lithium ion conductors capable of recovering hydrogen and deuterium through an electrolysis step at high temperatures.

  18. Natural gas anodes for aluminium electrolysis in molten fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarberg, Geir Martin; Khalaghi, Babak; Mokkelbost, Tommy

    2016-08-15

    Industrial primary production of aluminium has been developed and improved over more than 100 years. The molten salt electrolysis process is still suffering from low energy efficiency and considerable emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2 and PFC). A new concept has been suggested where methane is supplied through the anode so that the CO2 emissions may be reduced significantly, the PFC emissions may be eliminated and the energy consumption may decrease significantly. Porous carbon anodes made from different graphite grades were studied in controlled laboratory experiments. The anode potential, the anode carbon consumption and the level of HF gas above the electrolyte were measured during electrolysis. In some cases it was found that the methane oxidation was effectively participating in the anode process.

  19. A Feasibility Study of Steelmaking by Molten Oxide Electrolysis (TRP9956)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald R. Sadoway; Gerbrand Ceder

    2009-12-31

    Molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) is an extreme form of molten salt electrolysis, a technology that has been used to produce tonnage metals for over 100 years - aluminum, magnesium, lithium, sodium and the rare earth metals specifically. The use of carbon-free anodes is the distinguishing factor in MOE compared to other molten salt electrolysis techniques. MOE is totally carbon-free and produces no CO or CO2 - only O2 gas at the anode. This project is directed at assessing the technical feasibility of MOE at the bench scale while determining optimum values of MOE operating parameters. An inert anode will be identified and its ability to sustain oxygen evalution will be demonstrated.

  20. PEM Water Electrolysis at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Kalmar

    . This is followed in chapter 4 by a description of the electrolysis setups and electrolysis cells used during the work. Two different setups were used, one operating at atmospheric pressure and another that could operate at elevated pressure so that liquid water electrolysis could be performed at temperature above...... such as porosity and resistance which were supported by images acquired using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In chapters 6 and 7 the results of the steam electrolysis and pressurised water electrolysis, respectively, are presented and discussed. The steam electrolysis was tested at 130 °C and atmospheric...... needed and hence it has become acute to be able to store the energy. Hydrogen has been identified as a suitable energy carrier and water electrolysis is one way to produce it in a sustainable and environmentally friendly way. In this thesis an introduction to the subject (chapter 1) is given followed...

  1. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  2. Electrical impedance tomography of electrolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Meir

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations.

  3. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo M. F. Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article, the electrochemical fundamentals of alkaline water electrolysis are explained and the main process constraints (e.g., electrical, reaction, and transport are analyzed. The historical background of water electrolysis is described, different technologies are compared, and main research needs for the development of water electrolysis technologies are discussed.

  4. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Diogo M. F.; Sequeira, César A. C.; Figueiredo, José L.

    2013-01-01

    Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article...

  5. Colored fused filament fabrication

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Haichuan; Lefebvre, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Filament fused fabrication is the method of choice for printing 3D models at low cost, and is the de-facto standard for hobbyists, makers and schools. Unfortunately, filament printers cannot truly reproduce colored objects. The best current techniques rely on a form of dithering exploiting occlusion, that was only demonstrated for shades of two base colors and that behaves differently depending on surface slope. We explore a novel approach for 3D printing colored objects, capable of creating ...

  6. Static feed water electrolysis module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Jensen, F. C.

    1974-01-01

    An advanced static feed water electrolysis module (SFWEM) and associated instrumentation for generating breathable O2 was developed. The system also generates a H2 byproduct for use in an air revitalization system for O2 recovery from metabolic CO2. Special attention was given to: (1) eliminating water feed compartment degassing, (2) eliminating need for zero gravity condenser/separators, (3) increasing current density capability, and (4) providing a self contained module so that operation is independent of laboratory instrumentation and complicated startup/shutdown procedures.

  7. Electrolytic recovery of calcium from molten CaO-CaCl2 salt-mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    Calciothermic reduction of plutonium oxide is an industrial process for producing plutonium metal. The process is carried out in a molten calcium chloride medium which has a significantly high solubility for calcium oxide. However, the CaO-CaCl 2 salt-mix is radioactively contaminated and can not be discarded as such. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated mix has been carried out using graphite anode and steel cathode to produce calcium. The dissolved calcium in CaCl 2 salt can be used insitu to reduce plutonium oxide. The primary difficulty in obtaining a cathodic calcium deposit was the use of graphite anose which indirectly controls all the back-reactions in the cell through which the deposited calcium is lost. A porous ceramic sheath has been used to essentially keep the anodic and cathodic products separate. The porosity of the sheath has been optimized by measuring its diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature. The influence of a porous sheath on the cell potential has been also analyzed

  8. Structure of tungsten electrodeposited from oxide chloride-fluoride molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovskij, V.A.; Reznichenko, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigation results on the influence of electrolysis parameters and electrolyte composition on tungsten cathode deposit structure are presented. The electrolysis was performed in NaCl-NaF-WO 3 molten salts using tungsten and tungsten coated molybdenum cathodes. Morphological and metallographic studies of tungsten crystals were carrier out. Tungsten deposits were obtained in the form of crystalline conglomerates, sponge and high dispersity powder

  9. Determination of nickel in chloralkali electrolysis brines by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry on a membrane filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, L.L.; Minzl, E.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry after ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) preconcentration is proposed for the determination of nickel in chloralkali electrolysis brines. The optimum conditions for the precipitation target tube, peak intensity, background, analysing crystal, counters and exposure time were investigated. The method was applied to chloralkali brines of evaporite salts (halite, sylvinite, carnallite and tachhydrite), sodium, potassium and magnesium salts, explored in Sergipe (Brazil), by Petrobras-Mineracao S.A.(Author) [pt

  10. Three-dimensional printing of transparent fused silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotz, Frederik; Arnold, Karl; Bauer, Werner; Schild, Dieter; Keller, Nico; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Nargang, Tobias M.; Richter, Christiane; Helmer, Dorothea; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2017-04-01

    Glass is one of the most important high-performance materials used for scientific research, in industry and in society, mainly owing to its unmatched optical transparency, outstanding mechanical, chemical and thermal resistance as well as its thermal and electrical insulating properties. However, glasses and especially high-purity glasses such as fused silica glass are notoriously difficult to shape, requiring high-temperature melting and casting processes for macroscopic objects or hazardous chemicals for microscopic features. These drawbacks have made glasses inaccessible to modern manufacturing technologies such as three-dimensional printing (3D printing). Using a casting nanocomposite, here we create transparent fused silica glass components using stereolithography 3D printers at resolutions of a few tens of micrometres. The process uses a photocurable silica nanocomposite that is 3D printed and converted to high-quality fused silica glass via heat treatment. The printed fused silica glass is non-porous, with the optical transparency of commercial fused silica glass, and has a smooth surface with a roughness of a few nanometres. By doping with metal salts, coloured glasses can be created. This work widens the choice of materials for 3D printing, enabling the creation of arbitrary macro- and microstructures in fused silica glass for many applications in both industry and academia.

  11. Wind power generation plant installed on cargo ship and marine resources recovery by seawater electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murahara, M. [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)]|[Tokai Univ., Hiratsuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Seki, K. [Mingdao Univ., Taiwan (China)]|[Tokai Univ., Hiratsuka, Kanagawa (Japan). Research Inst. of Science and Technology

    2008-07-01

    Transmission loss from offshore wind turbine arrays is directly proportional to the length of the cable that brings power onshore. In order to minimize transmission loss, wind-generated electricity needs to be stored temporarily in a different form. Seawater, rock salt, and water of saline lakes can be desalinated and then electrolyzed to produce hydrogen. This paper presented a new method of offshore sodium production in Japan by seawater electrolysis. In this technique, sodium is manufactured on site by molten-salt electrolysis as a solid fuel. Sodium is electrolytically collected from the seawater or rock salt by the wind power generation. The sodium is then transported to a hydrogen power plant on land and then is added water to generate hydrogen for operating a hydrogen combustion turbine. The sodium hydroxide by-product is then supplied to the soda industry as a raw material. In seawater electrolysis, not only sodium but also fresh water, magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium hydroxide, chlorine, oxygen, hydrogen, hydrochloric acid, and sulfuric acid are isolated and recovered as by-products. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Water Electrolysis at Different Current - Voltage Regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleperis, J.; Blums, J.; Vanags, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Electrochemical impedance and volt-amperic methods were used to compare an efficiency of water electrolysis for different materials and different electrode configurations. Two and three electrode measurements were made, using standard calomel reference electrode. Non-standard capacitative electrolysis was analyzed in special cell made from cylindrical steel electrodes. Volt-amperic measurements from - 15V to +15V DC didn't indicated the presence of oxidation - reduction reactions when distilled water was used as electrolyte. Impedance measurements showed unusual frequency behavior when the AC voltage increased till 0.5V. Different nickel and carbon electrodes (plate, porous and textile - type) were used to learn classical Faraday electrolysis in strong alkali solutions. Flying increase of current was indicator of the presence of electrolysis, and characteristic potential was used differ between materials accordingly they effectiveness for usage in an electrolyser device. (Aithors)

  13. Treatment of high salinity organic wastewater by membrane electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongfang, Shen; Jinghuan, Ma; Ying, Liu; Chenguang, Zhao

    2018-03-01

    The effects of different operating conditions on the treatment of electrolytic wastewater were investigated by analyzing the removal rate of ammonia and COD before and after wastewater treatment by cation exchange membrane. Experiment shows that as the running time increases the electrolysis effect first increases after the smooth. The removal rate of ammonia will increase with the increase of current density, and the removal rate of COD will increase first and then decrease with the increase of current density. The increase of the temperature of the electrolytic solution will slowly increase the COD removal rate to saturation, but does not affect the removal of ammonia nitrogen. When the flow rate is less than 60L / h, the change of influent flow rate will not affect the removal of ammonia nitrogen, but the effect on COD is small, which will increase and decrease slightly. After the experiment, the surface of the cation exchange membrane was analyzed by cold field scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer. The surface contamination and the pollutant were determined. The experimental results showed that the aggregates were mainly chlorinated Sodium, calcium and magnesium inorganic salts, which will change the morphology of the film to reduce porosity, reduce the mass transfer efficiency, affecting the electrolysis effect.

  14. Water electrolysis system refurbishment and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenough, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The electrolytic oxygen generator for the back-up water electrolysis system in a 90-day manned test was refurbished, improved and subjected to a 182-day bench test. The performance of the system during the test demonstrated the soundness of the basic electrolysis concept, the high development status of the automatic controls which allowed completely hands-off operation, and the capability for orbital operation. Some design improvements are indicated.

  15. Electromagnetic radiation during electrolysis of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval'chuk, E.P.; Yanchuk, O.M.; Reshetnyak, O.V.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions during electrolysis of heavy water on nickel and palladium cathodes was determined for the first time. A sharp jump of the intensity photon flow was observed at a current density of higher than 125 mA/cm 2 . A hypothesis about the relation of the electrochemiluminescence phenomenon during electrolysis of heavy water with the formation of fresh surfaces in consequence of the hydrogenous corrosion of the cathode material is formulated. ((orig.))

  16. Tritium separation from heavy water using electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Y.; Sakuma, Y.; Ohtani, N.; Kodaka, M.

    2001-01-01

    A tritium separation from heavy water by the electrolysis using a solid polymer electrode (SPE) was specified on investigation. The heavy water (∼10 Bq g -1 ) and the light water (∼70 Bq g -1 ) were electrolysed using an electrolysis device (Tripure XZ001, Permelec Electrode Ltd.) with the SPE layer. The cathode was made of stainless steel (SUS314). The electrolysis was carried out at 20 A x 60 min, with the electrolysis temperature at 10, 20, or 30degC, and 15 A x 80 min at 5degC. The produced hydrogen and oxygen gases were recombined using a palladium catalyst (ND-101, N.E. Chemcat Ltd.) with nitrogen gas as a carrier. The activities of the water in the cell and of the recombined water were analyzed using a liquid scintillation counter. The electrolysis potential to keep the current 20 A was 2-3 V. The yields of the recombined water were more than 90%. The apparent separation factors (SF) for the heavy water and the light water were ∼2 and ∼12, respectively. The SF value was in agreement with the results in other work. The factors were changed with the cell temperature. The electrolysis using the SPE is applicable for the tritium separation, and is able to perform the small-scale apparatus at the room temperature. (author)

  17. Obtainment of lithium metal by electrolysis of molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Costa, M.A.Z. da.

    1988-04-01

    The obtainment metallic lithium through KCL + LiCl, using a stainless steel cathode and a graphite anode is studied. The applications of lithium on nuclear energy, aerospatial program, metalurgy and as refining and degassing agent are also presented. The purification of lithium is still mentioned. (C.G.C.) [pt

  18. Fabrication of cathode supported tubular solid oxide electrolysis cell for high temperature steam electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Le; Wang, Shaorong; Qian, Jiqin; Xue, Yanjie; Liu, Renzhu

    2011-01-15

    In recent years, hydrogen has been identified as a potential alternative fuel and energy carrier for the future energy supply. Water electrolysis is one of the important hydrogen production technologies which do not emit carbon dioxide. High temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) consumes even less electrical energy than low temperature water electrolysis. Theoretically, HTSE using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) can efficiently utilize renewable energy to produce hydrogen, and it is also possible to operate the SOEC in reverse mode as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to produce electricity. Tubular SOFC have been widely investigated. In this study, tubular solid oxide cells were fabricated by dip-coating and cosintering techniques. In SOEC mode, results suggested that steam ratio had a strong impact on the performance of the tubular cell; the tubular SOEC preferred to be operated at high steam ratio in order to avoid concentration polarization. The microstructure of the tubular SOEC should therefore be optimized for high temperature steam electrolysis.

  19. Durable solid oxide electrolysis cells and stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming Chen

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this project was to make a substantial contribution to development of a cost competitive electrolysis technology based on solid oxide cells. The strategy was to address what had been identified as the key issues in previous research projects. Accordingly five lines of work were carried out in the here reported project: 1) Cell and stack element testing and post test characterization to identify major degradation mechanisms under electrolysis operation. 2) Development of interconnects and coatings to allow stable electrolysis operation at approx850 deg. C or above. 3) Development of seals with reduced Si emission. 4) Development of durable SOEC cathodes. 5) Modeling. Good progress has been made on several of the planned activities. The outcome and most important achievements of the current project are listed for the five lines of the work. (LN)

  20. Poisoning of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells by Impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune; Graves, Christopher R.; Hauch, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Electrolysis of H2O, CO2, and co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 was studied in Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrode supported solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) consisting of a Ni/YSZ support, a Ni/YSZ electrode layer, a YSZ electrolyte, and an lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/YSZ ox...

  1. Molten salt electrorefining method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Shoji, Yuichi; Matsumaru, Ken-ichi.

    1994-01-01

    A molten cadmium phase (lower side) and a molten salt phase (upper side) are filled in an electrolytic bath. A basket incorporating spent nuclear fuels is inserted/disposed in the molten cadmium phase. A rotatable solid cathode is inserted/disposed in the molten salt phase. The spent fuels, for example, natural uranium, incorporated in the basket is dissolved in the molten cadmium phase. In this case, the uranium concentration in the molten salt phase is determined as from 0.5 to 20wt%. Then, electrolysis is conducted while setting a stirring power for stirring at least the molten salt phase of from 2.5 x 10 2 to 1 x 10 4 based on a reynolds number. Crystalline nuclei of uranium are precipitated uniformly on the surface of the solid cathode, and they grow into fine dendrites. With such procedures, since short-circuit between the cathode precipitates and the molten cadmium phase (anode) is scarcely caused, to improve the recovering rate of uranium. (I.N.)

  2. Molten salts in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirian, J.; Saint-James

    1959-01-01

    Collection of references dealing with the physicochemical studies of fused salts, in particular the alkali and alkali earth halides. Numerous binary, ternary and quaternary systems of these halides with those of uranium and thorium are examined, and the physical properties, density, viscosity, vapour pressure etc... going from the halides to the mixtures are also considered. References relating to the corrosion of materials by these salts are included and the treatment of the salts with a view to recuperation after irradiation in a nuclear reactor is discussed. (author) [fr

  3. Transient nanobubbles in short-time electrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svetovoy, Vitaly; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2013-01-01

    Water electrolysis in a microsystem is observed and analyzed on a short-time scale of ∼10 μs. The very unusual properties of the process are stressed. An extremely high current density is observed because the process is not limited by the diffusion of electroactive species. The high current is

  4. Towards solid oxide electrolysis plants in 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Blennow, Peter; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    The goal of the project is to further improve performance and durability of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) and stacks targeting applications specifically for regulating the future Danish power system with a high amount of fluctuating renewable energies, and at the same time enhance the co...

  5. Liquefier Dynamics in Fused Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellini, Anna; Guceri, Selcuk; Bertoldi, Maurizio

    2004-01-01

    Layered manufacturing (LM) is an evolution of rapid prototyping (RP) technology whereby a part is built in layers. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is a particular LM technique in which each section is fabricated through vector style deposition of building blocks, called roads, which...

  6. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  7. FUSED SALT METHOD FOR COATING URANIUM WITH A METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubank, L.D.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for coating uranium with a less active metal such as Cr, Ni, or Cu comprising immersing the U in a substantially anhydrous molten solution of a halide of these less active metals in a ternary chloride composition which consists of selected percentages of KCl, NaCl and another chloride such as LiCl or CaCl/sub 2/.

  8. Fused aromatic thienopyrazines: structure, properties and function

    KAUST Repository

    Mondal, Rajib; Ko, Sangwon; Bao, Zhenan

    2010-01-01

    Recent development of a fused aromatic thieno[3.4-b]pyrazine system and their application in optoelectronic devices are reviewed. Introduction of a fused aromatic unit followed by side chain engineering, dramatically enhanced the charge carrier

  9. Economics of liquid hydrogen from water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, F. N.; Moore, W. I.; Walker, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    An economical model for preliminary analysis of LH2 cost from water electrolysis is presented. The model is based on data from vendors and open literature, and is suitable for computer analysis of different scenarios for 'directional' purposes. Cost data associated with a production rate of 10,886 kg/day are presented. With minimum modification, the model can also be used to predict LH2 cost from any electrolyzer once the electrolyzer's cost data are available.

  10. Tunable microbubble generator using electrolysis and ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Younes Achaoui; Khaled Metwally; Damien Fouan; Zoubida Hammadi; Roger Morin; Eric Debieu; Cédric Payan; Serge Mensah

    2017-01-01

    This letter reports on a method for producing on demand calibrated bubbles in a non-chemically controlled solution using localized micro-electrolysis and ultrasound. Implementing a feedback loop in the process leads to a point source of stable mono-dispersed microbubbles. This approach overcomes the inertial constraints encountered in microfluidics with the possibility to produce from a single to an array of calibrated bubbles. Moreover, this method avoids the use of additional surfactant tha...

  11. Electrolysis activities at FCH Test Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn Nielsen, Eva; Nygaard, Frederik Berg

    FCH Test Center for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies was established in 2010 at Risø DTU in Denmark. Today, the test center is part of DTU Energy Conversion. The center gives industry access to advanced testing and demonstration of components and systems. A number of national projects and EU...... projects regarding water electrolysis involve FCH Test Center as a partner. This presentation gives an overview of the activities....

  12. Performance of supported catalysts for water electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gurrik, Stian

    2012-01-01

    The most active catalyst for oxygen evolution in PEM water electrolysis is ruthenium oxide. Its major drawback as a commercial catalyst is its poor stability. In a mixed oxide with iridium, ruthenium becomes more stable. However, it would be favorable to find a less expensive substitute to iridium. In this work, the dissolution potential and lifetime of mixed oxides containing ruthenium and tantalum are investigated. In order to effectively determine what effects tantalum and particle size ha...

  13. Hydrogen electrolysis using a NASICON solid protonic conductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulens, J.; Longhurst, T.H.; Kuriakose, A.K.; Canaday, J.D.

    1988-09-01

    A protonic conductor based on a bonded NASICON disc has been used for hydrogen electrolysis at 300 K. Currents up to 200 mA can be passed through the disc, and the electrolysis proceeds with 100% current efficiency. The resistance of the ceramic is affected by its extent of hydration. Degradation and failure of the ceramic occurs at the cathode as a result of electrolysis.

  14. Microbial electrolysis cells as innovative technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorbadzhiyska, Elitsa; Hristov, Georgi; Mitov, Mario; Hubenova, Yolina

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen production is becoming increasingly important in view of using hydrogen in fuel cells. However, most of the production of hydrogen so far comes from the combustion of fossil fuels and water electrolysis. Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC), also known as Bioelectrochemically Assisted Microbial Reactor, is an ecologically clean, renewable and innovative technology for hydrogen production. Microbial electrolysis cells produce hydrogen mainly from waste biomass assisted by various bacteria strains. The principle of MECs and their constructional elements are reviewed and discussed. Keywords: microbial Electrolysis Cells, hydrogen production, waste biomass purification

  15. Exploding metallic fuse physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goforth, J.H.; Hackett, K.E.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Lopez, E.A.; McCullough, W.F.; Dona, H.; Reinovsky, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The ultimate practicality of inductive pulse compression systems as drivers for energetic plasma implosions hinges on the development of a suitable opening switch capable of interrupting tons of megamp currents in time scales of a few hundred nanoseconds while withstanding L(dI/dt) voltages of a megavolt or more. 1. Exploding metallic foils (fuses) are a candidate for switching elements in the inductive store pulsed power systems used in the Los Alamos and Air Force Weapons Laboratory foil implosion X-ray source generation programs. To verify or modify new theoretical and computational predictions about the electrical and hydrodynamic behavior of exploding metallic foils used as fuses. The authors have initiated a new series of small scale capacitor bank driven fuse experiments. The experiments represent an extension of previous experiments, but in the new series a foil geometry more amenable to theoretical and computational analysis is used. The metallic foil (aluminum or copper) is laminated between two thin layers of insulating material (mylar or kaptan). Adjacent to one layer of insulation is a much heavier backing insulator (polyethylene) whereas air is adjacent to the other layer. Because of the differing masses on the two sides of the foil, the foil expansion and hydrodynamic motion is essentially one-sided and the layer of insulation on the expanding side becomes a readily-characterizable ''flyer'' which provides a controlled amount of hydrodynamic tamping. In addition to the usual voltage, current, and dI/dt electrical measurements, time-resolved spectrometer measurements are used to determine the temperature of the expanding metallic foil. Post-shot examination of the flyer and the insulation impacted by the flyer gives insight into the experimental behavior

  16. Fusion algebra and fusing matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yihong; Li Miao; Yu Ming.

    1989-09-01

    We show that the Wilson line operators in topological field theories form a fusion algebra. In general, the fusion algebra is a relation among the fusing (F) matrices. In the case of the SU(2) WZW model, some special F matrix elements are found in this way, and the remaining F matrix elements are then determined up to a sign. In addition, the S(j) modular transformation of the one point blocks on the torus is worked out. Our results are found to agree with those obtained from the quantum group method. (author). 24 refs

  17. Solid oxide electrolysis cells - Performance and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauch, A.

    2007-10-15

    In this work H2 electrode supported solid oxide cells (SOC) produced at Risoe National Laboratory, DTU, have been used for steam electrolysis. Electrolysis tests have been performed at temperatures from 650AeC to 950AeC, p(H2O)/p(H2) from 0.99/0.01 to 0.30/0.70 and current densities from -0.25 A/cm2 to -2 A/cm2. The solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) have been characterised by iV curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at start and end of tests and by EIS under current load during electrolysis testing. The tested SOCs have shown the best initial electrolysis performance reported in literature to date. Area specific resistances of 0.26 Oecm2 at 850AeC and 0.17 Oecm2 at 950AeC were obtained from electrolysis iV curves. The general trend for the SOEC tests was: 1) a short-term passivation in first few hundred hours, 2) then an activation and 3) a subsequent and underlying long-term degradation. The transient phenomenon (passivation/activation) was shown to be a set-up dependent artefact caused by the albite glass sealing with a p(Si(OH)4) of 1.10-7 atm, leading to silica contamination of the triple-phase boundaries (TPBs) of the electrode. The long-term degradation for the SOECs was more pronounced than for fuel cell testing of similar cells. Long-term degradation of 2%/1000 h was obtained at 850AeC, p(H2O)/p(H2) = 0.5/0.5 and -0.5 A/cm2, whereas the degradation rate increased to 6%/1000h at 950AeC, p(H2O)/p(H2) = 0.9/0.1 and -1.0 A/cm2. Both the short-term passivation and the long-term degradation appear mainly to be related to processes in the H2 electrode. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs show that only limited changes occur in the Ni particle size distribution and these are not the main degradation mechanism for the SOECs. Micro and nano analysis using energy dispersive spectroscopy in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM reveals that glassy phase impurities have accumulated at the TPBs as a result of

  18. Microscale Electrolysis Using Coin-Type Lithium Batteries and Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Yajima, Seiko

    2013-01-01

    An educational experiment illustrates the electrolysis of water and copper chloride to middle school science students. The electrolysis cell is composed of filter paper soaked with Na[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4] or CuCl[subscript 2] aqueous solution sandwiched, along with a sheet of platinum foil, between two coin-type lithium batteries. When the…

  19. About a New Type of Fuse Based on the Controllable Fusing Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PLESCA, A.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Fuses are among the best known of electrical devices and there are an extremely large number in use throughout the world. Beside of the advantageous features, the nowadays fuses have certain drawbacks. Therefore, a new type of fuse based on controllable fusing concept is proposed and a study as regards the total clearing time is done. The new concept has been validated through many experimental tests at different current values. The new type of fuse based on controllable fusing concept can be integrated within an overcurrent protection system especially to protect power semiconductors where the Joule integral criterion is better satisfied.

  20. High Temperature and Pressure Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank

    against conventional technologies for hydrogen production, such as natural gas reforming, the production and investment costs have to be reduced. A reduction of the investment costs may be achieved by increasing the operational pressure and temperature of the electrolyzer, as this will result in: 1.......3 A cm-2 combined with relatively small production costs may lead to both reduced investment and operating costs for hydrogen and oxygen production. One of the produced electrolysis cells was operated for 350 h. Based on the successful results a patent application covering this novel cell was filed...

  1. Tunable microbubble generator using electrolysis and ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaoui, Younes; Metwally, Khaled; Fouan, Damien; Hammadi, Zoubida; Morin, Roger; Debieu, Eric; Payan, Cédric; Mensah, Serge

    2017-01-01

    This letter reports on a method for producing on demand calibrated bubbles in a non-chemically controlled solution using localized micro-electrolysis and ultrasound. Implementing a feedback loop in the process leads to a point source of stable mono-dispersed microbubbles. This approach overcomes the inertial constraints encountered in microfluidics with the possibility to produce from a single to an array of calibrated bubbles. Moreover, this method avoids the use of additional surfactant that may modify the composition of the host fluid. It impacts across a broad range of scientific domains from bioengineering, sensing to environment.

  2. Tunable microbubble generator using electrolysis and ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younes Achaoui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This letter reports on a method for producing on demand calibrated bubbles in a non-chemically controlled solution using localized micro-electrolysis and ultrasound. Implementing a feedback loop in the process leads to a point source of stable mono-dispersed microbubbles. This approach overcomes the inertial constraints encountered in microfluidics with the possibility to produce from a single to an array of calibrated bubbles. Moreover, this method avoids the use of additional surfactant that may modify the composition of the host fluid. It impacts across a broad range of scientific domains from bioengineering, sensing to environment.

  3. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    1979-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  4. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  5. Use of low fusing alloy in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, A G; Schneider, R L; Aquilino, S A

    1998-11-01

    Low fusing alloy has been used in dentistry for remount procedures in both fixed and removable prosthodontics, in implant prosthodontics for the fabrication of solid implant casts, in maxillofacial prosthetics as oral radiation shields, and in dental research for its unique properties. Previously, the use of low fusing alloy was thought to offer a high degree of dimensional accuracy. However, multiple in vitro studies have shown that its presumed dimensional accuracy may be questionable. This article reviews the physical properties, metallurgical considerations of low fusing alloy, its applications in dentistry, and a safe, simple method of using low fusing alloy.

  6. HYFIRE: fusion-high temperature electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Benenati, R.; Dang, V.D.; Horn, F.; Isaacs, H.; Lazareth, O.; Makowitz, H.; Usher, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a comprehensive conceptual design study called HYFIRE of a commercial fusion Tokamak reactor, high-temperature electrolysis system. The study is placing particular emphasis on the adaptability of the STARFIRE power reactor to a synfuel application. The HYFIRE blanket must perform three functions: (a) provide high-temperature (approx. 1400 0 C) process steam at moderate pressures (in the range of 10 to 30 atm) to the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) units; (b) provide high-temperature (approx. 700 to 800 0 C) heat to a thermal power cycle for generation of electricity to the HTE units; and (c) breed enough tritium to sustain the D-T fuel cycle. In addition to thermal energy for the decomposition of steam into its constitutents, H 2 and O 2 , electrical input is required. Power cycle efficiencies of approx. 40% require He cooling for steam superheat. Fourteen hundred degree steam coupled with 40% power cycle efficiency results in a process efficiency (conversion of fusion energy to hydrogen chemical energy) of 50%

  7. Heavy water production by alkaline water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamath, Sachin; Sandeep, K.C.; Bhanja, Kalyan; Mohan, Sadhana; Sugilal, G.

    2014-01-01

    Several heavy water isotope production processes are reported in literature. Water electrolysis in combination with catalytic exchange CECE process is considered as a futuristic process to increase the throughput and reduce the cryogenic distillation load but the application is limited due to the high cost of electricity. Any improvement in the efficiency of electrolyzers would make this process more attractive. The efficiency of alkaline water electrolysis is governed by various phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization and concentration polarization in the cell. A systematic study on the effect of these factors can lead to methods for improving the efficiency of the electrolyzer. A bipolar and compact type arrangement of the alkaline water electrolyzer leads to increased efficiency and reduced inventory in comparison to uni-polar tank type electrolyzers. The bipolar type arrangement is formed when a number of single cells are stacked together. Although a few experimental studies have been reported in the open literature, CFD simulation of a bipolar compact alkaline water electrolyzer with porous electrodes is not readily available.The principal aim of this study is to simulate the characteristics of a single cell compact electrolyzer unit. The simulation can be used to predict the Voltage-Current Density (V-I) characteristics, which is a measure of the efficiency of the process.The model equations were solved using COMSOL multi-physics software. The simulated V-I characteristic is compared with the experimental data

  8. Efficient uranous nitrate production using membrane electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhongwei Yuan; Taihong Yan; Weifang Zheng; Hongying Shuang; Liang Xian; Xiaoyan Bian; Chen Zuo; Chuanbo Li; Zhi Cao

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate is a green, simple way to make uranous ion. In order to improve the ratio of uranous ion to the total uranium and maintain high current efficiency, an electrolyser with very thin cathodic and anodic compartment, which were separated by a cation exchange membrane, was setup, and its performance was tested. The effects of various parameters on the reduction were also evaluated. The results show that the apparatus is quite positive. It runs well with 120 mA/cm 2 current density (72 cm 2 cathode, constant current batch operation). U(IV) yield can achieve 93.1 % (500 mL feed, total uranium 199 g/L) after 180 min electrolysis. It was also shown that when U(IV) yield was below 80 %, very high current efficiency was maintained, and there was almost a linear relationship between uranous ion yield and electrolysis time; under the range of experimental conditions, the concentration of uranyl nitrate, hydrazine, and nitric acid had little effect on the reduction. (author)

  9. 30 CFR 57.6502 - Safety fuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... blasthole detonates. (d) Fuse shall be cut and capped in dry locations. (e) Blasting caps shall be crimped... the primer and the explosive material are securely in place. (g) Safety fuse shall be ignited only... to be fired, electric initiation systems, igniter cord and connectors, or other nonelectric...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6502 - Safety fuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... be cut and capped in dry locations. (e) Blasting caps shall be crimped to fuse only with implements... material are securely in place. (g) Safety fuse shall be ignited only with devices designed for that... initiation systems, igniter cord and connectors, or other nonelectric initiation systems shall be used...

  11. Progress in Aluminum Electrolysis Control and Future Direction for Smart Aluminum Electrolysis Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Li, Tianshuang; Li, Jie; Yang, Shuai; Zou, Zhong

    2017-02-01

    The industrial aluminum reduction cell is an electrochemistry reactor that operates under high temperatures and highly corrosive conditions. However, these conditions have restricted the measurement of key control parameters, making the control of aluminum reduction cells a difficult problem in the industry. Because aluminum electrolysis control systems have a significant economic influence, substantial research has been conducted on control algorithms, control systems and information systems for aluminum reduction cells. This article first summarizes the development of control systems and then focuses on the progress made since 2000, including alumina concentration control, temperature control and electrolyte molecular ratio control, fault diagnosis, cell condition prediction and control system expansion. Based on these studies, the concept of a smart aluminum electrolysis plant is proposed. The frame construction, key problems and current progress are introduced. Finally, several future directions are discussed.

  12. A Demonstration of Carbon-Assisted Water Electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalekan D. Adeniyi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that carbon fuel cell technology can be combined with that of high temperature steam electrolysis by the incorporation of carbon fuel at the cell anode, with the resulting reduction of the required electrolysis voltage by around 1 V. The behaviour of the cell current density and applied voltage are shown to be connected with the threshold of electrolysis and the main features are compared with theoretical results from the literature. The advantage arises from the avoidance of efficiency losses associated with electricity generation using thermal cycles, as well as the natural separation of the carbon dioxide product stream for subsequent processing.

  13. Hydrogen production by high-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam. Test results obtained with an electrolysis tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1995-01-01

    High-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam is an advanced hydrogen production process decomposing high temperature steam up to 1,000degC, which applies an electro-chemical reaction reverse to the solid oxide fuel cell. At Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted using a practical electrolysis tube with 12 electrolysis cells in order to develop heat utilization systems for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The electrolysis cells of which electrolyte was yttria-stabilized zirconia were formed on a porous ceramic tube in series by plasma spraying. In the experiments, water steam mixed with argon carrier gas was supplied into the electrolysis tube heated at a constant temperature regulated in the range from 850degC to 950degC, and electrolysis power was supplied by a DC power source. Hydrogen production rate increased with applied voltage and electrolysis temperature; the maximum production rate was 6.9Nl/h at 950degC. Hydrogen production rate was correlated with applied current densities on the basis of experimental data. High energy efficiency was achieved under the applied current density ranging from 80 to 100 mA/cm 2 . (author)

  14. Static feed water electrolysis subsystem development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Franz H. (Inventor); Grigger, David J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an electrolysis cell forming hydrogen and oxygen at spaced terminals. The anode terminal is porous and able to form oxygen within the cell and permit escape of the gaseous oxygen through the anode and out through a flow line in the presence of backpressure. Hydrogen is liberated in the cell at the opposing solid metal cathode which is permeable to hydrogen but not oxygen so that the migratory hydrogen formed in the cell is able to escape from the cell. The cell is maintained at an elevated pressure so that oxygen liberated by the cell is delivered at elevated pressure without pumping to raise the pressure of the oxygen.

  15. Operational Modelling of High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick Lovera; Franck Blein; Julien Vulliet

    2006-01-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) and High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) work on two opposite processes. The basic equations (Nernst equation, corrected by a term of over-voltage) are thus very similar, only a few signs are different. An operational model, based on measurable quantities, was finalized for HTE process, and adapted to SOFCs. The model is analytical, which requires some complementary assumptions (proportionality of over-tensions to the current density, linearization of the logarithmic term in Nernst equation). It allows determining hydrogen production by HTE using a limited number of parameters. At a given temperature, only one macroscopic parameter, related to over-voltages, is needed for adjusting the model to the experimental results (SOFC), in a wide range of hydrogen flow-rates. For a given cell, this parameter follows an Arrhenius law with a satisfactory precision. The prevision in HTE process is compared to the available experimental results. (authors)

  16. Percutaneous treatment of pulmonary tumors by electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuelsson, L.; Joensson, L.; Stahl, E.

    1983-06-01

    Five lung tumors in four patients were treated with electrolysis. One of the tumors was probably primary, while the others were metastases. Under local anesthesia, two or three platinum electrodes (diameter 3 mm) were introduced through the thoracic wall into the lung tumor using biplane fluoroscopy. The patient was sedated before the procedure and a chest tube was inserted into the pleural cavity. Between anode and cathode a direct current of 80 mA and 10 V was passed during 2-4 h, creating substantial electrolytic destruction mainly through chlorine liberation. Observations at autopsy, surgery, chest X-ray, and CT showed that 60%-80% of the tumor mass was destroyed. No tumor was completely destroyed. The patients stood the procedure well.

  17. Advances in the electrolysis of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierini, G.; Spelta, B.; Maffei, S.; Modica, G.; Perez, G.; Possagno, E.

    1988-01-01

    The exhaust plasma processing plant, proposed a few years ago as an alternative to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly plant in operation at Los Alamos National Laboratory, required further research in such areas as low liquid inventory electrolytic cell and the types of separator or membrane resistant to beta radiation. Moreover, it was suggested that the value of the separation factors among H/sub 2/, D/sub 2/, and T/sub 2/ should be checked during electrolysis at high D/sub 2/O concentration in a alkaline medium by using different materials for the cathode. The results of experimental work carried out in these directions have shown the feasibility of the process, although some improvements can still be made in the optimization of the separators and in the design of the cell. The research carried out at the Joint Research Centre, Ispra, Italy, with support from other institutes, is described

  18. Economic Analysis of Improved Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckshinrichs, Wilhelm; Ketelaer, Thomas; Koj, Jan Christian

    2017-01-01

    Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) is a mature hydrogen production technology and there exists a range of economic assessments for available technologies. For advanced AWEs, which may be based on novel polymer-based membrane concepts, it is of prime importance that development comes along with new configurations and technical and economic key process parameters for AWE that might be of interest for further economic assessments. This paper presents an advanced AWE technology referring to three different sites in Europe (Germany, Austria, and Spain). The focus is on financial metrics, the projection of key performance parameters of advanced AWEs, and further financial and tax parameters. For financial analysis from an investor’s (business) perspective, a comprehensive assessment of a technology not only comprises cost analysis but also further financial analysis quantifying attractiveness and supply/market flexibility. Therefore, based on cash flow (CF) analysis, a comprehensible set of metrics may comprise levelised cost of energy or, respectively, levelized cost of hydrogen (LCH) for cost assessment, net present value (NPV) for attractiveness analysis, and variable cost (VC) for analysis of market flexibility. The German AWE site turns out to perform best in all three financial metrics (LCH, NPV, and VC). Though there are slight differences in investment cost and operation and maintenance cost projections for the three sites, the major cost impact is due to the electricity cost. Although investment cost is slightly lower and labor cost is significantly lower in Spain, the difference can not outweigh the higher electricity cost compared to Germany. Given the assumption that the electrolysis operators are customers directly and actively participating in power markets, and based on the regulatory framework in the three countries, in this special case electricity cost in Germany is lowest. However, as electricity cost is profoundly influenced by political decisions as

  19. Basic study of alkaline water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manabe, A.; Kashiwase, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayashida, T.; Kato, A.; Hirao, K.; Shimomura, I.; Nagashima, I.

    2013-01-01

    In order to realize future hydrogen society, hydrogen production systems must meet the large demand of hydrogen usage. Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) would be one of the candidate technologies to produce hydrogen on a large scale from renewable energy. We have conducted basic research into AWE, trying to reveal technical issues under zero gap system in new cell technology. The zero gap system contributes lower cell voltage without causing any major operating problems compared with conventional finite gap cell. However, it was observed that Ni base electrodes showed corrosion phenomena in a number of test trials including steady operating conditions and several shut-downs. Activated Raney Ni alloy coating for anode material had an advantage for oxygen overvoltage. It showed a saving of around 100 mV at 40 A/dm 2 (0.4 A/cm 2 ) against Ni bare anodes. In the Chlor–Alkali (C/A) industry, thermal decomposition coating of mixed noble metal on Ni substrate is commonly used for advanced activated cathodes. It showed very low hydrogen over-potential of around 100 mV in AWE. To achieve better cell performance, separator selection is very important. We evaluated several separators including ion exchange membrane (IEM) to understand the basic function in AWE. IEM for C/A electrolysis showed high cell voltage (over 2.2 V) but low O 2 impurity in H 2 gas. Hydrogen purity was over 99.95%. Porous separators made of polypropylene showed 1.76 V at 40 A/dm 2 (0.4 A/cm 2 ), 80 °C. But there was a weakness on the durability for continuous operation. Proper selection of separator is important in an actual plant for effective and safe cell operation. The concept of safety operation is referred to by diffusion coefficient of hydrogen

  20. Economic Analysis of Improved Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuckshinrichs, Wilhelm, E-mail: w.kuckshinrichs@fz-juelich.de; Ketelaer, Thomas; Koj, Jan Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute for Energy and Climate Research – Systems Analysis and Technology Evaluation (IEK-STE), Juelich (Germany)

    2017-02-20

    Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) is a mature hydrogen production technology and there exists a range of economic assessments for available technologies. For advanced AWEs, which may be based on novel polymer-based membrane concepts, it is of prime importance that development comes along with new configurations and technical and economic key process parameters for AWE that might be of interest for further economic assessments. This paper presents an advanced AWE technology referring to three different sites in Europe (Germany, Austria, and Spain). The focus is on financial metrics, the projection of key performance parameters of advanced AWEs, and further financial and tax parameters. For financial analysis from an investor’s (business) perspective, a comprehensive assessment of a technology not only comprises cost analysis but also further financial analysis quantifying attractiveness and supply/market flexibility. Therefore, based on cash flow (CF) analysis, a comprehensible set of metrics may comprise levelised cost of energy or, respectively, levelized cost of hydrogen (LCH) for cost assessment, net present value (NPV) for attractiveness analysis, and variable cost (VC) for analysis of market flexibility. The German AWE site turns out to perform best in all three financial metrics (LCH, NPV, and VC). Though there are slight differences in investment cost and operation and maintenance cost projections for the three sites, the major cost impact is due to the electricity cost. Although investment cost is slightly lower and labor cost is significantly lower in Spain, the difference can not outweigh the higher electricity cost compared to Germany. Given the assumption that the electrolysis operators are customers directly and actively participating in power markets, and based on the regulatory framework in the three countries, in this special case electricity cost in Germany is lowest. However, as electricity cost is profoundly influenced by political decisions as

  1. Porphyrins Fused with Unactivated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Diev, Vyacheslav V.; Schlenker, Cody W.; Hanson, Kenneth; Zhong, Qiwen; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.; Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic study of the preparation of porphyrins with extended conjugation by meso,β-fusion with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is reported. The meso-positions of 5,15-unsubstituted porphyrins were readily functionalized with PAHs. Ring fusion using standard Scholl reaction conditions (FeCl 3, dichloromethane) occurs for perylene-substituted porphyrins to give a porphyrin β,meso annulated with perylene rings (0.7:1 ratio of syn and anti isomers). The naphthalene, pyrene, and coronene derivatives do not react under Scholl conditions but are fused using thermal cyclodehydrogenation at high temperatures, giving mixtures of syn and anti isomers of the meso,β-fused porphyrins. For pyrenyl-substituted porphyrins, a thermal method gives synthetically acceptable yields (>30%). Absorption spectra of the fused porphyrins undergo a progressive bathochromic shift in a series of naphthyl (λ max = 730 nm), coronenyl (λ max = 780 nm), pyrenyl (λ max = 815 nm), and perylenyl (λ max = 900 nm) annulated porphyrins. Despite being conjugated with unsubstituted fused PAHs, the β,meso-fused porphyrins are more soluble and processable than the parent nonfused precursors. Pyrenyl-fused porphyrins exhibit strong fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, with a progressive improvement in luminescent efficiency (up to 13% with λ max = 829 nm) with increasing degree of fusion. Fused pyrenyl-porphyrins have been used as broadband absorption donor materials in photovoltaic cells, leading to devices that show comparatively high photovoltaic efficiencies. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Porphyrins Fused with Unactivated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Diev, Vyacheslav V.

    2012-01-06

    A systematic study of the preparation of porphyrins with extended conjugation by meso,β-fusion with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is reported. The meso-positions of 5,15-unsubstituted porphyrins were readily functionalized with PAHs. Ring fusion using standard Scholl reaction conditions (FeCl 3, dichloromethane) occurs for perylene-substituted porphyrins to give a porphyrin β,meso annulated with perylene rings (0.7:1 ratio of syn and anti isomers). The naphthalene, pyrene, and coronene derivatives do not react under Scholl conditions but are fused using thermal cyclodehydrogenation at high temperatures, giving mixtures of syn and anti isomers of the meso,β-fused porphyrins. For pyrenyl-substituted porphyrins, a thermal method gives synthetically acceptable yields (>30%). Absorption spectra of the fused porphyrins undergo a progressive bathochromic shift in a series of naphthyl (λ max = 730 nm), coronenyl (λ max = 780 nm), pyrenyl (λ max = 815 nm), and perylenyl (λ max = 900 nm) annulated porphyrins. Despite being conjugated with unsubstituted fused PAHs, the β,meso-fused porphyrins are more soluble and processable than the parent nonfused precursors. Pyrenyl-fused porphyrins exhibit strong fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral region, with a progressive improvement in luminescent efficiency (up to 13% with λ max = 829 nm) with increasing degree of fusion. Fused pyrenyl-porphyrins have been used as broadband absorption donor materials in photovoltaic cells, leading to devices that show comparatively high photovoltaic efficiencies. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Technology advancement of the static feed water electrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A program to advance the technology of oxygen- and hydrogen-generating subsystems based on water electrolysis was studied. Major emphasis was placed on static feed water electrolysis, a concept characterized by low power consumption and high intrinsic reliability. The static feed based oxygen generation subsystem consists basically of three subassemblies: (1) a combined water electrolysis and product gas dehumidifier module; (2) a product gas pressure controller and; (3) a cyclically filled water feed tank. Development activities were completed at the subsystem as well as at the component level. An extensive test program including single cell, subsystem and integrated system testing was completed with the required test support accessories designed, fabricated, and assembled. Mini-product assurance activities were included throughout all phases of program activities. An extensive number of supporting technology studies were conducted to advance the technology base of the static feed water electrolysis process and to resolve problems.

  4. Studies on membrane acid electrolysis for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marco Antonio Oliveira da; Linardi, Marcelo; Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Celulas a Combustivel e Hidrogenio], Email: saliba@ipen.br

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen represents great opportunity to be a substitute for fossil fuels in the future. Water as a renewable source of hydrogen is of great interest, since it is abundant and can decompose, producing only pure H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. This decomposition of water can be accomplished by processes such as electrolysis, thermal decomposition and thermochemical cycles. The electrolysis by membrane has been proposed as a viable process for hydrogen production using thermal and electrical energy derived from nuclear energy or any renewable source like solar energy. In this work, within the context of optimization of the electrolysis process, it is intended to develop a mathematical model that can simulate and assist in parameterization of the electrolysis performed by polymer membrane electrolytic cell. The experimental process to produce hydrogen via the cell membrane, aims to optimize the amount of gas produced using renewable energy with noncarbogenic causing no harm by producing gases deleterious to the environment. (author)

  5. Thermal dynamic analysis of sulfur removal from coal by electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Gao, J.; Meng, F. [Qinghua University, Beijing (China). Dept. of Thermal Engineering

    2002-06-01

    The electrolytic reactions about sulfur removal from coal were studied by using chemical thermal dynamic analysis. According to the thermodynamical data, the Gibbs free energy value of the electrolytic reactions of pyritic and organic sulfur removal from coal is higher than zero. So, these electrolytic reactions are not spontaneous chemical reactions. In order to carry out desulfurisation by electrolysis, a certain voltage is necessary and important. Because theoretic decomposition voltage of pyrite and some parts of organic sulfur model compound is not very high, electrolysis reactions are easily to be carried out by using electrolysis technology. Mn ion and Fe ion are added into electrolysis solutions to accelerate the desulfurisation reaction. The electrolytic decomposition of coal is discussed. Because the theoretical decomposition voltage of some organic model compound is not high, the coal decomposition might happen. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. Advanced Additive Manufacturing Feedstock from Molten Regolith Electrolysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate the feasibility of Molten Regolith Electrolysis (MRE) Reactor start by initiating resistive-heating of the regolith past its melting point using...

  7. Micro-electrolysis technology for industrial wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Yue-Feng; Li, Wei

    2003-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the role of micro-electrolysis in removing chromaticity and COD and improving the biodegradability of wastewater from pharmaceutical, dye-printing and papermaking plants. Results showed that the use of micro-electrolysis technology could remove more than 90% of chromaticity and more than 50% of COD and greatly improved the biodegradability of pharmaceutical wastewater. Lower initial pH could be advantageous to the removal of chromaticity. A retention time of 30 minutes was recommended for the process design of micro-electrolysis. For the use of micro-electrolysis in treatment of dye-printing wastewater, the removal rates of both chromaticity and COD were increased from neutral condition to acid condition for disperse blue wastewater; more than 90% of chromaticity and more than 50% of COD could be removed in neutral condition for vital red wastewater.

  8. The micro-electrolysis technique in waste water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiti Zhou; Weihen Yang; Fenglin Yang; Xuemin Xiang; Yulu Wang

    1997-01-01

    The micro-electrolysis is one of the efficient methods to treat some kinds of waste water. The experiments have shown its high efficiency in sewage treatment and some kinds of industrial waste water. It is suitable for pre-treatment of high concentrated waste water and deep treatment of waste water for reuse purpose. The disadvantage of micro-electrolysis is its high energy consumption in case of high electrolyte concentration. (author) 2 figs., 11 tabs., 2 refs

  9. Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy via High Temperature Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Grant L. Hawkes

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the technical case for high-temperature nuclear hydrogen production. A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on high-temperature thermal water splitting processes is presented. Specific details of hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis are also provided, including results of recent experiments performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Based on these results, high-temperature electrolysis appears to be a promising technology for efficient large-scale hydrogen production

  10. The micro-electrolysis technique in waste water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiti Zhou; Weihen Yang; Fenglin Yang; Xuemin Xiang; Yulu Wang [Dalian Univ. of Technology, Dalian (China)

    1997-12-31

    The micro-electrolysis is one of the efficient methods to treat some kinds of waste water. The experiments have shown its high efficiency in sewage treatment and some kinds of industrial waste water. It is suitable for pre-treatment of high concentrated waste water and deep treatment of waste water for reuse purpose. The disadvantage of micro-electrolysis is its high energy consumption in case of high electrolyte concentration. (author) 2 figs., 11 tabs., 2 refs.

  11. [Water disinfection by the combined exposure to super-high frequency energy and available chlorine produced during water electrolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimarev, S I; Siniak, Iu E

    2014-01-01

    The article reports the results of studying the effects on polluted water of SHF-energy together with the residual free (active) chlorine as a by-product of electrolysis action on dissolved chlorine-containing salts. Purpose of the studies was to evaluate input of these elements to the water disinfection effect. The synergy was found to kill microorganisms without impacts on the physicochemical properties of processed water or nutrient medium; therefore, it can be used for water treatment, and cultivation of microorganisms in microbiology.

  12. Salt Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Liming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-01-01

    Studying salt stress is an important means to the understanding of plant ion homeostasis and osmo-balance. Salt stress research also benefits agriculture because soil salinity significantly limits plant productivity on agricultural lands. Decades of physiological and molecular studies have generated a large body of literature regarding potential salt tolerance determinants. Recent advances in applying molecular genetic analysis and genomics tools in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana are sh...

  13. Sea salt

    OpenAIRE

    Galvis-Sánchez, Andrea C.; Lopes, João Almeida; Delgadillo, Ivone; Rangel, António O. S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The geographical indication (GI) status links a product with the territory and with the biodiversity involved. Besides, the specific knowledge and cultural practices of a human group that permit transforming a resource into a useful good is protected under a GI designation. Traditional sea salt is a hand-harvested product originating exclusively from salt marshes from specific geographical regions. Once salt is harvested, no washing, artificial drying or addition of anti-caking agents are all...

  14. Comparative evaluation of fiber fuse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.D.; Mettler, S.C.; DiGiovanni, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    A phenomenon which results in the catastrophic destruction of the guiding properties of an optical fiber has been observed at laser power densities on the order of 3 x 10 6 watts/cm 2 in the core. This phenomenon is characterized by the propagation of a bright visible light from the point of initiation toward the laser source. The term 'fiber fuse' has been used because of the similarity in appearance to a burning fuse. The fiber fuse has been shown to start when the end of the fiber is contacted. It has also been initiated spontaneously from mechanical splices. This paper reports experimental data gathered on the fiber fuse and discusses their relationship to proposed physical mechanisms

  15. SINA: A test system for proximity fuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruizenaar, M. G. A.

    1989-04-01

    SINA, a signal generator that can be used for testing proximity fuses, is described. The circuitry of proximity fuses is presented; the output signal of the RF circuit results from a mixing of the emitted signal and received signal that is Doppler shifted in frequency by the relative motion of the fuse with respect to the reflecting target of surface. With SINA, digitized and stored target and clutter signals (previously measured) can be transformed to Doppler signals, for example during a real flight. SINA can be used for testing fuse circuitry, for example in the verification of results of computer simulations of the low frequency Doppler signal processing. The software of SINA and its use are explained.

  16. Endodontic therapy for a fused mandibular molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, I; Moshonov, J; Cohenca, N

    1997-06-01

    Variations in tooth morphology present a clinical challenge when endodontic treatment is required. A case of conservative endodontic therapy for a fused mandibular second and third molar is presented.

  17. Redox shuttles having an aromatic ring fused to a 1,1,4,4-tetrasubstituted cyclohexane ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Amine, Khalil

    2015-12-01

    An electrolyte includes an alkali metal salt; an aprotic solvent; and a redox shuttle additive including an aromatic compound having at least one aromatic ring fused with at least one non-aromatic ring, the aromatic ring having two or more oxygen or phosphorus-containing substituents.

  18. On change of iodobenzene electroreduction mechanism with change of tetraethylammonium salts concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majranovskij, S.G.; Rubinskaya, T.Ya.; Proskurovskaya, I.V.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of the nature and concentration of tetraethylammonium salt on the mechanism of electroreduction of iodobenzene at the mercury electrode was studied. For this purpose a microelectrolysis of iodobenzene solution was carried out with a subsequent chromatographic analysis of the yield products (with tetraethylammonium bromide as an indifferent electrolyte). Diphenylmercury was found on the background of tetraethylammonium salts at 0.08 to 0.2M concentrations among the electrolysis products besides the main product-benzene. At 0.01 and 1M salt concentrations even traces of diphenylmercury weren't detected. The diphenyl mercury content somewhat increases, if the electrolysis is conducted at the potentials of the startrise of the iodobenzene reduction wave, i. e. at E=-1.45V. Thus, the change of tetraethylammonium salt concentration may partially alter the iodobenzene reduction mechanism

  19. Molten salt engineering for thorium cycle. Electrochemical studies as examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiko

    1998-01-01

    A Th-U nuclear energy system utilizing accelerator driven subcritical molten salt breeder reactor has several advantages compared to conventional U-Pu nuclear system. In order to obtain fundamental data on molten salt engineering of Th-U system, electrochemical study was conducted. As the most primitive simulated study of beam irradiation of molten salt, discharge electrolysis was investigated in molten LiCl-KCl-AgCl system. Stationary discharge was generated under atmospheric argon gas and fine Ag particles were obtained. Hydride ion (H - ) behavior in molten salts was also studied to predict the behavior of tritide ion (T - ) in molten salt fuel. Finally, hydrogen behavior in metals at high temperature was investigated by electrochemical method, which is considered to be important to confine and control tritium. (author)

  20. Advances in molten salt electrochemistry towards future energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    This review article describes some selected novel molten salt electrochemical processes which have been created/developed by the author and his coworkers, with emphasis on the applications towards future energy systems. After showing a perspective of the applications of molten salt electrochemistry from the viewpoints of energy and environment, several selected topics are described in detail, which include nitride fuel cycle in a nuclear field, hydrogen energy system coupled with ammonia economy, thermally regenerative fuel cell systems, novel Si production process for solar cell and novel molten salt electrochemical processes for various energy and environment related functional materials including nitrides, rare earth-transition metal alloys, fine particles obtained by plasma-induced electrolysis, and carbon film. And finally, the author stresses again, the importance and potential of molten salt electrochemistry, and encourages young students, scientists and researchers to march in a procession hand in hand towards a bright future of molten salts. (author)

  1. “Inexhaustible” source of hydrogen may be unlocked by salt water

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce

    2011-12-01

    A grain of salt or two may be all that microbial electrolysis cells need to produce hydrogen from wastewater or organic by-products, without adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere or using grid electricity, according to engineers in the USA at The Pennsylvania State University. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. “Inexhaustible” source of hydrogen may be unlocked by salt water

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A grain of salt or two may be all that microbial electrolysis cells need to produce hydrogen from wastewater or organic by-products, without adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere or using grid electricity, according to engineers in the USA at The Pennsylvania State University. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Design of a water electrolysis flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. Gene; Grigger, David J.; Thompson, C. Dean; Cusick, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Supply of oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2) by electolyzing water in space will play an important role in meeting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) needs and goals for future space missios. Both O2 and H2 are envisioned to be used in a variety of processes including crew life support, spacecraft propulsion, extravehicular activity, electrical power generation/storage as well as in scientific experiment and manufacturing processes. The Electrolysis Performance Improvement Concept Study (EPICS) flight experiment described herein is sponsored by NASA Headquarters as a part of the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP). The objective of the EPICS is to further contribute to the improvement of the SEF technology, specifially by demonstrating and validating the SFE electromechanical process in microgravity as well as investigating perrformance improvements projected possible in a microgravity environment. This paper defines the experiment objective and presents the results of the preliminary design of the EPICS. The experiment will include testing three subscale self-contained SFE units: one containing baseline components, and two units having variations in key component materials. Tests will be conducted at varying current and thermal condition.

  4. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  5. Reactions on carbon anodes in aluminium electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidet, Trygve

    1997-12-31

    The consumption of carbon anodes and energy in aluminium electrolysis is higher than what is required theoretically. This thesis studies the most important of the reactions that consume anode materials. These reactions are the electrochemical anode reaction and the airburn and carboxy reactions. The first part of the thesis deals with the kinetics and mechanism of the electrochemical anode reaction using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The second part deals with air and carboxy reactivity of carbon anodes and studies the effects of inorganic impurities on the reactivity of carbon anodes in the aluminium industry. Special attention is given to sulphur since its effect on the carbon gasification is not well understood. Sulphur is always present in anodes, and it is expected that the sulphur content of available anode cokes will increase in the future. It has also been suggested that sulphur poisons catalyzing impurities in the anodes. Other impurities that were investigated are iron, nickel and vanadium, which are common impurities in anodes which have been reported to catalyze carbon gasification. 88 refs., 92 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. Steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) with proton-conducting oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lei; Boulfrad, Samir; Traversa, Enrico

    2014-12-21

    Energy crisis and environmental problems caused by the conventional combustion of fossil fuels boost the development of renewable and sustainable energies. H2 is regarded as a clean fuel for many applications and it also serves as an energy carrier for many renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power. Among all the technologies for H2 production, steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency and low environmental impact, provided that the needed electrical power is generated from renewable sources. However, the deployment of SOECs based on conventional oxygen-ion conductors is limited by several issues, such as high operating temperature, hydrogen purification from water, and electrode stability. To avoid these problems, proton-conducting oxides are proposed as electrolyte materials for SOECs. This review paper provides a broad overview of the research progresses made for proton-conducting SOECs, summarizing the past work and finding the problems for the development of proton-conducting SOECs, as well as pointing out potential development directions.

  7. Steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) with proton-conducting oxides

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Boulfrad, Samir; Traversa, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Energy crisis and environmental problems caused by the conventional combustion of fossil fuels boost the development of renewable and sustainable energies. H2 is regarded as a clean fuel for many applications and it also serves as an energy carrier for many renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power. Among all the technologies for H2 production, steam electrolysis by solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency and low environmental impact, provided that the needed electrical power is generated from renewable sources. However, the deployment of SOECs based on conventional oxygen-ion conductors is limited by several issues, such as high operating temperature, hydrogen purification from water, and electrode stability. To avoid these problems, proton-conducting oxides are proposed as electrolyte materials for SOECs. This review paper provides a broad overview of the research progresses made for proton-conducting SOECs, summarizing the past work and finding the problems for the development of proton-conducting SOECs, as well as pointing out potential development directions.

  8. Fused Bead Analysis of Diogenite Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D.W.; Beck, B.W.; McSween, H.Y.; Lee, C.T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Bulk rock chemistry is an essential dataset in meteoritics and planetary science [1]. A common method used to obtain the bulk chemistry of meteorites is ICP-MS. While the accuracy, precision and low detection limits of this process are advantageous [2], the sample size used for analysis (approx.70 mg) can be a problem in a field where small and finite samples are the norm. Fused bead analysis is another bulk rock analytical technique that has been used in meteoritics [3]. This technique involves forming a glass bead from 10 mg of sample and measuring its chemistry using a defocused beam on a microprobe. Though the ICP-MS has lower detection limits than the microprobe, the fused bead method destroys a much smaller sample of the meteorite. Fused bead analysis was initially designed for samples with near-eutectic compositions and low viscosities. Melts generated of this type homogenize at relatively low temperatures and produce primary melts near the sample s bulk composition [3]. The application of fused bead analysis to samples with noneutectic melt compositions has not been validated. The purpose of this study is to test if fused bead analysis can accurately determine the bulk rock chemistry of non-eutectic melt composition meteorites. To determine this, we conduct two examinations of the fused bead. First, we compare ICP-MS and fused bead results of the same samples using statistical analysis. Secondly, we inspect the beads for the presence of crystals and chemical heterogeneity. The presence of either of these would indicate incomplete melting and quenching of the bead.

  9. High Temperature Electrolysis using Electrode-Supported Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of electrode-supported solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. The cells currently under study were developed primarily for the fuel cell mode of operation. Results presented in this paper were obtained from single cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes (∼10 (micro)m thick), nickel-YSZ steam/hydrogen electrodes (∼1400 (micro)m thick), and manganite (LSM) air-side electrodes (∼90 (micro)m thick). The purpose of the present study was to document and compare the performance and degradation rates of these cells in the fuel cell mode and in the electrolysis mode under various operating conditions. Initial performance was documented through a series of DC potential sweeps and AC impedance spectroscopy measurements. Degradation was determined through long-duration testing, first in the fuel cell mode, then in the electrolysis mode over more than 500 hours of operation. Results indicate accelerated degradation rates in the electrolysis mode compared to the fuel cell mode, possibly due to electrode delamination. The paper also includes details of the single-cell test apparatus developed specifically for these experiments.

  10. Electrolysis with diamond anodes: Eventually, there are refractory species!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Ismael F; Cotillas, Salvador; Díaz, Elena; Sáez, Cristina; Rodríguez, Juan J; Cañizares, P; Mohedano, Ángel F; Rodrigo, Manuel A

    2018-03-01

    In this work, synthetic wastewater polluted with ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (Bmim) bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (NTf 2 ) undergoes four electrolytic treatments with diamond anodes (bare electrolysis, electrolysis enhanced with peroxosulfate promoters, irradiated with UV light and with US) and results obtained were compared with those obtained with the application of Catalytic Wet Peroxide Oxidation (CWPO). Despite its complex heterocyclic structure, Bmim + cation is successfully depleted with the five technologies tested, being transformed into intermediates that eventually can be mineralized. Photoelectrolysis attained the lowest concentration of intermediates, while CWPO is the technology less efficient in their degradation. However, the most surprising result is that concentration of NTf 2 - anion does not change during the five advanced oxidation processes tested, pointing out its strong refractory character, being the first species that exhibits this character in wastewater undergoing electrolysis with diamond. This means that the hydroxyl and sulfate radicals mediated oxidation and the direct electrolysis are inefficient for breaking the C-S, C-F and S-N bounds of the NTf 2 - anion, which is a very interesting mechanistic information to understand the complex processes undergone in electrolysis with diamond. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Small-Scale and Low-Cost Apparatus for the Electrolysis of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggeen, Per-Odd; Kvittingen, Lise

    2004-01-01

    The construction of two simple, inexpensive apparatuses that clearly show the electrolysis of water are described. Traditionally the electrolysis of water is conducted in a Hofmann apparatus which is expensive and fragile.

  12. Additive manufacturing of transparent fused quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junjie; Hostetler, John M.; Gilbert, Luke; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2018-04-01

    This paper investigates a filament-fed process for additive manufacturing (AM) of fused quartz. Glasses such as fused quartz have significant scientific and engineering applications, which include optics, communications, electronics, and hermetic seals. AM has several attractive benefits such as increased design freedom, faster prototyping, and lower processing costs for small production volumes. However, current research into glass AM has focused primarily on nonoptical applications. Fused quartz is studied here because of its desirability for use in high-quality optics due to its high transmissivity and thermal stability. Fused quartz filaments are fed into a CO2 laser-generated molten region, smoothly depositing material onto the workpiece. Spectroscopy and pyrometry are used to measure the thermal radiation incandescently emitted from the molten region. The effects of the laser power and scan speed are determined by measuring the morphology of single tracks. Thin walls are printed to study the effects of layer-to-layer height. This information is used to deposit solid pieces including a cylindrical-convex shape capable of focusing visible light. The transmittance and index homogeneity of the printed fused quartz are measured. These results show that the filament-fed process has the potential to print transmissive optics.

  13. Development status of a preprototype water electrolysis subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R. B.; Erickson, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    A preprototype water electrolysis subsystem was designed and fabricated for NASA's advanced regenerative life support program. A solid polymer is used for the cell electrolyte. The electrolysis module has 12 cells that can generate 5.5 kg/day of oxygen for the metabolic requirements of three crewmembers, for cabin leakage, and for the oxygen and hydrogen required for carbon dioxide collection and reduction processes. The subsystem can be operated at a pressure between 276 and 2760 kN/sq m and in a continuous constant-current, cyclic, or standby mode. A microprocessor is used to aid in operating the subsystem. Sensors and controls provide fault detection and automatic shutdown. The results of development, demonstration, and parametric testing are presented. Modifications to enhance operation in an integrated and manned test are described. Prospective improvements for the electrolysis subsystem are discussed.

  14. Solid oxide electrolysis cell for decomposition of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, S.; Ohno, H.; Yoshida, H.; Katsuta, H.; Naruse, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The decomposition of tritiated water vapor by means of solid oxide electrolysis cells has been proposed for the application to the D-T fusion reactor system. This method is essentially free from problems such as large tritium inventory, radiation damage, and generation of solid waste, so it is expected to be a promising one. Electrolysis of water vapor in an argon carrier was performed using a tube-type stabilized zirconia cell with porous platinum electrodes over the temperature range 500-950 0 C. High conversion ratios from water to hydrogen, of up to 99.9%, were achieved. The characteristics of the cell were deduced from the Nernst equation and the conversion ratios expressed as a function of the IR-free voltage. Experimental results agreed with the equation. The isotope effect in electrolysis is also discussed and experiments with heavy water were carried out. The obtained separation factor was slightly higher than the theoretical value. (author)

  15. Solid oxide electrolysis cell for decomposition of tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, S.; Katsuta, H.; Naruse, Y.; Ohno, H.; Yoshida, H.

    1984-01-01

    The decomposition of tritiated water vapor with solid oxide electrolysis cell was proposed for the application to the D-T fusion reactor system. This method is essentially free from problems such as large tritium inventory, radiation damage, and generation of solid waste, so it is expected to be a promising one. Electrolysis of water vapor in argon carrier was performed using tube-type stabilized zirconia cell with porous platinum electrodes in the temperature range of 500 0 C to 950 0 C. High conversion ratio from water to hydrogen up to 99.9% was achieved. The characteristics of the cell is deduced from the Nernst's equation and conversion ratio is described as the function of the open circuit voltage. Experimental results agreed with the equation. Isotope effect in electrolysis is also discussed and experiments with heavy water were carried out. Obtained separation factor was slightly higher than the theoretical value

  16. Development of Hydrogen Electrodes for Alkaline Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjartansdóttir, Cecilía Kristín

    , production of electricity via fuel cells, fuel for internal combustion engines or gas turbines, or as a raw material for the production of synthetic fuels via Sabatier or Fischer - Tropsch process. In some situations it may be suitable to simply inject hydrogen into the existing natural gas based...... will be needed. Producing hydrogen via water electrolysis using surplus, low cost, power from renewables offers the possibility of increased production capacity and load management with no greenhouse emissions. Hydrogen is a valuable energy carrier, which is able to contribute to various forms of energy, such as...... infrastructure. Alkaline water electrolysis (AWE) is the current standard (stat of the art) for industrial large-scale water electrolysis systems. One of the main criteria for industrial AWE is efficient and durable electrodes. The aim of the present PhD study was to develop electrode materials for hydrogen...

  17. Salt cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    If you are a professional associated with system and infrastructure management, looking at automated infrastructure and deployments, then this book is for you. No prior experience of Salt is required.

  18. Water Electrolysis for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Sending humans to Mars for any significant amount of time will require capabilities and technologies that enable Earth independence. To move towards this independence, the resources found on Mars must be utilized to produce the items needed to sustain humans away from Earth. To accomplish this task, NASA is studying In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) systems and techniques to make use of the atmospheric carbon dioxide and the water found on Mars. Among other things, these substances can be harvested and processed to make oxygen and methane. Oxygen is essential, not only for sustaining the lives of the crew on Mars, but also as the oxidizer for an oxygen-methane propulsion system that could be utilized on a Mars ascent vehicle. Given the presence of water on Mars, the electrolysis of water is a common technique to produce the desired oxygen. Towards this goal, NASA designed and developed a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolysis system, which was originally slated to produce oxygen for propulsion and fuel cell use in the Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project. As part of the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) project, this same electrolysis system, originally targeted at enabling in situ propulsion and power, operated in a life-support scenario. During HESTIA testing at Johnson Space Center, the electrolysis system supplied oxygen to a chamber simulating a habitat housing four crewmembers. Inside the chamber, oxygen was removed from the atmosphere to simulate consumption by the crew, and the electrolysis system's oxygen was added to replenish it. The electrolysis system operated nominally throughout the duration of the HESTIA test campaign, and the oxygen levels in the life support chamber were maintained at the desired levels.

  19. Fusing Facial Features for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Ahmad Dargham

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Face recognition is an important biometric method because of its potential applications in many fields, such as access control, surveillance, and human-computer interaction. In this paper, a face recognition system that fuses the outputs of three face recognition systems based on Gabor jets is presented. The first system uses the magnitude, the second uses the phase, and the third uses the phase-weighted magnitude of the jets. The jets are generated from facial landmarks selected using three selection methods. It was found out that fusing the facial features gives better recognition rate than either facial feature used individually regardless of the landmark selection method.

  20. Carbon dioxide and water vapor high temperature electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Verostko, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    The design, fabrication, breadboard testing, and the data base obtained for solid oxide electrolysis systems that have applications for planetary manned missions and habitats are reviewed. The breadboard tested contains sixteen tubular cells in a closely packed bundle for the electrolysis of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The discussion covers energy requirements, volume, weight, and operational characteristics related to the measurement of the reactant and product gas compositions, temperature distribution along the electrolyzer tubular cells and through the bundle, and thermal energy losses. The reliability of individual cell performance in the bundle configuration is assessed.

  1. Electrolysis test of different composite membranes at elevated temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Kalmar

    temperatures, phosphoric acid (H3PO4)[1] and zirconium phosphate (ZrP)[2] were introduced. These composite membranes were tested in an electrolysis setup. A typical electrolysis test was performed at 130°C with a galvanostatic load. Polarization curves were recorded under stationary conditions. Testing...... night at 150°C in a zirconium phosphate saturated 85wt% phosphoric acid solution. Different thicknesses of membranes were tested and as expected, the performance increased when the thickness of the membranes decreased. Furthermore composite membranes only treated with phosphoric acid or only treated...

  2. Economical hydrogen production by electrolysis using nano pulsed DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmaraj, C.H. [Tangedco, Tirunelveli, ME Environmental Engineering (India); Adshkumar, S. [Department of Civil Engineering, Anna University of Technology Tirunelveli, Tirunelveli - 627007 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Hydrogen is an alternate renewable eco fuel. The environmental friendly hydrogen production method is electrolysis. The cost of electrical energy input is major role while fixing hydrogen cost in the conventional direct current Electrolysis. Using nano pulse DC input makes the input power less and economical hydrogen production can be established. In this investigation, a lab scale electrolytic cell developed and 0.58 mL/sec hydrogen/oxygen output is obtained using conventional and nano pulsed DC. The result shows that the nano pulsed DC gives 96.8 % energy saving.

  3. Combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process for hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.; Stevens, W.H.; Butler, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes can be separated efficiently by a process which combines an electrolysis cell with a trickle bed column packed with a hydrophobic platinum catalyst. The column effects isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of electrolytic hydrogen and liquid water while the electrolysis cell contributes to isotope separation by virtue of the kinetic isotope effect inherent in the hydrogen evolution reaction. The main features of the CECE process for heavy water production are presented as well as a discussion of the inherent positive synergistic effects, and other advantages and disadvantages of the process. Several potential applications of the process in the nuclear power industry are discussed. 3 figures, 2 tables

  4. Chemistry and technology of Molten Salt Reactors - history and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlir, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactors represent one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included also in the Generation IV reactors family. This reactor type is distinguished by an extraordinarily close connection between the reactor physics and chemical technology, which is given by the specific features of the chemical form of fuel, representing by molten fluoride salt and circulating through the reactor core and also by the requirements of continuous 'on-line' reprocessing of the spent fuel. The history of Molten Salt Reactors reaches the period of fifties and sixties, when the first experimental Molten Salt Reactors were constructed and tested in ORNL (US). Several molten salt techniques dedicated to fresh molten salt fuel processing and spent fuel reprocessing were studied and developed in those days. Today, after nearly thirty years of discontinuance, a renewed interest in the Molten Salt Reactor technology is observed. Current experimental R and D activities in the area of Molten Salt Reactor technology are realized by a relatively small number of research institutions mainly in the EU, Russia and USA. The main effort is directed primarily to the development of separation processes suitable for the molten salt fuel processing and reprocessing technology. The techniques under development are molten salt/liquid metal extraction processes, electrochemical separation processes from the molten salt media, fused salt volatilization techniques and gas extraction from the molten salt medium

  5. Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 1800 0 C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 1400 0 C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) [$1000/KW(E) equivalent], the H 2 energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 10 6 scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen

  6. Metallurgical electrochemistry: the interface between materials science and molten salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Even though molten salt electrolysis finds application in the primary extraction of metals (electrowinning), the purification and recycling of metals (electrorefining), and in the formation of metal coatings (electroplating), the technology remains in many respects underexploited. Electrolysis in molten salts as well as other nonaqueous media has enormous potential for materials processing. First, owing to the special attributes of nonaqueous electrolytes electrochemical processing in these media has an important role to play in the generation of advanced materials, i.e., materials with specialized chemistries or tailored microstructures (electrosynthesis). Secondly, as environmental quality standards rise beyond the capabilities of classical metals extraction technologies to comply, molten salt electrolysis may prove to be the only acceptable route from ore to metal. Growing public awareness of pollution from the metals industry could stimulate a renaissance in molten salt electrochemistry. Challenges facing metallurgical electrochemistry as relates to the environment fall into two categories: (1) improving existing electrochemical technology, and (2) developing clean electrochemical technology to displace current nonelectrochemical technology. In both instances success hinges upon the discovery of advanced materials and the ecologically sound extraction of metals, the close coupling between materials science and molten salt chemistry is manifest. (author) 6 refs

  7. Complete degradation of Orange G by electrolysis in sub-critical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Asli; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2011-06-15

    Complete degradation of azo dye Orange G was studied using a 500 mL continuous flow reactor made of SUS 316 stainless steel. In this system, a titanium reactor wall acted as a cathode and a titanium plate-type electrode was used as an anode in a subcritical reaction medium. This hydrothermal electrolysis process provides an environmentally friendly route that does not use any organic solvents or catalysts to remove organic pollutants from wastewater. Reactions were carried out from 30 to 90 min residence times at a pressure of 7 MPa, and at different temperatures of 180-250°C by applying various direct currents ranging from 0.5 to 1A. Removal of dye from the product solution and conversion of TOC increased with increasing current value. Moreover, the effect of salt addition on degradation of Orange G and TOC conversion was investigated, because in real textile wastewater, many salts are also included together with dye. Addition of Na(2)CO(3) resulted in a massive degradation of the dye itself and complete mineralization of TOC, while NaCl and Na(2)SO(4) obstructed the removal of Orange G. Greater than 99% of Orange G was successfully removed from the product solution with a 98% TOC conversion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fused aromatic thienopyrazines: structure, properties and function

    KAUST Repository

    Mondal, Rajib

    2010-01-01

    Recent development of a fused aromatic thieno[3.4-b]pyrazine system and their application in optoelectronic devices are reviewed. Introduction of a fused aromatic unit followed by side chain engineering, dramatically enhanced the charge carrier mobility in thin film transistor devices and mobilities up to 0.2 cm2/Vs were achieved. The optoelectronic properties of these fused aromatic thienopyrazine polymers (Eg = 1.3 to 1.6 eV, HOMO = -4.9 to -5.2 V) were tuned by introduction of various fused aromatic rings within thienopyrazine. By balancing the fundamental properties of these polymers, both high charge carrier mobilities and moderate PCEs in solar cells were achieved. Further, effects of copolymerizing units are discussed. Low band gap semiconducting polymer (Eg ∼ 1 eV) with high field effect mobility (0.044 cm2/Vs) was obtained using cyclopentadithiophene as copolymerizing unit. Finally, a molecular design approach to enhance the absorption coefficients is discussed, which resulted in improved power conversion efficiency in bulk heterojunction solar cells. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Fungal Systematics and Evolution: FUSE 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crous, Pedro W; Schumacher, René K; Wingfield, Michael J; Lombard, Lorenzo; Giraldo, Alejandra; Christensen, Martha; Gardiennet, Alain; Nakashima, Chiharu; Pereira, Olinto L; Smith, Alexander J; Groenewald, Johannes Z

    2015-01-01

    Fungal Systematics and Evolution (FUSE) is introduced as a new series to expedite the publication of issues relating to the epitypification of formerly described species, report new sexual-asexual connections, the merging of sexual and asexual gen¬era following the end of dual nomenclature, and to

  10. Investigation of fused silica dynamic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaise, F.; Chevalier, J.M.; Bertron, I.; Malka, F.

    2006-01-01

    The survivability of the fused silica shields to shrapnel impacts is a key factor for the affordable operation of the intense laser irradiation future facility Laser Mega Joule (LMJ). This paper presents experimental data and computational modelling for LMJ fused silica upon shock wave loading and unloading. Gas-gun flyer plate impact and explosively driven tests have been conducted to investigate the dynamic behaviour of this material. Hugoniot states and the Hugoniot Elastic Limit of LMJ fused silica have been obtained. These experimental data are useful for determining some constitutive model constants of the 'Crack-Model', a continuum tensile and compressive failure model with friction based. This model has been improved by taking into account nonlinear elasticity. The numerical results obtained by performing computations of the previous tests and some ballistic impact tests are discussed. The numerical comparisons with the experimental data show good agreement. Further developments to simulate the permanent densification and the solid-to-solid phase transformation of fused silica are required. (authors)

  11. Demonstrating Earth Connections and Fuses Working Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Earth wires and fuses work together in UK mains circuits to keep users safe from electric shocks and are taught in many school contexts. The subject can be quite abstract and difficult for pupils to grasp, and a simple but visually clear and direct demonstration is described which would be easy for most physics departments to build and which can…

  12. 2nd Generation alkaline electrolysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yde, L. [Aarhus Univ. Business and Social Science - Centre for Energy Technologies (CET), Aarhus (Denmark); Kjartansdottir, C.K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Mechanical Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Allebrod, F. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)] [and others

    2013-03-15

    The overall purpose of this project has been to contribute to this load management by developing a 2{sup nd} generation of alkaline electrolysis system characterized by being compact, reliable, inexpensive and energy efficient. The specific targets for the project have been to: 1) Increase cell efficiency to more than 88% (according to the higher heating value (HHV)) at a current density of 200 mA /cm{sup 2}; 2) Increase operation temperature to more than 100 degree Celsius to make the cooling energy more valuable; 3) Obtain an operation pressure more than 30 bar hereby minimizing the need for further compression of hydrogen for storage; 4) Improve stack architecture decreasing the price of the stack with at least 50%; 5) Develop a modular design making it easy to customize plants in the size from 20 to 200 kW; 6) Demonstrating a 20 kW 2{sup nd} generation stack in H2College at the campus of Arhus University in Herning. The project has included research and development on three different technology tracks of electrodes; an electrochemical plating, an atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and finally a high temperature and pressure (HTP) track with operating temperature around 250 deg. C and pressure around 40 bar. The results show that all three electrode tracks have reached high energy efficiencies. In the electrochemical plating track a stack efficiency of 86.5% at a current density of 177mA/cm{sup 2} and a temperature of 74.4 deg. C has been shown. The APS track showed cell efficiencies of 97%, however, coatings for the anode side still need to be developed. The HTP cell has reached 100 % electric efficiency operating at 1.5 V (the thermoneutral voltage) with a current density of 1. 1 A/cm{sup 2}. This track only tested small cells in an externally heated laboratory set-up, and thus the thermal loss to surroundings cannot be given. The goal set for the 2{sup nd} generation electrolyser system, has been to generate 30 bar pressure in the cell stack. An obstacle to be

  13. Principle and perspectives of hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendal, R.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Euverink, G.J.W.; Metz, S.J.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2006-01-01

    Biocatalyzed electrolysis is a novel biological hydrogen production process with the potential to efficiently convert a wide range of dissolved organic materials in wastewaters. Even substrates formerly regarded to be unsuitable for hydrogen production due to the endothermic nature of the involved

  14. Determination of the Electronics Charge--Electrolysis of Water Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachar, Arun C.

    1985-01-01

    Presents an alternative method for measuring the electronic charge using data from the electrolysis of acidified distilled water. The process (carried out in a commercially available electrolytic cell) has the advantage of short completion time so that students can determine electron charge and mass in one laboratory period. (DH)

  15. Endurance Test and Evaluation of Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Andrew J.; Schubert, Franz H.; Chang, B. J.; Larkins, Jim T.

    1985-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to assess the state of alkaline water electrolysis cell technology and its potential as part of a Regenerative Fuel Cell System (RFCS) of a multikilowatt orbiting powerplant. The program evaluates the endurance capabilities of alkaline electrolyte water electrolysis cells under various operating conditions, including constant condition testing, cyclic testing and high pressure testing. The RFCS demanded the scale-up of existing cell hardware from 0.1 sq ft active electrode area to 1.0 sq ft active electrode area. A single water electrolysis cell and two six-cell modules of 1.0 sq ft active electrode area were designed and fabricated. The two six-cell 1.0 sq ft modules incorporate 1.0 sq ft utilized cores, which allow for minimization of module assembly complexity and increased tolerance to pressure differential. A water electrolysis subsystem was designed and fabricated to allow testing of the six-cell modules. After completing checkout, shakedown, design verification and parametric testing, a module was incorporated into the Regenerative Fuel Cell System Breadboard (RFCSB) for testing at Life Systems, Inc., and at NASA JSC.

  16. Computer simulation of the NASA water vapor electrolysis reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    The water vapor electrolysis (WVE) reactor is a spacecraft waste reclamation system for extended-mission manned spacecraft. The WVE reactor's raw material is water, its product oxygen. A computer simulation of the WVE operational processes provided the data required for an optimal design of the WVE unit. The simulation process was implemented with the aid of a FORTRAN IV routine.

  17. Behavior of oxygem bubbles during alkaline water electrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedershoven, H.M.S.; Jonge, de R.M.; Sillen, C.W.M.P.; Stralen, van S.J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Growth rate, departure radius and population of oxygen bubbles at the transparent anode during alkaline water electrolysis have been investigated experimentally. The supersaturation of dissolved oxygen in the electrolyte adjacent to the anode surface has been derived from bubble growth rates.

  18. Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented

  19. Power to fuel using electrolysis and CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Graves, Christopher R.; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos

    2014-01-01

    % of the cost of H2 produced by electrolysis originates from electricity cost. How much more depends on the actual electricity price and depends further on efficiency, investment cost and lifetime of electrolyzer. Investment costs are inversely proportional the current density at a given cell voltage...

  20. Analysis of cavitation effect for water purifier using electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Ko, Han Seo; Lee, Seung Ho

    2015-11-01

    Water is a limited and vital resource, so it should not be wasted by pollution. A development of new water purification technology is urgent nowadays since the original and biological treatments are not sufficient. The microbubble-aided method was investigated for removal of algal in this study since it overcomes demerits of the existing purification technologies. Thus, the cavitation effect in a venturi-type tube using the electrolysis was analyzed. Ruthenium-coated titanium plates were used as electrodes. Optimum electrode interval and applied power were determined for the electrolysis. Then, the optimized electrodes were installed in the venturi-type tube for generating cavitation. The cavitation effect could be enhanced without any byproduct by the bubbly flow induced by the electrolysis. The optimum mass flow rate and current were determined for the cavitation with the electrolysis. Finally, the visualization techniques were used to count the cell number of algal and microbubbles for the confirmation of the performance. As a result, the energy saving and high efficient water purifier was fabricated in this study. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Korean government (MEST) (No. 2013R1A2A2A01068653).

  1. High temperature electrolysis for hydrogen production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J. Stephen; O'brien, James E.; Stoots, Carl M.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Hartvigsen, Joseph J.

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of hydrogen production from water splitting, which can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) or thermochemical processes. In order to achieve competitive efficiencies, both processes require high-temperature operation (∼850degC). High-temperature electrolytic water splitting supported by nuclear process heat and electricity has the potential to produce hydrogen with overall system efficiencies of 45 to 55%. At the Idaho National Laboratory, we are developing solid-oxide cells to operate in the steam electrolysis mode. The research program includes both experimental and modeling activities. Experimental results were obtained from ten-cell and 22-cell planar electrolysis stacks, fabricated by Ceramatec, Inc. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (∼200 μm thick, 64 cm 2 active area), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions, gas glow rates, and current densities. Hydrogen production rates greater than 100 normal liters per hour for 196 hours have been demonstrated. In order to evaluate the performance of large-scale HTE operations, we have developed single-cell models, based on FLUENT, and a process model, using the systems-analysis code HYSYS. (author)

  2. HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. O& #39; Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2005-10-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

  3. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Nguyen Q.; Loutfy, Raouf O.; Yao, Neng-Ping

    1984-01-01

    Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  4. Study on hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Aita, Hideki; Sekita, Kenji; Haga, Katsuhiro; Iwata, Tomo-o.

    1997-09-01

    In JAERI, design and R and D works on hydrogen production process have been conducted for connecting to the HTTR under construction at the Oarai Research Establishment of JAERI as a nuclear heat utilization system. As for a hydrogen production process by high-temperature electrolysis of steam, laboratory-scale experiments were carried out with a practical electrolysis tube with 12 cells connected in series. Hydrogen was produced at a maximum density of 44 Nml/cm 2 h at 950degC, and know-how of operational procedures and operational experience were also accumulated. Thereafter, a planar electrolysis cell supported by a metallic plate was fabricated in order to improve hydrogen production performance and durability against thermal cycles. In the preliminary test with the planar cell, hydrogen has been produced continuously at a maximum density of 33.6 Nml/cm 2 h at an electrolysis temperature of 950degC. This report presents typical test results mentioned above, a review of previous studies conducted in the world and R and D items required for connecting to the HTTR. (author)

  5. The labor protection and safety measures at the electrolysis department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galushkin, N.V.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter of monograph is devoted to labor protection and safety measures at the electrolysis department. Thus, the characteristics of dangerous and harmful production factors as well as the danger of thermal burns and thermal exposure were considered. Safety requirements on labor safety were studied.

  6. Durability of solid oxide electrolysis cells for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauch, A.; Hoejgaard Jensen, S.; Dalgaard Ebbesen, S.

    2007-05-15

    In the perspective of the increasing interest in renewable energy and hydrogen economy, the reversible solid oxide cells (SOCs) is a promising technology as it has the potential of providing efficient and cost effective hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam (HTES). Furthermore development of such electrolysis cells can gain from the results obtained within the R and D of SOFCs. For solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) to become interesting from a technological point of view, cells that are reproducible, high performing and long-term stable need to be developed. In this paper we address some of the perspectives of the SOEC technology i.e. issues such as a potential H2 production price as low as 0.71 US dollar/kg H{sub 2} using SOECs for HTES; is there a possible market for the electrolysers? and what R and D steps are needed for the realisation of the SOEC technology? In the experimental part we present electrolysis test results on SOCs that have been optimized for fuel cell operation but applied for HTES. The SOCs are produced on a pre-pilot scale at Risoe National Laboratory. These cells have been shown to have excellent initial electrolysis performance, but the durability of such electrolysis cells are not optimal and examples of results from SOEC tests over several hundreds of hours are given here. The long-term tests have been run at current densities of -0.5 A/cm{sup 2} and -1 A/cm{sup 2}, temperatures of 850 deg. C and 950 deg. C and p(H{sub 2}O)/p(H{sub 2}) of 0.5/0.5 and 0.9/0.1. Long-term degradation rates are shown to be up to 5 times higher for SOECs compared to similar SOFC testing. Furthermore, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production prices are calculated using the experimental results from long-term electrolysis test as input and a short outlook for the future work on SOECs will be given as well. (au)

  7. Electrorefining of High Carbon Ferromanganese in Molten Salts to Produce Pure Ferromanganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao S. J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available High carbon ferromanganese is used as a starting material to prepare pure ferromanganese by electrorefining in molten salts. High carbon ferromanganese was applied as the anode, molybdenum was the cathode and Ag/AgCl was the reference electrode. The anodic dissolution was investigated by linear polarization in molten NaCl-KCl system. Then potentiostatic electrolysis was carried out to produce pure ferromanganese from high carbon ferromanganese. The cathodic product was determined to be a mixture of manganese and iron by x-ray diffraction (XRD. The content of carbon in the product was analyzed by carbon and sulfur analyzer. The post-electrolysis anode was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The mechanism of the anode dissolution and the distribution of the main impurity of carbon and silicon after electrolysis were discussed.

  8. Dihydropyridine-fused and pyridine-fused coumarins: Reduction on a glassy carbon electrode in dimethylformamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuñez-Vergara, Luis J.; Pardo-Jiménez, V.; Barrientos, C.; Olea-Azar, C.A.; Navarrete-Encina, P.A.; Squella, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, two series of dihydropyridine-fused and pyridine-fused coumarins were synthesised and electrochemically characterised in aprotic medium. In both series, the most easily reducible groups were the endocyclic carbonyl groups. The electrochemical mechanism for both types of compounds is strongly dependent on the experimental time-scale. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) reduction on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) of the endocyclic carbonyl group of dihydropyridine-fused coumarins involves an ECEC mechanism with two electron transfer steps that are coupled with chemical reactions to produce the corresponding hemiacetal derivative. In the case of pyridine-fused coumarins, CV reduction of the endocyclic carbonyl group involves an EEC mechanism. ESR studies revealed the presence of a stabilised intermediate only for the pyridine-fused derivatives. Our theoretical study showed a spin density map of radical species delocalised mainly within the coumarin ring, indicating the reduction of the endocyclic carbonyl group. In the case of the dihydropyridine-fused derivatives, the mildly acid hydrogen of the dihydropyridine ring destabilises the radical via a father–son type reaction.

  9. 29 CFR 1926.907 - Use of safety fuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... way shall be forbidden. (b) The hanging of a fuse on nails or other projections which will cause a...-called “drop fuse” method of dropping or pushing a primer or any explosive with a lighted fuse attached...

  10. Bath Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deaths and been blamed for a handful of suicides and murders. Two of the chemicals in bath salts (mephedrone and MDPV) are Schedule I class drugs. That means they have a high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use . People who are ...

  11. 30 CFR 57.12036 - Fuse removal or replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuse removal or replacement. 57.12036 Section 57.12036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12036 Fuse removal or replacement. Fuses shall not be removed or...

  12. 30 CFR 56.12036 - Fuse removal or replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuse removal or replacement. 56.12036 Section 56.12036 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... § 56.12036 Fuse removal or replacement. Fuses shall not be removed or replaced by hand in an energized...

  13. The challenges of treating a fused tooth

    OpenAIRE

    Baratto-Filho, Flares; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Crozeta, Bruno Monguilhott; Baratto, Samantha Pugsley; Campos, Edson Alves; Tomazinho, Flavia Sens Fagundes; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the multidisciplinary treatment involving a permanent maxillary lateral incisor fused to a supernumerary tooth, both presenting pulp necrosis and periapical lesion. A 15-year-old male patient sought treatment complaining of pain, swelling and mobility on the maxillary right lateral incisor. After clinical and radiographic examination, root canal preparation was performed according to the crown-down technique and a calcium hydroxide dressing was placed for 15...

  14. Fungal Systematics and Evolution: FUSE 1

    OpenAIRE

    Crous, Pedro W; Schumacher, René K; Wingfield, Michael J; Lombard, Lorenzo; Giraldo, Alejandra; Christensen, Martha; Gardiennet, Alain; Nakashima, Chiharu; Pereira, Olinto L; Smith, Alexander J; Groenewald, Johannes Z

    2015-01-01

    Fungal Systematics and Evolution (FUSE) is introduced as a new series to expedite the publication of issues relating to the epitypification of formerly described species, report new sexual-asexual connections, the merging of sexual and asexual gen¬era following the end of dual nomenclature, and to describe species or note interesting observations regarding fungi. This first paper includes 18 new combinations, 13 new species, three new genera and one new family. All taxa are ascomycetes, excep...

  15. Helicopter Aircrew Training Using Fused Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    PROCESS Blue screening involving human filming usually employs a blue or green backdrop, since skin contains little blue or green hue. These backdrops...Helicopter Aircrew Training Using Fused Reality 27 - 10 RTO-MP-HFM-136 a. b. c. d. e. f. Figure 13: Frames Showing Physical Object ( witch ... filming . However, when a user’s hands disrupt the light from a helmet-mounted light source, the shadows cast onto the distant background are diffuse and

  16. Time efficiency of tritium measurement in the environmental water by electrolysis enrichment (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Y.; Koganezawa, T.; Iida, T.

    2003-01-01

    Now the electrolysis enrichment is necessary for tritium measurement of the environmental water in Japan. Generally, the electrolysis needs distilling the sample water before and after the electrolysis. To save the time to measure, it was investigated that a possibility of the omission of the distillation after the electrolysis and of the substitution the filtration for the distillation before the electrolysis. The electrolysis was carried out with a device using solid polymer electrolyte layer, which was recently developed in Japan. Initially, impurities eluted from the device were measured by enrichment of ultra pure water. Although some impurities eluted from the layer, the concentrations were so low that the enriched water brought ineffectual quenching for the liquid scintillation counting. Secondly, two filtration methods, i.e.; micro filtration with the pore size of 0.1 μm and reverse osmosis, were applied to eliminate the impurities in the environmental waters before the electrolysis. Although the impurity concentrations in the samples by the filtrations were higher than those by the distillation, the filtered water brought only slight quenching. However, the frequent electrolysis of the water treated with the micro filtration caused degradation of the electrolysis cell. Consequently, the distillation after the electrolysis may omit, and the reverse osmosis treatment may alternate the distillation before the electrolysis. Improving the treatment will not only save the time and labor but also reduce the error with the treatment. The measurement technique proposed here will take 25 hours to measure one sample using the electrolysis device produced commercially. A hypothetic electrolysis device of which final sample volume were 20 cm 3 could allow the measuring time of 10 hours. (author)

  17. Outbursts In Symbiotic Binaries (FUSE 2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the past year, we made good progress on analysis of FUSE observations of the symbiotic binary Z And. For background, Z And is a binary system composed of a red giant and a hot component of unknown status. The orbital period is roughly 750 days. The hot component undergoes large-scale eruptions every 10-20 yr. An outburst began several years ago, triggering this FUSE opportunity. First, we obtained an excellent set of ground-based optical data in support, of the FUSE observations. We used FAST, a high throughput low resolution spectrograph on the 1.5-m telescope at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. A 300 g/ mm grating blazed at 4750 A, a 3 in. slit, and a thinned Loral 512 x 2688 CCD gave us spectra covering 3800-7500 A at a resolution of 6 A. The wavelength solution for each spectrum has a probable error of +/- 0.5 A or better. Most of the resulting spectra have moderate signal-to-noise, S/.N approx. greater than 30 per pixel. The time coverage for these spectra is excellent. Typically, we acquired spectra every 1-2 nights during dark runs at Mt. Hopkins. These data cover most of the rise and all of the decline of the recent outburst. The spectra show a wealth of emission lines, including H I, He I, He II, [Fe V11], and the Raman scattering bands at 6830 A and 7088 A. The Raman bands and other high ionization features vary considerably throughout the outburst. These features will enable us to correlate variations in the FUSE spectra with variations in the optical spectra. Second, we began an analysis of FUSE spectra of Z And. We have carefully examined the spectra, identifying real features and defects. We have identified and measured fluxes for all strong emission lines, including the O VI doublet at 1032 A and 1038 A. These and several other strong emission lines display pronounced P Cygni absorption components indicative of outgrowing gas. We will attempt to correlate these velocities with similar profiles observed on optical spectra. The line velocities - together

  18. Development of a static feed water electrolysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lantz, J. B.; Hallick, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    A one person level oxygen generation subsystem was developed and production of the one person oxygen metabolic requirements, 0.82 kg, per day was demonstrated without the need for condenser/separators or electrolyte pumps. During 650 hours of shakedown, design verification, and endurance testing, cell voltages averaged 1.62 V at 206 mA/sq cm and at average operating temperature as low as 326 K, virtually corresponding to the state of the art performance previously established for single cells. This high efficiency and low waste heat generation prevented maintenance of the 339 K design temperature without supplemental heating. Improved water electrolysis cell frames were designed, new injection molds were fabricated, and a series of frames was molded. A modified three fluid pressure controller was developed and a static feed water electrolysis that requires no electrolyte in the static feed compartment was developed and successfully evaluated.

  19. Numerical modeling of hypolimnetic oxygenation by electrolysis of water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaćimović Nenad M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a novel method for hypolimnetic oxygenation by electrolysis of water. The performance of the method is investigated by the laboratory and the field experiment. The laboratory experiment is conducted in a 90 L vessel, while the field experiment is conducted at the lake Biwa in Japan. In order to provide a better insight into involved processes, a numerical model for simulation of bubble flow is developed with consideration of gas compressibility and oxygen dissolution. The model simultaneously solves 3-D volume averaged two-fluid governing equations. Developed model is firstly verified by simulation of bubble flow experiments, reported in the literature, where good qualitative agreement between measured and simulated results is observed. In the second part, the model is applied for simulation of conducted water electrolysis experiments. The model reproduced the observed oxygen concentration dynamics reasonably well. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 37009

  20. Hydroxyl radical production in plasma electrolysis with KOH electrolyte solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saksono, Nelson; Febiyanti, Irine Ayu, E-mail: irine.ayu41@ui.ac.id; Utami, Nissa; Ibrahim [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424, Indonesia Phone: +62217863516, Fax: +62217863515 (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    Plasma electrolysis is an effective technology for producing hydroxyl radical (•OH). This method can be used for waste degradation process. This study was conducted to obtain the influence of applied voltage, electrolyte concentration, and anode depth in the plasma electrolysis system for producing hydroxyl radical. The materials of anode and cathode, respectively, were made from tungsten and stainless steel. KOH solution was used as the solution. Determination of hydroxyl radical production was done by measuring H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount formed in plasma system using an iodometric titration method, while the electrical energy consumed was obtained by measuring the electrical current throughout the process. The highest hydroxyl radical production was 3.51 mmol reached with 237 kJ energy consumption in the power supply voltage 600 V, 0.02 M KOH, and 0.5 cm depth of anode.

  1. HYFIRE: a tokamak/high-temperature electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.P.; Benenati, R.; Varljen, T.C.; Chi, J.W.H.; Karbowski, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    The HYFIRE studies to date have investigated a number of technical approaches for using the thermal energy produced in a high-temperature Tokamak blanket to provide the electrical and thermal energy required to drive a high-temperature (> 1000 0 C) water electrolysis process. Current emphasis is on two design points, one consistent with electrolyzer peak inlet temperatures of 1400 0 C, which is an extrapolation of present experience, and one consistent with a peak electrolyzer temperature of 1100 0 C. This latter condition is based on current laboratory experience with high-temperature solid electrolyte fuel cells. Our major conclusion to date is that the technical integration of fusion and high-temperature electrolysis appears to be feasible and that overall hydrogen production efficiencies of 50 to 55% seem possible

  2. Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Reversible Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operated at 250 °C and 40 bar have shown to be able to convert electrical energy into hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. Foam based gas diffusion electrodes and an immobilized electrolyte allow for reversible operation as electrolysis cell or fuel...... cell. In the present work we demonstrate the application of hydrophobic, porous, and electro-catalytically active gas diffusion electrodes. PTFE particles and silver nanowires as electro-catalysts were used in the gas diffusion electrodes. Impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were performed...... to determine the cell characteristics. The thickness of the electrolyte matrix was only 200 µm, thereby achieving a serial resistance and area specific resistance of 60 mΩ cm2 and 150 mΩ cm2, respectively, at 200 °C and 20 bar. A new production method was developed to increase the cell size from lab scale (1...

  3. Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Reversible Alkaline Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operated at 250 °C and 40 bar have shown to be able to convert electrical energy into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. Foam based gas diffusion electrodes and a liquid immobilized electrolyte allow the operation...... of the newly designed electrolysis cell as a fuel cell, but condensation of steam may lead to blocked pores, thereby inhibiting gas diffusion and decreasing the performance of the cell. In the here presented work we present the application of a hydrophobic, porous, and electro-catalytically active layer...... the electrochemical characteristics of the cell. The thickness of the electrolyte matrix was reduced to 200 µm, thereby achieving a serial resistance and area specific resistance as low as 60 mΩ cm2 and 150 mΩ cm2, respectively, at a temperature of 200 °C and 20 bar pressure. A new production method was developed...

  4. Water electrolysis for hydrogen production in Brazilian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Carvalho, Fatima M.S.; Bergamaschi, Vanderlei Sergio; Linardi, Marcelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CCCH/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Center], Email: saliba@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation and distributed energy sector of Brazilian economy. Fossil fuels are polluting by carbogenic emissions from their combustion, being so co-responsible for present global warming. However, no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally non-carbogenic hydrogen production process is currently available for commercialization. There are feasible possibilities to use electrolysis as one of the main sources of hydrogen, especially thinking on combination with renewable sources of energy, mainly eolic and solar. In this work some perspectives for Brazilian energy context is presented, where electrolysis combined with renewable power source and fuel cell power generation would be a good basis to improve the distributed energy supply for remote areas, where the electricity grid is not present or is deficient. (author)

  5. Hydrogen production from fusion reactors coupled with high temperature electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and complement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Processes which may be considered for this purpose include electrolysis, thermochemical decomposition or thermochemical-electrochemical hybrid cycles. Preliminary studies at Brookhaven indicate that high temperature electrolysis has the highest potential efficiency for production of hydrogen from fusion. Depending on design electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  6. Hydrogen generation through static-feed water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, F. C.; Schubert, F. H.

    1975-01-01

    A static-feed water electrolysis system (SFWES), developed under NASA sponsorship, is presented for potential applicability to terrestrial hydrogen production. The SFWES concept uses (1) an alkaline electrolyte to minimize power requirements and materials-compatibility problems, (2) a method where the electrolyte is retained in a thin porous matrix eliminating bulk electrolyte, and (3) a static water-feed mechanism to prevent electrode and electrolyte contamination and to promote system simplicity.

  7. Electrolysis of plutonium in neutral and basic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on electrolysis of Pu in waste streams. Removal of Pu by this process is maximum at pH 11. Runs on an actual waste stream showed that: Pu can be electrolyzed from neutral or basic solutions down to 10 -10 g/l. Am can also be removed. The removal efficiency is pH dependent. The deposits can be removed by acid leaching

  8. Polybenzimidazole membranes for zero gap alkaline electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraglund, Mikkel Rykær; Aili, David; Christensen, Erik

    Membranes of m-PBI doped in KOH (aq), 15-35 wt%, show high ionic conductivity in the temperature range 20-80 ºC. In electrolysis cells with nickel foam electrodes m-PBI membranesprovide low internal resistance. With a 60 µm membraneat 80ºC in 20 wt% KOH,1000 mA/cm2 is achieved at 2.25....

  9. Can high temperature steam electrolysis function with geothermal heat?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurvinsson, J.; Mansilla, C.; Werkoff, F.; Lovera, P.

    2007-01-01

    It is possible to improve the performance of electrolysis processes by operating at a high temperature. This leads to a reduction in electricity consumption but requires a part of the energy necessary for the dissociation of water to be in the form of thermal energy. Iceland produces low cost electricity and very low cost geothermal heat. However, the temperature of geothermal heat is considerably lower than the temperature required at the electrolyser's inlet, making heat exchangers necessary to recuperate part of the heat contained in the gases at the electrolyser's outlet. A techno-economic optimisation model devoted to a high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) process which includes electrolysers as well as a high temperature heat exchanger network was created. Concerning the heat exchangers, the unit costs used in the model are based on industrial data. For the electrolyser cells, the unit cost scaling law and the physical sub-model we used were formulated using analogies with solid oxide fuel cells. The method was implemented in a software tool, which performs the optimisation using genetic algorithms. The first application of the method is done by taking into account the prices of electricity and geothermal heat in the Icelandic context. It appears that even with a geothermal temperature as low as 230 degrees C, the HTE could compete with alkaline electrolysis. (authors)

  10. The electrolysis time on electrosynthesis of hydroxyapatite with bipolar membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Adrian; Jumari, Arif; Budiman, Anatta Wahyu; Puspitaningtyas, Stella Febianti; Cahyaningrum, Suci; Nazriati, Nazriati; Fajaroh, Fauziatul

    2018-02-01

    The electrochemical method with bipolar membrane has been successfully used for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite. In this work, we have developed 2 chambers electrolysis system separated by a bipolar membrane. The membrane was used to separate cations (H+ ions produced by the oxidation of water at the anode) and anions (OH- ions produced by the reduction of water at the cathode). With this system, we have designed that OH- ions still stay in the anions chamber because OH- ions was very substantial in the hydroxyapatite particles formation. The aim of this paper was to compare the electrolysis time on electrosynthesis of hydroxyapatite with and without the bipolar membrane. The electrosynthesis was performed at 500 mA/cm2 for 0.5 to 2 hours at room temperature and under ultrasonic cleaner to void agglomeration with and without the bipolar membrane. The electrosynthesis of hydroxyapatite with the bipolar membrane more effective than without the bipolar membrane. The hydroxyapatite has been appeared at 0.5 h of the electrolysis time with the bipolar membrane (at the cathode chamber) while it hasn't been seen without the bipolar membrane. The bipolar membrane prevents OH- ions migrate to the cation chamber. The formation of HA becomes more effective because OH- ions just formed HA particle.

  11. Tritium separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey, D.W.; Petek, M.; Taylor, R.D.; Kobisk, E.H.; Ramey, J.; Sampson, C.A.

    1979-10-01

    Use of bipolar electrolysis with countercurrent electrolyte flow to separate hydrogen isotopes was investigated for the removal of tritium from light water effluents or from heavy water moderator. Deuterium-tritium and protium-tritium separation factors occurring on a Pd-25% Ag bipolar electrode were measured to be 2.05 to 2.16 and 11.6 to 12.4 respectively, at current densities between 0.21 and 0.50 A cm -2 , and at 35 to 90 0 C. Current densities up to 0.3 A cm -2 have been achieved in continuous operation, at 80 to 90 0 C, without significant gas formation on the bipolar electrodes. From the measured overvoltage at the bipolar electrodes and the electrolyte conductivity the power consumption per stage was calculated to be 3.0 kwh/kg H 2 O at 0.2 A cm -2 and 5.0 kwh/kg H 2 O at 0.5 A cm -2 current density, compared to 6.4 and 8.0 kwh/kg H 2 O for normal electrolysis. A mathematical model derived for hydrogen isotope separation by bipolar electrolysis, i.e., for a square cascade, accurately describes the results for protium-tritium separation in two laboratory scale, multistage experiments with countercurrent electrolyte flow; the measured tiritum concentration gradient through the cascade agreed with the calculated values

  12. NOx generation method from recovered nitric acid by electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Shimizu, H.; Inoue, M.; Fujiso, M.; Shibuya, M.; Iwamoto, F.; Outou, Y.; Ochi, E.; Tsuyuki, T.

    1998-01-01

    An R and D has been conducted on an electrolytic NO x generation process utilizing recovered nitric acid from a PUREX reprocessing plant. The purpose of the study is to drastically reduce the amount of low-level-liquid waste(LLW). The research program phase-1, constituting mainly of electrochemical reaction mechanism study, material balance evaluation and process design study, finished in 1995. The results were presented in the previous papers). The research program phase-2 has started in 1995. The schedule is as follows: FY 1991-1994: Research program phase-1 Basic study using electrolysis equipment with 100-700 cm 2 electrodes FY 1995-1999: Research program phase-2 Process performance test by larger scale electrolysis equipment with 3.6 m 2 electrodes - pilot plant design (FY 1995) - pilot plant construction (FY 1996) - engineering data acquisition (FY 1997-1999). The process consists of many unit operations such as electrolysis, oxidation, nitric acid concentration, NO x compression and storage, NO x recovery, off-gas treatment and acid supplier. This paper outlines the pilot test plant. (author)

  13. Carbon dioxide electrolysis using a ceramic electrolyte. [for space processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erstfeld, T. E.; Mullins, O., Jr.; Williams, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of an experimental study of the electrical aspects of carbon dioxide electrolysis using a ceramic electrolyte. The electrolyte compositions used in this study are 8% Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2, 7.5% CaO stabilized ZrO2, and 5% Y2O3 stabilized ThO2. Results indicate that the 8% Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 is the best material to use for electrolysis, in terms of current as a function of voltage and temperature, and in terms of efficiency of oxide ion flow through it. The poorest results were obtained with the 5% Y2O3 stabilized ThO2 composition. An electrolysis system which might be employed to reclaim oxygen and carbon from effluents of space manufacturing, assuming that an industry would have to electrolyze 258,000 tonnes of CO2 per year, is predicted to require a total cell area of 110,000 sq m of 1 mm thickness and electrical capacity of 441 MW.

  14. Production of hydrogen using composite membrane in PEM water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhi priya, E.L.; Mahender, C.; Mahesh, Naga; Himabindu, V. [Centre for Environment, Institute of Science and Technology, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 085, A.P (India); Anjaneyulu, Y. [Director, TLGVRC, JSU Box 18739, JSU, Jackson, MS 32917-0939 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Electrolysis of water is the best known technology till today to produce hydrogen. The only practical way to produce hydrogen using renewable energy sources is by proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis. The most commonly used PEM membrane is Nafion. Composite membrane of TiO2 is synthesized by casting method using Nafion 5wt% solution. RuO2 is used as anode and 10 wt% Pd on activated carbon is used as cathode in the water electrolyser system. The performance of this Composite membrane is studied by varying voltage range 1.8 to 2.6V with respect to hydrogen yield and at current density 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5(A cm-2). This Composite membrane has been tested using in-house fabricated single cell PEM water electrolysis cell with 10cm2 active area at temperatures ranging from 30,45,65 850c and at 1 atmosphere pressure.

  15. Endurance test and evaluation of alkaline water electrolysis cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K. A.; Schubert, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    Utilization in the development of multi-kW low orbit power systems is discussed. The following technological developments of alkaline water electrolysis cells for space power application were demonstrated: (1) four 92.9 cm2 single water electrolysis cells, two using LST's advanced anodes and two using LST's super anodes; (2) four single cell endurance test stands for life testing of alkaline water electrolyte cells; (3) the solid performance of the advanced electrode and 355 K; (4) the breakthrough performance of the super electrode; (5) the four single cells for over 5,000 hours each significant cell deterioration or cell failure. It is concluded that the static feed water electrolysis concept is reliable and due to the inherent simplicity of the passive water feed mechanism coupled with the use of alkaline electrolyte has greater potential for regenerative fuel cell system applications than alternative electrolyzers. A rise in cell voltage occur after 2,000-3,000 hours which was attributed to deflection of the polysulfone end plates due to creepage of the thermoplastic. More end plate support was added, and the performance of the cells was restored to the initial performance level.

  16. Effect of La surface treatments on corrosion resistance of A3xx.x/SiCp composites in salt fog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Arrabal, R.; Merino, S.; Viejo, F.; Coy, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of the SiC p proportion and the matrix concentration of four aluminium metal matrix composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) modified by lanthanum-based conversion or electrolysis coating was evaluated in neutral salt fog according to ASTM B 117. Lanthanum-based conversion coatings were obtained by immersion in 50 deg. C solution of La(III) salt and lanthanum electrolysis treatments were performed in ethylene glycol mono-butyl ether solution. These treatments preferentially covered cathodic areas such as intermetallic compounds, Si eutectic and SiC p . The kinetic of the corrosion process was studied on the basis of gravimetric tests. Both coating microstructure and nature of corrosion products were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) before and after accelerated testing to determine the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour during exposure to the corrosive environment. The corrosion process was more influenced by the concentration of alloy elements in the matrix than by the proportion of SiC p reinforcement. Both conversion and electrolysis surface treatments improved the behaviour to salt fog corrosion in comparison with original composites without treatment. Additionally, electrolysis provided a higher degree of protection than the conversion treatment because the coating was more extensive

  17. Electrocatalysis in Water Electrolysis with Solid Polymer Electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasten, Egil

    2001-10-01

    Development and optimization of the electrodes in a water electrolysis system using a polymer membrane as electrolyte have been carried out in this work. A cell voltage of 1.59 V (energy consumption of about 3.8 kWh/Nm{sub 3} H{sub 2}) has been obtained at practical operation conditions of the electrolysis cell (10 kA . m2, 90{sup o}C) using a total noble metal loading of less than 2.4 mg.cm{sub 2} and a Nafion -115 membrane. It is further shown that a cell voltage of less than 1.5 V is possible at the same conditions by combination of the best electrodes obtained in this work. The most important limitation of the electrolysis system using polymer membrane as electrolyte has proven to be the electrical conductivity of the catalysts due to the porous backing/current collector system, which increases the length of the current path and decreases the cross section compared to the apparent one. A careful compromise must therefore be obtained between electrical conductivity and active surface area, which can be tailored by preparation and annealing conditions of the metal oxide catalysts. Anode catalysts of different properties have been developed. The mixed oxide of Ir-Ta (85 mole% Ir) was found to exhibit highest voltage efficiency at a current density of 10 kA.m{sub 2} or below, whereas the mixed oxide of Ir and Ru (60-80 mole% Ir) was found to give the highest voltage efficiency for current densities of above 10 kA.m{sub 2}. Pt on carbon particles, was found to be less suitable as cathode catalyst in water electrolysis. The large carbon particles introduced an unnecessary porosity into the catalytic layer, which resulted in a high ohmic drop. Much better voltage efficiency was obtained by using Pt-black as cathode catalyst, which showed a far better electrical conductivity. Ru-oxide as cathode catalyst in water electrolysis systems using a polymer electrolyte was not found to be of particular interest due to insufficient electrochemical activity and too low

  18. Enhanced hydrogen generation using a saline catholyte in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2011-11-01

    High rates of hydrogen gas production were achieved in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) without a catholyte phosphate buffer by using a saline catholyte solution and a cathode constructed around a stainless steel mesh current collector. Using the non-buffered salt solution (68 mM NaCl) produced the highest current density of 131 ± 12 A/m3, hydrogen yield of 3.2 ± 0.3 mol H2/mol acetate, and gas production rate of 1.6 ± 0.2 m3 H2/m 3·d, compared to MECs with catholytes externally sparged with CO2 or containing a phosphate buffer. The salinity of the catholyte achieved a high solution conductivity, and therefore the electrode spacing did not appreciably affect performance. The coulombic efficiency with the cathode placed near the membrane separating the chambers was 83 ± 4%, similar to that obtained with the cathode placed more distant from the membrane (84 ± 4%). Using a carbon cloth cathode instead of the stainless steel mesh cathode did not significantly affect performance, with all reactor configurations producing similar performance in terms of total gas volume, COD removal, rcat and overall energy recovery. These results show MEC performance can be improved by using a saline catholyte without pH control. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimization of catholyte concentration and anolyte pHs in two chamber microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-12-01

    The hydrogen production rate in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) using a non-buffered saline catholyte (NaCl) can be optimized through proper control of the initial anolyte pH and catholyte NaCl concentration. The highest hydrogen yield of 3.3 ± 0.4 mol H2/mole acetate and gas production rate of 2.2 ± 0.2 m3 H2/m3/d were achieved here with an initial anolyte pH = 9 and catholyte NaCl concentration of 98 mM. Further increases in the salt concentration substantially reduced the anolyte pH to as low as 4.6, resulting in reduced MEC performance due to pH inhibition of exoelectrogens. Cathodic hydrogen recovery was high (rcat > 90%) as hydrogen consumption by hydrogenotrophic methanogens was prevented by separating the anode and cathode chambers using a membrane. These results show that the MEC can be optimized for hydrogen production through proper choices in the concentration of a non-buffered saline catholyte and initial anolyte pH in two chamber MECs. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of a molten salt electrolyte for direct reduction of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alangi, Nagaraj; Anupama, P.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Gantayet, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Use of molten fluoride salt towards direct reduction of actinides and lanthanides by molten salt electrolysis is of interest for problems related to metallic nuclear fuels. The performance of the molten salt bath is dependent on the pre-conditioning of the molten salt. A procedure for conditioning of LiF-BaF 2 salt mixtures has been developed based on systematic electrochemical experimental investigations using voltammetry with graphite and platinum as electrode materials. We utilize the linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the electrolyte condition. This technique is fast and offers the advantage of in-situ/online measurement eliminating the need for sampling. The conditioning procedure that was developed was tried on LiF-CaF 2

  1. Fused Reality for Enhanced Flight Test Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Ed; Klyde, David

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of using Fused Reality-based simulation technology to enhance flight test capabilities has been investigated. In terms of relevancy to piloted evaluation, there remains no substitute for actual flight tests, even when considering the fidelity and effectiveness of modern ground-based simulators. In addition to real-world cueing (vestibular, visual, aural, environmental, etc.), flight tests provide subtle but key intangibles that cannot be duplicated in a ground-based simulator. There is, however, a cost to be paid for the benefits of flight in terms of budget, mission complexity, and safety, including the need for ground and control-room personnel, additional aircraft, etc. A Fused Reality(tm) (FR) Flight system was developed that allows a virtual environment to be integrated with the test aircraft so that tasks such as aerial refueling, formation flying, or approach and landing can be accomplished without additional aircraft resources or the risk of operating in close proximity to the ground or other aircraft. Furthermore, the dynamic motions of the simulated objects can be directly correlated with the responses of the test aircraft. The FR Flight system will allow real-time observation of, and manual interaction with, the cockpit environment that serves as a frame for the virtual out-the-window scene.

  2. Electrochemical reduction of cerium oxides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claux, B.; Serp, J.; Fouletier, J.

    2011-01-01

    This brief article describes a pyrochemical process that is used by CEA to turn actinide oxides into metal actinides. This process is applied to Cerium oxides (CeO 2 ) that simulate actinide oxides well chemically as cerium belongs to the lanthanide family. The process is in fact an electrolysis of cerium oxide in a bath of molten calcium chloride salt whose temperature is between 800 and 900 Celsius degrees. At those temperatures calcium chloride becomes a ionic liquid (Ca 2+ and Cl - ) that is a good electrical conductor and is particularly well-adapted as solvent to an electrolytic process. The electrolysis current allows the transformation of solvent Ca 2+ ions into metal calcium which, in turn, can reduce cerium oxide into metal cerium through chromatically. Experimental data shows the reduction of up to 90% of 10 g samples of CeO 2 in a 6 hour long electrolysis while the best reduction rate ever known was 80% so far. This result is all the more promising that cerium oxides are more difficult to reduce than actinide oxides from the thermodynamical perspective

  3. Fused upper central incisors: management of two clinical cases

    OpenAIRE

    Sfasciotti, Gian Luca; Marini, Roberta; Bossù, Maurizio; Ierardo, Gaetano; Annibali, Susanna

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the management of two clinical cases, in which the upper right central incisor was fused with a supernumerary tooth and the upper left central incisor was macrodontic. A radiographic examination revealed that the fused teeth had two separate roots. Hemisectioning of the fused teeth was performed, the supernumerary portion was extracted and the remaining part was reshaped to remove any sharp margins and to achieve a normal morphology. The macrodontic central incisors were no...

  4. Generating User Interfaces with the FUSE-System

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Lonczewski; Siegfried Schreiber

    2017-01-01

    With the FUSE(Formal User interface Specification Environment)-System we present a methodology and a set of integrated tools for the automatic generation of graphical user interfaces. FUSE provides tool-based support for all phases (task-, user-, problem domain analysis, design of the logical user interface, design of user interface in a particular layout style) of the user interface development process. Based on a formal specification of dialogue- and layout guidelines, FUSE allows the autom...

  5. A Radiographic Study of Fused and Geminated Tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chul Jae; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyunhee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-02-15

    The incidence and several characteristic features of fused and geminated teeth were studied radiographically, with full mouth periapical radiogram and pantomogram, in 4201 patients of mixed dentition and 5358 patients of permanent dentition. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence was revealed to 2.86%, 0.32%, 0.33%, and 0.06% in deciduous fused tooth, permanent fused tooth, deciduous geminated tooth and permanent geminated tooth respectively, and these anomalies were occurred in female more than male. 2. Fused teeth were observed predominantly in lower anterior teeth area, especially in lateral incisor and canine region, and many cases of deciduous geminated tooth were observed in upper central incisor region. 3. Congenital missing rates of succedaneous tooth in deciduous fused teeth were 57.1%, 85.7%, 71.0%, 69.0% in upper right and left central-lateral incisor regions, lower right and left lateral incisor-canine regions, respectively. 4. Prevalence of dental caries was 42.3%, 18.8% and 5.6% in deciduous fused, deciduous geminated and permanent fused tooth, respectively. 5. In classifying of fused and geminated teeth into 9 type, by following appearance such as number of crown, root, pulp chamber and pulp canal of those teeth, it was more favorable that Type I (2 crown, 2 root, 2 pulp chamber, 2 pulp canal) in deciduous fused tooth and Type IX (1 crown, 1 root, 1 pulp chamber, 1 pulp canal) in permanent used tooth, deciduous and permanent geminated tooth.

  6. A Radiographic Study of Fused and Geminated Tooth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chul Jae; Lee, Sang Rae

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and several characteristic features of fused and geminated teeth were studied radiographically, with full mouth periapical radiogram and pantomogram, in 4201 patients of mixed dentition and 5358 patients of permanent dentition. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence was revealed to 2.86%, 0.32%, 0.33%, and 0.06% in deciduous fused tooth, permanent fused tooth, deciduous geminated tooth and permanent geminated tooth respectively, and these anomalies were occurred in female more than male. 2. Fused teeth were observed predominantly in lower anterior teeth area, especially in lateral incisor and canine region, and many cases of deciduous geminated tooth were observed in upper central incisor region. 3. Congenital missing rates of succedaneous tooth in deciduous fused teeth were 57.1%, 85.7%, 71.0%, 69.0% in upper right and left central-lateral incisor regions, lower right and left lateral incisor-canine regions, respectively. 4. Prevalence of dental caries was 42.3%, 18.8% and 5.6% in deciduous fused, deciduous geminated and permanent fused tooth, respectively. 5. In classifying of fused and geminated teeth into 9 type, by following appearance such as number of crown, root, pulp chamber and pulp canal of those teeth, it was more favorable that Type I (2 crown, 2 root, 2 pulp chamber, 2 pulp canal) in deciduous fused tooth and Type IX (1 crown, 1 root, 1 pulp chamber, 1 pulp canal) in permanent used tooth, deciduous and permanent geminated tooth.

  7. Fuse Modeling for Reliability Study of Power Electronic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive modeling approach on reliability of fuses used in power electronic circuits. When fuses are subjected to current pulses, cyclic temperature stress is introduced to the fuse element and will wear out the component. Furthermore, the fuse may be used in a large......, and rated voltage/current are opposed to shift in time to effect early breaking during the normal operation of the circuit. Therefore, in such cases, a reliable protection required for the other circuit components will not be achieved. The thermo-mechanical models, fatigue analysis and thermo...

  8. Feasibility study of NaOH regeneration in acid gas removal unit using membrane electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufany, Fadlilatul; Pratama, Alvian; Romzuddin, Muhammad

    2017-05-01

    The world's energy demand is increasing with the development of human civilization. Due to limited energy resource, after 2020 fossil fuels thus is predicted will be replaced by renewable resources. Taking an example, one of the potential renewable energy to be considered is biogas, as its high content of methane, which can be produced via the fermentation process of the organic compounds under controlled anaerobic environment by utilizing the methanogen bacteria. However, prior the further use, this biogas must be purified from its impurities contents, i.e. acid gas of CO2 and H2S, up to 4% and 16 ppmv, respectively, in the acid gas removal unit. This such of purification efforts, will significantly increase the higher heating value of biogas, approximately from 600 to 900 Btu/Scf. During the purification process in this acid gas removal unit, NaOH solution is used as a liquid absorbent to reduce those acid gases content, in which the by-product of alkali salt (brine) was produced as waste. Here we report the feasibility study of the NaOH regeneration process in acid gas removal unit via membrane electrolysis technology, in which both the technical and economic aspects are taken account. To be precise in procedure, the anode semi-cell was filled with the brine solution, while the cathode semi-cell was filled with demineralized water, and those electrodes were separated by the cation exchange membrane. Furthermore, the applied potential was varied ranging from 5, 10, 15 and to 20 V, while the concentration of KCl electrolyte solutions were varied ranging from 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, and to 0.03 M. This study was conducted under controlled temperatures of 30 and 50 °C. Here we found that the % sodium recovery was increased along with the applied potential, temperature, and the decrease in KCl electrolyte concentration. We found that the best results, by means of the highest % sodium recovery, i.e. 97.26 %, was achieved under the experimental condition of temperature at 30

  9. Cooking without salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000760.htm Cooking without salt To use the sharing features on ... other dishes to add zest. Try Salt-free Cooking Explore cooking with salt substitutes. Add a splash ...

  10. The development and application of solid polymer electrolysis enrichment device of tritium in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xuelian; Yang Hailan Wu Bin; Yang Huaiyuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the working principle of solid polymer electrolysis enrichment device of tritium in water, presents experiments and works in development of SPE tritium automatic electrolysis enrichment device by CIRP, with which the water samples had been processed for TRIC2000, and the measurement results are satisfied

  11. Electrolysis of Water in the Secondary School Science Laboratory with Inexpensive Microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. A.; Athey, S. L.; Vandevender, M. L.; Crihfield, C. L.; Kolanko, C. C. E.; Shao, S.; Ellington, M. C. G.; Dicks, J. K.; Carver, J. S.; Holland, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    This activity allows students to visualize the electrolysis of water in a microfluidic device in under 1 min. Instructional materials are provided to demonstrate how the activity meets West Virginia content standards and objectives. Electrolysis of water is a standard chemistry experiment, but the typical laboratory apparatus (e.g., Hoffman cell)…

  12. Performance of single chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis with different types of ion exchange membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendal, R.A.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Molenkamp, R.J.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper hydrogen production through biocatalyzed electrolysis was studied for the first time in a single chamber configuration. Single chamber biocatalyzed electrolysis was tested in two configurations: (i) with a cation exchange membrane (CEM) and (ii) with an anion exchange membrane (AEM).

  13. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logan, B.E.; Call, D.; Cheng, S.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Jeremiasse, A.W.; Rozendal, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few

  14. Efficiency of tritium measurement in the environmental water by electrolysis enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koganezawa, T.; Iida, T. [Nagoya Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Sakuma, Y.; Yamanishi, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Ogata, Y. [Nagoya Univ., School of Health Sciences, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Tsuji, N. [Japan Air-conditioning Service Co. and Ltd., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Kakiuchi, M. [Gakushuin Univ., Faculty of Science, Tokyo (Japan); Satake, H. [Toyama Univ., Faculty of Science, Toyama (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Now tritium concentration in the environmental water is 0.5-2 Bq{center_dot}L{sup -1} in Japan. Tritium concentration cannot be measured accurately by liquid scintillation method, because the minimum detectable limits of liquid scintillation method is 0.5 Bq{center_dot}L{sup -1}. Therefore, one needs to enrich tritium concentration in the environmental water. Although the most popular method for tritium enrichment is electrolysis, the electrolysis takes much time and labor for distilling sample water at before and after the electrolysis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of more convenient method for tritium measurement. The method substitutes filtration for distillation at before electrolysis and omits distillation at after electrolysis. The method enables by using the electrolysis with solid polymer electrode. We performed two kinds of experiment to confirm the possibility of the method. First, impurities eluted from electrolysis installation with ultra pure water as sample was measured. Some impurities were eluted into the sample, but they brought noneffective quenching. Secondly, we applied new method to the environmental waters. Substituting for distillation, two filtration, 0.1 {mu}m filtration and reverse osmosis method, were investigated. Impurities in the samples by the filtrations were somewhat higher than that by the distillation, they brought noneffective quenching. We, however, observed distemper of the electrolysis happened by electrolysing filtered sample. Distillation is substituted filtration at before enrichment and omitted at after enrichment, leaving the influence of quenching out of consideration. (author)

  15. Efficiency of tritium measurement in the environmental water by electrolysis enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koganezawa, T.; Iida, T.; Sakuma, Y.; Yamanishi, H.; Ogata, Y.; Tsuji, N.; Kakiuchi, M.; Satake, H.

    2002-01-01

    Now tritium concentration in the environmental water is 0.5-2 Bq·L -1 in Japan. Tritium concentration cannot be measured accurately by liquid scintillation method, because the minimum detectable limits of liquid scintillation method is 0.5 Bq·L -1 . Therefore, one needs to enrich tritium concentration in the environmental water. Although the most popular method for tritium enrichment is electrolysis, the electrolysis takes much time and labor for distilling sample water at before and after the electrolysis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of more convenient method for tritium measurement. The method substitutes filtration for distillation at before electrolysis and omits distillation at after electrolysis. The method enables by using the electrolysis with solid polymer electrode. We performed two kinds of experiment to confirm the possibility of the method. First, impurities eluted from electrolysis installation with ultra pure water as sample was measured. Some impurities were eluted into the sample, but they brought noneffective quenching. Secondly, we applied new method to the environmental waters. Substituting for distillation, two filtration, 0.1 μm filtration and reverse osmosis method, were investigated. Impurities in the samples by the filtrations were somewhat higher than that by the distillation, they brought noneffective quenching. We, however, observed distemper of the electrolysis happened by electrolysing filtered sample. Distillation is substituted filtration at before enrichment and omitted at after enrichment, leaving the influence of quenching out of consideration. (author)

  16. Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Water Photo-Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Girolamo, Mariarita; Siracusano, Stefania; Sebastian, David; Baglio, Vincenzo; Schuster, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Water-fed photo-electrolysis cells equipped with perfluorosulfonic acid (Nafion® 115) and quaternary ammonium-based (Fumatech® FAA3) ion exchange membranes as separator for hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions were investigated. Protonic or anionic ionomer dispersions were deposited on the electrodes to extend the interface with the electrolyte. The photo-anode consisted of a large band-gap Ti-oxide semiconductor. The effect of membrane characteristics on the photo-electrochemical conversion of solar energy was investigated for photo-voltage-driven electrolysis cells. Photo-electrolysis cells were also studied for operation under electrical bias-assisted mode. The pH of the membrane/ionomer had a paramount effect on the photo-electrolytic conversion. The anionic membrane showed enhanced performance compared to the Nafion®-based cell when just TiO2 anatase was used as photo-anode. This was associated with better oxygen evolution kinetics in alkaline conditions compared to acidic environment. However, oxygen evolution kinetics in acidic conditions were significantly enhanced by using a Ti sub-oxide as surface promoter in order to facilitate the adsorption of OH species as precursors of oxygen evolution. However, the same surface promoter appeared to inhibit oxygen evolution in an alkaline environment probably as a consequence of the strong adsorption of OH species on the surface under such conditions. These results show that a proper combination of photo-anode and polymer electrolyte membrane is essential to maximize photo-electrolytic conversion. PMID:28468242

  17. Cadmium (II) removal mechanisms in microbial electrolysis cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colantonio, Natalie; Kim, Younggy, E-mail: younggy@mcmaster.ca

    2016-07-05

    Highlights: • Rapid removal of Cd(II) was achieved in 24 h using microbial electrolysis cells. • Cathodic reduction (electrodeposition) of Cd(II) cannot explain the rapid removal. • H{sub 2} evolution in microbial electrolysis cells increases local pH near the cathode. • High local pH induces Cd(OH){sub 2} and CdCO{sub 3} precipitation only with electric current. • Neutral pH caused by low current and depleted substrate dissolves the precipitated Cd. - Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal, causing serious environmental and human health problems. Conventional methods for removing cadmium from wastewater are expensive and inefficient for low concentrations. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can simultaneously treat wastewater, produce hydrogen gas, and remove heavy metals with low energy requirements. Lab-scale MECs were operated to remove cadmium under various electric conditions: applied voltages of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 V; and a fixed cathode potential of −1.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Regardless of the electric condition, rapid removal of cadmium was demonstrated (50–67% in 24 h); however, cadmium concentration in solution increased after the electric current dropped with depleted organic substrate under applied voltage conditions. For the fixed cathode potential, the electric current was maintained even after substrate depletion and thus cadmium concentration did not increase. These results can be explained by three different removal mechanisms: cathodic reduction; Cd(OH){sub 2} precipitation; and CdCO{sub 3} precipitation. When the current decreased with depleted substrates, local pH at the cathode was no longer high due to slowed hydrogen evolution reaction (2H{sup +} + 2e{sup −} → H{sub 2}); thus, the precipitated Cd(OH){sub 2} and CdCO{sub 3} started dissolving. To prevent their dissolution, sufficient organic substrates should be provided when MECs are used for cadmium removal.

  18. Mechanical losses in thin fused silica fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilenko, I A; Braginsky, V B; Lourie, S L

    2004-01-01

    Intracavity topology of the readout system for LIGO III project and table-top QND mechanical measurements under development require the use of small probe masses and suspensions with a very low level of internal losses. A good choice is to use thin fused silica fibres similar to LIGO II mirrors suspensions. Mechanical losses of silica fibres are investigated in this work through the study of quality factor dependence on diameter for pendulum and violin modes of oscillations with diameters ranging from 1.5 to 40 μm. The estimated values of effective mechanical loss angle show noticeably greater growth with lower diameters than might be expected while extrapolating known results of research done for thicker fibres

  19. Mechanical losses in thin fused silica fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilenko, I A; Braginsky, V B; Lourie, S L [Department of Oscillatory Physics, Physics Faculty, Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2004-03-07

    Intracavity topology of the readout system for LIGO III project and table-top QND mechanical measurements under development require the use of small probe masses and suspensions with a very low level of internal losses. A good choice is to use thin fused silica fibres similar to LIGO II mirrors suspensions. Mechanical losses of silica fibres are investigated in this work through the study of quality factor dependence on diameter for pendulum and violin modes of oscillations with diameters ranging from 1.5 to 40 {mu}m. The estimated values of effective mechanical loss angle show noticeably greater growth with lower diameters than might be expected while extrapolating known results of research done for thicker fibres.

  20. Understanding error generation in fused deposition modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochmann, Lennart; Transchel, Robert; Wegener, Konrad; Bayley, Cindy; Helu, Moneer; Dornfeld, David

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing offers completely new possibilities for the manufacturing of parts. The advantages of flexibility and convenience of additive manufacturing have had a significant impact on many industries, and optimizing part quality is crucial for expanding its utilization. This research aims to determine the sources of imprecision in fused deposition modeling (FDM). Process errors in terms of surface quality, accuracy and precision are identified and quantified, and an error-budget approach is used to characterize errors of the machine tool. It was determined that accuracy and precision in the y direction (0.08–0.30 mm) are generally greater than in the x direction (0.12–0.62 mm) and the z direction (0.21–0.57 mm). Furthermore, accuracy and precision tend to decrease at increasing axis positions. The results of this work can be used to identify possible process improvements in the design and control of FDM technology. (paper)

  1. Understanding error generation in fused deposition modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochmann, Lennart; Bayley, Cindy; Helu, Moneer; Transchel, Robert; Wegener, Konrad; Dornfeld, David

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing offers completely new possibilities for the manufacturing of parts. The advantages of flexibility and convenience of additive manufacturing have had a significant impact on many industries, and optimizing part quality is crucial for expanding its utilization. This research aims to determine the sources of imprecision in fused deposition modeling (FDM). Process errors in terms of surface quality, accuracy and precision are identified and quantified, and an error-budget approach is used to characterize errors of the machine tool. It was determined that accuracy and precision in the y direction (0.08-0.30 mm) are generally greater than in the x direction (0.12-0.62 mm) and the z direction (0.21-0.57 mm). Furthermore, accuracy and precision tend to decrease at increasing axis positions. The results of this work can be used to identify possible process improvements in the design and control of FDM technology.

  2. Fusing Recommendations for Social Bookmarking Websites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; van den Bosch, Antal

    2011-01-01

    Social bookmarking websites are rapidly growing in popularity. Recommender systems, a promising remedy to the information overload accompanying the explosive growth in content, are designed to identify which unseen content might be of interest to a particular user, based on his or her past...... that use tag overlap and metadata provide better results for social bookmarking data sets than the transaction patterns that are used traditionally in recommender systems research. In addition, we investigate how to fuse different recommendation approaches to further improve recommendation accuracy. We...... preferences. Most previous work in recommendation for social bookmarking suffers from a lack of comparisons between the different available approaches. In this article, we address this issue by comparing and evaluating eight recommendation approaches on four data sets from two domains. We find that approaches...

  3. Alkaline membrane water electrolysis with non-noble catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraglund, Mikkel Rykær

    at 1.7 V and 2800 mA cm-2 at 2.0 V. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data showed a 6-fold reduction in ohmic cell resistance compared to conventional materials. Albeit good performance, ex-situ characterization and durability tests showed that polymer backbone and membrane stability remained......As renewable energy sources reach higher grid penetration, large scale energy storage solutions are becoming increasingly important. Hydrogen produced with renewable energy by water electrolysis is currently the only option to solve this challenge on a global scale, and green hydrogen is essential...

  4. Elimination of heavy metals from leachates by membrane electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, R. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Siedlungs- und Industriewasserwirtschaft, Mommsenstrasse 13, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Seidel, H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Rahner, D. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie und Eektrochemie, Mommsenstrasse 13, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Morgenstern, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Analytik, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Loeser, C. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Lebensmittel- und Bioverfahrenstechnik, Bergstrasse 120, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    The elimination of heavy metals from bioleaching process waters (leachates) by electrolysis was studied in the anode and cathode region of a membrane electrolysis cell at current densities of 5-20 mA/cm{sup 2} using various electrode materials. The leaching waters containing a wide range of dissolved heavy metals, were high in sulfate, and had pH values of approx. 3. In preliminary tests using a rotating disc electrode the current density-potential curve (CPK) was recorded at a rotation velocity of 0, 1000 and 2000 rpm and a scan rate of 10 mV/s in order to collect information on the influence of transport processes on the electrochemical processes taking place at the electrodes. The electrochemical deposition-dissolution processes at the cathode are strongly dependent on the hydrodynamics. Detailed examination of the anodic oxidation of dissolved Mn(II) indicated that the manganese dioxide which formed adhered well to the electrode surface but in the cathodic return run it was again reduced. Electrode pairs of high-grade steel, lead and coal as well as material combinations were used to investigate heavy metal elimination in a membrane electrolysis cell. Using high-grade steel, lead and carbon electrode pairs, the reduction and deposition of Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni and some Cd in metallic or hydroxide form were observed in an order of 10-40 % in the cathode chamber. The dominant process in the anode chamber was the precipitation of manganese dioxide owing to the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II). Large amounts of heavy metals were co-precipitated by adsorption onto the insoluble MnO{sub 2}. High-grade steel and to some extent lead anodes were dissolved and hence were proven unsuitable as an anode material. These findings were largely confirmed by experiments using combination electrodes of coal and platinized titanium as an anode material and steel as a cathode material.The results indicate that electrochemical metal separation in the membrane electrolysis cell can represent a

  5. Electrolysis: Information and Opportunities for Electric Power Utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, B.; Levene, J.; Harrison, K.; Sen, P.K.; Novachek, F.

    2006-09-01

    Recent advancements in hydrogen technologies and renewable energy applications show promise for economical near- to mid-term conversion to a hydrogen-based economy. As the use of hydrogen for the electric utility and transportation sectors of the U.S. economy unfolds, electric power utilities need to understand the potential benefits and impacts. This report provides a historical perspective of hydrogen, discusses the process of electrolysis for hydrogen production (especially from solar and wind technologies), and describes the opportunities for electric power utilities.

  6. Search for neutron emission during the electrolysis of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, P.R.P.; Saxena, R.N.; Morato, S.P.; Goldman, I.D.; Pinho, A.G. de; Nascimento, I.C.

    1990-03-01

    A liquid scintillator detector NE 213 with pulse shape discrimination technique was used to observe neutrons during the electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode. From the measured fore and background couting rates, a neutron emission rate of (8.2 ± 2.9) x 10 -3 n/(sec.g.) Pd was determined implying (2.9 ± 1.0) x 10 -24 fusions / [(dd pair).sec.] as compared to ≅ 10 -23 fusion/ [(dd pair).sec.] reported by Jones et al. using titanium electrode. (author) [pt

  7. Iron migration from the anode surface in alumina electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, Elena N.; Drozdova, Tatiana N.; Ponomareva, Svetlana V. [Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation); Kirik, Sergei D., E-mail: kiriksd@yandex.ru [Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk, 660041 (Russian Federation); Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk, 660036 (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corrosion destruction of two-component iron-based alloys in high-temperature aluminum electrolysis in the cryolite alumina melt has been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was found that at the first stage oxidative polarization of iron atoms on the anode surface into Fe{sup 2+} takes place. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 2+} interacts with cryolite melt producing FeF{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FeF{sub 2} gives oxides FeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The participation of oxygen in the corrosion has not been observed. - Abstract: Corrosion destruction of two-component iron-based alloys used as an anode in high-temperature alumina electrolysis in the melt of NaF/KF/AlF{sub 3} electrolyte has been considered. Ni, Si, Cu, Cr, Mn, Al, Ti in the amount of up to 10% have been tested as the dopants to an anode alloys. The composition of the corrosion products has been studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. It has been established that the anode corrosion is induced by a surface electrochemical polarization and iron atom oxidation. Iron ions come into an exchange interaction with the fluoride components of the melted electrolyte, producing FeF{sub 2}. The last interacts with oxyfluoride species transforming into the oxide forms: FeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Due to the low solubility, the iron oxides are accumulated in the near-electrode sheath. The only small part of iron from anode migrates to cathode that makes an production of high purity aluminum of a real task. The alloy dopants are also subjected to corrosion in accordance with electromotive series resulting corrosion tunnels on the anode surface. The oxides are final compounds which collect in the same area. The corrosion products form an anode shell which is electronic conductor at electrolysis temperature. The

  8. Intermediate Temperature Steam Electrolysis with Phosphate-Based Electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Carsten Brorson

    as the technological issues and challenges faced. A setup suitable for intermediate temperature electrolysis has been constructed in order to accommodate testing in the IT region. This included the evaluation of multiple generations of components such as end plates and flow plates. Chemical vapour deposition...... treatment step of the synthesis. It was found that initial heating of the synthesis precursors to 270 _C gave a high quality sample in a reproducible fashion. Investigations of two additional novel phosphates was attempted. These were phosphoric acid treated Nb5P7O30 and a mixture of Bi2P4O13, BiPO4 and 2...

  9. Production of Oxygen from Lunar Regolith by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the use of the molten oxide electrolysis (MOE) process for the extraction of oxygen for life support and propellant, and silicon and metallic elements for use in fabrication on the Moon. The Moon is rich in mineral resources, but it is almost devoid of chemical reducing agents, therefore, molten oxide electrolysis is ideal for extraction, since the electron is the only practical reducing agent. MOE has several advantages over other extraction methods. First, electrolytic processing offers uncommon versatility in its insensitivity to feedstock composition. Secondly, oxide melts boast the twin key attributes of highest solubilizing capacity for regolith and lowest volatility of any candidate electrolytes. The former is critical in ensuring high productivity since cell current is limited by reactant solubility, while the latter simplifies cell design by obviating the need for a gas-tight reactor to contain evaporation losses as would be the case with a gas or liquid phase fluoride reagent operating at such high temperatures. Alternatively, MOE requires no import of consumable reagents (e.g. fluorine and carbon) as other processes do, and does not rely on interfacing multiple processes to obtain refined products. Electrolytic processing has the advantage of selectivity of reaction in the presence of a multi-component feed. Products from lunar regolith can be extracted in sequence according to the stabilities of their oxides as expressed by the values of the free energy of oxide formation (e.g. chromium, manganese, Fe, Si, Ti, Al, magnesium, and calcium). Previous work has demonstrated the viability of producing Fe and oxygen from oxide mixtures similar in composition to lunar regolith by molten oxide electrolysis (electrowinning), also called magma electrolysis having shown electrolytic extraction of Si from regolith simulant. This paper describes recent advances in demonstrating the MOE process by a joint project with participation by NASA KSC and

  10. Effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on chlorine generation of electrolyzed deep ocean water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoo-Shyng Wang Hsu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrolyzed water is a sustainable disinfectant, which can comply with food safety regulations and is environmentally friendly. A two-factor central composite design was adopted for studying the effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on the chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzed deep ocean water (DOW. DOW was electrolyzed in a glass electrolyzing cell equipped with platinum–plated titanium anode and cathode. The results showed that chlorine concentration reached maximal level in the batch process. Prolonged electrolysis reduced chlorine concentration in the electrolyte and was detrimental to electrolysis efficiency, especially under high electric potential conditions. Therefore, the optimal choice of electrolysis time depends on the electrolyzable chloride in DOW and cell potential adopted for electrolysis. The higher the electric potential, the faster the chlorine level reaches its maximum, but the lower the electric efficiency will be.

  11. Effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on chlorine generation of electrolyzed deep ocean water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Guoo-Shyng Wang; Lu, Yi-Fa; Hsu, Shun-Yao

    2017-10-01

    Electrolyzed water is a sustainable disinfectant, which can comply with food safety regulations and is environmentally friendly. A two-factor central composite design was adopted for studying the effects of electrolysis time and electric potential on the chlorine generation efficiency of electrolyzed deep ocean water (DOW). DOW was electrolyzed in a glass electrolyzing cell equipped with platinum-plated titanium anode and cathode. The results showed that chlorine concentration reached maximal level in the batch process. Prolonged electrolysis reduced chlorine concentration in the electrolyte and was detrimental to electrolysis efficiency, especially under high electric potential conditions. Therefore, the optimal choice of electrolysis time depends on the electrolyzable chloride in DOW and cell potential adopted for electrolysis. The higher the electric potential, the faster the chlorine level reaches its maximum, but the lower the electric efficiency will be. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Electrochemical Behavior of LiBr, LiI, and Li2Se in LiCl Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In Kyu; Do, Jae Bum; Hong, Sun Seok; Seo, Chung Seok

    2006-03-01

    The effect of fission products on the electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide has been studied. It has been reported that volatile fission products, such as Br, I, and Se, react with Li metal which is a reductant in the process to give LiBr, LiI, and Li 2 Se. These compounds are dissociated as corresponding anions and cations in the LiCl molten salt at 650 .deg. C. In this experiment, oxidation and reduction reaction of 3wt% of each compound in LiCl molten salt were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. For LiBr, redox reactions of cation and anion were reversible, while redox reactions of Li + and I - were irreversible. For Li 2 Se, about half of the produced Li metal was disappeared at the cathode and two anodic current curves were appeared. After the cyclic voltammetric measurements for each compound, chronopotentiometric experiment was carried out for one hour with 100 - 400 mA. After the electrolysis, no compounds gave Li metal in the porous MgO filter in which Li metal was produced at the cathode. However, LiCl salt was covered with Br 2 for LiBr electrolysis. Dark red color of Br 2 was easily removed by water. For LiI electrolysis, salt gave black color and I 2 was deposited on the Pt anode. For Li 2 Se electrolysis, black fine powders were precipitated in the salt. After the separation and dryness of the precipitates, it was analyzed with XRD and it turned out PtSe 2 . From the electrochemical experimental results, it was concluded that these compounds may affect the electrolytic reduction process of uranium oxide in the spent fuel

  13. New Electrolytes for CO2 Electrolysis Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Pia Lolk

    The aim of this thesis has been to explore the potential of aqueous immobilized K2CO3 as a possible electrolyte for co-electrolysis of CO2 and water at approx. 200 °C. This has been done by exploring the properties of pure K2CO3 (aq) and immobilized K2CO3 (aq) as well as the properties...... was observed for 10 wt% K2CO3 immobilized in TiO2 when changing the atmosphere from N2 to CO2. K2CO3 (aq) immobilized in TiO2 shows good promise as a potential electrolyte for co-electrolysis of CO2 and water at 200 °C....... in a 10 wt% K2CO3 (aq) solution are K+ and HCO3-. The water partial pressure as well as the amount of water vapour at different temperatures, pressures and K2CO3 (aq) concentrations was also calculated using FactSage. K2CO3 (aq) was immobilized in both SrTiO3 and TiO2. It was found that a loss...

  14. Static Feed Water Electrolysis Subsystem Testing and Component Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszenski, E. P.; Schubert, F. H.; Burke, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    A program was carried out to develop and test advanced electrochemical cells/modules and critical electromechanical components for a static feed (alkaline electrolyte) water electrolysis oxygen generation subsystem. The accomplishments were refurbishment of a previously developed subsystem and successful demonstration for a total of 2980 hours of normal operation; achievement of sustained one-person level oxygen generation performance with state-of-the-art cell voltages averaging 1.61 V at 191 ASF for an operating temperature of 128F (equivalent to 1.51V when normalized to 180F); endurance testing and demonstration of reliable performance of the three-fluid pressure controller for 8650 hours; design and development of a fluid control assembly for this subsystem and demonstration of its performance; development and demonstration at the single cell and module levels of a unitized core composite cell that provides expanded differential pressure tolerance capability; fabrication and evaluation of a feed water electrolyte elimination five-cell module; and successful demonstration of an electrolysis module pressurization technique that can be used in place of nitrogen gas during the standby mode of operation to maintain system pressure and differential pressures.

  15. Electrochemical extraction of oxygen using PEM electrolysis technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOULBABA ELADEB

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical extraction of oxygen from air can be carried out by chemical reduction of oxygen at the cathode and simultaneous oxygen evolution by water anode oxidation. The present investigation deals with the use of an electrolysis cell of PEM technology for this purpose. A dedicated 25 cm2 cell provided with a commercial water electrolysis MEA and titanium grooved plates has been designed for continuous operation at pressures close to the ambient level. The MEA consisted of a Nafion 117 membrane sandwiched between a Pt/C cathode and a non-supported Pt-Ir anode. Oxygen partial consumption in long-term runs was evaluated by analysis of the outlet air by gas chromatography, depending on the cell voltage - or the current density - and the excess in air oxygen fed to the cathode. Runs over more 50 hours indicated the relative stability of the components used for current densities ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 A cm-2 with high efficiency of oxygen reduction. Higher current density could be envisaged with more efficient MEA’s, exhibiting lower overpotentials for oxygen evolution to avoid too significant degradation of the anode material and the membrane. Interpretation of the data has been carried out by calculation of the cathode current efficiency.

  16. HYFIRE: a tokamak-high-temperature electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Benenati, R.; Horn, F.; Isaacs, H.; Lazareth, O.W.; Makowitz, H.; Usher, J.

    1980-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a comprehensive conceptual design study called HYFIRE of a commercial fusion Tokamak reactor, high-temperature electrolysis system. The study is placing particular emphasis on the adaptability of the STARFIRE power reactor to a synfuel application. The HYFIRE blanket must perform three functions: (a) provide high-temperature (approx. 1400 0 C) process steam at moderate pressures (in the range of 10 to 30 atm) to the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) units; (b) provide high-temperature (approx. 700 0 to 800 0 C) heat to a thermal power cycle for generation of electricity to the HTE units; and (c) breed enough tritium to sustain the D-T fuel cycle. In addition to thermal energy for the decomposition of steam into its constituents, H 2 and O 2 , electrical input is required. Fourteen hundred degree steam coupled with 40% power efficiency results in a process efficiency (conversion of fusion energy to hydrogen chemical energy) of 50%

  17. HYFIRE: a tokamak-high-temperature electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Benenati, R.; Horn, F.; Isaacs, H.; Lazareth, O.W.; Makowitz, H.; Usher, J.

    1980-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a comprehensive conceptual design study called HYFIRE of a commercial fusion Tokamak reactor, high-temperature electrolysis system. The study is placing particular emphasis on the adaptability of the STARFIRE power reactor to a synfuel application. The HYFIRE blanket must perform three functions: (a) provide high-temperature (approx. 1400 0 C) process steam at moderate pressures (in the range of 10 to 30 atm) to the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) units; (b) provide high-temperature (approx. 700 0 to 800 0 C) heat to a thermal power cycle for generation of electricity to the HTE units; and (c) breed enough tritium to sustain the D-T fuel cycle. In addition to thermal energy for the decomposition of steam into its constituents, H 2 and O 2 , electrical input is required. Fourteen hundred degree steam coupled with 40% power cycle efficiency results in a process efficiency (conversion of fusion energy to hydrogen chemical energy) of 50%

  18. Bilateral maxillary fused second and third molars: a rare occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Jin-Tao; Wu, You-Nong; Smales, Roger J; Hu, Ming; Yu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2012-12-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and endodontic therapy of maxillary fused second and third molars, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 31-year-old Chinese male, with no contributory medical or family/social history, presented with throbbing pain in the maxillary right molar area following an unsuccessful attempted tooth extraction. Clinical examination revealed what appeared initially to be a damaged large extra cusp on the buccal aspect of the distobuccal cusp of the second molar. However, CBCT revealed that a third molar was fused to the second molar. Unexpectedly, the maxillary left third molar also was fused to the second molar, and the crown of an unerupted supernumerary fourth molar was possibly also fused to the apical root region of the second molar. Operative procedures should not be attempted without adequate radiographic investigation. CBCT allowed the precise location of the root canals of the right maxillary fused molar teeth to permit successful endodontic therapy, confirmed after 6 months.

  19. Electrochemical reduction of actinides oxides in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claux, B.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive metals are currently produced from their oxide by multiple steps reduction techniques. A one step route from the oxide to the metal has been suggested for metallic titanium production by electrolysis in high temperature molten chloride salts. In the so-called FFC process, titanium oxide is electrochemically reduced at the cathode, generating O 2- ions, which are converted on a graphite anode into carbon oxide or dioxide. After this process, the spent salt can in principle be reused for several batches which is particularly attractive for a nuclear application in terms of waste minimization. In this work, the electrochemical reduction process of cerium oxide (IV) is studied in CaCl 2 and CaCl 2 -KCl melts to understand the oxide reduction mechanism. Cerium is used as a chemical analogue of actinides. Electrolysis on 10 grams of cerium oxide are made to find optimal conditions for the conversion of actinides oxides into metals. The scale-up to hundred grams of oxide is also discussed. (author) [fr

  20. Effect of La surface treatments on corrosion resistance of A3xx.x/SiC{sub p} composites in salt fog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: anpardo@quim.ucm.es; Merino, M.C. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Arrabal, R. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Merino, S. [Departamento de Tecnologia Industrial, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Viejo, F. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Coy, A.E. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-02-15

    The influence of the SiC{sub p} proportion and the matrix concentration of four aluminium metal matrix composites (A360/SiC/10p, A360/SiC/20p, A380/SiC/10p, A380/SiC/20p) modified by lanthanum-based conversion or electrolysis coating was evaluated in neutral salt fog according to ASTM B 117. Lanthanum-based conversion coatings were obtained by immersion in 50 deg. C solution of La(III) salt and lanthanum electrolysis treatments were performed in ethylene glycol mono-butyl ether solution. These treatments preferentially covered cathodic areas such as intermetallic compounds, Si eutectic and SiC{sub p}. The kinetic of the corrosion process was studied on the basis of gravimetric tests. Both coating microstructure and nature of corrosion products were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) before and after accelerated testing to determine the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour during exposure to the corrosive environment. The corrosion process was more influenced by the concentration of alloy elements in the matrix than by the proportion of SiC{sub p} reinforcement. Both conversion and electrolysis surface treatments improved the behaviour to salt fog corrosion in comparison with original composites without treatment. Additionally, electrolysis provided a higher degree of protection than the conversion treatment because the coating was more extensive.

  1. High-pressure water electrolysis: Electrochemical mitigation of product gas crossover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalenbach, Maximilian; Stolten, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • New technique to reduce gas crossover during water electrolysis • Increase of the efficiency of pressurized water electrolysis • Prevention of safety hazards due to explosive gas mixtures caused by crossover • Experimental realization for a polymer electrolyte membrane electrolyzer • Discussion of electrochemical crossover mitigation for alkaline water electrolysis - Abstract: Hydrogen produced by water electrolysis can be used as an energy carrier storing electricity generated from renewables. During water electrolysis hydrogen can be evolved under pressure at isothermal conditions, enabling highly efficient compression. However, the permeation of hydrogen through the electrolyte increases with operating pressure and leads to efficiency loss and safety hazards. In this study, we report on an innovative concept, where the hydrogen crossover is electrochemically mitigated by an additional electrode between the anode and the cathode of the electrolysis cell. Experimentally, the technique was applied to a proton exchange membrane water electrolyzer operated at a hydrogen pressure that was fifty times larger than the oxygen pressure. Therewith, the hydrogen crossover was reduced and the current efficiency during partial load operation was increased. The concept is also discussed for water electrolysis that is operated at balanced pressures, where the crossover of hydrogen and oxygen is mitigated using two additional electrodes

  2. Oxygen Handling and Cooling Options in High Temperature Electrolysis Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01

    Idaho National Laboratory is working on a project to generate hydrogen by high temperature electrolysis (HTE). In such an HTE system, safety precautions need to be taken to handle high temperature oxygen at ~830°C. This report is aimed at addressing oxygen handling in a HTE plant.. Though oxygen itself is not flammable, most engineering material, including many gases and liquids, will burn in the presence of oxygen under some favorable physicochemical conditions. At present, an absolute set of rules does not exist that can cover all aspects of oxygen system design, material selection, and operating practices to avoid subtle hazards related to oxygen. Because most materials, including metals, will burn in an oxygen-enriched environment, hazards are always present when using oxygen. Most materials will ignite in an oxygen-enriched environment at a temperature lower than that in air, and once ignited, combustion rates are greater in the oxygen-enriched environment. Even many metals, if ignited, burn violently in an oxygen-enriched environment. However, these hazards do not preclude the operations and systems involving oxygen. Oxygen can be safely handled and used if all the materials in a system are not flammable in the end-use environment or if ignition sources are identified and controlled. In fact, the incidence of oxygen system fires is reported to be low with a probability of about one in a million. This report is a practical guideline and tutorial for the safe operation and handling of gaseous oxygen in high temperature electrolysis system. The intent is to provide safe, practical guidance that permits the accomplishment of experimental operations at INL, while being restrictive enough to prevent personnel endangerment and to provide reasonable facility protection. Adequate guidelines are provided to govern various aspects of oxygen handling associated with high temperature electrolysis system to generate hydrogen. The intent here is to present acceptable

  3. Production of Synthetic Fuels by Co-Electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2009-01-01

    reactions, the equilibrium of the water-gas shift reaction is reached, and moreover, CO is produced via the water-gas shift reaction. The degradation observed when performing co-electrolysis in these SOCs occurs mainly at the Ni/YSZ cathode and may be a consequence of impurities in the gas stream, adsorbing......Co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 was studied in solid oxide cells (SOCs) supported by nickel-/yittria-stabilized zirconia (Ni/YSZ) electrode. Polarization characterization indicates that electrochemical reduction of both CO2 and H2O occurs during co-electrolysis. In parallel with the electrochemical...

  4. Treatment of chitin-producing wastewater by micro-electrolysis-contact oxidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue-ping; Xu, Xin-hua; Chen, Hai-feng

    2004-04-01

    The technique of micro-electrolysis-contact oxidization was exploited to treat chitin-producing wastewater. Results showed that Fe-C micro-electrolysis can remove about 30% COD(cr), raise pH from 0.7 to 5.5. The COD(cr) removal efficiency by biochemical process can be more than 80%. During a half year's operation, the whole system worked very stably and had good results, as proved by the fact that every quality indicator of effluent met the expected discharge standards; which means that chitin wastewater can be treated by the technique of micro-electrolysis, contact oxidization.

  5. ELIMINATING NEGETIVE EFFECT OF INVERTER-BASED DGs ON FUSE-RECLOSER COORDINATION IN DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    shakarami, mahmoudreza; namdari, farhad; salehi, moslem

    2015-01-01

    Despite many advantages of distributed generation (DG) sources, they may have a negative effect on the protection of distribution systems. In a distribution system, fuse-recloser protection scheme is designed such that the recloser could operate faster than the fuse to prevent fuse burning; but, the presence of DGs in fault conditions may lead to increased fuse current and thus faster performance of the fuse than the recloser and lack of coordination. In this paper, effect of DGs on fuse-recl...

  6. Computational model of exploding metallic fuses for multimegajoule switching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Brownell, J.H.; Greene, A.E.; Nickel, G.H.; Oliphant, T.A.; Weiss, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    A new model for determining the time-dependent behavior of exploding metallic fuses is formulated. The model draws on an atomic data base and gives insight into the temporal behavior of the material density and temperature of the fuse as well as the nonlinear electrical circuit interaction. The model includes an embedding insulating tamper and leads to a plausible explanation of fuse ''restrike.'' The model predicts time-scale compression of 500 for inductive store systems powered by explosive driven magnetic flux compression generators. A scenario for achieving multimegajoule foil implosions is predicted

  7. Fused upper central incisors: management of two clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfasciotti, Gian Luca; Marini, Roberta; Bossù, Maurizio; Ierardo, Gaetano; Annibali, Susanna

    2011-03-01

    This paper reports the management of two clinical cases, in which the upper right central incisor was fused with a supernumerary tooth and the upper left central incisor was macrodontic. A radiographic examination revealed that the fused teeth had two separate roots. Hemisectioning of the fused teeth was performed, the supernumerary portion was extracted and the remaining part was reshaped to remove any sharp margins and to achieve a normal morphology. The macrodontic central incisors were not treated. At 12-months post-surgery there were no periodontal problems and no hypersensitivity. Orthodontic treatment was performed to appropriately align the maxillary teeth and to correct the malocclusion.

  8. Renal cell carcinoma in patient with crossed fused renal ectopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Cakmak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary renal cell carcinomas have rarely been reported in patients with crossed fused renal ectopia. We presented a patient with right to left crossed fused kidney harbouring renal tumor. The most frequent tumor encountered in crossed fused renal ectopia is renal cell carcinoma. In this case, partial nephrectomy was performed which pave way to preservation of the uninvolved both renal units. Due to unpredictable anatomy, careful preoperative planning and meticulous delineation of renal vasculature is essential for preservation of the uninvolved renal units.

  9. Two-stage electrolysis to enrich tritium in environmental water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shima, Nagayoshi; Muranaka, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    We present a two-stage electrolyzing procedure to enrich tritium in environmental waters. Tritium is first enriched rapidly through a commercially-available electrolyser with a large 50A current, and then through a newly-designed electrolyser that avoids the memory effect, with a 6A current. Tritium recovery factor obtained by such a two-stage electrolysis was greater than that obtained when using the commercially-available device solely. Water samples collected in 2006 in lakes and along the Pacific coast of Aomori prefecture, Japan, were electrolyzed using the two-stage method. Tritium concentrations in these samples ranged from 0.2 to 0.9 Bq/L and were half or less, that in samples collected at the same sites in 1992. (author)

  10. Impact of low gravity on water electrolysis operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, F. T.; Schubert, F. H.; Lee, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced space missions will require oxygen and hydrogen utilities for several important operations including the following: (1) propulsion; (2) electrical power generation and storage; (3) environmental control and life support; (4) extravehicular activity; (5) in-space manufacturing and (6) in-space science activities. An experiment suited to a Space Shuttle standard middeck payload has been designed for the Static Feed Water Electrolysis technology which has been viewed as being capable of efficient, reliable oxygen and hydrogen generation with few subsystem components. The program included: end use design requirements, phenomena to be studied, Space Shuttle Orbiter experiment constraints, experiment design and data requirements, and test hardware requirements. The objectives are to obtain scientific and engineering data for future research and development and to focus on demonstrating and monitoring for safety of a standard middeck payload.

  11. Advancements in water vapor electrolysis technology. [for Space Station ECLSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda; Heppner, Dennis B.; Sudar, Martin

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes a technology development program whose goal is to develop water vapor electrolysis (WVE) hardware that can be used selectively as localized topping capability in areas of high metabolic activity without oversizing the central air revitalization system on long-duration manned space missions. The WVE will be used primarily to generate O2 for the crew cabin but also to provide partial humidity control by removing water vapor from the cabin atmosphere. The electrochemically based WVE interfaces with cabin air which is controlled in the following ranges: dry bulb temperature of 292 to 300 K; dew point temperature of 278 to 289 K; relative humidity of 25 to 75 percent; and pressure of 101 + or - 1.4 kPa. Design requirements, construction details, and results for both single-cell and multicell module testing are presented, and the preliminary sizing of a multiperson subsystem is discussed.

  12. An investigation of energy balances in palladium cathode electrolysis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, G. R.; Dolan, T. J.; Henriksen, G. L.

    1990-09-01

    A series of experiments was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate mechanisms that may contribute to energy flows in electrolysis cells like those of Fleischmann and Pons. Ordinary water (H2O), heavy water (D2O), and a mixture of the two were used in the INEL experiments. Cathodes used include a 51-μm Pd foil and 1-mm diameter extruded wire Pd rods in straight and coiled configurations. Energy balances in these experiments revealed no significant net gain or net loss of energy. Cell overpotential curves were fit well with a Tafel equation, with parameters dependent on electrode configuration, electrolyte composition, and temperature. Water evaporation and interactions of hydrogen isotopes with the Pd cathode were evaluated and found not to be significant to energy balances. No ionizing radiation, tritium production, or other evidence of fusion reactions was observed in the INEL experiments.

  13. Hydrogen Production by Water Electrolysis Via Photovoltaic Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hydrogen Production by Water Electrolysis Via Photovoltaic Panel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen fuel is a good alternative to fossil fuels. It can be produced using a clean energy without contaminated emissions. This work is concerned with experimental study on hydrogen production via solar energy. Photovoltaic module is used to convert solar radiation to electrical energy. The electrical energy is used for electrolysis of water into hydrogen and oxygen by using alkaline water electrolyzer with stainless steel electrodes. A MATLAB computer program is developed to solve a four-parameter-model and predict the characteristics of PV module under Baghdad climate conditions. The hydrogen production system is tested at different NaOH mass concentration of (50,100, 200, 300 gram. The maximum hydrogen production rate is 153.3 ml/min, the efficiency of the system is 20.88% and the total amount of hydrogen produced in one day is 220.752 liter.

  14. A Decade of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Improvements at DTU Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Brodersen, Karen; Chen, Ming

    2017-01-01

    a short review of the R&D work on SOEC single cells conducted at DTU Energy from 2005 to 2015. The SOEC improvements have involved increasing the of the oxygen electrode performance, elimination of impurities in the feed streams, optimization of processing routes, and fuel electrode structure optimization....... All together, these improvements have led to a decrease in long-term degradation rate from ∼40 %/kh to ∼0.4 %/kh for steam electrolysis at -1 A/cm2, while the initial area specific resistance has been decreased from 0.44 Ωcm2 to 0.15 Ωcm2 at -0.5 A/cm2 and 750 °C....

  15. CO2 Fixation by Membrane Separated NaCl Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Hyun Sic; Lee, Ju Sung; Han, Junyoung

    2015-01-01

    for converting CO2 into CaCO3 requires high temperature and high pressure as reaction conditions. This study proposes a method to fixate CaCO3 stably by using relatively less energy than existing methods. After forming NaOH absorbent solution through electrolysis of NaCl in seawater, CaCO3 was precipitated...... crystal product was high-purity calcite. The study shows a successful method for fixating CO2 by reducing carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere while forming high-purity CaCO3.......Atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), a major cause of global warming, have been rising due to industrial development. Carbon capture and storage (CCS), which is regarded as the most effective way to reduce such atmospheric CO2 concentrations, has several environmental and technical...

  16. Experiment on electrolysis decontamination of stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongwen; Dou Tianjun; Zhao Yujie

    2004-01-01

    A new electrolytic decontamination method used metal balls as conducting anode was investigated. The influences of current density, solution property and diameter of pipes on efficiency of electrolytic decontamination were examined and the efficiency of this method was compared with that of common electrolytic method under the same experimental conditions. Decontamination of samples of stainless steel pipes contaminated by plutonium was performed. Experimental results indicate that decontamination of stainless steel pipes contaminated by plutonium can be achieved at the optimum conditions of greater than 0.2 A·cm -2 current density, 5% sulfuric acid electrolyte and 5 min electrolysis. This method can be used in the decontamination of a wide variety of decommissioned metal materials. (author)

  17. Durable solid oxide electrolysis cells for hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2014-01-01

    production is required for promoting commercialization of the SOEC technology. In this work, we report a recent 4400 hours test of a state-of-the-art Ni-YSZ electrode supported SOEC cell. The cell consists of a Ni-YSZ (YSZ: yttria stabilized zirconia) support and active fuel electrode, an YSZ electrolyte...... that except for the first 250 hours fast initial degradation, for the rest of the testing period, the cell showed rather stable performance with an moderate degradation rate of around 25 mV/1000 h. The electrochemical impedance spectra show that both serial resistance and polarization resistance of the cell...... and changing of porosity inside the active layer. The degree of these microstructural changes becomes less and less severe along the hydrogen-steam flow path. The present test results show that this type of cell can be used for early demonstration electrolysis at 1A/cm2. Future work should be focus on reducing...

  18. A model-based understanding of solid-oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for syngas production by H2O/CO2 co-electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vikram; Fu, Qingxi; Janardhanan, Vinod M.; Deutschmann, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    High temperature co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 offers a promising route for syngas (H2, CO) production via efficient use of heat and electricity. The performance of a SOEC during co-electrolysis is investigated by focusing on the interactions between transport processes and electrochemical parameters. Electrochemistry at the three-phase boundary is modeled by a modified Butler-Volmer approach that considers H2O electrolysis and CO2 electrolysis, individually, as electrochemically active charge transfer pathways. The model is independent of the geometrical structure. A 42-step elementary heterogeneous reaction mechanism for the thermo-catalytic chemistry in the fuel electrode, the dusty gas model (DGM) to account for multi-component diffusion through porous media, and a plug flow model for flow through the channels are used in the model. Two sets of experimental data are reproduced by the simulations, in order to deduce parameters of the electrochemical model. The influence of micro-structural properties, inlet cathode gas velocity, and temperature are discussed. Reaction flow analysis is performed, at OCV, to study methane production characteristics and kinetics during co-electrolysis. Simulations are carried out for configurations ranging from simple one-dimensional electrochemical button cells to quasi-two-dimensional co-flow planar cells, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the computational tool for performance and design optimization.

  19. Bibliographical study for the development of an electrochemical preparation of plutonium molten salts; Etude bibliographique en vue de la mise au point d'une preparation electrochimique en sels fondus du plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, J.

    1957-01-15

    Based on an analogy with methods of electrochemical preparation of uranium molten salts, this bibliographical study reports data of physical properties of plutonium (melting point, density, ranges of existence of the different plutonium phases, resistivity, resistivity variation coefficient), discusses the search for an electrolytic bath (properties of plutonium bromides, chlorides and fluorides), and the required apparatus (an electrolysis cell)

  20. Fused salt processing of impure plutonium dioxide to high-purity plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.; Babcock, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting impure plutonium dioxide (approx. 96% pure) to high-purity plutonium metal (>99.9%) was developed. The process consists of reducing the oxide to an impure plutonium metal intermediate with calcium metal in molten calcium chloride. The impure intermediate metal is cast into an anode and electrorefined to produce high-purity plutonium metal. The oxide reduction step is being done now on a 0.6-kg scale with the resulting yield being >99.5%. The electrorefining is being done on a 4.0-kg scale with the resulting yield being 80 to 85%. The purity of the product, which averages 99.98%, is essentially insensitive to the purity of the feed metal. The yield, however, is directly dependent on the chemical composition of the feed. To date, approximately 250 kg of impure oxide has been converted to pure metal by this processing sequence. The availability of impure plutonium dioxide, together with the need for pure plutonium metal, makes this sequence a valuable plutonium processing tool

  1. Fused salt power reactor study: Minutes of discussion meeting No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, L. G.

    1956-01-01

    Remarks made by participants in a 1956 meeting are sketched. Economics was a major concern. Significant topics included development of a new alloy for use in the heat exchanger, conversion ratios in a U-233 breeder, the effects of ThF 4 on corrosion, and means of producing various transmutation products other than U-233.

  2. A prototype hybrid 7π quinone-fused 1,3,2-dithiazolyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decken, A; Mailman, A; Passmore, J; Rautiainen, J M; Scherer, W; Scheidt, E-W

    2011-01-28

    Reaction of 1,4-naphthoquinone and SNSMF(6) (M = As, Sb) in SO(2) solution in a 1 : 2 molar ratio led to the naphthoquinone fused 1,3,2-dithiazolylium salts, 3MF(6) quantitatively by multinuclear NMR (87% isolated yield of 3SbF(6)) via the cycloaddition and oxidative dehydrogenation chemistry of SNS(+) with formation of NH(4)SbF(6) and S(8). The product 3SbF(6) was fully characterized by IR, Raman, multinuclear {(1)H, (13)C, (14)N} NMR, elemental analysis, cyclic voltammetry and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The reduction of 3SbF(6) with ferrocene (Cp(2)Fe) in refluxing acetonitrile (CH(3)CN) led to the first isolation of a fused quinone-thiazyl radical, 3˙ in 73% yield. The prototype hybrid quinone-thiazyl radical 3˙ was fully characterized by IR, Raman microscopy, EI-MS, elemental analysis, solution and solid state EPR, magnetic susceptibility (2-370 K) and was found to form π*-π* dimers in the solid state as determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, the thermal decomposition of 3˙ led to a novel quinone-fused 1,2,3,4-tetrathiine, 10 (x = 2) and the known 1,2,5-thiadiazole, 11. The energetics of the cycloadditon and oxidative dehydrogenation chemistry of SNS(+) and 1,4-naphthoquinone leading to 3SbF(6) were estimated in the gas phase and SO(2) solution by DFT calculations (PBE0/6-311G(d)) and lattice enthalpies obtained by the volume based thermodynamic (VBT) approach in the solid state. The gas phase ion energetics (ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA)) of 3˙ are compared to related 1,3,2- and 1,2,3-dithiazolyl radicals.

  3. [Historical roles of salt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, E; Ritz, C

    2004-12-17

    Recently increasing evidence has been provided pointing to a close relation of salt consumption to hypertension as well as to target organ damage. It is interesting to note that the discussion concerning salt is unusually emotional. This may be explained, at least in part, by the fact that since ancient times salt had deep symbolic significance, as exemplified, mostly subconsciously, by many customs and expressions still in current use. In the past salt was essential to preserve food. The past importance of salt as a commodity can well be compared with that of oil today. These and further historical aspects of the role of salt are briefly dealt with in this article.

  4. Fused Adaptive Lasso for Spatial and Temporal Quantile Function Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ying; Wang, Huixia J.; Fuentes, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    and temporal data with a fused adaptive Lasso penalty to accommodate the dependence in space and time. This method penalizes the difference among neighboring quantiles, hence it is desirable for applications with features ordered in time or space without

  5. Fusing Intelligence With Law Enforcement Information: An Analytic Imperative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thornlow, Christopher C

    2005-01-01

    ... and Law Enforcement Communities to fuse and analyze foreign threat intelligence with domestic law enforcement information in a timely fashion to provide adequate indications and warning of such an...

  6. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.; Hayward, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10 −12 Pa −1 . Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented

  7. Thermodynamic properties of thulium and ytterbium in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselova, A., E-mail: A.Novoselova@ihte.uran.ru [Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry, Ural Division, Russian Academy of Science, S. Kovalevskaya Str., 22, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation); Smolenski, V. [Institute of High-Temperature Electrochemistry, Ural Division, Russian Academy of Science, S. Kovalevskaya Str., 22, Ekaterinburg 620990 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Research highlights: > Tm and Yb chloride compounds as fission products. > The investigation of electrochemical properties of lanthanides. > Determination of the apparent standard redox potentials of the couple Ln(III)/Ln(II) in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic at (823 to 973) K. > The calculation of the basic thermodynamic properties of redox reaction in molten salt. - Abstract: This work presents the results of a study of the Tm{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 2+} and Yb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 2+} couple redox potentials vs. Cl{sup -}/Cl{sub 2} reference electrode at the temperature range (823 to 973) K in fused NaCl-KCl-CsCl eutectic by direct potentiometric method. Initial concentrations of TmCl{sub 3} and YbCl{sub 3} in solvents did not exceed 5.0 mol%. Basic thermodynamic properties of the reactions TmCl{sub 2(l)} + 1/2 Cl{sub 2(g)} {r_reversible} TmCl{sub 3(l)} and YbCl{sub 2(l)} + 1/2 Cl{sub 2(g)} {r_reversible} YbCl{sub 3(l)} were calculated using the temperature dependencies of apparent standard potentials of the couples E{sub Tm{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 2+*}} and E{sub Yb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 2+*}}.

  8. Advancements in oxygen generation and humidity control by water vapor electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, D. B.; Sudar, M.; Lee, M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Regenerative processes for the revitalization of manned spacecraft atmospheres or other manned habitats are essential for realization of long-term space missions. These processes include oxygen generation through water electrolysis. One promising technique of water electrolysis is the direct conversion of the water vapor contained in the cabin air to oxygen. This technique is the subject of the present program on water vapor electrolysis development. The objectives were to incorporate technology improvements developed under other similar electrochemical programs and add new ones; design and fabricate a mutli-cell electrochemical module and a testing facility; and demonstrate through testing the improvements. Each aspect of the water vapor electrolysis cell was reviewed. The materials of construction and sizing of each element were investigated analytically and sometime experimentally. In addition, operational considerations such as temperature control in response to inlet conditions were investigated. Three specific quantitative goals were established.

  9. Microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell for CO2 sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Mineral carbonation can be used for CO2 sequestration, but the reaction rate is slow. In order to accelerate mineral carbonation, acid generated in a microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC) was examined to dissolve

  10. Phosphate recovery as struvite within a single chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    An energy efficient method of concurrent hydrogen gas and struvite (MgNH 4PO 4·6H 2O) production was investigated based on bioelectrochemically driven struvite crystallization at the cathode of a single chamber microbial electrolysis struvite

  11. Procedure and technique critique for tritium enrichment by electrolysis at the IAEA Laboratory (effective November 1976)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-11-05

    This publication gives a detailed description of the experimental and calculation procedures for tritium enrichment. Most descriptive sections are divided into 2 parts: Section A describes the procedure in the IAEA laboratory; section B discusses the reasons behind the various procedures, and may indicate alternative acceptable, or in some cases even better, procedures. The description of the equipment focuses on electrolysis cells, cooling system and power supply. Routine procedures are discussed including handling and checking of samples after receipt, 'spike' and blank water, initial sample distillation, preparation of cells and samples for electrolysis, electrolysis and completion of electrolysis (weighing of cells, neutralisation and distillation) and precautions against contaminations (prevention, detection and cure). A list of equipment required for electrolytic enrichment of tritium is provided.

  12. Conjugated oligoelectrolyte represses hydrogen oxidation by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia; Hou, Huijie; Chen, Xiaofen; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Logan, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. A conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE), which spontaneously aligns within cell membranes, was shown to completely inhibit H2 uptake by Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrolysis cells. Coulombic efficiencies that were 490

  13. THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS PROGRAM AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: OBSERVATIONS ON PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the high-temperature electrolysis research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory, with selected observations of electrolysis cell degradation at the single-cell, small stack and large facility scales. The objective of the INL program is to address the technical and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. In the envisioned application, high-temperature electrolysis would be coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor for efficient large-scale non-fossil non-greenhouse-gas hydrogen production. The program supports a broad range of activities including small bench-scale experiments, larger scale technology demonstrations, detailed computational fluid dynamic modeling, and system modeling. A summary of the current status of these activities and future plans will be provided, with a focus on the problem of cell and stack degradation.

  14. 31. Introduction with adjacent production of foundry and rolling department of electrolysis shop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    The introduction with adjacent production of foundry and rolling department of electrolysis shop was conducted. The foundry machine was described. The chemical properties of aluminium for ferrous alloy production were defined.

  15. A comparative evaluation of different types of microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangli; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Haiping; Cheng, Xing; Zhang, Renduo; Teng, Wenkai

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate different microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production. The systems included microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC), microbial electrolysis desalination cell (MEDC) with bipolar membrane and anion exchange membrane (BP-A MEDC), MEDC with bipolar membrane and cation exchange membrane (BP-C MEDC), and modified microbial desalination cell (M-MDC). The microbial electrolysis desalination cells performed differently in terms of malic acid production and energy consumption. The MEDCC performed best with the highest malic acid production rate (18.4 ± 0.6 mmol/Lh) and the lowest energy consumption (0.35 ± 0.14 kWh/kg). The best performance of MEDCC was attributable to the neutral pH condition in the anode chamber, the lowest internal resistance, and the highest Geobacter percentage of the anode biofilm population among all the reactors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A quantitative method to evaluate microbial electrolysis cell effectiveness for energy recovery and wastewater treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Ivan; Ren, Lijiao; Siegert, Michael; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are potential candidates for sustainable wastewater treatment as they allow for recovery of the energy input by producing valuable chemicals such as hydrogen gas. Evaluating the effectiveness of MEC treatment

  17. Hydrogen Production System with High Temperature Electrolysis for Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kentaro, Matsunaga; Eiji, Hoashi; Seiji, Fujiwara; Masato, Yoshino; Taka, Ogawa; Shigeo, Kasai

    2006-01-01

    Steam electrolysis with solid oxide cells is one of the most promising methods for hydrogen production, which has the potential to be high efficiency. Its most parts consist of environmentally sound and common materials. Recent development of ceramics with high ionic conductivity suggests the possibility of widening the range of operating temperature with maintaining the high efficiency. Toshiba is constructing a hydrogen production system with solid oxide electrolysis cells for nuclear power plants. Tubular-type cells using YSZ (Yttria-Stabilized- Zirconia) as electrolyte showed good performance of steam electrolysis at 800 to 900 deg C. Larger electrolysis cells with present configuration are to be combined with High Temperature Reactors. The hydrogen production efficiency on the present designed system is expected around 50% at 800 to 900 deg C of operating temperature. For the Fast Reactors, 'advanced cell' with higher efficiency at lower temperature are to be introduced. (authors)

  18. Procedure and technique critique for tritium enrichment by electrolysis at the IAEA Laboratory (effective November 1976)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This publication gives a detailed description of the experimental and calculation procedures for tritium enrichment. Most descriptive sections are divided into 2 parts: Section A describes the procedure in the IAEA laboratory; section B discusses the reasons behind the various procedures, and may indicate alternative acceptable, or in some cases even better, procedures. The description of the equipment focuses on electrolysis cells, cooling system and power supply. Routine procedures are discussed including handling and checking of samples after receipt, 'spike' and blank water, initial sample distillation, preparation of cells and samples for electrolysis, electrolysis and completion of electrolysis (weighing of cells, neutralisation and distillation) and precautions against contaminations (prevention, detection and cure). A list of equipment required for electrolytic enrichment of tritium is provided

  19. Electrochemical reduction behavior of U3O8 powder in a LiCl molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Sang Mun; Shin, Ho-Sup; Hong, Sun-Seok; Hur, Jin-Mok; Do, Jae Bum; Lee, Han Soo

    2010-01-01

    The reduction path of the U 3 O 8 powder vol-oxidized at 1200 deg. C has been determined by a series of electrochemical experiments in a 1 wt.% Li 2 O/LiCl molten salt. Various reaction intermediates are observed by during electrolysis of U 3 O 8 . The formation of the metallic uranium is caused from two different reduction paths, a direct reduction of uranium oxide and an electro-lithiothermic reduction. As the uranium oxide is converted to the metallic uranium, the lithium metal is more actively formed in the cathode basket. The reducibility of the rare earth oxides with the U 3 O 8 powder has been tested by constant voltage electrolysis. The results suggest the advanced vol-oxidation could lead to the enhancement in the reducibility of the rare earth fission products.

  20. Study of the effect of pressure on electrolysis of H2O and co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernadet, Lucile

    2016-01-01

    This thesis work investigates the behavior of a solid oxide cell operating under pressure in high temperature steam electrolysis and co-electrolysis mode (H 2 O and CO 2 ). The experimental study of single cell associated with the development of multi-physical models have been set up. The experiments, carried out using an original test bench developed by the CEA-Grenoble on two types of cells between 1 and 10 bar and 700 to 800 C, allowed to identify in both operating modes that the pressure has a positive or negative effect on performance depending on the cell operating point (current, voltage). In addition, gas analyzes performed in co-electrolysis led to detect in situ CH 4 production under pressure. These pressure effects were simulated by models calibrated at atmospheric pressure. Simulations analysis helped identify the pressure dependent mechanisms and propose operating conditions thanks to the establishment of operating maps. (author) [fr

  1. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  2. Microbial electrolysis cells turning to be versatile technology: recent advances and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    and achieve high-yield hydrogen production from wide range of organic matters at relatively mild conditions. This approach greatly reduces the electric energy cost for hydrogen production in contrast to direct water electrolysis. In addition to hydrogen production, MECs may also support several energetically......Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are an electricity-mediated microbial bioelectrochemical technology, which is originally developed for high-efficiency biological hydrogen production from waste streams. Compared to traditional biological technologies, MECs can overcome thermodynamic limitations...

  3. Life Time Performance Characterization of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer a promising technological solution for efficient energy conversion and production of hydrogen or syngas. The commercialization of the SOEC technology can be promoted if SOECs can be operated at high current density with stable performance over ~5 years...... - 3 years (continuous operation, setting 1.5 V as the upper voltage defining “end of life”). The results provide technological input to future design of electrolysis plants for hydrogen production. © 2015 ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  4. Enhancing the efficiency of zero valent iron by electrolysis: Performance and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhaokun; Lai, Bo; Yang, Ping

    2018-03-01

    Electrolysis was applied to enhance the efficiency of micron-size zero valent iron (mFe 0 ) and thereby promote p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal. The rate of PNP removal by mFe 0 with electrolysis was determined in cylindrical electrolysis reactor that employed annular aluminum plate cathode as a function of experimental factors, including initial pH, mFe 0 dosage and current density. The rate constants of PNP removal by Ele-mFe 0 were 1.72-144.50-fold greater than those by pristine mFe 0 under various tested conditions. The electrolysis-induced improvement could be primarily ascribed to stimulated mFe 0 corrosion, as evidenced by Fe 2+ release. The application of electrolysis could extend the working pH range of mFe 0 from 3.0 to 6.0 to 3.0-10.0 for PNP removal. Additionally, intermediates analysis and scavengers experiments unraveled the reduction capacity of mFe 0 was accelerated in the presence of electrolysis instead of oxidation. Moreover, the electrolysis effect could also delay passivation of mFe 0 under acidic condition, as evidenced by SEM-EDS, XRD, and XPS analysis after long-term operation. This is mainly due to increased electromigration meaning that iron corrosion products (iron hydroxides and oxides) are not primarily formed in the vicinity of the mFe 0 or at its surface. In the presence of electrolysis, the effect of electric field significantly promoted the efficiency of electromigration, thereby enhanced mFe 0 corrosion and eventually accelerated the PNP removal rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Continuous modification of AK11 silumin with multicomponent salt on base of NaCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pezda

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Sodium belongs to the most effective modifying agents. The sodium can be brought into metal bath in metallic form or in form of chemical compounds comprising sodium, the most often in form of NaF. In the both above mentioned cases action of sodium is of very short duration, (what constitutes its main disadvantage, as lasting for about 15-20 minutes, mainly due to its evaporation from metal bath.Prolongation of modifying agent’s action can be accomplished due to technology of continuous introduction of sodium to metal bath. That technology is based on continuous electrolysis of sodium salt, occurring directly in melting pot with liquid alloy. Application of solid electrolyte – conducting sodium ions (ionic conductance – and simultaneously maintaining solid state of aggregation in melting and superheating temperature of alloy, i.e. 600÷800°C is indispensable for such process. Suitable sodium salt which is placed in retort produced from solid electrolyte shall undergo dissociation, and next electrolysis, in result of applied direct current. Sodium ions arisen during the dissociation of sodium salts and electrolysis are “conveyed” through retort walls made from solid electrolyte. In contact with liquid alloy as cathode, sodium ions pass to atomic state, modifying the alloy. The paper discusses results of initial study concerning process of continuous modification of AK11 silumin with use of multicomponent sodium salt on base of NaCl, shows results of tensile strength Rm and measurement of voltage drop for the alloy in solid state. Values of those parameters have confirmed obtained modification effect of investigated alloys. Assurance of stable run of continuous modification process brings about necessity of a further research aimed at optimization of parameters of the process.

  6. Sea Salt vs. Table Salt: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and healthy eating What's the difference between sea salt and table salt? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. The main differences between sea salt and table salt are in their taste, texture ...

  7. Low-salt diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-sodium diet; Salt restriction ... control many functions. Too much sodium in your diet can be bad for you. For most people, ... you limit salt. Try to eat a balanced diet. Buy fresh vegetables and fruits whenever possible. They ...

  8. High performance of nitrogen and phosphorus removal in an electrolysis-integrated biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y; Xie, Y W; Zhang, Q; Yu, Y X; Yang, L Y

    A novel electrolysis-integrated biofilter system was developed in this study to evaluate the intensified removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from contaminated water. Two laboratory-scale biofilter systems were established, one with electrolysis (E-BF) and one without electrolysis (BF) as control. The dynamics of intensified nitrogen and phosphorus removal and the changes of inflow and outflow water qualities were also evaluated. The total nitrogen (TN) removal rate was 94.4% in our newly developed E-BF, but only 74.7% in the control BF. Ammonium removal rate was up to 95% in biofilters with or without electrolysis integration with an influent ammonium concentration of 40 mg/L, and the accumulation of nitrate and nitrite was much lower in the effluent of E-BF than that of BF. Thus electrolysis plays an important role in TN removal especially the nitrate and nitrite removal. Phosphorus removal was significantly enhanced, exceeding 90% in E-BF by chemical precipitation, physical adsorption, and flocculation of phosphorus because of the in situ formation of ferric ions by the anodizing of sacrificial iron anodes. Results from this study indicate that the electrolysis integrated biofilter is a promising solution for intensified nitrogen and phosphorus removal.

  9. Removal of pigments from molasses wastewater by combining micro-electrolysis with biological treatment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ben; Tian, Xiaofei; Yu, Lian; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2016-12-01

    Pigments in molasses wastewater (MWW) effluent, such as melanoidins, were considered as kinds of the most recalcitrant and hazardous colorant contaminants to the environment. In this study, de-coloring the MWW by a synergistic combination of micro-electrolysis with bio-treatment was performed. Aiming to a high de-colorization yield, levels of nutrition source supplies, MWW dilution ratio, and micro-electrolysis reaction time were optimized accordingly. For a diluted (50 %, v/v) MWW, an maximum overall de-colorization yield (97.1 ± 0.5 %, for absorbance at 475 nm) was achieved through the bio-electrolysis treatment. In electrolysis bio-treatment, the positive effect of micro-electrolysis was also revealed by a promoted growth of fungal biomass as well as activities of ligninolytic enzymes. Activities of lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and laccase were promoted by 111.2, 103.9, and 7.7 %, respectively. This study also implied that the bio-treatment and the micro-electrolysis had different efficiencies on removal of pigments with distinct polarities.

  10. Molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    MSBR Study Group formed in October 1974 has studied molten salt breeder reactor and its various aspects. Usage of a molten salt fuel, extremely interesting as reactor chemistry, is a great feature to MSBR; there is no need for separate fuel making, reprocessing, waste storage facilities. The group studied the following, and these results are presented: molten salt technology, molten salt fuel chemistry and reprocessing, reactor characteristics, economy, reactor structural materials, etc. (Mori, K.)

  11. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

    1987-05-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  12. Inactivation characteristics of ozone and electrolysis process for ballast water treatment using B. subtilis spores as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youmi; Yoon, Yeojoon; Hong, Eunkyung; Kwon, Minhwan; Kang, Joon-Wun

    2013-07-15

    Since ballast water affects the ocean ecosystem, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) sets a standard for ballast water management and might impose much tighter regulations in the future. The aim of this study is to evaluate the inactivation efficiency of ozonation, electrolysis, and an ozonation-electrolysis combined process, using B. subtilis spores. In seawater ozonation, HOBr is the key active substance for inactivation, because of rapid reactivity of ozone with Br(-) in seawater. In seawater electrolysis, it is also HOBr, but not HOCl, because of the rapid reaction of HOCl with Br(-), which has not been recognized carefully, even though many electrolysis technologies have been approved by the IMO. Inactivation pattern was different in ozonation and electrolysis, which has some limitations with the tailing or lag-phase, respectively. However, each deficiency can be overcome with a combined process, which is most effective as a sequential application of ozonation followed by electrolysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Energy-saving chlorine production. Chlor-alkali electrolysis using innovative cathode technology; Energiesparende Chlorpoduktion. Chlor-Alkali-Elektrolyse mit innovativer Kathoden-Technologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woltering, Peter; Hofmann, Philipp; Funck, Frank; Kiefer, Randolf; Baeumer, Ulf-Steffen; Donst, Dmitri; Schmitt, Carsten [Thyssen Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Chlorine is used in the synthesis of almost two thirds of all chemical products. Producing chlorine from salt by electrolysis is a very energy-intensive process. Through their joint venture UHDENORA S.p.A., ThyssenKrupp Uhde and Industrie De Nora S.p.A. have played a major part in the development of a globally available technology that can produce chlorine using up to 30 percent less energy than conventional processes. It uses oxygen depolarized cathode technology with an innovative new cathode chamber design in an Uhde single-cell element. In Germany alone, converting all existing plants to the new technology would save enough electricity to power a city the size of Cologne. (orig.)

  14. Process for manufacturing hollow fused-silica insulator cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Krogh, Michael L.; Davis, Steven C.; Decker, Derek E.; Rosenblum, Ben Z.; Sanders, David M.; Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2001-01-01

    A method for building hollow insulator cylinders that can have each end closed off with a high voltage electrode to contain a vacuum. A series of fused-silica round flat plates are fabricated with a large central hole and equal inside and outside diameters. The thickness of each is related to the electron orbit diameter of electrons that escape the material surface, loop, and return back. Electrons in such electron orbits can support avalanche mechanisms that result in surface flashover. For example, the thickness of each of the fused-silica round flat plates is about 0.5 millimeter. In general, the thinner the better. Metal, such as gold, is deposited onto each top and bottom surface of the fused-silica round flat plates using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Eutectic metals can also be used with one alloy constituent on the top and the other on the bottom. The CVD, or a separate diffusion step, can be used to defuse the deposited metal deep into each fused-silica round flat plate. The conductive layer may also be applied by ion implantation or gas diffusion into the surface. The resulting structure may then be fused together into an insulator stack. The coated plates are aligned and then stacked, head-to-toe. Such stack is heated and pressed together enough to cause the metal interfaces to fuse, e.g., by welding, brazing or eutectic bonding. Such fusing is preferably complete enough to maintain a vacuum within the inner core of the assembled structure. A hollow cylinder structure results that can be used as a core liner in a dielectric wall accelerator and as a vacuum envelope for a vacuum tube device where the voltage gradients exceed 150 kV/cm.

  15. Synergistic Effects of Micro-electrolysis-Photocatalysis on Water Treatment and Fish Performance in Saline Recirculating Aquaculture System

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Zhangying; Wang, Shuo; Gao, Weishan; Li, Haijun; Pei, Luowei; Shen, Mingwei; Zhu, Songming

    2017-01-01

    A new physico-chemical process for TAN (total ammonia nitrogen) removal and disinfection is introduced in saline recirculating aquaculture system (RAS), in which the biofilter is replaced with an integrated electrolysis cell and an activated carbon filter. The electrolysis cell which is based on micro current electrolysis combined with UV-light was self-designed. After the fundamental research, a small pilot scale RAS was operated for 30 days to verify the technical feasibility. The system wa...

  16. Improving The Efficiency Of Ammonia Electrolysis For Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, Ramasamy

    Given the abundance of ammonia in domestic and industrial wastes, ammonia electrolysis is a promising technology for remediation and distributed power generation in a clean and safe manner. Efficiency has been identified as one of the key issues that require improvement in order for the technology to enter the market phase. Therefore, this research was performed with the aim of improving the efficiency of hydrogen production by finding alternative materials for the cathode and electrolyte. 1. In the presence of ammonia the activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) followed the trend Rh>Pt>Ru>Ni. The addition of ammonia resulted in lower rates for HER for Pt, Ru, and Ni, which have been attributed to competition from the ammonia adsorption reaction. 2. The addition of ammonia offers insight into the role of metal-hydrogen underpotential deposition (M-Hupd) on HER kinetics. In addition to offering competition via ammonia adsorption it resulted in fewer and weaker M-Hupd bonds for all metals. This finding substantiates the theory that M-Hupd bonds favor HER on Pt electrocatalyst. However, for Rh results suggest that M-Hupd bond may hinder the HER. In addition, the presence of unpaired valence shell electrons is suggested to provide higher activity for HER in the presence of ammonia. 3. Bimetals PtxM1-x (M = Ir, Ru, Rh, and Ni) offered lower overpotentials for HER compared to the unalloyed metals in the presence of ammonia. The activity of HER in the presence of ammonia follows the trend Pt-Ir>Pt-Rh>Pt-Ru>Pt-Ni. The higher activity of HER is attributed to the synergistic effect of the alloy, where ammonia adsorbs onto the more electropositive alloying metal leaving Pt available for Hupd formation and HER to take place. Additionally, this supports the theory that the presence of a higher number of unpaired electrons favors the HER in the presence of ammonia. 4. Potassium polyacrylate (PAA-K) was successfully used as a substitute for aqueous KOH for ammonia

  17. Quantification of Residual Stress from Photonic Signatures of Fused Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William E.

    2013-01-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 +/- 0.54 x 10(exp -12)/Pa. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented. Keywords: Glass, fused silica, photoelasticity, residual stress

  18. Electrode kinetics of a water vapor electrolysis cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G.

    1974-01-01

    The anodic electrochemical behavior of the water vapor electrolysis cell was investigated. A theoretical review of various aspects of cell overvoltage is presented with special emphasis on concentration overvoltage and activation overvoltage. Other sources of overvoltage are described. The experimental apparatus controlled and measured anode potential and cell current. Potentials between 1.10 and 2.60 V (vs NHE) and currents between 0.1 and 3000 mA were investigated. Different behavior was observed between the standard cell and the free electrolyte cell. The free electrolyte cell followed typical Tafel behavior (i.e. activation overvoltage) with Tafel slopes of about 0.15, and the exchange current densities of 10 to the minus 9th power A/sq cm, both in good agreement with literature values. The standard cell exhibitied this same Tafel behavior at lower current densities but deviated toward lower than expected current densities at higher potentials. This behavior and other results were examined to determine their origin.

  19. Porous poly(perfluorosulfonic acid) membranes for alkaline water electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Hansen, Martin Kalmar; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2015-01-01

    Poly(perfluorosulfonic acid) (PFSA) is one of a few polymer types that combine excellent alkali resistance with extreme hydrophilicity. It is therefore of interest as a base material in separators for alkaline water electrolyzers. In the pristine form it, however, shows high cation selectivity. T...... for the unmodified membrane. The technological feasibility was demonstrated by testing the membranes in an alkaline water electrolysis cell with encouraging performance.......Poly(perfluorosulfonic acid) (PFSA) is one of a few polymer types that combine excellent alkali resistance with extreme hydrophilicity. It is therefore of interest as a base material in separators for alkaline water electrolyzers. In the pristine form it, however, shows high cation selectivity...... and washed out and the obtained porous materials allowed for swelling to reach water contents up to λ=85 [H2O] [−SO3K]−1. After equilibration in 22 wt% aqueous KOH, ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm−1 was recorded for this membrane type at room temperature, which is significantly higher than 0.01 S cm−1...

  20. Denitrification of coking wastewater with micro-electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanli; Wang, Yanqiu; Shan, Mingjun; Shen, Xue; Su, Ying

    2011-06-01

    The denitrification for the coking wastewater was conducted by means of original battery principle with Fe-C micro-electrolysis. Fe-C serves as positive and negative electrodes, by which N02(-)-N and TN were reduced to nitrogen, and then the purpose of denitrifieation for coking wastewater was realized. The influences of pH value, carbon particle size, Fe/C ratio (mass ratio), reaction time and coagulation pH value on removal rate of N02(-)-N and TN were investigated. Coking wastewater originated from Jiamusi Coal Chemistry Engineering Company. The optimum conditions of treatment were as follows: the initial pH was 3.0, the dosage of Fe 73.5 g/L, reaction time 70 min, mass ratio of Fe/C ratio 1.0:1.3, coagulation pH 9.0 and sedimentation time 40 min. Under those conditions, nitrogen removal efficiencies of N02(-)-N and TN were beyond 50% and 45%, respectively. Copyright © 2011 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Methanobacterium Dominates Biocathodic Archaeal Communities in Methanogenic Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Methane is the primary end product from cathodic current in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) in the absence of methanogenic inhibitors, but little is known about the archaeal communities that develop in these systems. MECs containing cathodes made from different materials (carbon brushes, or plain graphite blocks or blocks coated with carbon black and platinum, stainless steel, nickel, ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide) were inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and acclimated at a set potential of -600 mV (versus a standard hydrogen electrode). The archaeal communities on all cathodes, except those coated with platinum, were predominated by Methanobacterium (median 97% of archaea). Cathodes with platinum contained mainly archaea most similar to Methanobrevibacter. Neither of these methanogens were abundant (<0.1% of archaea) in the inoculum, and therefore their high abundance on the cathode resulted from selective enrichment. In contrast, bacterial communities on the cathode were more diverse, containing primarily δ-Proteobacteria (41% of bacteria). The lack of a consistent bacterial genus on the cathodes indicated that there was no similarly selective enrichment of bacteria on the cathode. These results suggest that the genus Methanobacterium was primarily responsible for methane production in MECs when cathodes lack efficient catalysts for hydrogen gas evolution. (Figure Presented).

  2. Degradation of Anionic Dye Eosin by Glow Discharge Electrolysis Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Jinzhang; Ma Dongping; Guo Xiao; Wang Aixiang; Fu Yan; Wu Jianlin; Yang Wu

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the degradation of eosin by using glow discharge electrolysis (GDE). The effects of various parameters on the removal efficiency were studied. It was found that the eosin degradation could be raised considerably by increasing the applied voltage and the initial concentration, or by decreasing pH of the aqueous solution. Fe 2+ ion had an evident accelerating effect on the eosin degradation. The degradation process of eosin obeyed a pseudo-first-order reaction. The relationship between the degradation rate constant k and the reaction temperature T could be expressed by Arrhenius equation with which the apparent activation energy Ea of 14.110 kJ. mol -1 and the pre-exponential factor ko of 2.065x10 -1 min -1 were obtained, too. The determination of hydroxyl radical was carried out by using N,N-dimethyl-p-nitrosoaniline (RNO) as a scavenger. The results showed that the hydroxyl radical plays an important role in the degradation process.

  3. Degradation of Anionic Dye Eosin by Glow Discharge Electrolysis Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinzhang; Ma, Dongping; Guo, Xiao; Wang, Aixiang; Fu, Yan; Wu, Jianlin; Yang, Wu

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes a novel method for the degradation of eosin by using glow discharge electrolysis (GDE). The effects of various parameters on the removal efficiency were studied. It was found that the eosin degradation could be raised considerably by increasing the applied voltage and the initial concentration, or by decreasing pH of the aqueous solution. Fe2+ ion had an evident accelerating effect on the eosin degradation. The degradation process of eosin obeyed a pseudo-first-order reaction. The relationship between the degradation rate constant k and the reaction temperature T could be expressed by Arrhenius equation with which the apparent activation energy Ea of 14.110 kJ. mol-1 and the pre-exponential factor ko of 2.065×10-1 min-1 were obtained, too. The determination of hydroxyl radical was carried out by using N,N-dimethyl-p-nitrosoaniline (RNO) as a scavenger. The results showed that the hydroxyl radical plays an important role in the degradation process.

  4. Hydrogen production profiles using furans in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Gover, Tansu; Yaman, Bugra; Droguetti, Jessica; Yilancioglu, Kaan

    2017-06-01

    Microbial electrochemical cells including microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are novel biotechnological tools that can convert organic substances in wastewater or biomass into electricity or hydrogen. Electroactive microbial biofilms used in this technology have ability to transfer electrons from organic compounds to anodes. Evaluation of biofilm formation on anode is crucial for enhancing our understanding of hydrogen generation in terms of substrate utilization by microorganisms. In this study, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) were analyzed for hydrogen generation using single chamber membrane-free MECs (17 mL), and anode biofilms were also examined. MECs were inoculated with mixed bacterial culture enriched using chloroethane sulphonate. Hydrogen was succesfully produced in the presence of HMF, but not furfural. MECs generated similar current densities (5.9 and 6 mA/cm 2 furfural and HMF, respectively). Biofilm samples obtained on the 24th and 40th day of cultivation using aromatic compounds were evaluated by using epi-fluorescent microscope. Our results show a correlation between biofilm density and hydrogen generation in single chamber MECs.

  5. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  6. Treatment of tanneries waste water by ultrasound assisted electrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Gilani, M. A.; Durrani, M.; Mahmood, Q.; Shaukat, S. F.; Choima, N.

    2013-01-01

    The leather industry is a major producer of wastewater and solid waste containing potential water and soil contaminants. Considering the large amount and variety of chemical agents used in skin processing, the wastewaters generated by tanneries are very complex. Therefore, the development of treatment methods for these effluents is extremely necessary. In this work the electrochemical treatment of a tannery wastewater by ultrasound assisted electrochemical process, using stainless steel and lead cathode and titanium anodes was studied. Effect of ultrasound irradiation at various ultrasonic intensities 0, 40, 60 and 80% on electrochemical removal of chromium was investigated. Experiments were conducted at two pH conditions of pH 3 and 9. Significant removal of chromium was found at pH 3 and it was also noticed that by increasing ultrasonic intensities, percentage removal of chromium and sulfate also increases. The optimum removal of chromium and sulfate ions was observed at 80% ultrasonic intensity. The technique of electrolysis assisted with ultrasonic waves can be further improved and can be the future waste water treatment process for industries. (author)

  7. Converting hcp Mg-Al-Zn alloy into bcc Mg-Li-Al-Zn alloy by electrolytic deposition and diffusion of reduced lithium atoms in a molten salt electrolyte LiCl-KCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.C.; Tsai, C.Y.; Uan, J.Y.

    2007-01-01

    A body-centered cubic (bcc) Mg-12Li-9Al-1Zn (wt.%) alloy was fabricated in air by electrolysis from LiCl-KCl molten salt at 500 deg. C. Electrolytic deposition of Li atoms on cathode (Mg-Al-Zn alloy) and diffusion of the Li atoms formed the bcc Mg-Li-Al-Zn alloy with 12 wt.% Li and only 0.264 wt.% K. Low K concentration in the bcc Mg alloy strip after the electrolysis process resulted from 47% atomic size misfit between K and Mg atoms and low solubility of K in Mg matrix

  8. Energy-positive wastewater treatment and desalination in an integrated microbial desalination cell (MDC)-microbial electrolysis cell (MEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Styczynski, Jordyn; Huang, Yuankai; Xu, Zhiheng; McCutcheon, Jeffrey; Li, Baikun

    2017-07-01

    Simultaneous removal of nitrogen in municipal wastewater, metal in industrial wastewater and saline in seawater was achieved in an integrated microbial desalination cell-microbial electrolysis cell (MDC-MEC) system. Batch tests showed that more than 95.1% of nitrogen was oxidized by nitrification in the cathode of MDC and reduced by heterotrophic denitrification in the anode of MDC within 48 h, leading to the total nitrogen removal rate of 4.07 mg L-1 h-1. Combining of nitrogen removal and desalination in MDC effectively solved the problem of pH fluctuation in anode and cathode, and led to 63.7% of desalination. Power generation of MDC (293.7 mW m-2) was 2.9 times higher than the one without salt solution. The electric power of MDC was harvested by a capacitor circuit to supply metal reduction in a MEC, and 99.5% of lead (II) was removed within 48 h. A kinetic MDC model was developed to elucidate the correlation of voltage output and desalination efficiency. Ratio of wastewater and sea water was calculated for MDC optimal operation. Energy balance of nutrient removal, metal removal and desalination in the MDC-MEC system was positive (0.0267 kW h m-3), demonstrating the promise of utilizing low power output of MDCs.

  9. HVI Ballistic Limit Characterization of Fused Silica Thermal Panes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. E.; Bohl, W. D.; Christiansen, E. L.; Davis, B. A.; Deighton, K. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fused silica window systems are used heavily on crewed reentry vehicles, and they are currently being used on the next generation of US crewed spacecraft, Orion. These systems improve crew situational awareness and comfort, as well as, insulating the reentry critical components of a spacecraft against the intense thermal environments of atmospheric reentry. Additionally, these materials are highly exposed to space environment hazards like solid particle impacts. This paper discusses impact studies up to 10 km/s on a fused silica window system proposed for the Orion spacecraft. A ballistic limit equation that describes the threshold of perforation of a fuse silica pane over a broad range of impact velocities, obliquities and projectile materials is discussed here.

  10. Thermodynamic evaluation of geothermal energy powered hydrogen production by PEM water electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Ceyhun; Kanoglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis of a PEM water electrolyzer driven by geothermal power for hydrogen production is performed. For this purpose, work is produced from a geothermal resource by means of the organic Rankine cycle; the resulting work is used as a work input for an electrolysis process; and electrolysis water is preheated by the waste geothermal water. The first and second-law based performance parameters are identified for the considered system and the system performance is evaluated. The effects of geothermal water and electrolysis temperatures on the amount of hydrogen production are studied and these parameters are found to be proportional to each other. We consider a geothermal resource at 160 °C available at a rate of 100 kg/s. Under realistic operating conditions, 3810 kW power can be produced in a binary geothermal power plant. The produced power is used for the electrolysis process. The electrolysis water can be preheated to 80 °C by the geothermal water leaving the power plant and hydrogen can be produced at a rate of 0.0340 kg/s. The energy and exergy efficiencies of the binary geothermal power plant are 11.4% and 45.1%, respectively. The corresponding efficiencies for the electrolysis system are 64.0% and 61.6%, respectively, and those for the overall system are 6.7% and 23.8%, respectively. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production by PEM electrolysis powered by geothermal energy. • Power is used for electrolyser; used geothermal water is for preheating electrolysis water. • Effect of geothermal water and electrolysis temperatures on the amount of hydrogen production. • Hydrogen can be produced at a rate of 0.0340 kg/s for a resource at 160 °C available at 100 kg/s. • Energy and exergy efficiencies of the overall system are 6.7% and 23.8%, respectively

  11. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  12. High-Speed Fuses in IGBT based Voltage Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Rasmussen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    The demand for protection of power electronic applications has during the last couple of years increased regarding the high-power IGBT modules. Even with an active protection, a high power IGBT still has a risk of exhibiting a violent rupture in the case of a fault if IGBT fuses do not protect it...... protection. First, the problem of adding inductance in the DC-link circuit is treated, second a short discussion of the protection of the IGBT module is done, and finally, the impact of the high frequency loading on the current carrying capability of the fuses is presented....

  13. Nondestructive detection system of faults in fuses using radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, D.

    1973-01-01

    A system is developed to show the viability of non-destructive detection of the faults of explosive safety fuses which are manufactured by Fabrica da Estrela do Ministerio do Exercito. The faults are detected by an ion-chamber based on the variation of the intensity of the beta particles that penetrate the fuse which passes through a collimator. The beta particles are emitted by Strontium-90 + Yttrium-90 encapsulated in either stainless steel or aluminum. The concept of 'bucking Voltage' is applied to differentiate electronically the signal generated by the ion-chamber. (author)

  14. Modelling and Analysis of Proximity Effect in IGBT Fuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Rasmussen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    The demand for protection of power electronic applications has during the last couple of years increased regarding the high-power IGBT modules. The consequences of electrical faults can be severe in special cases; not only on the equipment but also to people, if safety principles are not applied....... Even with an active protection, a high power IGBT still has a risk of exhibiting a violent rupture in the case of a fault if e.g. IGBT fuses are not protecting it. By introducing fuses into voltage source converters a better protection of IGBT's can be achieved. However, skin and proximity effects...

  15. Hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of water vapour and nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Pierre Py; Alain Capitaine

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents hydrogen production by a nuclear reactor (High Temperature Reactor, HTR or Pressurized Water Reactor, PWR) coupled to a High Temperature Electrolyser (HTE) plant. With respect to the coupling of a HTR with a HTE plant, EDF and AREVA NP had previously selected a combined cycle HTR scheme to convert the reactor heat into electricity. In that case, the steam required for the electrolyser plant is provided either directly from the steam turbine cycle or from a heat exchanger connected with such cycle. Hydrogen efficiency production is valued using high temperature electrolysis. Electrolysis production of hydrogen can be performed with significantly higher thermal efficiencies by operating in the steam phase than in the water phase. The electrolysis performance is assessed with solid oxide and solid proton electrolysis cells. The efficiency from the three operating conditions (endo-thermal, auto-thermal and thermo-neutral) of a high temperature electrolysis process is evaluated. The technical difficulties to use the gases enthalpy to heat the water are analyzed, taking into account efficiency and technological challenges. EDF and AREVA NP have performed an analysis to select an optimized process giving consideration to plant efficiency, plant operation, investment and production costs. The paper provides pathways and identifies R and D actions to reach hydrogen production costs competitive with those of other hydrogen production processes. (authors)

  16. Intensified nitrogen and phosphorus removal in a novel electrolysis-integrated tidal flow constructed wetland system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xinxin; Wu, Shubiao; Zhang, Yansheng; Dong, Renjie

    2014-08-01

    A novel electrolysis-integrated tidal flow constructed wetland (CW) system was developed in this study. The dynamics of intensified nitrogen and phosphorus removal and that of hydrogen sulphide control were evaluated. Ammonium removal of up to 80% was achieved with an inflow concentration of 60 mg/L in wetland systems with and without electrolysis integration. Effluent nitrate concentration decreased from 2 mg/L to less than 0.5 mg/L with the decrease in current intensity from 1.5 mA/cm(2) to 0.57 mA/cm(2) in the electrolysis-integrated wetland system, thus indicating that the current intensity of electrolysis plays an important role in nitrogen transformations. Phosphorus removal was significantly enhanced, exceeding 95% in the electrolysis-integrated CW system because of the in-situ formation of a ferric iron coagulant through the electro-dissolution of a sacrificial iron anode. Moreover, the electrolyzed wetland system effectively inhibits sulphide accumulation as a result of a sulphide precipitation coupled with ferrous-iron electro-dissolution and/or an inhibition of bacterial sulphate reduction under increased aerobic conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Arias-Buría

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US- guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n=17 group or exercise (n=19 group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions. Shoulder pain (NPRS and disability (DASH were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P<0.01: individuals receiving US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention.

  18. Electrolysis byproduct D2O provides a third way to mitigate CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenewerk, William Ernest

    2009-01-01

    Rapid atomic power deployment may be possible without using fast breeder reactors or making undue demands on uranium resource. Using by-product D2O and thorium-U233 in CANDU and RBMK piles may circumvent need for either fast breeder reactors or seawater uranium. Atmospheric CO2 is presently increasing 2.25%/year in proportion to 2.25%/year exponential fossil fuel consumption increase. Roughly 1/3 anthropologic CO2 is removed by various CO2 sinks. CO2 removal is modelled as being proportional to 45-year-earlier CO2 amount above 280 ppm-C Water electrolysis produces roughly 0.1 kg-D20/kWe-y. Material balance assumes each electrolysis stage increases D2O bottoms concentration times 3. Except for first two electrolysis stages, all water from hydrogen consumption is returned to electrolysis. The unique characteristic of this process is the ability to economically burn all deuterium-enriched H2 in vehicles. Condensate from vehicles returns to appropriate electrolysis stage. Fuel cell condensate originally from reformed natural gas may augment second-sage feed. Atomic power expansion is 5%/year, giving 55000 GWe by 2100. World primary energy increases 2.25%/y, exceeding 4000 EJ/y by 2100. CO2 maximum is roughly 600 ppm-C around year 2085. CO2 declines back below 300 ppm-C by 2145 if the 45-year-delay seawater sink remains effective

  19. A history of salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, M; Capasso, G; Di Leo, V A; De Santo, N G

    1994-01-01

    The medical history of salt begins in ancient times and is closely related to different aspects of human history. Salt may be extracted from sea water, mineral deposits, surface encrustations, saline lakes and brine springs. In many inland areas, wood was used as a fuel source for evaporation of brine and this practice led to major deafforestation in central Europe. Salt played a central role in the economies of many regions, and is often reflected in place names. Salt was also used as a basis for population censuses and taxation, and salt monopolies were practised in many states. Salt was sometimes implicated in the outbreak of conflict, e.g. the French Revolution and the Indian War of Independence. Salt has also been invested with many cultural and religious meanings, from the ancient Egyptians to the Middle Ages. Man's innate appetite for salt may be related to his evolution from predominantly vegetarian anthropoids, and it is noteworthy that those people who live mainly on protein and milk or who drink salty water do not generally salt their food, whereas those who live mainly on vegetables, rice and cereals use much more salt. Medicinal use tended to emphasize the positive aspects of salt, e.g. prevention of putrefaction, reduction of tissue swelling, treatment of diarrhea. Evidence was also available to ancient peoples of its relationship to fertility, particularly in domestic animals. The history of salt thus represents a unique example for studying the impact of a widely used dietary substance on different important aspects of man's life, including medical philosophy.

  20. Dedication for Safety-Related Fuses used in Class-1E Power System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Younghee

    2014-01-01

    The safety-related fuses used in class-1E power system provide overcurrent protection for electrical system and isolate the class 1E circuit from a fault or overload condition. These days, the number of nuclear grade suppliers has been reduced. Accordingly, commercial grade, instead of safety-related, fuses are procured and used in the utilities through the dedication process. Therefore, this paper introduces the commercial grade fuse dedication process/engineering and how to assure the quality requirements with this process and engineering. The fuses used in class-1E power system are to protect overcurrent and to isolate fault. Therefore the fuse for acceptance in order to improve the quality and reliability for commercial grade fuses shall be dedicated. The fuse resistance value may be useful as an indicator of acceptance. The current carrying capacity test can change the fuse performance properties. Therefore these critical characteristics are needed for additional review and analysis with fuse manufactures

  1. Worth its salt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The idea that all underground salt deposits can serve as storage sites for toxic and nuclear waste does not always hold water—literally. According to Daniel Ronen and Brian Berkowitz of Israel's Weizmann Institute of Science and Yoseph Yechieli of the Geological Survey of Israel, some buried salt layers are in fact highly conductive of liquids, suggesting that wastes buried in their confines could easily leech into groundwater and nearby soil.When drilling three wells into a 10,000-year-old salt layer near the Dead Sea, the researchers found that groundwater had seeped into the layer and had absorbed some of its salt.

  2. Fuse and application of said fuse to the construction of an emergency shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taulier, H.H.L.; Brugeille, G.

    1978-01-01

    A fuse device for an automatic emergency shutdown system in fast reactors provides a coupling between a casing tube placed within a fuel can and a series of neutron-absorbing masses held together above the reactor core under normal operating conditions but released in free fall to the lower portion of the casing tube at the level of the reactor core as a result of melting of the fuse when operating characteristics such as temperature or neutron flux attain a level which exceeds a predetermined threshold

  3. Fuse and application of said fuse to the construction of an emergency shutdown system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taulier, H.H.L.; Brugeilles, G.

    1976-01-01

    A fuse device for an automatic emergency shutdown system in fast reactors provides a coupling between a casing tube placed within a fuel can and a series of neutron-absorbing masses held together above the reactor core under normal operating conditions. They are released in free fall to the lower portion of the casing tube at the level of the reactor core as a result of melting of the fuse when operating characteristics such as temperature or neutron flux attain a level which exceeds a predetermined threshold

  4. High Temperature Co‐Electrolysis of Steam and CO2 in an SOC Stack: Performance and Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Nielsen, J. U.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, co‐electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide was studied in a Topsoe Fuel Cell (TOFC®) 10‐cell stack, containing three different types of Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrode supported solid oxide electrolysis cells with a footprint of 12 × 12 cm. The stack was operated at 800...

  5. Solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis system development. [to generate oxygen for manned space station applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte technology used in a water electrolysis system (WES) to generate oxygen and hydrogen for manned space station applications was investigated. A four-man rated, low pressure breadboard water electrolysis system with the necessary instrumentation and controls was fabricated and tested. A six man rated, high pressure, high temperature, advanced preprototype WES was developed. This configuration included the design and development of an advanced water electrolysis module, capable of operation at 400 psig and 200 F, and a dynamic phase separator/pump in place of a passive phase separator design. Evaluation of this system demonstrated the goal of safe, unattended automated operation at high pressure and high temperature with an accumulated gas generation time of over 1000 hours.

  6. Technoeconomic analysis of a methanol plant based on gasification of biomass and electrolysis of water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lasse Røngaard; Houbak, N.; Elmegaard, Brian

    2010-01-01

    , and the low-temperature waste heat is used for district heat production. This results in high total energy efficiencies (similar to 90%) for the plants. The specific methanol costs for the six plants are in the range 11.8-25.3 (sic)/GJ(exergy). The lowest cost is obtained by a plant using electrolysis......Methanol production process configurations based on renewable energy sources have been designed. The processes were analyzed in the thermodynamic process simulation tool DNA. The syngas used for the catalytic methanol production was produced by gasification of biomass, electrolysis of water, CO2...... with a different syngas production method, were compared. The plants achieve methanol exergy efficiencies of 59-72%, the best from a configuration incorporating autothermal reforming of biogas and electrolysis of water for syngas production. The different processes in the plants are highly heat integrated...

  7. Method and system for purification of gas/liquid streams for fuel cells or electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the first electrode of the fuel cell or electrolysis cell; and/or providing at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the second electrode of the fuel cell or electrolysis cell; and - purifying the gas....../liquid streams towards the first and second electrode; wherein the at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the first electrode and/or the at least one scrubber in the gas/liquid stream at the inlet side of the second electrode comprises a material suitable as an electrolyte material...... with the at least one scrubber, with the proviso that the fuel cell or electrolysis cell is not a solid oxide cell....

  8. Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic Matter

    KAUST Repository

    Logan, Bruce E.

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (>0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  9. Manufacturing of a micro-tungsten carbide electrode using a supersonic-aided electrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Feng-Tsai; Ho, Chi-Ting

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a novel micromachining technology for fabricating micro parts was described. The original diameter of a tungsten carbide rod was 3 mm, and it was first processed to a rod with a diameter of 50 µm by a precision-grinding process. It could then be machined to the desired diameter by a supersonic-aided electrolysis process. A high-aspect ratio of the micro-tungsten carbide rod was easily obtained by this process. The surface roughness of the sample that was processed by electrolysis with supersonic-aided agitation was compared with that of the sample obtained without agitation. The machined surface of the sample was smooth, and the reason may be that ionized particles in the anode could be removed by supersonic-aided agitation during the electrolysis process. A microelectrode with a tip of approximately 1 µm could be obtained by this process. (technical note)

  10. The Use of Multi-Reactor Cascade Plasma Electrolysis for Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksono, Nelson; Ibrahim; Zainah; Budikania, Trisutanti

    2018-03-01

    Plasma electrolysis is a method that can produce large amounts of hydroxyl radicals to degrade organic waste. The purpose of this study is to improve the effectiveness of Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) degradation by using multi-reactor cascade plasma electrolysis. The reactor which operated in circulation system, using 3 reactors series flow and 6 L of LAS with initial concentration of 100 ppm. The results show that the LAS degradation can be improved multi-reactor cascade plasma electrolysis. The greatest LAS degradation is achieved up to 81.91% with energy consumption of 2227.34 kJ/mmol that is obtained during 120 minutes by using 600 Volt, 0.03 M of KOH, and 0.5 cm of the anode depth.

  11. Vacuum fused deposition modelling system to improve tensile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the printing process, the interlayer bonding is made too quick thus the layers are not fully fused together causing the reduced tensile strength. This paper presents a possible solution to this problem by incorporating vacuum technology in FDM system to improve tensile strength of 3D printed specimens. In this study, a ...

  12. Fused silica thermal conductivity dispersion at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchut, P.; Decruppe, D.; Delrive, L.

    2004-01-01

    A continuous CO 2 laser is focused to locally anneal small fused silica spots. A noncontact radiometry diagnostic enables us to follow surface temperature variation that occurs from site to site. A 'steady state' dispersion of surface temperature is observed across our sample. We show that nonhomogeneous silica thermal conductivity, above 1000 K is responsible for this temperature dispersion

  13. New developments in fused deposition modeling of ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellini, Anna; Shor, L.; Guceri, S.I.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - To shift from rapid prototyping (RP) to agile fabrication by broadening the material selection, e.g. using ceramics, hence improving the properties (e.g. mechanical properties) of fused deposition modeling (FDM) products. Design/methodology/approach - This paper presents the development...

  14. Evaluation of a color fused dual-band NVG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Toet, A.

    2009-01-01

    We designed and evaluated a dual-band Night Vision Goggles sensor system. The sensor system consists of two optically aligned NVGs fitted with filters splitting the sensitive range into a visual and a near-infrared band. The Color-the-night technique (Hogervorst & Toet, FUSION2008) was used to fuse

  15. Evaluation of a color fused dual-band NVG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Toet, A.

    2009-01-01

    We have tested a prototype dual-band NVG system consisting of two NVGs fitted with filters that split the NVG sensitive range into a short (visual) and a long wavelength (NIR) band. The Color-the-night technique (see Hogervorst & Toet, SPIE D&S ‘08) was used to fuse the images of the two sensors. We

  16. The burning fuse model of unbecoming in time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, John D.

    2015-11-01

    In the burning fuse model of unbecoming in time, the future is real and the past is unreal. It is used to motivate the idea that there is something unbecoming in the present literature on the metaphysics of time: its focus is merely the assigning of a label "real."

  17. Crossed fused renal ectopia: Challenges in diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Solanki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Crossed fused renal ectopia is a rare congenital malformation, which is reported to be usually asymptomatic but may have varied presentations. This survey was conducted to study the clinical profile and the challenges posed in the management of this entity. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 6 patients diagnosed to have crossed fused renal ectopia during 1997-2010. The diagnosis was confirmed during surgical exploration in one patient. In one patient it was detected on antenatal ultrasonography and in the other 4 patients it was detected during investigations for abdominal pain, abdominal mass, anorectal malformation and urinary tract infection. Results: The left moiety was crossed and fused with the right moiety in 4 cases. Ultrasonography was found to be a good screening investigation with useful diagnostic contributions from CT scans, radionuclide scintigraphy and magnetic resonance urography. Micturating cystourethrography revealed presence of VUR in 4 cases, 3 of whom have undergone ureteric reimplantation. Two patients required pyeloplasty for pelviureteric junction obstruction; in one of these patients the upper ureter was entrapped in the isthmus. In one patient, a non-functioning moiety resulted in nephrectomy. All children were asymptomatic at last follow-up with stable renal functions. Conclusions: Crossed fused renal ectopia was detected in most patients during investigation for other problems. It was found more commonly in boys. The left moiety was crossed to the right in the majority of cases. Associated urological problems were found in most cases and required the appropriate surgical management.

  18. Separation factor dependence upon cathode material for tritium separation from heavy water by electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Y.; Sakuma, Y.; Ohtani, N.; Kotaka, M.

    2002-01-01

    Using three cathode materials, i.e. carbon (C), stainless steel (SUS), and nickel (Ni), tritium was separated from heavy water by electrolysis, and the separation factors were compared. To separate hydrogen isotopes, heavy water was electrolyzed by an electrolysis device with a solid polymer electrode (SPE), which needed no electrolyte additives for electrolysis. The anode was made of 3 mm thickness of a sintered porous titanium plate covered with iridium oxide. The cathode was made of the same thickness of a sintered porous carbon, stainless steel, or nickel plate. Heavy water or light water spiked with tritiated water was electrolyzed 20 A x 60 min with the electrolysis cell temperature at 10, 20 or 30degC, and 15 A x 80 min at 5degC. The produced hydrogen and oxygen gases were recombined using a palladium catalyst with nitrogen gas as a carrier. The activities of the water in the electrolysis cell and of the recombined water were analyzed using a liquid scintillation counter. The apparent D-T separation factor (SF D/T ) and H-T separation factor (SF H/T ) were calculated as quotient the specific activity of the water in the cell divided by that of the recombined water. The electrolysis potential to keep the current 20 A was 2-3 V. The average yields of the recombined water were 95%. At the cell temperature of 20degC, SF D/T (C), SF D/T (SUS), and SF D/T (Ni) were 2.42, 2.17, and 2.05, respectively. At the same temperature, SF H/T (C), SF H/T (SUS), and SF H/T (Ni) were 12.5, 10.8, and 11.8, respectively. The SFs were in agreement with the results in other works. The SFs were changed with the cell temperature. (author)

  19. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a 'hydrogen economy.' The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  20. Probing absorption of deuterium into palladium cathodes during D2O electrolysis with an in situ electrochemical microbalance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Noboru; Yamamoto, Nobushige; Hatozaki, Osamu; Ohsaka, Takeo

    1990-01-01

    The in situ observation of the absorption of deuterium (or hydrogen) into the Pd cathode during D 2 O (or H 2 O) electrolysis was made by an electrochemical microbalance technique which is based on the quartz-crystal electrode. The resonant frequency of the Pd-coated quartz-crystal electrode decreased with increasing amount of charge passed during electrolysis, and the frequency change for the D 2 O electrolysis was about twice that for the H 2 O electrolysis. The atom ratios of H/Pd and D/Pd of the H-Pd and D-Pd compounds resulting from the electrolysis were estimated to be 0.59 and 0.57, respectively. (author)

  1. Treatment of process water containing heavy metals with a two-stage electrolysis procedure in a membrane electrolysis cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, R.; Krebs, P. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Siedlungs- und Industriewasserwirtschaft, Mommsenstrasse 13, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Seidel, H. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Bioremediation, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Morgenstern, P. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Department Analytik, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Foerster, H.J.; Thiele, W. [Eilenburger Elektrolyse- und Umwelttechnik GmbH, Ziegelstrasse 2, D-04838 Eilenburg (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    The capability of a two-stage electrochemical treatment for the regeneration of acidic heavy-metal containing process water was examined. The process water came from sediment bioleaching and was characterized by a wide spectrum of dissolved metals, a high sulfate content, and a pH of about 3. In the modular laboratory model cell used, the anode chamber and the cathode chamber were separated by a central chamber fitted with an ion exchanger membrane on either side. The experiments were carried out applying a platinum anode and a graphite cathode at a current density of 0.1 A/cm{sup 2}. The circulation flow of the process water in the batch process amounted to 35 L/h, the electrolysis duration was 5.5 h at maximum and the total electrolysis current was about 1 A. In the first stage, the acidic process water containing metals passed through the cathode chamber. In the second stage, the cathodically pretreated process water was electrolyzed anodically. In the cathode chamber the main load of dissolved Cu, Zn, Cr and Pb was eliminated. The sulfuric acid surplus of 3-4 g/L decreased to about 1 g/L, the pH rose from initially 3.0 to 4-5, but the desired pH of 9-10 was not achieved. Precipitation in the proximity to the cathode evidently takes place at a higher pH than farther away. The dominant process in the anode chamber was the precipitation of amorphous MnO{sub 2} owing to the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II). The further depletion of the remaining heavy metals in the cathodically pretreated process water by subsequent anodic treatment was nearly exhaustive, more than 99 % of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were removed from the leachate. The high depletion of heavy metals might be due to both the sorption on MnO{sub 2} precipitates and/or basic ferrous sulfate formed anodically, and the migration of metal ions through the cation exchanger membrane via the middle chamber into the cathode chamber. In the anode chamber, the sulfuric acid content increased to 6-7 g/L and the

  2. Water electrolysis system - H2 and O2 generation. [for spacecraft atmosphere revitalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Lee, M. K.; Davenport, R. J.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    An oxygen generation system design based on the static feed water electrolysis concept is described. The system is designed to generate 4.20 kg/d of oxygen to satisfy the metabolic needs of a three-person crew, to compensate for spacecraft leakage, and to provide the oxygen required by the electrochemical depolarized CO2 concentrator. The system has a fixed hardware weight of 75 kg, occupies a volume of 0.11 cu m, and requires only 1.1 kw of electrical power. The static feed electrolysis concept is discussed, and experimental data on the high-performance electrode are presented.

  3. Tritium separation from heavy water by electrolysis with solid polymer electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Y.; Ohtani, N.; Kotaka, M.

    2003-01-01

    A tritium separation from heavy water by electrolysis using a solid polymer electrode layer was specified. The cathode was made of stainless steel or nickel. The electrolysis was performed for 1 hour at 5, 10, 20, and 30 deg C. Using a palladium catalyst, generated hydrogen and oxygen gases were recombined, which was collected with a cold trap. The activities of the samples were measured by a liquid scintillation counter. The apparent tritium separation factors of the heavy and light water at 20 deg C were ∼2 and ∼12, respectively. (author)

  4. Heterogeneous anion conducting membranes based on linear and crosslinked KOH doped polybenzimidazole for alkaline water electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Hansen, Martin Kalmar; Renzaho, Richard Fulgence

    2013-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole is a highly hygroscopic polymer that can be doped with aqueous KOH to give a material with high ion conductivity in the 10−2Scm−1 range, which in combination with its low gas permeability makes it an interesting electrolyte material for alkaline water electrolysis. In this study...... on their linear counterpart. The technical feasibility of the membranes was evaluated by the preliminary water electrolysis tests showing performance comparable to that of commercially available cell separators with great potential of further improvement....

  5. Alkaline water electrolysis technology for Space Station regenerative fuel cell energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hoberecht, M. A.; Le, M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell system (RFCS), designed for application to the Space Station energy storage system, is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte technology and incorporates a dedicated fuel cell system (FCS) and water electrolysis subsystem (WES). In the present study, emphasis is placed on the WES portion of the RFCS. To ensure RFCS availability for the Space Station, the RFCS Space Station Prototype design was undertaken which included a 46-cell 0.93 cu m static feed water electrolysis module and three integrated mechanical components.

  6. The analysis of energy efficiency in water electrolysis under high temperature and high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourng, L. W.; Tsai, T. T.; Lin, M. Y.

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to analyze the energy efficiency of water electrolysis under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on four different kinds of reaction mechanisms, namely, reversible voltage, activation polarization, ohmic polarization, and concentration polarization, are investigated in details. Results show that the ohmic and concentration over-potentials are increased as temperature is increased, however, the reversible and activation over-potentials are decreased as temperature is increased. Therefore, the net efficiency is enhanced as temperature is increased. The efficiency of water electrolysis at 350°C/100 bars is increased about 17%, compared with that at 80°C/1bar.

  7. Towards a stable ion-solvating polymer electrolyte for advanced alkaline water electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aili, David; Wright, Andrew G.; Kraglund, Mikkel Rykær

    2017-01-01

    Advanced alkaline water electrolysis using ion-solvating polymer membranes as electrolytes represents a new direction in the field of electrochemical hydrogen production. Polybenzimidazole membranes equilibrated in aqueous KOH combine the mechanical robustness and gas-tightness of a polymer...... stability in alkaline environments. The novel electrolytes are extensively characterized with respect to physicochemical and electrochemical properties and the chemical stability is assessed in 0-50 wt% aqueous KOH for more than 6 months at 88 degrees C. In water electrolysis tests using porous 3...

  8. Solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis preprototype subsystem. [oxygen production for life support systems on space stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Hardware and controls developed for an electrolysis demonstration unit for use with the life sciences payload program and in NASA's regenerative life support evaluation program are described. Components discussed include: the electrolysis module; power conditioner; phase separator-pump and hydrogen differential regulator; pressure regulation of O2, He, and N2; air-cooled heat exchanger; water accumulator; fluid flow sight gage assembly; catalytic O2/H2 sensor; gas flow sensors; low voltage power supply; 100 Amp DC contactor assembly; and the water purifier design.

  9. Space Station propulsion - Advanced development testing of the water electrolysis concept at MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lee W.; Bagdigian, Deborah R.

    1989-01-01

    The successful demonstration at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that the water electrolysis concept is sufficiently mature to warrant adopting it as the baseline propulsion design for Space Station Freedom is described. In particular, the test results demonstrated that oxygen/hydrogen thruster, using gaseous propellants, can deliver more than two million lbf-seconds of total impulse at mixture ratios of 3:1 to 8:1 without significant degradation. The results alao demonstrated succcessful end-to-end operation of an integrated water electrolysis propulsion system.

  10. Effects of low voltage electrolysis and freezing on coliform content of contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qazi, J.I.; Saleem, F.

    2003-01-01

    A sewage sample was mixed with drinking water and subjected to low voltage (15V) electrolysis in the presence of 1% NaCl. The prepared sample was also kept in freezer with and without the presence of sodium chloride for 4-hours. Among these treatments the electrolysis proved to kill the coliforms, while the freezing reduced the bacterial content. Antibiotics sensitivity patterns revealed that certain of the coliform strains survived the freezing and thawing shocks. Nature of such surviving bacteria and need to study chemical parameters of electrolyzed water are discussed. (author)

  11. Oxidation of organic pollutants on BDD anodes using modulated current electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panizza, M.; Kapalka, Agnieszka; Comninellis, Ch.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model is presented for organic pollutants mineralization at high current efficiency (close to 100%) and low energy consumption on boron-doped diamond electrodes. The model is formulated for a perfect mixed electrochemical reactor operated as a batch recirculation system under multiple current steps, in which the applied current is adjusted during the electrolysis to be close to the limiting value. An experimental validation with the anodic oxidation of 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid is also provided. The results have shown that multiple current steps electrolysis and continuous current control allowed obtaining high oxidation rate and current efficiency

  12. Oxidation of organic pollutants on BDD anodes using modulated current electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panizza, M. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Genoa, P.le J.F. Kennedy 1, 16129 Genova (Italy)], E-mail: marco.panizza@unige.it; Kapalka, Agnieszka [Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Comninellis, Ch. [Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)], E-mail: christos.comninellis@epfl.ch

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model is presented for organic pollutants mineralization at high current efficiency (close to 100%) and low energy consumption on boron-doped diamond electrodes. The model is formulated for a perfect mixed electrochemical reactor operated as a batch recirculation system under multiple current steps, in which the applied current is adjusted during the electrolysis to be close to the limiting value. An experimental validation with the anodic oxidation of 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid is also provided. The results have shown that multiple current steps electrolysis and continuous current control allowed obtaining high oxidation rate and current efficiency.

  13. Electrolysis of a nitrosyl hexafluoro-molybdate in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougin, Jacques

    1972-01-01

    This thesis addresses the field of irradiated fuel reprocessing, and more particularly the study of the formation of molybdenum hexafluoride (MoF_6) by electrolysis of nitrosyl hexafluoro-molybdate (NOMoF_6) in solution in HF. The author presents the conditions of preparation of an electrolysis in anhydrous HF: solvent purification and control, production of a reference electrode, potential-kinetic study of the behaviour of materials selected for the electrode. The author then addresses the actual hydrolysis of the solution of nitrosyl hexafluoro-molybdate [fr

  14. Molten salt reactors: chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This work is a critical analysis of the 1000 MW MSBR project. Behavior of rare gases in the primary coolant circuit, their extraction from helium. Coating of graphite by molybdenum, chemistry of protactinium and niobium produced in the molten salt, continuous reprocessing of the fuel salt and use of stainless steel instead of hastelloy are reviewed [fr

  15. Dynamic Reference Electrode development for redox potential measurements in fluoride molten salt at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durán-Klie, Gabriela; Rodrigues, Davide; Delpech, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of redox potential in fluoride media is a major problem due to the difficulty to design a reference electrode with high stability, high mechanical resistance and high accuracy. In the frame of molten salt reactor studies, a dynamic reference electrode (DRE) is developed to measure redox potential in fluoride molten salt at high temperature. DRE is based on the in-situ generation of a transient redox system. The choice of the redox couple corresponds to the cathodic limit of the molten salt considered. As a preliminary step, the demonstration of feasibility of generating a DRE was done in LiF-NaF-KF (46.5–11.5–42 mol%) media at 500 °C. In this salt, the reference redox system generated by coulometry at applied current is KF/K, metallic potassium being electrodeposited on a tungsten wire electrode. The validation of the DRE response and the experimental optimization parameters for DRE generation were realized by following the NiF 2 /Ni redox potential evolution as a function of NiF 2 concentration in the fused salt. The current value applied for DRE generation was optimized. It depends on the amount of metallic cations contained in the fused salt and which can be electrochemically reduced simultaneously during the DRE generation. The current corresponding to the DRE generation has to be 4 times greater than the current corresponding to the reduction of the other elements.

  16. Salt Tolerance in Soybean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsui-Hung Phang; Guihua Shao; Hon-Ming Lam

    2008-01-01

    Soybean is an Important cash crop and its productivity is significantly hampered by salt stress. High salt Imposes negative impacts on growth, nodulation, agronomy traits, seed quality and quantity, and thus reduces the yield of soybean. To cope with salt stress, soybean has developed several tolerance mechanisms, including: (I) maintenance of ion homeostasis; (ii) adjustment in response to osmotic stress; (iii) restoration of osmotic balance; and (iv) other metabolic and structural adaptations. The regulatory network for abiotic stress responses in higher plants has been studied extensively in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Some homologous components involved in salt stress responses have been identified in soybean. In this review, we tried to integrate the relevant works on soybean and proposes a working model to descdbe Its salt stress responses at the molecular level.

  17. Geomechanics of bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serata, S.; Milnor, S.W.

    1979-01-01

    Creep data from the literature search is reinterpreted by SGI, resulting in a better understanding of the temperature and stress state dependence of the octahedral creep rate and the octahedral shear strength. The concept of a transition strength between the elastic and the plastic states is in agreement with the data. The elastic and rheological properties of salt are described, and a set of constitutive equations is presented. The dependence of material properties on parameters such as temperature is considered. Findings on the permeability of salt are summarized, and the in-situ behavior of openings in bedded salt is described based on extensive engineering experience. A stress measuring system utilizing a finite element computer code is discussed. Geological factors affecting the stability of salt openings are considered, and the Stress Control Technique for designing stable openings in bedded salt formations is explained

  18. Salt og forbrugervalg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Trine; Grunert, Klaus G

    af saltreducerede fødevarer og deres købsintention af disse. Dette blev undersøgt ved at måle forbrugerens viden om salt, anvendelse af salt, ønske om reduktion af salt og købsintention af saltreducerede fødevarer i en web-baseret undersøgelse. Efter den web-baserede undersøgelse, blev de samme mål...... undersøgt, men i et supermarked, hvor deltagerne blev inddelt i fire grupper for at undersøge effekten af priming og saltmærkning. Desuden blev der foretaget 15 kvalitative interviews, for at studere hvem og hvad der karakteriserer de deltagere i eksperimentet, som enten ender med ingen salt......-reducerede produkter at købe eller som ender med at købe alle de salt-reducerede produkter....

  19. Lowering Salt in Your Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Lowering Salt in Your Diet Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Subscribe: FDA Consumer Health Information Everyone needs some salt to function. Also known as sodium chloride, salt ...

  20. Water purification using organic salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  1. TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. O' Brien; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock

    2011-11-01

    A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

  2. Testing And Performance Analysis Of NASA 5 CM BY 5 CM Bi-Supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells Operated In Both Fuel Cell And Steam Electrolysis Modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, R.C.; O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.M.; Zhang, X.; Farmer, S.C.; Cable, T.L.; Setlock, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A series of 5 cm by 5 cm bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 cm by 5 cm SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.

  3. Preparation of Ferrotitanium Alloys by Electrolysis-Assisted Calciothermic Reduction of Ilmenite in Equimolar CaCl2-NaCl Electrolyte: Effect of Calcium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongren; Zhang, Yingjie; Hua, Yixin; Xu, Cunying; Dong, Peng; Zhang, Qibo; Wang, Ding

    2018-04-01

    The effect of CaO content on the preparation of ferrotitanium alloys from ilmenite with the method of the electrolysis-assisted calciothermic reduction has been investigated by use of ilmenite powders as raw materials that positions them next to the cathodic molybdenum plate, equimolar CaCl2-NaCl molten salt with 2-7 mol.% CaO as electrolyte and graphite as anode at 700°C with cell voltage of 2.8 V under argon atmosphere. It is demonstrated that increasing the reactant CaO content is beneficial to the calciothermic reduction of ilmenite and the intermediate CaTiO3. Experimental results also show that after 14 h of calciothermic reduction process, the products are ferrotitanium alloys and the specific energy consumption is only about 10.21 kWh kg-1 when adding 5 mol.% CaO into equimolar CaCl2-NaCl molten salt and approximately 14.40 kWh kg-1 when CaO content is increased to 7 mol.%.

  4. Crushed Salt Constitutive Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, G.D.

    1999-01-01

    The constitutive model used to describe the deformation of crushed salt is presented in this report. Two mechanisms -- dislocation creep and grain boundary diffusional pressure solution -- are combined to form the basis for the constitutive model governing the deformation of crushed salt. The constitutive model is generalized to represent three-dimensional states of stress. Upon complete consolidation, the crushed-salt model reproduces the Multimechanism Deformation (M-D) model typically used for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) host geological formation salt. New shear consolidation tests are combined with an existing database that includes hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on WIPP and southeastern New Mexico salt. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to the database produced two sets of material parameter values for the model -- one for the shear consolidation tests and one for a combination of the shear and hydrostatic consolidation tests. Using the parameter values determined from the fitted database, the constitutive model is validated against constant strain-rate tests. Shaft seal problems are analyzed to demonstrate model-predicted consolidation of the shaft seal crushed-salt component. Based on the fitting statistics, the ability of the model to predict the test data, and the ability of the model to predict load paths and test data outside of the fitted database, the model appears to capture the creep consolidation behavior of crushed salt reasonably well

  5. Molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Simon, N.; Renault, C.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt reactors are one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. The principle of this reactor is very innovative: the nuclear fuel is dissolved in the coolant which allows the online reprocessing of the fuel and the online recovery of the fission products. A small prototype: the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE - 8 MWt) was operating a few years in the sixties in the USA. The passage towards a fast reactor by the suppression of the graphite moderator leads to the concept of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) which is presently studied through different European projects such as MOST, ALISIA and EVOL. Worldwide the main topics of research are: the adequate materials resisting to the high level of corrosiveness of the molten salts, fuel salt reprocessing, the 3-side coupling between neutron transport, thermohydraulics and thermo-chemistry, the management of the changing chemical composition of the salt, the enrichment of lithium with Li 7 in the case of the use of lithium fluoride salt and the use of MSFR using U 233 fuel (thorium cycle). The last part of the article presents a preliminary safety analysis of the MSFR. (A.C.)

  6. Fabrication of BCP/Silica Scaffolds with Dual-Pore by Combining Fused Deposition Modeling and the Particle Leaching Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sa, Min-Woo; Kim, Jong Young

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, traditional scaffold fabrication techniques such as gas foaming, salt leaching, sponge replica, and freeze casting in tissue engineering have significantly limited sufficient mechanical property and cell interaction effect due to only random pores. Fused deposition modeling is the most apposite technology for fabricating the 3D scaffolds using the polymeric materials in tissue engineering application. In this study, 3D slurry mould was fabricated with a blended biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP)/Silica/Alginic acid sodium salt slurry in PCL mould and heated for two hours at 100 .deg. C to harden the blended slurry. 3D dual-pore BCP/Silica scaffold, composed of macro pores interconnected with micro pores, was successfully fabricated by sintering at furnace of 1100 .deg. C. Surface morphology and 3D shape of dual-pore BCP/Silica scaffold from scanning electron microscopy were observed. Also, the mechanical properties of 3D BCP/Silica scaffold, according to blending ratio of alginic acid sodium salt, were evaluated through compression test

  7. Fabrication of BCP/Silica Scaffolds with Dual-Pore by Combining Fused Deposition Modeling and the Particle Leaching Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sa, Min-Woo; Kim, Jong Young [Andong National Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In recent years, traditional scaffold fabrication techniques such as gas foaming, salt leaching, sponge replica, and freeze casting in tissue engineering have significantly limited sufficient mechanical property and cell interaction effect due to only random pores. Fused deposition modeling is the most apposite technology for fabricating the 3D scaffolds using the polymeric materials in tissue engineering application. In this study, 3D slurry mould was fabricated with a blended biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP)/Silica/Alginic acid sodium salt slurry in PCL mould and heated for two hours at 100 .deg. C to harden the blended slurry. 3D dual-pore BCP/Silica scaffold, composed of macro pores interconnected with micro pores, was successfully fabricated by sintering at furnace of 1100 .deg. C. Surface morphology and 3D shape of dual-pore BCP/Silica scaffold from scanning electron microscopy were observed. Also, the mechanical properties of 3D BCP/Silica scaffold, according to blending ratio of alginic acid sodium salt, were evaluated through compression test.

  8. Gases in molten salts

    CERN Document Server

    Tomkins, RPT

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains tabulated collections and critical evaluations of original data for the solubility of gases in molten salts, gathered from chemical literature through to the end of 1989. Within the volume, material is arranged according to the individual gas. The gases include hydrogen halides, inert gases, oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and halogens. The molten salts consist of single salts, binary mixtures and multicomponent systems. Included also, is a special section on the solubility of gases in molten silicate systems, focussing on slags and fluxes.

  9. 30 CFR 75.601-2 - Short circuit protection; use of fuses; approval by the Secretary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short circuit protection; use of fuses... Trailing Cables § 75.601-2 Short circuit protection; use of fuses; approval by the Secretary. Fuses shall not be employed to provide short circuit protection for trailing cables unless specifically approved...

  10. 30 CFR 75.601-3 - Short circuit protection; dual element fuses; current ratings; maximum values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Short circuit protection; dual element fuses... Trailing Cables § 75.601-3 Short circuit protection; dual element fuses; current ratings; maximum values. Dual element fuses having adequate current-interrupting capacity shall meet the requirements for short...

  11. Influence of System Parameters on Fuse Protection Use in Regenerative DC Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Salman Qamber

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Current limiting fuses are widely used to protect the thyristors in DC drive systems. One very important problem is the choice of the correct voltage rating for fuses protecting regenerative DC drives, where many types of fault may occur, which makes fuse protection difficult. In the event of a commutation failure while regenerating, the fuses need to interrupt the loop supplied by the AC and DC voltages acting in series, which is the most difficult case for protection by fuses. In this paper a detailed study of the complete interruption process has been investigated by modeling of arcing process of the fuse protection against the regenerative circuit internal commutation fault. The effect of varying the motor time constant, supply impedance, number of fuses used to clear the fault and DC machine rating on the total transient response is studied. The model of a 200 A fuse is employed in this study. Fuses in series with both the semiconductor devices (F1 and fuses in AC lines (F2 are considered. Comparison was made between arc energy produced for fuses protecting the regenerative circuit if failure occurs, with the arc energy produced in a standard AC test in order to investigate the required voltage rating for the fuse.

  12. ANALYSIS OF A POSSIBLE REDUCTION IN ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN WATER ELECTROLYSIS REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurel George POPESCU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It was experimentally observed that the electrolysis reaction continues a short period of time - time torelax c - after the cell power supply is interrupted. This paper presents an analysis of transient phenomenaoccurring and pr opose technical solutions

  13. The electrolysis of water: An actuation principle for MEMS with a big opportunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusu, C.R.; Neagu, Cristina; Jansen, Henricus V.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    In this paper the theory of water electrolysis in a closed electrochemical cell, that contains two electrodes, an electrolyte and a pressure sensor is described. From the leakage and electrochemical experiments done with this macrocell it is possible to obtain information about the applicability of

  14. Nanoporous materials for reducing the over potential of creating hydrogen by water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marc A.; Leonard, Kevin C.

    2016-06-14

    Disclosed is an electrolyzer including an electrode including a nanoporous oxide-coated conducting material. Also disclosed is a method of producing a gas through electrolysis by contacting an aqueous solution with an electrode connected to an electrical power source, wherein the electrode includes a nanoporous oxide-coated conducting material.

  15. Model-supported characterization of a PEM water electrolysis cell for the effect of compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frensch, Steffen Henrik; Olesen, Anders Christian; Simon Araya, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the cell compression of a PEM water electrolysis cell. A small single cell is therefore electrochemically analyzed by means of polarization behavior and impedance spectroscopy throughout a range of currents (0.01 A cm−2 to 2.0 A cm−2) at two temperatures (60...

  16. Syntrophic interactions drive the hydrogen production from glucose at low temperature in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Nanqi; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    H2 can be obtained from glucose by fermentation at mesophilic temperatures, but here we demonstrate that hydrogen can also be obtained from glucose at low temperatures using microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). H2 was produced from glucose at 4°C

  17. High hydrogen production from glycerol or glucose by electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Selembo, Priscilla A.; Perez, Joe M.; Lloyd, Wallis A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of glycerol for hydrogen gas production was examined via electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). A hydrogen yield of 3.9 mol-H2/mol was obtained using glycerol, which is higher than that possible by fermentation

  18. Comparative costs of hydrogen produced from photovoltaic electrolysis and from photoelectrochemical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The need for hydrogen produced from renewable energy sources is the key element to the world's large-scale usage of hydrogen and to the hydrogen economy envisioned by the World Hydrogen Energy Association. Renewables-produced hydrogen is also the most technically difficult problem to be solved. Hydrogen will never achieve large-scale usage until it can be competitively produced from renewable energy. One of the important questions that has to be addressed is: What are the economics of present and expected future technologies that will be used to produce hydrogen from renewables? The objective of this study is to give an answer to this question by determining the cost of hydrogen (in U.S.$/MBtu) from competing renewable production technologies. It should be noted that the costs and efficiencies assumed in this paper are assumptions of the author, and that the values are expected to be achieved after additional research on photoelectrochemical process technologies. The cost analysis performed is for three types of hydrogen (H 2 ) produced from five different types of renewable processes: photovoltaic (PV) electrolysis, three photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes and higher temperature electrolysis (HTE). The costs and efficiencies for PV, PEC and HTE processes are established for present day, and for expected costs and efficiencies 10 years into the future. A second objective of this analysis is to set base case costs of PV electrolysis. For any other renewable process, the costs for PV electrolysis, which is existing technology, sets the numbers which the other processes must better. (author)

  19. Diagnosis of a cathode-supported solid oxide electrolysis cell by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nechache, A.; Mansuy, A.; Petitjean, M.; Mougin, J.; Mauvy, F.; Boukamp, Bernard A.; Cassir, M.; Ringuede, A.

    2016-01-01

    High-temperature electrolysis (HTSE) is a quite recent topic where most of the studies are focused on performance measurements and degradation observations, mainly achieved by polarization curve. However, it mainly leads to the overall cell behaviour. To get more specific knowledge on the operation

  20. The importance of OH − transport through anion exchange membrane in microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ye, Yaoli; Logan, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    In two-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) with anion exchange membranes (AEMs), a phosphate buffer solution (PBS) is typically used to avoid increases in catholyte pH as Nernst equation calculations indicate that high pHs adversely impact

  1. Optimization of catholyte concentration and anolyte pHs in two chamber microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen production rate in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) using a non-buffered saline catholyte (NaCl) can be optimized through proper control of the initial anolyte pH and catholyte NaCl concentration. The highest hydrogen yield of 3

  2. Durable SOC stacks for production of hydrogen and synthesis gas by high temperature electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Nielsen, Karsten Agersted

    2011-01-01

    . The degradation of the electrolysis cells was found to be influenced by the adsorption of impurities from the applied inlet gases, whereas the application of chromium containing interconnect plates and glass sealings do not seem to influence the durability when operated at 850 °C. Cleaning the inlet gases...

  3. The impact of anode acclimation strategy on microbial electrolysis cell treating hydrogen fermentation effluent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ruizhe; Qian, Yawei

    2017-01-01

    The impact of different anode acclimation methods for enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was investigated in this study. The anodes were first acclimated in microbial fuel cells using acetate, butyrate and corn stalk fermentation effluent (CSFE) as substrate before...

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of the efficiency of high-temperature steam electrolysis system for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyi, Liu; Bo, Yu; Jingming, Xu; Jing, Chen

    High-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), a reversible process of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) in principle, is a promising method for highly efficient large-scale hydrogen production. In our study, the overall efficiency of the HTSE system was calculated through electrochemical and thermodynamic analysis. A thermodynamic model in regards to the efficiency of the HTSE system was established and the quantitative effects of three key parameters, electrical efficiency (η el), electrolysis efficiency (η es), and thermal efficiency (η th) on the overall efficiency (η overall) of the HTSE system were investigated. Results showed that the contribution of η el, η es, η th to the overall efficiency were about 70%, 22%, and 8%, respectively. As temperatures increased from 500 °C to 1000 °C, the effect of η el on η overall decreased gradually and the η es effect remained almost constant, while the η th effect increased gradually. The overall efficiency of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with the HTSE system under different conditions was also calculated. With the increase of electrical, electrolysis, and thermal efficiency, the overall efficiencies were anticipated to increase from 33% to a maximum of 59% at 1000 °C, which is over two times higher than that of the conventional alkaline water electrolysis.

  5. Hydrogen Production Performance of a 10-Cell Planar Solid-Oxide Electrolysis Stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Steve Herring; J. Hartvigsen

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900 C. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (∼140 (micro)m thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1-0.6), gas flow rates (1000-4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 100 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate

  6. Contact glow discharge electrolysis: its origin, plasma diagnostics and non-faradaic chemical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen Gupta, Susanta K

    2015-01-01

    Contact glow discharge electrolysis (CGDE) also termed plasma electrolysis is a novel electrolysis where a stable sheath of light emitting plasma develops around an electrode immersed well inside a relatively high-conductivity liquid electrolyte during normal electrolysis (NE) at several hundred volts. The phenomenon may develop in dc-, pulsed dc-, ac- as well as RF-driven electrolyses. The chemical effects of CGDE are remarkably non-faradaic in respect to the nature of the products as well as their yields. The article traces comprehensively the progress made in studies of CGDE in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions since 1844 and reviews the developments in the understanding of its origin, light emission, plasma state and non-faradaic effects leading to the elucidation of detailed mechanism of the origin of CGDE on the basis of the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities in local vaporization of the solvent near the working electrode during NE, and that of highly non-faradaic effects of CGDE based on a model of two reaction zones located within the electrode plasma and at the plasma–liquid interface producing solvent derived radicals at high local concentrations. Keeping in view the recent surge of interest in varied applications of CGDE, the article is appended with highlights of these applications across synthetic chemistry, waste water treatment, electrosurgical devices, nanoparticle fabrications, surface engineering and micro-machining. (topical review)

  7. High Temperature Alkaline Electrolysis Cells with Metal Foam Based Gas Diffusion Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    Alkaline electrolysis cells operating at 250°C and 40 bar are able to convert electrical energy into hydrogen at very high efficiencies and power densities. In the present work we demonstrate the application of a PTFE hydrophobic network and Ag nanowires as oxygen evolution electrocatalyst...

  8. Single exponential decay waveform; a synergistic combination of electroporation and electrolysis (E2 for tissue ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Klein

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Electrolytic ablation and electroporation based ablation are minimally invasive, non-thermal surgical technologies that employ electrical currents and electric fields to ablate undesirable cells in a volume of tissue. In this study, we explore the attributes of a new tissue ablation technology that simultaneously delivers a synergistic combination of electroporation and electrolysis (E2. Method A new device that delivers a controlled dose of electroporation field and electrolysis currents in the form of a single exponential decay waveform (EDW was applied to the pig liver, and the effect of various parameters on the extent of tissue ablation was examined with histology. Results Histological analysis shows that E2 delivered as EDW can produce tissue ablation in volumes of clinical significance, using electrical and temporal parameters which, if used in electroporation or electrolysis separately, cannot ablate the tissue. Discussion The E2 combination has advantages over the three basic technologies of non-thermal ablation: electrolytic ablation, electrochemical ablation (reversible electroporation with injection of drugs and irreversible electroporation. E2 ablates clinically relevant volumes of tissue in a shorter period of time than electrolysis and electroporation, without the need to inject drugs as in reversible electroporation or use paralyzing anesthesia as in irreversible electroporation.

  9. Analysis and Countermeasures of Wind Power Accommodation by Aluminum Electrolysis Pot-Lines in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Ran, Ling; He, Guixiong; Wang, Zhenyu; Li, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The unit energy consumption and its price have become the main obstacles for the future development of the aluminum electrolysis industry in China. Meanwhile, wind power is widely being abandoned because of its instability. In this study, a novel idea for wind power accommodation is proposed to achieve a win-win situation: the idea is for nearby aluminum electrolysis plants to absorb the wind power. The features of the wind power distribution and aluminum electrolysis industry are first summarized, and the concept of wind power accommodation by the aluminum industry is introduced. Then, based on the characteristics of aluminum reduction cells, the key problems, including the bus-bar status, thermal balance, and magnetohydrodynamics instabilities, are analyzed. In addition, a whole accommodation implementation plan for wind power by aluminum reduction is introduced to explain the theoretical value of accommodation, evaluation of the reduction cells, and the industrial experiment scheme. A numerical simulation of a typical scenario proves that there is large accommodation potential for the aluminum reduction cells. Aluminum electrolysis can accommodate wind power and remain stable under the proper technique and accommodation scheme, which will provide promising benefits for the aluminum plant and the wind energy plant.

  10. Treating soil-washing fluids polluted with oxyfluorfen by sono-electrolysis with diamond anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dos Santos, E; Sáez, C; Cañizares, P; Martínez-Huitle, C A; Rodrigo, M A

    2017-01-01

    This works is focused on the treatment by sono-electrolysis of the liquid effluents produced during the Surfactant-Aided Soil-Washing (SASW) of soils spiked with herbicide oxyfluorfen. Results show that this combined technology is very efficient and attains the complete mineralization of the waste, regardless of the surfactant/soil radio applied in the SASW process (which is the main parameter of the soil remediation process and leads to very different wastes). Both the surfactant and the herbicide are completely degraded, even when single electrolysis is used; and only two intermediates are detected by HPLC in very low concentrations. Conversely, the efficiency of single sonolysis approach, for the oxidation of pollutant, is very low and just small changes in the herbicides and surfactant concentrations are observed during the tests carried out. Sono-electrolysis with diamond electrodes achieved higher degradation rates than those obtained by single sonolysis and/or single electrolysis with diamond anodes. A key role of sulfate is developed, when it is released after the electrochemical degradation of surfactant. The efficient catalytic effect observed which can be explained by the anodic formation of persulfate and the later, a sono-activation is attained to produce highly efficient sulfate radicals. The effect of irradiating US is more importantly observed in the pesticide than in the surfactant, in agreement with the well-known behavior of these radicals which are known to oxidize more efficiently aromatic compounds than aliphatic species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbial electrolysis contribution to anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge, leading to accelerated methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; Cai, Weiwei; Guo, Zechong

    2016-01-01

    Methane production rate (MPR) in waste activated sludge (WAS) digestion processes is typically limitedby the initial steps of complex organic matter degradation, leading to a limited MPR due to sludgefermentation speed of solid particles. In this study, a novel microbial electrolysis AD reactor (ME...

  12. Present status of r and d on hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Aita, Hideki; Sekita, Kenji; Haga, Katsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Iwata, Tomo-o.

    1995-08-01

    In JAERI, design and R and D works on hydrogen production process have been conducted for connecting to the HTTR under construction at the Oarai Establishment of the JAERI as the nuclear heat utilization system. As for a hydrogen production process by high-temperature electrolysis of steam, laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted using a practical electrolysis tube with 12 cells connected in series. Hydrogen was produced at a maximum density of 44 Nml/cm 2 h at 950degC, and know-how of operational procedures and operational experience have been also accumulated. Then, a self-supporting planar electrolysis cell was fabricated in order to improve hydrogen production performance. In the preliminary test with the planar cell, hydrogen has been produced continuously at a maximum density of 36 Nml/cm 2 h at lower electrolysis temperature of 850degC. This report presents typical test results mentioned above, a review of previous studies conducted in the world and R and D items required for connecting to the HTTR. (author)

  13. HVI Ballistic Limit Charaterization of Fused Silica Thermal Pane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, William E.; Miller, Joshua E.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Deighton, Kevin.; Davis, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft's windows are exposed to the micrometeroid and orbital debris (MMOD) space environments while in space as well as the Earth entry environment at the mission's conclusion. The need for a low-mass spacecraft window design drives the need to reduce conservatism when assessing the design for loss of crew due to MMOD impact and subsequent Earth entry. Therefore, work is underway at NASA and Lockheed Martin to improve characterization of the complete penetration ballistic limit of an outer fused silica thermal pane. Hypervelocity impact tests of the window configuration at up to 10 km/s and hydrocode modeling have been performed with a variety of projectile materials to enable refinement of the fused silica ballistic limit equation.

  14. Crossed fused renal ectopia in a Persian cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Hyuk Seo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Case summary This report describes a rare case of crossed fused renal ectopia (CFRE in a cat. A mature intact male Persian cat presented with bloody nasal discharge and ascites. Diagnostic studies revealed an ectopic left kidney fused with an orthotopic right kidney and a concurrent feline infectious peritonitis (FIP infection. The FIP was responsible for clinical signs in this cat, while clinical signs associated with CFRE were not obvious. Despite receiving intensive treatment, the cat died. A post-mortem examination was not performed because the owners declined approval. Relevance and novel information To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of L-shaped CFRE in a cat. In addition, this report describes the CT features of L-shaped CFRE in a cat.

  15. Treatment of oilfield wastewater by combined process of micro-electrolysis, Fenton oxidation and coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenchao

    2017-12-01

    In this study, a combined process was developed that included micro-electrolysis, Fenton oxidation and coagulation to treat oilfield fracturing wastewater. Micro-electrolysis and Fenton oxidation were applied to reduce chemical oxygen demand (COD) organic load and to enhance organic components gradability, respectively. Orthogonal experiment were employed to investigate the influence factors of micro-electrolysis and Fenton oxidation on COD removal efficiency. For micro-electrolysis, the optimum conditions were: pH, 3; iron-carbon dosage, 50 mg/L; mass ratio of iron-carbon, 2:3; reaction time, 60 min. For Fenton oxidation, a total reaction time of 90 min, a H 2 O 2 dosage of 12 mg/L, with a H 2 O 2 /Fe 2+ mole ratio of 30, pH of 3 were selected to achieve optimum oxidation. The optimum conditions in coagulation process: pH, cationic polyacrylamide dosage, mixing speed and time is 4.3, 2 mg/L, 150 rpm and 30 s, respectively. In the continuous treatment process under optimized conditions, the COD of oily wastewater fell 56.95%, 46.23%, 30.67%, respectively, from last stage and the total COD removal efficiency reached 83.94% (from 4,314 to 693 mg/L). In the overall treatment process under optimized conditions, the COD of oily wastewater was reduced from 4,314 to 637 mg/L, and the COD removal efficiency reached 85.23%. The contribution of each stage is 68.45% (micro-electrolysis), 24.07% (Fenton oxidation), 7.48% (coagulation), respectively. Micro-electrolysis is the uppermost influencing process on COD removal. Compared with the COD removal efficiency of three processes on raw wastewater under optimized conditions: the COD removal efficiency of single micro-electrolysis, single Fenton oxidation, single coagulation is 58.34%, 44.88% and 39.72%, respectively. Experiments proved the effect of combined process is marvelous and the overall water quality of the final effluent could meet the class III national wastewater discharge standard of petrochemical industry of China

  16. Tetrakis(4-tert-butylphenyl) substituted and fused quinoidal porphyrins

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Wangdong

    2012-01-01

    4-tert-Butylphenyl-substituted and fused quinoidal porphyrins 1 and 2 are prepared for the first time. They show (1) intense one-photon absorption in the far-red/near-infrared region, (2) enhanced two-photon absorption compared with aromatic porphyrin monomers, and (3) amphoteric redox behavior. Their geometry and electronic structure are studied by DFT calculations. This journal is © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Bilateral maxillary fused second and third molars: a rare occurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Jin-Tao; Wu, You-Nong; Smales, Roger J; Hu, Ming; Yu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and endodontic therapy of maxillary fused second and third molars, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 31-year-old Chinese male, with no contributory medical or family/social history, presented with throbbing pain in the maxillary right molar area following an unsuccessful attempted tooth extraction. Clinical examination revealed what appeared initially to be a damaged large extra cusp on the buccal aspect of the distobuccal cusp of the secon...

  18. Hydrogen production from inexhaustible supplies of fresh and salt water using microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Y.; Logan, B. E.

    2011-01-01

    There is a tremendous source of entropic energy available from the salinity difference between river water and seawater, but this energy has yet to be efficiently captured and stored. Here we demonstrate that H(2) can be produced in a single process

  19. The salt glands of Tamarix usneoides E. Mey. ex Bunge (South African Salt Cedar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hayden; Mycock, David; Weiersbye, Isabel M

    2017-06-03

    Tamarix usneoides is a halophyte tree endemic to south-western Africa. This species is known to excrete a range of ions from specialized glandular structures on its leaves. To understand the mechanisms involved in the transport, sequestration and excretion of ions by the glands, a study was performed on salt gland distribution and ultrastructure. The glands are vesiculated trichomes, comprised of eight cells viz. two basal collecting cells and six excretory cells, partially bounded by a secondary cell wall that could serve as an impermeable barrier, forcing excess ions to move from the apoplast of the surrounding tissue into the cytoplasm of the basal excretory cells. It was hypothesized that the ions are moved across the excretory cells in endocytotic vesicles that fuse with the plasmalemma or form junctional complexes, allowing ion movement from one excretory cell to the next. In the apical cell, the vesicles fuse with the plasmalemma, releasing the ions into the network of cell wall ingrowths which channel the ions to the outside surface of the cell. This study shows that there are distinct structural adaptations for the processing of ions for excretion, although the mechanism by which ions enter the cells still needs to be determined.

  20. Hybrid Z-Θ Pinches with fused capacitor banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandey, R.; Gersten, M.; Loter, N.; Rauch, J.; Rostoker, N.; Thompson, W.; Ware, K.

    1987-01-01

    The Hybrid Z-Θ Pinch circuit equations in the thin shell model were reexamined to see what advantages can be obtained by using a fused, high-energy (>--1MJ) bank driver. The DNA ACE facility at MLI utilizes a 36 μF capacitor band which can be charged to 120 kV to provide 250 kJ of stored energy. This configuration appears to be very appropriate to test the performance of a hybrid-stabilized fused-bank driven pinch. The circuit analyses suggest that the energy transfer efficiency from the bank to a pinched plasma can be increased from less than 1%, for a nonfused bank, to about 10% for a fused configuration. In the applicable region of parameter space, the Hybrid Pinch does not increase the efficiency of energy transfer into the plasma over that obtainable from a Z-pinch. The additional stability may allow larger initial radii to be used with concomitant improved coupling into radiation above 1 keV

  1. High strength fused silica flexures manufactured by femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellouard, Yves; Said, Ali A.; Dugan, Mark; Bado, Philippe

    2009-02-01

    Flexures are mechanical elements used in micro- and precision-engineering to precisely guide the motion of micro-parts. They consist of slender bodies that deform elastically upon the application of a force. Although counter-intuitive at first, fused silica is an attractive material for flexure. Pending that the machining process does not introduce surface flaws that would lead to catastrophic failure, the material has a theoretically high ultimate tensile strength of several GPa. We report on high-aspect ratio fused silica flexures manufactured by femtosecond laser combined with chemical etching. Notch-hinges with thickness as small as twenty microns and aspect ratios comparable to aspect ratios obtained by Deep- Reactive-Ion-Etching (DRIE) were fabricated and tested under different loading conditions. Multiple fracture tests were performed for various loading conditions and the cracks morphologies were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The manufactured elements show outstanding mechanical properties with flexural strengths largely exceeding those obtained with other technologies and materials. Fused silica flexures offer a mean to combine integrated optics with micro-mechanics in a single monolithic substrate. Waveguides and mechanical elements can be combined in a monolithic devices opening new opportunities for integrated opto-mechatronics devices.

  2. A hierarachical data structure representation for fusing multisensor information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maren, A.J. [Tennessee Univ., Tullahoma, TN (United States). Space Inst.; Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T. [Accurate Automation Corp., Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1989-12-31

    A major problem with MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the data element, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Data-element fusion has problems with coregistration. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented data relies on a Presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing (including object identification) to be useful. MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Data Structure (HDS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The HDS is an intermediate representation between the raw or smoothed data stream and symbolic interpretation of the data. it represents the structural organization of the data. Fused HDSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based region interpretation.

  3. A hierarachical data structure representation for fusing multisensor information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maren, A.J. (Tennessee Univ., Tullahoma, TN (United States). Space Inst.); Pap, R.M.; Harston, C.T. (Accurate Automation Corp., Chattanooga, TN (United States))

    1989-01-01

    A major problem with MultiSensor Information Fusion (MSIF) is establishing the level of processing at which information should be fused. Current methodologies, whether based on fusion at the data element, segment/feature, or symbolic levels, are each inadequate for robust MSIF. Data-element fusion has problems with coregistration. Attempts to fuse information using the features of segmented data relies on a Presumed similarity between the segmentation characteristics of each data stream. Symbolic-level fusion requires too much advance processing (including object identification) to be useful. MSIF systems need to operate in real-time, must perform fusion using a variety of sensor types, and should be effective across a wide range of operating conditions or deployment environments. We address this problem through developing a new representation level which facilitates matching and information fusion. The Hierarchical Data Structure (HDS) representation, created using a multilayer, cooperative/competitive neural network, meets this need. The HDS is an intermediate representation between the raw or smoothed data stream and symbolic interpretation of the data. it represents the structural organization of the data. Fused HDSs will incorporate information from multiple sensors. Their knowledge-rich structure aids top-down scene interpretation via both model matching and knowledge-based region interpretation.

  4. What Are Bath Salts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bath salts can produce: feelings of joy increased social interaction increased sex drive paranoia nervousness hallucinations (see or ... Institutes of Health; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Cite this article APA Style MLA Style ...

  5. Synthetic Cathinones ("Bath Salts")

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  6. Effect of the graphite electrode material on the characteristics of molten salt electrolytically produced carbon nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical erosion of a graphite cathode during the electrolysis of molten lithium chloride salt may be used for the preparation of nano-structured carbon materials. It has been found that the structures and morphologies of these carbon nanomaterials are dependent on those of the graphite cathodes employed. A combination of tubular and spherical carbon nanostructures has been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of predominantly planar micro-sized grains and a minor fraction of more irregular nano-sized grains, whilst only spherical carbon nanostructures have been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of primarily nano-sized grains. Based on the experimental results, a best-fit regression equation is proposed that relates the crystalline domain size of the graphite reactants and the carbon products. The carbon nanomaterials prepared possess a fairly uniform mesoporosity with a sharp peak in pore size distribution at around 4 nm. The results are of crucial importance to the production of carbon nanomaterials by way of the molten salt electrolytic method. - Highlights: → Carbon nanomaterials are synthesised by LiCl electrolysis with graphite electrodes. → The degree of crystallinity of graphite reactant and carbon product are related. → A graphite reactant is identified that enables the preparation of carbon nanotubes. → The carbon products possess uniform mesoporosity with narrow pore size distribution.

  7. Mass transport in bedded salt and salt interbeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.; Pigford, T.H.; Chambre, P.L.; Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-08-01

    Salt is the proposed host rock for geologic repositories of nuclear waste in several nations because it is nearly dry and probably impermeable. Although experiments and experience at potential salt sites indicate that salt may contain brine, the low porosity, creep, and permeability of salt make it still a good choice for geologic isolation. In this paper we summarize several mass-transfer and transport analyses of salt repositories. The mathematical details are given in our technical reports

  8. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. Emphasize is put essentially on the fuel salt of the primary circuit inside which fission reactions occur. The reasons why the (LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 -UF 4 ) salt was chosen for the M.S.B.R. concept are examined; the physical, physicochemical and chemical properties of this salt are discussed with its interactions with the structural materials and its evolution in time. An important part of this volume is devoted to the continuous reprocessing of the active salt, the project designers having deemed advisable to take advantage at best from the availability of a continuous purification, in a thermal breeding. The problem of tritium formation and distribution inside the reactor is also envisaged and the fundamentals of the chemistry of the secondary coolant salt are given. The solutions proposed are: the hydrogen scavenging of the primary circuit, a reduction in metal permeability by an oxyde layer deposition on the side in contact with the vapor, and tritium absorption through an isotope exchange with the hydroxifluoroborate [fr

  9. Asymmetric synthesis of a potent, aminopiperidine-fused imidazopyridine dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Corley, Edward; Zacuto, Michael; Conlon, David A; Pipik, Brenda; Humphrey, Guy; Murry, Jerry; Tschaen, David

    2010-03-05

    A practical asymmetric synthesis of a novel aminopiperidine-fused imidazopyridine dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibitor 1 has been developed. Application of a unique three-component cascade coupling with chiral nitro diester 7, which is easily accessed via a highly enantioselective Michael addition of dimethyl malonate to a nitrostyrene, allows for the assembly of the functionalized piperidinone skeleton in one pot. Through a base-catalyzed, dynamic crystallization-driven process, the cis-piperidionone 16a is epimerized to the desired trans isomer 16b, which is directly crystallized from the crude reaction stream in high yield and purity. Isomerization of the allylamide 16b in the presence of RhCl(3) is achieved without any epimerization of the acid/base labile stereogenic center adjacent to the nitro group on the piperidinone ring, while the undesired enamine intermediate is consumed to <0.5% by utilizing a trace amount of HCl generated from RhCl(3). The amino lactam 4, obtained through hydrogenation and hydrolysis, is isolated as its crystalline pTSA salt from the reaction solution directly, as such intramolecular transamidation has been dramatically suppressed via kinetic control. Finally, a Cu(I) catalyzed coupling-cyclization allows for the formation of the tricyclic structure of the potent DPP-4 inhibitor 1. The synthesis, which is suitable for large scale preparation, is accomplished in 23% overall yield.

  10. Fiber fuse behavior in kW-level continuous-wave double-clad field laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Jun-Yi; Xiao Qi-Rong; Li Dan; Wang Xue-Jiao; Zhang Hai-Tao; Gong Ma-Li; Yan Ping

    2016-01-01

    In this study, original experimental data for fiber fuse in kW-level continuous-wave (CW) high power double-clad fiber (DCF) laser are reported. The propagating velocity of the fuse is 9.68 m/s in a 3.1-kW Yb-doped DCF laser. Three other cases in Yb-doped DCF are also observed. We think that the ignition of fiber fuse is caused by thermal mechanism, and the formation of bullet-shaped tracks is attributed to the optical discharge and temperature gradient. The inducements of initial fuse and formation of bullet-shaped voids are analyzed. This investigation of fiber fuse helps better understand the fiber fuse behavior, in order to avoid the catastrophic destruction caused by fiber fuse in high power fiber laser. (paper)

  11. Cooperativity of complex salt bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Gvritishvili, Anzor G.; Gribenko, Alexey V.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2008-01-01

    The energetic contribution of complex salt bridges, in which one charged residue (anchor residue) forms salt bridges with two or more residues simultaneously, has been suggested to have importance for protein stability. Detailed analysis of the net energetics of complex salt bridge formation using double- and triple-mutant cycle analysis revealed conflicting results. In two cases, it was shown that complex salt bridge formation is cooperative, i.e., the net strength of the complex salt bridge...

  12. Hydrodynamic simulation of a lithium chloride salt system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, C. S.; Herrmann, S. D.; Knighton, G. C.

    1999-01-01

    A fused lithium chloride salt system's constitutive properties were evaluated and compared to a number of fluid properties, and water was shown to be an excellent simulant of lithium chloride salt. With a simple flow model, the principal scaling term was shown to be a function of the kinematic viscosity. A water mock-up of the molten salt was also shown to be within a ±3% error in the scaling analysis. This made it possible to consider developing water scaled tests of the molten salt system. Accurate flow velocity and pressure measurements were acquired by developing a directional velocity probe. The device was constructed and calibrated with a repeatable accuracy of ±15%. This was verified by a detailed evaluation of the probe. Extensive flow measurements of the engineering scale mockup were conducted, and the results were carefully compared to radial flow patterns of a straight blade stirrer. The flow measurements demonstrated an anti-symmetric nature of the stirring, and many additional effects were also identified. The basket design was shown to prevent fluid penetration into the fuel baskets when external stirring was the flow mechanism

  13. The Interconversion of Electrical and Chemical Energy: The Electrolysis of Water and the Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffia, Sergio; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses some of the drawbacks of using a demonstration of the electrolysis of water to illustrate the interconversion between electrical and chemical energy. Illustrates a simple apparatus allowing demonstration of this concept while overcoming these drawbacks. (CW)

  14. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Aijie; Sun, Dan; Cao, Guangli; Wang, Haoyu; Ren, Nanqi; Wu, Wei-Min; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs

  15. Multiple paths of electron flow to current in microbial electrolysis cells fed with low and high concentrations of propionate

    KAUST Repository

    Rao, Hari Ananda; Katuri, Krishna; Gorron, Eduardo; Logan, Bruce E.; Saikaly, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) provide a viable approach for bioenergy generation from fermentable substrates such as propionate. However, the paths of electron flow during propionate oxidation in the anode of MECs are unknown. Here, the paths

  16. Studies of water electrolysis in polymeric membrane cells; Estudos de eletrolise aquosa em celulas de membrana polimerica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira-Silva, M.A.; Linardi, M.; Saliba-Silva, A.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Celulas a Combustivel e Hidrogenio

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen represents great opportunity to be a substitute for fossil fuels in the future. Water as a renewable source of hydrogen is of great interest, since it is abundant and can decompose, producing only pure H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. This decomposition of water can be accomplished by processes such as electrolysis, thermal decomposition and thermochemical cycles. The membrane electrolysis has been proposed as a viable process for hydrogen production using thermal and electrical energy derived from nuclear energy or any renewable source like solar energy. In this work, within the context of optimization of the electrolysis process, it is intended to develop a mathematical model that can simulate and assist in parameterization of the electrolysis performed by polymer membrane electrolytic cell. The experimental process to produce hydrogen via the cell membrane, aims to optimize the amount of gas produced using renewable energy with non-carbogenic causing no harm by producing gases deleterious to the environment. (author)

  17. Evaluation of low cost cathode materials for treatment of industrial and food processing wastewater using microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tenca, Alberto; Cusick, Roland D.; Schievano, Andrea; Oberti, Roberto; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to treat wastewater and produce hydrogen gas, but low cost cathode catalysts are needed to make this approach economical. Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and stainless steel (SS) were evaluated

  18. Hydrogen production through high-temperature electrolysis in a solid oxide cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.St.; Lessing, P.; O'Brien, J.E.; Stoots, C.; Hartvigsen, J.; Elangovan, S.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental research programme is being conducted by the INEEL and Ceramatec, Inc., to test the high-temperature, electrolytic production of hydrogen from steam using a solid oxide cell. The research team is designing and testing solid oxide cells for operation in the electrolysis mode, producing hydrogen rising a high-temperature heat and electrical energy. The high-temperature heat and the electrical power would be supplied simultaneously by a high-temperature nuclear reactor. Operation at high temperature reduces the electrical energy requirement for electrolysis and also increases the thermal efficiency of the power-generating cycle. The high-temperature electrolysis process will utilize heat from a specialized secondary loop carrying a steam/hydrogen mixture. It is expected that, through the combination of a high-temperature reactor and high-temperature electrolysis, the process will achieve an overall thermal conversion efficiency of 40 to 50%o while avoiding the challenging chemistry and corrosion issues associated with the thermochemical processes. Planar solid oxide cell technology is being utilised because it has the best potential for high efficiency due to minimized voltage and current losses. These losses also decrease with increasing temperature. Initial testing has determined the performance of single 'button' cells. Subsequent testing will investigate the performance of multiple-cell stacks operating in the electrolysis mode. Testing is being performed both at Ceramatec and at INEEL. The first cells to be tested were single cells based on existing materials and fabrication technology developed at Ceramatec for production of solid oxide fuel cells. These cells use a relatively thick (∼ 175 μm) electrolyte of yttria- or scandia-stabilised zirconia, with nickel-zirconia cermet anodes and strontium-doped lanthanum manganite cathodes. Additional custom cells with lanthanum gallate electrolyte have been developed and tested. Results to date have

  19. Fundamental Properties of Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y Gutknecht; Guy L Fredrickson

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties of molten salt systems are of interest to electrorefining operations, pertaining to both the Fuel Cycle Research & Development Program (FCR&D) and Spent Fuel Treatment Mission, currently being pursued by the Department of Energy (DOE). The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely impacted by the build-up of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided, during electrorefining operations, include (i) fissile elements build up in the salt that might approach the criticality limits specified for the vessel, (ii) electrolyte freezing at the operating temperature of the electrorefiner due to changes in the liquidus temperature, and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution). The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can be monitored by studying the thermal characteristics of the molten salts as a function of impurity concentration. Simulated salt compositions consisting of the selected rare earth and alkaline earth chlorides, with a eutectic mixture of LiCl-KCl as the carrier electrolyte, were studied to determine the melting points (thermal characteristics) using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The experimental data were used to model the liquidus temperature. On the basis of the this data, it became possible to predict a spent fuel treatment processing scenario under which electrorefining could no longer be performed as a result of increasing liquidus temperatures of the electrolyte.

  20. Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ preparation and use in electrolysis process for aluminum production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, C.C.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    A continuous process for producing aluminum sulfide and for electrolyzing the aluminum sulfide to form metallic aluminum in which the aluminum sulfide is produced from aluminum oxide and COS or CS/sub 2/ in the presence of a chloride melt which also serves as the electrolysis bath. Circulation between the reactor and electrolysis cell is carried out to maintain the desired concentration of aluminum sulfide in the bath.

  1. Tree Classification with Fused Mobile Laser Scanning and Hyperspectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttonen, Eetu; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Litkey, Paula; Hyyppä, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Mobile Laser Scanning data were collected simultaneously with hyperspectral data using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Sensei system. The data were tested for tree species classification. The test area was an urban garden in the City of Espoo, Finland. Point clouds representing 168 individual tree specimens of 23 tree species were determined manually. The classification of the trees was done using first only the spatial data from point clouds, then with only the spectral data obtained with a spectrometer, and finally with the combined spatial and hyperspectral data from both sensors. Two classification tests were performed: the separation of coniferous and deciduous trees, and the identification of individual tree species. All determined tree specimens were used in distinguishing coniferous and deciduous trees. A subset of 133 trees and 10 tree species was used in the tree species classification. The best classification results for the fused data were 95.8% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes. The best overall tree species classification succeeded with 83.5% accuracy for the best tested fused data feature combination. The respective results for paired structural features derived from the laser point cloud were 90.5% for the separation of the coniferous and deciduous classes and 65.4% for the species classification. Classification accuracies with paired hyperspectral reflectance value data were 90.5% for the separation of coniferous and deciduous classes and 62.4% for different species. The results are among the first of their kind and they show that mobile collected fused data outperformed single-sensor data in both classification tests and by a significant margin. PMID:22163894

  2. Nanodrilling of fused silica using nanosecond laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, P., E-mail: pierre.lorenz@iom-leipzig.de; Zajadacz, J.; Bayer, L.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low-fluence irradiation of 10 nm Mo on SiO{sub 2} results in the formation of Mo droplets. • High-fluence irradiation of droplets results in the formation of holes in the SiO{sub 2}. • The process allows the formation of randomly distributed and periodic holes. • The randomly distributed hole density ρ{sub h} depends on the fluence (ρ{sub h} ≤ 1.3 μm{sup −2}). • The interaction of the laser beam with Mo/SiO{sub 2} was simulated by FEM. - Abstract: The fast laser drilling of dielectric surfaces with hole diameters in the sub-μm range and a high aspect ratio is a challenge for laser methods. In this study, a novel laser structuring method for the production of randomly and periodically distributed holes in a fused silica surface will be presented using a self-assembling process. A fused silica surface was covered with a 10 nm thick magnetron-sputtered molybdenum film. The metal film was irradiated by a KrF excimer laser (wavelength λ = 248 nm, pulse duration Δt{sub p} = 25 ns) with low laser fluences (Φ < 1 J/cm{sup 2}) and the laser-induced heating resulting in a melting of the metal film and finally in a self-assembled formation of randomly distributed metal droplets due to the surface tension of the metal liquid phase using a top hat beam profile. Furthermore, the usage of a periodically modulated laser beam profile allows the fabrication of periodically distributed droplet pattern. The multi-pulse irradiation of the laser-generated metal droplets with higher laser fluences results in a stepwise evaporation of the metal and in a partial evaporation of the fused silica near the metal droplets. Finally, the laser-induced stepwise evaporation process results in a formation of cone-like holes in the fused silica surface where the resultant holes are dependent on the size of the generated metal droplets and on the laser parameters. The “drilling” process allows the fabrication of holes with a depth up to 1

  3. Endodontic treatment of a fused tooth. Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallottini, L; Barbato Bellatini, R C; Migliau, G

    2007-01-01

    Dental fusion, a rare developmental anomaly present in 0.2% of the general population, consists of the union of two teeth originating from two different tooth germs. The irregular coronal morphology and the complex endodontic anatomy, characterized by the partial or total union of the pulp chambers, together with the peculiarity of the root canal systems, make diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation difficult. The authors describe the endodontic treatment of a permanent lower second molar fused with a third molar and having four root canals.

  4. Textiles: Some technocal information and data VI: fusing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cawood, MP

    1980-09-01

    Full Text Available only one month is reauired to train an oDerator for fusing whereas 4 - 6 monthsare - - -- - necessary f i r sewing machine bperatod. 3. Higher production rates and a reduction in manufacturing costs'-7, 11. 14-11. It has been stated that although... less thanoncea day. Funhermore, confusionsG~ existed with respect to temperature (i e glue line or surface) and nressure laress or air line) s~ecifications and a wide ranee of temperatures &ere deingempibYedfor thesakeiype of adhesive. ~ ~ ~ a r e n...

  5. Stimulated resonant scattering at stressed fused silica surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchut, Philippe; Reymermier, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    The radiative emission in CO 2 laser heated stressed fused silica is radically modified when gold microspheres are on the surface. At high heating rates, the emission dynamics changes from thermoluminescence to stimulated resonant scattering with an emission rate that is increased tenfold and the near infrared (NIR) spectrum is red-shifted. We show that the dynamic tensile stress that rises in heated silica is coupled with a fluctuating electromagnetic field that enables electromagnetic friction between moving OH emitters from silica bulk and NIR resonant scatterers at the silica surface. (paper)

  6. Cerium-doped scintillating fused-silica fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.

    2018-04-01

    We report on a set of measurements made on (scintillating) cerium-doped fused-silica fibers using high-energy particle beams. These fibers were uniformly embedded in a copper absorber in order to utilize electromagnetic showers as a source of charged particles for generating signals. This new type of cerium-doped fiber potentially offers myriad new applications in calorimeters in high-energy physics, tracking systems, and beam monitoring detectors for future applications. The light yield, pulse shape, attenuation length, and light propagation speeds are given and discussed. Possible future applications are also explored.

  7. Collaborative Filtering Fusing Label Features Based on SDAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huo, Huan; Liu, Xiufeng; Zheng, Deyuan

    2017-01-01

    problem, auxiliary information such as labels are utilized. Another approach of recommendation system is content-based model which can’t be directly integrated with CF-based model due to its inherent characteristics. Considering that deep learning algorithms are capable of extracting deep latent features......, this paper applies Stack Denoising Auto Encoder (SDAE) to content-based model and proposes LCF(Deep Learning for Collaborative Filtering) algorithm by combing CF-based model which fuses label features. Experiments on real-world data sets show that DLCF can largely overcome the sparsity problem...... and significantly improves the state of art approaches....

  8. Molten salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Tsukada, Kineo; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Oomichi, Toshihiko; Oono, Hideo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To simplify the structure, as well as improve the technical reliability and safety by the elimination of a proton beam entering window. Constitution: The nuclear reactor container main body is made of Hastelloy N and provided at the inner surface with two layers of graphite shields except for openings. An aperture was formed in the upper surface of the container, through which protons accelerated by a linear accelerator are directly entered to the liquid surface of molten salts such as 7LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 , 7LiF-NaF-ThF 4 , 7LiF-Rb-UF 4 , NaF-KF-UF 4 and the like. The heated molten salts are introduced by way of a pipeway into a heat exchanger where the heat is transferred to coolant salts and electric generation is conducted by way of heated steams. (Furukawa, Y.)

  9. Mineral resource of the month: salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostick, Dennis S.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents information on various types of salt. Rock salt is either found from underground halite deposits or near the surface. Other types of salt include solar salt, salt brine, and vacuum pan salt. The different uses of salt are also given including its use as a flavor enhancer, as a road deicing agent, and to manufacture sodium hydroxide.

  10. Electrochemical disinfection of coliform and Escherichia coli for drinking water treatment by electrolysis method using carbon as an electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto; Agustiningsih, W. A.

    2018-04-01

    Disinfection of coliform and E. Coli in water has been performed by electrolysis using carbon electrodes. Carbon electrodes were used as an anode and cathode with a purity of 98.31% based on SEM-EDS analysis. This study was conducted using electrolysis powered by electric field using carbon electrode as the anode and cathode. Electrolysis method was carried out using variations of time (30, 60, 90, 120 minutes at a voltage of 5 V) and voltage (5, 10, 15, 20 V for 30 minutes) to determine the effect of the disinfection of the bacteria. The results showed the number of coliform and E. coli in water before and after electrolysis was 190 and 22 MPN/100 mL, respectively. The standards quality of drinking water No. 492/Menkes/Per/IV/2010 requires the zero content of coliform and E. Coli. Electrolysis with the variation of time and potential can reduce the number of coliforms and E. Coli but was not in accordance with the standards. The effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to the electrochemical disinfection was determined using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The levels of H2O2 formed increased as soon after the duration of electrolysis voltage but was not a significant influence to the mortality of coliform and E.coli.

  11. Degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile in aqueous solution by Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Yang, Ping; Yang, Jinghui; Wang, Juling

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile was investigated using the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system. Effects of influent pH value, Fe(0)/GAC ratio and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption on the removal efficiency of the pollutant were studied in the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system. The degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile was affected by influent pH, and a decrease of the influent pH values from 8.0 to 4.0 led to the increase of degradation efficiency. Granular activated carbon was added as cathode to form macroscopic galvanic cells between Fe(0) and GAC and enhance the current efficiency of the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system. The GAC could only adsorb the pollutant and provide buffer capacity for the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system, and the macroscopic galvanic cells of the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system played a leading role in degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile. With the analysis of the degradation products with GC-MS, possible reaction pathway for the degradation of 3,3'-iminobis-propanenitrile by the Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis system was suggested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Feasibility of Using an Electrolysis Cell for Quantification of the Electrolytic Products of Water from Gravimetric Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, Samuel; Gebeyehu, Zewdu; Dabke, Rajeev B

    2018-01-01

    A gravimetric method for the quantitative assessment of the products of electrolysis of water is presented. In this approach, the electrolysis cell was directly powered by 9 V batteries. Prior to electrolysis, a known amount of potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) was added to the cathode compartment, and an excess amount of KHCO 3 was added to the anode compartment electrolyte. During electrolysis, cathode and anode compartments produced OH - (aq) and H + (aq) ions, respectively. Electrolytically produced OH - (aq) neutralized the KHP, and the completion of this neutralization was detected by a visual indicator color change. Electrolytically produced H + (aq) reacted with HCO 3 - (aq) liberating CO 2 (g) from the anode compartment. Concurrent liberation of H 2 (g) and O 2 (g) at the cathode and anode, respectively, resulted in a decrease in the mass of the cell. Mass of the electrolysis cell was monitored. Liberation of CO 2 (g) resulted in a pronounced effect of a decrease in mass. Experimentally determined decrease in mass (53.7 g/Faraday) agreed with that predicted from Faraday's laws of electrolysis (53.0 g/Faraday). The efficacy of the cell was tested to quantify the acid content in household vinegar samples. Accurate results were obtained for vinegar analysis with a precision better than 5% in most cases. The cell offers the advantages of coulometric method and additionally simplifies the circuitry by eliminating the use of a constant current power source or a coulometer.

  13. Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Friendly Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Process for Magnesium Oxide Reduction: Experiment and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports a solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis experiment using an LSM(La0.8Sr0.2MnO3-δ)-Inconel inert anode current collector for production of magnesium and oxygen directly from magnesium oxide at 1423 K (1150 °C). The electrochemical performance of the SOM cell was evaluated by means of various electrochemical techniques including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic scan, and electrolysis. Electronic transference numbers of the flux were measured to assess the magnesium dissolution in the flux during SOM electrolysis. The effects of magnesium solubility in the flux on the current efficiency and the SOM stability during electrolysis are discussed. An inverse correlation between the electronic transference number of the flux and the current efficiency of the SOM electrolysis was observed. Based on the experimental results, a new equivalent circuit of the SOM electrolysis process is presented. A general electrochemical polarization model of SOM process for magnesium and oxygen gas production is developed, and the maximum allowable applied potential to avoid zirconia dissociation is calculated as well. The modeling results suggest that a high electronic resistance of the flux and a relatively low electronic resistance of SOM are required to achieve membrane stability, high current efficiency, and high production rates of magnesium and oxygen.

  14. Molten salt reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This document is one of the three parts of a first volume devoted to the compilations of American data on the molten salt reactor concept. This part 'CIRCUITS' regroups under a condensed form - in French and using international units - the essential information contained in both basic documents of the American project for a molten-salt breeder power plant. This part is only dealing with things relating to the CEA-EDF workshop 'CIRCUITS'. It is not concerned with information on: the reactor and the moderator replacement, the primary and secondary salts, and the fuel salt reprocessing, that are dealt with in parts 'CORE' and 'CHEMISTRY' respectively. The possible evolutions in the data - and solutions - taken by the American designers for their successive projects (1970 to 1972) are shown. The MSBR power plant comprises three successive heat transfer circuits. The primary circuit (Hastelloy N), radioactive and polluted, containing the fuel salt, includes the reactor, pumps and exchangers. The secondary circuit (pipings made of modified Hastelloy N) contaminated in the exchanger, ensures the separation between the fuel and the fluid operating the turbo-alternator. The water-steam circuit feeds the turbine with steam. This steam is produced in the steam generator flowed by the secondary fluid. Some subsidiary circuits (discharge and storage of the primary and secondary salts, ventilation of the primary circuit ...) complete the three principal circuits which are briefly described. All circuits are enclosed inside the controlled-atmosphere building of the nuclear boiler. This building also ensures the biological protection and the mechanical protection against outer aggressions [fr

  15. Conversion of laser energy to chemical energy by the photoassisted electrolysis of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrighton, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation of the n-type semiconductor TiO2 crystal electrode of an aqueous electrochemical cell evolves O2 at the TiO2 electrode and H2 at the Pt electrode. The gases are typically evolved in a 2:1 (H2:O2) volume ratio. The photoassisted reaction seems to require applied voltages, but values as low as 0.25 V do allow the photoassisted electrolysis to proceed. Prolonged irradiation in either acid or base evolves the gaseous products in amounts which clearly demonstrate that the reaction is catalytic with respect to the TiO2. The wavelength response of the TiO2 and the correlation of product yield and current are reported. The results support the claim that TiO2 is a true photoassistance agent for the electrolysis of water. Minimum optical storage efficiencies of the order of 1 percent can be achieved by the production of H2.

  16. Development of Non-Platinum Catalysts for Intermediate Temperature Water Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikiforov, Aleksey Valerievich; Petrushina, Irina Michailovna; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    Water electrolysis is recognized as an efficient energy storage (in the form of hydrogen) supplement in renewable energy production. However, industrial alkaline water electrolyzers are rather ineffective and space requiring for a commercial use in connection with energy storage. The most effective...... modern water electrolyzers are based on polymeric proton-conducting membrane electrolytes (PEM), e.g. Nafion®, a perfluorocarbon-sulfonic acid polymer. These electrolyzers work at temperatures up to around 80 °C, and, in extreme cases, up to 130-140 °C. The most developed PEM electrolyzers...... as electrolytes for the intermediate temperature applications, such as CsHSO4, KHSO45. The most successful systems have been developed with CsH2PO4 (solid acid fuel cells (SAFCs) and Sn0.9In0.1P2O7 electrolytes6,7. While developing materials for the promising medium temperature electrolysis systems...

  17. Test results of six-month test of two water electrolysis systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, E. S.; Wells, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    The two water electrolysis systems used in the NASA space station simulation 90-day manned test of a regenerative life support system were refurbished as required and subjected to 26-weeks of testing. The two electrolysis units are both promising systems for oxygen and hydrogen generation and both needed extensive long-term testing to evaluate the performance of the respective cell design and provide guidance for further development. Testing was conducted to evaluate performance in terms of current, pressure, variable oxygen demands, and orbital simulation. An automatic monitoring system was used to record, monitor and printout performance data at one minute, ten minute or one-hour intervals. Performance data is presented for each day of system operation for each module used during the day. Failures are analyzed, remedial action taken to eliminate problems is discussed and recommendations for redesign for future space applications are stated.

  18. Hydrogen from renewable energy - Photovoltaic/water electrolysis as an exemplary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprafka, R. J.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted for a NASA Kennedy Space Center liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen production facility using solar cell arrays as the power source for electrolysis. The 100 MW output of the facility would be split into 67.6 and 32 MW portions for electrolysis and liquefaction, respectively. The solar cell array would cover 1.65 sq miles, and would be made up of 249 modular 400-kW arrays. Hydrogen and oxygen are generated at either dispersed or centralized water electrolyzers. The yearly hydrogen output is projected to be 5.76 million lbs, with 8 times that much oxygen; these fuel volumes can support approximately 18 Space Shuttle launches/year.

  19. Bioelectrohydrogenesis and inhibition of methanogenic activity in microbial electrolysis cells - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Rengasamy; Cheng, Ka Yu; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Bose, Arpita; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2017-11-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are a promising technology for biological hydrogen production. Compared to abiotic water electrolysis, a much lower electrical voltage (~0.2V) is required for hydrogen production in MECs. It is also an attractive waste treatment technology as a variety of biodegradable substances can be used as the process feedstock. Underpinning this technology is a recently discovered bioelectrochemical pathway known as "bioelectrohydrogenesis". However, little is known about the mechanism of this pathway, and numerous hurdles are yet to be addressed to maximize hydrogen yield and purity. Here, we review various aspects including reactor configurations, microorganisms, substrates, electrode materials, and inhibitors of methanogenesis in order to improve hydrogen generation in MECs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Summary of the Mol electrolysis cell test program in the CRL tritium laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.; Keyes, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The development of electrolysis technology for highly tritiated water at the Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d'Etude de l'Energie Nucleaire (SCK/CEN), Mol, Belgium, focused on A Low Inventory Capillary Electrolyser (ALICE). The key characteristic of ALICE is its low liquid inventory, a key feature for the radio-toxicity of tritiated water. A program to test this electrolytic cell design with highly tritiated water in the Chalk River Tritium Laboratory was initiated in 1988 and extended through to early 1995. The activities conducted at CRL and associated with the experimental program-design, installation, licensing and commissioning activities- are described in this report along with the results of the test program conducted on the experimental system with non-tritiated heavy water. The installation in the CRL Tritium Laboratory consisted of three main sections: the electrolysis section, the tritium storage and supply section, and the recombination section. 16 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs

  1. Carbon Deposition during CO2 Electrolysis in Ni-Based Solid-Oxide-Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Graves, Christopher R.; Blennow, P.

    2015-01-01

    . Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in both H2/H2O and CO/CO2 revealed an increase in resistance of the fuel electrode after each CO2 electrolysis current-voltage curve, indicating possible carbon deposition. The difference in partial oxygen pressure between inlet and outlet was analyzed to verify carbon...... in detail. In an attempt to mitigate the degradation due to carbon deposition, the Ni-YSZ electrode was infiltrated with a gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) solution. Initial results indicate that the coking tolerance was not enhanced, but it is still unclear whether infiltrated cells degrade less. However......, infiltrated cells display a significant performance enhancement before coking, especially under electrolysis current. The investigation thus indicated carbon formation in the Ni containing fuel electrode before the thermodynamically calculated threshold for average measurements of the cell was reached...

  2. Microstructure characterisation of solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Jacob R.; Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Chen, Ming

    degradation of cell components in relation to the loss of electrochemical performance specific to the mode of operation. Thus descriptive microstructure characterization methods are required in combination with electrochemical characterization methods to decipher degradation mechanisms. In the present work......High temperature solid oxide cells can be operated either as fuel cells or electrolysis cells for efficient power generation or production of hydrogen from steam or synthesis gas (H2 + CO) from steam and CO2 respectively. When operated under harsh conditions, they often exhibit microstructural...... quantified using the mean linear intercept method as a function of current density and correlated to increases in serial resistance. The above structural changes are then compared in terms of electrode degradation observed during the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 at current densities up to -1.5 A cm-2...

  3. Experiments on a ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Ohno, Hideo; Naruse, Yuji; Coffin, D.O.; Walthers, C.R.; Binning, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    A ceramic electrolysis cell and a palladium diffuser are developed in Japan and is tested with tritium in Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, in order to confirm the feasibility as possible upgrades for the fuel cleanup system (PCU). The ceramic electrolysis cell made of stabilized zirconia was operated at 630 0 C for an extended period with a mixture of 3% T 2 O in He carrier gas in the circulation system with oxidizing catalyst bed. The palladium diffuser was tested with circulated pure tritium gas at 280 0 C to verify the compatibility of the alloy with tritium, since the 3 He produced in the metal could cause a degradation. The isotopic effects were also measured for both devices

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of synthetic hydrocarbon fuel production in pressurized solid oxide electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    2012-01-01

    A promising way to store wind and solar electricity is by electrolysis of H2O and CO2 using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) to produce synthetic hydrocarbon fuels that can be used in existing fuel infrastructure. Pressurized operation decreases the cell internal resistance and enables...... improved system efficiency, potentially lowering the fuel production cost significantly. In this paper, we present a thermodynamic analysis of synthetic methane and dimethyl ether (DME) production using pressurized SOECs, in order to determine feasible operating conditions for producing the desired......, and outlet gas composition. For methane production, low temperature and high pressure operation could improve the system efficiency, but might lead to a higher capital cost. For DME production, high pressure SOEC operation necessitates higher operating temperature in order to avoid carbon formation at higher...

  5. Development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures. Task 3 report; Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkous, C.A.; Anderson, R.; Kopitzke, R.W.

    1995-12-01

    This project is an attempt to synthesize and fabricate proton exchange membranes for hydrogen production via water electrolysis that can take advantage of the better kinetic and thermodynamic conditions that exist at higher temperatures. Current PEM technology is limited to the 125--150 C range. Based on previous work evaluating thermohydrolytic stability, some 5 families of polymers were chosen as viable candidates: polyether ketones, polyether sulfones, fluorinated polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenyl quinoxalines. Several of these have been converted into ionomers via sulfonation and fashioned into membranes for evaluation. In particular, the sulfonated polyetheretherketone, or SPEEK, was tested for water uptake, thermo-conductimetric analysis, and performance as the solid electrolyte material in an electrolysis cell. Results comparable to commercial perfluorocarbon sulfonates were obtained.

  6. Experiment Plan of High Temperature Steam and Carbon dioxide Co-electrolysis for Synthetic Gas Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Duk-Joo; Ko, Jae-Hwa

    2008-01-01

    Currently, Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) come into the spotlight in the middle of the energy technologies of the future for highly effective conversion of fossil fuels into electricity without carbon dioxide emission. The SOFC is a reversible cell. By applying electrical power to the cell, which is solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), it is possible to produce synthetic gas (syngas) from high temperature steam and carbon dioxide. The produced syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) can be used for synthetic fuels. This SOEC technology can use high temperature from VHTRs for high efficiency. This paper describes KEPRI's experiment plan of high temperature steam and carbon co-electrolysis for syngas production using SOEC technology

  7. Hydrogen Generation by Koh-Ethanol Plasma Electrolysis Using Double Compartement Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksono, Nelson; Sasiang, Johannes; Dewi Rosalina, Chandra; Budikania, Trisutanti

    2018-03-01

    This study has successfully investigated the generation of hydrogen using double compartment reactor with plasma electrolysis process. Double compartment reactor is designed to achieve high discharged voltage, high concentration, and also reduce the energy consumption. The experimental results showed the use of double compartment reactor increased the productivity ratio 90 times higher compared to Faraday electrolysis process. The highest hydrogen production obtained is 26.50 mmol/min while the energy consumption can reach up 1.71 kJ/mmol H2 at 0.01 M KOH solution. It was shown that KOH concentration, addition of ethanol, cathode depth, and temperature have important effects on hydrogen production, energy consumption, and process efficiency.

  8. Microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells for the production of bioelectricity and biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Wang, Hongyu; Jin, Tao; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2013-01-01

    Today's global energy crisis requires a multifaceted solution. Bioenergy is an important part of the solution. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology stands out as an attractive potential technology in bioenergy. MFCs can convert energy stored in organic matter directly into bioelectricity. MFCs can also be operated in the electrolysis mode as microbial electrolysis cells to produce bioproducts such as hydrogen and ethanol. Various wastewaters containing low-grade organic carbons that are otherwise unutilized can be used as feed streams for MFCs. Despite major advances in the past decade, further improvements in MFC power output and cost reduction are needed for MFCs to be practical. This paper analysed MFC operating principles using bioenergetics and bioelectrochemistry. Several major issues were explored to improve the MFC performance. An emphasis was placed on the use of catalytic materials for MFC electrodes. Recent advances in the production of various biomaterials using MFCs were also investigated.

  9. Clinical estimation of sup(99m)Tc-labeled compounds produced by electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Katsuji; Kawahira, Kenjiro; Kamoi, Itsuma; Morita, Kazunori

    1974-01-01

    Scintigrams were made using sup(99m)Tc-Sn-colloid, sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate, sup(99m)Tc-EDTA and sup(99m)Tc-albumin prepared by electrolysis, and a clinical evaluation was attempted. No side effects were recognized in 228 cases, therefore the object of this study could be attained. Future study was thought to be necessary because the pictures were somewhat indistinct. However, each sup(99m)Tc-labeled compound could be prepared very easily and was extremely convenient for daily use. sup(99m)Tc- is a nuclide which has many advantages for use with scintigrams. More useful sup(99m)Tc-labeled compounds will be explored in the future and is expected that electrolysis has many possibilities for use in the preparation of sup(99m)Tc-labeled compounds. (Tsunoda, M.)

  10. Electrode materials for hydrobromic acid electrolysis in Texas Instruments' solar chemical converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luttmer, J.D.; Konrad, D.; Trachtenberg, I.

    1985-05-01

    Texas Instruments has developed a solar chemical converter (SCC) which converts solar energy into chemical energy via the electrolysis of hydrobromic acid. Various materials were evaluated as anodes and cathodes for the electrolysis of the acid. Emphasis was placed on obtaining low overvoltage electrodes with good long-term stability. Sputtered platinum-iridium thin films were identified as the best choice as the cathode material, and sputtered iridium and iridium oxide thin films were identified as the best choice as anode materials. Electrochemical measurements indicate that low overvoltage losses are encountered on these materials at operating current densitities in the SCC. Accelerated corrosion tests of the materials predict acceptable electrode stability for 20 years in an environment representative of onthe-roof service.

  11. Life Time Performance Characterization of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    . In this work, long-term durability of Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) supported planar SOECs were investigated at 800 oC for electrolysis of steam. The cells, which represent the state-of-the-art SOEC technology at Technical University of Denmark (DTU), have a Ni/YSZ support and active fuel electrode......, OCV) to -1.25 A/cm2. Detailed electrochemical and post-mortem characterizations were further conducted in order to clarify the cell or electrode degradation mechanisms. The cells show stable performance, with a steady-state degradation rate of up to 2 %/1000 h for electrolysis tests with current......Globally the amount of electricity generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar energy is increasing. To integrate high amount of fluctuating renewable energy into the existing energy grid, efficient and cost competitive conversion of electricity into other kinds of energy carriers...

  12. Hydrogen Through Water Electrolysis and Biomass Gasification for Application in Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kirosa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is considered to be one of the most promising green energy carrier in the energy storage and conversion scenario. Although it is abundant on Earth in the form of compounds, its occurrence in free form is extremely low. Thus, it has to be produced by reforming processes, steam reforming (SR, partial oxidation (POX and auto-thermal reforming (ATR mainly from fossil fuels for high throughput with high energy requirements, pyrolysis of biomass and electrolysis. Electrolysis is brought about by passing electric current though two electrodes to evolve water into its constituent parts, viz. hydrogen and oxygen, respectively. Hydrogen produced by non-noble metal catalysts for both anode and cathode is therefore cost-effective and can be integrated into fuel cells for direct chemical energy conversion into electrical energy electricity, thus meeting the sustainable and renewable use with low carbon footprint.

  13. Selection of combined water electrolysis and resistojet propulsion for Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, George R.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical rationale is presented for the configuration of the NASA Space Station's two-element propulsion system, and attention is given to the cost benefits accruing to this system over the Space Station's service life. The principal system element uses gaseous oxygen and hydrogen obtained through water electrolysis to furnish attitude control, backup attitude control, and contingency maneuvering. The secondary element uses resistojets to augment Space Station reboost through the acceleration of waste gases in the direction opposite the Station's flight path.

  14. Study of deuterium charging in palladium by electrolysis of heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ninno, A.; Violante, V.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model supported by a numerical computer code with distributed parameters was developed in order to describe the evolution of the deuteron concentration profile inside a Pd cathode under pulsed electrolysis. A delocalized gas picture was used when the deuterons exceeded the ratio, x=0.8, in Pd-D compounds. Several boundary conditions were taken into account. A good agreement was found between the system evolution and experimental data

  15. Feasibility Analysis of Liquefying Oxygen Generated from Water Electrolysis Units on Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Frank F.

    2009-01-01

    Concepts for liquefying oxygen (O2) generated from water electrolysis subsystems on the Lunar surface were explored. Concepts for O2 liquefaction units capable of generating 1.38 lb/hr (0.63 kg/hr) liquid oxygen (LOX) were developed. Heat and mass balance calculations for the liquefaction concepts were conducted. Stream properties, duties of radiators, heat exchangers and compressors for the selected concepts were calculated and compared.

  16. Surface topography of a palladium cathode after electrolysis in heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, D.S.; Dash, J.; Keefe, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    Electrolysis was performed with a palladium cathode and an electrolyte containing both hydrogen and deuterium ions. The cathode bends toward the anode during this process. Examination of both the concave and the convex surfaces with the scanning electron microscope, scanning tunneling microscope, and atomic force microscope shows unusual surface characteristics. Rimmed craters with faceted crystals inside and multitextural surfaces were observed on an electrolyzed palladium cathode but not on palladium that has not been electrolyzed. 9 refs., 9 figs

  17. Electrolysis Bubble Noise in Small-Scale Tests of a Seawater MHD thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    SECURITY CLAS&ICATION AUTHORITY I DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILIT Y OF REPORT 2b. DECLSIFICATIONJDOWNGRADING SCHEDULE Approved for public release...to those which might occur in an undersea MI-D-powered vesseL The electrolysis of sea water at current densities up to 0.3 A/cn, ’produced broad-band...3 Test Equipm eni ...................................................... 5 Water Table Facility and Flow Channels

  18. Research Progress of Hydrogen Production fromOrganic Wastes in Microbial Electrolysis Cell(MEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Yin-sheng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial electrolysis cell(MECtechnology as an emerging technology, has achieved the target of hydrogen production from different substrates such as waste water, forestry wastes, activated sludge by simultaneous enzymolysis and fermentation, which can effectively improve the efficiency of resource utilization. This paper described the working principle of MEC and analyzed these factors influencing the process of hydrogen production from organic waste in MEC.

  19. Understanding the processes governing performance and durability of solid oxide electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Sun, Xiufu; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    Operation of a Ni–YSZ electrode supported Solid Oxide Cell (SOC) was studied in both fuel cell mode (FC-mode) and electrolysis cell mode (EC-mode) in mixtures of H2O/H2, CO2/CO, H2O/H2O/CO2/CO at 750 °C, 800 °C and 850 °C. Although the SOCs are reversible, the polarisation characterisation shows ...

  20. Recovery of fission products from waste solutions utilizing controlled cathodic potential electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin, W.W.; Darlington, W.B.

    1975-01-01

    Fission products, e.g., palladium, rhodium and technetium, are recovered from aqueous waste solutions thereof, e.g., aged Purex alkaline waste solutions. The metal values from the waste solutions are extracted by ion exchange techniques. The metals adsorbed by the ion exchange resin are eluted and selectively recovered by controlled cathodic potential electrolysis. The metal values deposited on the cathode are recovered and, if desired, further purified

  1. 21 CFR 100.155 - Salt and iodized salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salt and iodized salt. 100.155 Section 100.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION GENERAL Specific Administrative Rulings and Decisions § 100.155 Salt and iodized salt. (a) For the purposes of this section, the...

  2. Planning the FUSE Mission Using the SOVA Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, James; Heatwole, Scott; Ward, Philip R.; Civeit, Thomas; Calvani, Humberto; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Suchkov, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    Three documents discuss the Sustainable Objective Valuation and Attainability (SOVA) algorithm and software as used to plan tasks (principally, scientific observations and associated maneuvers) for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite. SOVA is a means of managing risk in a complex system, based on a concept of computing the expected return value of a candidate ordered set of tasks as a product of pre-assigned task values and assessments of attainability made against qualitatively defined strategic objectives. For the FUSE mission, SOVA autonomously assembles a week-long schedule of target observations and associated maneuvers so as to maximize the expected scientific return value while keeping the satellite stable, managing the angular momentum of spacecraft attitude- control reaction wheels, and striving for other strategic objectives. A six-degree-of-freedom model of the spacecraft is used in simulating the tasks, and the attainability of a task is calculated at each step by use of strategic objectives as defined by use of fuzzy inference systems. SOVA utilizes a variant of a graph-search algorithm known as the A* search algorithm to assemble the tasks into a week-long target schedule, using the expected scientific return value to guide the search.

  3. Laser induced damage and fracture in fused silica vacuum windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.; Hurst, P.A.; Heggins, D.D.; Steele, W.A.; Bumpas, S.E.

    1996-11-01

    Laser-induced damage, that initiates catastrophic fracture, has been observed in large (≤61 cm dia) fused silica lenses that also serve as vacuum barriers in Nova and Beamlet lasers. If the elastic stored energy in the lens is high enough, the lens will fracture into many pieces (implosion). Three parameters control the degree of fracture in the vacuum barrier window: elastic stored energy (tensile stress), ratio of window thickness to flaw depth, and secondary crack propagation. Fracture experiments were conducted on 15-cm dia fused silica windows that contain surface flaws caused by laser damage. Results, combined with window failure data on Beamlet and Nova, were used to develop design criteria for a ''fail-safe'' lens (that may catastrophically fracture but not implode). Specifically, the window must be made thick enough so that the peak tensile stress is less than 500 psi (3.4 MPa) and the thickness/critical flaw size is less than 6. The air leak through the window fracture and into the vacuum must be rapid enough to reduce the load on the window before secondary crack growth occurs. Finite element stress calculations of a window before and immediately following fracture into two pieces show that the elastic stored energy is redistributed if the fragments ''lock'' in place and thereby bridge the opening. In such cases, the peak stresses at the flaw site can increase, leading to further (i.e. secondary) crack growth

  4. Ball driven type MEMS SAD for artillery fuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Jin Oh; Jeong, Ji-hun; Eom, Junseong; Lee, Seung S; Lee, Chun Jae; Ryu, Sung Moon; Oh, Jong Soo

    2017-01-01

    The SAD (safety and arming device) is an indispensable fuse component that ensures safe and reliable performance during the use of ammunition. Because the application of electronic devices for smart munitions is increasing, miniaturization of the SAD has become one of the key issues for next-generation artillery fuses. Based on MEMS technology, various types of miniaturized SADs have been proposed and fabricated. However, none of them have been reported to have been used in actual munitions due to their lack of high impact endurance and complicated explosive train arrangements. In this research, a new MEMS SAD using a ball driven mechanism, is successfully demonstrated based on a UV LIGA (lithography, electroplating and molding) process. Unlike other MEMS SADs, both high impact endurance and simple structure were achieved by using a ball driven mechanism. The simple structural design also simplified the fabrication process and increased the processing yield. The ball driven type MEMS SAD performed successfully under the desired safe and arming conditions of a spin test and showed fine agreement with the FEM simulation result, conducted prior to its fabrication. A field test was also performed with a grenade launcher to evaluate the SAD performance in the firing environment. All 30 of the grenade samples equipped with the proposed MEMS SAD operated successfully under the high-G setback condition. (paper)

  5. Ball driven type MEMS SAD for artillery fuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Jin Oh; Jeong, Ji-hun; Eom, Junseong; Lee, Seung S.; Lee, Chun Jae; Ryu, Sung Moon; Oh, Jong Soo

    2017-01-01

    The SAD (safety and arming device) is an indispensable fuse component that ensures safe and reliable performance during the use of ammunition. Because the application of electronic devices for smart munitions is increasing, miniaturization of the SAD has become one of the key issues for next-generation artillery fuses. Based on MEMS technology, various types of miniaturized SADs have been proposed and fabricated. However, none of them have been reported to have been used in actual munitions due to their lack of high impact endurance and complicated explosive train arrangements. In this research, a new MEMS SAD using a ball driven mechanism, is successfully demonstrated based on a UV LIGA (lithography, electroplating and molding) process. Unlike other MEMS SADs, both high impact endurance and simple structure were achieved by using a ball driven mechanism. The simple structural design also simplified the fabrication process and increased the processing yield. The ball driven type MEMS SAD performed successfully under the desired safe and arming conditions of a spin test and showed fine agreement with the FEM simulation result, conducted prior to its fabrication. A field test was also performed with a grenade launcher to evaluate the SAD performance in the firing environment. All 30 of the grenade samples equipped with the proposed MEMS SAD operated successfully under the high-G setback condition.

  6. Quinone-fused porphyrins as contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Banala, Srinivas

    2017-06-27

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging non-invasive diagnostic modality with many potential clinical applications in oncology, rheumatology and the cardiovascular field. For this purpose, there is a high demand for exogenous contrast agents with high absorption coefficients in the optical window for tissue imaging, i.e. the near infrared (NIR) range between 680 and 950 nm. We herein report the photoacoustic properties of quinone-fused porphyrins inserted with different transition metals as new highly promising candidates. These dyes exhibit intense NIR absorption, a lack of fluorescence emission, and PA sensitivity in concentrations below 3 nmol mL. In this context, the highest PA signal was obtained with a Zn(ii) inserted dye. Furthermore, this dye was stable in blood serum and free thiol solution and exhibited negligible cell toxicity. Additionally, the Zn(ii) probe could be detected with an up to 3.2 fold higher PA intensity compared to the clinically most commonly used PA agent, ICG. Thus, further exploration of the \\'quinone-fusing\\' approach to other chromophores may be an efficient way to generate highly potent PA agents that do not fluoresce and shift their absorption into the NIR range.

  7. Electric fuses operation, a review: 2. Arcing period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussière, W

    2012-01-01

    In the electric fuse operation the arcing period follows immediately the pre-arcing period depicted in Part 1 (Part 1. Pre-arcing period). The transition between these two operation steps is not fully understood at this time. To simplify the beginning of the arcing period can be identified with the electric arc ignition i.e. with the electrodes voltage drop. The consecutive plasma is of metallic type at the beginning of the arcing period and of metallic plus silica type with varying mixture up to the end of the arcing period. The energy brought by the fault current is withdrawn by means of the interaction between the electric arc and the arc quenching material (usually silica sand) whose morphometric properties influence the properties of the plasma column: composition, thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients of the plasma column depend on the porosity (and other morphometric properties) of the filler. The fuse element erosion also known as burn-back is responsible for the lengthening of the plasma column and the variations of the electric field. The whole of these processes is depicted by means of experimental results or modellings when possible.

  8. Conceptual study of on orbit production of cryogenic propellants by water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility is assessed of producing cryogenic propellants on orbit by water electrolysis in support of NASA's proposed Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions. Using this method, water launched into low earth orbit (LEO) would be split into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen by electrolysis in an orbiting propellant processor spacecraft. The resulting gases would then be liquified and stored in cryogenic tanks. Supplying liquid hydrogen and oxygen fuel to space vehicles by this technique has some possible advantages over conventional methods. The potential benefits are derived from the characteristics of water as a payload, and include reduced ground handling and launch risk, denser packaging, and reduced tankage and piping requirements. A conceptual design of a water processor was generated based on related previous studies, and contemporary or near term technologies required. Extensive development efforts would be required to adapt the various subsystems needed for the propellant processor for use in space. Based on the cumulative results, propellant production by on orbit water electrolysis for support of SEI missions is not recommended.

  9. Chemically durable polymer electrolytes for solid-state alkaline water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Joo; Capuano, Christopher B.; Ayers, Katherine E.; Bae, Chulsung

    2018-01-01

    Generation of high purity hydrogen using electrochemical splitting of water is one of the most promising methods for sustainable fuel production. The materials to be used as solid-state electrolytes for alkaline water electrolyzer require high thermochemical stability against hydroxide ion attack in alkaline environment during the operation of electrolysis. In this study, two quaternary ammonium-tethered aromatic polymers were synthesized and investigated for anion exchange membrane (AEM)-based alkaline water electrolyzer. The membranes properties including ion exchange capacity (IEC), water uptake, swelling degree, and anion conductivity were studied. The membranes composed of all C-C bond polymer backbones and flexible side chain terminated by cation head groups exhibited remarkably good chemical stability by maintaining structural integrity in 1 M NaOH solution at 95 °C for 60 days. Initial electrochemical performance and steady-state operation performance were evaluated, and both membranes showed a good stabilization of the cell voltage during the steady-state operation at the constant current density at 200 mA/cm2. Although both membranes in current form require improvement in mechanical stability to afford better durability in electrolysis operation, the next generation AEMs based on this report could lead to potentially viable AEM candidates which can provide high electrolysis performance under alkaline operating condition.

  10. Technetium electrodeposition from aqueous formate solutions: electrolysis kinetics and material balance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslennikov, A.; Peretroukhine, V.

    1998-01-01

    The kinetics of the Tc electrodeposition and the material balance of potentiostatic electrolysis of formate buffer solutions (pH = 1.79-8.5) containing 5*10 -4 - 1*10 -2 M Tc(VII) at graphite cathode has been studied. The deposition of Tc from the solution was found to become possible at E x *y H 2 O (x ≤ 2, 1.5 cath. ) towards more negative values and the augmentation of the electrolyte surface/volume ratio (S/V) were found to increase the yield of the electrolysis and the rate of the electrodeposition process. A maximum technetium recovery of 92-95% has been observed in the electrolysis of neutral HCOONa solutions (pH = 6.0-7.5, μ = 1.0) containing up to 5*10 -1 M Tc(VII) at potentials of the graphite cathode E 2 . A starting Tc concentration in the solution of [Tc(VII)] > 5 *10 -1 M and the presence of more than 0.05 M NO 3 - in the electrolyte were found to suppress the recovery of technetium from the solution. (orig.)

  11. Preconceptual design of hyfire. A fusion driven high temperature electrolysis plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varljen, T.C.; Chi, J.W.H.; Karbowski, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been engaged in a scoping study to investigate the potential merits of coupling a fusion reactor with a high temperature blanket to a high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Westinghouse is assisting this study in the areas of systems design integration, plasma engineering, balance of plant design and electrolyzer technology. The aim of the work done in the past year has been to focus on a reference design point for the plant, which has been designated HYFIRE. In prior work, the STARFIRE commercial tokamak fusion reactor was directly used as the fusion driver. This report describes a new design obtained by scaling the basic STARFIRE design to permit the achievement of a blanket power of 6000 MWt. The high temperature blanket design employs a thermally insulated refractory oxide region which provides high temperature (>1000 deg. C) steam at moderate pressures to high temperature electrolysis units. The electrolysis process selected is based on the high temperature, solid electrolyte fuel cell technology developed by Westinghouse. An initial process design and plant layout has been completed; component cost and plant economics studies are now underway to develop estimates of hydrogen production costs and to determine the sensitivity of this cost to changes in major design parameters. (author)

  12. CFD Model Of A Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell For Hydrogen Production From Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell as it would exist in an electrolysis stack. Details of the model geometry are specific to a stack that was fabricated by Ceramatec2, Inc. and tested at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT2. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with experimental results obtained from an actual ten-cell stack tested at INL

  13. Preliminary estimations on the heat recovery method for hydrogen production by the high temperature steam electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Duck Joo

    2009-01-01

    As a part of the project 'development of hydrogen production technologies by high temperature electrolysis using very high temperature reactor', we have developed an electrolyzer model for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) system and carried out some preliminary estimations on the effects of heat recovery on the HTSE hydrogen production system. To produce massive hydrogen by using nuclear energy, the HTSE process is one of the promising technologies with sulfur-iodine and hybrid sulfur process. The HTSE produces hydrogen through electrochemical reaction within the solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), which is a reverse reaction of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The HTSE system generally operates in the temperature range of 700∼900 .deg. C. Advantages of HTSE hydrogen production are (a) clean hydrogen production from water without carbon oxide emission, (b) synergy effect due to using the current SOFC technology and (c) higher thermal efficiency of system when it is coupled nuclear reactor. Since the HTSE system operates over 700 .deg. C, the use of heat recovery is an important consideration for higher efficiency. In this paper, four different heat recovery configurations for the HTSE system have been investigated and estimated

  14. Enhanced dewaterability of textile dyeing sludge using micro-electrolysis pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xun-An; Wen, Weibin; Zhang, Yaping; Li, Ruijing; Sun, Jian; Wang, Yujie; Yang, Zuoyi; Liu, Jingyong

    2015-09-15

    The effects of micro-electrolysis treatment on textile dyeing sludge dewatering and its mechanisms were investigated in this study. Capillary suction time (CST) and settling velocity (SV) were used to evaluate sludge dewaterability. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) concentration and sludge disintegration degree (DDSCOD) were determined to explain the observed changes in sludge dewaterability. The results demonstrated that the micro-electrolysis could significantly improve sludge dewaterability by disrupting the sludge floc structure. The optimal conditions of sludge dewatering were the reaction time of 20 min, initial pH of 2.5, Fe/C mass ratio of 1/1, and the iron powder dosage of 2.50 g/L, which achieved good CST (from 34.1 to 27.8 s) and SV (from 75 to 60%) reduction efficiency. In addition, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images revealed that the treated sludge floc clusters are broken up and that the dispersion degree is better than that of a raw sludge sample. The optimal EPS concentration and DDSCOD to obtain maximum sludge dewaterability was 43-46 mg/L and 4.2-4.9%, respectively. The destruction of EPS was one of the primary reasons for the improvement of sludge dewaterability during micro-electrolysis treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Status of the INL high-temperature electrolysis research program –experimental and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

    2009-04-01

    This paper provides a status update on the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), with an overview of recent large-scale system modeling results and the status of the experimental program. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor coolant outlet temperatures. In terms of experimental research, the INL has recently completed an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) HTE test at the 15 kW level. The initial hydrogen production rate for the ILS test was in excess of 5000 liters per hour. Details of the ILS design and operation will be presented. Current small-scale experimental research is focused on improving the degradation characteristics of the electrolysis cells and stacks. Small-scale testing ranges from single cells to multiple-cell stacks. The INL is currently in the process of testing several state-of-the-art anode-supported cells and is working to broaden its relationship with industry in order to improve the long-term performance of the cells.

  16. Summary Report on Solid-oxide Electrolysis Cell Testing and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. O' Brien; X. Zhang; R.C. O' Brien; G.L. Hawkes

    2012-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900 C. From 2003 to 2009, this work was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, under the Office of Nuclear Energy. Starting in 2010, the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research program has been sponsored by the INL Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. This report provides a summaryof program activities performed in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 and the first quarter of FY-12, with a focus on small-scale testing and cell development activities. HTE research priorities during this period have included the development and testing of SOEC and stack designs that exhibit high-efficiency initial performance and low, long-term degradation rates. This report includes contributions from INL and five industry partners: Materials and Systems Research, Incorporated (MSRI); Versa Power Systems, Incorporated (VPS); Ceramatec, Incorporated; National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Glenn Research Center (NASA - GRC); and the St. Gobain Advanced Materials Division. These industry partners have developed SOEC cells and stacks for in-house testing in the electrolysis mode and independent testing at INL. Additional fundamental research and post-test physical examinations have been performed at two university partners: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the University of Connecticut. Summaries of these activities and test results are also presented in this report.

  17. Treatment of coking wastewater by a novel electric assisted micro-electrolysis filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ruosong; Wu, Miaomiao; Qu, Guangfei; Ning, Ping; Cai, Yingying; Lv, Pei

    2018-04-01

    A newly designed electric assisted micro-electrolysis filter (E-ME) was developed to investigate its degradation efficiency for coking wastewater and correlated characteristics. The performance of the E-ME system was compared with separate electrolysis (SE) and micro-electrolysis (ME) systems. The results showed a prominent synergistic effect on COD removal in E-ME systems. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis confirmed that the applied electric field enhanced the degradation of phenolic compounds. Meanwhile, more biodegradable oxygen-bearing compounds were detected. SEM images of granular activated carbon (GAC) showed that inactivation and blocking were inhibited during the E-ME process. The effects of applied voltage and initial pH in E-ME systems were also studied. The best voltage value was 1V, but synergistic effects existed even with lower applied voltage. E-ME systems exhibited some pH buffering capacity and attained the best efficiency in neutral media, which means that there is no need to adjust pH prior to or during the treatment process. Therefore, E-ME systems were confirmed as a promising technology for treatment of coking wastewater and other refractory wastewater. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. to salt stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tony

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... 3Inner Mongolia Industrial Engineering Research, Center of University for Castor, Tongliao 028042, ... strengthen and improve salt stress tolerance in plants. .... 2 µl cDNA, 1 µl each of 4 µM forward and reverse primer, 0.2 µl.

  19. Molten salt reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Molten salt reactor is an advanced breeder concept which is suited for the utilization of thorium for nuclear power production. This reactor is based on the use of solutions of uranium or plutonium fluorides in LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 as fuel. Unlike the conventional reactors, no external coolant is used in the reactor core and the fuel salt itself is circulated through heat exchangers to transfer the fission produced heat to a secondary salt (NaF-NaBF 4 ) for steam generation. A part of the fuel stream is continuously processed to isolate 233 Pa, so that it can decay to fissile 233 U without getting converted to 234 Pa, and for the removal of neutron absorbing fission products. This on-line processing scheme makes this reactor concept to achieve a breeding ratio of 1.07 which is the highest for any thermal breeder reactor. Experimental studies at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, have established the use of plutonium as fuel for this reactor. This molten salt reactor concept is described and the work conducted at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is summarised. (auth.)

  20. Borehole closure in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1988-12-01

    Constitutive law parameters are determined from salt behavior characterization experiments. The results are applied to predict creep (time-dependent) closure of boreholes in salt specimens subjected to various loading configurations. Rheological models (linear and nonlinear viscoelastic and viscoplastic models), empirical models, and physical theory models have been formulated from the results of uniaxial creep tests, strain and stress rate controlled uniaxial tests, constant strain rate triaxial tests, cyclic loading tests, and seismic velocity measurements. Analytical solutions for a thick-walled cylinder subjected to internal and external pressures and for a circular hole in an infinite plate subjected to a biaxial or uniaxial stressfield have been derived from each of the linear viscoelastic models and from one of the empirical laws. The experimental results indicate that the salt samples behave as an elastic-viscoplastic material. The elastic behavior tends to be linear and time-independent. The plastic deformation is time-dependent. The stress increment to strain rate increment ratio gradually decreases as the stress level increases. The transient potential creep law seems to give the simplest satisfactory governing equation describing the viscoplastic behavior of salt during the transient phase. 204 refs., 27 figs., 29 tabs