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Sample records for fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol

  1. TRANFSER OF FUSARIUM MYCOTOXINS AND ?MASKED? DEOXYNIVALENOL (DEOXYNIVALENOL-3-GLUCOSIDE) FROM FIELD BARLEY THROUGH MALT TO BEER

    OpenAIRE

    Lancova, Katerina; Hajslova, Jana; Poustka, Jan; Krplova, Alexandra; Zachariasova, Milena; Dostálek, Pavel; Sachambula, Lenka

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The fate of 5 Fusarium toxins- deoxynivalenol (DON), sum of 15- and 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (ADONs), HT-2 toxin (HT-2) representing main trichothecenes and zearalenone (ZON)- during the malting and brewing processes was investigated. In addition to these ?free? mycotoxins, also occurrence of deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON-3-Glc) was, to our knowledge, for the first time, monitored in beer production chain (currently, only DON and ZON are regulated). Two batches of barley,...

  2. Transcript profiling of the phytotoxic response of wheat to the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Stephanie; Doohan, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a trichothecene mycotoxin commonly produced by Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum during infection of cereal plants, such as wheat and barley. This toxin is a fungal virulence factor that facilitates the development of Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease. Wheat cultivar (cv...

  3. Transfer of Fusarium mycotoxins and 'masked' deoxynivalenol (deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside) from field barley through malt to beer.

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    Lancova, K; Hajslova, J; Poustka, J; Krplova, A; Zachariasova, M; Dostalek, P; Sachambula, L

    2008-06-01

    The fate of five Fusarium toxins--deoxynivalenol (DON), sum of 15- and 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (ADONs), HT-2 toxin (HT-2) representing the main trichothecenes and zearalenone (ZON) during the malting and brewing processes--was investigated. In addition to these 'free' mycotoxins, the occurrence of deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON-3-Glc) was monitored for the first time in a beer production chain (currently, only DON and ZON are regulated). Two batches of barley, naturally infected and artificially inoculated with Fusarium spp. during the time of flowering, were used as a raw material for processing experiments. A highly sensitive procedure employing high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was validated for the analysis of 'free' Fusarium mycotoxins and DON-conjugate in all types of matrices. The method was also able to detect nivalenol (NIV), fusarenon-X (FUS-X) and T-2 toxin (T-2); nevertheless, none of these toxins was found in any of the samples. While steeping of barley grains (the first step in the malting process) apparently reduced Fusarium mycotoxin levels to below their quantification limits (5-10 microg kg(-1)), their successive accumulation occurred during germination. In malt, the content of monitored mycotoxins was higher compared with the original barley. The most significant increase was found for DON-3-Glc. During the brewing process, significant further increases in levels occurred. Concentrations of this 'masked' DON in final beers exceeded 'free' DON, while in malt grists this trichothecene was the most abundant, with the DON/DON-3-Glc ratio being approximately 5:1 in both sample series. When calculating mass balance, no significant changes were observed during brewing for ADONs. The content of DON and ZON slightly decreased by a maximum of 30%. Only traces of HT-2 were detected in some processing intermediates (wort after trub removal and green beer).

  4. The fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol can inhibit plant apoptosis-like programmed cell death.

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    Mark Diamond

    Full Text Available The Fusarium genus of fungi is responsible for commercially devastating crop diseases and the contamination of cereals with harmful mycotoxins. Fusarium mycotoxins aid infection, establishment, and spread of the fungus within the host plant. We investigated the effects of the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON on the viability of Arabidopsis cells. Although it is known to trigger apoptosis in animal cells, DON treatment at low concentrations surprisingly did not kill these cells. On the contrary, we found that DON inhibited apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD in Arabidopsis cells subjected to abiotic stress treatment in a manner independent of mitochondrial cytochrome c release. This suggested that Fusarium may utilise mycotoxins to suppress plant apoptosis-like PCD. To test this, we infected Arabidopsis cells with a wild type and a DON-minus mutant strain of F. graminearum and found that only the DON producing strain could inhibit death induced by heat treatment. These results indicate that mycotoxins may be capable of disarming plant apoptosis-like PCD and thereby suggest a novel way that some fungi can influence plant cell fate.

  5. Reduced susceptibility to Fusarium head blight in Brachypodium distachyon through priming with the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol.

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    Blümke, Antje; Sode, Björn; Ellinger, Dorothea; Voigt, Christian A

    2015-06-01

    The fungal cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum produces deoxynivalenol (DON) during infection. The mycotoxin DON is associated with Fusarium head blight (FHB), a disease that can cause vast grain losses. Whilst investigating the suitability of Brachypodium distachyon as a model for spreading resistance to F. graminearum, we unexpectedly discovered that DON pretreatment of spikelets could reduce susceptibility to FHB in this model grass. We started to analyse the cell wall changes in spikelets after infection with F. graminearum wild-type and defined mutants: the DON-deficient Δtri5 mutant and the DON-producing lipase disruption mutant Δfgl1, both infecting only directly inoculated florets, and the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase disruption mutant Δgpmk1, with strongly decreased virulence but intact DON production. At 14 days post-inoculation, the glucose amounts in the non-cellulosic cell wall fraction were only increased in spikelets infected with the DON-producing strains wild-type, Δfgl1 and Δgpmk1. Hence, we tested for DON-induced cell wall changes in B. distachyon, which were most prominent at DON concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 ppb. To test the involvement of DON in defence priming, we pretreated spikelets with DON at a concentration of 1 ppm prior to F. graminearum wild-type infection, which significantly reduced FHB disease symptoms. The analysis of cell wall composition and plant defence-related gene expression after DON pretreatment and fungal infection suggested that DON-induced priming of the spikelet tissue contributed to the reduced susceptibility to FHB.

  6. Transcriptome analyses to understand effects of the Fusarium deoxynivalenol and nivalenol mycotoxins on Escherichia coli.

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    Park, Jungwook; Lee, Hyun-Hee; Youn, Kihoon; Kim, Sunyoung; Jung, Boknam; Lee, Jungkwan; Seo, Young-Su

    2014-12-20

    Fusarium spp. cause many diseases in farming systems and can produce diverse mycotoxins that can easily impact humans and animals through the ingestion of food and feed. Among these mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) are considered the most important hazards because they can rapidly diffuse into cells and block eukaryotic ribosomes, leading to inhibition of the translation system. Conversely, the effects of DON and NIV mycotoxins on bacteria remain unclear. We employed RNA-seq technology to obtain information regarding the biological responses of bacteria and putative bacterial mechanisms of resistance to DON and NIV mycotoxins. Most differentially expressed genes down-regulated in response to these mycotoxins were commonly involved in phenylalanine metabolism, glyoxylate cycle, and cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase systems. In addition, we generated an overall network of 1028 up-regulated genes to identify core genes under DON and NIV conditions. The results of our study provide a snapshot view of the transcriptome of Escherichia coli K-12 under DON and NIV conditions. Furthermore, the information provided herein will be useful for development of methods to detect DON and NIV.

  7. Blood-Brain Barrier Effects of the Fusarium Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol, 3 Acetyldeoxynivalenol, and Moniliformin and Their Transfer to the Brain.

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    Matthias Behrens

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium fungi frequently contaminate food and feed and have adverse effects on human and animal health. Fusarium mycotoxins exhibit a wide structural and biosynthetic diversity leading to different toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics. Several studies investigated the toxicity of mycotoxins, focusing on very specific targets, like the brain. However, it still remains unclear how fast mycotoxins reach the brain and if they impair the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. This study investigated and compared the effects of the Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and moniliformin on the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, the transfer properties to the brain were analyzed, which are required for risk assessment, including potential neurotoxic effects.Primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells were cultivated to study the effects of the examined mycotoxins on the blood-brain barrier in vitro. The barrier integrity was monitored by cellular impedance spectroscopy and 14C radiolabeled sucrose permeability measurements. The distribution of the applied toxins between blood and brain compartments of the cell monolayer was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to calculate transfer rates and permeability coefficients.Deoxynivalenol reduced the barrier integrity and caused cytotoxic effects at 10 μM concentrations. Slight alterations of the barrier integrity were also detected for 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol. The latter was transferred very quickly across the barrier and additionally cleaved to deoxynivalenol. The transfer of deoxynivalenol and moniliformin was slower, but clearly exceeded the permeability of the negative control. None of the compounds was enriched in one of the compartments, indicating that no efflux transport protein is involved in their transport.

  8. Blood-Brain Barrier Effects of the Fusarium Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol, 3 Acetyldeoxynivalenol, and Moniliformin and Their Transfer to the Brain

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    Behrens, Matthias; Hüwel, Sabine; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium fungi frequently contaminate food and feed and have adverse effects on human and animal health. Fusarium mycotoxins exhibit a wide structural and biosynthetic diversity leading to different toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics. Several studies investigated the toxicity of mycotoxins, focusing on very specific targets, like the brain. However, it still remains unclear how fast mycotoxins reach the brain and if they impair the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. This study investigated and compared the effects of the Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and moniliformin on the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, the transfer properties to the brain were analyzed, which are required for risk assessment, including potential neurotoxic effects. Methods Primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells were cultivated to study the effects of the examined mycotoxins on the blood-brain barrier in vitro. The barrier integrity was monitored by cellular impedance spectroscopy and 14C radiolabeled sucrose permeability measurements. The distribution of the applied toxins between blood and brain compartments of the cell monolayer was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to calculate transfer rates and permeability coefficients. Results Deoxynivalenol reduced the barrier integrity and caused cytotoxic effects at 10 μM concentrations. Slight alterations of the barrier integrity were also detected for 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol. The latter was transferred very quickly across the barrier and additionally cleaved to deoxynivalenol. The transfer of deoxynivalenol and moniliformin was slower, but clearly exceeded the permeability of the negative control. None of the compounds was enriched in one of the compartments, indicating that no efflux transport protein is involved in their transport. PMID:26600019

  9. Transcriptomic profiling to identify genes involved in Fusarium mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone tolerance in the mycoparasitic fungus Clonostachys rosea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosawang, Chatchai; Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Dan Funck

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clonostachys rosea strain IK726 is a mycoparasitic fungus capable of controlling mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species, including F. graminearum and F. culmorum, known to produce Zearalenone (ZEA) and Deoxynivalenol (DON). DON is a type B trichothecene known to interfere with protein...... synthesis in eukaryotes. ZEA is a estrogenic-mimicing mycotoxin that exhibits antifungal growth. C. rosea produces the enzyme zearalenone hydrolase (ZHD101), which degrades ZEA. However, the molecular basis of resistance to DON in C. rosea is not understood. We have exploited a genome-wide transcriptomic...... approach to identify genes induced by DON and ZEA in order to investigate the molecular basis of mycotoxin resistance C. rosea.Results: We generated DON- and ZEA-induced cDNA libraries based on suppression subtractive hybridization. A total of 443 and 446 sequenced clones (corresponding to 58 and 65 genes...

  10. The Impact of the Fusarium Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol on the Health and Performance of Broiler Chickens

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    Jürgen Zentek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present experiment was to investigate the effects of feeding grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on morphometric indices of jejunum and to follow the passage of deoxynivalenol (DON through subsequent segments of the digestive tract of broilers. A total of 45 1-d-old broiler chickens (Ross 308 males were randomly allotted to three dietary treatments (15 birds/treatment: (1 control diet; (2 diet contaminated with 1 mg DON/kg feed; (3 diet contaminated with 5 mg DON/kg feed for five weeks. None of the zootechnical traits (body weight, body weight gain, feed intake, and feed conversion responded to increased DON levels in the diet. However, DON at both dietary levels (1 mg and 5 mg DON/kg feed significantly altered the small intestinal morphology. In the jejunum, the villi were significantly (P < 0.01 shorter in both DON treated groups compared with the controls. Furthermore, the dietary inclusion of DON decreased (P < 0.05 the villus surface area in both DON treated groups. The absolute or relative organ weights (liver, heart, proventriculus, gizzard, small intestine, spleen, pancreas, colon, cecum, bursa of Fabricius and thymus were not altered (P > 0.05 in broilers fed the diet containing DON compared with controls. DON and de-epoxy-DON (DOM-1 were analyzed in serum, bile, liver, feces and digesta from consecutive segments of the digestive tract (gizzard, cecum, and rectum. Concentrations of DON and its metabolite DOM-1 in serum, bile, and liver were lower than the detection limits of the applied liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method. Only about 10 to 12% and 6% of the ingested DON was recovered in gizzard and feces, irrespective of the dietary DON-concentration. However, the DON recovery in the cecum as percentage of DON-intake varied between 18 to 22% and was not influenced by dietary DON-concentration. Interestingly, in the present trial, DOM-1 did not appear in the large

  11. The Impact of the Fusarium Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol on the Health and Performance of Broiler Chickens

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    Awad, Wageha A.; Hess, Michael; Twarużek, Magdalena; Grajewski, Jan; Kosicki, Robert; Böhm, Josef; Zentek, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to investigate the effects of feeding grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on morphometric indices of jejunum and to follow the passage of deoxynivalenol (DON) through subsequent segments of the digestive tract of broilers. A total of 45 1-d-old broiler chickens (Ross 308 males) were randomly allotted to three dietary treatments (15 birds/treatment): (1) control diet; (2) diet contaminated with 1 mg DON/kg feed; (3) diet contaminated with 5 mg DON/kg feed for five weeks. None of the zootechnical traits (body weight, body weight gain, feed intake, and feed conversion) responded to increased DON levels in the diet. However, DON at both dietary levels (1 mg and 5 mg DON/kg feed) significantly altered the small intestinal morphology. In the jejunum, the villi were significantly (P 0.05) in broilers fed the diet containing DON compared with controls. DON and de-epoxy-DON (DOM-1) were analyzed in serum, bile, liver, feces and digesta from consecutive segments of the digestive tract (gizzard, cecum, and rectum). Concentrations of DON and its metabolite DOM-1 in serum, bile, and liver were lower than the detection limits of the applied liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Only about 10 to 12% and 6% of the ingested DON was recovered in gizzard and feces, irrespective of the dietary DON-concentration. However, the DON recovery in the cecum as percentage of DON-intake varied between 18 to 22% and was not influenced by dietary DON-concentration. Interestingly, in the present trial, DOM-1 did not appear in the large intestine and in feces. The results indicate that deepoxydation in the present study hardly occurred in the distal segments of the digestive tract, assuming that the complete de-epoxydation occurs in the proximal small intestine where the majority of the parent toxin is absorbed. In conclusion, diets with DON contamination below levels that induce a negative impact on

  12. Decontamination and detoxification strategies for the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol in animal feed and the effectiveness of microbial biodegradation.

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    Awad, Wageha A; Ghareeb, Khaled; Bohm, Josef; Zentek, Jurgen

    2010-04-01

    Trichothecenes are a group of mycotoxins mainly produced by fungi of the Fusarium genus. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most abundant and important trichothecenes in food and feed, and is a significant contaminants due to its frequent occurrence in toxicologically relevant concentrations worldwide. Since toxin production depends strongly on environmental conditions, such as temperature and humidity, Fusarium toxin contamination can not be avoided completely. Therefore, exposure to this toxin is a permanent health risk for both humans and farm animals. As cereal crops are commonly contaminated with DON and animal diets consist mainly of cereals, it can be assumed that animals are frequently exposed to DON-contaminated feeds. Many strategies can be undertaken to reduce the toxic effect of DON. In addition to the general necessity for minimizing all risk factors that might influence the contamination of cereals with DON, such as the so-called field toxins before harvest, several post-harvest strategies can be applied to counteract possible deleterious effects of this mycotoxin in farm animals. Another approach for decontamination in feedstuffs is the use of adsorbent materials. Adsorbent materials may bind mycotoxins in the gastrointestinal tract and reduce absorption and systemic toxicity. It has been shown that some adsorbents are suitable to alleviate the toxic effects of specific mycotoxins, but its efficacy against trichothecenes is practically zero. Therefore, alternative strategies to reduce animal and human health risk are needed. The use of microbial additives is a method which uses microorganisms having the capability to detoxify mycotoxins by metabolism or degradation prior to their resorption in the gastrointestinal tract. DON has been reported to be completely transformed to de-epoxy-DON by ruminal and intestinal microflora. Eubacterium BBSH 797 was capable of DON degradation and counteracted the toxic effects of DON in animals. This review focuses on

  13. The toxicological impacts of the Fusarium mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol, in poultry flocks with special reference to immunotoxicity.

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    Awad, Wageha; Ghareeb, Khaled; Böhm, Josef; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-04-29

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common Fusarium toxin in poultry feed. Chickens are more resistant to the adverse impacts of deoxynivalenol (DON) compared to other species. In general, the acute form of DON mycotoxicosis rarely occurs in poultry flocks under normal conditions. However, if diets contain low levels of DON (less than 5 mg DON/kg diet), lower productivity, impaired immunity and higher susceptibility to infectious diseases can occur. The molecular mechanism of action of DON has not been completely understood. A significant influence of DON in chickens is the impairment of immunological functions. It was known that low doses of DON elevated the serum IgA levels and affected both cell-mediated and humoral immunity in animals. DON is shown to suppress the antibody response to infectious bronchitis vaccine (IBV) and to Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in broilers (10 mg DON/kg feed) and laying hens (3.5 to 14 mg of DON/kg feed), respectively. Moreover, DON (10 mg DON/kg feed) decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the plasma of broilers. DON can severely affect the immune system and, due to its negative impact on performance and productivity, can eventually result in high economic losses to poultry producers. The present review highlights the impacts of DON intoxication on cell mediated immunity, humoral immunity, gut immunity, immune organs and pro-inflammatory cytokines in chickens.

  14. The Toxicological Impacts of the Fusarium Mycotoxin, Deoxynivalenol, in Poultry Flocks with Special Reference to Immunotoxicity

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    Wageha Awad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a common Fusarium toxin in poultry feed. Chickens are more resistant to the adverse impacts of deoxynivalenol (DON compared to other species. In general, the acute form of DON mycotoxicosis rarely occurs in poultry flocks under normal conditions. However, if diets contain low levels of DON (less than 5 mg DON/kg diet, lower productivity, impaired immunity and higher susceptibility to infectious diseases can occur. The molecular mechanism of action of DON has not been completely understood. A significant influence of DON in chickens is the impairment of immunological functions. It was known that low doses of DON elevated the serum IgA levels and affected both cell-mediated and humoral immunity in animals. DON is shown to suppress the antibody response to infectious bronchitis vaccine (IBV and to Newcastle disease virus (NDV in broilers (10 mg DON/kg feed and laying hens (3.5 to 14 mg of DON/kg feed, respectively. Moreover, DON (10 mg DON/kg feed decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α in the plasma of broilers. DON can severely affect the immune system and, due to its negative impact on performance and productivity, can eventually result in high economic losses to poultry producers. The present review highlights the impacts of DON intoxication on cell mediated immunity, humoral immunity, gut immunity, immune organs and pro-inflammatory cytokines in chickens.

  15. Fate of Fusarium mycotoxins in the cereal product supply chain: the deoxynivalenol (DON) case within industrial bread-making technology.

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    Bergamini, E; Catellani, D; Dall'asta, C; Galaverna, G; Dossena, A; Marchelli, R; Suman, M

    2010-05-01

    Fusarium mycotoxins are a relevant problem in the cereal supply chain at a worldwide level, with wheat, maize and barley being the main contaminated crops. Mould growth can happen in the pre-harvest phase and also during transport and storage due to ineffective drying conditions. Among Fusarium toxins, deoxynivalenol (DON) is considered the most important contaminant in wheat due to its widespread occurrence. In the last years the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the European Commission have frequently expressed opinions on Fusarium toxins, setting limits, regulations and guidelines in order to reduce their levels in raw materials and food commodities. In particular, European legislation (Reg. 1881/2006) sets the maximum limit for DON in flour and bread as 750 and 500 microg kg(-1) respectively. Relatively few studies have taken into account the loss of trichothecenes during processing, focusing on how processing factors may influence their degradation. In particular, the description of DON behaviour during bread-making is very difficult, since complex physico-chemical modifications occur during the transformation of the raw ingredients into the final product. In the present study, we studied how DON concentration may be influenced by modifying bread-making parameters, with a special emphasis on the fermentation and baking stages, starting from a naturally contaminated flour at both pilot and industrial scales. Exploiting the power of a Design of Experiments (DoE) approach to consider the great complexity of the studied system, the obtained model shows satisfying goodness-of-fit and prediction, suggesting that the baking step (time/temperature ranges) is crucial for minimizing native DON level in bread.

  16. A Deoxynivalenol-Activated Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene from Wheat Encodes a Nuclear Localized Protein and Protects Plants Against Fusarium Pathogens and Mycotoxins.

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    Zuo, Dong-Yun; Yi, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Rong-Jing; Qu, Bo; Huang, Tao; He, Wei-Jie; Li, Cheng; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the fungal pathogen that causes globally important diseases of cereals and produces mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). Owing to the dearth of available sources of resistance to Fusarium pathogens, characterization of novel genes that confer resistance to mycotoxins and mycotoxin-producing fungi is vitally important for breeding resistant crop varieties. In this study, a wheat methionyl-tRNA synthetase (TaMetRS) gene was identified from suspension cell cultures treated with DON. It shares conserved aminoacylation catalytic and tRNA anticodon binding domains with human MetRS and with the only previously characterized plant MetRS, suggesting that it functions in aminoacylation in the cytoplasm. However, the TaMetRS comprises a typical nuclear localization signal and cellular localization studies with a TaMetRS::GFP fusion protein showed that TaMetRS is localized in the nucleus. Expression of TaMetRS was activated by DON treatment and by infection with a DON-producing F. graminearum strain in wheat spikes. No such activation was observed following infection with a non-DON-producing F. graminearum strain. Expression of TaMetRS in Arabidopsis plants conferred significant resistance to DON and F. graminearum. These results indicated that this DON-activated TaMetRS gene may encode a novel type of MetRS in plants that has a role in defense and detoxification.

  17. Using enzymes and microorganisms to modify the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol

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    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by the fungus Fusarium graminearum that contaminates staple crops such as wheat, barley, and maize when they are infected with this fungus. New strategies are needed to mitigate DON. We screened for microbes that could grow in the presence o...

  18. [Occurrence of Fusarium strains and their mycotoxins in corn silage. 7. Formation of deoxynivalenol (DON) in a silage corn plot artificially inoculated with Fusarium culmorum and the effect of silaging on the stability of the DON formed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepom, P; Knabe, O; Baath, H

    1990-10-01

    The formation of deoxynivalenol in a maize plot inoculated with Fusarium culmorum was studied over a growing season. Already three weeks after inoculation 4.9 mg/kg of DON were measured in the infected ears. The toxin concentration increased continuously up to harvest after eight weeks to a value of 261 mg/kg. Ensilage experiments in laboratory scale silos have shown that the DON content of naturally contaminated corn-cob-mix was not reduced during the ensilage process. It was concluded that infection of maize plants by toxin-producing Fusarium species followed by DON production in the field seems to be the most probable way of contamination of maize silage with this mycotoxin.

  19. Occurrence of four Fusarium mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and HT-2 toxin, in wheat, barley, and Japanese retail food.

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    Yoshinari, Tomoya; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Koji; Taniguchi, Masaru; Hashiguchi, Shigeki; Kai, Shigemi; Ogiso, Motoki; Sato, Takashi; Akiyama, Yu; Nakajima, Masahiro; Tabata, Setsuko; Tanaka, Toshitsugu; Ishikuro, Eiichi; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko

    2014-11-01

    A survey of the contamination of wheat, barley, and Japanese retail food by four Fusarium mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEN), T-2 toxin (T-2), and HT-2 toxin (HT-2), was performed between 2010 and 2012. A method for the simultaneous determination of the four mycotoxins by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was validated by a small-scale interlaboratory study using two spiked wheat samples (DON was spiked at 20 and 100 μg/kg and ZEN, T-2, and HT-2 at 6 and 20 μg/kg in the respective samples). The recovery of the four mycotoxins ranged from 77.3 to 107.2%. A total of 557 samples of 10 different commodities were analyzed over 3 years by this validated method. Both T-2 and HT-2 were detected in wheat, wheat flour, barley, Job's tears products, beer, corn grits, azuki beans, soybeans, and rice with mixed grains. Only T-2 toxin was detected in sesame seeds. The highest concentrations of T-2 toxin (48.4 μg/kg) and HT-2 toxin (85.0 μg/kg) were present in azuki beans and wheat, respectively. DON was frequently detected in wheat, wheat flour, beer, and corn grits. The contamination level of wheat was below the provisional standard in Japan (1,100 μg/kg). The maximum contamination level of DON was present in a sample of a Job's tears product (1,093 μg/kg). ZEN was frequently detected in Job's tears products, corn grits, azuki beans, rice with mixed grains, and sesame seeds. A sample of a Job's tears product presented the highest ZEN contamination (153 μg/kg). These results indicate that continuous monitoring by multiple laboratories is effective and necessary due to the percentage of positive samples detected.

  20. Development of a generic PCR detection of deoxynivalenol- and nivalenol-chemotypes of Fusarium graminearum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H.P.; Wu, A.B.; Zhao, C.S.; Scholten, O.E.; Löffler, H.J.M.; Liao, Y.C.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the intergenic sequences of Tri5¿Tri6 genes involved in the mycotoxin pathways of Fusarium species, a generic PCR assay was developed to detect a 300 bp fragment of deoxynivalenol (DON)-chemotypes and a 360 bp sequence of nivalenol (NIV)- chemotypes of Fusarium graminearum. Mycotoxin

  1. Bioprospecting for Trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases in the fungal genus Fusarium yields functional enzymes that vary in their Aaility to modify the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol

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    The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common contaminant of small grains, such as wheat and barley, in the United States. New strategies to mitigate the threat of DON need to be developed and implemented. TRI101 and TRI201 are trichothecene 3-O-acetyltransferases that are able to mod...

  2. Evaluation of deoxynivalenol production in dsRNA Carrying and Cured Fusarium graminearum isolates by AYT1 expressing transformed tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Samira Shahbazi; Naser Safaeie; Amir Mousavi; Forough Sanjarian; Mahsa Karimi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fusarium head blight (FHB), is the most destructive disease of wheat, producing the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol, a protein synthesis inhibitor, which is harmful to humans and livestock. dsRNAmycoviruses-infected-isolates of Fusariumgraminearum, showed changes in morphological and pathogenicity phenotypes including reduced virulence towards wheat and decreased production of trichothecene mycotoxin (deoxynivalenol: DON). Materials and methods: Previous studies indicated that over...

  3. Modelling mycotoxin formation by Fusarium graminearum in maize in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, van E.D.; Booij, C.J.H.; Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.

    2012-01-01

    The predominant species in maize in temperate climates is Fusarium graminearum, which produces the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol and zearalenone. Projected climate change is expected to affect Fusarium incidence and thus the occurrence of these mycotoxins. Predictive models may be helpful in determining

  4. Transcriptomic profiling to identify genes involved in Fusarium mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone tolerance in the mycoparasitic fungus Clonostachys rosea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosawang, Chatchai; Karlsson, Magnus; Jensen, Dan Funck;

    2014-01-01

    approach to identify genes induced by DON and ZEA in order to investigate the molecular basis of mycotoxin resistance C. rosea.Results: We generated DON- and ZEA-induced cDNA libraries based on suppression subtractive hybridization. A total of 443 and 446 sequenced clones (corresponding to 58 and 65 genes...

  5. Fusarium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    The genus Fusarium is one of the most important mycotoxigenic fungal genera in food and feed. Nearly all species are able to produce mycotoxins of which many are under international regulation. Well-known Fusarium mycotoxins are fumonisins, zearalenone, deoxynivalenol, and additional trichothecenes...

  6. Advances in Biosensors, Chemosensors and Assays for the Determination of Fusarium Mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xialu Lin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The contaminations of Fusarium mycotoxins in grains and related products, and the exposure in human body are considerable concerns in food safety and human health worldwide. The common Fusarium mycotoxins include fumonisins, T-2 toxin, deoxynivalenol and zearalenone. For this reason, simple, fast and sensitive analytical techniques are particularly important for the screening and determination of Fusarium mycotoxins. In this review, we outlined the related advances in biosensors, chemosensors and assays based on the classical and novel recognition elements such as antibodies, aptamers and molecularly imprinted polymers. Application to food/feed commodities, limit and time of detection were also discussed.

  7. Evaluation of deoxynivalenol production in dsRNA Carrying and Cured Fusarium graminearum isolates by AYT1 expressing transformed tobacco

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    Mohammad Hasan shahhosseiny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fusarium head blight (FHB, is the most destructive disease of wheat, producing the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol, a protein synthesis inhibitor, which is harmful to humans and livestock. dsRNAmycoviruses-infected-isolates of Fusariumgraminearum, showed changes in morphological and pathogenicity phenotypes including reduced virulence towards wheat and decreased production of trichothecene mycotoxin (deoxynivalenol: DON. Materials and methods: Previous studies indicated that over expression of yeast acetyl transferase gene (ScAYT1 encoding a 3-O trichothecene acetyl transferase that converts deoxynivalenol to a less toxic acetylated form, leads to suppression of the deoxynivalenol sensitivity in pdr5 yeast mutants. To identify whether ScAYT1 over-expression in transgenic tobacco plants can deal with mycotoxin (deoxynivalenol in fungal extract and studying the effect of dsRNA contamination on detoxification and resistance level, we have treated T1 AYT1 transgenic tobacco seedlings with complete extraction of normal F. graminearum isolate carrying dsRNA metabolites. First, we introduced AYT1into the model tobacco plants through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation in an attempt to detoxify deoxynivalenol. Results: In vitro tests with extraction of dsRNA carrying and cured isolates of F. graminearum and 10 ppm of deoxynivalenol indicated variable resistance levels in transgenic plants. Discussion and conclusion: The results of this study indicate that the transgene expression AYT1 and Fusarium infection to dsRNA can induce tolerance to deoxynivalenol, followed by increased resistance to Fusarium head blight disease of wheat.

  8. Analysis of Deoxynivalenol and Deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside in Hard Red Spring Wheat Inoculated with Fusarium Graminearum

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    Maribel Ovando-Martínez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin affecting wheat quality. The formation of the “masked” mycotoxin deoxinyvalenol-3-glucoside (D3G results from a defense mechanism the plant uses for detoxification. Both mycotoxins are important from a food safety point of view. The aim of this work was to analyze DON and D3G content in inoculated near-isogenic wheat lines grown at two locations in Minnesota, USA during three different years. Regression analysis showed positive correlation between DON content measured with LC and GC among wheat lines, locality and year. The relationship between DON and D3G showed a linear increase until a certain point, after which the DON content and the D3G increased. Wheat lines having higher susceptibility to Fusarium showed the opposite trend. ANOVA demonstrated that the line and location have a greater effect on variation of DON and D3G than do their interaction among years. The most important factor affecting DON and D3G was the growing location. In conclusion, the year, environmental conditions and location have an effect on the D3G/DON ratio in response to Fusarium infection.

  9. Technetium-99m-labeled deoxynivalenol from Fusarium mycotoxin alters organ toxicity in BALB/c mice by oral and intravenous route

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    P Chattopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of deoxynivalenol, both intravenously and orally, was investigated in male and female BALB/c mice. Technetium-99m (99m Tc-labeled deoxynivalenol was administered to mice by tail vein injection and orally dosed. Distribution of labeled deoxynivalenol at 26 hours was monitored by gamma-scintigraphy. In the evaluated organs, the accumulation of radioactive deoxynivalenol was correlated with the amount of radioactivity. In addition, the toxicity of deoxynivalenol was measured by biochemical assays followed by histopathological findings. Kidney and hepatic marker enzymes were significantly increased in intravenously administered deoxynivalenol as compared to orally treated mice. Intravenously treated mice showed severe damage in liver and kidney when compared to those orally exposed. Biodistribution of 99mTc-labeled deoxynivalenol differed between oral and intravenous treatment. In intravenously exposed mice, deoxynivalenol was distributed primarily in the liver and kidney whereas in oral exposure, it was found in the stomach and intestines after 26 hours. Deoxynivalenol toxicity, associated with its biodistribution and organ toxicity, was greatest where it had accumulated. The results show that the toxicity of deoxynivalenol is associated with organ accumulation.

  10. Technetium-99m-labeled deoxynivalenol from Fusarium mycotoxin alters organ toxicity in BALB/c mice by oral and intravenous route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, P; Pandey, A; Goyary, D; Chaurasia, A; Singh, L; Veer, V. [Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, Defence Research Laboratory, Assam (India); Department of Life Sciences, Defense Research Development and Organization, New Delhi (India)

    2012-07-01

    The toxicity of deoxynivalenol, both intravenously and orally, was investigated in male and female BALB/c mice. Technetium-99m ({sup 99m} Tc)-labeled deoxynivalenol was administered to mice by tail vein injection and orally dosed. Distribution of labeled deoxynivalenol at 26 hours was monitored by gamma scintigraphy. In the evaluated organs, the accumulation of radioactive deoxynivalenol was correlated with the amount of radioactivity. In addition, the toxicity of deoxynivalenol was measured by biochemical assays followed by histopathological findings. Kidney and hepatic marker enzymes were significantly increased in intravenously administered deoxynivalenol as compared to orally treated mice. Intravenously treated mice showed severe damage in liver and kidney when compared to those orally exposed. Biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled deoxynivalenol differed between oral and intravenous treatment. In intravenously exposed mice, deoxynivalenol was distributed primarily in the liver and kidney whereas in oral exposure, it was found in the stomach and intestines after 26 hours. Deoxynivalenol toxicity, associated with its biodistribution and organ toxicity, was greatest where it had accumulated. The results show that the toxicity of deoxynivalenol is associated with organ accumulation. (author)

  11. Incidence of Fusarium Species and Mycotoxins in Silage Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckard, Sonja; Wettstein, Felix E.; Forrer, Hans-Rudolf; Vogelgsang, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Maize is frequently infected by the Fusarium species producing mycotoxins. Numerous investigations have focused on grain maize, but little is known about the Fusarium species in the entire plant used for silage. Furthermore, mycotoxins persist during the ensiling process and thus endanger feed safety. In the current study, we analyzed 20 Swiss silage maize samples from growers’ fields for the incidence of Fusarium species and mycotoxins. The species spectrum was analyzed morphologically and mycotoxins were measured by LC-MS/MS. A pre-harvest visual disease rating showed few disease symptoms. In contrast, the infection rate of two-thirds of the harvest samples ranged from 25 to 75% and twelve different Fusarium species were isolated. The prevailing species were F. sporotrichioides, F. verticillioides and F. graminearum. No infection specificity for certain plant parts was observed. The trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) was found in each sample (ranging from 780 to 2990 µg kg−1). Other toxins detected in descending order were zearalenone, further trichothecenes (nivalenol, HT-2 and T-2 toxin, acetylated DON) and fumonisins. A generalized linear regression model containing the three cropping factors harvest date, pre-precrop and seed treatment was established, to explain DON contamination of silage maize. Based on these findings, we suggest a European-wide survey on silage maize. PMID:22069750

  12. Incidence of Fusarium species and mycotoxins in silage maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckard, Sonja; Wettstein, Felix E; Forrer, Hans-Rudolf; Vogelgsang, Susanne

    2011-08-01

    Maize is frequently infected by the Fusarium species producing mycotoxins. Numerous investigations have focused on grain maize, but little is known about the Fusarium species in the entire plant used for silage. Furthermore, mycotoxins persist during the ensiling process and thus endanger feed safety. In the current study, we analyzed 20 Swiss silage maize samples from growers' fields for the incidence of Fusarium species and mycotoxins. The species spectrum was analyzed morphologically and mycotoxins were measured by LC-MS/MS. A pre-harvest visual disease rating showed few disease symptoms. In contrast, the infection rate of two-thirds of the harvest samples ranged from 25 to 75% and twelve different Fusarium species were isolated. The prevailing species were F. sporotrichioides, F. verticillioides and F. graminearum. No infection specificity for certain plant parts was observed. The trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) was found in each sample (ranging from 780 to 2990 µg kg(-1)). Other toxins detected in descending order were zearalenone, further trichothecenes (nivalenol, HT-2 and T-2 toxin, acetylated DON) and fumonisins. A generalized linear regression model containing the three cropping factors harvest date, pre-precrop and seed treatment was established, to explain DON contamination of silage maize. Based on these findings, we suggest a European-wide survey on silage maize.

  13. Susceptibility of broiler chickens to coccidiosis when fed subclinical doses of deoxynivalenol and fumonisins – special emphasis on the immunological response and the mycotoxin interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisins (FB) are the most frequently encountered mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in livestock diets. The effect of subclinical doses of mycotoxins in chickens is largely unknown, and in particular the susceptibility of birds to pathogenic challenge when fed these ...

  14. Deoxynivalenol and other selected Fusarium toxins in Swedish oats--occurrence and correlation to specific Fusarium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredlund, Elisabeth; Gidlund, Ann; Sulyok, Michael; Börjesson, Thomas; Krska, Rudolf; Olsen, Monica; Lindblad, Mats

    2013-10-15

    Fusarium moulds frequently contaminate oats and other cereals world-wide, including those grown in Northern Europe. To investigate the presence of toxigenic Fusarium species and their toxins in oats, samples were taken during 2010 and 2011 in three geographical regions of Sweden (east, west, south). The samples were analysed by real-time PCR for the specific infection level of seven Fusarium species associated with oats and other cereals (Fusarium poae, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium langsethiae, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium tricinctum, Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium avenaceum) and with a multi-mycotoxin method based on liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS) for the detection of many fungal metabolites, including deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA), nivalenol (NIV), T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxins, moniliformin (MON), beauvericin (BEA) and enniatins (ENNs). Most samples contained at least four of the seven Fusarium species analysed and F. poae, F. langsethiae and F. avenaceum were present in approximately 90-100% of all samples. The most common toxins detected were DON, NIV, BEA and ENNs, which were present in more than 90% of samples. Most Fusarium species and their toxins occurred in higher concentrations in 2010 than in 2011, with the exception of DON and its main producer F. graminearum. Significant regional differences were detected for some moulds and mycotoxins, with higher levels of F. graminearum, DON and ZEA in western Sweden than in the east (Poats and revealed significant annual and regional differences. This is the first study of the so-called emerging mycotoxins (e.g., ENNs, MON and BEA) in oats grown in Sweden. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Production of mycotoxins by galactose oxidase producing Fusarium using different culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Angela Maria

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The original isolate of the galactose oxidase producing fungus Dactylium dendroides, and other five galactose oxidase producing Fusarium isolates were cultivated in different media and conditions, in order to evaluate the production of 11 mycotoxins, which are characteristic of the genus Fusarium: moniliformin, fusaric acid, deoxynivalenol, fusarenone-X, nivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, neosolaniol, zearalenol, zearalenone, acetyl T-2, and iso T-2. The toxicity of the culture extracts to Artemia salina larvae was tested.

  16. Analysis of deoxynivalenol and deoxynivalenol-3-glucosides content in Canadian spring wheat cultivars inoculated with Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasinghe, Chami C; Simsek, Senay; Brûlé-Babel, Anita; Fernando, W G Dilantha

    2016-07-01

    Contamination of wheat grains with Fusarium mycotoxins and their modified forms is an important issue in wheat industry. The objective of this study was to analyse the deoxynivalenol (DON) and deoxynivalenol-3-glucosides (D3G) content in Canadian spring wheat cultivars grown in two locations, inoculated with a mixture of 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON)-producing Fusarium graminearum strains and a mixture of 15-acetlyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON)-producing F. graminearum strains. According to the analysis of variance, significant differences were observed among the cultivars for Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease index, Fusarium-damaged kernel percentage (%FDK), DON content and D3G content. When the effect of chemotype was considered, significant differences were observed for FHB disease index, FDK percentage and DON content. The D3G content and D3G/DON ratio were not significantly different between the chemotypes, except for D3G content at the Winnipeg location. The Pearson correlation coefficient between DON and D3G was 0.84 and 0.77 at Winnipeg and Carman respectively. The highest D3G/DON ratio was observed in cultivars Carberry (44%) in Carman and CDC Kernen (63.8%) in Winnipeg. The susceptible cultivars showed lower D3G/DON ratio compared with the cultivars rated as moderately resistant and intermediate. The current study indicated that Canadian spring cultivars produce D3G upon Fusarium infection.

  17. In vivo toxicity studies of fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escrivá, L; Font, G; Manyes, L

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes the information regarding the in vivo studies of Fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade. The most common studies are classified as subacute toxicity, subchronic toxicity, acute toxicity, toxicokinetic studies and teratogenicity in order of importance. The most used animals in in vivo studies are pigs, rats, chickens and mice. Fumonisin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, nivalenol and T-2 toxin are the most studied fusarotoxins. Studies with combinations of mycotoxins are also frequent, deoxynivalenol generally being one of them. The predominant route of administration is oral, administered mostly in the form of naturally contaminated feed. Other administration routes also used are intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous. In vivo research on Fusarium mycotoxins has increased since 2010 highlighting the need for such studies in the field of food and feed safety.

  18. Multi-mycotoxin stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method for Fusarium toxins in beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habler, Katharina; Gotthardt, Marina; Schüler, Jan; Rychlik, Michael

    2017-03-01

    A stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS multi-mycotoxin method was developed for 12 different Fusarium toxins including modified mycotoxins in beer (deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside, deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol, HT2-toxin, T2-toxin, enniatin B, B1, A1, A, beauvericin and zearalenone). As sample preparation and purification of beer a combined solid phase extraction for trichothecenes, enniatins, beauvericin and zearalenone was firstly developed. The validation of the new method gave satisfying results: intra-day and inter-day precision and recoveries were 1-5%, 2-8% and 72-117%, respectively. In total, 61 different organic and conventional beer samples from Germany and all over the world were analyzed by using the newly developed multi-mycotoxin method. In summary, deoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside, 3-acetyldeoxynivaleneol and enniatin B were quantified in rather low contents in the investigated beer samples. None of the other monitored Fusarium toxins like 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, HT2- and T2-toxin, zearalenone, enniatin B1, A1, A or beauvericin were detectable.

  19. Distribution of Fusarium mycotoxins in UK wheat mill fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, S G; Dickin, E T; MacDonald, S; Buttler, D; Hazel, C M; Patel, S; Scudamore, K A

    2011-12-01

    The EU has set maximum limits for the Fusarium mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZON). The maximum permitted level decreases from unprocessed wheat, through intermediary products, e.g. flour, to finished products such as bakery goods and breakfast cereals. It is, therefore, important to understand the effects of processing on the mycotoxin distribution in mill fractions. Between 2004 and 2007, samples were taken at commercial flour mills at various points in the milling process and analysed for trichothecenes and ZON. Samples with a range of mycotoxin concentrations harvested in 2004 and 2005 were processed in a pilot mill and the mycotoxins in the different mill fractions quantified. In the commercial samples, DON was the predominant mycotoxin with highest levels detected in the bran fraction. Analysis of the pilot mill fractions identified a significant difference between the two years and between mycotoxins. The proportion of DON and nivalenol in the mill fractions varied between years. DON and nivalenol were higher in flour fractions and lower in bran and offal in samples from 2004 compared to samples from 2005. This may be a consequence of high rainfall pre-harvest in 2004 resulting in movement of these mycotoxins within grains before harvest. There was no significant difference in the distribution of ZON within mill fractions between the two years. For DON, higher concentrations in the grain resulted in a greater proportion of DON within the flour fractions. Understanding the factors that impact on the fractionation of mycotoxins during milling will help cereal processors to manufacture products within legislative limits.

  20. Investigations on Fusarium spp. and their mycotoxins causing Fusarium ear rot of maize in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shala-Mayrhofer, Vitore; Varga, Elisabeth; Marjakaj, Robert; Berthiller, Franz; Musolli, Agim; Berisha, Defrime; Kelmendi, Bakir; Lemmens, Marc

    2013-01-01

    After wheat, maize (Zea mays L.) is the second most important cereal crop in Kosovo and a major component of animal feed. The purpose of this study was to analyse the incidence and identity of the Fusarium species isolated from naturally infected maize kernels in Kosovo in 2009 and 2010, as well as the mycotoxin contamination. The disease incidence of Fusarium ear rot (from 0.7% to 40% diseased ears) on maize in Kosovo is high. The most frequently Fusarium spp. identified on maize kernels were Fusarium subglutinans, F. verticillioides/F. proliferatum and F. graminearum. Maize kernel samples were analysed by LC-MS/MS and found to be contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON), DON-3-glucoside, 3-acetyl-DON, 15-acetyl-DON, zearalenone, zearalenone-14-sulphate, moniliformin, fumonisin B1 and fumonisin B2. This is the first report on the incidence and identification of Fusarium species isolated from naturally infected maize as well as the mycotoxin contamination in Kosovo.

  1. Relationships among deoxynivalenol, ergosterol and Fusarium exoantigens in Canadian hard and soft wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, D; Gan, Z; Clear, R M; Gilbert, J; Marquardt, R R

    1998-12-22

    Soluble extracellular components (exoantigens) from cultures of Fusarium graminearum and F. sporotrichioides were used to produce antisera from chickens for an indirect enzyme immunoassay. This immunoassay was used to estimate Fusarium exoantigen levels in 40 samples of fusarium head blight-infected hard red spring wheat from Manitoba, and in 50 samples of infected soft white winter wheat from Ontario. These wheat samples were also assayed for deoxynivalenol (DON), the predominant Fusarium mycotoxin, and for ergosterol, a metabolite reflecting fungal biomass. Using F. sporotrichioides antisera, the linear correlations between exoantigen level and DON content for the hard and soft wheats had coefficients of 0.80 and 0.76, respectively. With the same antisera, linear correlations between exoantigen level and total ergosterol concentration for the hard and soft wheats had coefficients of 0.66 and 0.81, respectively.

  2. The induction of mycotoxins by trichothecene producing Fusarium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Rohan; Jubault, Mélanie; Canning, Gail; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many Fusarium species have emerged which now threaten the productivity and safety of small grain cereal crops worldwide. During floral infection and post-harvest on stored grains the Fusarium hyphae produce various types of harmful mycotoxins which subsequently contaminate food and feed products. This article focuses specifically on the induction and production of the type B sesquiterpenoid trichothecene mycotoxins. Methods are described which permit in liquid culture the small or large scale production and detection of deoxynivalenol (DON) and its various acetylated derivatives. A wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) ear inoculation assay is also explained which allows the direct comparison of mycotoxin production by species, chemotypes and strains with different growth rates and/or disease-causing abilities. Each of these methods is robust and can be used for either detailed time-course studies or end-point analyses. Various analytical methods are available to quantify the levels of DON, 3A-DON and 15A-DON. Some criteria to be considered when making selections between the different analytical methods available are briefly discussed.

  3. Effect of processing on Fusarium mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L S; Bullerman, L B

    1999-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by a wide variety of fungal species that contaminate food or feed. Fumonisins (FUM), deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN) are examples of common mycotoxins in grains that have been shown to affect human and/or animal health. Physical, chemical and biological methods have been used for decontaminating grains containing these toxins. Some treatments reduce the concentration of mycotoxins while others are ineffective. For example, removal of damaged grain by density segregation can reduce DON and ZEN concentrations in corn and wheat. In contrast, thermal processing is usually ineffective for reducing the FUM and ZEN content of foods. More work is needed to identify effective methods for detoxifying mycotoxin contaminated food.

  4. Occurrence of Fusarium mycotoxins in Italian cereal and cereal products from organic farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Cristina; Ritieni, Alberto; Mañes, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, the occurrence of eighteen mycotoxins, nine trichothecenes (deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol, 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol, nivalenol, neosolaniol, diacetoxyscirpenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin and HT-2 toxin), three zearalenones (zearalenone, α-zearalenol and β-zearalenol), and six emergent mycotoxins, beauvericin and five enniatins (A, A1, B, B1 and B4), was monitored in different Italian organic cereals and cereal products by using a liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry method. A total of 93 organic cereal samples (wheat, barley, rye and oat) were collected from Italy. Limits of quantification ranged from 5 to 15 μg/kg. 80% of analyzed samples contained mycotoxins. The occurrence was 33%, 6.5%, 2%, 27%, 7%, 10% and 43% for deoxynivalenol, HT-2, T-2, nivalenol, zearalenone, beauvericin and enniatins, respectively. The major mycotoxin found was enniatin B4; it was detected in 40% of all analyzed samples and its levels ranged from 5.7 to 284.2 μg/kg. Risk assessment was evaluated by EDI calculations which were lower than TDI for all legislated Fusarium mycotoxins.

  5. Optimization for the Production of Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone by Fusarium graminearum Using Response Surface Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Qiu, Lijuan; Zhang, Huijie; Sun, Juan; Hu, Xuexu; Wang, Bujun

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN) are the most common contaminants in cereals worldwide, causing a wide range of adverse health effects on animals and humans. Many environmental factors can affect the production of these mycotoxins. Here, we have used response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the Fusarium graminearum strain 29 culture conditions for maximal toxin production. Three factors, medium pH, incubation temperature and time, were optimized using a Box-Behnken design (BBD). The optimized conditions for DON production were pH 4.91 and an incubation temperature of 23.75 °C for 28 days, while maximal ZEN production required pH 9.00 and an incubation temperature of 15.05 °C for 28 days. The maximum levels of DON and ZEN production were 2811.17 ng/mL and 23789.70 ng/mL, respectively. Considering the total level of DON and ZEN, desirable yields of the mycotoxins were still obtained with medium pH of 6.86, an incubation temperature of 17.76 °C and a time of 28 days. The corresponding experimental values, from the validation experiments, fitted well with these predictions. This suggests that RSM could be used to optimize Fusarium mycotoxin levels, which are further purified for use as potential mycotoxin standards. Furthermore, it shows that acidic pH is a determinant for DON production, while an alkaline environment and lower temperature (approximately 15 °C) are favorable for ZEN accumulation. After extraction, separation and purification processes, the isolated mycotoxins were obtained through a simple purification process, with desirable yields, and acceptable purity. The mycotoxins could be used as potential analytical standards or chemical reagents for routine analysis. PMID:28208576

  6. Perspectives for geographically oriented management of fusarium mycotoxins in the cereal supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Booij, C J H

    2010-06-01

    This article provides an overview of available systems for management of Fusarium mycotoxins in the cereal grain supply chain, with an emphasis on the use of predictive mathematical modeling. From the state of the art, it proposes future developments in modeling and management and their challenges. Mycotoxin contamination in cereal grain-based feed and food products is currently managed and controlled by good agricultural practices, good manufacturing practices, hazard analysis critical control points, and by checking and more recently by notification systems and predictive mathematical models. Most of the predictive models for Fusarium mycotoxins in cereal grains focus on deoxynivalenol in wheat and aim to help growers make decisions about the application of fungicides during cultivation. Future developments in managing Fusarium mycotoxins should include the linkage between predictive mathematical models and geographical information systems, resulting into region-specific predictions for mycotoxin occurrence. The envisioned geographically oriented decision support system may incorporate various underlying models for specific users' demands and regions and various related databases to feed the particular models with (geographically oriented) input data. Depending on the user requirements, the system selects the best fitting model and available input information. Future research areas include organizing data management in the cereal grain supply chain, developing predictive models for other stakeholders (taking into account the period up to harvest), other Fusarium mycotoxins, and cereal grain types, and understanding the underlying effects of the regional component in the models.

  7. Fate of Fusarium mycotoxins in cereal product supply chain: the DON case within industrial bread-making technology

    OpenAIRE

    BERGAMINI, Elena; Catellani, Dante; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Galaverna, Gianni; Dossena, Arnaldo; Marchelli, Rosangela; Suman, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Fusarium mycotoxins are a relevant problem in the cereal supply chain at a worldwide level, being wheat, maize and barley the main contaminated crops; mould growth could happen in the pre-harvest phase and also during transport and storage due to ineffective drying conditions. Among Fusarium toxins, deoxynivalenol (DON) is considered the most important contaminant in wheat, due to its wide-spread occurrence. In the last years the European Food Safety Authority and the Euro...

  8. Deoxynivalenol and other selected Fusarium toxins in Swedish wheat--occurrence and correlation to specific Fusarium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad, Mats; Gidlund, Ann; Sulyok, Michael; Börjesson, Thomas; Krska, Rudolf; Olsen, Monica; Fredlund, Elisabeth

    2013-10-15

    Wheat is often infected by Fusarium species producing mycotoxins, which may pose health risks to humans and animals. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most important Fusarium toxin in Swedish wheat and has previously been shown to be produced mainly by Fusarium graminearum. However, less is known about the co-occurrence of DON and F. graminearum with other toxins and Fusarium species in Sweden. This study examined the distribution of the most important toxigenic Fusarium species and their toxins in winter wheat (2009 and 2011) and spring wheat (2010 and 2011). DNA from seven species was quantified with qPCR and the toxin levels were quantified with a multitoxin analysis method based on liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS). The method enabled detection of many fungal metabolites, including DON, zearalenone (ZEA), nivalenol (NIV), T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxins, moniliformin (MON), beauvericin (BEA), and enniatins (ENNs). It was found that Fusarium poae and Fusarium avenaceum were present in almost all samples. Other common Fusarium species were F. graminearum and F. culmorum, present in more than 70% of samples. Several species occurred at lower DNA levels in 2011 than in other years, but the reverse was true for F. graminearum and Fusarium langsethiae. The most prevalent toxins were ENNs, present in 100% of samples. DON was also common, especially in spring wheat, whereas ZEA and NIV were common in 2009 and in winter wheat, but less common in 2011 and in spring wheat. Only three samples of spring wheat contained T-2 or HT-2 above LOQ. Annual mean levels of several mycotoxins were significantly lower in 2011 than in other years, but the reverse applied for DON. The strongest correlations between mycotoxin and Fusarium DNA levels were found between F. avenaceum and ENNs (r(2) = 0.67) and MON (r(2) = 0.62), and F. graminearum and DON (r(2) = 0.74). These results show that several Fusarium species and toxins co-occur in wheat. The

  9. Fusarium mycotoxins: effects on reproductive function in domestic animals--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Cristina; Pizzo, Fabiola; Spicer, Leon J; Caloni, Francesca

    2013-10-01

    On a global scale, cereal grains and animal feed may be contaminated with trichothecenes, such as deoxynivalenol and T-2 toxin, zearalenone (ZEA), and fumonisins, the major mycotoxins of Fusarium fungi. Of these mycotoxins, ZEA is unequivocally implicated in reproductive disorders of swine and other domestic animals. Experiments in vivo and in vitro indicate that ZEA and its metabolites exert estrogenic effects resulting in functional and morphological alterations in reproductive organs. Recently, the potential of trichothecenes and fumonisins to cause reproductive disorders in domestic animals has been investigated. The present review summarizes the toxicological data on the effects of Fusarium mycotoxins on ovarian function, testicular function, placenta and fetus, and puberty/sexual maturity of domestic animals. The results of in vivo animal studies and in vitro tests are reported and discussed.

  10. New tricks of an old enemy: isolates of Fusarium graminearum produce a type A trichothecene mycotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Elisabeth; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Hametner, Christian; Ward, Todd J; Dong, Yanhong; Schöfbeck, Denise; McCormick, Susan; Broz, Karen; Stückler, Romana; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Krska, Rudolf; Kistler, H Corby; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    The ubiquitous filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum causes the important disease Fusarium head blight on various species of cereals, leading to contamination of grains with mycotoxins. In a survey of F. graminearum (sensu stricto) on wheat in North America several novel strains were isolated, which produced none of the known trichothecene mycotoxins despite causing normal disease symptoms. In rice cultures, a new trichothecene mycotoxin (named NX-2) was characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements identified NX-2 as 3α-acetoxy-7α,15-dihydroxy-12,13-epoxytrichothec-9-ene. Compared with the well-known 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3-ADON), it lacks the keto group at C-8 and hence is a type A trichothecene. Wheat ears inoculated with the isolated strains revealed a 10-fold higher contamination with its deacetylated form, named NX-3, (up to 540 mg kg(-1) ) compared with NX-2. The toxicities of the novel mycotoxins were evaluated utilizing two in vitro translation assays and the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. NX-3 inhibits protein biosynthesis to almost the same extent as the prominent mycotoxin deoxynivalenol, while NX-2 is far less toxic, similar to 3-ADON. Genetic analysis revealed a different TRI1 allele in the N-isolates, which was verified to be responsible for the difference in hydroxylation at C-8.

  11. Fusarium mycotoxins: Current research at the USDA ARS Mycotoxin Prevention unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to the health and economic costs of mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species, there is a compelling need for improved understanding of these fungi, from across diverse perspectives and disciplinary approaches. Current research at the USDA ARS Mycotoxin Prevention unit addresses Fusarium mycotoxin...

  12. Influence of Agronomic and Climatic Factors on Fusarium Infestation and Mycotoxin Contamination of Cereals in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhoft, A.; Torp, M.; Clasen, P.-E.; Løes, A.-K.; Kristoffersen, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 602 samples of organically and conventionally grown barley, oats and wheat was collected at grain harvest during 2002–2004 in Norway. Organic and conventional samples were comparable pairs regarding cereal species, growing site and harvest time, and were analysed for Fusarium mould and mycotoxins. Agronomic and climatic factors explained 10–30% of the variation in Fusarium species and mycotoxins. Significantly lower Fusarium infestation and concentrations of important mycotoxins were found in the organic cereals. The mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and HT-2 toxin (HT-2) constitute the main risk for human and animal health in Norwegian cereals. The impacts of various agronomic and climatic factors on DON and HT-2 as well as on their main producers F. graminearum and F. langsethiae and on total Fusarium were tested by multivariate statistics. Crop rotation with non-cereals was found to reduce all investigated characteristics significantly – mycotoxin concentrations as well as various Fusarium infestations. No use of mineral fertilisers and herbicides was also found to decrease F. graminearum, whereas lodged fields increased the occurrence of this species. No use of herbicides was also found to decrease F. langsethiae, but for this species the occurrence was lower in lodged fields. Total Fusarium infestation was decreased with no use of fungicides or mineral fertilisers, and with crop rotation, as well as by using herbicides and increased by lodged fields. Clay and to some extent silty soils seemed to reduce F. graminearum in comparison with sandy soils. Concerning climate factors, low temperature before grain harvest was found to increase DON; and high air humidity before harvest to increase HT-2. F. graminearum was negatively correlated with precipitation in July but correlated with air humidity before harvest. F. langsethiae was correlated with temperature in July. Total Fusarium increased with increasing precipitation in July. Organic cereal

  13. Determination of Mycotoxin Production of Fusarium Species in Genetically Modified Maize Varieties by Quantitative Flow Immunocytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánáti, Hajnalka; Darvas, Béla; Fehér-Tóth, Szilvia; Czéh, Árpád; Székács, András

    2017-01-01

    Levels of mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in genetically modified (GM) and near-isogenic maize, were determined using multi-analyte, microbead-based flow immunocytometry with fluorescence detection, for the parallel quantitative determination of fumonisin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T-2, ochratoxin A, and aflatoxin B1. Maize varieties included the genetic events MON 810 and DAS-59122-7, and their isogenic counterparts. Cobs were artificially infested by F. verticillioides and F. proliferatum conidia, and contained F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides natural infestation. The production of fumonisin B1 and deoxynivalenol was substantially affected in GM maize lines: F. verticillioides, with the addition of F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides, produced significantly lower levels of fumonisin B1 (~300 mg·kg−1) in DAS-59122-7 than in its isogenic line (~580 mg·kg−1), while F. proliferatum, in addition to F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides, produced significantly higher levels of deoxynivalenol (~18 mg·kg−1) in MON 810 than in its isogenic line (~5 mg·kg−1). Fusarium verticillioides, with F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides, produced lower amounts of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone than F. proliferatum, with F. graminearum and F. sporotrichoides. T-2 toxin production remained unchanged when considering the maize variety. The results demonstrate the utility of the Fungi-Plex™ quantitative flow immunocytometry method, applied for the high throughput parallel determination of the target mycotoxins. PMID:28241411

  14. Antibody-mediated Prevention of Fusarium Mycotoxins in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cai Liao

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium mycotoxins directly accumulated in grains during the infection of wheat and other cereal crops by Fusarium head blight (FHB pathogens are detrimental to humans and domesticated animals. Prevention of the mycotoxins via the development of FHB-resistant varieties has been a challenge due to the scarcity of natural resistance against FHB pathogens. Various antibodies specific to Fusarium fungi and mycotoxins are widely used in immunoassays and antibody-mediated resistance in planta against Fusarium pathogens has been demonstrated. Antibodies fused to antifungal proteins have been shown to confer a very significantly enhanced Fusarium resistance in transgenic plants. Thus, antibody fusions hold great promise as an effective tool for the prevention of mycotoxin contaminations in cereal grains. This review highlights the utilization of protective antibodies derived from phage display to increase endogenous resistance of wheat to FHB pathogens and consequently to reduce mycotoxins in field. The role played by Fusarium-specific antibody in the resistance is also discussed.

  15. Strategies for managing Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol accumulation in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Gary Y; Schoneweis, Susan D

    2007-10-20

    Many mycotoxigenic fungi infect plant hosts and cause disease in the field. Therefore, control of field infection by these fungi is a critical step in managing mycotoxin accumulation in the harvested product. Fusarium graminearum, also known as Gibberella zeae, is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), or scab, in cereals and is also the primary agent responsible for contamination of grain with deoxynivalenol (DON). Research efforts worldwide are devoted to the development of strategies to control field infection of wheat and barley by this pathogen. Strategies include the use of fungicides and biological control agents to protect flowering heads from infection. There is extensive effort in breeding for host resistance to infection and spread of the pathogen within the heads. Scientists are also seeking exogenous traits to introduce into cereals to enhance resistance. Cultural practices are also being examined, primarily as measures to reduce pathogen survival and inoculum production in crop residues. The successes and limitations of these strategies in the management of Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol are discussed.

  16. Role of the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) on contamination of maize with 13 Fusarium mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandino, Massimo; Scarpino, Valentina; Vanara, Francesca; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Reyneri, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    The European corn borer (ECB) plays an important role in promoting Fusarium verticillioides infections and in the consequent fumonisin contamination in maize grain in temperate areas. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the ECB feeding activity could also affect the occurrence of emerging mycotoxins in maize kernels. During the 2008-10 period, natural infestation of the insect was compared, in field research, with the protection of infestation, which was obtained by using an entomological net. The ears collected in the protected plots were free from ECB attack, while those subject to natural insect attacks showed a damage severity that varied from 10% to 25%. The maize samples were analysed by means of an LC-MS/MS-based multi-mycotoxin method, which led to the detection of various metabolites: fumonisins (FUMs), fusaproliferin (FUS), moniliformin (MON), bikaverin (BIK), beauvericin (BEA), fusaric acid (FA), equisetin (EQU), deoxynivalenol (DON), deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON-3-G), zearalenone (ZEA), culmorin (CULM), aurofusarin (AUR) and butenolide (BUT). The occurrence of mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. of Liseola section was affected significantly by the ECB feeding activity. The presence of ECB injuries increased the FUMs from 995 to 4694 µg kg(-1), FUS from 17 to 1089 µg kg(-1), MON from 22 to 673 µg kg(-1), BIK from 58 to 377 µg kg(-1), BEA from 6 to 177 µg kg(-1), and FA from 21 to 379 µg kg(-1). EQU, produced by F. equiseti section Gibbosum, was also increased by the ECB activity, by 1-30 µg kg(-1) on average. Instead, the content of mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. of Discolor and Roseum sections was not significantly affected by ECB activity. As for FUMs, the application of a strategy that can reduce ECB damage could also be the most effective solution to minimise the other mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. of Liseola section.

  17. Multiplex dipstick immunoassay for semi-quantitative determination of Fusarium mycotoxins in cereals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lattanzio, Veronica M.T., E-mail: veronica.lattanzio@ispa.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA-CNR), Via Amendola 122/O, 70126 Bari (Italy); Nivarlet, Noan [UNISENSOR S.A., Zoning industriel du Dossay, Rue du Dossay no 3, B-4020 Liege (Belgium); Lippolis, Vincenzo; Gatta, Stefania Della [National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA-CNR), Via Amendola 122/O, 70126 Bari (Italy); Huet, Anne-Catherine; Delahaut, Philippe [Centre d' Economie Rurale (CER Groupe), Rue du Point du Jour no 8, B-6900 Marloie (Belgium); Granier, Benoit [UNISENSOR S.A., Zoning industriel du Dossay, Rue du Dossay no 3, B-4020 Liege (Belgium); Visconti, Angelo [National Research Council of Italy, Institute of Sciences of Food Production (ISPA-CNR), Via Amendola 122/O, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed a rapid method based on a multiplex dipstick immunoassay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assay allowed the determination of major Fusarium toxins in wheat, oats, maize. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtained cut off levels close to EU regulatory levels. - Abstract: A multiplex dipstick immunoassay based method for the simultaneous determination of major Fusarium toxins, namely zearalenone, T-2 and HT-2 toxins, deoxynivalenol and fumonisins in wheat, oats and maize has been developed. The dipstick format was based on an indirect competitive approach. Four test lines (mycotoxin-BSA conjugates) and one control line were located on the strip membrane. Labelled antibodies were freeze-dried within the microwell. Two matrix-related sample preparation protocols have been developed for wheat/oats (not containing fumonisins) and maize (containing fumonisins) respectively. The use of a methanol/water mixture for sample preparation allowed recoveries in the range 73-109% for all mycotoxins in all tested cereals, with relative standard deviation less than 10%. The optimized immunoassay was able to detect target mycotoxins at cut off levels equal to 80% of EU maximum permitted levels, i.e. 280, 400, 1400 and 3200 {mu}g kg{sup -1}, respectively, for zearalenone, T-2/HT-2 toxins, deoxynivalenol and fumonisins in maize, and 80, 400 and 1400 {mu}g kg{sup -1}, respectively, for zearalenone, T-2/HT-2 toxins and deoxynivalenol in wheat and oats. Analysis of naturally contaminated samples resulted in a good agreement between multiplex dipstick and validated confirmatory LC-MS/MS. The percentage of false positive results was less than or equal to 13%, whereas no false negative results were obtained. Data on the presence/absence of 6 mycotoxins at levels close to EU regulatory levels were obtained within 30 min. The proposed immunoassay protocol is rapid, inexpensive, easy-to-use and fit for purpose of rapid screening of mycotoxins

  18. Fusarium and mycotoxin spectra in Swiss barley are affected by various cropping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöneberg, Torsten; Martin, Charlotte; Wettstein, Felix E; Bucheli, Thomas D; Mascher, Fabio; Bertossa, Mario; Musa, Tomke; Keller, Beat; Vogelgsang, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    Fusarium head blight is one of the most important cereal diseases worldwide. Cereals differ in terms of the main occurring Fusarium species and the infection is influenced by various factors, such as weather and cropping measures. Little is known about Fusarium species in barley in Switzerland, hence harvest samples from growers were collected in 2013 and 2014, along with information on respective cropping factors. The incidence of different Fusarium species was obtained by using a seed health test and mycotoxins were quantified by LC-MS/MS. With these techniques, the most dominant species, F. graminearum, and the most prominent mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), were identified. Between the three main Swiss cropping systems, Organic, Extenso and Proof of ecological performance, we observed differences with the lowest incidence and toxin accumulation in organically cultivated barley. Hence, we hypothesise that this finding was based on an array of growing techniques within a given cropping system. We observed that barley samples from fields with maize as previous crop had a substantially higher F. graminearum incidence and elevated DON accumulation compared with other previous crops. Furthermore, the use of reduced tillage led to a higher disease incidence and toxin content compared with samples from ploughed fields. Further factors increasing Fusarium infection were high nitrogen fertilisation as well as the application of fungicides and growth regulators. Results from the current study can be used to develop optimised cropping systems that reduce the risks of mycotoxin contamination.

  19. Plasma-Based Degradation of Mycotoxins Produced by Fusarium, Aspergillus and Alternaria Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars ten Bosch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP with ambient air as working gas for the degradation of selected mycotoxins was studied. Deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, enniatins, fumonisin B1, and T2 toxin produced by Fusarium spp., sterigmatocystin produced by Aspergillus spp. and AAL toxin produced by Alternaria alternata were used. The kinetics of the decay of mycotoxins exposed to plasma discharge was monitored. All pure mycotoxins exposed to CAPP were degraded almost completely within 60 s. Degradation rates varied with mycotoxin structure: fumonisin B1 and structurally related AAL toxin were degraded most rapidly while sterigmatocystin exhibited the highest resistance to degradation. As compared to pure compounds, the degradation rates of mycotoxins embedded in extracts of fungal cultures on rice were reduced to a varying extent. Our results show that CAPP efficiently degrades pure mycotoxins, the degradation rates vary with mycotoxin structure, and the presence of matrix slows down yet does not prevent the degradation. CAPP appears promising for the decontamination of food commodities with mycotoxins confined to or enriched on surfaces such as cereal grains.

  20. Detoxification of Deoxynivalenol via Glycosylation Represents Novel Insights on Antagonistic Activities of Trichoderma when Confronted with Fusarium graminearum

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    Ye Tian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin mainly produced by the Fusarium graminearum complex, which are important phytopathogens that can infect crops and lead to a serious disease called Fusarium head blight (FHB. As the most common B type trichothecene mycotoxin, DON has toxic effects on animals and humans, which poses a risk to food security. Thus, efforts have been devoted to control DON contamination in different ways. Management of DON production by Trichoderma strains as a biological control-based strategy has drawn great attention recently. In our study, eight selected Trichoderma strains were evaluated for their antagonistic activities on F. graminearum by dual culture on potato dextrose agar (PDA medium. As potential antagonists, Trichoderma strains showed prominent inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and mycotoxin production of F. graminearum. In addition, the modified mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (D3G, which was once regarded as a detoxification product of DON in plant defense, was detected when Trichoderma were confronted with F. graminearum. The occurrence of D3G in F. graminearum and Trichoderma interaction was reported for the first time, and these findings provide evidence that Trichoderma strains possess a self-protection mechanism as plants to detoxify DON into D3G when competing with F. graminearum.

  1. Detoxification of Deoxynivalenol via Glycosylation Represents Novel Insights on Antagonistic Activities of Trichoderma when Confronted with Fusarium graminearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Tan, Yanglan; Liu, Na; Yan, Zheng; Liao, Yucai; Chen, Jie; de Saeger, Sarah; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Qiaoyan; Wu, Aibo

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin mainly produced by the Fusarium graminearum complex, which are important phytopathogens that can infect crops and lead to a serious disease called Fusarium head blight (FHB). As the most common B type trichothecene mycotoxin, DON has toxic effects on animals and humans, which poses a risk to food security. Thus, efforts have been devoted to control DON contamination in different ways. Management of DON production by Trichoderma strains as a biological control-based strategy has drawn great attention recently. In our study, eight selected Trichoderma strains were evaluated for their antagonistic activities on F. graminearum by dual culture on potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium. As potential antagonists, Trichoderma strains showed prominent inhibitory effects on mycelial growth and mycotoxin production of F. graminearum. In addition, the modified mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (D3G), which was once regarded as a detoxification product of DON in plant defense, was detected when Trichoderma were confronted with F. graminearum. The occurrence of D3G in F. graminearum and Trichoderma interaction was reported for the first time, and these findings provide evidence that Trichoderma strains possess a self-protection mechanism as plants to detoxify DON into D3G when competing with F. graminearum. PMID:27854265

  2. Biological detoxification of the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol and its use in genetically engineered crops and feed additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlovsky, Petr

    2011-08-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the major mycotoxin produced by Fusarium fungi in grains. Food and feed contaminated with DON pose a health risk to humans and livestock. The risk can be reduced by enzymatic detoxification. Complete mineralization of DON by microbial cultures has rarely been observed and the activities turned out to be unstable. The detoxification of DON by reactions targeting its epoxide group or hydroxyl on carbon 3 is more feasible. Microbial strains that de-epoxidize DON under anaerobic conditions have been isolated from animal digestive system. Feed additives claimed to de-epoxidize trichothecenes enzymatically are on the market but their efficacy has been disputed. A new detoxification pathway leading to 3-oxo-DON and 3-epi-DON was discovered in taxonomically unrelated soil bacteria from three continents; the enzymes involved remain to be identified. Arabidopsis, tobacco, wheat, barley, and rice were engineered to acetylate DON on carbon 3. In wheat expressing DON acetylation activity, the increase in resistance against Fusarium head blight was only moderate. The Tri101 gene from Fusarium sporotrichioides was used; Fusarium graminearum enzyme which possesses higher activity towards DON would presumably be a better choice. Glycosylation of trichothecenes occurs in plants, contributing to the resistance of wheat to F. graminearum infection. Marker-assisted selection based on the trichothecene-3-O-glucosyltransferase gene can be used in breeding for resistance. Fungal acetyltransferases and plant glucosyltransferases targeting carbon 3 of trichothecenes remain promising candidates for engineering resistance against Fusarium head blight. Bacterial enzymes catalyzing oxidation, epimerization, and less likely de-epoxidation of DON may extend this list in future.

  3. Biocontrol of Fusarium graminearum Growth and Deoxynivalenol Production in Wheat Kernels with Bacterial Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuijuan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is the main causal pathogen affecting small-grain cereals, and it produces deoxynivalenol, a kind of mycotoxin, which displays a wide range of toxic effects in human and animals. Bacterial strains isolated from peanut shells were investigated for their activities against F. graminearum by dual-culture plate and tip-culture assays. Among them, twenty strains exhibited potent inhibition to the growth of F. graminearum, and the inhibition rates ranged from 41.41% to 54.55% in dual-culture plate assay and 92.70% to 100% in tip-culture assay. Furthermore, eighteen strains reduced the production of deoxynivalenol by 16.69% to 90.30% in the wheat kernels assay. Finally, the strains with the strongest inhibitory activity were identified by morphological, physiological, biochemical methods and also 16S rDNA and gyrA gene analysis as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The current study highlights the potential application of antagonistic microorganisms and their metabolites in the prevention of fungal growth and mycotoxin production in wheat kernels. As a biological strategy, it might avoid safety problems and nutrition loss which always caused by physical and chemical strategies.

  4. Fusarium and Aspergillus mycotoxins effects on dairy cow health, performance and the efficacy of Anti-Mycotoxin Additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovaišienė, J; Bakutis, B; Baliukonienė, V; Gerulis, G

    2016-01-01

    One hundred two samples of feeds made in Lithuania, which included maize silage, grass-legume silage, hay and ensiled crimped maize were investigated during 2008-2012 for contamination with some mycotoxins. The highest concentrations of mycotoxins determined were those of deoxynivalenol (DON)--471.0 μg/kg and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)--21.2 μg/kg in ryegrass silage from bales, and zearalenone (ZEA)--625.0 μg/kg in maize silage from trenches. The present study has been carried out based on these data because animal feeds contaminated with mycotoxins can cause reduced productivity of dairy cows and health disorders in the long term. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term exposure of toxic effects of a diet naturally contaminated with low concentrations of mycotoxins on milk composition and biochemical, hematological, immunological parameters of dairy cows and to determine the anti-mycotoxin effect of Mycofix Plus 3.E. Twenty eight clinically healthy, medium productive Lithuanian Red cows were selected. ZEA was a major contaminant found in the corn silage at concentration levels of up to 1000.0 μg/kg of dry matter. DON was the second major found in the hay at concentration levels of up to 600.0 μg/kg of dry matter. The highest concentration AFB1- 10.0 μg/kg was determined in ground barley. The Anti-Mycotoxin Additive (AMA) Mycofix Plus 3.E was given individually to 14 cows at a concentration of 40.0 g daily for 9 weeks. The present results indicate that feeds naturally contaminated with low concentration of mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. and Aspergillus spp. in a diet of dairy cows can have a negative influence on somatic cell count, blood parameters and immunity. The addition of an Anti-Mycotoxin Additive (Mycofix Plus 3.E) to diet of dairy cows can prevent many of these effects.

  5. Effects of feed-borne Fusarium mycotoxins and an organic mycotoxin adsorbent on immune cell dynamics in the jejunum of chickens infected with Eimeria maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, George N; Barta, John R; Girish, Channarayapatna K; Karrow, Niel A; Boermans, Herman J; Smith, Trevor K

    2010-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to explore the effects of Fusarium mycotoxins, common animal feed contaminants, on intestinal immune responses to coccidia (Eimeria) in chickens. Effects of feed-borne Fusarium mycotoxins and a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GMA) on immune cell populations were studied in the jejunum of broiler breeder pullets using an Eimeria maxima infection model. Birds were fed a control diet, a diet naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins, contaminated diet plus 0.2% GMA, or control diet plus 0.2% GMA. Contaminated diets contained up to 6.5μg/g deoxynivalenol (DON), 0.47μg/g 15-acetyl-DON and 0.73μg/g zearalenone. Birds received a primary oral inoculation (1000 oocysts/bird) with E. maxima USDA strain 68 at 2 weeks of age and a secondary oral inoculation (30,000 oocysts/bird) with the same strain at 4 weeks of age. Diet-related differences in CD4(+) cell, CD8(+) cell and macrophage recruitment pattern into the jejunum were observed following both the primary and secondary infections. It was concluded that feed-borne Fusarium mycotoxins and GMA have the potential to modulate immune response to coccidial infections.

  6. Occurrence of Fusarium Mycotoxins in Cereal Crops and Processed Products (Ogi from Nigeria

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    Cynthia Adaku Chilaka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Nigeria, maize, sorghum, and millet are very important cash crops. They are consumed on a daily basis in different processed forms in diverse cultural backgrounds. These crops are prone to fungi infestation, and subsequently may be contaminated with mycotoxins. A total of 363 samples comprising of maize (136, sorghum (110, millet (87, and ogi (30 were collected from randomly selected markets in four agro-ecological zones in Nigeria. Samples were assessed for Fusarium mycotoxins contamination using a multi-mycotoxin liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method. Subsequently, some selected samples were analysed for the occurrence of hidden fumonisins. Overall, 64% of the samples were contaminated with at least one toxin, at the rate of 77%, 44%, 59%, and 97% for maize, sorghum, millet, and ogi, respectively. Fumonisins were the most dominant, especially in maize and ogi, occurring at the rate of 65% and 93% with mean values of 935 and 1128 μg/kg, respectively. The prevalence of diacetoxyscirpenol was observed in maize (13%, sorghum (18%, and millet (29%, irrespective of the agro-ecological zone. Other mycotoxins detected were deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and their metabolites, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, HT-2 toxin, and hidden fumonisins. About 43% of the samples were contaminated with more than one toxin. This study suggests that consumption of cereals and cereal-based products, ogi particularly by infants may be a source of exposure to Fusarium mycotoxins.

  7. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonissen, Gunther; Van Immerseel, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (Penteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens.

  8. Effect of Environmental Factors on Fusarium Species and Associated Mycotoxins in Maize Grain Grown in Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Czembor

    Full Text Available Maize is one of the most important crops and Poland is the fifth largest producing country in Europe. Diseases caused by Fusarium spp. can affect the yield and grain quality of maize because of contamination with numerous mycotoxins produced by these fungi. The present study was performed to identify the prevailing Fusarium species and the environmental factors affecting their frequencies and the contamination of grain with the main mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON, zearalenone (ZON and fumonisin B1 (FB1. Thirty kernel samples were collected in three locations in 2011 and in seven locations in 2012 from three hybrids. On average, 25.24% kernels were colonized by Fusarium spp. (424 strains were isolated. Fusarium verticillioides and F. temperatum were the most prevalent species, F. subglutinans, F. proliferatum and F. graminearum were in minor abundance. In total, 272 isolates of F. verticillioides and 81 isolates of F. temperatum were identified. Fusarium temperatum frequency ranged from 1.70% to 28.57% and differences between locations were significant. Fumonisin B1 was found in all tested samples. DON was found in 66.67% and ZON in 43.33% of samples. Rainfall amount positively affected F. temperatum and F. subglutinans frequency in opposite to mean temperatures in July. On the other hand, relationships between frequency of these species and historical data from 1950-2000 for annual temperature range were negative in contrast to the coldest quarter temperatures.

  9. Effect of Environmental Factors on Fusarium Species and Associated Mycotoxins in Maize Grain Grown in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czembor, Elżbieta; Stępień, Łukasz; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Maize is one of the most important crops and Poland is the fifth largest producing country in Europe. Diseases caused by Fusarium spp. can affect the yield and grain quality of maize because of contamination with numerous mycotoxins produced by these fungi. The present study was performed to identify the prevailing Fusarium species and the environmental factors affecting their frequencies and the contamination of grain with the main mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZON) and fumonisin B1 (FB1). Thirty kernel samples were collected in three locations in 2011 and in seven locations in 2012 from three hybrids. On average, 25.24% kernels were colonized by Fusarium spp. (424 strains were isolated). Fusarium verticillioides and F. temperatum were the most prevalent species, F. subglutinans, F. proliferatum and F. graminearum were in minor abundance. In total, 272 isolates of F. verticillioides and 81 isolates of F. temperatum were identified. Fusarium temperatum frequency ranged from 1.70% to 28.57% and differences between locations were significant. Fumonisin B1 was found in all tested samples. DON was found in 66.67% and ZON in 43.33% of samples. Rainfall amount positively affected F. temperatum and F. subglutinans frequency in opposite to mean temperatures in July. On the other hand, relationships between frequency of these species and historical data from 1950–2000 for annual temperature range were negative in contrast to the coldest quarter temperatures. PMID:26225823

  10. The influence of gamma radiation and substrate on mycotoxin production by Fusarium culmorum IMI 309344

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, K. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Damoglou, A.P.; Patterson, M.F. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)]|[Department of Agriculture for Northern Ireland, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    Mycotoxin production (deoxynivalenol (DON), acetyl deoxynivalenol (A DON) and zearalenone) by Fusarium culmorum inoculated on to maize (heat sterilized, irradiation sterilized and non-sterile) and irradiated to 1 kGy or 3 kGy, or unirradiated, was investigated over a period of time. Lowest mycotoxin production was observed on non-sterile maize which may be due to the presence of a competitive microflora on non-sterile maize. In general, mycotoxin production was higher on heat-sterilized grain as compared to irradiation-sterilized maize. It was suggested that this pattern of mycotoxin production was possibly caused by changes in the grain brought about by autoclaving, which favoured mycotoxin production and possibly induced changes in irradiation-sterilized maize which inhibited mycotoxin production. On sterile maize, there was no significant difference in DON production by unirradiated, 1 kGy and 3 kGy irradiated cultures up to 56 d of incubation; between days 56 and 77 of incubation, DON production increased rapidly with largest increases occurring in irradiated (1 kGy and 3 kGy) cultures. On non-sterile grain, neither DON nor A DON were detected in unirradiated cultures of F. culmorum but were detected in cultures irradiated to 1 kGy and 3 kGy. In practice grain should be stored under conditions of temperature and moisture content which prevent fungal growth. However, in this study, the grain was stored under conditions that were approaching ideal for growth of the test organism. The results highlight that irradiation disinfestation of grain must be combined with good grain handling practices so that excessive mycotoxin production can be prevented during storage. (Author).

  11. The compositional mosaic of Fusarium species and their mycotoxins in unprocessed cereals, food and feed products in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanheule, Adriaan; Audenaert, Kris; De Boevre, Marthe; Landschoot, Sofie; Bekaert, Boris; Munaut, Françoise; Eeckhout, Mia; Höfte, Monica; De Saeger, Sarah; Haesaert, Geert

    2014-07-02

    Global food safety depends on continuous monitoring of food contaminants such as mycotoxins in cereals and cereal-derived products. Here, we combine this type of investigation with quantitative occurrence data on Fusarium infestation of these products in extensive correlation studies. Finally, this contributes to a thorough understanding of the presence, origin and physiology of Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) related mycotoxins and the correlations within their ranks. Two hundred and thirty-seven samples were analyzed from diverse cereal matrices, representing the most important stages of the cereal food and feed chain in Belgium. Food, feed and non-processed field samples were investigated, with a strong emphasis on whole-grain food products. Two approaches were pursued to estimate the full scope of FHB and its repercussions: UPLC-MS/MS was applied to detect twelve different mycotoxins, and Q-PCR was used to measure the presence of ten Fusarium species. We found that different matrices have different characteristic contamination profiles, and extensive correlation studies identified certain mycotoxins for future assessment (e.g. moniliformin produced by the Fusarium avenaceum/Fusarium tricinctum species group). The investigated harvest year of 2012 yielded many non-processed field materials containing elevated levels of deoxynivalenol (DON), while even in a so-called DON-year less prevalent toxins such as T-2 and HT-2 might be considered problematic due to their consistent co-occurrence with related mycotoxins. Our data illustrate complex interactions between the many Fusarium species that are responsible for FHB and their mycotoxins. Correlation studies demonstrate that consistent co-occurrence of mycotoxins is not to be neglected, and pinpoint issues for future surveillance and legislation.

  12. Deoxynivalenol in wheat and wheat products from a harvest affected by fusarium head blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Viera MACHADO

    Full Text Available Abstract Fusarium head blight is an important disease occurring in wheat, caused mainly by the fungus Fusarium graminearum. In addition to direct damage to crops, reduced quality and yield losses, the infected grains can accumulate mycotoxins (toxic metabolites originating from prior fungal growth, especially deoxynivalenol (DON. Wheat crops harvested in 2014/2015 in southern Brazil were affected by high levels of Fusarium head blight. In this context, the aim of this study was evaluate the mycotoxicological quality of Brazilian wheat grains and wheat products (wheat flour and wheat bran for DON. DON contamination was evaluated in 1,504 wheat and wheat product samples produced in Brazil during 2014. It was determined by high performance liquid chromatograph fitted to a mass spectrometer (LC-MS / MS. The results showed that 1,000 (66.5% out of the total samples tested were positive for DON. The mean level of sample contamination was 1047 µg.kg-1, but only 242 samples (16.1% had contamination levels above the maximum permissible levels (MPL - the maximum content allowed by current Brazilian regulation. As of 2017, MPL will be stricter. Thus, research should be conducted on DON contamination of wheat and wheat products, since wheat is a raw material widely used in the food industry, and DON can cause serious harm to public health.

  13. Fumonisins--mycotoxins produced by Fusarium moniliforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norred, W P

    1993-03-01

    Fumonisins are toxic metabolites of the fungus Fusarium moniliforme, which is a common contaminant of corn everywhere in the world. The fumonisins are carcinogenic in laboratory rats, and cause acute toxicity of domestic animals that mimics field cases of disease attributed to contamination of feed by F. moniliforme. These include both equine leukoencephalomalacia and porcine pulmonary edema. Fusarium moniliforme contamination of corn consumed by humans in certain areas of the world is associated with higher than average incidence of esophageal cancer, and fumonisins may be responsible. Analytical methods have been developed for fumonisins, but improvements are needed so that more accurate, less expensive, and more rapid assays of food and feedstuffs can be done. Fumonisins are structurally similar to sphingosine, and may exert their biological activity through their ability to block key enzymes (sphinganine- and sphingosine-N-acyltransferases) involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis. Much more research is needed to define the extent to which this mycotoxin adversely affects the food supply, and its involvement in animal and human diseases.

  14. Effect of preceding crop on Fusarium species and mycotoxin contamination of wheat grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianbo; Dong, Fei; Yu, Mingzheng; Xu, Jianhong; Shi, Jianrong

    2016-10-01

    The Fusarium graminearum species complex infects several cereals and causes the reduction of grain yield and quality. Many factors influence the extent of Fusarium infection and mycotoxin levels. Such factors include crop rotation. In the present study, we explored the effect of rice or maize as former crops on mycotoxin accumulation in wheat grains. More than 97% of samples were contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON). DON concentrations in wheat grains from rice and maize rotation fields were 884.37 and 235.78 µg kg(-1) . Zearalenone (ZEN) was detected in 45% of samples which were mainly collected from maize-wheat rotation systems. Fusarium strains were isolated and more F. graminearum sensu stricto (s. str.) isolates were cultured from wheat samples obtained from maize rotation fields. DON levels produced by Fusarium isolates from rice rotation fields were higher than those of samples from maize rotation fields. Rice-wheat rotation favours DON accumulation, while more ZEN contamination may occur in maize-wheat rotation models. Appropriate crop rotation may help to reduce toxin levels in wheat grains. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Occurrence of Fusarium Head Blight species and Fusarium mycotoxins in winter wheat in the Netherlands in 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Rijk, de T.C.; Booij, C.J.H.; Goedhart, P.W.; Boers, E.A.M.; Zhao, C.; Waalwijk, C.; Mol, J.G.J.; Lee, van der T.A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Most recent information on the occurrence of Fusarium Head Blight species and related mycotoxins in wheat grown in the Netherlands dates from 2001. This aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and levels of Fusarium Head Blight species and Fusarium mycotoxins, as well as their possible

  16. Deoxynivalenol. Derivation of concentration limits in wheat and wheat containing food products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters MN; Fiolet DCM; Baars AJ; CSR

    1999-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) produced by fungi of the Fusarium genus may occur in various cereal crops. A provisional TDI of 1.1 ug per kg body weight was derived to calculate concentration limits for the mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), in wheat and wheat food products. Children (1-4 years

  17. Deoxynivalenol. Derivation of concentration limits in wheat and wheat containing food products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters MN; Fiolet DCM; Baars AJ; CSR

    1999-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) produced by fungi of the Fusarium genus may occur in various cereal crops. A provisional TDI of 1.1 ug per kg body weight was derived to calculate concentration limits for the mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), in wheat and wheat food products. Children (1-4 years o

  18. Contrasting Roles of Deoxynivalenol and Nivalenol in Host-Mediated Interactions between Fusarium graminearum and Sitobion avenae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jassy Drakulic

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is the predominant causal species of Fusarium head blight in Europe and North America. Different chemotypes of the species exist, each producing a plethora of mycotoxins. Isolates of differing chemotypes produce nivalenol (NIV and deoxynivalenol (DON, which differ in toxicity to mammals and plants. However, the effect of each mycotoxin on volatile emissions of plant hosts is not known. Host volatiles are interpreted by insect herbivores such as Sitobion avenae, the English grain aphid, during host selection. Previous work has shown that grain aphids are repelled by wheat infected with DON-producing F. graminearum, and this study seeks to determine the influence of pathogen mycotoxins to host volatile chemistry. Volatile collections from infected hosts and olfactometer bioassays with alate aphids were performed. Infections with isolates that produced DON and NIV were compared, as well as a trichothecene deficient transformant derived from the NIV-producing isolate. This work confirmed the repellent nature of infected hosts with DON accumulation. NIV accumulation produced volatiles that were attractive to aphids. Attraction did not occur when NIV was absent and was, therefore, a direct consequence of NIV production.

  19. Contrasting Roles of Deoxynivalenol and Nivalenol in Host-Mediated Interactions between Fusarium graminearum and Sitobion avenae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulic, Jassy; Kahar, Mohd Haziq; Ajigboye, Olubukola; Bruce, Toby; Ray, Rumiana V

    2016-11-30

    Fusarium graminearum is the predominant causal species of Fusarium head blight in Europe and North America. Different chemotypes of the species exist, each producing a plethora of mycotoxins. Isolates of differing chemotypes produce nivalenol (NIV) and deoxynivalenol (DON), which differ in toxicity to mammals and plants. However, the effect of each mycotoxin on volatile emissions of plant hosts is not known. Host volatiles are interpreted by insect herbivores such as Sitobion avenae, the English grain aphid, during host selection. Previous work has shown that grain aphids are repelled by wheat infected with DON-producing F. graminearum, and this study seeks to determine the influence of pathogen mycotoxins to host volatile chemistry. Volatile collections from infected hosts and olfactometer bioassays with alate aphids were performed. Infections with isolates that produced DON and NIV were compared, as well as a trichothecene deficient transformant derived from the NIV-producing isolate. This work confirmed the repellent nature of infected hosts with DON accumulation. NIV accumulation produced volatiles that were attractive to aphids. Attraction did not occur when NIV was absent and was, therefore, a direct consequence of NIV production.

  20. Effects of dietary Fusarium mycotoxins on intestinal lymphocyte subset populations, cell proliferation and histological changes in avian lymphoid organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, C K; Smith, T K; Boermans, H J; Anil Kumar, P; Girgis, G N

    2010-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary Fusarium mycotoxins on gut immunity, cell proliferation, and histology of avian lymphoid organs. The efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GMA) was also determined. Seventy-two one-day-old male turkey poults were fed corn, wheat, and soybean meal-based diets for 21 days. Diets included control grains, contaminated grains and contaminated grains +0.2% GMA. The major contaminant was deoxynivalenol (3.9 μg/g) with lesser amounts of zearalenone (0.67-0.75 μg/g), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (0.34 μg/g) and HT-2 toxin (0.078-0.085 μg/g). T- and B-lymphocyte populations and crypt cellular proliferation in duodenum, jejunum, ileum and cecal tonsil were measured immunohistochemically on day 14 and 21. Histological changes were recorded after 14 and 21 days of feeding. Feeding contaminated grains significantly increased the percentage of B-lymphocytes in ileum on day 14, and reduced (Pcontaminated diets also caused a reduction (Pcontaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins results in adverse effects on gut immunity and mucosal cell proliferation.

  1. Occurrence of mycotoxins in wheat grains exposed to fungicides on fusarium head blight control in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Leandro N; Pizzutti, Ionara R; Balardin, Ricardo S; Dos Santos, Ingrid D; Dias, Jonatan V; Stefanello, Marlon T; Serafini, Pablo T

    2017-01-12

    Mycotoxins occurrence in wheat grains impose risks to human and animal health. The southern Brazil has favorable weather conditions for Fusarium graminearum infections and consequently for mycotoxins accumulation on grains. The goal of this study was to evaluate the behavior of new wheat commercial genotypes to Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), to control performance of new fungicide formulations and their relationship with mycotoxins concentration in grains. The manly mycotoxin occurrence on wheat grains in southern Brazil was deoxynivalenol (DON). Two cultivars showed high DON concentration above the tolerance limits (>3000 μg kg(-1)). Many other mycotoxins monitored presented concentrations below method detection limit. Satisfactory levels of fungicide effectiveness were achieved against F. graminearum. Some fungicides promoted a satisfactory decrease on DON accumulation in grains. The best results were obtained when prothioconazole was present. SDHI (Succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors) + QoI (Quinone outside inhibitors) fungicides showed benefic effects at FHB control at field, but it did not promote satisfactory reduction on DON contamination. Fungicides can be used satisfactory for FHB control and reduce DON contamination in grains in southern Brazil. The presence of prothioconazole should be recommended. Some genotypes showed high DON concentration and it was not directly related with FHB severity at field.

  2. Effects of Wheat Naturally Contaminated with Fusarium Mycotoxins on Growth Performance and Selected Health Indices of Red Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus × O. mossambicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriporn Tola

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to examine effects of wheat naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, DON 41 mg·kg−1 on growth performance and selected health indices of red tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus × O. mossambicus; initial weight = 4.3 g/fish. Five experimental diets were formulated by replacement of clean wheat with naturally contaminated wheat resulting in graded levels of DON and zearalenone (ZEN (Diet 1 0.07/0.01, Diet 2 0.31/0.09, Diet 3 0.50/0.21, Diet 4 0.92/0.37 and Diet 5 1.15/0.98 mg·kg−1. Groups of 50 fish were randomly allocated into each of 20 aquaria and fed to near-satiety for eight weeks. Growth rate, feed intake and feed efficiency of fish fed the experimental diets decreased linearly with increasing levels of Fusarium mycotoxins (p < 0.05. Although growth depression was associated with feeding diets naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins, especially DON, no biochemical and histopathological parameters measured in blood and liver appeared affected by Fusarium mycotoxin concentrations of diets (p > 0.05. Though there was no clear evidence of overt DON toxicity to red tilapia, it is recommended that feed ingredients should be screened for Fusarium mycotoxin contamination to ensure optimal growth performance.

  3. Effect of soil biochar amendment on grain crop resistance to Fusarium mycotoxin contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycotoxin contamination of food and feed is among the top food safety concerns. Fusarium spp. cause serious diseases in cereal crops reducing yield and contaminating grain with mycotoxins that can be deleterious to human and animal health. Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium verticillioides infect whe...

  4. Food safety of cereals: a chain wide approach to reduce Fusarium mycotoxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.E.; Ruckenbauer, P.; Visconti, A.; Osenburggen, W.A.; Nijs, den A.P.M.

    2002-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat and barley and Fusarium ear rot in maize is caused by several Fusarium species. The disease reduces the quality of the seed since several of these fungi produce mycotoxins. From a food safety point of view, consumption of mycotoxin-infected cereals is dangerous as

  5. Food safety of cereals: a chain wide approach to reduce Fusarium mycotoxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.E.; Ruckenbauer, P.; Visconti, A.; Osenburggen, W.A.; Nijs, den A.P.M.

    2002-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat and barley and Fusarium ear rot in maize is caused by several Fusarium species. The disease reduces the quality of the seed since several of these fungi produce mycotoxins. From a food safety point of view, consumption of mycotoxin-infected cereals is dangerous as

  6. Deoxynivalenol-producing ability of Fusarium culmorum strains and their impact on infecting barley in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekkour, Amine; Toumatia, Omrane; Meklat, Atika; Verheecke, Carol; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Zitouni, Abdelghani; Mathieu, Florence

    2015-06-01

    The cereal-pathogenic Fusarium culmorum (W.G. Smith), causal agent of various blights and rot diseases, is considered as a chronic fungus of economic concern worldwide including North African countries such as Algeria. This pathogen produces a wide range of mycotoxins, amongst which the type B-trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON). In addition to its acute and chronic side effects in livestock and humans, DON is believed to play a determinant role in the pathogenesis toward Triticeae. However, regardless its significant occurrence and impact, little is known about trichothecenes-producing ability of F. culmorum infecting cereals in Algeria. The PCR assay based on Tri genes of 12 F. culmorum strains (designated Fc1-Fc12), which were recovered from several cropping areas of North Algeria, revealed their trichothecenes-producing ability with 3-AcDON genotype. The molecular prediction was confirmed by HPLC analysis. All strains were able to produce the toxin at detectable levels. Strains Fc1 and Fc12 were the highest producers of this mycotoxin with 220 and 230 µg g(-1), respectively. The evaluation of pathogenic ability of strains through a barley infesting experiment exhibited the significant disease impact of most strains. Significant correlation between the DON-producing ability of strains and the increase in both disease severity (r = 0.88, P = 0.05) and disease occurrence (r = 0.70, P = 0.05) was observed. Chemotyping of F. culmorum isolates and evaluation of their pathogenic ability are reported for the first time for isolates from Algeria, and highlights the important potential of F. culmorum to contaminate cultivated cereal with DON trichothecenes.

  7. Susceptibility of Maize to Stalk Rot Caused by Fusarium graminearum Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Ocampo, L M; Al-Haddad, J; Scruggs, A C; Buell, C R; Trail, F

    2016-08-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a destructive pathogen of cereals that can cause stalk rot in maize. Stalk rot results in yield losses due to impaired grain filling, premature senescence, and lodging, which limits production and harvesting of ears. In addition, mycotoxins can make infected tissues unfit for silage. Our objectives were to evaluate the natural variation in stalk rot resistance among maize inbreds, to establish whether deoxynivalenol (DON)- and zearalenone (ZEA)-deficient strains are pathogenic on a panel of diverse inbreds, and to quantify the accumulation of DON in infected stalk tissue. Wild-type F. graminearum and mycotoxin mutants (DON and ZEA) were used to separately inoculate stalks of 9-week-old plants of 20 inbreds in the greenhouse. Plants were evaluated for lesion area at the inoculation point at 0, 2, 14, and 28 days postinoculation and tissues around lesions were sampled to determine the DON content. Regardless of their ability to produce DON or ZEA, all tested F. graminearum strains caused stalk rot; however, significant differences in disease levels were detected. Among the tested inbreds, Mp717 was resistant to all three F. graminearum strains while Mp317 and HP301 were only partially resistant. Accumulation of DON was significantly lower in infected stalks of the resistant and partially resistant inbreds than the susceptible inbreds. Analysis of the 20 inbreds using data from 17 simple-sequence repeats revealed population structure among the individuals; however, there was no association between genetic clustering and stalk rot resistance. These findings are an additional step toward breeding maize inbreds suitable for planting in fields infested with F. graminearum.

  8. Rapid screening of wheat bran contaminated by deoxynivalenol mycotoxin using Raman spectroscopy: a preliminary experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Mencaglia, A. A.; De Girolamo, A.; Lippolis, V.; Pascale, M.

    2016-05-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin frequently occurring in cereals and derived products, and regulated in many countries. Raman spectroscopy performed using optical fibers, with excitation at 1064 nm and a dispersive detection scheme, was utilized to analyze wheat bran samples naturally contaminated with DON. A multivariate processing of the spectroscopic data allowed to distinguish two classes of contamination, with DON below and above 400 μg/kg, respectively. Only one highly contaminated sample was misclassified. This preliminary result demonstrates the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a useful analytical tool for the non-destructive and rapid analysis of mycotoxins in food.

  9. The Food Contaminant Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Inhibits the Swallowing Reflex in Anaesthetized Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Abysique; Catherine Tardivel; Jean-Denis Troadec; Bernadette Félix

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on cereals, is known to be implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and animals. Among the symptoms, anorexia, reduction of weight gain and decreased nutrition efficiency were described, but the mechanisms underlying these effects on feeding behavior are not yet totally understood. Swallowing is a major motor component of ingestive behavior which allows the propulsion of the alimentary bolu...

  10. Bioprospecting for TRI101 in Fusarium: Searching for a Better Enzyme to Detoxify Deoxynivalenol (DON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common contaminant of wheat and barley in the United States. New strategies to mitigate the threat of DON need to be developed and implemented. Previous research has shown the value of an enzyme (TRI101) to modify DON and reduce its toxicity. Recent work by...

  11. Relationship between Fusarium spp. diversity and mycotoxin contents of mature grains in southern Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellin, Pierre; Dedeurwaerder, Géraldine; Duvivier, Maxime; Scauflaire, Jonathan; Huybrechts, Bart; Callebaut, Alfons; Munaut, Françoise; Legrève, Anne

    2016-07-01

    Over a 4-year period (2010-13), a survey aiming at determining the occurrence of Fusarium spp. and their relations to mycotoxins in mature grains took place in southern Belgium. The most prevalent species were F. graminearum, F. avenaceum, F. poae and F. culmorum, with large variations between years and locations. An even proportion of mating type found for F. avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. cerealis and F. tricinctum is usually a sign of ongoing sexual recombination. In contrast, an unbalanced proportion of mating type was found for F. poae and no MAT1-2 allele was present in the F. langsethiae population. Genetic chemotyping indicates a majority of deoxynivalenol (DON)-producing strains in F. culmorum (78%, all 3-ADON producers) and F. graminearum (95%, mostly 15-ADON producers), while all F. cerealis strains belong to the nivalenol (NIV) chemotype. Between 2011 and 2013, DON, NIV, enniatins (ENNs) and moniliformin (MON) were found in each field in various concentrations. By comparison, beauvericin (BEA) was scarcely detected and T-2 toxin, zearalenone and α- and β-zearalenols were never detected. Principal component analysis revealed correlations of DON with F. graminearum, ENNs and MON with F. avenaceum and NIV with F. culmorum, F. cerealis and F. poae. BEA was associated with the presence of F. tricinctum and, to a lesser extent, with the presence of F. poae. The use of genetic chemotype data revealed that DON concentrations were mostly influenced by DON-producing strains of F. graminearum and F. culmorum, whereas the concentrations of NIV were influenced by the number of NIV-producing strains of both species added to the number of F. cerealis and F. poae strains. This study emphasises the need to pay attention to less-studied Fusarium spp. for future Fusarium head blight management strategies, as they commonly co-occur in the field and are associated with a broad spectrum of mycotoxins.

  12. Comparative Analysis of Deoxynivalenol Biosynthesis Related Gene Expression among Different Chemotypes of Fusarium graminearum in Spring Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasinghe, Chami C.; Fernando, W. G. Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol (DON) and nivalenol (NIV) act as virulence factors and are essential for symptom development after initial infection in wheat. To date, 16 genes have been identified in the DON biosynthesis pathway. However, a comparative gene expression analysis in different chemotypes of Fusarium graminearum in response to Fusarium head blight infection remains to be explored. Therefore, in this study, nine genes that involved in trichothecene biosynthesis were analyzed among 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON) and nivalenol producing F. graminearum strains in a time course study. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that the expression of all examined TRI gene transcripts initiated at 2 days post-inoculation (dpi), peaked at three to four dpi and gradually decreased at seven dpi. The early induction of TRI genes indicates that presence of high levels of TRI gene transcripts at early stages is important to initiate the biosynthetic pathway of DON and NIV. Comparison of gene expression among the three chemotypes showed that relative expression of TRI genes was higher in 3-ADON producing strains compared with 15-ADON and NIV strains. Comparatively higher levels of gene expression may contribute to the higher levels of DON produced by 3-ADON strains in infected grains. PMID:27550207

  13. Effect of the Fusarium toxins, zearalenone and deoxynivalenol, on the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Z H; Deng, H D; Deng, Y T; Deng, J L; Zuo, Z C; Yu, S M; Shen, L H; Cui, H M; Xu, Z W; Hu, Y C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find effects of Fusarium toxins on brain injury in mice. We evaluated the individual and combined effect of the Fusarium toxins zearalenone and deoxynivalenol on the mouse brain. We examined brain weight, protein, antioxidant indicators, and apoptosis. After 3 and 5days of treatment, increased levels of nitric oxide, total nitric oxide synthase, hydroxyl radical scavenging, and malondialdehyde were observed in the treatment groups. This was accompanied by reduced levels of brain protein, superoxide dismutase (apart from the low-dose zearalenone groups), glutathione, glutathione peroxidase activity, and percentage of apoptotic cells. By day 12, most of these indicators had returned to control group levels. The effects of zearalenone and deoxynivalenol were dose-dependent, and were synergistic in combination. Our results suggest that brain function is affected by zearalenone and deoxynivalenol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Deoxynivalenol and other Fusarium toxins in wheat and rye flours on the Danish market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter Have; Pasikhani, Faranak Ghorbani; Berg, T.

    2003-01-01

    Information on the contamination of Danish cereals and cereal products with Fusarium toxins is limited and the last survey is from 1984/1985. In the present study, the occurrence of deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), HT-2 toxin, T-2 toxin and zearalenone (ZON) was investigated in. our of common...

  15. Multiplex Lateral Flow Immunoassays Based on Amorphous Carbon Nanoparticles for Detecting Three Fusarium Mycotoxins in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiya; Yu, Xuezhi; Wen, Kai; Li, Chenglong; Mujtaba Mari, Ghulam; Jiang, Haiyang; Shi, Weimin; Shen, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhanhui

    2017-09-13

    The detecting labels used for lateral flow immunoassays (LFAs) have been traditionally gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and, more recently, luminescent nanoparticles, such as quantum dots (QDs). However, these labels have low sensitivity and are costly, in particular, for trace detection of mycotoxins in cereals. Here, we provided a simple preparation procedure for amorphous carbon nanoparticles (ACNPs) and described multiplex LFAs employing ACNPs as labels (ACNP-LFAs) for detecting three Fusarium mycotoxins. The analytical performance of ACNPs in LFA was compared to GNPs and QDs using the same immunoreagents, except for the labels, allowing for their analytical characteristics to be objectively compared. The visual limit of detection for ACNP-LFAs in buffer was 8-fold better than GNPs and 2-fold better than QDs. Under optimized conditions, the quantitative limit of detection of ACNP-LFAs in maize was as low as 20 μg/kg for deoxynivalenol, 13 μg/kg for T-2 toxin, and 1 μg/kg for zearalenone. These measurements were much lower than the action level of these mycotoxins in maize. The accuracy and precision of the ACNP-LFAs were evaluated by analysis of spiked and incurred maize samples with recoveries of 84.6-109% and coefficients of variation below 13%. The results of ACNP-LFAs using naturally incurred maize samples showed good agreement with results from high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, indicating that ACNPs were more sensitive labels than and a promising alternative to GNPs used in LFAs for detecting mycotoxins in cereals.

  16. Distribution of disease symptoms and mycotoxins in maize ears infected by Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Elisabeth; Ellner, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Red ear rot an important disease of maize cultivated in Europe is caused by toxigenic Fusarium species like Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum. To get detailed information on the time course of the infection process leading to the accumulation of Fusarium mycotoxins in maize ears, a field study was conducted over 2 years with two maize varieties, which were inoculated with F. culmorum or F. graminearum isolates at the stage of female flowering. Every fortnight after inoculation, infection and contamination progress in the ears was followed by visually evaluating disease signs and analysing Fusarium toxin concentrations in the infected ear tissues. In principle, infection and mycotoxin distribution were similar in respect of pathogens, varieties, and years. External infection symptoms showing some small pale or brown-marbled kernels with dark brown pedicels were mainly seen at the ear tip, whereas internal infection symptoms on the rachis were much more pronounced and spread in the upper half showing greyish brownish or pink discoloration of the pith. Well correlated with disease symptoms, a top-down gradient from high to low toxin levels within the ear with considerably higher concentrations in the rachis compared with the kernels was observed. It is suggested that both Fusarium pathogens primarily infect the rachis from the tip toward the bottom, whereas the kernels are subsequently infected via the rachillae connected to the rachis. A special focus on the pronounced disease symptoms visible in the rachis may be an approach to improve the evaluation of maize-genotype susceptibility against red ear rot pathogens. It has to be underlined that the accumulation of Fusarium mycotoxins in the rachis greatly accelerated 6 weeks after inoculation; therefore, highest contamination risk is indicated for feedstuffs containing large amounts of rachis (e.g., corn cob mix), especially when cut late in growing season.

  17. The 5-oxoprolinase is required for conidiation, sexual reproduction, virulence and deoxynivalenol production of Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Piao; Chen, Yunyun; Wu, Huiming; Fang, Wenqin; Liang, Qifu; Zheng, Yangling; Olsson, Stefan; Zhang, Dongmei; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Zonghua; Zheng, Wenhui

    2017-09-16

    In eukaryotic organisms, the 5-oxoprolinase is one of the six key enzymes in the γ-glutamyl cycle that is involved in the biosynthetic pathway of glutathione (GSH, an antioxidative tripeptide counteracting the oxidative stress). To date, little is known about the biological functions of the 5-oxoprolinase in filamentous phytopathogenic fungi. In this study, we investigated the 5-oxoprolinase in Fusarium graminearum for the first time. In F. graminearum, two paralogous genes (FgOXP1 and FgOXP2) were identified to encode the 5-oxoprolinase while only one homologous gene encoding the 5-oxoprolinase could be found in other filamentous phytopathogenic fungi or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion of FgOXP1 or FgOXP2 in F. graminearum led to significant defects in its virulence on wheat. This is likely caused by an observed decreased deoxynivalenol (DON, a mycotoxin) production in the gene deletion mutant strains as DON is one of the best characterized virulence factors of F. graminearum. The FgOXP2 deletion mutant strains were also defective in conidiation and sexual reproduction while the FgOXP1 deletion mutant strains were normal for those phenotypes. Double deletion of FgOXP1 and FgOXP2 led to more severe defects in conidiation, DON production and virulence on plants, suggesting that both FgOXP1 and FgOXP2 play a role in fungal development and plant colonization. Although transformation of MoOXP1into ΔFgoxp1 was able to complement ΔFgoxp1, transformation of MoOXP1 into ΔFgoxp2 failed to restore its defects in sexual development, DON production and pathogenicity. Taken together, these results suggest that FgOXP1 and FgOXP2 are likely to have been functionally diversified and play significant roles in fungal development and full virulence in F. graminearum.

  18. Genetic Relationships, Carbendazim Sensitivity and Mycotoxin Production of the Fusarium Graminearum Populations from Maize, Wheat and Rice in Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC are important pathogens on wheat, maize, barley, and rice in China. Harvested grains are often contaminated by mycotoxins, such as the trichothecene nivalenol (NIV and deoxynivalenol (DON and the estrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN, which is a big threat to humans and animals. In this study, 97 isolates were collected from maize, wheat, and rice in Jiangsu and Anhui provinces in 2013 and characterized by species- and chemotype-specific PCR. F. graminearum sensu stricto (s. str. was predominant on maize, while most of the isolates collected from rice and wheat were identified as F. asiaticum. Fusarium isolates from three hosts varied in trichothecene chemotypes. The 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON chemotype predominated on wheat and rice population, while 15ADON was prevailing in the remaining isolates. Sequence analysis of the translation elongation factor 1α and trichodiene synthase indicated the accuracy of the above conclusion. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis suggested four groups with strong correlation with species, chemotype, and host. These isolates were also evaluated for their sensitivity to carbendazim and mycotoxins production. The maize population was less sensitive than the other two. The DON levels were similar in three populations, while those isolates on maize produced more ZEN. More DON was produced in carbendazim resistant strains than sensitive ones, but it seemed that carbendazim resistance had no effect on ZEN production in wheat culture.

  19. Genetic Relationships, Carbendazim Sensitivity and Mycotoxin Production of the Fusarium Graminearum Populations from Maize, Wheat and Rice in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianbo; Shi, Jianrong

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) are important pathogens on wheat, maize, barley, and rice in China. Harvested grains are often contaminated by mycotoxins, such as the trichothecene nivalenol (NIV) and deoxynivalenol (DON) and the estrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN), which is a big threat to humans and animals. In this study, 97 isolates were collected from maize, wheat, and rice in Jiangsu and Anhui provinces in 2013 and characterized by species- and chemotype-specific PCR. F. graminearum sensu stricto (s. str.) was predominant on maize, while most of the isolates collected from rice and wheat were identified as F. asiaticum. Fusarium isolates from three hosts varied in trichothecene chemotypes. The 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON) chemotype predominated on wheat and rice population, while 15ADON was prevailing in the remaining isolates. Sequence analysis of the translation elongation factor 1α and trichodiene synthase indicated the accuracy of the above conclusion. Additionally, phylogenetic analysis suggested four groups with strong correlation with species, chemotype, and host. These isolates were also evaluated for their sensitivity to carbendazim and mycotoxins production. The maize population was less sensitive than the other two. The DON levels were similar in three populations, while those isolates on maize produced more ZEN. More DON was produced in carbendazim resistant strains than sensitive ones, but it seemed that carbendazim resistance had no effect on ZEN production in wheat culture. PMID:25093387

  20. Emerging Fusarium and Alternaria Mycotoxins: Occurrence, Toxicity and Toxicokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Fraeyman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging Fusarium and Alternaria mycotoxins gain more and more interest due to their frequent contamination of food and feed, although in vivo toxicity and toxicokinetic data are limited. Whereas the Fusarium mycotoxins beauvericin, moniliformin and enniatins particularly contaminate grain and grain-based products, Alternaria mycotoxins are also detected in fruits, vegetables and wines. Although contamination levels are usually low (µg/kg range, higher contamination levels of enniatins and tenuazonic acid may occasionally occur. In vitro studies suggest genotoxic effects of enniatins A, A1 and B1, beauvericin, moniliformin, alternariol, alternariol monomethyl ether, altertoxins and stemphyltoxin-III. Furthermore, in vitro studies suggest immunomodulating effects of most emerging toxins and a reproductive health hazard of alternariol, beauvericin and enniatin B. More in vivo toxicity data on the individual and combined effects of these contaminants on reproductive and immune system in both humans and animals is needed to update the risk evaluation by the European Food Safety Authority. Taking into account new occurrence data for tenuazonic acid, the complete oral bioavailability, the low total body clearance in pigs and broiler chickens and the limited toxicity data, a health risk cannot be completely excluded. Besides, some less known Alternaria toxins, especially the genotoxic altertoxins and stemphyltoxin III, should be incorporated in risk evaluation as well.

  1. Emerging Fusarium and Alternaria Mycotoxins: Occurrence, Toxicity and Toxicokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeyman, Sophie; Croubels, Siska; Devreese, Mathias; Antonissen, Gunther

    2017-07-18

    Emerging Fusarium and Alternaria mycotoxins gain more and more interest due to their frequent contamination of food and feed, although in vivo toxicity and toxicokinetic data are limited. Whereas the Fusarium mycotoxins beauvericin, moniliformin and enniatins particularly contaminate grain and grain-based products, Alternaria mycotoxins are also detected in fruits, vegetables and wines. Although contamination levels are usually low (µg/kg range), higher contamination levels of enniatins and tenuazonic acid may occasionally occur. In vitro studies suggest genotoxic effects of enniatins A, A1 and B1, beauvericin, moniliformin, alternariol, alternariol monomethyl ether, altertoxins and stemphyltoxin-III. Furthermore, in vitro studies suggest immunomodulating effects of most emerging toxins and a reproductive health hazard of alternariol, beauvericin and enniatin B. More in vivo toxicity data on the individual and combined effects of these contaminants on reproductive and immune system in both humans and animals is needed to update the risk evaluation by the European Food Safety Authority. Taking into account new occurrence data for tenuazonic acid, the complete oral bioavailability, the low total body clearance in pigs and broiler chickens and the limited toxicity data, a health risk cannot be completely excluded. Besides, some less known Alternaria toxins, especially the genotoxic altertoxins and stemphyltoxin III, should be incorporated in risk evaluation as well.

  2. Bacterial endophytes from wild maize suppress Fusarium graminearum in modern maize and inhibit mycotoxin accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Kamel Mousa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Wild maize (teosinte has been reported to be less susceptible to pests than their modern maize (corn relatives. Endophytes, defined as microbes that inhabit plants without causing disease, are known for their ability to antagonize plant pests and pathogens. We hypothesized that the wild relatives of modern maize may host endophytes that combat pathogens. Fusarium graminearum is the fungus that causes Gibberella Ear Rot (GER in modern maize and produces the mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON. In this study, 215 bacterial endophytes, previously isolated from diverse maize genotypes including wild teosintes, traditional landraces and modern varieties, were tested for their ability to antagonize F. graminearum in vitro. Candidate endophytes were then tested for their ability to suppress GER in modern maize in independent greenhouse trials. The results revealed that three candidate endophytes derived from wild teosintes were most potent in suppressing F. graminearum in vitro and GER in a modern maize hybrid. These wild teosinte endophytes could suppress a broad spectrum of fungal pathogens of modern crops in vitro. The teosinte endophytes also suppressed DON mycotoxin during storage to below acceptable safety threshold levels. A fourth, less robust anti-fungal strain was isolated from a modern maize hybrid. Three of the anti-fungal endophytes were predicted to be Paenibacillus polymyxa, along with one strain of Citrobacter. Microscopy studies suggested a fungicidal mode of action by all four strains. Molecular and biochemical studies showed that the P. polymyxa strains produced the previously characterized anti-Fusarium compound, fusaricidin. Our results suggest that the wild relatives of modern crops may serve as a valuable reservoir for endophytes in the ongoing fight against serious threats to modern agriculture. We discuss the possible impact of crop evolution and domestication on endophytes in the context of plant defense.

  3. Covariation between line and testcross performance for reduced mycotoxin concentrations in European maize after silk channel inoculation of two Fusarium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Martin; Kessel, Bettina; Ouzunova, Milena; Miedaner, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Fusarium spp. in maize can contaminate grain with mycotoxins harmful to humans and animals. Breeding and growing resistant varieties is one alternative to reduce contamination by mycotoxins. Little is known about the population parameters relevant to resistance breeding. The objectives of this study were to draw conclusions on breeding of reduced mycotoxin concentrations of deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and fumonisins, and resistance to ear rot after silk channel inoculation with F. graminearum or F. verticillioides, respectively. For that, variation and covariation of line and testcross performance and correlations between both species and between mycotoxin concentrations and ear rot resistance were calculated. Means of ear rot after infection with F. graminearum were higher than with F. verticillioides. Moderate phenotypic correlations (r = 0.46-0.65) between resistances to both Fusarium spp. implicate the need of separate testing. Analyses of variance revealed significant (P inoculation. Moderate genotypic correlations between line and testcross performance were found (r = 0.64-0.83). The use of one moderately to highly susceptible tester is sufficient since genotypic correlations between testcrosses of different testers were high (r = 0.80-0.94). Indirect selection for testcross performance based on line performance is less effective than selection based on mycotoxin concentrations. Consequently, selection for resistance to ear rot and mycotoxin accumulation should be started among testcrosses tested first for general combining ability based on ear rot data in parallel with a negative selection for line per se performance.

  4. From the Gut to the Brain: Journey and Pathophysiological Effects of the Food-Associated Trichothecene Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Maresca

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites contaminating food and causing toxicity to animals and humans. Among the various mycotoxins found in crops used for food and feed production, the trichothecene toxin deoxynivalenol (DON or vomitoxin) is one of the most prevalent and hazardous. In addition to native toxins, food also contains a large amount of plant and fungal derivatives of DON, including acetyl-DON (3 and 15ADON), glucoside-DON (D3G), and potentially animal derivatives such as gluc...

  5. Effect of lignin supplementation of a diet contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on blood and intestinal lymphocyte subpopulations in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revajová, Viera; Levkut, Mikuláš; Levkutová, Mária; Bořutová, Radka; Grešaková, Lubomíra; Košiková, Božena; Leng, Lubomír

    2013-09-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of lignin supplementation of a diet contaminated with the Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEA) on peripheral blood leukocytes and duodenal immunocompetent cells in broiler chickens. From day 1 after hatching, all chickens were fed an identical control diet for two weeks. Then chickens of Group 1 continued to be fed the control diet, whereas Group 2 was fed the same diet supplemented with lignin at 0.5% level. Simultaneously, Group 3 started to receive a diet contaminated with DON (2.95 mg kg-1) and ZEA (1.59 mg kg-1), while Group 4 received an identical contaminated diet supplemented with 0.5% lignin for further two weeks. Samples of blood and duodenal tissue were collected from 6 birds of each group at 4 weeks of age. Neither counts of white blood cells nor phagocytic function in the peripheral blood were significantly affected in the mycotoxin- and/or lignin-treated birds. As compared to the control, increased numbers of IgM-bearing cells were found in the peripheral blood in Group 3 fed the contaminated diet (P contaminated diet supplemented with lignin (P contaminated diet led to reduced numbers of duodenal CD4+ cells, in Group 2 treated only with lignin the number of duodenal CD4+ cells was increased. Lignin enrichment of the contaminated diet did not eliminate the mycotoxin-induced reduction in the number of duodenal CD4+ cells. The results suggest that dietary supplementation of lignin as an indigestible compound to poultry feed may increase the density of some intestinal immunocompetent cells without exerting effects on that in the peripheral blood. However, when added to a diet contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins, lignin did not prevent the mycotoxin-induced changes in the numbers of blood and intestinal immunocompetent cells.

  6. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Antonissen

    Full Text Available Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001. DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001 and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014 indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023. Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens.

  7. Antioxidant Secondary Metabolites in Cereals: Potential Involvement in Resistance to Fusarium and Mycotoxin Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vessela eATANASOVA-PENICHON

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gibberella and Fusarium Ear Rot and Fusarium Head Blight are major diseases affecting European cereals. These diseases are mainly caused by fungi of the Fusarium genus, primarily Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium verticillioides. These Fusarium species pose a serious threat to food safety because of their ability to produce a wide range of mycotoxins, including type B trichothecenes and fumonisins. Many factors such as environmental, agronomic or genetic ones may contribute to high levels of accumulation of mycotoxins in the grain and there is an urgent need to implement efficient and sustainable management strategies to reduce mycotoxin contamination. Actually, fungicides are not fully efficient to control the mycotoxin risk. In addition, because of harmful effects on human health and environment, their use should be seriously restricted in the near future. To durably solve the problem of mycotoxin accumulation, the breeding of tolerant genotypes is one of the most promising strategies for cereals. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant resistance to both Fusarium and mycotoxin contamination will shed light on plant-pathogen interactions and provide relevant information for improving breeding programs. Resistance to Fusarium depends on the plant ability in preventing initial infection and containing the development of the toxigenic fungi while resistance to mycotoxin contamination is also related to the capacity of plant tissues in reducing mycotoxin accumulation. This capacity can result from two mechanisms: metabolic transformation of the toxin into less toxic compounds and inhibition of toxin biosynthesis. This last mechanism involves host metabolites able to interfere with mycotoxin biosynthesis. This review aims at gathering the latest scientific advances that support the contribution of grain antioxidant secondary metabolites to the mechanisms of plant resistance to Fusarium and mycotoxin accumulation.

  8. Antioxidant Secondary Metabolites in Cereals: Potential Involvement in Resistance to Fusarium and Mycotoxin Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela; Barreau, Christian; Richard-Forget, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Gibberella and Fusarium Ear Rot and Fusarium Head Blight are major diseases affecting European cereals. These diseases are mainly caused by fungi of the Fusarium genus, primarily Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium verticillioides. These Fusarium species pose a serious threat to food safety because of their ability to produce a wide range of mycotoxins, including type B trichothecenes and fumonisins. Many factors such as environmental, agronomic or genetic ones may contribute to high levels of accumulation of mycotoxins in the grain and there is an urgent need to implement efficient and sustainable management strategies to reduce mycotoxin contamination. Actually, fungicides are not fully efficient to control the mycotoxin risk. In addition, because of harmful effects on human health and environment, their use should be seriously restricted in the near future. To durably solve the problem of mycotoxin accumulation, the breeding of tolerant genotypes is one of the most promising strategies for cereals. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant resistance to both Fusarium and mycotoxin contamination will shed light on plant-pathogen interactions and provide relevant information for improving breeding programs. Resistance to Fusarium depends on the plant ability in preventing initial infection and containing the development of the toxigenic fungi while resistance to mycotoxin contamination is also related to the capacity of plant tissues in reducing mycotoxin accumulation. This capacity can result from two mechanisms: metabolic transformation of the toxin into less toxic compounds and inhibition of toxin biosynthesis. This last mechanism involves host metabolites able to interfere with mycotoxin biosynthesis. This review aims at gathering the latest scientific advances that support the contribution of grain antioxidant secondary metabolites to the mechanisms of plant resistance to Fusarium and mycotoxin accumulation. PMID:27148243

  9. Wildly Growing Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) Hosts Pathogenic Fusarium Species and Accumulates Their Mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępień, Łukasz; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Urbaniak, Monika

    2016-05-01

    Asparagus officinalis L. is an important crop in many European countries, likely infected by a number of Fusarium species. Most of them produce mycotoxins in plant tissues, thus affecting the physiology of the host plant. However, there is lack of information on Fusarium communities in wild asparagus, where they would definitely have considerable environmental significance. Therefore, the main scientific aim of this study was to identify the Fusarium species and quantify their typical mycotoxins present in wild asparagus plants collected at four time points of the season. Forty-four Fusarium strains of eight species--Fusarium acuminatum, Fusarium avenaceum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium equiseti, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium proliferatum, Fusarium sporotrichioides, and Fusarium tricinctum--were isolated from nine wild asparagus plants in 2013 season. It is the first report of F. sporotrichioides isolated from this particular host. Fumonisin B1 was the most abundant mycotoxin, and the highest concentrations of fumonisins B1-B3 and beauvericin were found in the spears collected in May. Moniliformin and enniatins were quantified at lower concentrations. Mycotoxins synthesized by individual strains obtained from infected asparagus tissues were assessed using in vitro cultures on sterile rice grain. Most of the F. sporotrichioides strains synthesized HT-2 toxin and F. equiseti strains were found to be effective zearalenone producers.

  10. Opposite effects of two trichothecene mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol and nivalenol, on the levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α and MIP-1β in HL60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Kushiro, Masayo

    2012-11-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the toxicities of the trichothecene mycotoxins deoxynivalenol and nivalenol, their effects on the secretion of anti-hematopoietic chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and MIP-1β in human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL60 were investigated. Exposure to deoxynivalenol for 24h significantly induced the secretion of chemokines. The induction of these chemokines may account for the leukopenia after exposure to trichothecene mycotoxins. Treatment with nivalenol decreased the secretion of these chemokines. Our finding that deoxynivalenol induces the secretion of these chemokines, whereas nivalenol has the opposite effect, clearly indicates that the toxicity mechanisms of deoxynivalenol and nivalenol differ.

  11. MICOTOXINAS DO FUSARIUM spp NA AVICULTURA COMERCIAL MYCOTOXIN OF FUSARIUM spp IN COMMERCIAL POULTRY

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    Elizabeth Santin

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Micotoxinas são metabólitos tóxicos produzidos por fungos, de natureza heterogênea e com variados princípios farmacológicos, que podem atuar sobre o organismo animal prejudicando o seu desempenho e desenvolvendo alterações patológicas graves. Nos últimos anos, as micotoxicoses têm recebido especial atenção devido às enormes perdas que vem causando na avicultura mundial. Fungos do gênero Fusarium são descritos como produtores de diversos tipos de toxinas. Assim sendo, as intoxicações causadas por essas micotoxinas, dificilmente ocorrerão devido a uma substância isolada, de forma que se faz necessário obter maiores informações sobre o efeito interativo dessas toxinas.Mycotoxins are fungi toxic metabolites, heterogeneous in their nature and with varied pharmacological actions. They can cause injuries to animals, resulting in decreased performance and serious pathologic lesion. In the last years, the mycotoxicosis has received special attention worldwide due to losses in poultry industry. Fusarium fungi are reported as producers of diverse mycotoxin. Therefore, intoxication caused by Fusarium mycotoxins will hardly be due to one separate substance and more information is needed about the interaction effect of these.

  12. Synergistic estrogenic effects of Fusarium and Alternaria mycotoxins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejdovszky, Katharina; Hahn, Kathrin; Braun, Dominik; Warth, Benedikt; Marko, Doris

    2017-03-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites formed by various fungal species that are found as natural contaminants in food. This very heterogeneous group of compounds triggers multiple toxic mechanisms, including endocrine disruptive potential. Current risk assessment of mycotoxins, as for most chemical substances, is based on the effects of single compounds. However, concern on a potential enhancement of risks by interactions of single substances in naturally occurring mixtures has greatly increased recently. In this study, the combinatory effects of three mycoestrogens were investigated in detail. This includes the endocrine disruptors zearalenone (ZEN) and α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) produced by Fusarium fungi and alternariol (AOH), a cytotoxic and estrogenic mycotoxin formed by Alternaria species. For evaluation of effects, estrogen-dependent activation of alkaline phosphatase (AlP) and cell proliferation were tested in the adenocarcinoma cell line Ishikawa. The estrogenic potential varied among the single substances. Half maximum effect concentrations (EC50) for AlP activation were evaluated for α-ZEL, ZEN and AOH as 37 pM, 562 pM and 995 nM, respectively. All three mycotoxins were found to act as partial agonists. The majority of binary combinations, even at very low concentrations in the case of α-ZEL, showed strong synergism in the AlP assay. These potentiating phenomena of mycotoxin mixtures highlight the urgent need to incorporate combinatory effects into future risk assessment, especially when endocrine disruptors are involved. To the best of our knowledge, this study presents the first investigation on synergistic effects of mycoestrogens.

  13. Risk assessment of chronic dietary exposure to the conjugated mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-β-glucoside in the Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.M.; Sprong, R.C.; Wester, P.W.; Boevre, de M.; Mengelers, M.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a risk assessment of dietary exposure to the conjugated mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-β-glucoside (DON-3G) in the Dutch population was conducted. Data on DON-3G levels in food products available in the Netherlands are scarce. Therefore, data on co-occurring levels of DON-3G and

  14. Risk assessment of chronic dietary exposure to the conjugated mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-β-glucoside in the Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.M.; Sprong, R.C.; Wester, P.W.; Boevre, de M.; Mengelers, M.J.B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a risk assessment of dietary exposure to the conjugated mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-β-glucoside (DON-3G) in the Dutch population was conducted. Data on DON-3G levels in food products available in the Netherlands are scarce. Therefore, data on co-occurring levels of DON-3G and deoxyn

  15. Occurence of Fusarium Mycotoxins in Wheat from Europe – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanciu Oana

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quality of cereals is very important for both human and animal nutrition. Fusarium mycotoxins include a great number of compounds. Trichothecenes, zearalenone (ZEN and fumonisins are the major Fusarium mycotoxins occurring in cereal grains, animal feeds and forages. Conditions that predispose to mycotoxin production by Fusarium species include humidity, temperature, aeration and substrate type. Even if a great number of fungal metabolites have been designated as mycotoxins, a small number are known to have significant animal/human health and economic significance. For this, the world-wide impact of mycotoxins on human and animal health is likely underestimated and the future in this area is to identify additional specific biomarkers and group of biomarkers that can be used to establish the exposition of human and animals to individual mycotoxins.

  16. Genetic variation and associations involving Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol accumulation in cultivated oat (Avena sativa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance in oats (Avena sativa L.) to infection by Fusarium graminearum was assessed in field trials in 2011-12 including 424 spring oat lines from North America and Scandinavia. Traits measured were Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), deoxynivalenol (DON) content, days to flowering (DTF) and days to matu...

  17. A survey of the natural occurrence of Fusarium mycotoxins in cereals grown in New Zealand in 1986-1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauren, D R; Agnew, M P; Smith, W A; Sayer, S T

    1991-01-01

    Fusarium mycotoxins, principally trichothecenes, occurred commonly in grain from crops in the North Island of New Zealand, but were much less common and also at the much lower levels in grains from South Island regions. The principal contaminants were trichothecenes of the nivalenol (NIV) and deoxynivalenol (DON) types. Trichothecenes derived from scirpentriol and T-2 tetraol were not common. Moniliformin occurred very rarely, while zearalenone contamination was not uncommon, but the levels were generally low. Maize kernels were commonly contaminated by moderate levels of both NIV- and DON-type trichothecenes, with levels up to 3.6 mg/kg and 11.95 mg/kg respectively recorded. The occurrence of NIV-type trichothecenes as a general contaminant in the range of 0.3-0.8 mg/kg, and frequently as the main contaminant, is unusual.

  18. Diversity of Fusarium species and mycotoxins contaminating pineapple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępień, Łukasz; Koczyk, Grzegorz; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka

    2013-08-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus var. comosus) is an important perennial crop in tropical and subtropical areas. It may be infected by various Fusarium species, contaminating the plant material with mycotoxins. The aim of this study was to evaluate Fusarium species variability among the genotypes isolated from pineapple fruits displaying fungal infection symptoms and to evaluate their mycotoxigenic abilities. Forty-four isolates of ten Fusarium species were obtained from pineapple fruit samples: F. ananatum, F. concentricum, F. fujikuroi, F. guttiforme, F. incarnatum, F. oxysporum, F. polyphialidicum, F. proliferatum, F. temperatum and F. verticillioides. Fumonisins B1-B3, beauvericin (BEA) and moniliformin (MON) contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in pineapple fruit tissue. Fumonisins are likely the most dangerous metabolites present in fruit samples (the maximum FB1 content was 250 μg g(-1) in pineapple skin and 20 μg ml(-1) in juice fraction). In both fractions, BEA and MON were of minor significance. FUM1 and FUM8 genes were identified in F. fujikuroi, F. proliferatum, F. temperatum and F. verticillioides. Cyclic peptide synthase gene (esyn1 homologue) from the BEA biosynthetic pathway was identified in 40 isolates of eight species. Based on the gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, none of the isolates tested were found to be able to produce trichothecenes or zearalenone.

  19. Fusarium Head Blight of Cereals in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L. K.; Jensen, J. D.; Nielsen, G. C.

    2011-01-01

    1957 to 2000, to determine incidence and abundance of individual Fusarium spp. The mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol, zearalenone, T-2, and HT-2 were quantified using liquid chromatography–double mass spectrometry. Major differences in the Fusarium species complex among the five cereals...

  20. Fusarium graminearum forms mycotoxin producing infection structures on wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boenisch Marike J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mycotoxin producing fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB of small grain cereals in fields worldwide. Although F. graminearum is highly investigated by means of molecular genetics, detailed studies about hyphal development during initial infection stages are rare. In addition, the role of mycotoxins during initial infection stages of FHB is still unknown. Therefore, we investigated the infection strategy of the fungus on different floral organs of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. under real time conditions by constitutive expression of the dsRed reporter gene in a TRI5prom::GFP mutant. Additionally, trichothecene induction during infection was visualised with a green fluorescent protein (GFP coupled TRI5 promoter. A tissue specific infection pattern and TRI5 induction were tested by using different floral organs of wheat. Through combination of bioimaging and electron microscopy infection structures were identified and characterised. In addition, the role of trichothecene production for initial infection was elucidated by a ΔTRI5-GFP reporter strain. Results The present investigation demonstrates the formation of foot structures and compound appressoria by F. graminearum. All infection structures developed from epiphytic runner hyphae. Compound appressoria including lobate appressoria and infection cushions were observed on inoculated caryopses, paleas, lemmas, and glumes of susceptible and resistant wheat cultivars. A specific trichothecene induction in infection structures was demonstrated by different imaging techniques. Interestingly, a ΔTRI5-GFP mutant formed the same infection structures and exhibited a similar symptom development compared to the wild type and the TRI5prom::GFP mutant. Conclusions The different specialised infection structures of F. graminearum on wheat florets, as described in this study, indicate that the penetration strategy of this fungus is far more

  1. Relationship between lutein and mycotoxin content in durum wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Rosa M; Sulyok, Michael; Jirsa, Ondřej; Spitzer, Tomáš; Krska, Rudolf; Polišenská, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Levels of lutein and a number of mycotoxins were determined in seven varieties of durum wheat (Triticum durum) and two varieties of common wheat (Triticum aestivum) in order to explore possible relationships amongst these components. Durum wheat cultivars always showed both higher lutein and mycotoxin contents than common wheat cultivars. The mycotoxins detected in both common and durum wheat cultivars were produced by the genera Fusarium, Claviceps, Alternaria and Aspergillus. Fusarium was the major producer of mycotoxins (26 mycotoxins) followed by Claviceps (14 mycotoxins), which was present only in some cultivars such as Chevalier (common wheat), Lupidur and Selyemdur (both durum wheat), Alternaria (six mycotoxins) and Aspergillus (three mycotoxins). Positive correlations between the levels of lutein and mycotoxins in durum wheat cultivars were found for the following mycotoxins: deoxynivalenol (DON), its derivative DON-3-glucoside, moniliformin, culmorin and its derivatives (5-hydroxyculmorin and 15-hydroxyculmorin).

  2. Metabolomic evaluation of conditions favoring mycotoxin production in isolates of Fusarium fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several species of Fusarium have the potential to produce secondary metabolites that have been identified as mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are often found in plants that serve as hosts for invasive fungi. Toxicity can serve as a mechanism for imparting virulence to invasive fungi, and can cause toxicity in...

  3. Effects of Wheat Naturally Contaminated with Fusarium Mycotoxins on Growth Performance and Selected Health Indices of Red Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus × O. mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tola, Siriporn; Bureau, Dominique P; Hooft, Jamie M; Beamish, Frederick W H; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Encarnação, Pedro; Petkam, Rakpong

    2015-05-29

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to examine effects of wheat naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, DON 41 mg·kg(-1)) on growth performance and selected health indices of red tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus × O. mossambicus; initial weight = 4.3 g/fish). Five experimental diets were formulated by replacement of clean wheat with naturally contaminated wheat resulting in graded levels of DON and zearalenone (ZEN) (Diet 1 0.07/0.01, Diet 2 0.31/0.09, Diet 3 0.50/0.21, Diet 4 0.92/0.37 and Diet 5 1.15/0.98 mg·kg(-1)). Groups of 50 fish were randomly allocated into each of 20 aquaria and fed to near-satiety for eight weeks. Growth rate, feed intake and feed efficiency of fish fed the experimental diets decreased linearly with increasing levels of Fusarium mycotoxins (p 0.05). Though there was no clear evidence of overt DON toxicity to red tilapia, it is recommended that feed ingredients should be screened for Fusarium mycotoxin contamination to ensure optimal growth performance.

  4. Fusarium species and mycotoxin profiles on commercial maize hybrids in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görtz, A.; Zühlke, S.; Spiteller, M.; Steiner, U.; Dehne, H.W.; Waalwijk, C.; Vries, de P.M.; Oerke, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract High year-to-year variability in the incidence of Fusarium spp. and mycotoxin contamination was observed in a two-year survey investigating the impact of maize ear rot in 84 field samples from Germany. Fusarium verticillioides, F. graminearum, and F. proliferatum were the predominant

  5. Survey on Contamination of Fusarium Mycotoxins in 2011-harvested Rice and Its By-products from Rice Processing Complexes in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soohyung Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate Fusarium mycotoxin contamination in rice samples from rice processing complexes (RPCs, paddy rice and rice-milling products such as husks, brown rice, blue-tinged rice, broken rice, rice bran, discolored rice, and polished rice were collected from nationwide in 2012. Three hundred seventy one samples of rice and its by-products were analyzed for three trichothethenes including nivalenol (NIV, deoxynivalenol (DON, and zearalenone (ZEA by LC/MS. Discolored rice samples were found to have the highest contamination of DON, NIV or ZEA, followed by broken rice. Polished rice samples were largely free from mycotoxins, except three samples which were contaminated with NIV or DON at safety level. The rice byproduct samples were contaminated at higher level and frequencies than polished rice samples.

  6. Susceptibility of Broiler Chickens to Coccidiosis When Fed Subclinical Doses of Deoxynivalenol and Fumonisins-Special Emphasis on the Immunological Response and the Mycotoxin Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Bertrand; Dohnal, Ilse; Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Eicher, Susan D; Selvaraj, Ramesh K; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Applegate, Todd J

    2016-07-27

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisins (FB) are the most frequently encountered mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in livestock diets. The effect of subclinical doses of mycotoxins in chickens is largely unknown, and in particular the susceptibility of birds to pathogenic challenge when fed these fungal metabolites. Therefore, the present study reports the effects of DON and FB on chickens challenged with Eimeria spp, responsible for coccidiosis. Broilers were fed diets from hatch to day 20, containing no mycotoxins, 1.5 mg DON/kg, 20 mg FB/kg, or both toxins (12 pens/diet; 7 birds/pen). At day 14, six pens of birds per diet (half of the birds) were challenged with a 25×-recommended dose of coccidial vaccine, and all birds (challenged and unchallenged) were sampled 6 days later. As expected, performance of birds was strongly affected by the coccidial challenge. Ingestion of mycotoxins did not further affect the growth but repartitioned the rate of reduction (between the fraction due to the change in maintenance and feed efficiency), and reduced apparent nitrogen digestibility. Intestinal lesions and number of oocysts in the jejunal mucosa and feces of challenged birds were more frequent and intense in the birds fed mycotoxins than in birds fed control feed. The upregulation of cytokines (interleukin (IL) IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) following coccidial infection was higher in the jejunum of birds fed mycotoxins. Further, the higher intestinal immune response was associated with a higher percentage of T lymphocytes CD4⁺CD25⁺, also called Tregs, observed in the cecal tonsils of challenged birds fed mycotoxins. Interestingly, the increase in FB biomarker of exposure (sphinganine/sphingosine ratio in serum and liver) suggested a higher absorption and bioavailability of FB in challenged birds. The interaction of DON and FB was very dependent on the endpoint assessed, with three endpoints reporting antagonism, nine additivity, and two synergism. In conclusion

  7. Susceptibility of Broiler Chickens to Coccidiosis When Fed Subclinical Doses of Deoxynivalenol and Fumonisins—Special Emphasis on the Immunological Response and the Mycotoxin Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Bertrand; Dohnal, Ilse; Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Eicher, Susan D.; Selvaraj, Ramesh K.; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Applegate, Todd J.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisins (FB) are the most frequently encountered mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species in livestock diets. The effect of subclinical doses of mycotoxins in chickens is largely unknown, and in particular the susceptibility of birds to pathogenic challenge when fed these fungal metabolites. Therefore, the present study reports the effects of DON and FB on chickens challenged with Eimeria spp, responsible for coccidiosis. Broilers were fed diets from hatch to day 20, containing no mycotoxins, 1.5 mg DON/kg, 20 mg FB/kg, or both toxins (12 pens/diet; 7 birds/pen). At day 14, six pens of birds per diet (half of the birds) were challenged with a 25×-recommended dose of coccidial vaccine, and all birds (challenged and unchallenged) were sampled 6 days later. As expected, performance of birds was strongly affected by the coccidial challenge. Ingestion of mycotoxins did not further affect the growth but repartitioned the rate of reduction (between the fraction due to the change in maintenance and feed efficiency), and reduced apparent nitrogen digestibility. Intestinal lesions and number of oocysts in the jejunal mucosa and feces of challenged birds were more frequent and intense in the birds fed mycotoxins than in birds fed control feed. The upregulation of cytokines (interleukin (IL) IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) following coccidial infection was higher in the jejunum of birds fed mycotoxins. Further, the higher intestinal immune response was associated with a higher percentage of T lymphocytes CD4+CD25+, also called Tregs, observed in the cecal tonsils of challenged birds fed mycotoxins. Interestingly, the increase in FB biomarker of exposure (sphinganine/sphingosine ratio in serum and liver) suggested a higher absorption and bioavailability of FB in challenged birds. The interaction of DON and FB was very dependent on the endpoint assessed, with three endpoints reporting antagonism, nine additivity, and two synergism. In conclusion

  8. Deactivating fusarium spores throughout anaerobic fermentation in biogas plants. A prospect; Abtoetung von Fusariensporen waehrend des Gaerprozesses in Biogasanlagen. Ein Ausblick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frauz, B.; Oechsner, H. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Landesanstalt fuer Landwirtschaftliches Maschinen- und Bauwesens; Weinmann, U. [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Tierernaehrung

    2006-07-01

    Fusarium (the most harmful grain fungus in the field, known as fusarium head blight) and its poisonous product, catabolic mycotoxin DON (Deoxynivalenol) are known for their damaging effects. Due to this, the most feasible, environmentally compatible and economical disposal option are being researched in a cooperative project, where deactivating the fungus and reducing its mycotoxin are in the foreground. (orig.)

  9. Association of single nucleotide polymorphic sites in candidate genes with aggressiveness and deoxynivalenol production in Fusarium graminearum causing wheat head blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talas Firas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (s.s. is an ubiquitous pathogen of cereals. The economic impact of Fusarium head blight (FHB is characterized by crop losses and mycotoxin contamination. Our objective was to associate SNP diversity within candidate genes with phenotypic traits. A total of 77 F. graminearum s.s. isolates was tested for severity of fungal infection (= aggressiveness and deoxynivalenol (DON production in an inoculated field experiment at two locations in each of two years. For seven genes known to control fungal growth (MetAP1, Erf2 or DON production (TRI1, TRI5, TRI6 TRI10 and TRI14 single nucleotides polymorphic sites (SNPs were determined and evaluated for the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD. Associations of SNPs with both phenotypic traits were tested using linear mixed models. Results Decay of LD was in most instances fast. Two neighboring SNPs in MetAP1 and one SNP in Erf2 were significantly (P pG of 25.6%, 0.5%, and 13.1%, respectively. One SNP in TRI1 was significantly associated with DON production (pG = 4.4. Conclusions We argue that using the published sequence information of Fusarium graminearum as a template to amplify comparative sequence parts of candidate genes is an effective method to detect quantitative trait loci. Our findings underline the potential of candidate gene association mapping approaches to identify functional SNPs underlying aggressiveness and DON production for F. graminearum s.s populations.

  10. Molecular strategies for detection and quantification of mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Jiang, Yueming; Chen, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Fusarium contamination is considered a major agricultural problem, which could not only significantly reduce yield and quality of agricultural products, but produce mycotoxins that are virulence factors responsible for many diseases of humans and farm animals. One strategy to identify toxigenic Fusarium species is the use of modern molecular methods, which include the analysis of DNA target regions for differentiation of the Fusarium species, particularly the mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species such as F. verticillioides and F. graminearum. Additionally, polymerase chain reaction assays are used to determine the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the toxins in order to facilitate a qualitative and quantitative detection of Fusarium-producing mycotoxins. Also, it is worth mentioning that some factors that modulate the biosynthesis of mycotoxins are not only determined by their biosynthetic gene clusters, but also by environmental conditions. Therefore, all of the aforementioned factors which may affect the molecular diagnosis of mycotoxins will be reviewed and discussed in this paper. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Trichothecene mycotoxins associated with potato dry rot caused by Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Javier A; Schwarz, Paul B; Gillespie, James; Rivera-Varas, Viviana V; Secor, Gary A

    2010-03-01

    Fusarium graminearum, a known producer of trichothecene mycotoxins in cereal hosts, has been recently documented as a cause of dry rot of potato tubers in the United States. Due to the uncertainty of trichothecene production in these tubers, a study was conducted to determine the accumulation and diffusion of trichothecenes in potato tubers affected with dry rot caused by F. graminearum. Potato tubers of cv. Russet Burbank were inoculated with 14 F. graminearum isolates from potato, sugar beet, and wheat and incubated at 10 to 12 degrees C for 5 weeks to determine accumulation of trichothecenes in potato tubers during storage. Twelve of the isolates were classified as deoxynivalenol (DON) genotype and two isolates were as nivalenol (NIV) genotype. Trichothecenes were detected only in rotted tissue. DON was detected in all F. graminearum DON genotype isolates up to 39.68 microg/ml in rotted potato tissue. Similarly, both NIV genotype isolates accumulated NIV in rotted potato tissue up to 18.28 microg/ml. Interestingly, isolates classified as genotype DON accumulated both DON and NIV in the dry rot lesion. Potato tubers were then inoculated with two isolates of F. graminearum chemotype DON and incubated up to 7 weeks at 10 to 12 degrees C and assayed for DON diffusion. F. graminearum was recovered from >53% of the isolations from inoculated tubers at 3 cm distal to the rotted tissue after 7 weeks of incubation but DON was not detected in the surrounding tissue. Based in this data, the accumulation of trichothecenes in the asymptomatic tissue surrounding dry rot lesions caused by F. graminearum is minimal in cv. Russet Burbank potato tubers stored for 7 weeks at customary processing storage temperatures.

  12. Exploring Fusarium head blight disease control by RNA interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology provides a novel tool to study gene function and plant protection strategies. Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which reduces crop yield and quality by producing trichothecene mycotoxins including 3-acetyl deoxynivalenol (3-ADO...

  13. Role of fungicides, application of nozzle types, and the resistance level of wheat varieties in the control of Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterházy, Akos; Tóth, Beáta; Varga, Monika; Bartók, Tibor; Szabó-Hevér, Agnes; Farády, László; Lehoczki-Krsjak, Szabolcs

    2011-11-01

    Fungicide application is a key factor in the control of mycotoxin contamination in the harvested wheat grain. However, the practical results are often disappointing. In 2000-2004, 2006-2008 and 2007 and 2008, three experiments were made to test the efficacy of fungicide control on Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) in wheat and to find ways to improve control of the disease and toxin contamination. In a testing system we have used for 20 years, tebuconazole and tebuconazole + prothioconazole fungicides regularly reduced symptoms by about 80% with a correlating reduction in toxin contamination. Averages across the years normally show a correlation of r = 0.90 or higher. The stability differences (measured by the stability index) between the poorest and the best fungicides are about 10 or more times, differing slightly in mycotoxin accumulation, FHB index (severity) and Fusarium damaged kernels (FDK). The weak fungicides, like carbendazim, were effective only when no epidemic occurred or epidemic severity was at a very low level. Similar fungicide effects were seen on wheat cultivars which varied in FHB resistance. In this study, we found three fold differences in susceptibility to FHB between highly susceptible and moderately resistant cultivars when treated with fungicides. In the moderately resistant cultivars, about 50% of the fungicide treatments lowered the DON level below the regulatory limit. In the most susceptible cultivars, all fungicides failed to reduce mycotoxin levels low enough for grain acceptance, in spite of the fact that disease was significantly reduced. The results correlated well with the results of the large-scale field tests of fungicide application at the time of natural infection. The Turbo FloodJet nozzle reduced FHB incidence and DON contamination when compared to the TeeJet XR nozzle. Overall, the data suggest that significant decreases in FHB incidence and deoxynivalenol contamination in field situations are possible with proper fungicide

  14. Role of Fungicides, Application of Nozzle Types, and the Resistance Level of Wheat Varieties in the Control of Fusarium Head Blight and Deoxynivalenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Lehoczki-Krsjak

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Fungicide application is a key factor in the control of mycotoxin contamination in the harvested wheat grain. However, the practical results are often disappointing. In 2000–2004, 2006–2008 and 2007 and 2008, three experiments were made to test the efficacy of fungicide control on Fusarium Head Blight (FHB in wheat and to find ways to improve control of the disease and toxin contamination. In a testing system we have used for 20 years, tebuconazole and tebuconazole + prothioconazole fungicides regularly reduced symptoms by about 80% with a correlating reduction in toxin contamination. Averages across the years normally show a correlation of r = 0.90 or higher. The stability differences (measured by the stability index between the poorest and the best fungicides are about 10 or more times, differing slightly in mycotoxin accumulation, FHB index (severity and Fusarium damaged kernels (FDK. The weak fungicides, like carbendazim, were effective only when no epidemic occurred or epidemic severity was at a very low level. Similar fungicide effects were seen on wheat cultivars which varied in FHB resistance. In this study, we found three fold differences in susceptibility to FHB between highly susceptible and moderately resistant cultivars when treated with fungicides. In the moderately resistant cultivars, about 50% of the fungicide treatments lowered the DON level below the regulatory limit. In the most susceptible cultivars, all fungicides failed to reduce mycotoxin levels low enough for grain acceptance, in spite of the fact that disease was significantly reduced. The results correlated well with the results of the large-scale field tests of fungicide application at the time of natural infection. The Turbo FloodJet nozzle reduced FHB incidence and DON contamination when compared to the TeeJet XR nozzle. Overall, the data suggest that significant decreases in FHB incidence and deoxynivalenol contamination in field situations are possible with

  15. The Status of Fusarium Mycotoxins in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review of Emerging Trends and Post-Harvest Mitigation Strategies towards Food Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilaka, Cynthia Adaku; De Boevre, Marthe; Atanda, Olusegun Oladimeji; De Saeger, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Fusarium fungi are common plant pathogens causing several plant diseases. The presence of these molds in plants exposes crops to toxic secondary metabolites called Fusarium mycotoxins. The most studied Fusarium mycotoxins include fumonisins, zearalenone, and trichothecenes. Studies have highlighted the economic impact of mycotoxins produced by Fusarium. These arrays of toxins have been implicated as the causal agents of wide varieties of toxic health effects in humans and animals ranging from acute to chronic. Global surveillance of Fusarium mycotoxins has recorded significant progress in its control; however, little attention has been paid to Fusarium mycotoxins in sub-Saharan Africa, thus translating to limited occurrence data. In addition, legislative regulation is virtually non-existent. The emergence of modified Fusarium mycotoxins, which may contribute to additional toxic effects, worsens an already precarious situation. This review highlights the status of Fusarium mycotoxins in sub-Saharan Africa, the possible food processing mitigation strategies, as well as future perspectives. PMID:28067768

  16. The Food Contaminant Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Inhibits the Swallowing Reflex in Anaesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abysique, Anne; Tardivel, Catherine; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Félix, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on cereals, is known to be implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and animals. Among the symptoms, anorexia, reduction of weight gain and decreased nutrition efficiency were described, but the mechanisms underlying these effects on feeding behavior are not yet totally understood. Swallowing is a major motor component of ingestive behavior which allows the propulsion of the alimentary bolus from the mouth to the esophagus. To better understand DON effects on ingestive behaviour, we have studied its effects on rhythmic swallowing in the rat, after intravenous and central administration. Repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve or of the tractus solitarius, induces rhythmic swallowing that can be recorded using electromyographic electrodes inserted in sublingual muscles. Here we provide the first demonstration that, after intravenous and central administration, DON strongly inhibits the swallowing reflex with a short latency and in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, using c-Fos staining, a strong neuronal activation was observed in the solitary tract nucleus which contains the central pattern generator of swallowing and in the area postrema after DON intravenous injection. Our data show that DON modifies swallowing and interferes with central neuronal networks dedicated to food intake regulation.

  17. The Food Contaminant Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Inhibits the Swallowing Reflex in Anaesthetized Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Abysique

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on cereals, is known to be implicated in acute and chronic illnesses in both humans and animals. Among the symptoms, anorexia, reduction of weight gain and decreased nutrition efficiency were described, but the mechanisms underlying these effects on feeding behavior are not yet totally understood. Swallowing is a major motor component of ingestive behavior which allows the propulsion of the alimentary bolus from the mouth to the esophagus. To better understand DON effects on ingestive behaviour, we have studied its effects on rhythmic swallowing in the rat, after intravenous and central administration. Repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve or of the tractus solitarius, induces rhythmic swallowing that can be recorded using electromyographic electrodes inserted in sublingual muscles. Here we provide the first demonstration that, after intravenous and central administration, DON strongly inhibits the swallowing reflex with a short latency and in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, using c-Fos staining, a strong neuronal activation was observed in the solitary tract nucleus which contains the central pattern generator of swallowing and in the area postrema after DON intravenous injection. Our data show that DON modifies swallowing and interferes with central neuronal networks dedicated to food intake regulation.

  18. Occurrence of Fusarium Mycotoxins in Cereal Crops and Processed Products (Ogi) from Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In Nigeria, maize, sorghum, and millet are very important cash crops. They are consumed on a daily basis in different processed forms in diverse cultural backgrounds. These crops are prone to fungi infestation, and subsequently may be contaminated with mycotoxins. A total of 363 samples comprising of maize (136), sorghum (110), millet (87), and ogi (30) were collected from randomly selected markets in four agro-ecological zones in Nigeria. Samples were assessed for Fusarium mycotoxins contami...

  19. Metabolomics to Decipher the Chemical Defense of Cereals against Fusarium graminearum and Deoxynivalenol Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Léa; Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela; Chéreau, Sylvain; Richard-Forget, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB) and Gibberella ear rot (GER), two devastating diseases of wheat, barley, and maize. Furthermore, F. graminearum species can produce type B trichothecene mycotoxins that accumulate in grains. Use of FHB and GER resistant cultivars is one of the most promising strategies to reduce damage induced by F. graminearum. Combined with genetic approaches, metabolomic ones can provide powerful opportunities for plant breeding through the identification of resistant biomarker metabolites which have the advantage of integrating the genetic background and the influence of the environment. In the past decade, several metabolomics attempts have been made to decipher the chemical defense that cereals employ to counteract F. graminearum. By covering the major classes of metabolites that have been highlighted and addressing their potential role, this review demonstrates the complex and integrated network of events that cereals can orchestrate to resist to F. graminearum. PMID:26492237

  20. The prevalence and impact of Fusarium head blight pathogens and mycotoxins on malting barley quality in UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L.K.; Cook, D.J.; Edwards, S.G.; Ray, R.V.

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium and Microdochium species can significantly affect the yield of barley grain as well as the quality and safety of malt and beer. The present study provides new knowledge on the impacts of the FHB pathogen complex on the malting and brewing quality parameters of naturally infected barley. Quantitative real-time PCR and liquid chromatography double mass spectrometry were used to quantify the predominant FHB pathogens and Fusarium mycotoxins, respectively, in commercially grown UK malting barley samples collected between 2007 and 2011. The predominant Fusarium species identified across the years were F. poae, F. tricinctum and F. avenaceum. Microdochium majus was the predominant Microdochium species in 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2011 whilst Microdochium nivale predominated in 2009. Deoxynivalenol and zearalenone quantified in samples collected between 2007 and 2009 were associated with F. graminearum and F. culmorum, whilst HT-2 and T-2, and nivalenol in samples collected between 2010 and 2011 correlated positively with F. langsethiae and F. poae, respectively. Analysis of the regional distribution and yearly variation in samples from 2010 to 2011 showed significant differences in the composition of the FHB species complex. In most regions (Scotland, the South and North of England) the harvest in 2010 had higher concentrations of Fusarium spp. than in 2011, although no significant difference was observed in the Midlands between the two years. Microdochium DNA was significantly higher in 2011 and in the North of England and Scotland compared to the South or Midlands regions. Pathogens of the FHB complex impacted negatively on grain yield and quality parameters. Thousand grain weight of malting barley was affected significantly by M. nivale and M. majus whilst specific weight correlated negatively with F. avenaceum and F. graminearum. To determine the impact of sub-acute infections of the identified Fusarium and Microdochium

  1. The prevalence and impact of Fusarium head blight pathogens and mycotoxins on malting barley quality in UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L K; Cook, D J; Edwards, S G; Ray, R V

    2014-06-02

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by Fusarium and Microdochium species can significantly affect the yield of barley grain as well as the quality and safety of malt and beer. The present study provides new knowledge on the impacts of the FHB pathogen complex on the malting and brewing quality parameters of naturally infected barley. Quantitative real-time PCR and liquid chromatography double mass spectrometry were used to quantify the predominant FHB pathogens and Fusarium mycotoxins, respectively, in commercially grown UK malting barley samples collected between 2007 and 2011. The predominant Fusarium species identified across the years were F. poae, F. tricinctum and F. avenaceum. Microdochium majus was the predominant Microdochium species in 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2011 whilst Microdochium nivale predominated in 2009. Deoxynivalenol and zearalenone quantified in samples collected between 2007 and 2009 were associated with F. graminearum and F. culmorum, whilst HT-2 and T-2, and nivalenol in samples collected between 2010 and 2011 correlated positively with F. langsethiae and F. poae, respectively. Analysis of the regional distribution and yearly variation in samples from 2010 to 2011 showed significant differences in the composition of the FHB species complex. In most regions (Scotland, the South and North of England) the harvest in 2010 had higher concentrations of Fusarium spp. than in 2011, although no significant difference was observed in the Midlands between the two years. Microdochium DNA was significantly higher in 2011 and in the North of England and Scotland compared to the South or Midlands regions. Pathogens of the FHB complex impacted negatively on grain yield and quality parameters. Thousand grain weight of malting barley was affected significantly by M. nivale and M. majus whilst specific weight correlated negatively with F. avenaceum and F. graminearum. To determine the impact of sub-acute infections of the identified Fusarium and Microdochium

  2. Modified Fusarium mycotoxins unmasked: From occurrence in cereals to animal and human excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Nathan; Devreese, Mathias; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2015-06-01

    Modified mycotoxins formed by plants, fungi and during some food processing steps may remain undetected by analytical methods, potentially causing underestimation of mycotoxin exposure and risk. Furthermore, due to altered physico-chemical characteristics of modified mycotoxins, these compounds might have different gastro-intestinal absorption compared to the unmodified forms, leading to altered modified mycotoxin plasma concentrations. Additionally, modified mycotoxins can be converted back into their corresponding unmodified forms by in vivo hydrolysis upon oral ingestion. This review aims to describe the current knowledge on the production, occurrence, toxicity and toxicokinetic properties of the modified Fusarium mycotoxins. The need for more occurrence data to correctly assess the risks associated with these modified mycotoxins is clearly indicated, including differences between commodities as well as geographical and climatological influences. Research on toxicity of these modified forms demonstrates the possibility of significant decreases as well as increases in the toxic effects of these compounds compared with those of the unmodified forms. Their toxicokinetics demonstrates that a decreased (increased) polarity of modified mycotoxins might cause enhanced (decreased) oral absorption. The possibility of in vivo hydrolysis, altered toxicity and their wide-spread occurrence makes modified mycotoxins a complex threat for which a risk assessment will require prospective multi-disciplinary efforts.

  3. Linkage mapping and identification of QTL affecting deoxynivalenol (DON) content (Fusarium resistance) in oats (Avena sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinyao; Skinnes, Helge; Oliver, Rebekah E; Jackson, Eric W; Bjørnstad, Asmund

    2013-10-01

    Mycotoxins caused by Fusarium spp. is a major concern on food and feed safety in oats, although Fusarium head blight (FHB) is often less apparent than in other small grain cereals. Breeding resistant cultivars is an economic and environment-friendly way to reduce toxin content, either by the identification of resistance QTL or phenotypic evaluation. Both are little explored in oats. A recombinant-inbred line population, Hurdal × Z595-7 (HZ595, with 184 lines), was used for QTL mapping and was phenotyped for 3 years. Spawn inoculation was applied and deoxynivalenol (DON) content, FHB severity, days to heading and maturity (DH and DM), and plant height (PH) were measured. The population was genotyped with DArTs, AFLPs, SSRs and selected SNPs, and a linkage map of 1,132 cM was constructed, covering all 21 oat chromosomes. A QTL for DON on chromosome 17A/7C, tentatively designated as Qdon.umb-17A/7C, was detected in all experiments using composite interval mapping, with phenotypic effects of 12.2–26.6 %. In addition, QTL for DON were also found on chromosomes 5C, 9D, 13A, 14D and unknown_3, while a QTL for FHB was found on 11A. Several of the DON/FHB QTL coincided with those for DH, DM and/or PH. A half-sib population of HZ595, Hurdal × Z615-4 (HZ615, with 91 lines), was phenotyped in 2011 for validation of QTL found in HZ595, and Qdon.umb-17A/7C was again localized with a phenotypic effect of 12.4 %. Three SNPs closely linked to Qdon.umb-17A/7C were identified in both populations, and one each for QTL on 5C, 11A and 13A were identified in HZ595. These SNPs, together with those yet to be identified, could be useful in marker-assisted selection to pyramiding resistance QTL.

  4. RNA interference (RNAi) as a potential tool for control of mycotoxin contamination in crop plants: concepts and considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycotoxin contamination in food and feed crops is a major concern worldwide. Fungal pathogens of the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium are a major threat to food and feed crops due to production of mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, 4-deoxynivalenol, patulin, and numerous other toxic seconda...

  5. Fate of Fusarium Toxins during Brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habler, Katharina; Geissinger, Cajetan; Hofer, Katharina; Schüler, Jan; Moghari, Sarah; Hess, Michael; Gastl, Martina; Rychlik, Michael

    2017-01-11

    Some information is available about the fate of Fusarium toxins during the brewing process, but only little is known about the single processing steps in detail. In our study we produced beer from two different barley cultivars inoculated with three different Fusarium species, namely, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium sporotrichioides, and Fusarium avenaceum, producing a wide range of mycotoxins such as type B trichothecenes, type A trichothecenes, and enniatins. By the use of multi-mycotoxin LC-MS/MS stable isotope dilution methods we were able to follow the fate of Fusarium toxins during the entire brewing process. In particular, the type B trichothecenes deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol showed similar behaviors. Between 35 and 52% of those toxins remained in the beer after filtration. The contents of the potentially hazardous deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside and the type A trichothecenes increased during mashing, but a rapid decrease of deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside content was found during the following steps of lautering and wort boiling. The concentration of enniatins greatly decreased with the discarding of spent grains or finally with the hot break. The results of our study show the retention of diverse Fusarium toxins during the brewing process and allow for assessing the food safety of beer regarding the monitored Fusarium mycotoxins.

  6. Occurrence of Fusarium mycotoxins and their dietary intake through beer consumption by the European population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Carrasco, Yelko; Fattore, Margherita; Albrizio, Stefania; Berrada, Houda; Mañes, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    Since cereals are raw materials for production of beer and beer-based drinks, the occurrence mycotoxins in 154 beer samples was topic of investigation in this study. The analyses were conducted using QuEChERS extraction and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry determination. The analytical method showed recoveries for vast majority of analytes ranged from 70% to 110%, relative standard deviations lower than 15% and limits of detection from 0.05 to 8 μg/L. A significant incidence of HT-2 toxin and deoxynivalenol (DON) were found in 9.1% and 59.7% of total samples, respectively. The exposure of European population to mycotoxins through beer consumption was assessed. No toxicological concern was associated to mycotoxins exposure for average beer consumers. Despite that, for heavy beer drinkers, the contribution of this commodity to the daily intake is not negligible, approaching or even exceeding the safety levels.

  7. From the gut to the brain: journey and pathophysiological effects of the food-associated trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Marc

    2013-04-23

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites contaminating food and causing toxicity to animals and humans. Among the various mycotoxins found in crops used for food and feed production, the trichothecene toxin deoxynivalenol (DON or vomitoxin) is one of the most prevalent and hazardous. In addition to native toxins, food also contains a large amount of plant and fungal derivatives of DON, including acetyl-DON (3 and 15ADON), glucoside-DON (D3G), and potentially animal derivatives such as glucuronide metabolites (D3 and D15GA) present in animal tissues (e.g., blood, muscle and liver tissue). The present review summarizes previous and very recent experimental data collected in vivo and in vitro regarding the transport, detoxification/metabolism and physiological impact of DON and its derivatives on intestinal, immune, endocrine and neurologic functions during their journey from the gut to the brain.

  8. From the Gut to the Brain: Journey and Pathophysiological Effects of the Food-Associated Trichothecene Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Maresca

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites contaminating food and causing toxicity to animals and humans. Among the various mycotoxins found in crops used for food and feed production, the trichothecene toxin deoxynivalenol (DON or vomitoxin is one of the most prevalent and hazardous. In addition to native toxins, food also contains a large amount of plant and fungal derivatives of DON, including acetyl-DON (3 and 15ADON, glucoside-DON (D3G, and potentially animal derivatives such as glucuronide metabolites (D3 and D15GA present in animal tissues (e.g., blood, muscle and liver tissue. The present review summarizes previous and very recent experimental data collected in vivo and in vitro regarding the transport, detoxification/metabolism and physiological impact of DON and its derivatives on intestinal, immune, endocrine and neurologic functions during their journey from the gut to the brain.

  9. Relationship between mycoparasites lifestyles and biocontrol behaviors against Fusarium spp. and mycotoxins production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon Hwa; Vujanovic, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Global food security research is seeking eco-friendly solutions to control mycotoxins in grain infected by fungi (molds). In particular, mycotoxigenic Fusarium spp. outbreak is a chronic threat for cereal grain production, human, and animal health. In this review paper, we discuss up-to-date biological control strategies in applying mycoparasites as biological control agents (BCA) to prevent plant diseases in crops and mycotoxins in grain, food, and feed. The aim is to increase food safety and to minimize economic losses due to the reduced grain yield and quality. However, recent papers indicate that the study of the BCA specialists with biotrophic lifestyle lags behind our understanding of the BCA generalists with necrotrophic lifestyle. We examine critical behavioral traits of the two BCA groups of mycoparasites. The goal is to highlight their major characteristics in the context of future research towards an efficient biocontrol strategy against mycotoxin-producing Fusarium species. The emphasis is put on biocontrol of Fusarium graminearum, F. avenaceum, and F. culmorum causing Fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereals and their mycotoxins.

  10. Perspectives for geographically oriented management of fusarium mycotoxins in the cereal supply chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Booij, C.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an overview of available systems for management of Fusarium mycotoxins in the cereal grain supply chain, with an emphasis on the use of predictive mathematical modeling. From the state of the art, it proposes future developments in modeling and management and their challenges.

  11. Natural occurrence of emerging Fusarium mycotoxins in feed and fish from aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, Josefa; Font, Guillermina; Mañes, Jordi; Ferrer, Emilia

    2014-12-24

    A new analytical method for the simultaneous determination of enniatins (ENs) and beauvericin (BEA) in fish feed and fish tissues by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with linear ion trap (LC-MS/MS-LIT) was developed. Results showed that the developed method is precise and sensitive. The presence of emerging Fusarium mycotoxins, ENs and BEA, was determined in samples of aquaculture fish and feed for farmed fish, showing that all feed samples analyzed were contaminated with mycotoxins, with 100% coexistence. In aquacultured fish samples, the highest incidence was found in edible muscle and liver. As for the exposure assessment calculated, it was found that average consumer intake was lower than tolerable daily intake (TDI) values for other Fusarium mycotoxins.

  12. Mycotoxin analysis of industrial beers from Brazil: The influence of fumonisin B1 and deoxynivalenol in beer quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, Karim C; Rocha, Liliana O; Fontes, Lívia C; Carnielli, Lorena; Reis, Tatiana A; Corrêa, Benedito

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide, barley is the main source of carbohydrate in the brewing process. However, corn is often used as an adjunct to improve and accelerate the fermentation process. Considering that, these two substrates are susceptible to fungal contamination as well as mycotoxins. The objective of the current study is to determine the incidence of the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) in industrial beers. The method applied for mycotoxin analyses included high performance liquid chromatography. The mean levels for recovery experiments were 89.6% for DON and 93.3% for FB1. DON was not detected in any of the analyzed samples whereas FB1 was found in 49% of the 114 samples. The current survey demonstrated levels of FB1 contamination in industrial beer, possibly due to the addition of contaminated adjuncts. It is necessary to establish maximum levels of mycotoxins in beer in Brazil and other countries in order to reduce health risks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Comparison of Aggressiveness and Deoxynivalenol Production Between Canadian Fusarium graminearum Isolates with 3-Acetyl and 15-Acetyldeoxynivalenol Chemotypes in Field-Grown Spring Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty four isolates of Fusarium graminearum, half of which were 3- acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON) and half 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON) chemotypes, were tested for their ability to produce deoxynivalenol and to cause Fusarium head blight (FHB), in spring wheat cultivars. The objectives of this...

  14. A Comparison of the Aggressiveness and Deoxynivalenol Content of Canadian 3-acetyl and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol Producers of Fusarium graminearum in Fieldgrown Spring Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty four isolates of Fusarium graminearum of Canadian origin half of which were 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON) and half 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON) producers, were tested for their ability to cause Fusarium head blight (FHB), as measured by FHB index and production of deoxynivalenol (DON) ...

  15. A barley UDP-glucosyltransferase inactivates nivalenol and provides Fusarium head blight resistance in transgenic wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium Head Blight is a disease of cereal crops that causes severe yield losses and mycotoxin contamination of grain. The main causal pathogen, Fusarium graminearum, produces the trichothecene toxins deoxynivalenol or nivalenol as virulence factors. Nivalenol-producing isolates are most prevalent ...

  16. Frequent Occupational Exposure to Fusarium Mycotoxins of Workers in the Swiss Grain Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Niculita-Hirzel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Type B trichotecens such as deoxynivalenol (DON, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON, nivalenol (NIV and zearalenone (ZEN are mycotoxins contaminating wheat and wheat dust. Mycotoxins are toxic upon ingestion and considered potentially toxic when inhaled. Whereas dietary exposure to mycotoxins is controlled in food, data on occupational exposure by inhalation by grain workers are scarce. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of DON, 3-ADON, 15-ADON, NIV and ZEN in aerosols generated during grain harvesting and unloading and the risk of exposure of grain workers. Aerosols were collected during the threshing of 78 winter wheat fields and grain unloading of 59 grain lots in six grain terminals in the Vaud region (Switzerland. The samples represented the diversity of the winter wheat cultivar and of the farming system (88 treated with fungicides, 46 untreated. Using a HPLC MS/MS method developed to quantify mycotoxins in aerosols, we report that the mycotoxin content of aerosols was not affected by the wheat cultivars or farming system, but that the incidence of the mycotoxins differed between activities. While wheat harvesting generated on average 28, 20 and 1 ng·m−3 of DON, NIV and ZEN, respectively, grain unloading generated 53, 46 and 4 ng·m−3. Personal sampling revealed that working in a cab was an efficient protective measure. However, it was not sufficient to avoid chronic exposure to multiple mycotoxins. The most exposed activity was the cleaning, exposing workers to DON, NIV and ZEN at concentrations as high as 65, 59 and 3 ng·m−3. These data provide valuable information for future studies of mycotoxin toxicity at relevant concentrations on respiratory health.

  17. Frequent Occupational Exposure to Fusarium Mycotoxins of Workers in the Swiss Grain Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène; Hantier, Gregoire; Storti, Ferdinand; Plateel, Gregory; Roger, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Type B trichotecens such as deoxynivalenol (DON), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), nivalenol (NIV) and zearalenone (ZEN) are mycotoxins contaminating wheat and wheat dust. Mycotoxins are toxic upon ingestion and considered potentially toxic when inhaled. Whereas dietary exposure to mycotoxins is controlled in food, data on occupational exposure by inhalation by grain workers are scarce. The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of DON, 3-ADON, 15-ADON, NIV and ZEN in aerosols generated during grain harvesting and unloading and the risk of exposure of grain workers. Aerosols were collected during the threshing of 78 winter wheat fields and grain unloading of 59 grain lots in six grain terminals in the Vaud region (Switzerland). The samples represented the diversity of the winter wheat cultivar and of the farming system (88 treated with fungicides, 46 untreated). Using a HPLC MS/MS method developed to quantify mycotoxins in aerosols, we report that the mycotoxin content of aerosols was not affected by the wheat cultivars or farming system, but that the incidence of the mycotoxins differed between activities. While wheat harvesting generated on average 28, 20 and 1 ng·m−3 of DON, NIV and ZEN, respectively, grain unloading generated 53, 46 and 4 ng·m−3. Personal sampling revealed that working in a cab was an efficient protective measure. However, it was not sufficient to avoid chronic exposure to multiple mycotoxins. The most exposed activity was the cleaning, exposing workers to DON, NIV and ZEN at concentrations as high as 65, 59 and 3 ng·m−3. These data provide valuable information for future studies of mycotoxin toxicity at relevant concentrations on respiratory health. PMID:27973454

  18. Mycotoxigenic Potentials of Fusarium Species in Various Culture Matrices Revealed by Mycotoxin Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Shi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, twenty of the most common Fusarium species were molecularly characterized and inoculated on potato dextrose agar (PDA, rice and maize medium, where thirty three targeted mycotoxins, which might be the secondary metabolites of the identified fungal species, were detected by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Statistical analysis was performed with principal component analysis (PCA to characterize the mycotoxin profiles for the twenty fungi, suggesting that these fungi species could be discriminated and divided into three groups as follows. Group I, the fusaric acid producers, were defined into two subgroups, namely subgroup I as producers of fusaric acid and fumonisins, comprising of F. proliferatum, F. verticillioides, F. fujikuroi and F. solani, and subgroup II considered to only produce fusaric acid, including F. temperatum, F. subglutinans, F. musae, F. tricinctum, F. oxysporum, F. equiseti, F. sacchari, F. concentricum, F. andiyazi. Group II, as type A trichothecenes producers, included F. langsethiae, F. sporotrichioides, F. polyphialidicum, while Group III were found to mainly produce type B trichothecenes, comprising of F. culmorum, F. poae, F. meridionale and F. graminearum. A comprehensive picture, which presents the mycotoxin-producing patterns by the selected fungal species in various matrices, is obtained for the first time, and thus from an application point of view, provides key information to explore mycotoxigenic potentials of Fusarium species and forecast the Fusarium infestation/mycotoxins contamination.

  19. Mycotoxigenic Potentials of Fusarium Species in Various Culture Matrices Revealed by Mycotoxin Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen; Tan, Yanglan; Wang, Shuangxia; Gardiner, Donald M.; De Saeger, Sarah; Liao, Yucai; Wang, Cheng; Fan, Yingying; Wang, Zhouping; Wu, Aibo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, twenty of the most common Fusarium species were molecularly characterized and inoculated on potato dextrose agar (PDA), rice and maize medium, where thirty three targeted mycotoxins, which might be the secondary metabolites of the identified fungal species, were detected by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Statistical analysis was performed with principal component analysis (PCA) to characterize the mycotoxin profiles for the twenty fungi, suggesting that these fungi species could be discriminated and divided into three groups as follows. Group I, the fusaric acid producers, were defined into two subgroups, namely subgroup I as producers of fusaric acid and fumonisins, comprising of F. proliferatum, F. verticillioides, F. fujikuroi and F. solani, and subgroup II considered to only produce fusaric acid, including F. temperatum, F. subglutinans, F. musae, F. tricinctum, F. oxysporum, F. equiseti, F. sacchari, F. concentricum, F. andiyazi. Group II, as type A trichothecenes producers, included F. langsethiae, F. sporotrichioides, F. polyphialidicum, while Group III were found to mainly produce type B trichothecenes, comprising of F. culmorum, F. poae, F. meridionale and F. graminearum. A comprehensive picture, which presents the mycotoxin-producing patterns by the selected fungal species in various matrices, is obtained for the first time, and thus from an application point of view, provides key information to explore mycotoxigenic potentials of Fusarium species and forecast the Fusarium infestation/mycotoxins contamination. PMID:28035973

  20. Masked mycotoxins: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthiller, Franz; Crews, Colin; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Saeger, Sarah De; Haesaert, Geert; Karlovsky, Petr; Oswald, Isabelle P; Seefelder, Walburga; Speijers, Gerrit; Stroka, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on plant metabolites of mycotoxins, also called masked mycotoxins. Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites, toxic to human and animals. Toxigenic fungi often grow on edible plants, thus contaminating food and feed. Plants, as living organisms, can alter the chemical structure of mycotoxins as part of their defence against xenobiotics. The extractable conjugated or non-extractable bound mycotoxins formed remain present in the plant tissue but are currently neither routinely screened for in food nor regulated by legislation, thus they may be considered masked. Fusarium mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusaric acid) are prone to metabolisation or binding by plants, but transformation of other mycotoxins by plants (ochratoxin A, patulin, destruxins) has also been described. Toxicological data are scarce, but several studies highlight the potential threat to consumer safety from these substances. In particular, the possible hydrolysis of masked mycotoxins back to their toxic parents during mammalian digestion raises concerns. Dedicated chapters of this article address plant metabolism as well as the occurrence of masked mycotoxins in food, analytical aspects for their determination, toxicology and their impact on stakeholders.

  1. Potential natural exposure of endangered red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) to mycotoxins aflatoxin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da-wei; Liu, Hong-yi; Zhang, Hai-bin; Cao, Ming-chang; Sun, Yong; Wu, Wen-da; Lu, Chang-hu

    2016-02-01

    A survey was conducted to determine whether mycotoxins were present in the foods consumed by red-crowned cranes (Grus japonensis) in the Yancheng Biosphere Reserve, China. Collected in the reserve's core, buffer, and experimental zones during overwintering periods of 2013 to 2015, a total of 113 food samples were analyzed for aflatoxin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and ochratoxin A using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The contamination incidences vary among different zones and the mycotoxins levels of different food samples also presented disparity. Average mycotoxin concentration from rice grain was greater than that from other food types. Among mycotoxin-positive samples, 59.3% were simultaneously contaminated with more than one toxin. This study demonstrated for the first time that red-crowned cranes were exposed to mycotoxins in the Yancheng Biosphere Reserve and suggested that artificial wetlands could not be considered good habitats for the birds in this reserve, especially rice fields.

  2. Post-anthesis moisture increased Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol levels in North Carolina winter wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowger, Christina; Patton-Ozkurt, Jennifer; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Perugini, Leandro

    2009-04-01

    ABSTRACT Current models for forecasting Fusarium head blight (FHB) and deoxynivalenol (DON) levels in wheat are based on weather near anthesis, and breeding for resistance to FHB pathogens often relies on irrigation before and shortly after anthesis to encourage disease development. The effects of post-anthesis environmental conditions on FHB are poorly understood. We performed a field experiment at Kinston, NC, to explore the effects of increasing duration of post-anthesis moisture on disease incidence, disease severity, Fusarium-damaged kernels (FDK), percent infected kernels, and DON. The experiment had a split-plot design, and one trial was conducted in each of two successive years. Main plots consisted of post-anthesis mist durations of 0, 10, 20, or 30 days. Subplots were of eight cultivars in the first year and seven in the second year, two being susceptible to FHB and the remainder each with varying degrees of apparent type I and type II resistance. Plots were inoculated by spraying Fusarium graminearum macroconidia at mid-anthesis. Averaging across years and cultivars, 10 or 20 days of post-anthesis mist had the same effect (P > or = 0.198) and were associated with an approximately fourfold increase in mean disease incidence and eightfold increase in disease severity compared with 0 days of mist (P < or = 0.0002). In both years, mean FDK percentages at 0 and 10 days post-anthesis mist were the same and significantly lower than FDK percentages under 20 or 30 days of post-anthesis mist. Mist duration had a significant effect on percent kernels infected with Fusarium spp. as detected by a selective medium assay of 2007 samples. Averaging across all cultivars, in both years, DON levels increased significantly for 10 days compared with 0 days of mist, and increased again with 20 days of mist (P < or = 0.04). This is the first investigation to show that extended post-flowering moisture can have a significant enhancing effect on FHB, FDK, DON, and percent

  3. Risk assessment of deoxynivalenol in food: Concentration limits, exposure and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, M.N.; Freijer, J.; Baars, B.J.; Fiolet, D.C.M.; Klaveren, van J.D.; Slob, W.

    2002-01-01

    The mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), is produced world-wide by the Fusarium genus in different cereal crops. We derived a provisional TDI of 1.1 mug/kg body weight (bw) and proposed a concentration limit of 129 mug DON/kg wheat based on this TDI and a high wheat consumption of children. In the perio

  4. The effects of deoxynivalenol on gene expression in the murine thymus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kol, S.; Hendriksen, P.J.M.; Loveren, van H.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium species and is often detected in grains. Because of its high abundance, there has been a large interest in the effects of DON in animals and humans. DON is known to be immunosuppressive at high concentrations and immunostimulatory at l

  5. Stability of the Trichothecene, Deoxynivalenol in Processed Foods and Wheat Flake Cereal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species, principally F. graminearum and F. culmorum. These fungi are natural contaminants of wheat, barley and corn and, consequently, DON is found in cereal-based foods. The effect of thermal processing on DON is variable: som...

  6. Deoxynivalenol. Derivation of concentration limits in wheat and wheat containing food products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters MN; Fiolet DCM; Baars AJ; CSR

    1999-01-01

    Het mycotoxine deoxynivalenol (DON), dat geproduceerd wordt door schimmels van het geslacht Fusarium, kan in verschillende graansoorten aanwezig zijn. Om concentratielimieten te berekenen voor DON in tarwe en tarwe-bevattende producten is een voorlopige TDI afgeleid van 1,1 4g per kg lichaamsgew

  7. Hexokinase plays a critical role in deoxynivalenol (DON) production and fungal development in Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leigang; Li, Baicun; Zhang, Yu; Jia, Xiaojing; Zhou, Mingguo

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight, is a common pathogen on small grain cereals worldwide and produces various trichothecenes [deoxynivalenol (DON) is predominant] during infection. A previous study has revealed that DON production is positively correlated with the occurrence of carbendazim (MBC) resistance. Here, we identified and characterized two putative genes encoding hexokinase in F. graminearum (FgHXK1 and FgHXK2), which is a rate-limiting enzyme in DON biosynthesis. The expression level of hexokinase genes and the production of pyruvate, which is the precursor of DON, were up-regulated in the MBC-resistant strain, indicating that hexokinase genes might be involved in increased DON production. Phylogenetic and comparative analyses indicated that FgHXK1 was the predominant hexokinase gene. Gene disruption showed that ΔFgHXK1 severely affected DON production, indicating that FgHXK1 played a role in the regulation of DON biosynthesis. Morphological characterization showed that ΔFgHXK1 led to inhibited vegetative growth and conidiation. Sensitivity tests to MBC and various stresses indicated that both ΔFgHXK1 and ΔFgHXK2 mutants showed no significant difference from parental strains. Pathogencity assays showed that ΔFgHXK1 mutants lost virulence on wheat head and corn stigma; however, they showed no change in sexual reproduction. The FgHXK1-overexpressing transformants were obtained subsequently. Their pyruvate and DON production was confirmed to be increased, indicating that FgHXK1 positively regulated DON biosynthesis. Although additional defects appeared in overexpression mutants, MBC sensitivity showed no change. All of the results indicated that the transcriptional level of FgHXK1 regulated DON biosynthesis, but showed no direct relationship with MBC resistance.

  8. MicroRNA expression profiles in liver and colon of sexually immature gilts after exposure to Fusarium mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzuzan, P; Woźny, M; Wolińska-Nizioł, L; Piasecka, A; Florczyk, M; Jakimiuk, E; Góra, M; Łuczyński, M K; Gajecki, M

    2015-01-01

    To improve our knowledge of the role of microRNAs (miRs) in responses of the porcine digestive system to two Fusarium mycotoxins, zearalenone (ZEN) and deoxynivalenol (DON), we examined the expression of 7 miRs (miR-9, miR-15a, miR-21, miR-34a, miR-122, miR-125b, and miR-192), previously found to be deregulated in diseased liver and colon cells. In this study, immature gilts were exposed to NOEL doses of ZEN (40 μg/kg/d), DON (12 μg/kg/d), ZEN + DON (40 + 12 μg/kg/d), andplacebo (negative control group) for 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 days. Before the treatment, expression levels of the selected miRs were measured in the liver, the duodenum, the jejunum, and the ascending and the descending colon of the gilts. Hierarchical clustering of the tissues by their miR expression profiles was consistent with what would be expected based on the anatomical locations and the physiological functions of the organs, suggesting that functions of the miRs are related to the specificities of the tissues in which they are expressed. A subset of 2 pairs of miRs (miR-21+miR-192 and miR-15a+miR-34a), which were assigned to two distinct clusters based on their tissue abundance, was then evaluated in the liver and the ascending and the descending colon during the treatment. The most meaningful results were obtained from the ascending colon, where a significant effect of the treatment was observed, suggesting that during the exposure to mycotoxins, the pathways involved in cell proliferation and survival were disordered. Changes in miR expression in the liver and the descending colon of the treated gilts were smaller, and were associated more with treatment duration than the exposure to ZEN, DON, or ZEN + DON. Further research should focus on identification of genes whose expression is regulated by these aberrantly expressed miRs. This should facili- tate understanding of the miRNA-regulated biological effects of mycotoxins.

  9. Population genetic structure and mycotoxin potential of the wheat crown rot and head blight pathogen Fusarium culmorum in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surveys for crown rot (FCR) and head blight (FHB) of Algerian wheat conducted during 2014 and 2015 revealed that Fusarium culmorum strains producing 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3ADON) or nivalenol (NIV) were the primary causal agents of these important diseases. Morphological identification of the isol...

  10. Modulation of mucin mRNA (MUC5AC and MUC5B) expression and protein production and secretion in Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultures following exposure to individual and combined Fusarium mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Lam-Yim Murphy; Allen, Kevin J; Turner, Paul C; El-Nezami, Hani

    2014-05-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are a critical component of the innate local immune response. In order to reduce the risk of pathogen infection or xenobiotic intoxication, different host defense mechanisms have been evolved. Evidence has shown that upon ingestion of food or feed contaminated with toxins (e.g., mycotoxins), IECs respond by regulating mucin secretions, which act as a physical barrier inhibiting bacterial attachment and subsequent infection-related processes. However, the effect of Fusarium mycotoxins on mucin production remains unclear. Consequently, the aim of this study was to evaluate individual and interactive effects of four common Fusarium mycotoxins, deoxynivalenol, nivalenol, zearalenone, and fumonisins B1 on mRNA expression and secretion of mucins, MUC5AC, and MUC5B, as well as total mucin-like glycoprotein secretion, using Caco-2 (absorptive-type) and HT29-MTX (secretive-type) cells and their co-cultures (initial seeding ratios Caco-2/HT29-MTX: 90/10 and 70/30). Our results showed that individual and mixtures of mycotoxins significantly modulated MUC5AC and MUC5B mRNA and protein, and total mucin-like glycoprotein secretion as measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and enzyme-linked lectin assay, respectively. Additive effects were not always observed for mixtures. Also, the present study showed that in co-cultures, lower MUC5AC and MUC5B mRNA, protein and total mucin production occurred following exposure, which might suggest higher intestinal permeability and susceptibility to toxin exposure. This study demonstrates the importance of selecting an appropriate cell model for the in vitro investigation of Fusarium mycotoxin effects either alone or in combinations on the immunological defense mechanisms of IECs, and will contribute to improved toxin risk assessments.

  11. Expression of the N-terminal 99 Amino Acids of Yeast Ribosomal Protein L3 in Transgenic Wheat Confers Resistance to Fusarium Head Blight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Blechl; R. Dill-Macky; A. Tortora; N.E. Turner

    2007-01-01

    @@ Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a worldwide disease for wheat or barley. The contamination of important agricultural products with the trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) or 4,15-diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) produced by Fusarium species poses a major health concern for both human and animals.

  12. The effects of feed-borne Fusarium mycotoxins and glucomannan in turkey poults based on specific and non-specific parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devreese, Mathias; Girgis, George N; Tran, Si-Trung; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska; Smith, Trevor K

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins and a yeast derived glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GMA) on selected specific and non-specific parameters in turkey poults. Two hundred and forty 1-day-old male turkey poults were fed the experimental diets for twelve weeks. Experimental diets were formulated with control grains, control grains+0.2% GMA, naturally-contaminated grains, or naturally-contaminated grains+0.2% GMA. Deoxynivalenol (DON) was the major contaminant of the contaminated grains and concentrations varied from 4.0 to 6.5 mg/kg in the contaminated diets. Non-specific parameters measured included: performance parameters, plasma biochemistry profiles, morphometry and CD8(+) T-lymphocyte counts in the duodenum. Plasma concentrations of DON and de-epoxydeoxynivalenol (DOM-1) were used as specific parameters. Performance parameters and plasma biochemistry were altered by the feeding of contaminated diets and GMA but this was not consistent throughout the trial. The feeding of contaminated diets reduced duodenal villus height and apparent villus surface area. This effect was prevented by GMA supplementation. The feeding of contaminated diets elevated total duodenal CD8(+) T-lymphocyte counts but this effect was not prevented by GMA. No significant differences were seen in plasma concentrations of DON and DOM-1 comparing birds fed contaminated and contaminated+GMA diets suggesting that GMA did not prevent DON absorption under these conditions.

  13. Occurrence of Fusarium mycotoxins in maize imported into the UK, 2004-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudamore, K A; Patel, S

    2009-03-01

    This study examined a total of 82 consignments of French and Argentinean raw maize as received at maize mills in the UK between 2004 and 2007. Samples were analysed for deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV), other trichothecenes, zearalenone (ZON), and fumonisins B(1), B(2), and B(3) (FB(1), FB(2), and FB(3)) using fully validated analytical methods with limits of quantification of 10 microg kg(-1) for DON, NIV, and each fumonisin mycotoxin and 3 microg kg(-1) for ZON. All samples except two containing fumonisins met the European Commission statutory maximum permissible levels for DON, ZON, and FB(1) + FB(2) as operating in 2007. The maximum concentrations found for DON, NIV, ZON, and FB(1) + FB(2) were 444, 496, 165 and 5002 microg kg(-1), respectively. Fumonisins were detected in almost every sample with 65% of Argentinean maize containing more than 1000 microg kg(-1) of FB(1) + FB(2). In contrast, ZON was not detectable in almost 50% of consignments. During this period there was a distinct difference in mycotoxin concentrations between harvests and geographic origin. Flint maize from Argentina usually contained lower concentrations of DON and related trichothecenes and higher levels of fumonisins than maize from France, although concentrations of fumonisins up to 2000 microg kg(-1) or greater occurred in samples from both regions. The incidence and concentrations of fumonisins were similar to those in a similar previous survey, while zearalenone concentrations were lower. The distribution of mycotoxins in multi-hold ships was also investigated showing that fumonisins were much more evenly distributed than DON, thus indicating their general level in the ship as a whole. The effect of cleaning regimes was found to be very variable, especially for DON, ranging from no removal of mycotoxins to greater than 50% in some instances, but was not related to concentration. Evidence here suggests that while cleaning is essential for removing foreign bodies before milling

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Citrobacter freundii Strain A47, Resistant to the Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Lepp, Dion; Pauls, K. P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Citrobacter freundii strain A47 with a length of 4,878,242 bp, which contains 4,357 putative protein coding genes, including 270 unique genes. This work is expected to assist in obtaining novel gene(s) that code for deoxynivalenol (DON) de-epoxidation enzyme(s). PMID:28302773

  15. Advances in Deoxynivalenol Toxicity Mechanisms: The Brain as a Target

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Denis Troadec; Julien Roux; Lourdes Mounien; Michel Dallaporta; Marion S Bonnet

    2012-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), mainly produced by Fusarium fungi, and also commonly called vomitoxin, is a trichothecene mycotoxin. It is one of the most abundant trichothecenes which contaminate cereals consumed by farm animals and humans. The extent of cereal contamination is strongly associated with rainfall and moisture at the time of flowering and with grain storage conditions. DON consumption may result in intoxication, the severity of which is dose-dependent and may lead to different symptoms i...

  16. Natural occurrence of Fusarium mycotoxins in aquaculture fish food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tolosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Las micotoxinas son metabolitos secundarios producidos por hongos filamentosos, principalmente Fusarium spp., Aspergillus spp. y Penicillium spp. Fusarium puede producir las denominadas micotoxinas emergentes: beauvericina y eniatinas (eniatina A, eniatina A1, eniatina B y eniatina B1, entre otras. Estas micotoxinas están presentes en piensos destinados a peces de piscifactoría que incluyen cereales en su composición. Además, estas micotoxinas, al ser ingeridas, pueden aparecer en el músculo de los animales, suponiendo un riesgo potencial para la salud humana, por lo que en el presente trabajo se propone el estudio de la presencia de las micotoxinas emergentes de Fusarium (beauvericina y eniatinas en pescado. La extracción se realiza con acetonitrilo usando ultrasonidos. Las micotoxinas son identificadas y cuantificadas mediante cromatografía líquida y espectrometría de masas con triple cuadrupolo. Se analizaron un total de diecinueve muestras de pescado, dieciséis de ellas (lubina y dorada procedentes de piscifactorías y tres muestras procedentes de la pesca extractiva (bacalao, caballa y merluza, todas ellas adquiridas en diferentes supermercados de Valencia. Se detectaron niveles de eniatina A1, eniatina B y eniatina B1 del orden de μg/kg en muestras de pescado procedente de piscifactoría. La presencia de estas micotoxinas en el tejido de los peces puede ser debida a la ingesta de éstas con el pienso. Los resultados mostraron que las muestras correspondientes a peces procedentes de piscifactoría estaban contaminadas con micotoxinas, mientras que en las muestras de pesca extractiva no se detectó contaminación. Eniatina A y beauvericina no se detectaron en las muestras analizadas, mientras que la eniatina B fue la micotoxina más prevalente.

  17. [Determination of deoxynivalenol (DON) in wheat, barley and corn and its relationship with the levels of total molds, Fusarium spp., colonization percentage and water activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Contreras, M C; Martínez Yepez, A J; Raybaudi Martínez, R

    2000-06-01

    Fifty samples of cereals including 30 of wheat (10 of wheat hard red spring), 10 of wheat soft red winter and 10 of wheat durum ámber), 10 of barley and 10 of corn (5 of white corn and 5 of yellow corn) were analyzed to detect and determine by the TLC method, the quantity of deoxynivalenol levels, which is a toxic secondary metabolite produced by Fusarium species. The aw of samples and the internal and external micoflora and Fusarium spp. levels were also investigated. Results showed that the highest grade of infection (12-80%), and the highest count of total molds (3.9 Log UFC/g) were detected in wheat samples, while the highest levels of Fusarium spp. (2.3 Log UFC/g) were detected in white corn. Deoxynivalenol was found in the wheat and barley samples but not in corn. The wheat red winter soft samples showed the highest levels of deoxynivalenol (3.2 ug/g) which is over the limit levels accepted by the FDA. Correlation was not found among count of total molds, Fusarium spp., infestation grade, aw, and deoxynivalenol levels. These results suggest that it is necessary to exert measures to avoid and to control the importation of contaminated cereals with DON levels higher to those allowed.

  18. Effects of Fusarium toxin-contaminated wheat and feed intake level on the biotransformation and carry-over of deoxynivalenol in dairy cows.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeling, K; Dänicke, S; Valenta, H; Egmond, H P van; Schothorst, R C; Jekel, A A; Lebzien, P; Schollenberger, M; Razzazi-Fazeli, E; Flachowsky, G

    2006-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to examine the effects of feeding Fusarium toxin-contaminated wheat (8.21 mg deoxynivalenol (DON) and 0.09 mg zearalenone (ZON) per kg dry matter) at different feed intake levels on the biotransformation and carry-over of DON in dairy cows. For this purpose, 14 ruminal

  19. A lipid transfer protein increases the glutathione content and enhances Arabidopsis resistance to a trichothecene mycotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite cons...

  20. Simultaneous determination of 10 mycotoxins in grain by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using ¹³C₁₅-deoxynivalenol as internal standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, P G; Han, Z; Cai, Z X; Wu, Y J; Ren, Y P

    2010-12-01

    An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous determination of 10 mycotoxins in grain was developed. The selected mycotoxins were: deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, nivalenol, fusarenon X, moniliformin, zearalenone, zearalanone, ochratoxin A and ochratoxin B. The samples were extracted with aqueous acetonitrile (84 : 16, v/v) and purified by reliable laboratory-made mixed cartridges. The analytes were separated on an Acquity UPLC HSS T3 column (100 × 2.1 mm, 1.8 µm) and eluted with a mobile phase of water containing 0.2% aqueous ammonia and acetonitrile/methanol (90 : 10, v/v). All mycotoxins were detected with a Waters Micromass Quattro Ultima Pt tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in negative electrospray ionization using multiple reaction monitoring mode. Accurate determination was achieved by employing commercial ¹³C₁₅-deoxynivalenol as internal standard, which compensated for target loss and eliminated matrix effects. The established method was further validated by determining the linearity (R² > 0.9990), average recovery (75.8-106.5%), sensitivity (limit of quantitation 0.09-8.48 µg kg⁻¹) and precision (relative standard deviation ≤ 6.9%). It was shown to be a suitable method for simultaneous determination of 10 mycotoxins in grain. Finally, a total of 69 corn samples randomly collected from eastern and northern China were analyzed. The results showed that deoxynivalenol was the most frequently detected contaminant, whilst 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, nivalenol, zearalenone, zearalanone, fusarenon X and moniliformin also occurred frequently. Ochratoxin A and ochratoxin B were present only in trace amounts in a small number of samples.

  1. The AreA transcription factor mediates the regulation of deoxynivalenol (DON) synthesis by ammonium and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling in Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Rui; Jiang, Cong; Zheng, Qian; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2015-12-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium graminearum, is harmful to humans and animals. Because different nitrogen sources are known to have opposite effects on DON production, in this study, we characterized the regulatory mechanisms of the AREA transcription factor in trichothecene biosynthesis. The ΔareA mutant showed significantly reduced vegetative growth and DON production in cultures inoculated with hyphae. Suppression of TRI gene expression and DON production by ammonium were diminished in the ΔareA mutant. The deletion of AREA also affected the stimulatory effects of arginine on DON biosynthesis. The AreA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion complemented the ΔareA mutant, and its localization to the nucleus was enhanced under nitrogen starvation conditions. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the conserved predicted protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site S874 was important for AreA function, indicating that AreA may be a downstream target of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-PKA pathway, which is known to regulate DON production. We also showed that AreA interacted with Tri10 in co-immunoprecipitation assays. The interaction of AreA with Tri10 is probably related to its role in the regulation of TRI gene expression. Interestingly, the ΔareA mutant showed significantly reduced PKA activity and expression of all three predicted ammonium permease (MEP) genes, in particular MEP1, under low ammonium conditions. Taken together, our results show that AREA is involved in the regulation of DON production by ammonium suppression and the cAMP-PKA pathway. The AreA transcription factor may interact with Tri10 and control the expression and up-regulation of MEP genes.

  2. Utility of the phylotoxigenic relationships among trichothecene-producing Fusarium species for predicting their mycotoxin-producing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M; Yonezawa, T; Sugita-Konishi, Y; Kamata, Y

    2013-01-01

    Species of the genus Fusarium are well-known plant pathogens and mycotoxigenic fusaria are associated with health hazards to humans and animals. There is a need to understand the mechanisms of mycotoxin production by Fusarium species and to predict which produce mycotoxins. In this study, the Fusarium phylogenetic tree was first inferred among trichothecene producers and related species. We reconstructed the maximum likelihood (ML) tree based on the combined data from nucleotide sequences of rDNA cluster regions, the β-tubulin gene (β-tub) and the elongation factor 1α gene (EF-1α). Second, based on this tree topology, the ancestral states of the producing potential of type A and B trichothecenes (TriA and TriB), zearalenone (ZEN), moniliformin (MON), beauvericin (BEA) and enniatins (ENN) were reconstructed using the maximum parsimony (MP) method based on the observed production by extant species as reported in the literature. Finally, the species having the potential to produce each of these six mycotoxins was predicted on the basis of the parsimonious analysis. The ML tree indicated that the Fusarium species analysed in this study could be divided into two major clades. Clade I was divided into four distinct subclades: I-a, I-b, I-c and I-d. Furthermore, the parsimony reconstruction suggested that the potential for producing MON and ZEN was gained or lost only once, and that the producing potential for TriA and TriB, BEA and ENN was repeatedly gained and lost during the evolutionary history of the Fusarium species analysed in this study. Interestingly, the results showed the possibility that several species, about which reports were scarce with regard to mycotoxin production, have the potential to produce one or more of the six evaluated in this study. The phylogenetic information therefore helps one to predict the mycotoxin-producing potential by Fusarium species, and these "phylotoxigenic relationships" may be useful for predicting the pathogenicity of fungi.

  3. Zearalenone, deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 and their metabolites in pig urine as biomarkers for mycotoxin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieu, N Q; Pettersson, H

    2009-06-01

    Methods to determine zearalenone (ZEA), deoxynivalenol (DON), aflatoxins (AF) and their metabolites in pig urine were developed as biomarkers for pig exposure to the mycotoxins in feed. Urine samples were incubated with β-glucuronidase to cleave conjugates, extracted and cleaned-up with solid phase and immunoaffinity columns, followed by HPLC with UV and fluorescence detection. Good recoveries (83-130%), low variation (2-10%), and low detection limits (0.3-9.9 ng/ml) were obtained. The results of controlled AFB1 feeding trials found no difference in urine concentrations of AFB1 or AFM1 from pigs fed three different levels (127, 227, 327 µg/kg) of AFB1 in diets. The excretion of AFB1 and AFM1 in urine was on average 30% of the oral dose and the ratio AFB1 to AFM1 was around 23%. The analysis of 15 Vietnamese pig urine samples indicate a relatively high exposure of ZEA, DON and AF, which were found as toxin or metabolites in 47, 73, and 80% of the urine samples, respectively.

  4. Evaluation of the intestinal absorption of deoxynivalenol and nivalenol by an in vitro gastrointestinal model, and the binding efficacy of activated carbon and other adsorbent materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avantaggiato, G.; Havenaar, R.; Visconti, A.

    2004-01-01

    In vitro screening of 14 adsorbent materials, including some commercial products used to detoxify Fusarium-mycotoxins, were tested in the pH range of 3-8 for deoxynivalenol (DON)- and nivalenol (NIV)-binding ability. Only activated carbon showed to be effective with binding capacities of 35.1 μmol

  5. Crystal structure of Os79 (Os04g0206600) from Oryza sativa: a UDP-glucosyltransferase involved in the detoxification of deoxynivalenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight is a plant disease with significant agricultural and health impact which affects cereal crops such as wheat, barley, and maize and is characterized by reduced grain yield and the accumulation of trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). Studies have identified trich...

  6. Evaluation of the intestinal absorption of deoxynivalenol and nivalenol by an in vitro gastrointestinal model, and the binding efficacy of activated carbon and other adsorbent materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avantaggiato, G.; Havenaar, R.; Visconti, A.

    2004-01-01

    In vitro screening of 14 adsorbent materials, including some commercial products used to detoxify Fusarium-mycotoxins, were tested in the pH range of 3-8 for deoxynivalenol (DON)- and nivalenol (NIV)-binding ability. Only activated carbon showed to be effective with binding capacities of 35.1 μmol a

  7. Fusarium and Aspergillus mycotoxins contaminating wheat silage for dairy cattle feeding in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina del Palacio

    Full Text Available Abstract Wheat is one of the most important cultivated cereals in Uruguay for human consumption; however, when harvest yields are low, wheat is usually used in ensiling for animal feeding. Ensiling is a forage preservation method that allows for storage during extended periods of time while maintaining nutritional values comparable to fresh pastures. Silage is vulnerable to contamination by spoilage molds and mycotoxins because ensilage materials are excellent substrates for fungal growth. The aim of the study was to identify the mycobiota composition and occurrence of aflatoxins and DON from wheat silage. A total of 220 samples of wheat were collected from four farms in the southwest region of Uruguay were silage practices are developed. The main fungi isolated were Fusarium (43% and Aspergillus (36%, with Fusarium graminearum sensu lato and Aspergillus section Flavi being the most prevalent species. Aflatoxin concentrations in silo bags ranged from 6.1 to 23.3 µg/kg, whereas DON levels ranged between 3000 µg/kg and 12,400 µg/kg. When evaluating aflatoxigenic capacity, 27.5% of Aspergillus section Flavi strains produced AFB1, 5% AFB2, 10% AFG1 and 17.5% AFG2. All isolates of F. graminearum sensu lato produced DON and 15-AcDON. The results from this study contribute to the knowledge of mycobiota and mycotoxins present in wheat silage.

  8. Fusarium and Aspergillus mycotoxins contaminating wheat silage for dairy cattle feeding in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Palacio, Agustina; Bettucci, Lina; Pan, Dinorah

    Wheat is one of the most important cultivated cereals in Uruguay for human consumption; however, when harvest yields are low, wheat is usually used in ensiling for animal feeding. Ensiling is a forage preservation method that allows for storage during extended periods of time while maintaining nutritional values comparable to fresh pastures. Silage is vulnerable to contamination by spoilage molds and mycotoxins because ensilage materials are excellent substrates for fungal growth. The aim of the study was to identify the mycobiota composition and occurrence of aflatoxins and DON from wheat silage. A total of 220 samples of wheat were collected from four farms in the southwest region of Uruguay were silage practices are developed. The main fungi isolated were Fusarium (43%) and Aspergillus (36%), with Fusarium graminearum sensu lato and Aspergillus section Flavi being the most prevalent species. Aflatoxin concentrations in silo bags ranged from 6.1 to 23.3μg/kg, whereas DON levels ranged between 3000μg/kg and 12,400μg/kg. When evaluating aflatoxigenic capacity, 27.5% of Aspergillus section Flavi strains produced AFB1, 5% AFB2, 10% AFG1 and 17.5% AFG2. All isolates of F. graminearum sensu lato produced DON and 15-AcDON. The results from this study contribute to the knowledge of mycobiota and mycotoxins present in wheat silage. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of Pathogenic Fusarium spp. Causing Maize Ear Rot and Poten tial Mycotoxin Production in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canxing Duan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ear rot is a serious disease that affects maize yield and grain quality worldwide. The mycotoxins are often hazardous to humans and livestock. In samples collected in China between 2009 and 2014, Fusarium verticillioides and F. graminearum species complex were the dominant fungi causing ear rot. According to the TEF-1α gene sequence, F. graminearum species complex in China included three independent species: F. graminearum, F. meridionale, and F. boothii. The key gene FUM1 responsible for the biosynthesis of fumonisin was detected in all 82 F. verticillioides isolates. Among these, 57 isolates mainly produced fumonisin B1, ranging from 2.52 to 18,416.44 µg/g for each gram of dry hyphal weight, in vitro. Three different toxigenic chemotypes were detected among 78 F. graminearum species complex: 15-ADON, NIV and 15-ADON+NIV. Sixty and 16 isolates represented the 15-ADON and NIV chemotypes, respectively; two isolates carried both 15-ADON and NIV-producing segments. All the isolates carrying NIV-specific segment were F. meridionale. The in vitro production of 15-ADON, 3-ADON, DON, and ZEN varied from 5.43 to 81,539.49; 6.04 to 19,590.61; 13.35 to 19,795.33; and 1.77 to 430.24 µg/g of dry hyphal weight, respectively. Altogether, our present data demonstrate potential main mycotoxin production of dominant pathogenic Fusarium in China.

  10. Identification of Pathogenic Fusarium spp. Causing Maize Ear Rot and Potential Mycotoxin Production in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Canxing; Qin, Zihui; Yang, Zhihuan; Li, Weixi; Sun, Suli; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Xiaoming

    2016-06-21

    Ear rot is a serious disease that affects maize yield and grain quality worldwide. The mycotoxins are often hazardous to humans and livestock. In samples collected in China between 2009 and 2014, Fusarium verticillioides and F. graminearum species complex were the dominant fungi causing ear rot. According to the TEF-1α gene sequence, F. graminearum species complex in China included three independent species: F. graminearum, F. meridionale, and F. boothii. The key gene FUM1 responsible for the biosynthesis of fumonisin was detected in all 82 F. verticillioides isolates. Among these, 57 isolates mainly produced fumonisin B₁, ranging from 2.52 to 18,416.44 µg/g for each gram of dry hyphal weight, in vitro. Three different toxigenic chemotypes were detected among 78 F. graminearum species complex: 15-ADON, NIV and 15-ADON+NIV. Sixty and 16 isolates represented the 15-ADON and NIV chemotypes, respectively; two isolates carried both 15-ADON and NIV-producing segments. All the isolates carrying NIV-specific segment were F. meridionale. The in vitro production of 15-ADON, 3-ADON, DON, and ZEN varied from 5.43 to 81,539.49; 6.04 to 19,590.61; 13.35 to 19,795.33; and 1.77 to 430.24 µg/g of dry hyphal weight, respectively. Altogether, our present data demonstrate potential main mycotoxin production of dominant pathogenic Fusarium in China.

  11. A fungal symbiont of plant-roots modulates mycotoxin gene expression in the pathogen Fusarium sambucinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Ismail

    Full Text Available Fusarium trichothecenes are fungal toxins that cause disease on infected plants and, more importantly, health problems for humans and animals that consume infected fruits or vegetables. Unfortunately, there are few methods for controlling mycotoxin production by fungal pathogens. In this study, we isolated and characterized sixteen Fusarium strains from naturally infected potato plants in the field. Pathogenicity tests were carried out in the greenhouse to evaluate the virulence of the strains on potato plants as well as their trichothecene production capacity, and the most aggressive strain was selected for further studies. This strain, identified as F. sambucinum, was used to determine if trichothecene gene expression was affected by the symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF Glomus irregulare. AMF form symbioses with plant roots, in particular by improving their mineral nutrient uptake and protecting plants against soil-borne pathogens. We found that that G. irregulare significantly inhibits F. sambucinum growth. We also found, using RT-PCR assays to assess the relative expression of trichothecene genes, that in the presence of the AMF G. irregulare, F. sambucinum genes TRI5 and TRI6 were up-regulated, while TRI4, TRI13 and TRI101 were down-regulated. We conclude that AMF can modulate mycotoxin gene expression by a plant fungal pathogen. This previously undescribed effect may be an important mechanism for biological control and has fascinating implications for advancing our knowledge of plant-microbe interactions and controlling plant pathogens.

  12. A fungal symbiont of plant-roots modulates mycotoxin gene expression in the pathogen Fusarium sambucinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Youssef; McCormick, Susan; Hijri, Mohamed

    2011-03-24

    Fusarium trichothecenes are fungal toxins that cause disease on infected plants and, more importantly, health problems for humans and animals that consume infected fruits or vegetables. Unfortunately, there are few methods for controlling mycotoxin production by fungal pathogens. In this study, we isolated and characterized sixteen Fusarium strains from naturally infected potato plants in the field. Pathogenicity tests were carried out in the greenhouse to evaluate the virulence of the strains on potato plants as well as their trichothecene production capacity, and the most aggressive strain was selected for further studies. This strain, identified as F. sambucinum, was used to determine if trichothecene gene expression was affected by the symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus irregulare. AMF form symbioses with plant roots, in particular by improving their mineral nutrient uptake and protecting plants against soil-borne pathogens. We found that that G. irregulare significantly inhibits F. sambucinum growth. We also found, using RT-PCR assays to assess the relative expression of trichothecene genes, that in the presence of the AMF G. irregulare, F. sambucinum genes TRI5 and TRI6 were up-regulated, while TRI4, TRI13 and TRI101 were down-regulated. We conclude that AMF can modulate mycotoxin gene expression by a plant fungal pathogen. This previously undescribed effect may be an important mechanism for biological control and has fascinating implications for advancing our knowledge of plant-microbe interactions and controlling plant pathogens.

  13. The effect of selected environmental Fusarium mycotoxins on the ovaries in the female wild boar (Sus scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, Ł; Gajęcka, M; Żmudzki, J; Gajęcki, M

    2015-01-01

    The contamination of agricultural crops with Fusarium mycotoxins poses one of the greatest problems in food production. Wild boars live in specific habitats and are physiologically sensitive to Fusarium mycotoxins, therefore, they are an interesting model for studies investigating the effects of the discussed toxin, in particular under low-dose exposure. The objective of this study was to determine potential effects of Fusarium mycotoxins ingested with naturally contaminated food on reproductive function based on the proliferation and apoptotic indices of ovarian follicles in female wild boars. The experiment was conducted on 40 wild boars inhabiting north-eastern Poland. The effect of seasonal variations in the quantity and quality of ingested food on the concentrations of Fusarium mycotoxins and their metabolites in the blood of wild boars was analyzed. The observed differences in toxin levels were accompanied by changes in proliferation and apoptotic indices. Proliferation processes were most intense in autumn-winter and were least advanced in winter-spring. The intensity of apoptotic processes was inversely correlated with proliferation.

  14. Quorum signaling mycotoxins: A new risk strategy for bacterial biocontrol of Fusarium verticillioides and other endophytic fungal species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial endophytes are used as biocontrol organisms for plant pathogens such as the maize endophyte Fusarium verticillioides and its production of fumonisin mycotoxins. However, such applications are not always predictable and efficient. All bacteria communicate via cell-dependent signals, which...

  15. Assessment of inhibitory potential of essential oils on natural mycoflora and Fusarium mycotoxins production in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In the last years essential oils from different plants were used in the prevention of fungi and mycotoxins accumulation in cereals. The most attractive aspect derived from using of essential oils as seed grains protectants is due to their non-toxicity. This study was focused on assessment the inhibitory effect of some essential oils: Melissa officinalis (O1), Salvia officinalis (O2), Coriandrum sativum (O3), Thymus vulgaris (O4) Mentha piperita (O5) and Cinnamomum zeylanicum (O6) against natural mycoflora and Fusarium mycotoxins production correlated with their antioxidants properties. Results All essential oils showed inhibitory effect on fungal contamination of wheat seeds. This ability was dose-dependent. The highest inhibitory effect on Fusarium and Aspergillus fungi was recorded after 5 days of treatment. Fungi such as yeast (Pichia, Saccharomyces and Hyphopichia) were predominantly on seeds mycoflora after 22 days. Each treatment had a selective inhibitory effect on frequency of fungus genera. After 5 days of treatment the most fungicidal effect was recorder for O4, followed by O1. In terms of essential oils effect on mycotoxins development, the best control on fumonisins (FUMO) production was recorded for O6. The antioxidant properties of essential oils decreased in order: O4 > O1 > O6 > O5 > O2 > O3. Also, our data suggested that there is a significant negative correlation between antioxidant properties and seed contamination index (SCI), but there was not recorded a good correlation between antioxidant properties and FUMO content. Conclusions Based on proven antifungal and antimycotoxin effects as well as their antioxidant properties, the essential oils could be recommended as natural preservatives for stored cereals. The highest inhibition of fungal growth was noted after 5 days of treatment and decreased after 22 days. PMID:23409841

  16. Identification by PCR of Fusarium culmorum Strains Producing Large and Small Amounts of Deoxynivalenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, B.; Giraud-Delville, C.; Pinson, L.; Richard-Molard, D.; Fournier, E.; Brygoo, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Thirty deoxynivalenol-producing F. culmorum strains, isolated from wheat grains, were incubated in vitro and analyzed for trichothecene production. Seventeen strains produced more than 1 ppm of deoxynivalenol and acetyldeoxynivalenol and were considered high-deoxynivalenol-producing strains, whereas 13 F. culmorum strains produced less than 0.07 ppm of trichothecenes and were considered low-deoxynivalenol-producing strains. For all strains, a 550-base portion of the trichodiene synthase gene (tri5) was amplified and sequenced. According to the tri5 data, the F. culmorum strains tested clustered into two groups that correlated with in vitro deoxynivalenol production. For three high-producing and three low-producing F. culmorum strains, the tri5-tri6 intergenic region was then sequenced, which confirmed the two separate clusters within the F. culmorum strains. According to the tri5-tri6 sequence data, specific PCR primers were designed to allow differentiation of high-producing from low-producing F. culmorum strains. PMID:12406740

  17. Inhibition of Fusarium Growth and Mycotoxin Production in Culture Medium and in Maize Kernels by Natural Phenolic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruz, Elena; Loran, Susana; Herrera, Marta; Gimenez, Isabel; Bervis, Noemi; Barcena, Carmen; Carramiñana, Juan Jose; Juan, Teresa; Herrera, Antonio; Ariño, Agustin

    2016-10-01

    The possible role of natural phenolic compounds in inhibiting fungal growth and toxin production has been of recent interest as an alternative strategy to the use of chemical fungicides for the maintenance of food safety. Fusarium is a worldwide fungal genus mainly associated with cereal crops. The most important Fusarium mycotoxins are trichothecenes, zearalenone, and fumonisins. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of four natural phenolic acids (caffeic, ferulic, p-coumaric, and chlorogenic) for the control of mycelial growth and mycotoxin production by six toxigenic species of Fusarium . The addition of phenolic acids to corn meal agar had a marked inhibitory effect on the radial growth of all Fusarium species at levels of 2.5 to 10 mM in a dose-response pattern, causing total inhibition (100%) in all species except F. sporotrichioides and F. langsethiae . However, the effects of phenolic acids on mycotoxin production in maize kernels were less evident than the effects on growth. The fungal species differed in their responses to the phenolic acid treatments, and significant reductions in toxin concentrations were observed only for T-2 and HT-2 (90% reduction) and zearalenone (48 to 77% reduction). These results provide data that could be used for developing pre- and postharvest strategies for controlling Fusarium infection and subsequent toxin production in cereal grains.

  18. MICOTOXINAS DO FUSARIUM spp NA AVICULTURA COMERCIAL MYCOTOXIN OF FUSARIUM spp IN COMMERCIAL POULTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Santin; Alex Maiorka; Irineo Zanella; Leandro Magon

    2001-01-01

    Micotoxinas são metabólitos tóxicos produzidos por fungos, de natureza heterogênea e com variados princípios farmacológicos, que podem atuar sobre o organismo animal prejudicando o seu desempenho e desenvolvendo alterações patológicas graves. Nos últimos anos, as micotoxicoses têm recebido especial atenção devido às enormes perdas que vem causando na avicultura mundial. Fungos do gênero Fusarium são descritos como produtores de diversos tipos de toxinas. Assim sendo, as intoxicações causadas ...

  19. Is Quorum Signaling by Mycotoxins a New Risk-Mitigating Strategy for Bacterial Biocontrol of Fusarium verticillioides and Other Endophytic Fungal Species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Charles W; Hinton, Dorothy M; Mitchell, Trevor R

    2017-08-23

    Bacterial endophytes are used as biocontrol organisms for plant pathogens such as the maize endophyte Fusarium verticillioides and its production of fumonisin mycotoxins. However, such applications are not always predictable and efficient. In this work, we hypothesize and review work that quorum sensing inhibitors are produced either by fungi or by pathogenic bacteria for competitive purposes, altering the efficiency of the biocontrol organisms. Recently, quorum sensing inhibitors have been isolated from several fungi, including Fusarium species, three of which are mycotoxins. Thus, we further postulate that other mycotoxins are inhibitors or quenching metabolites that prevent the protective abilities and activities of endophytic biocontrol bacteria within intercellular spaces. To test the aforementioned suppositions, we review work detailing the use of bioassay bacteria for several mycotoxins for quorum activity. We specifically focus on the quorum use of endophytic bacteria as biocontrols for mycotoxic fungal endophytes, such as the Fusarium species and the fumonisin mycotoxins.

  20. Effect of prothioconazole-based fungicides on Fusarium head blight, grain yield and deoxynivalenol accumulation in wheat under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam HAIDUKOWSKI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of triazole-based treatments on Fusarium head blight (FHB, grain yields and the accumulation of deoxynivalenol (DON in harvested wheat kernels was evaluated by means of twenty multi-site field experiments performed during five consecutive growing seasons (from 2004‒2005 to 2008‒2009 in Italy. Fungicide treatments were carried out on different cultivars of common wheat (cv. Serio, Blasco, Genio and Savio and durum wheat (cv. Orobel, Saragolla, San Carlo, Levante, Duilio, Karur and Derrik after artificial inoculation with a mixture of toxigenic Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum strains. The application of fungicides containing prothioconazole (Proline® or Prosaro® at the beginning of anthesis (BBCH 61 resulted in a consistent reduction of FHB disease severity (by between 39 and 93% and DON levels in wheat kernels (by between 40 and 91% and increased wheat yields (from 0.4 to 5.6 t ha-1, average 2.2 t ha-1, as compared to the untreated/inoculated control. Fungicides containing tebuconazole (Folicur® SE and cyproconazole plus prochloraz (Tiptor® Xcell showed a reduced effectiveness compared with prothioconazole-based treatments. All fungicide treatments were more effective in reducing DON and increasing grain yields of common wheat than durum wheat. Results showed that the application of fungicides containing prothioconazole at the beginning of anthesis provided a strong reduction of FHB disease, allowing both an increase in grain yields and a considerable reduction of DON content in wheat kernels.

  1. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus irregulare, controls the mycotoxin production of Fusarium sambucinum in the pathogenesis of potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Youssef; McCormick, Susan; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    Trichothecenes are an important family of mycotoxins produced by several species of the genus Fusarium. These fungi cause serious disease on infected plants and postharvest storage of crops, and the toxins can cause health problems for humans and animals. Unfortunately, there are few methods for controlling mycotoxin production by fungal pathogens, and most rely on chemicals, creating therefore subsequent problems of chemical resistance. We tested the impact of the symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus irregulare on a trichothecene-producing strain of Fusarium sambucinum isolated from naturally infected potato plants. Using dual in vitro cultures, we showed that G. irregulare inhibited the growth of F. sambucinum and significantly reduced the production of the trichothecene 4, 15-diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS). Furthermore, using G. irregulare-colonized potato plants infected with F. sambucinum, we found that the G. irregulare treatment inhibited the production of DAS in roots and tubers. Thus, in addition to the known beneficial effect of mycorrhizal symbiosis on plant growth, we found that G. irregulare controlled the growth of a virulent fungal pathogen and reduced production of a mycotoxin. This previously undescribed, biological control of Fusarium mycotoxin production by G. irregulare has potential implications for improved potato crop production and food safety.

  2. Fusarium mycotoxins from peanuts suspected as a cause of sandhill crane mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windingstad, R.M.; Cole, R.J.; Nelson, P.E.; Roffe, T.J.; George, R.R.; Dorner, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    An estimated 9,500 sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) died in Gaines County, Texas and Roosevelt County, New Mexico between 1982 and 1987. The predominant clinical sign observed in sick cranes was their inability to hold their heads erect, both while standing and flying. Multiple muscle hemorrhages and submandibular edema were the most common lesions seen at necropsy. Mycotoxins produced by Fusarium sp. growing during cold, wet weather on peanuts left in the field after harvest, the predominant foods of the dead cranes at the time of these mortality events, were identified as the most likely cause of this mortality. Rendering moldy peanuts inaccessible to the cranes by conventional tillage resulted in reduced crane mortality in these areas.

  3. Cumulative health risk assessment of co-occurring mycotoxins of deoxynivalenol and its acetyl derivatives in wheat and maize: case study, Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zheng; Nie, Dongxia; Ediage, Emmanuel Njumbe; Yang, Xianli; Wang, Jianhua; Chen, Bo; Li, Shuguang; On, Stephen L W; De Saeger, Sarah; Wu, Aibo

    2014-12-01

    Humans are naturally and frequently exposed to a multitude of mycotoxins, but health risk assessments are usually performed on individual mycotoxins, which may underestimate the total risks. In this study, we assessed for the first time the cumulative health risks of concomitant exposure via dietary intake (DI) to multiple mycotoxins, namely deoxynivalenol (DON) and its acetyl derivatives of 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON) and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), based on the concentration addition (CA) concept. A cross-sectional study was conducted in seven districts in Shanghai, China with 1269 participants and 330 wheat and maize samples analyzed. After probabilistic analysis using Monte Carlo simulation, the results showed no health risks to the population in Shanghai considering individual mycotoxins. However, if the cumulative health risks were calculated based on the combined consideration of DON with either 3-ADON or 15-ADON or both, the DI values in 95th percentile were up to 1087 ng/kg body weight/day, exceeding the Provisional Maximum Tolerable Daily Intake (PMTDI) of 1000 ng/kg body weight/day and hence representing potential health risks to the population in Shanghai. The integrated study proposed here could be a model strategy for cumulative health risk assessment on the co-occurring hazards in the fields of food safety combined with environmental contaminants.

  4. Fusarium diseases of maize associated with mycotoxin contamination of agricultural products intended to be used for food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Elisabeth; Höppner, Frank; Ellner, Frank; Weinert, Joachim

    2017-08-01

    Infections of maize with phytopathogenic and toxinogenic Fusarium spp. may occur throughout the cultivation period. This can cause different types of diseases in vegetative and generative organs of the plant. Along with these infections, mycotoxins are often produced and accumulated in affected tissues, which could pose a significant risk on human and animal health when entering the food and feed chain. Most important fungal species infecting European maize belong to the Fusarium sections Discolour and Liseola, the first being more prevalent in cooler and humid climate regions than the second predominating in warmer and dryer areas. Coexistence of several Fusarium spp. pathogens in growing maize under field conditions is the usual case and may lead to multi-contamination with mycotoxins like trichothecenes, zearalenone and fumonisins. The pathways how the fungi gain access to the target organs of the plant are extensively described in relation to specific symptoms of typical rot diseases regarding ears, kernels, rudimentary ears, roots, stem, leaves, seed and seedlings. Both Gibberella and Fusarium ear rots are of major importance in affecting the toxinogenic quality of grain or ear-based products as well as forage maize used for human or animal nutrition. Although rudimentary ears may contain high amounts of Fusarium toxins, the contribution to the contamination of forage maize is minor due to their small proportion on the whole plant dry matter yield. The impact of foliar diseases on forage maize contamination is regarded to be low, as Fusarium infections are restricted to some parts on the leaf sheaths and husks. Mycotoxins produced in rotted basal part of the stem may contribute to forage maize contamination, but usually remain in the stubbles after harvest. As the probability of a more severe disease progression is increasing with a prolonged cultivation period, maize should be harvested at the appropriate maturity stage to keep Fusarium toxin contamination as

  5. Associations between Fusarium species and mycotoxins in oats and spring wheat from farmers fields in Norway over a six-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofgaard, I.S.; Aamot, H.U.; Torp, T.; Jestoi, M.; Lattanzio, V.M.T.; Klemsdal, S.S.; Waalwijk, C.; Lee, van der T.; Brodal, G.

    2016-01-01

    During the last ten years, Norwegian cereal grain industry has experienced large challenges due to Fusarium spp.and Fusarium mycotoxin contamination of small-grained cereals. To prevent severely contaminated grain lotsfrom entering the grain supply chain, it is important to establish surveys for

  6. Current Situation of Mycotoxin Contamination and Co-occurrence in Animal Feed—Focus on Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle P. Oswald

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by fungi especially those belonging to the genus Aspergillus, Penicillum and Fusarium. Mycotoxin contamination can occur in all agricultural commodities in the field and/or during storage, if conditions are favourable to fungal growth. Regarding animal feed, five mycotoxins (aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins and ochratoxin A are covered by EU legislation (regulation or recommendation. Transgressions of these limits are rarely observed in official monitoring programs. However, low level contamination by Fusarium toxins is very common (e.g., deoxynivalenol (DON is typically found in more than 50% of the samples and co-contamination is frequently observed. Multi-mycotoxin studies reported 75%–100% of the samples to contain more than one mycotoxin which could impact animal health at already low doses. Co-occurrence of mycotoxins is likely to arise for at least three different reasons (i most fungi are able to simultaneously produce a number of mycotoxins, (ii commodities can be contaminated by several fungi, and (iii completed feed is made from various commodities. In the present paper, we reviewed the data published since 2004 concerning the contamination of animal feed with single or combinations of mycotoxins  and highlighted the occurrence of these co-contaminations.

  7. Current situation of mycotoxin contamination and co-occurrence in animal feed--focus on Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Elisabeth; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Tassis, Panagiotis; Tzika, Eleni; Marin, Daniela; Taranu, Ionelia; Tabuc, Cristina; Nicolau, Anca; Aprodu, Iuliana; Puel, Olivier; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2012-10-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by fungi especially those belonging to the genus Aspergillus, Penicillum and Fusarium. Mycotoxin contamination can occur in all agricultural commodities in the field and/or during storage, if conditions are favourable to fungal growth. Regarding animal feed, five mycotoxins (aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisins and ochratoxin A) are covered by EU legislation (regulation or recommendation). Transgressions of these limits are rarely observed in official monitoring programs. However, low level contamination by Fusarium toxins is very common (e.g., deoxynivalenol (DON) is typically found in more than 50% of the samples) and co-contamination is frequently observed. Multi-mycotoxin studies reported 75%-100% of the samples to contain more than one mycotoxin which could impact animal health at already low doses. Co-occurrence of mycotoxins is likely to arise for at least three different reasons (i) most fungi are able to simultaneously produce a number of mycotoxins, (ii) commodities can be contaminated by several fungi, and (iii) completed feed is made from various commodities. In the present paper, we reviewed the data published since 2004 concerning the contamination of animal feed with single or combinations of mycotoxins and highlighted the occurrence of these co-contaminations.

  8. Data independent acquisition-digital archiving mass spectrometry: application to single kernel mycotoxin analysis of Fusarium graminearum infected maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Justin B; Sumarah, Mark W

    2016-05-01

    New and conjugated mycotoxins of concern to regulators are frequently being identified, necessitating the costly need for new method development and sample reanalysis. In response, we developed an LC-data independent acquisition (LC-DIA) method on a Q-Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometer tailored for mycotoxins analysis. This method combines absolute quantification of targeted fungal metabolites with non-targeted digital archiving (DA) of data on all ionizable compounds for retrospective analysis. The quantitative power of this approach was assessed by spiking 23 mycotoxins at a range of concentrations into clean maize extracts. The linearity and limits of detection achieved were comparable to conventional LC-MS/MS and significantly better than 'all-ion-fragmentation' scanning mode. This method was applied to single kernel analysis of Fusarium infected maize, where we quantified nine Fusarium metabolites and three metabolites from unexpected contaminations by Alternaria and Penicillium species. Retrospective analysis of this data set allowed us to detect the recently reported 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol-3-O-β-D-glucoside without requiring re-analysis of the samples. To our knowledge, this is the first reported occurrence of this conjugated mycotoxin in naturally contaminated maize, and led us to further study maize artificially inoculated with the 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol chemotypes of Fusarium graminearum. Analysis of these samples showed that the maize genotype tested glycosylates 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol but not 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol likely because the glycosylation site was blocked. In addition to confirming that these two F. graminearum chemotypes behave differently when infecting the host plant, it demonstrates the utility of using a single screening method to quantify known mycotoxins and archive a completely non-targeted dataset for future analysis.

  9. The cyclase-associated protein FgCap1 has both protein kinase A-dependent and -independent functions during deoxynivalenol production and plant infection in Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong; Jiang, Cong

    2017-01-31

    Fusarium graminearum is a causal agent of wheat scab and a producer of the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON). The expression of trichothecene biosynthesis (TRI) genes and DON production are mainly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway and two pathway-specific transcription factors (TRI6 and TRI10). Interestingly, deletion mutants of TRI6 show reduced expression of several components of cAMP signalling, including the FgCAP1 adenylate-binding protein gene that has not been functionally characterized in F. graminearum. In this study, we show that FgCap1 interacts with Fac1 adenylate cyclase and that deletion of FgCAP1 reduces the intracellular cAMP level and PKA activity. The Fgcap1 deletion mutant is defective in vegetative growth, conidiogenesis and plant infection. It also shows significantly reduced DON production and TRI gene expression, which can be suppressed by exogenous cAMP, indicating a PKA-dependent regulation of DON biosynthesis by FgCap1. The wild-type, but not tri6 mutant, shows increased levels of intracellular cAMP and FgCAP1 expression under DON-producing conditions. Furthermore, the promoter of FgCAP1 contains one putative Tri6-binding site that is important for its function during DON biosynthesis, but is dispensable for hyphal growth, conidiogenesis and pathogenesis. In addition, FgCap1 shows an actin-like localization to the cortical patches at the apical region of hyphal tips. Phosphorylation of FgCap1 at S353 was identified by phosphoproteomics analysis. The S353A mutation in FgCAP1 has no effect on its functions during vegetative growth, conidiation and DON production. However, expression of the FgCAP1(S353A) allele fails to complement the defects of the Fgcap1 mutant in plant infection, indicating the importance of the phosphorylation of FgCap1 at S353 during pathogenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that FgCAP1 is involved in the regulation of DON production via cAMP signalling

  10. Occurrence, importance and control of mycotoxins: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tola

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are poisonous chemical compounds produced by certain fungi. There are five mycotoxins or groups of mycotoxins that occur quite often in food: deoxynivalenol/Nivalenol, zearalenone, ochratoxin, fumonisins and aflatoxins. The fungi that produce mycotoxins in food fall broadly into two groups: those that invade before harvest, commonly called field fungi, and those that occur only after harvest, called storage fungi. There are three types of toxicogenic field fungi: plant pathogens such as Fusarium graminearum (deoxynivalenol, nivalenol; fungi that grow on senescent or stressed plants, such as Fusarium moniliforme (fumonisin and sometimes Aspergillus flavus (aflatoxin; and fungi that initially colonise the plant before harvest and predispose the commodity to mycotoxin contamination after harvest, such as Penicillium verrucosum (ochratoxin and Aspergillus flavus (aflatoxin. The favourable conditions for mycotoxins production are instigated with poor hygienic conditions at the time of transportation and storage, high temperature and moisture content and heavy rains. Mycotoxins are distributed in different items such as animal feeds, cereal crops, leguminous plants and animal products. Concentrated animal feed stuffs harbor highest level of mycotoxins. Noug cake and sorghum was warranted as the main source of aflatoxin contaminant among those concentrated animal feeds. Health effects occur in companion animals, livestock, poultry and humans because aflatoxins are potent hepatotoxins, immunosuppressant, and mutagens and carcinogens. Factors that affect mycotoxins production and contamination can be categorized as physical, chemical and biological. Therefore, African countries particularly Ethiopian governmental jurisdictions shouldimplement and regulate level of mycotoxins in animal feed stuffs and human foods.

  11. Advances in Mycotoxin Research: Public Health Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Ryu, Dojin

    2015-12-01

    Aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, deoxynivalenol, and zearalenone are of significant public health concern as they can cause serious adverse effects in different organs including the liver, kidney, and immune system in humans. These toxic secondary metabolites are produced by filamentous fungi mainly in the genus Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Fusarium. It is challenging to control the formation of mycotoxins due to the worldwide occurrence of these fungi in food and the environment. In addition to raw agricultural commodities, mycotoxins tend to remain in finished food products as they may not be destroyed by conventional processing techniques. Hence, much of our concern is directed to chronic health effects through long-term exposure to one or multiple mycotoxins from contaminated foods. Ideally risk assessment requires a comprehensive data, including toxicological and epidemiological studies as well as surveillance and exposure assessment. Setting of regulatory limits for mycotoxins is considered necessary to protect human health from mycotoxin exposure. Although advances in analytical techniques provide basic yet critical tool in regulation as well as all aspects of scientific research, it has been acknowledged that different forms of mycotoxins such as analogs and conjugated mycotoxins may constitute a significant source of dietary exposure. Further studies should be warranted to correlate mycotoxin exposure and human health possibly via identification and validation of suitable biomarkers.

  12. The Fusarium toxin zearalenone and deoxynivalenol affect murine splenic antioxidant functions, interferon levels, and T-cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Z H; Deng, H D; Wang, Y C; Deng, J L; Zuo, Z C; Wang, Y; Peng, X; Cui, H M; Fang, J; Yu, S M; Shen, L H; Hu, Y C

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the Fusarium toxin zearalenone (ZEA) and deoxynivalenol (DON) on splenic antioxidant functions, IFN levels, and T-cell subsets in mice. Herein, 360 mice were assigned to nine groups for a 12-day study. Mice were administered an intraperitoneal injection for 4 consecutive days with different concentrations of ZEA alone, DON alone, or ZEA+DON. Spleen and blood samples were collected on days 0, 3, 5, 8, and 12. Mice in each of the experimental groups showed dysreglated splenic antioxidant functions, IFN levels, and T-cell subset frequencies, suggesting that the immune system had been affected. The ZEA+DON-treated groups, especially the group that received a higher concentration of ZEA+DON (Group D2Z2), showed more obvious effects on the dysregulation of splenic antioxidant functions, IFN levels, and T-cell subsets. This finding suggested that DON and ZEA exerted synergistic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. FgRIC8 is involved in regulating vegetative growth, conidiation, deoxynivalenol production and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinjin; Liu, Yuting; Lv, Wuyun; Yue, Xiaofeng; Que, Yawei; Yang, Nan; Zhang, Zhengguang; Ma, Zhonghua; Talbot, Nicholas J; Wang, Zhengyi

    2015-10-01

    Proteins of the resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (Ric8) group act as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and play important roles in regulating G-protein signaling in animals. In filamentous fungi, putative Ric8 orthologs have so far been identified in Magnaporthe oryzae, Neurospora crassa, Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus. Here, we report the functional investigation of a potential RIC8 ortholog (FgRIC8) in the wheat head blight pathogen Fusarium graminearum. Targeted gene deletion mutants of FgRIC8 exhibited a significant reduction in vegetative growth, conidiation, pigment production as well as deoxynivalenol (DON) biosynthesis. Pathogenicity assays using a point-inoculated spikelet approach showed that the mutants were severely impaired in virulence on flowering wheat heads. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that genes encoding F. graminearum Gα (FgGpa1 and FgGpa3), Gβ (FgGpb1) and Gγ (FgGpg1) subunits were significantly down-regulated in Fgric8 mutants. Moreover, we showed that FgRic8 physically interacts with both FgGpa1 and FgGpa3, but not FgGpa2, in yeast two-hybrid assays. The intracellular cAMP levels in Fgric8 mutants were significantly decreased compared to the isogenic wild-type strain. Taken together, our results indicate that FgRic8 plays critical roles in fungal development, secondary metabolism and virulence in F. graminearum and may act as a regulator of G protein alpha subunits.

  14. Wheat safety in relation to presence and content of deoxynivalenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurić Verica B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point is a concept which identifies, evaluates, and controls hazards, significant for food safety. It is applicable to the entire food chain, "from farm to table". Prevention of a food borne mycotoxin contamination of commodities is the most rational and cost-effective method for preventing adverse effects of fungal metabolites on human and animal health. Deoxynivalenol (DON belongs to the group of mycotoxins produced by certain Fusarium species, which can damage several vital organs, or demonstrate immunotoxic effect, when ingested in small amounts for a longer period of time. Of particular concern is exposure of children to this mycotoxin through cereals, which are believed to lead to reduced weight gain and decreased liver weights. For that reason, we tried to present HACCP concept for preventing wheat contamination with deoxynivalenol. To be able to apply this system, hazards must be identified and risks assessed, and for that purpose a real picture of area (region in which preventive measures shall be applied, need to be established. According to the results of the study conducted in the laboratory at our department, DON contaminated wheat samples in the region of Vojvodina accounted for 41,6% in 2004 and 2005, whereas amounts of deoxynivalenol ranged from 57 to 1840 μg/kg.

  15. Study of embryotoxicity of Fusarium mycotoxin butenolide using a whole rat embryo culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Zhang, Li-Shi; Wang, Yi-Mei; Yan, Chang-Hui; Huang, Wen-Peng; Wu, Jing; Yuan, Hai-Tao; Lin, Bing-Wu; Shen, Jun-Ling; Peng, Shuang-Qing

    2011-12-01

    Butenolide, a mycotoxin elaborated by several toxigenic Fusarium species, has been implicated as an etiological factor of Kashin-Beck disease and it is always detected in food from endemic Kashin-Beck disease areas. Although butenolide is considered as a potential health risk to humans and animals, its toxicity targets and mechanism of action have not been fully understood and the knowledge of its developmental toxicity is absent. The present study investigated butenolide embryotoxicity via an in vitro whole embryo culture system using rat embryos. Embryos exposed to butenolide at a concentration of 0.625 mg/L showed and differentiation similar to that of the control embryos (=no observed adverse effect concentration; NOAECwec). The embryonic growth and differentiation were affected, represented as reduced crown-rump length and head length, and decreased number of somites from 1.25 mg/L. Total morphological scores decreased significantly at the concentration of butenolide of 2.5 mg/L. All embryos were malformed at 3.75 mg/L and above (=ICMaxWEC), presenting growth retardation with flexion failure and irregular somite differentiation. The IC503T3 of butenolide as calculated from the balb/c 3T3 cytotoxicity test is 6.45 mg/L. Our study shows that butenolide exerts detrimental effects on embryo development in vitro by inducing growth retardation and differentiation inhibition, and the embryotoxicity effect of butenolide should be treated with caution.

  16. Enhancement of trichothecene mycotoxins of Fusarium oxysporum by ferulic acid aggravates oxidative damage in Rehmannia glutinosa Libosch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen Fang; He, Chen Ling; Wang, Ying; Li, Ming Jie; Dai, Ya Jing; Wang, Tong; Lin, Wenxiong

    2016-01-01

    Rehmannia glutinosa is an important medicinal herb that cannot be replanted in the same field due to the effects of autotoxic substances. The effects of these substances on R. glutinosa in continuous cropping systems are unknown. In the present study, bioassays revealed that R. glutinosa exhibited severe growth restriction and higher disease indices in the FO+FA (F.oxysporum pretreated with ferulic acid) treatment. The increases in the contents of MDA and H2O2 were greater in the FA+FO treatment than in the FA or FO only treatments, respectively. Consistent with this result, the enzyme activities in the seedlings increased with treatment time. To identify the main factor underlying the increased pathogenicity of FO, macroconidia and trichothecene mycotoxins coproduced by FO were separated and used to treat R. glutinosa seedlings. The MDA and H2O2 contents were similar in the seedlings treated with deoxynivalenol and in the FA+FO treatment. Quantification of the relative expression of certain genes involved in Ca2+ signal transduction pathways suggested that trichothecene mycotoxins play an important role in the increased pathogenicity of FO. In conclusion, FA not only directly enhances oxidative damage in R. glutinosa but also increases wilting symptom outbreaks by promoting the secretion of trichothecene mycotoxins by FO. PMID:27667444

  17. Fusarium and Aspergillus mycotoxins effects on dairy cow health, performance and the efficacy of Anti-Mycotoxin Additive

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jovaišienė, J; Bakutis, B; Baliukonienė, V; Gerulis, G

    2016-01-01

    One hundred two samples of feeds made in Lithuania, which included maize silage, grass-legume silage, hay and ensiled crimped maize were investigated during 2008-2012 for contamination with some mycotoxins...

  18. Mycotoxin and fungicide residues in wheat grains from fungicide-treated plants measured by a validated LC-MS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz, Suzane Rickes; Pazdiora, Paulo Cesar; Dallagnol, Leandro José; Dors, Giniani Carla; Chaves, Fábio Clasen

    2017-04-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is an annual crop, cultivated in the winter and spring and susceptible to several pathogens, especially fungi, which are managed with fungicides. It is also one of the most consumed cereals, and can be contaminated by mycotoxins and fungicides. The objective of this study was to validate an analytical method by LC-MS for simultaneous determination of mycotoxins and fungicide residues in wheat grains susceptible to fusarium head blight treated with fungicides, and to evaluate the relationship between fungicide application and mycotoxin production. All parameters of the validated analytical method were within AOAC and ANVISA limits. Deoxynivalenol was the prevalent mycotoxin in wheat grain and epoxiconazole was the fungicide residue found in the highest concentration. All fungicidal treatments induced an increase in AFB2 production when compared to the control (without application). AFB1 and deoxynivalenol, on the contrary, were reduced in all fungicide treatments compared to the control.

  19. Fungal growth and fusarium mycotoxin content in isogenic traditional maize and genetically modified maize grown in France and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, B; Melcion, D; Richard-Molard, D; Cahagnier, B

    2002-02-13

    Fungi of the genus Fusarium are common fungal contaminants of maize and are also known to produce mycotoxins. Maize that has been genetically modified to express a Bt endotoxin has been used to study the effect of insect resistance on fungal infection of maize grains by Fusarium species and their related mycotoxins. Maize grain from Bt hybrids and near-isogenic traditional hybrids was collected in France and Spain from the 1999 crop, which was grown under natural conditions. According to the ergosterol level, the fungal biomass formed on Bt maize grain was 4-18 times lower than that on isogenic maize. Fumonisin B(1) grain concentrations ranged from 0.05 to 0.3 ppm for Bt maize and from 0.4 to 9 ppm for isogenic maize. Moderate to low concentrations of trichothecenes and zearalenone were measured on transgenic as well as on non-transgenic maize. Nevertheless, significant differences were obtained in certain regions. The protection of maize plants against insect damage (European corn borer and pink stem borer) through the use of Bt technology seems to be a way to reduce the contamination of maize by Fusarium species and the resultant fumonisins in maize grain grown in France and Spain.

  20. Impact of Deoxynivalenol on the Intestinal Microflora of Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Fravalo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, a mycotoxin produced by some Fusarium species, is a frequent contaminant of cereal. In the present study, 24 weanling piglets received either control feed or feed naturally contaminated with DON (2.8 mg/kg for four weeks. Consumption of contaminated feed significantly reduced the animal weight gain during the first week of the experiment, but had a moderate effect on cultivable bacteria in the pig intestine. By contrast, changes in the intestinal microflora were observed by Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism (CE-SSCP in DON-exposed animals, suggesting an impact of this toxin on the dynamics of intestinal bacteria communities.

  1. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin

    OpenAIRE

    McLAUGHLIN, JOHN E.; Mohamed Anwar Bin-Umer; Thomas Widiez; Daniel Finn; Susan McCormick; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin), a ty...

  2. Aphid Infestation Increases Fusarium langsethiae and T-2 and HT-2 Mycotoxins in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulic, Jassy; Ajigboye, Olubukola; Swarup, Ranjan; Bruce, Toby; Ray, Rumiana V

    2016-11-15

    Fusarium langsethiae is a fungal pathogen of cereal crops that is an increasing problem in northern Europe, but much of its epidemiology is poorly understood. The species produces the mycotoxins T-2 and HT-2, which are highly toxic. It was hypothesized that grain aphids, Sitobion avenae, may transmit F. langsethiae inoculum between wheat plants, and a series of transmission experiments and volatile chemical analyses was performed to test this. Manual translocation of aphids from inoculated to uninfected hosts resulted in pathogen DNA accumulation in hosts. However, the free movement of wingless aphids from infected to healthy plants did not. The addition of winged aphids reared on F. langsethiae-inoculated wheat seedlings to wheat plants also did not achieve successful pathogen transfer. While our data suggested that aphid transmission of the pathogen was not very efficient, we observed an increase in disease when aphids were present. After seedling inoculation, an increase in pathogen DNA accumulation in seedling leaves was observed upon treatment with aphids. Furthermore, the presence of aphids on wheat plants with F. langsethiae-inoculated ears not only led to a rise in the amount of F. langsethiae DNA in infected grain but also to an increase in the concentrations of T-2 and HT-2 toxins, with more than 3-fold higher toxin levels than diseased plants without aphids. This work highlights that aphids increase the susceptibility of wheat host plants to F. langsethiae and that aphid infestation is a risk factor for accumulating increased levels of T-2 and HT-2 in wheat products.

  3. A Dutch field survey on fungal infection and mycotoxin concentrations in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Asselt, E D; Azambuja, W; Moretti, A; Kastelein, P; De Rijk, T C; Stratakou, I; Van Der Fels-Klerx, H J

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by fungi that can cause adverse health effects. Due to climate change, temperatures are expected to rise and changes in rainfall patterns are foreseen. These developments may increase fungal occurrence and mycotoxin concentrations in maize. It is therefore useful to monitor mycotoxin levels in maize and record the accompanying agronomic factors and weather parameters. This paper describes a field survey in the Netherlands in which information on soil, cultivar, green manure, tillage as well as sowing, emergence, flowering and harvest dates of silage maize were collected from 148 growers. A small number of these growers (42 in total) were visited to collect maize samples revealing that 50% of the samples were contaminated with Fusarium species and mycotoxins were detected in 25% of the samples. The Fusarium species that was most commonly found was F. crookwellense followed by F. graminearum, F. culmorum, F. sporotrichiodes and F. equiseti. In total 31 mycotoxins were analysed. The predominant mycotoxins present were (sum of 3 and 15)-acetyl-DON and nivalenol; other mycotoxins found were alternariol, beauvericin, deoxynivalenol, diacetoxyscirpenol, moniliformin and zearalenone. Nivalenol was present in concentrations up to 1670 µg kg⁻¹ and acetylated DON was usually present at higher concentrations than DON. Statistical analysis of the current data showed no correlation between mycotoxins present and agronomic factors recorded. Field studies as described in this paper are useful and need to be continued in the future in order to observe trends in mycotoxin occurrence.

  4. Fungal biotransformation of chlorogenic and caffeic acids by Fusarium graminearum: New insights in the contribution of phenolic acids to resistance to deoxynivalenol accumulation in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Léa; Bonnin-Verdal, Marie-Noelle; Marchegay, Gisèle; Pinson-Gadais, Laetitia; Ducos, Christine; Richard-Forget, Florence; Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela

    2016-03-16

    Fusarium Head Blight and Gibberella Ear Rot, mainly caused by the fungi Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, are two of the most devastating diseases of small-grain cereals and maize. In addition to yield loss, these diseases frequently result in contamination of kernels with toxic type B trichothecenes. The potential involvement of chlorogenic acid in cereal resistance to Fusarium Head Blight and Gibberella Ear Rot and to trichothecene accumulation was the focus of this study. The effects of chlorogenic acid and one of its hydrolyzed products, caffeic acid, on fungal growth and type B trichothecenes biosynthesis were studied using concentrations close to physiological amounts quantified in kernels and a set of F. graminearum and F. culmorum strains. Both chlorogenic and caffeic acids negatively impact fungal growth and mycotoxin production, with caffeic acid being significantly more toxic. Inhibitory efficiencies of both phenolic acids were strain-dependent. To further investigate the antifungal and anti "mycotoxin" effect of chlorogenic and caffeic acids, the metabolic fate of these two phenolic acids was characterized in supplemented F. graminearum broths. For the first time, our results demonstrated the ability of F. graminearum to degrade chlorogenic acid into caffeic, hydroxychlorogenic and protocatechuic acids and caffeic acid into protocatechuic and hydroxycaffeic acids. Some of these metabolic products can contribute to the inhibitory efficiency of chlorogenic acid that, therefore, can be compared as a "pro-drug". As a whole, our data corroborate the contribution of chlorogenic acid to the chemical defense that cereals employ to counteract F. graminearum and its production of mycotoxins.

  5. Mold and mycotoxin problems encountered during malting and brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf-Hall, Charlene E

    2007-10-20

    Fusarium infections in grains can have severe effects on malt and beer. While some degree of Fusarium mycotoxins, such as deoxynivalenol, present in infected barley may be lost during steeping, the Fusarium mold is still capable of growth and mycotoxin production during steeping, germination and kilning. Therefore, detoxification of grain before malting may not be practical unless further growth of the mold is also prevented. Methods to reduce the amount of mold growth during malting are needed. Physical, chemical and biological methods are reviewed. Irradiation looks very promising as a means to prevent Fusarium growth during malting, but the effect on the surviving mold to produce mycotoxins and the effect on malt quality needs further study. Chemical treatments such as ozonation, which would not leave residual chemical in the beer also appear to be promising. Although biological control methods may be desirable, due to the use of "natural" inhibition, the effects of these inhibitors on malt and beer quality requires further investigation. It may also be possible to incorporate detoxifying genes into fermentation yeasts, which would result in detoxification of the wort when mold growth is no longer a problem. Development of these types of technological interventions should help improve the safety of products, such as beer, made from Fusarium infected grain.

  6. Factors Influencing Deoxynivalenol Accumulation in Small Grain Cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegulo, Stephen N.

    2012-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by the plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum. These and other closely related fungi cause a disease known as Fusarium head blight (FHB) in small grain cereals. Other mycotoxins produced by FHB-causing fungi include nivalenol, T-2 toxin, and zearalenone. Ingestion of mycotoxin-contaminated food and feed can lead to toxicosis in humans and animals, respectively. DON is the predominant and most economically important of these mycotoxins in the majority of small grain-producing regions of the world. This review examines the factors that influence DON accumulation in small grain cereals from an agricultural perspective. The occurrence and economic importance of FHB and DON in small grain cereals, epidemiological factors and cereal production practices that favor FHB development and DON accumulation in grain under field conditions, and regulatory/advisory standards for DON in food and feed are discussed. This information can be used to develop strategies that reduce DON accumulation in grain before harvest and to mitigate the human and animal health risks associated with DON contamination of food and feed. PMID:23202310

  7. Factors Influencing Deoxynivalenol Accumulation in Small Grain Cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen N. Wegulo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin produced by the plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum. These and other closely related fungi cause a disease known as Fusarium head blight (FHB in small grain cereals. Other mycotoxins produced by FHB-causing fungi include nivalenol, T-2 toxin, and zearalenone. Ingestion of mycotoxin-contaminated food and feed can lead to toxicosis in humans and animals, respectively. DON is the predominant and most economically important of these mycotoxins in the majority of small grain-producing regions of the world. This review examines the factors that influence DON accumulation in small grain cereals from an agricultural perspective. The occurrence and economic importance of FHB and DON in small grain cereals, epidemiological factors and cereal production practices that favor FHB development and DON accumulation in grain under field conditions, and regulatory/advisory standards for DON in food and feed are discussed. This information can be used to develop strategies that reduce DON accumulation in grain before harvest and to mitigate the human and animal health risks associated with DON contamination of food and feed.

  8. Factors influencing deoxynivalenol accumulation in small grain cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegulo, Stephen N

    2012-11-06

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by the plant pathogenic fungi Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum. These and other closely related fungi cause a disease known as Fusarium head blight (FHB) in small grain cereals. Other mycotoxins produced by FHB-causing fungi include nivalenol, T-2 toxin, and zearalenone. Ingestion of mycotoxin-contaminated food and feed can lead to toxicosis in humans and animals, respectively. DON is the predominant and most economically important of these mycotoxins in the majority of small grain-producing regions of the world. This review examines the factors that influence DON accumulation in small grain cereals from an agricultural perspective. The occurrence and economic importance of FHB and DON in small grain cereals, epidemiological factors and cereal production practices that favor FHB development and DON accumulation in grain under field conditions, and regulatory/advisory standards for DON in food and feed are discussed. This information can be used to develop strategies that reduce DON accumulation in grain before harvest and to mitigate the human and animal health risks associated with DON contamination of food and feed.

  9. Impact of selected antagonistic fungi on Fusarium species – toxigenic cereal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfina Popiel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium-ear blight is a destructive disease in various cereal-growing regions and leads to significant yield and quality losses for farmers and to contamination of cereal grains with mycotoxins, mainly deoxynivalenol and derivatives, zearalenone and moniliformin. Fusarium pathogens grow well and produce significant inoculum on crop resiudues. Reduction of mycotoxins production and pathogen sporulation may be influenced by saprophytic fungi, exhibiting antagonistic effect. Dual culture bioassays were used to examine the impact of 92 isolates (belonging to 29 fungal species against three toxigenic species, i.e. Fusarium avenaceum (Corda Saccardo, F. culmorum (W.G.Smith Saccardo and F. graminearum Schwabe. Both F.culmorum and F. graminearum isolates produce trichothecene mycotoxins and mycohormone zearalenone and are considered to be the most important cereal pathogens worldwide. Infection with those pathogens leads to accumulation of mycotoxins: deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEA in grains. Fusarium avenaceum isolates are producers of moniliformin (MON and enniatins. Isolates of Trichoderma sp. were found to be the most effective ones to control the growth of examined Fusarium species. The response of Fusarium isolates to antagonistic activity of Trichoderma isolates varied and also the isolates of Trichoderma differed in their antagonistic activity against Fusarium isolates. The production of MON by two isolates of F. avenaceum in dual culture on rice was reduced by 95% to 100% by T. atroviride isolate AN 35. The same antagonist reduced the amount of moniliformin from 100 μg/g to 6.5 μg/g when inoculated to rice culture contaminated with MON, which suggests the possible decomposition of this mycotoxin.

  10. Effects of Feeding Barley Naturally Contaminated with Fusarium Mycotoxins on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility, and Blood Chemistry of Gilts and Growth Recoveries by Feeding a Non-contaminated Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Kong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of feeding barley naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on growth performance, vulva swelling, and digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, and crude protein of gilts and the recovery of gilts fed normal diets immediately after the exposure to contaminated diets by measuring growth performance and vulva swelling. In Exp. 1, four diets were prepared to contain 0%, 15%, 30%, or 45% contaminated barley containing 25.7 mg/kg deoxynivalenol and 26.0 μg/kg zearalenone. Sixteen gilts with an initial body weight (BW of 33.3 kg (standard deviation = 3.0 were individually housed in a metabolism crate and assigned to 4 diets with 4 replicates in a randomized complete block design based on BW. During the 14-d feeding trial, individual BW and feed consumption were measured weekly and the vertical and horizontal lengths of vulva were measured every 3 d. From d 10, feces were collected by the maker-to-marker method for 4 d. Blood samples were collected on d 14. During the overall period, the average daily gain, average daily feed intake, and gain:feed of pigs linearly decreased (p<0.01 as the dietary concentration of contaminated barley increased. However, the digestibility of crude protein was linearly increased (p = 0.011 with the increasing amounts of contaminated barley. Increasing dietary Fusarium mycotoxin concentrations did not influence vulva size, blood characteristic as well as immunoglobulin level of pigs. In the Exp. 2, a corn-soybean meal-based diet was formulated as a recovery diet. Pigs were fed the recovery diet immediately after completion of the Exp. 1. During the 14-d of recovery period, the individual BW and feed consumption were measured weekly and the vertical and horizontal length of vulva were measured every 3 d from d 0. On d 7, the feed intake of pigs previously fed contaminated diets already reached that of pigs fed a diet with 0% contaminated barley and no

  11. Mycotoxins in corn and wheat silage in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimshoni, J A; Cuneah, O; Sulyok, M; Krska, R; Galon, N; Sharir, B; Shlosberg, A

    2013-01-01

    Silage is an important feed source for intensive dairy herds worldwide. Fungal growth and mycotoxin production before and during silage storage is a well-known phenomenon, resulting in reduced nutritional value and a possible risk factor for animal health. With this in mind, a survey was conducted to determine for the first time the occurrence of mycotoxins in corn and wheat silage in Israel. A total of 30 corn and wheat silage samples were collected from many sources and analysed using a multi-mycotoxin method based on LC-MS/MS. Most mycotoxins recorded in the present study have not been reported before in Israel. Overall, 23 mycotoxins were found in corn silage; while wheat silage showed a similar pattern of mycotoxin occurrence comprising 20 mycotoxins. The most common post-harvest mycotoxins produced by the Penicillium roqueforti complex were not found in any tested samples, indicative of high-quality preparation and use of silage. Moreover, none of the European Union-regulated mycotoxins--aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin, T-2 toxin, diacetoxyscirpenol and deoxynivalenol--were found above their limits of detection (LODs). The Alternaria mycotoxins--macrosporin, tentoxin and alternariol methyl ether--were highly prevalent in both corn and wheat silage (>80%), but at low concentrations. The most prominent (>80%) Fusarium mycotoxins in corn silage were fusaric acid, fumonisins, beauvericin, monilifomin, equisetin, zearalenone and enniatins, whereas in wheat silage only beauvericin, zearalenone and enniatins occurred in more than 80% of the samples. The high prevalence and concentration of fusaric acid (mean = 765 µg kg⁻¹) in Israeli corn silage indicates that this may be the toxin of highest potential concern to dairy cow performance. However, more data from different harvest years and seasons are needed in order to establish a more precise evaluation of the mycotoxin burden in Israeli silage.

  12. Survey of deoxynivalenol and its conjugates deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside and 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol in 374 beer samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Elisabeth; Malachova, Alexandra; Schwartz, Heidi; Krska, Rudolf; Berthiller, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Beer is one of the most popular beverages worldwide. Malted cereal grains are among the basic ingredients and hence mycotoxin contamination might occur. Previous studies reported the presence of the Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3ADON), as well as of the masked mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (D3G) in beer. In the present survey, 374 beer samples from 38 countries with a focus on Austrian (156) and German (64) beers were analysed for the presence of D3G, DON and 3ADON. Beers were assigned to the following six categories: pale (217), wheat (46), dark (47), bock (20), nonalcoholic beers (19) and shandies (25). In total, 348 and 289 beers (93 and 77%, respectively) contained D3G and DON at the levels above the limit of detection, whereas 3ADON was not detected in any of the samples. Average concentrations of all beers were 6.9 µg L(-1) for D3G and 8.4 µg L(-1) in the case of DON. Nonalcoholic beers and shandies showed the lowest contaminations, 1.5 and 3.2 µg L(-1) for D3G and 2.7 and 4.4 µg L(-1) for DON, respectively. In bock beers characterised by a higher gravity, a significant trichothecene load of 14.8 µg L(-1) D3G and 12.4 µg L(-1) DON was found. The highest contamination (81 µg L(-1) D3G, 89 µg L(-1) DON) was detected in a pale beer from Austria, underlining the importance of this study for food safety. The molar D3G to DON ratio ranged between 0.11 and 1.25 and was 0.56 on average. Concluding, the average contamination of beer is not of toxicological concern for moderate beer drinkers. However, in the case of heavy beer drinkers, beer consumption may considerably contribute to the overall intake of DON, which might even lead to exceeding the maximum tolerable limits established for this Fusarium toxin.

  13. Survey of Aspergillus and Fusarium species and their mycotoxins in raw materials and poultry feeds from Córdoba, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge, María Del Pilar; Magnoli, Carina Elizabeth; Chiacchiera, Stella Maris

    2012-05-01

    The aims of the present work were: (1) to determine both mycobiota in raw materials and finisher poultry feed, as well as the ability to produce aflatoxin B1 by A. flavus strains, and (2) to evaluate the natural co-occurrence of aflatoxins (AFs), fumonisins (FBs), gliotoxin, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS), HT-2 toxin, and T-2 toxin in poultry feed by LC-MS/MS. Nineteen percent of raw materials and 79% of finisher poultry feed samples exceeded the maximum allowed total fungal count (1 × 10(4) CFU g(-1)) to ensure hygienic quality. Aspergillus flavus was the only species belonging to section Flavi which was isolated while Fusarium verticilliodes was the prevalent species. Forty-seven percent of A. flavus strains were aflatoxin B1 producers and the highest frequency of aflatoxigenic strains was isolated from finisher poultry feeds. Principal component analysis showed that corn grains are closely related with total fungal and Fusarium counts. This positive relationship suggests that total fungal and Fusarium spp. counts in poultry feed might come mainly from corn grains. Regarding poultry feeds, in ground finisher type, Aspergillus spp. counts increased as water activity (aw) diminished. A positive relationship among aw, total fungal and Fusarium spp. counts was observed in both ground finisher and ground starter feed. Several mycotoxins were monitored in feeds by applying the LC MS/MS technique. One hundred percent of poultry samples were contaminated with FB1, and the highest levels were detected in pelleted finisher poultry. AFB1, gliotoxin, DAS, HT-2 toxin, and T-2 toxin were not detected in any poultry feed. The scarcity of available mycotoxicological studies from Argentinean poultry feed using a multitoxin analysis technique enhances the contribution of the findings of this report.

  14. Occurrence of Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone in Commercial Fish Feed: An Initial Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Constanze; Kersten, Susanne; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; Valenta, Hana; Dänicke, Sven

    2013-01-01

    The control of mycotoxins is a global challenge not only in human consumption but also in nutrition of farm animals including aquatic species. Fusarium toxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN), are common contaminants of animal feed but no study reported the occurrence of both mycotoxins in fish feed so far. Here, we report for the first time the occurrence of DON and ZEN in samples of commercial fish feed designed for nutrition of cyprinids collected from central Europe. A maximal DON concentration of 825 μg kg−1 feed was found in one feed whereas average values of 289 μg kg−1 feed were noted. ZEN was the more prevalent mycotoxin but the concentrations were lower showing an average level of 67.9 μg kg−1 feed. PMID:23325300

  15. Occurrence of Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone in Commercial Fish Feed: An Initial Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Dänicke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of mycotoxins is a global challenge not only in human consumption but also in nutrition of farm animals including aquatic species. Fusarium toxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEN, are common contaminants of animal feed but no study reported the occurrence of both mycotoxins in fish feed so far. Here, we report for the first time the occurrence of DON and ZEN in samples of commercial fish feed designed for nutrition of cyprinids collected from central Europe. A maximal DON concentration of 825 μg kg−1 feed was found in one feed whereas average values of 289 μg kg−1 feed were noted. ZEN was the more prevalent mycotoxin but the concentrations were lower showing an average level of 67.9 μg kg−1 feed.

  16. Microbial detoxification of mycotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycotoxins are fungal natural products that are toxic to vertebrate animals. Microbes have been identified that enzymatically convert aflatoxin, zearalenone, ochratoxin, patulin, fumonisin, deoxynivalenol, and T-2 toxin to less toxic products. Mycotoxin-degrading fungi and bacteria have been isolate...

  17. Natural co-occurrence of mycotoxins in wheat grains from Italy and Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadri, D; Rubert, J; Prodi, A; Pisi, A; Mañes, J; Soler, C

    2014-08-15

    This article describes the application of an analytical method for the detection of 25 mycotoxins in wheat grain based on simultaneous extraction using matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer (QTrap®). Information Dependent Acquisition (IDA), an extra confirmation tool for samples that contain the target mycotoxins, was used. The analysis of 40 Syrian and 46 Italian wheat grain samples interestingly showed that Syrian samples were mainly contaminated with ochratoxin A and aflatoxins, whereas Italian samples with deoxynivalenol and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol. Emerging Fusarium mycotoxins were predominant in Italian samples compared to the Syrian. Among the analysed samples, only one was found containing zeralenone with level above the maximum European recommended concentration (100 ppb). These results confirm that climatic differences between Syria and Italy, both in Mediterranean basin, play a key role in the diversity of fungal genera and mycotoxins in wheat grains.

  18. Bacillus velezensis RC 218 as a biocontrol agent to reduce Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol accumulation in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacillus velezensis RC 218 was originally isolated for the anthers of wheat as a potential antagonist of Fusarium graminearium, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight. It was demonstrated to have antagonist activity against the plant pathogen with in vitro and greenhouse assays. The current study ...

  19. Rainfastness of Prothioconazole+Tebuconazole for Fusarium head blight and Deoxynivalenol management in soft red winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungicides are most warranted for control of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a disease of wheat caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum, when wet, rainy conditions occurs during anthesis. However, it is unclear whether rainfall directly following application affects fungicide efficacy against...

  20. Effects of Citric and Lactic Acid on the Reduction of Deoxynivalenol and Its Derivatives in Feeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humer, Elke; Lucke, Annegret; Harder, Hauke; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Böhm, Josef; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to mycotoxin-contaminated feeds represents a serious health risk. This has necessitated the need for the establishment of practical methods for mycotoxin decontamination. This study investigated the effects of citric acid (CA) and lactic acid (LA) on common trichothecene mycotoxins in feeds contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins. Contaminated feed samples were processed either with 5% CA or 5% LA solutions in a ratio of 1:1.2 (w/v) for 5, 24, or 48 h, and analyzed for multiple mycotoxin metabolites using a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometric method. The analyses showed that treating the feed with CA and LA lowered the concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON), whereby 5% LA lowered the original DON concentration in the contaminated feed samples by half, irrespective of the processing time. Similar lowering effects were observed for the concentrations of 15Ac-DON, 5-hydroxyculmorin, and sambucinol. The concentration of nivalenol was only lowered by the LA treatment. In contrast, CA and LA treatments showed no or only small effects on the concentration of several mycotoxins and their derivatives, including zearalenone, fumonisins, and culmorin. In conclusion, the present results indicate that the use of 5% solutions of LA and CA might reduce the concentration of common trichothecene mycotoxins, especially DON and its derivate 15Ac-DON. However, further research is required to determine the effect on overall toxicity and to identify the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27690101

  1. Effects of Citric and Lactic Acid on the Reduction of Deoxynivalenol and Its Derivatives in Feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Humer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to mycotoxin-contaminated feeds represents a serious health risk. This has necessitated the need for the establishment of practical methods for mycotoxin decontamination. This study investigated the effects of citric acid (CA and lactic acid (LA on common trichothecene mycotoxins in feeds contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins. Contaminated feed samples were processed either with 5% CA or 5% LA solutions in a ratio of 1:1.2 (w/v for 5, 24, or 48 h, and analyzed for multiple mycotoxin metabolites using a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometric method. The analyses showed that treating the feed with CA and LA lowered the concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON, whereby 5% LA lowered the original DON concentration in the contaminated feed samples by half, irrespective of the processing time. Similar lowering effects were observed for the concentrations of 15Ac-DON, 5-hydroxyculmorin, and sambucinol. The concentration of nivalenol was only lowered by the LA treatment. In contrast, CA and LA treatments showed no or only small effects on the concentration of several mycotoxins and their derivatives, including zearalenone, fumonisins, and culmorin. In conclusion, the present results indicate that the use of 5% solutions of LA and CA might reduce the concentration of common trichothecene mycotoxins, especially DON and its derivate 15Ac-DON. However, further research is required to determine the effect on overall toxicity and to identify the underlying mechanisms.

  2. The Antagonistic Effect of Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone on Metabolic Profiling in Serum and Liver of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic profiling in liver and serum of mice was studied for the combined toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEN, through gas chromatography mass spectrum. The spectrum of serum and liver sample of mice, treated with individual 2 mg/kg DON, 20 mg/kg ZEN, and the combined DON + ZEN with final concentration 2 mg/kg DON and 20 mg/kg ZEN for 21 days, were deconvoluted, aligned and identified with MS DIAL. The data matrix was processed with univariate analysis and multivariate analysis for selection of metabolites with variable importance for the projection (VIP > 1, t-test p value < 0.05. The metabolic pathway analysis was performed with MetaMapp and drawn by CytoScape. Results show that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an obvious “antagonistic effect” in serum and liver tissue metabolic profiling of mice. The blood biochemical indexes, like alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and albumin (ALB/globulin (GLO, reveal a moderated trend in the combined DON + ZEN treatment group, which is consistent with histopathological examination. The metabolic pathway analysis demonstrated that the combined DON and ZEN treatment could down-regulate the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, and O-glycosyl compounds related glucose metabolism in liver tissue. The metabolic profiling in serum confirmed the finding that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an “antagonistic effect” on liver metabolism of mice.

  3. The Antagonistic Effect of Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone on Metabolic Profiling in Serum and Liver of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jian; Zhu, Pei; Cui, Fangchao; Pi, Fuwei; Zhang, Yinzhi; Li, Yun; Wang, Jiasheng; Sun, Xiulan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic profiling in liver and serum of mice was studied for the combined toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN), through gas chromatography mass spectrum. The spectrum of serum and liver sample of mice, treated with individual 2 mg/kg DON, 20 mg/kg ZEN, and the combined DON + ZEN with final concentration 2 mg/kg DON and 20 mg/kg ZEN for 21 days, were deconvoluted, aligned and identified with MS DIAL. The data matrix was processed with univariate analysis and multivariate analysis for selection of metabolites with variable importance for the projection (VIP) > 1, t-test p value < 0.05. The metabolic pathway analysis was performed with MetaMapp and drawn by CytoScape. Results show that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an obvious “antagonistic effect” in serum and liver tissue metabolic profiling of mice. The blood biochemical indexes, like alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and albumin (ALB)/globulin (GLO), reveal a moderated trend in the combined DON + ZEN treatment group, which is consistent with histopathological examination. The metabolic pathway analysis demonstrated that the combined DON and ZEN treatment could down-regulate the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, and O-glycosyl compounds related glucose metabolism in liver tissue. The metabolic profiling in serum confirmed the finding that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an “antagonistic effect” on liver metabolism of mice. PMID:28075412

  4. The effects of low doses of two Fusarium toxins, zearalenone and deoxynivalenol, on the pig jejunum. A light and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara; Tarasiuk, Michał; Lewczuk, Bogdan; Prusik, Magdalena; Ziółkowska, Natalia; Zielonka, Łukasz; Gajęcki, Maciej; Gajęcka, Magdalena

    2015-11-11

    Immature gilts were administered per os with zearalenone (ZEN) at 40 μg/kg BW (group Z, n = 9), deoxynivalenol (DON) at 12 μg/kg BW (group D, n = 9), a mixture of ZEN and DON (group M, n = 9) or a placebo (group C, n = 9) over a period of six weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after one, three, or six weeks of the treatment (12 pigs per each time-point). Histological investigations revealed an increase in the mucosal thickness and the crypt depth as well as a decrease in the ratio of the villus height to the crypt depth in groups D and M after six weeks of exposure to the mycotoxins. The number of goblet cells in the villus epithelium was elevated in groups Z and M after one week and in group D after three weeks. The administration of ZEN increased the lymphocyte number in the villus epithelium after 1 week and the plasma cell quantity in the lamina propria after one, three, and six weeks of the experiment. DON treatment resulted in an increase in the lymphocyte number in the villus epithelium and the lamina propria after six weeks, and in the plasma cell quantity in the lamina propria after one, three, and six weeks of exposure. In group M, lymphocyte counts in the epithelium and the lamina propria increased significantly after six weeks. Neither mycotoxin induced significant adverse changes in the ultrastructure of the mucosal epithelium and the lamina propria or in the intestinal barrier permeability. Our results indicate that immune cells are the principal target of low doses of ZEN and DON.

  5. Evidence for a reversible drought induced shift in the species composition of mycotoxin producing Fusarium head blight pathogens isolated from symptomatic wheat heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Marco; Pogoda, Friederike; Pallez, Marine; Lazic, Joëlle; Hoffmann, Lucien; Pasquali, Matias

    2014-07-16

    Fusarium species are fungal plant pathogens producing toxic secondary metabolites such as deoxynivalenol (DON), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (15AcDON) and nivalenol (NIV). In Luxembourg, the Fusarium species composition isolated from symptomatic winter wheat heads was dominated by Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto strains (genetic 15AcDON chemotype) between the years 2009 and 2012, except for 2011, when Fusarium culmorum strains (genetic NIV chemotype) dominated the pathogen complex. Previous reports indicated that F. graminearum sensu stricto (genetic 15AcDON chemotype) was also most frequently isolated from randomly sampled winter wheat kernels including symptomatic as well as asymptomatic kernels in 2007 and 2008. The annual precipitation (average of 10 weather stations scattered across the country) decreased continuously from 924.31mm in 2007 over 917.15mm in 2008, to 843.38mm in 2009, 736.24mm in 2010, and 575.09mm in 2011. In 2012, the annual precipitation increased again to 854.70mm. Hardly any precipitation was recorded around the time of wheat anthesis in the years 2010 and 2011, whereas precipitation levels >50mm within the week preceding anthesis plus the week post anthesis were observed in the other years. The shift to genetic NIV chemotype F. culmorum strains in 2011 was accompanied by a very minor elevation of average NIV contents (2.9ngg(-1)) in the grain. Our data suggest that high NIV levels in Luxembourgish winter wheat are at present rather unlikely, because the indigenous F. culmorum strains with the genetic NIV chemotype seem to be outcompeted under humid in vivo conditions by F. graminearum DON producing strains on the one hand and seem to be inhibited - even though to a lower extent than DON producing strains - under dry in vivo conditions on the other hand.

  6. Fusarium Pathogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium is a genus of filamentous fungi that contains many agronomically important plant pathogens, mycotoxin producers, and opportunistic human pathogens. Comparative analyses have revealed compartmentalization of genomes into regions responsible for metabolism and reproduction (core genome) and p...

  7. Diversity in metabolite production by Fusarium langsethiae, Fusarium poae, and Fusarium sporotrichioides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Ulf; Adler, A.; Clasen, P.E.;

    2004-01-01

    The production of mycotoxins and other metabolites by 109 strains of Fusarium langsethiae, Fusarium poae, Fusarium sporotrichioides, and F. kyushuense was investigated independently in four laboratories by liquid or gas chromatography analyses of cultural extracts with UV diode array, electron...

  8. Structural and Functional Characterization of the TRI101 Trichothecene 3-O-Acetyltransferase from Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium graminearum: KINETIC INSIGHTS TO COMBATING FUSARIUM HEAD BLIGHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, Graeme S.; McCormick, Susan P.; Rayment, Ivan (UWASH); (UW); (NCAUR)

    2008-06-30

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a plant disease with serious economic and health impacts. It is caused by fungal species belonging to the genus Fusarium and the mycotoxins they produce. Although it has proved difficult to combat this disease, one strategy that has been examined is the introduction of an indigenous fungal protective gene into cereals such as wheat barley and rice. Thus far the gene of choice has been tri101 whose gene product catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A to the C3 hydroxyl moiety of several trichothecene mycotoxins. In vitro this has been shown to reduce the toxicity of the toxins by {approx}100-fold but has demonstrated limited resistance to FHB in transgenic cereal. To understand the molecular basis for the differences between in vitro and in vivo resistance the three-dimensional structures and kinetic properties of two TRI101 orthologs isolated from Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium graminearum have been determined. The kinetic results reveal important differences in activity of these enzymes toward B-type trichothecenes such as deoxynivalenol. These differences in activity can be explained in part by the three-dimensional structures for the ternary complexes for both of these enzymes with coenzyme A and trichothecene mycotoxins. The structural and kinetic results together emphasize that the choice of an enzymatic resistance gene in transgenic crop protection strategies must take into account the kinetic profile of the selected protein.

  9. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in Iowa streams: An examination of underinvestigated compounds in agricultural basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Hoerger, Corinne C.; Meyer, Michael T.; Wettstein, Felix E.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Bucheli, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides the first broad-scale investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of phytoestrogens and mycotoxins in streams in the United States. Fifteen stream sites across Iowa were sampled five times throughout the 2008 growing season to capture a range of climatic and crop-growth conditions. Basin size upstream from sampling sites ranged from 7 km2 to >836,000 km2 Atrazine (herbicide) also was measured in all samples as a frame-of-reference agriculturally derived contaminant. Target compounds were frequently detected in stream samples: atrazine (100%), formononetin (80%), equol (45%), deoxynivalenol (43%), daidzein (32%), biochanin A (23%), zearalenone (13%), and genistein (11%). The nearly ubiquitous detection of formononetin (isoflavone) suggests a widespread agricultural source, as one would expect with the intense row crop and livestock production present across Iowa. Conversely, the less spatially widespread detections of deoxynivalenol (mycotoxin) suggest a more variable source due to the required combination of proper host and proper temperature and moisture conditions necessary to promote Fusarium spp. infections. Although atrazine concentrations commonly exceeded 100 ng L-1 (42/75 measurements), only deoxynivalenol (6/56 measurements) had concentrations that occasionally exceeded this level. Temporal patterns in concentrations varied substantially between atrazine, formononetin, and deoxynivalenol, as one would expect for contaminants with different source inputs and processes of formation and degradation. The greatest phytoestrogen and mycotoxin concentrations were observed during spring snowmelt conditions. Phytoestrogens and mycotoxins were detected at all sampling sites regardless of basin size. The ecotoxicological effects from long-term, low-level exposures to phytoestrogens and mycotoxins or complex chemicals mixtures including these compounds that commonly take place in surface water are poorly understood and have yet to be

  10. Polymorphism of mycotoxin biosynthetic genes among Fusarium equiseti isolates from Italy and Poland

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Fusarium equiseti (Corda) Saccardo is a soil saprophyte and a weak pathogen, associated with several diseases of fruit and other crops in subtropical and tropical areas, but also in countries with temperate climate. A wide range of secondary metabolites has been identified among natural F. equiseti populations, with zearalenone (ZEA), fusarochromanone and fusarenon-X being the most common. In present study, the genetic diversity of strains from two populations (from Italy and Poland) was eval...

  11. Analysis of the Fusarium mycotoxin moniliformin in cereal samples using 13C2-moniliformin and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bargen, Katharina Walburga; Lohrey, Lilia; Cramer, Benedikt; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-04-11

    Moniliformin is a mycotoxin produced by fungi of the Fusarium genus and occurs as a contaminant of different cereals worldwide. This study describes the first application of isotopically labeled (13)C(2)-moniliformin for the analysis of moniliformin in cereals. Moniliformin is a small and ionic molecule that forms only a single sensitive fragment ion in the collision cell of a tandem mass spectrometer. Therefore, the methods described in the literature for this kind of instrument observe only a single mass transition and show a relatively poor sensitivity. The use of high-resolution mass spectrometry was described to be a suitable alternative technique for the detection of this compound and was therefore applied in this study. The developed method is based on the use of strong anion exchange columns for cleanup prior to HPLC analysis and has a recovery rate of 75.3%, a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.7 μg/kg, and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 2.5 μg/kg. Twenty-three different cereal samples were analyzed for their moniliformin content. Twenty of them showed positive results with levels up to 126 ± 12.2 μg/kg.

  12. Kinetics and metabolism of the Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol in farm animals: consequences for diagnosis of exposure and intoxication and carry over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dänicke, Sven; Brezina, Ulrike

    2013-10-01

    The knowledge of factors influencing the kinetics, metabolism and bioavailability of the Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a basic prerequisite for evaluation of the transfer (carry over) of the toxin and its metabolites into edible tissues, and for a physiological specimen-based diagnosis of intoxication. These aspects are addressed in the present review, and potentials and pitfalls of the suitability of analysis of physiological samples for evaluation of the DON exposure as a veterinary tool are discussed. For example, the farm animal species was shown to be a determining factor influencing the metabolic profile and the bioavailability of DON. Although linear relationships were derived between DON exposure of ad libitum and restrictively fed animals and DON or de-epoxy-DON concentration in the blood of pigs, dairy cows and sheep, it has to be considered that individual values might markedly deviate from these relationships, which makes interpretation of measured concentrations of DON and its metabolites difficult. The situation is further complicated by the lack of established relationships between DON residues in physiological matrices and the adverse effects of DON on the health and performance of farm animals.

  13. Survey of 11 mycotoxins in wheat flour in Hebei province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinping; Lu, Yang; Wang, Liying; Chang, Fengqi; Yang, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    A survey of 11 mycotoxins in 348 wheat flour samples marketed in Hebei province of China were analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, was carried out. The selected mycotoxins consisted of four aflatoxins (AFs: AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2) and seven Fusarium toxins, i.e. deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, zearalenone, Fusarenon-X and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside. Results indicated that most of the wheat samples analysed were contaminated with mycotoxins. Wheat was most susceptible to DON (91.4% contamination), with a mean level of 240 μg kg(-1). On average the probable daily intake (PDI, expressed as µg kg(-1) body weight day(-1)) of mycotoxins was within the provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI, 2.0 µg kg(-1) of body weight day(-1)) as set by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives. Nevertheless, exposure assessment revealed that the maximum PDI of mycotoxins was 4.06 µg kg(-1) body weight day(-1), which was twice the PMTDI value. Thus, consistent monitoring is recommended, as to keep the contamination level under control.

  14. Fusarial toxins: secondary metabolites of Fusarium fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesic, Ksenija; Ivanovic, Snezana; Nesic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins occurs worldwide, even though there are geographic and climatic differences in the amounts produced and occurrence of these substances.Mycotoxins are secondary chemical metabolites of different fungi. They are natural contaminants of cereals, so their presence is often inevitable. Among many genera that produce mycotoxins, Fusarium fungi are the most widespread in cereal-growing areas of the planet. Fusarium fungi produce a diversity of mycotoxin types, whose distributions are also diverse. What is produced and where it is produced is influenced primarily by environmental conditions, and crop production and storage methods. The amount of toxin produced depends on physical (viz., moisture, relative humidity, temperature, and mechanical damage), chemical (viz., carbon dioxide,oxygen, composition of substrate, insecticides and fungicides), and biological factors (viz., plant variety, stress, insects, spore load, etc.). Moisture and temperature have a major influence on mold growth rate and mycotoxin production.Among the most toxic and prevalent fusaria) toxins are the following: zearalenone,fumonisins, moniliformin and trichothecenes (T-2/HT-2 toxin, deoxynivalenol,diacetoxyscirpenol, nivalenol). Zearalenone (ZEA; ZON, F-2 toxin) isaphy to estrogenic compound, primarily a field contaminant, which exhibits estrogenic activity and has been implicated in numerous mycotoxicoses of farm animals,especially pigs. Recently, evidence suggests that ZEA has potential to stimulate the growth of human breast cancer cells. Fumonisins are also cancer-promoting metabolites,of which Fumonisin 8 I (FBI) is the most important. Moniliformin (MON) isalso highly toxic to both animals and humans. Trichothecenes are classified as gastrointestinal toxins, dermatotoxins, immunotoxins, hematotoxins, and gene toxins.T-2 and HT-2 toxin, and diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS, anguidine) are the most toxic mycotoxins among the trichothecene group. Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) and

  15. Temporal Variation of Mycotoxin Producing Fungi in Norwegian Cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Sundheim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spring barley is grown on about half of the Norwegian cereal area. The rest of the area is equally divided between wheat and oats. Most years the domestic production provides 70%–80% of the domestic market for bread wheat. Barley and oats are mainly grown for animal feed. During the years 2008–2012, severe epidemics of Fusarium head blight have led to increased mycotoxin contamination of cereals. During that period, precipitation was above normal during anthesis and grain maturation. The most important mycotoxin producers have been F. avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. graminearum and F. langsethiae. Increased deoxynivalenol contamination of Norwegian cereals during recent years is due to severe F. graminearum epidemics.

  16. Tissue-specific and pathogen-inducible expression of a fusion protein containing a Fusarium-specific antibody and a fungal chitinase protects wheat against Fusarium pathogens and mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wei; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Du, Hong-Jie; Wei, Qi-Yong; Huang, Tao; Yang, Peng; Kong, Xian-Wei; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2015-06-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) in wheat and other small grain cereals is a globally devastating disease caused by toxigenic Fusarium pathogens. Controlling FHB is a challenge because germplasm that is naturally resistant against these pathogens is inadequate. Current control measures rely on fungicides. Here, an antibody fusion comprised of the Fusarium spp.-specific recombinant antibody gene CWP2 derived from chicken, and the endochitinase gene Ech42 from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma atroviride was introduced into the elite wheat cultivar Zhengmai9023 by particle bombardment. Expression of this fusion gene was regulated by the lemma/palea-specific promoter Lem2 derived from barley; its expression was confirmed as lemma/palea-specific in transgenic wheat. Single-floret inoculation of independent transgenic wheat lines of the T3 to T6 generations revealed significant resistance (type II) to fungal spreading, and natural infection assays in the field showed significant resistance (type I) to initial infection. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed marked reduction of mycotoxins in the grains of the transgenic wheat lines. Progenies of crosses between the transgenic lines and the FHB-susceptible cultivar Huamai13 also showed significantly enhanced FHB resistance. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the tissue-specific expression of the antibody fusion was induced by salicylic acid drenching and induced to a greater extent by F. graminearum infection. Histochemical analysis showed substantial restriction of mycelial growth in the lemma tissues of the transgenic plants. Thus, the combined tissue-specific and pathogen-inducible expression of this Fusarium-specific antibody fusion can effectively protect wheat against Fusarium pathogens and reduce mycotoxin content in grain. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Relationships between Genetic Diversity and Fusarium Toxin Profiles of Winter Wheat Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góral, Tomasz; Stuper-Szablewska, Kinga; Buśko, Maciej; Boczkowska, Maja; Walentyn-Góral, Dorota; Wiśniewska, Halina; Perkowski, Juliusz

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium head blight is one of the most important and most common diseases of winter wheat. In order to better understanding this disease and to assess the correlations between different factors, 30 cultivars of this cereal were evaluated in a two-year period. Fusarium head blight resistance was evaluated and the concentration of trichothecene mycotoxins was analysed. Grain samples originated from plants inoculated with Fusarium culmorum and naturally infected with Fusarium species. The genetic distance between the tested cultivars was determined and data were analysed using multivariate data analysis methods. Genetic dissimilarity of wheat cultivars ranged between 0.06 and 0.78. They were grouped into three distinct groups after cluster analysis of genetic distance. Wheat cultivars differed in resistance to spike and kernel infection and in resistance to spread of Fusarium within a spike (type II). Only B trichothecenes (deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and nivalenol) produced by F. culmorum in grain samples from inoculated plots were present. In control samples trichothecenes of groups A (H-2 toxin, T-2 toxin, T-2 tetraol, T-2 triol, scirpentriol, diacetoxyscirpenol) and B were detected. On the basis of Fusarium head blight assessment and analysis of trichothecene concentration in the grain relationships between morphological characters, Fusarium head blight resistance and mycotoxins in grain of wheat cultivars were examined. The results were used to create of matrices of distance between cultivars – for trichothecene concentration in inoculated and naturally infected grain as well as for FHB resistance Correlations between genetic distance versus resistance/mycotoxin profiles were calculated using the Mantel test. A highly significant correlation between genetic distance and mycotoxin distance was found for the samples inoculated with Fusarium culmorum. Significant but weak relationships were found between genetic distance matrix and FHB resistance or

  18. Monitoring levels of deoxynivalenol in wheat flour of Brazilian varieties

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    Cristiano L Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium graminearum and its intake represents a severe risk to human and animal health. The objective of this study was to evaluate levels of DON in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. flour from two representative locations of south Brazil. Experiments were carried out in Pato Branco (Paraná and Coxilha (Rio Grande do Sul in a randomized complete block design with three replicates. Levels of DON were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS. This mycotoxin was detected in 97% of samples, ranging from 200 to 4140 u,g kg-1. Only 17% of samples presented DON beyond of the maximum allowed by the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency up to the year 2012; even though, Fusarium head blight (FHB epidemics were slight low in the growing season that the study was performed. According to our knowledge, this is the first report showing genetic variability of Brazilian cultivars to DON contamination and some genotypes have potential to be exploited as a source of low accumulation of this toxin.

  19. COLONIZATION OF GRAPE BERRIES BY THE GENUS FUSARIUM AND TOXIGENITY OF THE MOST COMMON REPRESENTATIVES

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    Zuzana Mašková

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess mycotoxin-producing fungi, especially from Fusarium genus, in grapes destined for wine production and to test the ability of selected Fusarium strains to produce mycotoxins as deoxynivalenol (DON, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS, HT-2 (HT-2 toxin, T-2 (T-2 toxin and zearalenon (ZEA. Totally we processed 24 samples, collected from various Slovak localities in year 2012. The total and endogenous mycobiota was determined by the method of direct placing of grape berries on agar plates. Endogenous mycobiota was estimated after the superficial sterilization. The isolation frequency of the Fusarium genus was 83.3%, in the framework of the non-sterilized and also of sterilized berries. The average relative density was relatively low (2.2% - without sterilization, 2.3% - with sterilization. Totally we identified 11 species of the genus Fusarium. The most important species, on the basis of the isolation frequency and relative density, were F. proliferatum and F. sporotrichioides. Selected isolates of this two species were tested for their toxigenity, by means of thin-layer chromatography. Tests of F. proliferatum confirmed only sporadic production of diacetoxyscirpenol, HT-2 and T-2 toxins. Isolates of F. sporotrichioides have demonstrated high ability to produce diacetoxyscipenol, deoxynivalenol and T-2 toxin (100%, 73% produced HT-2 toxin and 50% synthesized zearalenon.

  20. Higher Fusarium Toxin Accumulation in Grain of Winter Triticale Lines Inoculated with Fusarium culmorum as Compared with Wheat †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góral, Tomasz; Wiśniewska, Halina; Ochodzki, Piotr; Walentyn-Góral, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to Fusarium head blight in 32 winter triticale and 34 winter wheat accessions was evaluated. Triticale and wheat were sown in field experiments in two locations. At the time of flowering, heads were inoculated with three Fusarium culmorum isolates. Fusarium head blight index was scored and after the harvest percentage of Fusarium damaged kernels was assessed. Grain was analysed for type B trichothecenes (deoxynivalenol and derivatives, nivalenol) and zearalenone (ZEN) content. The average Fusarium head blight indexes were 28.0% for wheat and 19.2% for triticale accessions. The percentage of Fusarium damaged kernels was also higher for wheat and came to 55.6%, while for triticale this figure was 40.2%. The average content of deoxynivalenol (DON) for wheat amounted to 11.65 mg/kg and was lower than the result for triticale which was 14.12 mg/kg. The average contents of nivalenol were similar in both cereals: 4.13 mg/kg and 5.19 mg/kg for wheat and triticale respectively. Considerable amounts of DON derivatives in the cereals were also detected. The ZEN content in the grain was 0.60 mg/kg for wheat and 0.66 mg/kg for triticale. Relationships between Fusarium head blight index, Fusarium damaged kernels and mycotoxin contents were statistically significant for wheat and mostly insignificant for triticale. Triticale proved to have less infected heads and kernels than wheat. However, the content of type B trichothecenes was higher in triticale grain than in wheat grain. PMID:27763547

  1. Transcription factor ART1 mediates starch hydrolysis and mycotoxin production in Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mira; Son, Hokyoung; Choi, Gyung Ja; Lee, Chanhui; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Kim, Hun; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-06-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the responses to environmental factors, such as nitrogen, carbon and pH, involve components that regulate the production of secondary metabolites, including mycotoxins. In this study, we identified and characterized a gene in the FGSG_02083 locus, designated as FgArt1, which was predicted to encode a Zn(II)2 Cys6 zinc finger transcription factor. An FgArt1 deletion mutant of Fusarium graminearum exhibited impaired starch hydrolysis as a result of significantly reduced α-amylase gene expression. The deletion strain was unable to produce trichothecenes and exhibited low Tri5 and Tri6 expression levels, whereas the complemented strain showed a similar ability to produce trichothecenes as the wild-type strain. In addition, FgArt1 deletion resulted in impairment of germination in starch liquid medium and reduced pathogenicity on flowering wheat heads. To investigate the roles of the FgArt1 homologue in F. verticillioides, we deleted the FVEG_02083 gene, and the resulting strain showed defects in starch hydrolysis, similar to the FgArt1 deletion strain, and produced no detectable level of fumonisin B1 . Fum1 and Fum12 expression levels were undetectable in the deletion strain. However, when the FvArt1-deleted F. verticillioides strain was complemented with FgArt1, the resulting strain was unable to recover the production of fumonisin B1 , although FgArt1 expression and starch hydrolysis were induced. Thus, our results suggest that there are different regulatory pathways governed by each ART1 transcription factor in trichothecene and fumonisin biosynthesis. Taken together, we suggest that ART1 plays an important role in both trichothecene and fumonisin biosynthesis by the regulation of genes involved in starch hydrolysis.

  2. Mycotoxin-induced disease in captive whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, G.H.; Carpenter, J.W.; Gee, G.F.; Thomas, N.J.; Dein, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    In 1987, an epizootic in cranes at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, USA, caused illness in 80% of 300 captive whooping cranes (Grus americana) and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and death of 15 of these cranes. Gross pathology findings were inconclusive and consisted of dehydration, atrophy of fat, renal insufficiency, and small spleens. Extensive testing resulted in isolation of Fusarium sp. mold from constituents of the grain-based diet. Low levels of two mycotoxins, T2 (1-2 ppm) and deoxynivalenol (0.4 ppm), were isolated from the pelleted feed.

  3. Isolation of deoxynivalenol-transforming bacteria from the chicken intestines using the approach of PCR-DGGE guided microbial selection

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    Li Xiu-Zhen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination of grains with trichothecene mycotoxins, especially deoxynivalenol (DON, has been an ongoing problem for Canada and many other countries. Mycotoxin contamination creates food safety risks, reduces grain market values, threatens livestock industries, and limits agricultural produce exports. DON is a secondary metabolite produced by some Fusarium species of fungi. To date, there is a lack of effective and economical methods to significantly reduce the levels of trichothecene mycotoxins in food and feed, including the efforts to breed Fusarium pathogen-resistant crops and chemical/physical treatments to remove the mycotoxins. Biological approaches, such as the use of microorganisms to convert the toxins to non- or less toxic compounds, have become a preferred choice recently due to their high specificity, efficacy, and environmental soundness. However, such approaches are often limited by the availability of microbial agents with the ability to detoxify the mycotoxins. In the present study, an approach with PCR-DGGE guided microbial selection was developed and used to isolate DON -transforming bacteria from chicken intestines, which resulted in the successful isolation of several bacterial isolates that demonstrated the function to transform DON to its de-epoxy form, deepoxy-4-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1, a product much less toxic than DON. Results The use of conventional microbiological selection strategies guided by PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis bacterial profiles for isolating DON-transforming bacteria has significantly increased the efficiency of the bacterial selection. Ten isolates were identified and isolated from chicken intestines. They were all able to transform DON to DOM-1. Most isolates were potent in transforming DON and the activity was stable during subculturing. Sequence data of partial 16S rRNA genes indicate that the ten isolates belong to four different bacterial groups

  4. Metabolism of the Fusarium Mycotoxins T-2 Toxin and HT-2 Toxin in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanail, Alexis V; Varga, Elisabeth; Meng-Reiterer, Jacqueline; Bueschl, Christoph; Michlmayr, Herbert; Malachova, Alexandra; Fruhmann, Philipp; Jestoi, Marika; Peltonen, Kimmo; Adam, Gerhard; Lemmens, Marc; Schuhmacher, Rainer; Berthiller, Franz

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the metabolic fate of HT-2 toxin (HT2) and T-2 toxin (T2) in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), an untargeted metabolomics study utilizing stable isotopic labeling and liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry was performed. In total, 11 HT2 and 12 T2 derived in planta biotransformation products were annotated putatively. In addition to previously reported mono- and diglucosylated forms of HT2, evidence for the formation of HT2-malonyl-glucoside and feruloyl-T2, as well as acetylation and deacetylation products in wheat was obtained for the first time. To monitor the kinetics of metabolite formation, a time course experiment was conducted involving the Fusarium head blight susceptible variety Remus and the resistant cultivar CM-82036. Biotransformation reactions were observed already at the earliest tested time point (6 h after treatment), and formed metabolites showed different kinetic profiles. After ripening, less than 15% of the toxins added to the plants were determined to be unmetabolized.

  5. Changes in the Fusarium Head Blight Complex of Malting Barley in a Three-Year Field Experiment in Italy

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    Giovanni Beccari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, conducted for three years on eleven malting barley varieties cultivated in central Italy, the incidence of different mycotoxigenic fungal genera, the identification of the Fusarium species associated with the Fusarium Head Blight (FHB complex, and kernels contamination with deoxynivalenol (DON and T-2 mycotoxins were determined. The influence of climatic conditions on Fusarium infections and FHB complex composition was also investigated. Fusarium species were always present in the three years and the high average and maximum temperatures during anthesis mainly favored their occurrence. The FHB complex was subject to changes during the three years and the main causal agents were F. poae, F. avenaceum, F. tricinctum and F. graminearum, which, even if constantly present, never represented the principal FHB agent. The relative incidence of Fusarium species changed because of climatic conditions occurring during the seasons. The FHB complex was composed of many different Fusarium species and some of them were associated with a specific variety and/or with specific weather parameters, indicating that the interaction between a certain plant genotype and climatic conditions may influence the presence of Fusarium spp. causing infections. With regard to mycotoxin contamination, T-2 toxin, in some cases, was found in kernels at levels that exceeded EU recommended values.

  6. Changes in the Fusarium Head Blight Complex of Malting Barley in a Three-Year Field Experiment in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccari, Giovanni; Prodi, Antonio; Tini, Francesco; Bonciarelli, Umberto; Onofri, Andrea; Oueslati, Souheib; Limayma, Marwa; Covarelli, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, conducted for three years on eleven malting barley varieties cultivated in central Italy, the incidence of different mycotoxigenic fungal genera, the identification of the Fusarium species associated with the Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) complex, and kernels contamination with deoxynivalenol (DON) and T-2 mycotoxins were determined. The influence of climatic conditions on Fusarium infections and FHB complex composition was also investigated. Fusarium species were always present in the three years and the high average and maximum temperatures during anthesis mainly favored their occurrence. The FHB complex was subject to changes during the three years and the main causal agents were F. poae, F. avenaceum, F. tricinctum and F. graminearum, which, even if constantly present, never represented the principal FHB agent. The relative incidence of Fusarium species changed because of climatic conditions occurring during the seasons. The FHB complex was composed of many different Fusarium species and some of them were associated with a specific variety and/or with specific weather parameters, indicating that the interaction between a certain plant genotype and climatic conditions may influence the presence of Fusarium spp. causing infections. With regard to mycotoxin contamination, T-2 toxin, in some cases, was found in kernels at levels that exceeded EU recommended values. PMID:28353653

  7. Influence of low doses of deoxynivalenol on histopathology of selected organs of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, Ł; Wiśniewska, M; Gajecka, M; Obremski, K; Gajecki, M

    2009-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol is one of mycotoxins that are most frequently determined in animal feed manufactured in Poland. The examination of histopathological lesions concomitant with deoxynivalenol intoxication is difficult because of the common, often synergistic, reaction of this mycotoxin with other toxins, such as zearalenone or ochratoxin A, which has a strong nephrotoxic activity. The possibility of estimating histopathological lesions in the course of intoxication with pure toxin at various doses is therefore of interest. Dosages used in this experiment relate to clinical cases observed in feeding the animals with whole ration feed obtained by processing feedingstuffs contaminated with Fusarium moulds. However, concerning the fact of one-shot administration of clinically pure toxin, the main question was if it was a sufficient dose to cause changes in the histopathological picture of gastrointestinal tract organs. The experiment was carried out on 12 nursery pigs of mixed breed (Polish White Large x Polish White Ear-pendent) with an average body weigh of 35 kg. The experimental nursery pigs were divided into 3 groups: group I (n=4)--control; group II (n=4)--DON administered at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg b.w.; group III (n=4)--DON administered at a dose of 0.4 mg/kg b.w. After slaughter of the animals, macroscopic examination was performed and segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes were sampled and assigned for histopathological examination. The results obtained equate to the clinically observed signs in swine production involving some nutrient metabolism disturbances in the gastrointestinal tract in the course of deoxynivalenol mycotoxicosis. Histopathological examination of segments of the duodenum, the jejunum, the ileum, the liver and the lymph nodes indicate that the regressive lesions are more expressed in the experimental group treated with the highest concentration of deoxynivalenol.

  8. Engineering deoxynivalenol metabolism in wheat through the expression of a fungal trichothecene acetyltransferase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubara, P A; Blechl, A E; McCormick, S P; Alexander, N J; Dill-Macky, R; Hohn, T M

    2002-12-01

    Fusarium head blight occurs in cereals throughout the world and is especially important in humid growing regions. Fusarium head blight (FHB) has re-emerged as a major disease of wheat and barley in the U.S. and Canada since 1993. The primary causal agents of FHB, Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, can produce deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin that enhances disease severity and poses a health hazard to humans and monogastric animals. To reduce the effects of DON on wheat, we have introduced FsTRI101, a Fusarium sporotrichioides gene formerly known as TriR, into the regenerable cultivar Bobwhite. TRI101 encodes an enzyme that transfers an acetyl moiety to the C3 hydroxyl group of trichothecenes. Four different transgenic plants carrying the FsTRI101 gene were identified. Although expression levels varied among the four lines, all of them accumulated FsTRI101 transcripts in endosperm and glume. TRI101-encoded acetyltransferase activity was detected in endosperm extracts of a single plant that accumulated FsTRI101 mRNA. Greenhouse resistance tests indicated that the accumulation of FsTRI101-encoded acetyltransferase in this plant confers partial protection against the spread of F. graminearum in inoculated wheat heads (spikes).

  9. Deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and T-2 in grain based swine feed in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tima, Helga; Rácz, Anita; Guld, Zsuzsanna; Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla; Kiskó, Gabriella

    2016-12-01

    Fusarium genera can produce trichothecenes like deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEN) and T-2 toxin, which can occur in feed cereal grains. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) tests of different Hungarian swine feedstuff proved that these mycotoxins were present. In this survey, 45 feed samples from 3 significant Hungarian swine feedstuff manufacturers were tested. ELISA methodology validation showed mean recovery rates in ranges from 85.3% to 98.1%, with intermediate precision of 86.9-96.9% and variation coefficients of 3.4-5.7% and 5.9-7.1%, respectively. The results showed that among Fusarium toxins, generally DON was present in the highest concentration, followed by T-2 and finally ZEN in all tested swine feeds. Each of the mycotoxins was found above the limit of detection in all swine feedstuffs. Boars feed's DON (average ± standard deviation was 872 ± 139 µg kg(-1)) and ZEN (172 ± 18 µg kg(-1)) results of one of the manufacturers were above the guidance values. It indicates the necessity for efficient monitoring of DON, ZEN and T-2 mycotoxins in swine feeds.

  10. Biological control as a strategy to reduce the impact of mycotoxins in peanuts, grapes and cereals in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulze, S N; Palazzini, J M; Torres, A M; Barros, G; Ponsone, M L; Geisen, R; Schmidt-Heydt, M; Köhl, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins including aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, fumonisins and ochratoxin A are among the main fungal secondary metabolites detected as natural contaminants in South America in different commodities such as peanuts (aflatoxins), cereals (deoxynivalenol and fumonisins) or grapes (ochratoxin A). Different strategies including crop rotation, tillage practices, fungicide application and planting less susceptible cultivars are used in order to reduce the impact of these mycotoxins in both food and feed chains. The development of fungicide resistance in many fungal pathogens as well as rising of public concern on the risks associated with pesticide use led to the search for alternative environmentally friendly methods. Biological control of plant pathogens and toxigenic fungi offers an alternative that can complement chemical control in the frame of an integrated pest management to reduce the impact of mycotoxins in the food and feed chains. The advances made in Argentina on reducing the impact of toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins in peanut, grapes and cereals using the biocontrol strategy are summarised. Native bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi have been selected to evaluate them as potential biocontrol agents. Field trials showed that Bacillus subtilis RC 218 and Brevibacillus sp. RC 263 were effective at reducing deoxynivalenol accumulation in wheat. The application of Clonostachys rosea isolates on wheat stubble reduced Fusarium colonisation on the stubble. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Microbacterium oleovorans showed good activity to control both Fusarium verticillioides growth and the accumulation of fumonisins at pre-harvest stage in maize. Control of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin accumulation in peanuts was achieved using a native atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain based on competitive exclusion of the toxigenic strains. Kluyveromyces thermotolerans strains were used as biocontrol agents to reduce the impact of Aspergillus section Nigri and

  11. Deoxynivalenol Biomarkers in the Urine of UK Vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Liz; Hardie, Laura; Williams, Courtney; White, Kay; Liu, Yunru; De Santis, Barbara; Debegnach, Francesca; Moretti, Georgio; Greetham, Stephanie; Brera, Carlo; Papageorgiou, Maria; Thatcher, Natalie J; Rigby, Alan; Atkin, Stephen L; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat

    2017-06-22

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is produced by Fusarium graminearum and is one of the most commonly occurring trichothecenes. Vegetarians are alleged to be a high-risk group for DON exposure due to high intakes of cereals susceptible to the growth of the mycotoxin. This study provides the levels of DON and de-epoxi Deoxynivalenol (DOM-1) in urine analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in UK vegetarians. Over two consecutive days, morning urine samples were collected from 32 vegetarians and 31 UK adult volunteers, and associated food consumption 24 h prior to the sample was recorded. Statistically significant differences between the weight of the UK adults and vegetarians (t = 3.15. df = 61, p ≤ 0.005 two-tailed) were observed. The mean levels of DON in urine for adults on day 1 was 3.05 ng free DON/mg creatinine, and on day 2 was 2.98 ng free DON/mg creatinine. Even though high mean levels were observed, most adults were within the tolerable daily intake. However, for vegetarians, the mean level of urinary DON on day 1 was 6.69 ng free DON/mg creatinine, and on day 2 was 3.42 ng free DON/mg creatinine. These levels equate to up to 32% of vegetarians exceeding recommended tolerable daily intakes (TDI) of exposure (1 µg/kg b.w./day).

  12. Deoxynivalenol Biomarkers in the Urine of UK Vegetarians

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    Liz Wells

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is produced by Fusarium graminearum and is one of the most commonly occurring trichothecenes. Vegetarians are alleged to be a high-risk group for DON exposure due to high intakes of cereals susceptible to the growth of the mycotoxin. This study provides the levels of DON and de-epoxi Deoxynivalenol (DOM-1 in urine analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS in UK vegetarians. Over two consecutive days, morning urine samples were collected from 32 vegetarians and 31 UK adult volunteers, and associated food consumption 24 h prior to the sample was recorded. Statistically significant differences between the weight of the UK adults and vegetarians (t = 3.15. df = 61, p ≤ 0.005 two-tailed were observed. The mean levels of DON in urine for adults on day 1 was 3.05 ng free DON/mg creatinine, and on day 2 was 2.98 ng free DON/mg creatinine. Even though high mean levels were observed, most adults were within the tolerable daily intake. However, for vegetarians, the mean level of urinary DON on day 1 was 6.69 ng free DON/mg creatinine, and on day 2 was 3.42 ng free DON/mg creatinine. These levels equate to up to 32% of vegetarians exceeding recommended tolerable daily intakes (TDI of exposure (1 µg/kg b.w./day.

  13. Colonisation of winter wheat grain by Fusarium spp. and mycotoxin content as dependent on a wheat variety, crop rotation, a crop management system and weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaban, Janusz; Wróblewska, Barbara; Sułek, Alicja; Mikos, Marzena; Boguszewska, Edyta; Podolska, Grażyna; Nieróbca, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted during three consecutive growing seasons (2007/08, 2008/09 and 2009/10) with four winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars - 'Bogatka', 'Kris', 'Satyna' and 'Tonacja' - grown on fields with a three-field crop rotation (winter triticale, spring barley, winter wheat) and in a four-field crop rotation experiment (spring wheat, spring cereals, winter rapeseed, winter wheat). After the harvest, kernels were surface disinfected with 2% NaOCl and then analysed for the internal infection by different species of Fusarium. Fusaria were isolated on Czapek-Dox iprodione dichloran agar medium and identified on the basis of macro- and micro-morphology on potato dextrose agar and synthetic nutrient agar media. The total wheat grain infection by Fusarium depended mainly on relative humidity (RH) and a rainfall during the flowering stage. Intensive rainfall and high RH in 2009 and 2010 in the period meant the proportions of infected kernels by the fungi were much higher than those in 2008 (lack of precipitation during anthesis). Weather conditions during the post-anthesis period changed the species composition of Fusarium communities internally colonising winter wheat grain. The cultivars significantly varied in the proportion of infected kernels by Fusarium spp. The growing season and type of crop rotation had a distinct effect on species composition of Fusarium communities colonising the grain inside. A trend of a higher percentage of the colonised kernels by the fungi in the grain from the systems using more fertilisers and pesticides as well as the buried straw could be perceived. The most frequent species in the grain were F. avenaceum, F. tricinctum and F. poae in 2008, and F. avenaceum, F. graminearum, F. tricinctum and F. poae in 2009 and 2010. The contents of deoxynivalenol and zearalenon in the grain were correlated with the percentage of kernels colonised by F. graminearum and were the highest in 2009 in the grain from the four

  14. Detection of multiple mycotoxin occurrences in soy animal feed by traditional mycological identification combined with molecular species identification

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    A.C. Gutleb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soy products are a main component of animal feed. Because mycotoxins may harm farm animals, undermining productivity and health, a mycological and toxigenic screening was carried out on 36 batches used in animal feed, collected in 2008, 2009 and 2010 in Italy. The investigated mycoflora of a subset of soy seed (n = 6 suggested that Aspergillus spp. and Fusarium spp. frequently colonize soy seeds. Aflatoxins, fumonisins and deoxynivalenol were detected in 88.9%, 72.2% and 30.6% of samples, respectively. Co-occurrence of at least two toxins was observed in 72% of cases. The molecular analysis of the Fusarium spp. population identified Fusarium verticillioides as potential producers of fumonisins, but no known deoxynivalenol producers were detected. It is suggested that the widespread presence of toxins can be due to non-optimal storing conditions of the feed. Moreover, our results suggest that mycotoxin thresholds should be adapted to consider the frequent case of toxin co-occurrence. This approach would better reflect the real toxigenic risk of feedstuffs.

  15. Optimization for the Production of Deoxynivalenoland Zearalenone by Fusarium graminearum UsingResponse Surface Methodology

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    Li Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEN are the most common contaminants in cereals worldwide, causing a wide range of adverse health effects on animals and humans. Many environmental factors can affect the production of these mycotoxins. Here, we have used response surface methodology (RSM to optimize the Fusarium graminearum strain 29 culture conditions for maximal toxin production. Three factors, medium pH, incubation temperature and time, were optimized using a Box-Behnken design (BBD. The optimized conditions for DON production were pH 4.91 and an incubation temperature of 23.75 °C for 28 days, while maximal ZEN production required pH 9.00 and an incubation temperature of 15.05 °C for 28 days. The maximum levels of DON and ZEN production were 2811.17 ng/mL and 23789.70 ng/mL, respectively. Considering the total level of DON and ZEN, desirable yields of the mycotoxins were still obtained with medium pH of 6.86, an incubation temperature of 17.76 °C and a time of 28 days. The corresponding experimental values, from the validation experiments, fitted well with these predictions. This suggests that RSM could be used to optimize Fusarium mycotoxin levels, which are further purified for use as potential mycotoxin standards. Furthermore, it shows that acidic pH is a determinant for DON production, while an alkaline environment and lower temperature (approximately 15 °C are favorable for ZEN accumulation. After extraction, separation and purification processes, the isolated mycotoxins were obtained through a simple purification process, with desirable yields, and acceptable purity. The mycotoxins could be used as potential analytical standards or chemical reagents for routine analysis.

  16. Optimization for the Production of Deoxynivalenoland Zearalenone by Fusarium graminearum UsingResponse Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Qiu, Lijuan; Zhang, Huijie; Sun, Juan; Hu, Xuexu; Wang, Bujun

    2017-02-10

    Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN) are the mostcommon contaminants in cereals worldwide, causing a wide range of adverse health effects onanimals and humans. Many environmental factors can affect the production of these mycotoxins.Here, we have used response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the Fusarium graminearumstrain 29 culture conditions for maximal toxin production. Three factors, medium pH, incubationtemperature and time, were optimized using a Box-Behnken design (BBD). The optimizedconditions for DON production were pH 4.91 and an incubation temperature of 23.75 °C for 28 days,while maximal ZEN production required pH 9.00 and an incubation temperature of 15.05 °C for 28days. The maximum levels of DON and ZEN production were 2811.17 ng/mL and 23789.70 ng/mL,respectively. Considering the total level of DON and ZEN, desirable yields of the mycotoxins werestill obtained with medium pH of 6.86, an incubation temperature of 17.76 °C and a time of 28 days.The corresponding experimental values, from the validation experiments, fitted well with thesepredictions. This suggests that RSM could be used to optimize Fusarium mycotoxin levels, whichare further purified for use as potential mycotoxin standards. Furthermore, it shows that acidic pHis a determinant for DON production, while an alkaline environment and lower temperature(approximately 15 °C) are favorable for ZEN accumulation. After extraction, separation andpurification processes, the isolated mycotoxins were obtained through a simple purification process,with desirable yields, and acceptable purity. The mycotoxins could be used as potential analyticalstandards or chemical reagents for routine analysis.

  17. Endocrine activity of mycotoxins and mycotoxin mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaegdt, Heidi; Daminet, Britt; Evrard, Annick; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Muller, Marc; Pussemier, Luc; Callebaut, Alfons; Vandermeiren, Karine

    2016-10-01

    Reporter gene assays incorporating nuclear receptors (estrogen, androgen, thyroid β and PPARγ2) have been implemented to assess the endocrine activity of 13 mycotoxins and their mixtures. As expected, zearalenone and its metabolites α-zearalenol and β- zearalenol turned out to have the strongest estrogenic potency (EC50 8,7 10-10 ± 0,8; 3,1 10-11 ± 0,5 and 1,3 10-8 ± 0,3 M respectively). The metabolite of deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol also had estrogenic activity (EC50 3,8 10-7 ± 1,1 M). Furthermore, most of the mycotoxins (and their mixtures) showed anti-androgenic effects (15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol and α-zearalenol with potencies within one order of magnitude of that of the reference compound flutamide). In particular, deoxynivalenol and 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol acted as antagonists for the PPARy2 receptor. When testing mixtures of mycotoxins on the same cell systems, we showed that most of the mixtures reacted as predicted by the concentration addition (CA) theory. Generally, the CA was within the 95% confidence interval of the observed ones, only minor deviations were detected. Although these reporter gene tests cannot be directly extrapolated in vivo, they can be the basis for further research. Especially the additive effects of ZEN and its metabolites are of importance and could have repercussions in vivo.

  18. Biological control as a strategy to reduce the impact of mycotoxins in peanuts, grapes and cereals in Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chulze, S.N.; Palazzini, J.M.; Torres, A.M.; Barros, G.; Ponsone, M.L.; Geisen, R.; Schmidt-Heydt, M.; Köhl, J.

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins including aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, fumonisins and ochratoxin A are among the main fungal secondary metabolites detected as natural contaminants in South America in different commodities such as peanuts (aflatoxins), cereals (deoxynivalenol and fumonisins) or grapes (ochratoxin A). Diff

  19. Simultaneous Determination of Multi-Mycotoxins in Cereal Grains Collected from South Korea by LC/MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ho Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An improved analytical method compared with conventional ones was developed for simultaneous determination of 13 mycotoxins (deoxynivalenol, nivalenol, 3-acetylnivalenol, aflatoxin B1, aflatoxin B2, aflatoxin G1, aflatoxin G2, fumonisin B1, fumonisin B2, T-2, HT-2, zearalenone, and ochratoxin A in cereal grains by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS after a single immunoaffinity column clean-up. The method showed a good linearity, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in mycotoxin determination by LC/MS/MS. The levels of 13 mycotoxins in 5 types of commercial grains (brown rice, maize, millet, sorghum, and mixed cereal from South Korea were determined in a total of 507 cereal grains. Mycotoxins produced from Fusarium sp. (fumonisins, deoxynivalenol, nivalenol, and zearalenone were more frequently (more than 5% and concurrently detected in all cereal grains along with higher mean levels (4.3–161.0 ng/g in positive samples than other toxins such as aflatoxins and ochratoxin A (less than 9% and below 5.2 ng/g in positive samples from other fungal species.

  20. Deoxynivalenol-Induced Proinflammatory Gene Expression: Mechanisms and Pathological Sequelae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Pestka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON is commonly encountered in human cereal foods throughout the world as a result of infestation of grains in the field and in storage by the fungus Fusarium. Significant questions remain regarding the risks posed to humans from acute and chronic DON ingestion, and how to manage these risks without imperiling access to nutritionally important food commodities. Modulation of the innate immune system appears particularly critical to DON’s toxic effects. Specifically, DON induces activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs in macrophages and monocytes, which mediate robust induction of proinflammatory gene expression—effects that can be recapitulated in intact animals. The initiating mechanisms for DON-induced ribotoxic stress response appear to involve the (1 activation of constitutive protein kinases on the damaged ribosome and (2 autophagy of the chaperone GRP78 with consequent activation of the ER stress response. Pathological sequelae resulting from chronic low dose exposure include anorexia, impaired weight gain, growth hormone dysregulation and aberrant IgA production whereas acute high dose exposure evokes gastroenteritis, emesis and a shock-like syndrome. Taken together, the capacity of DON to evoke ribotoxic stress in mononuclear phagocytes contributes significantly to its acute and chronic toxic effects in vivo. It is anticipated that these investigations will enable the identification of robust biomarkers of effect that will be applicable to epidemiological studies of the human health effects of this common mycotoxin.

  1. Molecular Detection of Mycotoxin Chemotypes of Seeds Borned Fusarium graminearum Clade on Maize%我国北方玉米子粒禾谷镰孢菌群产毒素化学型检测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董怀玉; 徐婧; 王丽娟; 刘可杰; 姜钰; 胡兰; 张明会; 徐秀德

    2014-01-01

    利用镰孢菌产毒素基因特异性引物,对分离自我国北方春玉米区玉米子粒的禾谷镰孢菌复合种群(Fusarium graminearum clade)的43株镰孢菌菌株进行产毒素化学型检测.结果表明,我国北方玉米子粒中携带的禾谷镰孢菌(包括F.graminearum和F.asiaticum)检测到2种产毒素化学型,F.graminearum只产生脱氧雪腐镰孢烯醇(Deoxynivalenol,DON),F.asiaticum可以产生脱氧雪腐镰孢烯醇(Deoxynivalenol,DON)和雪腐镰孢烯醇(Nivalenol,NIV).

  2. Mycoflora and mycotoxin contamination of Roundup Ready soybean harvested in the Pampean Region, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Carolina E; González, Héctor H L; Salas, María Paula; Resnik, Silvia L; Pacin, Ana M

    2013-08-01

    A total of 89 freshly harvested soybean seed samples (Roundup Ready [transgenic] soybean cultivars) from the 2010/2011 crop season were collected from five locations in the Northern Pampean Region II, Argentina. These samples were analyzed for internal mycoflora, toxin production of isolated fungi, and for a range of mycotoxins. Mycotoxin analysis of aflatoxins (AFs), zearalenone (ZEA), fumonisins (FBs) and ochratoxin A (OTA) was done by HPLC-FLD (high performance liquid chromatography with postcolumn fluorescence derivatization), alternariol and alternariol monomethyl ether with HPLC-UV (HPLC with UV detection), trichothecenes (deoxynivalenol, nivalenol, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, fusarenon X, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol were analyzed by GC-ECD (gas chromatography with electron capture detector). Fungal colonization was more frequently found for samples from América, Saladillo and Trenque Lauquen than for samples from General Villegas and Trenel; a total of 1,401 fungal isolates were obtained from the soybean seeds. The most commonly identified fungal genera were Alternaria, Sclerotinia, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Phomopsis and Fusarium. Alternaria alternata, A.tenuissima, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium citrinum, Fusarium verticillioides and F.semitectum were the predominant toxigenic fungal species. Mycotoxin production was confirmed for several isolates of toxigenic species, including Aspergillus flavus, A. parasiticus, Alternaria alternata, A.tenuissima, Fusarium graminearum, F semitectum and F. verticillioides. In particular, the percentage of mycotoxigenic Alternaria alternata (100%), A.tenuissima (95%) and aflatoxigenic strains of A. flavus (57%) were remarkably high. Although none of the mycotoxins, AFs, ZEA, FBs, trichothecenes and OTA, were directly detected in samples of soybean seeds, the frequent presence of toxigenic fungal species indicates the risk of multiple mycotoxin contamination.

  3. Influence of mycotoxins and a mycotoxin adsorbing agent on the oral bioavailability of commonly used antibiotics in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Pasmans, Frank; De Baere, Siegrid; Devreese, Mathias; Osselaere, Ann; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; Audenaert, Kris; Haesaert, Geert; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-04-01

    It is recognized that mycotoxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects in animals, including altered gastrointestinal barrier function. It is the aim of the present study to determine whether mycotoxin-contaminated diets can alter the oral bioavailability of the antibiotics doxycycline and paromomycin in pigs, and whether a mycotoxin adsorbing agent included into diets interacts with those antibiotics. Experiments were conducted with pigs utilizing diets that contained blank feed, mycotoxin-contaminated feed (T-2 toxin or deoxynivalenol), mycotoxin-contaminated feed supplemented with a glucomannan mycotoxin binder, or blank feed supplemented with mycotoxin binder. Diets with T-2 toxin and binder or deoxynivalenol and binder induced increased plasma concentrations of doxycycline administered as single bolus in pigs compared to diets containing blank feed. These results suggest that complex interactions may occur between mycotoxins, mycotoxin binders, and antibiotics which could alter antibiotic bioavailability. This could have consequences for animal toxicity, withdrawal time for oral antibiotics, or public health.

  4. Production of the Fusarium Mycotoxin Moniliformin by Penicillium melanoconidium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas-Møller, Magnus; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2016-01-01

    Moniliformin is a mycotoxin produced by several cereal associated Fusaria. Here, we show for the first time that moniliformin can be produced by the cereal fungus, Penicillium melanoconidium (4 out of 4 strains), but not in the related species in the Viridicata series. Moniliformin was detected i...

  5. Further data on the presence of Fusarium emerging mycotoxins enniatins, fusaproliferin and beauvericin in cereals available on the Spanish markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meca, Giuseppe; Zinedine, Abdellah; Blesa, Jesus; Font, Guillermina; Mañes, Jordi

    2010-05-01

    In this work, 64 samples of cereals purchased from local markets in the Valencian community (Spain) were investigated for the presence of six emerging mycotoxins: enniatins ENs (ENA, ENA1, ENB and ENB1), beauvericin (BEA) and fusaproliferin (FUS). Samples were extracted with a mixture of water/acetonitrile (85/15, v/v) by using an Ultra-turrax homogenizer. Mycotoxins were then identified and quantified with a liquid chromatography (LC) with diode array detector (DAD). Positive samples were confirmed with an LC-MS/MS. Analytical Results showed that the frequencies of contamination of samples with ENs, BEA and FUS were 73.4%, 32.8% and 7.8%, respectively. ENA1 was the most mycotoxin found and levels ranged from 33.38 to 814.42 mg/kg. ENB levels ranged between 2.23 and 21.37 mg/kg. ENB1 levels varied from 4.34 to 45.94 mg/kg. All samples were free of ENA. BEA levels ranged from 0.51 to 11.78 mg/kg and FUS levels varied between 1.01 and 6.63 mg/kg. It could be concluded from this study that the high contamination levels found especially for ENs could be of a negative impact on the population. This is the first paper on the presence of emerging mycotoxins in cereals available in Spain.

  6. Histological structure of duodenum in gilts receiving low doses of zearalenone and deoxynivalenol in feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewczuk, Bogdan; Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara; Gajęcka, Magdalena; Targońska, Krystyna; Ziółkowska, Natalia; Prusik, Magdalena; Gajęcki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN), produced by microfungi of the Fusarium family, are among the most commonly occurring mycotoxins. They are considered important factors affecting human and animal health as well as livestock productivity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of low doses of these mycotoxins on the histological structure of the pig duodenum. The study was performed on 72 gilts, with initial weights of approximately 25kg, divided into 4 equal groups. Group I received per os ZEN (40μg/kg BW), group II-DON (12μg/kg BW), group III-ZEN (40μg/kg BW) and DON (12μg/kg BW), and group IV-vehicle. The pigs were killed after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 weeks of the treatment, and the duodenum samples were prepared for histological investigations. The slides were digitalized and subjected to morphometrical analysis. The treatment with DON and ZEN did not change the architecture of the mucosa or the ratio between goblet and adsorptive cells in the epithelium. The administration of DON induced an increase in the number of lymphocytes in the mucosal epithelium. Both mycotoxins, administered alone or together, increased the quantity of lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages with black-brown granules in the lamina propria. The time-courses of changes in the number of defense system cells evoked by DON and ZEN were different. In conclusion, dietary exposure to low doses of Fusarium mycotoxins should be considered an important risk factor for subclinical inflammation in the small intestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Fusarium praegraminearum sp. nov. is a novel nivalenol mycotoxin-producing head blight pathogen from New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report on the molecular and morphological characterization of a novel B-type trichothecene toxin-producing species (i.e., B clade) recovered from litter in a maize field near Wellington, New Zealand, which is described as Fusarium praegraminearum sp. nov. This species was initially identified as ...

  8. Organ Damage and Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Carp (Cyprinus carpio L. after Feed-Borne Exposure to the Mycotoxin, Deoxynivalenol (DON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanze Pietsch

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON frequently contaminates animal feed, including fish feed used in aquaculture. This study intends to further investigate the effects of DON on carp (Cyprinus carpio L. at concentrations representative for commercial fish feeds. Experimental feeding with 352, 619 or 953 μg DON kg−1 feed resulted in unaltered growth performance of fish during six weeks of experimentation, but increased lipid peroxidation was observed in liver, head kidney and spleen after feeding of fish with the highest DON concentration. These effects of DON were mostly reversible by two weeks of feeding the uncontaminated control diet. Histopathological scoring revealed increased liver damage in DON-treated fish, which persisted even after the recovery phase. At the highest DON concentration, significantly more fat, and consequently, increased energy content, was found in whole fish body homogenates. This suggests that DON affects nutrient metabolism in carp. Changes of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity in kidneys and muscle and high lactate levels in serum indicate an effect of DON on anaerobic metabolism. Serum albumin was reduced by feeding the medium and a high dosage of DON, probably due to the ribotoxic action of DON. Thus, the present study provides evidence of the effects of DON on liver function and metabolism.

  9. Postharvest and stored corn in Brazil: mycoflora interaction, abiotic factors and mycotoxin occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, C R; Corrêa, B; Gambale, W; Paula, C R; Chacon-Reche, N O; Meirelles, M C

    1995-01-01

    The mycoflora of 130 samples of postharvest and stored corn was analysed throughout one year. The sample originated from Riberirão Preto, State of São Paulo, Brazil. The influences of abiotic factors (moisture content, relative humidity, temperature, rainfall) and mycotoxin occurrence were also verified. The isolation of the fungi was performed with Potato Dextrose Agar. Fungi were identified by using standard techniques. The determination of mycotoxins (aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, sterigmatocystin, zearalenone, deoxynivalenol and fumonisin B1) was carried out by thin-layer chromatography. The Fusarium spp. was the most dominant fungi (83.8%) followed by Penicillium spp. (55.3%), Aspergillus spp. (40.7%) and 11 other filamentous fungi. All of these were isolated from grains with moisture contents of 12.3-17.8%, an average temperature of 18.4-24.1 degrees C, a relative humidity between 64.0 and 97.5% and rainfall of up to 337 mm. With regard to the number of colony forming units (cfu), Fusarium spp. was the main contaminant, varying from 545 x 10(3) to 1.5 x 10(3). The Simple linear correlation analysis showed significant positive correlation of the Fusarium genus with moisture content of grains, and a significant negative correlation in relation to the minimum and medium temperatures, rainfall and relative humidity. The linear correlation of the Penicillium and Aspergillus genera with the abiotic factors was not significant. In the samples analysed only one contained aflatoxin B1.

  10. Occurrence, importance and control of mycotoxins: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Tola; Bedaso Kebede

    2016-01-01

    Mycotoxins are poisonous chemical compounds produced by certain fungi. There are five mycotoxins or groups of mycotoxins that occur quite often in food: deoxynivalenol/Nivalenol, zearalenone, ochratoxin, fumonisins and aflatoxins. The fungi that produce mycotoxins in food fall broadly into two groups: those that invade before harvest, commonly called field fungi, and those that occur only after harvest, called storage fungi. There are three types of toxicogenic field fungi: plant pathogens su...

  11. In vitro evaluation of the efficacy of peach stones as mycotoxin binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopičić Zorica R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes in vitro model for the evaluation of ability of peach shell (unmodified and modified, prepared at the Institute for Technology of Nuclear and Other Mineral Raw Materials, Belgrade, to adsorb different mycotoxins. Peach stones were obtained from “Vino Župa” Company from Aleksandrovac, where they have been disposed of as by-products from their Juice Factory. After proper preparation, two sorts of peach shell particles were used: one as unmodified peach shell particles (PS and another one obtained by acid modification, denoted as MPS. Adsorption of six mycotoxins: aflatoxin B1 (AFL, ochratoxin A (OTA, deoxynivalenol (DON, zearalenone (ZON, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS and T-2 toxin by PS and MPS was tested in vitro. Crude extracts of mycotoxins, produced at the Department of Microbiology of Bio-ecological Center, Zrenjanin, were used for adsorption experiments. The ability of binding mycotoxins was evaluated in the electrolyte 0.1 M K2HPO4, which pH value was adjusted to 3.0 and 7.0, respectively. Mass ratio of individual mycotoxin and peach shell samples was 1:5000. The experimental mixtures were incubated for 1 hour on a rotary shaker (185 rpm at room temperature (22-25ºC. After incubation, the extractions of non-adsorbed mycotoxins from the filtrates were performed with organic solvents, and their quantification was done by thin-layer chromatography (TLC. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31003: Development of technologies and products based on mineral raw materials and waste biomass for protection of natural resources for safe food production i br. TR 31023: Reduction of toxigenic Fusarium species and their mycotoxins in production of safe cereal-based foods

  12. Single and combined effects of deoxynivalenol mycotoxin and a microbial feed additive on lymphocyte DNA damage and oxidative stress in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Wageha A; Ghareeb, Khaled; Dadak, Agnes; Hess, Michael; Böhm, Josef

    2014-01-01

    The immune and intestinal epithelial cells are particularly sensitive to the toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON). The aim of this experiment was to study the effects of DON and/or a microbial feed additive on the DNA damage of blood lymphocytes and on the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in broilers. A total of forty 1-d-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 dietary treatments (10 birds per group) for 5 wk. The dietary treatments were 1) basal diet; 2) basal diet contaminated with 10 mg DON/kg feed; 3) basal diet contaminated with 10 mg DON/kg feed and supplemented with 2.5 kg/ton of feed of Mycofix Select; 4) basal diet supplemented with Mycofix Select (2.5 kg/ton of feed). At the end of the feeding trial, blood were collected for measuring the level of lymphocyte DNA damage of blood and the TBARS level was measured in plasma, heart, kidney, duodenum and jejunum. The dietary exposure of DON caused a significant increase (P = 0.001) of DNA damage in blood lymphocytes (31.99 ± 0.89%) as indicated in the tail of comet assay. Interestingly addition of Mycofix Select to DON contaminated diet decreased (P = 0.001) the DNA damage (19.82 ± 1.75%) induced by DON. In order to clarify the involvement of lipid peroxidation in the DNA damage of DON, TBARS levels was measured. A significant increase (P = 0.001) in the level of TBARS (23 ± 2 nmol/mg) was observed in the jejunal tissue suggesting that the lipid peroxidation might be involved in the DNA damage. The results indicate that DON is cytotoxic and genotoxic to the chicken intestinal and immune cells and the feed additive have potential ability to prevent DNA damage induced by DON.

  13. Risks of Mycotoxins from Mycoinsecticides to Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiongbo; Li, Fuxia; Zhang, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    There are more than thirty mycotoxins produced by fungal entomopathogens. Totally, they belong to two classes, NRP and PK mycotoxins. Most of mycotoxins have not been paid sufficient attention yet. Generally, mycotoxins do not exist in mycoinsecticide and might not be released to environments unless entomogenous fungus proliferates and produces mycotoxins in host insects or probably in plants. Some mycotoxins, destruxins as an example, are decomposed in host insects before they, with the insect's cadavers together, are released to environments. Many species of fungal entomopathogens have the endophytic characteristics. But we do not know if fungal entomopathogens produce mycotoxins in plants and release them to environments. On the contrary, the same mycotoxins produced by phytopathogens such as Fusarium spp. and Aspergillus spp. have been paid enough concerns. In conclusion, mycotoxins from mycoinsecticides have limited ways to enter environments. The risks of mycotoxins from mycoinsecticides contaminating foods are controllable.

  14. Risks of Mycotoxins from Mycoinsecticides to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiongbo; Li, Fuxia; Zhang, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    There are more than thirty mycotoxins produced by fungal entomopathogens. Totally, they belong to two classes, NRP and PK mycotoxins. Most of mycotoxins have not been paid sufficient attention yet. Generally, mycotoxins do not exist in mycoinsecticide and might not be released to environments unless entomogenous fungus proliferates and produces mycotoxins in host insects or probably in plants. Some mycotoxins, destruxins as an example, are decomposed in host insects before they, with the insect's cadavers together, are released to environments. Many species of fungal entomopathogens have the endophytic characteristics. But we do not know if fungal entomopathogens produce mycotoxins in plants and release them to environments. On the contrary, the same mycotoxins produced by phytopathogens such as Fusarium spp. and Aspergillus spp. have been paid enough concerns. In conclusion, mycotoxins from mycoinsecticides have limited ways to enter environments. The risks of mycotoxins from mycoinsecticides contaminating foods are controllable. PMID:27144161

  15. Effects of processing on mycotoxin stability in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Jafar; Maleki, Gisoo

    2014-09-01

    The mycotoxins that generally occur in cereals and other products are not completely destroyed during food-processing operations and can contaminate finished processed foods. The mycotoxins most usually associated with cereal grains are aflatoxins, ochratoxins, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and fumonisins. The various food processes that may have effects on mycotoxins include cleaning, milling, brewing, cooking, baking, frying, roasting, flaking, alkaline cooking, nixtamalization, and extrusion. Most of the food processes have variable effects on mycotoxins, with those that utilize high temperatures having the greatest effects. In general, the processes reduce mycotoxin concentrations significantly, but do not eliminate them completely. This review focuses on the effects of various thermal treatments on mycotoxins.

  16. Updated survey of Fusarium species and toxins in Finnish cereal grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietaniemi, Veli; Rämö, Sari; Yli-Mattila, Tapani; Jestoi, Marika; Peltonen, Sari; Kartio, Mirja; Sieviläinen, Elina; Koivisto, Tauno; Parikka, Päivi

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the project was to produce updated information during 2005-14 on the Fusarium species found in Finnish cereal grains, and the toxins produced by them, as the last comprehensive survey study of Fusarium species and their toxins in Finland was carried out at the turn of the 1960s and the 1970s. Another aim was to use the latest molecular and chemical methods to investigate the occurrence and correlation of Fusarium species and their mycotoxins in Finland. The most common Fusarium species found in Finland in the FinMyco project 2005 and 2006 were F. avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. graminearum, F. poae, F. sporotrichioides and F. langsethiae. F. avenaceum was the most dominant species in barley, spring wheat and oat samples. The occurrence of F. culmorum and F. graminearum was high in oats and barley. Infection by Fusarium fungi was the lowest in winter cereal grains. The incidence of Fusarium species in 2005 was much higher than in 2006 due to weather conditions. F. langsethiae has become much more common in Finland since 2001. F. graminearum has also risen in the order of importance. A highly significant correlation was found between Fusarium graminearum DNA and deoxynivalenol (DON) levels in Finnish oats, barley and wheat. When comparing the FinMyco data in 2005-06 with the results of the Finnish safety monitoring programme for 2005-14, spring cereals were noted as being more susceptible to infection by Fusarium fungi and the formation of toxins. The contents of T-2 and HT-2 toxins and the frequency of exceptionally high DON concentrations all increased in Finland during 2005-14. Beauvericin (BEA), enniatins (ENNs) and moniliformin (MON) were also very common contaminants of Finnish grains in 2005-06. Climate change is leading to warmer weather, and this may indicate more changes in Finnish Fusarium mycobiota and toxin contents and profiles in the near future.

  17. Novel approaches in analysis of Fusarium mycotoxins in cereals employing ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachariasova, M.; Lacina, O.; Malachova, A.; Kostelanska, M.; Poustka, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, Department of Food Chemistry and Analysis, Technicka 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Godula, M. [Thermo Fisher Scientific, Czech Republic, Slunecna 27, 100 00 Prague 10 (Czech Republic); Hajslova, J., E-mail: jana.hajslova@vscht.cz [Institute of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology, Department of Food Chemistry and Analysis, Technicka 3, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2010-03-03

    Rapid, simple and cost-effective analytical methods with performance characteristics matching regulatory requirements are needed for effective control of occurrence of Fusarium toxins in cereals and cereal-based products to which they might be transferred during processing. Within this study, two alternative approaches enabling retrospective data analysis and identification of unknown signals in sample extracts have been implemented and validated for determination of 11 major Fusarium toxins. In both cases, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (U-HPLC) coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry (HR MS) was employed. {sup 13}C isotopically labeled surrogates as well as matrix-matched standards were employed for quantification. As far as time of flight mass analyzer (TOF-MS) was a detection tool, the use of modified QuEChERS (quick easy cheap effective rugged and safe) sample preparation procedure, widely employed in multi-pesticides residue analysis, was shown as an optimal approach to obtain low detection limits. The second challenging alternative, enabling direct analysis of crude extract, was the use of mass analyzer based on Orbitrap technology. In addition to demonstration of full compliance of the new methods with Commission Regulation (EC) No. 401/2006, also their potential to be used for confirmatory purposes according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC has been critically assessed.

  18. Public health impacts of foodborne mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Felicia; Groopman, John D; Pestka, James J

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic and carcinogenic metabolites produced by fungi that colonize food crops. The most agriculturally important mycotoxins known today are aflatoxins, which cause liver cancer and have also been implicated in child growth impairment and acute toxicoses; fumonisins, which have been associated with esophageal cancer (EC) and neural tube defects (NTDs); deoxynivalenol (DON) and other trichothecenes, which are immunotoxic and cause gastroenteritis; and ochratoxin A (OTA), which has been associated with renal diseases. This review describes the adverse human health impacts associated with these major groups of mycotoxins. First, we provide background on the fungi that produce these different mycotoxins and on the food crops commonly infected. Then, we describe each group of mycotoxins in greater detail, as well as the adverse effects associated with each mycotoxin and the populations worldwide at risk. We conclude with a brief discussion on estimations of global burden of disease caused by dietary mycotoxin exposure.

  19. Effects of Fusarium mycotoxins in rations with different concentrate proportions on serum haptoglobin and hepatocellular integrity in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, A; Keese, C; Beineke, A; Meyer, U; Starke, A; Sauerwein, H; Dänicke, S; Rehage, J

    2015-10-01

    It was hypothesized that long-term intake of a diet contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON) and differing in the proportion of concentrate might affect hepatocellular integrity and function as well as biomarkers of systemic inflammation in lactating dairy cows. In Period 1 (11 weeks), 26 lactating German Holstein cows (13 primiparous and 13 pluriparous, 31 days in milk, 522 kg body weight, on average) were divided into two groups and fed diets (50% concentrate) with (MYC, n = 12; on average 5.3 mg DON/kg DM) or without (CON, n = 14) DON contaminations. In Period 2 (16 weeks), each group was further divided into two groups to test whether elevated concentrate proportion as additional burden might enhance the toxicity of DON. The cows in MYC60 (n = 6; 4.6 mg DON/kg DM) and CON60 (n = 7) received the diet with 60% concentrate, while cows in MYC30 (n = 6; 4.4 mg DON/kg DM) and CON30 (n = 7) received the diet with 30% concentrate. Blood samples were taken in biweekly intervals for activities of aspartate amino transferase (AST), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and gamma-glutamyl transferase as well as for concentration of total bilirubin and haptoglobin. Biopsies from liver were collected in week 27 for morphological analyses. No DON effect was found for the variables assessed in blood. The diet with 60% concentrate led to higher activities of AST and GLDH in Period 2. No morphological change was found by both light and electron microscopic analyses of liver samples. Results indicated that long-term intake of DON-contaminated diet over 27 weeks led to neither relevant damages of hepatocytes nor systemic inflammatory responses in lactating dairy cows, even if the dietary concentrate proportion was increased to 60%.

  20. Rapid methods for deoxynivalenol and other trichothecenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Elisabeth; Curtui, Valeriu; Seidler, Caroline; Dietrich, Richard; Usleber, Ewald; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2004-10-10

    Method development for deoxynivalenol (DON) and other trichothecenes in recent years was driven by the analytical necessities arising from its widespread (and increasing) occurrence in foods and feeds. This has resulted in the establishment of guideline levels for animal feed, tolerable daily intake (TDI) levels for humans, and most importantly, in the prospect of low-tolerance levels for these toxins in foods in the near future. In order to ensure reliable determination of the toxin content at the tolerance levels, routine analytical methods must have detection limits of less than the tolerance level. This paper intends to give an overview of current analytical developments of rapid testing for deoxynivalenol and other trichothecene mycotoxins, with a special focus on antibody-based techniques. This includes high-throughput instrumental analysis for the laboratory environment, as well as rapid visual tests for on-site testing. The applicability of rapid tests within an integrated detection system for mycotoxins in foods is discussed.

  1. 镰刀菌真菌毒素产生与调控机制研究进展%The research advance of biosynthesis and regulation mechanism on Fusarium mycotoxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岳平

    2011-01-01

    镰刀菌是一种重要的植物病原菌,给世界范围内农作物生产带来巨大破坏.除导致产量下降外,由其产生的镰刀菌真菌毒素能够污染农产品品质,给动物和人类食物安全造成严重隐患.单端孢霉烯族毒素(Trichothecenes)、伏马菌素(Fumonisin)和玉米赤霉烯酮(Zearalenone)是三种最重要的镰刀菌真菌毒素.镰刀菌真菌毒素的生物合成与生产受到体内一系列相关功能基因的调控;此外,pH值、碳氮比等环境条件也能影响真菌毒素的产量.本文简述了镰刀菌真菌毒素在产生机理、主要分类、致病性以及调控因素等方面的研究进展.%Fusarium spp.are particularly significant filamentous pathogen fungi, which can cause severe yield loss worldwide.In addition to yield losses, infested agricultural products are often contaminated with mycotoxins that are harmful to humans and animals.The trichothecenes, fumonisin, and zearalenone are three most important mycotoxins of Fusarium spp.With the developments of complete genomes of the Fusarium spp., more and more genes and gene clusters are being reported to regulate the biosynthesis and production.The conditions of environment, such as pH, and the ratio of carbon/nitrogen, are also involved in regulation of the mycotoxins production.This article summarizes the recent progress and current state of knowledge and highlight of toxicity mechanism, major kinds, pathogenesis, and regulation factors in Fusarium mycotoxins.

  2. Advances in Deoxynivalenol Toxicity Mechanisms: The Brain as a Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Denis Troadec

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, mainly produced by Fusarium fungi, and also commonly called vomitoxin, is a trichothecene mycotoxin. It is one of the most abundant trichothecenes which contaminate cereals consumed by farm animals and humans. The extent of cereal contamination is strongly associated with rainfall and moisture at the time of flowering and with grain storage conditions. DON consumption may result in intoxication, the severity of which is dose-dependent and may lead to different symptoms including anorexia, vomiting, reduced weight gain, neuroendocrine changes, immunological effects, diarrhea, leukocytosis, hemorrhage or circulatory shock. During the last two decades, many studies have described DON toxicity using diverse animal species as a model. While the action of the toxin on peripheral organs and tissues is well documented, data illustrating its effect on the brain are significantly less abundant. Yet, DON is known to affect the central nervous system. Recent studies have provided new evidence and detail regarding the action of the toxin on the brain. The purpose of the present review is to summarize critical studies illustrating this central action of the toxin and to suggest research perspectives in this field.

  3. Diagnostic opportunities for evaluation of the exposure of dairy cows to the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN): reliability of blood plasma, bile and follicular fluid as indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, J; Kersten, S; Meyer, U; Stinshoff, H; Locher, L; Rehage, J; Wrenzycki, C; Engelhardt, U H; Dänicke, S

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the usefulness of follicular fluid (FF) in relation to blood plasma and bile as indicators of exposure of dairy cows to ZEN, DON and their metabolites, a dose-response study was performed with 30 dairy cows. The cows, 10 in each group (named CON; FUS-50, FUS-100), received a diet with three different concentrations of Fusarium toxin-contaminated maize. Thereby, the following dietary concentration were reached: CON (0.02 mg ZEN and 0.07 mg DON, per kg dry matter, DM), FUS-50 (0.33 mg ZEN and 2.62 mg DON, per kg DM) and FUS-100 (0.66 mg ZEN and 5.24 mg DON, per kg DM). ZEN, DON and de-epoxy-DON (de-DON) were detected in FF. Based on the linear regression between toxin concentration in plasma and FF, it seems that about 50% (m = 0.5) of ZEN present in plasma is present in FF while an increase of 1 ng/ml DON or de-DON in plasma is paralleled by an increase of 1.5 ng/ml DON or 1.1 ng/ml de-DON in FF. ZEN, DON and their metabolites, except zearalenone (ZAN), were also detected in bile. Contrary to DON and de-DON, ZEN and its metabolites were accumulated in bile so that the concentration of ZEN and metabolites was much higher than for DON and de-DON. The main compound was β-zearalenol (β-ZEL). The biliary ZEN, α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) and β-ZEL concentration correlated linearly with each other with an uncertainty of <15% (r(2) ≥ 0.86), whereas the ratio between ZEN: α-ZEL: β-ZEL was about 1.5:1:11. With the help of established linear relationship between toxin intake and toxin concentration, bile could be used as diagnostic indicator to assess the exposure of cows. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Transcription of Genes in the Biosynthetic Pathway for Fumonisin Mycotoxins Is Epigenetically and Differentially Regulated in the Fungal Maize Pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, I.; Montis, V.; Döll, K.; Alabouvette, C.; Tamietti, G.; Karlovsky, P.

    2012-01-01

    When the fungal pathogen Gibberella moniliformis (anamorph, Fusarium verticillioides) colonizes maize and maize-based products, it produces class B fumonisin (FB) mycotoxins, which are a significant threat to human and animal health. FB biosynthetic enzymes and accessory proteins are encoded by a set of clustered and cotranscribed genes collectively named FUM, whose molecular regulation is beginning to be unraveled by researchers. FB accumulation correlates with the amount of transcripts from the key FUM genes, FUM1, FUM21, and FUM8. In fungi in general, gene expression is often partially controlled at the chromatin level in secondary metabolism; when this is the case, the deacetylation and acetylation (and other posttranslational modifications) of histones are usually crucial in the regulation of transcription. To assess whether epigenetic factors regulate the FB pathway, we monitored FB production and FUM1, FUM21, and FUM8 expression in the presence of a histone deacetylase inhibitor and verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation the relative degree of histone acetylation in the promoter regions of FUM1, FUM21, and FUM8 under FB-inducing and noninducing conditions. Moreover, we generated transgenic F. verticillioides strains expressing GFP under the control of the FUM1 promoter to determine whether its strength under FB-inducing and noninducing conditions was influenced by its location in the genome. Our results indicate a clear and differential role for chromatin remodeling in the regulation of FUM genes. This epigenetic regulation can be attained through the modulation of histone acetylation at the level of the promoter regions of the key biosynthetic genes FUM1 and FUM21, but less so for FUM8. PMID:22117026

  5. Changes in the Subpopulations of Porcine Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Zearalenone (ZEN and Deoxynivalenol (DON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Dąbrowski

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone and deoxynivalenol are secondary metabolites of fungi of the genus Fusarium. The presence of mycotoxins in cereals and the resulting contamination of feeds and foods pose health risks for animals and humans. The dangers associated with high doses of mycotoxins have been extensively researched but very little is known about NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level doses or exposure to a combination of mycotoxins (mixed mycotoxicoses. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of six-week exposure to NOAEL doses of individual and combined mycotoxins on the subpopulations of CD4+8−, CD4−8+ and CD4+8+ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of pigs. The experiment was performed on 72 gilts with average body weight of 25 kg, divided into three experimental groups (E1, E2 and E3, administered zearalenone (ZEN, deoxynivalenol (DON and ZEN + DON, respectively, on a daily basis and a control group (C receiving placebo. Changes in lymphocyte subpopulations were evaluated by flow cytometry at weekly intervals (experimental days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. A linear increase in the percentage of CD4+8+ lymphocytes was highly correlated with time (r = 0.682 in group C. The correlations and linear increase in the above subpopulation were disrupted in the remaining groups. In group E3, a statistically significant (p < 0.05 decrease in CD4+8+ counts was observed in week 5, which could point to a transient depletion of regulatory mechanisms of immune responses. The noted results also suggest that in mixed mycotoxicosis, ZEN and DON exerted stronger immunomodulatory effects.

  6. Changes in the Subpopulations of Porcine Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Zearalenone (ZEN) and Deoxynivalenol (DON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Michał; Obremski, Kazimierz; Gajęcka, Magdalena; Gajęcki, Maciej Tadeusz; Zielonka, Łukasz

    2016-04-27

    Zearalenone and deoxynivalenol are secondary metabolites of fungi of the genus Fusarium. The presence of mycotoxins in cereals and the resulting contamination of feeds and foods pose health risks for animals and humans. The dangers associated with high doses of mycotoxins have been extensively researched but very little is known about NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) doses or exposure to a combination of mycotoxins (mixed mycotoxicoses). The aim of this study was to determine the effects of six-week exposure to NOAEL doses of individual and combined mycotoxins on the subpopulations of CD4⁺8(-), CD4(-)8⁺ and CD4⁺8⁺ lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of pigs. The experiment was performed on 72 gilts with average body weight of 25 kg, divided into three experimental groups (E1, E2 and E3, administered zearalenone (ZEN), deoxynivalenol (DON) and ZEN + DON, respectively, on a daily basis) and a control group (C) receiving placebo. Changes in lymphocyte subpopulations were evaluated by flow cytometry at weekly intervals (experimental days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42). A linear increase in the percentage of CD4⁺8⁺ lymphocytes was highly correlated with time (r = 0.682) in group C. The correlations and linear increase in the above subpopulation were disrupted in the remaining groups. In group E3, a statistically significant (p < 0.05) decrease in CD4⁺8⁺ counts was observed in week 5, which could point to a transient depletion of regulatory mechanisms of immune responses. The noted results also suggest that in mixed mycotoxicosis, ZEN and DON exerted stronger immunomodulatory effects.

  7. Upstream regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants of food and feed products, posing a substantial health risk to humans and animals throughout the world. A plethora of filamentous fungi has been identified as mycotoxin producers and most of these fungal species belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium. A number of studies have been conducted to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biosynthesis of key mycotoxins and the regulatory cascades controlling toxigenesis. In many cases, the mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are clustered and regulated by one or more pathway-specific transcription factor(s). In addition, as biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites is coordinated with fungal growth and development, there are a number of upstream regulators affecting biosynthesis of mycotoxins in fungi. This review presents a concise summary of the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis, focusing on the roles of the upstream regulatory elements governing biosynthesis of aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus.

  8. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Quaroni, Andrea [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Veterinary Research Tower, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–6401 (United States); Autore, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Severino, Lorella [Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Division of Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Marzocco, Stefania, E-mail: smarzocco@unisa.it [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  9. Effects of Milling and Cooking Processes on the Deoxynivalenol Content in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayo Kushiro

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin is a natural-occuring mycotoxin mainly produced by Fusarium graminearum, a food-borne fungi widely distributed in crops and it is one of the most important mycotoxins in wheat and wheat-based foods and feeds. DON affects animal and human health causing diarrhea, vomiting, gastro-intestinal inflammation, and immunomodulation. Since the rate of the occurrence of DON in wheat is high, effective procedures to remove or eliminate DON from food products is essential to minimize exposures in those who consume large amounts of wheat. Cleaning prior to milling reduced to some extent the concentration of DON in final products. Since DON is distributed throughout the kernels, with higher content in the outer skin, milling is also effective in reducing the DON levels of wheat-based foods if bran and shorts are removed before thermal cooking. DON is water-soluble and cooking with larger amounts of water lowers DON content in products such as spaghetti and noodles. During baking or heating, DON is partially degraded to DON-related chemicals, whose toxicological effects are not studied well. This paper reviews the researches on the effects of milling and cooking on the DON level and discusses the perspectives of further studies.

  10. EVALUATION OF SOME ANTIOXIDANTS’ EFFECTS IN KIDNEY HISTOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF WEANED PIGS, INTOXICATED WITH DEOXYNIVALENOL (DON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABI DUMITRESCU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol is a mycotoxin produced by fungi of the Fusarium genera, which are abundant in various cereal crops and processed grains. In order to protect cell structure within the tissues studied, we tried various experimental variants by incorporating some selenium and boron sources into the combined fodder, and also in mixture with DON with different concentrations. To determine the morphophysiological changes induced by the mycotoxin DON upon kidney histological structure, and also the antioxidants’ effects, we took samples from 9 piglets belonging to three groups: group 1 (fed with fodder added with DON, group 2 (fed with fodder added with selenium and group 3 (fed with fodder added with selenium and DON. At renal parenchyma level, DON determines a series of changes in the renal corpuscles and also in the uriniferous tubes. These changes are represented by glomerular atrophies and nephrocyte epithelial dystrophies. The epithelial dystrophic processes occur in the renal medullar, too, where numerous ectasied capillaries and hemorrhagic areas are present. In the case of groups 2 and 3 consisted of piglets fed with fodder added with selenium, respectively fodder added with DON and selenium, the renal vascular network becomes hypertrophic associated with leukocyte infiltrative processes.

  11. Dual Effects Exerted in Vitro by Micromolar Concentrations of Deoxynivalenol on Undifferentiated Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Manda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of crops used for food and feed production with Fusarium mycotoxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON, raise important health and economic issues all along the food chain. Acute exposure to high DON concentrations can alter the intestinal barrier, while chronic exposure to lower doses may exert more subtle effects on signal transduction pathways, leading to disturbances in cellular homeostasis. Using real-time cellular impedance measurements, we studied the effects exerted in vitro by low concentrations of DON (0.37–1.50 μM, relevant for mycotoxin-contaminated food, on the proliferation of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells presenting a tumorigenic phenotype. A 1.5 μM concentration of DON maintained cell adherence of non-proliferating Caco-2 cells, whilst arresting the growth of actively proliferating cells compared with control Caco-2 cells in vitro. At 0.37 μM, DON enhanced Caco-2 cell metabolism, thereby triggering a moderate increase in cell proliferation. The results of the current study suggested that low concentrations of DON commonly detected in food may either limit or sustain the proliferation of colon cancer cells, depending on their proliferation status and on DON concentration. Soluble factors released by Lactobacillus strains can partially counteract the inhibitory action of DON on actively proliferating colon cancer cells. The study also emphasized that real-time cellular impedance measurements were a valuable tool for investigating the dynamics of cellular responses to xenobiotics.

  12. Proximal sensing of within-field mycotoxin variation - a case study in Northeast Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Marina; Koszinski, Sylvia; Bangs, Donovan E.; Wehrhan, Marc; Ullrich, Andreas; Verch, Gernot; Brenning, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Fusarium head blight is a global problem in agriculture that results in yield losses and, more seriously, produces harmful toxins that enter the food chain. This study (Müller et al. 2016) builds on previous research identifying within-field humidity as an important factor in infection processes by Fusarium fungi and its mycotoxin production. Environmental variables describing topographic control of humidity (topographic wetness index TWI), soil texture and related moisture by electrical conductivity (ECa), and canopy humidity by density (normalized difference vegetation index NDVI) were explored in their relationship to the fungal infection rates and mycotoxin accumulation. Field studies at four sites in NE German Lowlands were performed in 2009 and 2011. Sites differed slightly in soil textural properties and, more pronounced, mean annual precipitation. Sampling positions were selected by usage of NDVI values range from remote sensing data base. Environmental data included elevation and its derivatives like topographic wetness index (TWI) from a DEM25, electrical conductivity distribution maps (5 x 5 m) based on EM38DD survey and, orthorectified RapidEye imagery (5 x 5 m2) with resulting NDVI distributions across the field sites. Grain yield, fungal infection rate, microbiological characteristics and mycotoxin accumulation were determined at 223 field positions. Statistical analysis incorporated Spearman rank order correlations and three regression methods (censored regression models, linear mixed-effects models and spatial linear mixed-effects models). Kriging was used to visualize the spatial patterns and trends. All analyses were performed by R software. In 2011, a more wet year than 2009, high Fusarium infection rates and a high concentration of mycotoxins were stated, the latter once exceeding EU threshold values. For both years associations between NDVI and microbiological variables were found, but being more pronounced and more often significant for 2011

  13. The AreA transcription factor in Fusarium graminearum regulates the use of some nonpreferred nitrogen sources and secondary metabolite production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Nanna Henriette; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Sorensen, Jens Laurids

    2013-01-01

    Growth conditions are known to affect the production of secondary metabolites in filamentous fungi. The influence of different nitrogen sources and the transcription factor AreA on the production of mycotoxins in Fusarium graminearum was examined. Growth on glutamine or NH4-sources was poor...... and asparagine was found to be a preferential nitrogen source for F. graminearum. Deletion of areA led to poor growth on NaNO3 suggesting its involvement in regulation of the nitrate reduction process. In addition utilization of aspartic acid, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, threonine, tyrosine, and valine...... as nitrogen sources was shown to depend of a functional AreA. AreA was shown to be required for the production of the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone, and fusarielin H regardless of the nutrient medium. Deletion of nmr, the repressor of AreA under nitrogen sufficient conditions, had little effect...

  14. Deoxynivalenol alone or in combination with nivalenol and zearalenone induce systemic histological changes in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerez, Juliana R; Pinton, Philippe; Callu, Patrick; Grosjean, François; Oswald, Isabelle P; Bracarense, Ana Paula F L

    2015-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV) and zearalenone (ZEA) are mycotoxins commonly produced by Fusarium species. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of DON alone and in combination with NIV and ZEA on several parameters including weight gain and histological aspects of pigs submitted to chronic intoxication. Twenty, 5-week-old piglets received for 28 days one of the following diets: a control diet, a diet mono- contaminated with DON (1.5mg/kg), a diet multi-contaminated with DON (2mg/kg)+NIV (1.3mg/kg)+ZEA (1.5mg/kg) or a diet contaminated with DON (3mg/kg)+NIV (1.3mg/kg)+ZEA (1.5mg/kg). Animals fed the multi-contaminated diets presented a significant decrease in weight gain over the total period. The chronic ingestion of the contaminated diets induced a significant increase on histological changes on the intestine, liver and lymphoid organs. In addition, a significant increase on lymphocyte apoptosis was observed in lymph nodes and spleen in the animals receiving the contaminated diets. These data provide a better understanding of the possible effects of Fusarium toxins, alone or in combinations on the morphology of the intestine and lymphoid organs, which would contribute to the risk assessment of these toxins.

  15. Effects of Bread Making and Wheat Germ Addition on the Natural Deoxynivalenol Content in Bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Isabel; Blesa, Jesús; Herrera, Marta; Ariño, Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) is a type-B trichothecene mycotoxin produced by several field fungi such as Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum and known to have various toxic effects. This study investigated the effect of the bread making process on the stability of DON in common bread and wheat germ-enriched bread using naturally contaminated ingredients at the level of 560 µg/kg. The concentration of DON and its evolution during bread making were determined by immunoaffinity column cleanup followed by liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). During the bread making process, DON was reduced by 2.1% after fermentation and dropped by 7.1% after baking, reaching a maximum reduction of 19.8% in the crust as compared with a decrease of 5.6% in the crumb. The addition of 15% wheat germ to the dough did not affect DON stability during bread making, showing an apparent increase of 3.5% after fermentation and a reduction by 10.2% after baking. PMID:24451845

  16. Effects of Bread Making and Wheat Germ Addition on the Natural Deoxynivalenol Content in Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Giménez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin is a type-B trichothecene mycotoxin produced by several field fungi such as Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum and known to have various toxic effects. This study investigated the effect of the bread making process on the stability of DON in common bread and wheat germ-enriched bread using naturally contaminated ingredients at the level of 560 µg/kg. The concentration of DON and its evolution during bread making were determined by immunoaffinity column cleanup followed by liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD. During the bread making process, DON was reduced by 2.1% after fermentation and dropped by 7.1% after baking, reaching a maximum reduction of 19.8% in the crust as compared with a decrease of 5.6% in the crumb. The addition of 15% wheat germ to the dough did not affect DON stability during bread making, showing an apparent increase of 3.5% after fermentation and a reduction by 10.2% after baking.

  17. Effects of bread making and wheat germ addition on the natural deoxynivalenol content in bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Isabel; Blesa, Jesús; Herrera, Marta; Ariño, Agustín

    2014-01-21

    Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) is a type-B trichothecene mycotoxin produced by several field fungi such as Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum and known to have various toxic effects. This study investigated the effect of the bread making process on the stability of DON in common bread and wheat germ-enriched bread using naturally contaminated ingredients at the level of 560 µg/kg. The concentration of DON and its evolution during bread making were determined by immunoaffinity column cleanup followed by liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). During the bread making process, DON was reduced by 2.1% after fermentation and dropped by 7.1% after baking, reaching a maximum reduction of 19.8% in the crust as compared with a decrease of 5.6% in the crumb. The addition of 15% wheat germ to the dough did not affect DON stability during bread making, showing an apparent increase of 3.5% after fermentation and a reduction by 10.2% after baking.

  18. Fate of enniatins and deoxynivalenol during pasta cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Nijs, Monique; van den Top, Hester; de Stoppelaar, Joyce; Lopez, Patricia; Mol, Hans

    2016-12-15

    The fate of deoxynivalenol and enniatins was studied during cooking of commercially available dry pasta in the Netherlands in 2014. Five samples containing relatively high levels of deoxynivalenol and/or enniatins were selected for the cooking experiment. Cooking was performed in duplicate on different days, under standardised conditions, simulating house-hold preparation. Samples were extracted with a mixture of acetonitrile/water followed by salt-induced partitioning. The extracts were analysed by LC-MS/MS. The method limits of detection were 8μg/kg for deoxynivalenol, 10μg/kg for enniatin A1 and 5μg/kg for enniatins A, B and B1. During the cooking of the five dry pasta samples, 60% of the deoxynivalenol and 83-100% of the enniatins were retained in the cooked pasta. It is recommended to study food processing fate of mycotoxins through naturally contaminated materials (incurred materials).

  19. Fusarium toxins and fungi associated with handling of grain on eight Finnish farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Sanna; Nikulin, Marjo; Berg, Seija; Parikka, Päivi; Hintikka, Eeva-Liisa; Pasanen, Anna-Liisa

    Farmers' exposure to airborne dust, fungi and possibly also to Fusarium toxins during the drying and milling of grain and feeding of cattle was studied on eight Finnish farms. Airborne viable and total spores were collected on polycarbonate filters. Spore concentrations and fungal flora were determined by cultivation and epifluorescence microscope counting. Eighteen airborne dust samples were taken on glass-fiber filters with a high-volume sampler, and biological toxicity was tested from those samples. In toxic dust samples, Fusarium toxins were analyzed with a gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Fungi and Fusarium toxins were also analyzed in ten grain samples collected from the farms during the air sampling. Yeasts, as well as species of Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Absidia and Fusarium occurred in the air at all three stages of grain handling. Airborne spore concentrations ranged from 103 to 10 6 cfu m -3 for viable fungi and from 10 5 to 10 7 spores m -3 for total spores; airborne dust concentrations varied from 0.04 to 81.1 mg m -3. Low deoxynivalenol concentrations (3 and 20 ng m -3) were found in two air samples collected during milling. Fusarium spp. were identified in eight grain samples, and DON concentrations of 0.004-11 mg kg -1 were detected in all samples analyzed. Although any conclusion on Finnish farmers' exposure to mycotoxins cannot be done on the basis of this small data, it can be assumed that toxigenic fungi and Fusarium toxins may occur in the air and inhalation exposure of farmers to Fusarium toxins is possible in agricultural environment.

  20. Mechanisms regulating grain contamination with trichothecenes translocated from the stem base of wheat (Triticum aestivum) infected with Fusarium culmorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Mark; Koopmann, Birger; Döll, Katharina; Karlovsky, Petr; Kropf, Ute; Schlüter, Klaus; von Tiedemann, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Factors limiting trichothecene contamination of mature wheat grains after Fusarium infection are of major interest in crop production. In addition to ear infection, systemic translocation of deoxynivalenol (DON) may contribute to mycotoxin levels in grains after stem base infection with toxigenic Fusarium spp. However, the exact and potential mechanisms regulating DON translocation into wheat grains from the plant base are still unknown. We analyzed two wheat cultivars differing in susceptibility to Fusarium head blight (FHB), which were infected at the stem base with Fusarium culmorum in climate chamber experiments. Fungal DNA was found only in the infected stem base tissue, whereas DON and its derivative, DON-3-glucoside (D3G), were detected in upper plant parts. Although infected stem bases contained more than 10,000 μg kg⁻¹ dry weight (DW) of DON and mean levels of DON after translocation in the ear and husks reached 1,900 μg kg⁻¹ DW, no DON or D3G was detectable in mature grains. D3G quantification revealed that DON detoxification took mainly place in the stem basis, where ≤ 50% of DON was metabolized into D3G. Enhanced expression of a gene putatively encoding a uridine diphosphate-glycosyltransferase (GenBank accession number FG985273) was observed in the stem base after infection with F. culmorum. Resistance to F. culmorum stem base infection, DON glycosylation in the stem base, and mycotoxin translocation were unrelated to cultivar resistance to FHB. Histological studies demonstrated that the vascular transport of DON labeled with fluorescein as a tracer from the peduncle to the grain was interrupted by a barrier zone at the interface between grain and rachilla, formerly described as "xylem discontinuity". This is the first study to demonstrate the effective control of influx of systemically translocated fungal mycotoxins into grains at the rachilla-seed interface by the xylem discontinuity tissue in wheat ears.

  1. Influence of organically or conventionally produced wheat on health, performance and mycotoxin residues in tissues and bile of growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneweis, Isabell; Meyer, Karsten; Ritzmann, Mathias; Hoffmann, Peter; Dempfle, Leo; Bauer, Johann

    2005-06-01

    From 1999-2001 three different varieties of wheat [Contur (susceptible to Fusarium), Batis and Petrus (less susceptible to Fusarium)] were cultivated under organic and conventional conditions in order to determine mycotoxin burden. Soil quality, preceding crop and weather conditions were comparable in the different production systems. The wheat batches were analysed for moulds, and the contents of zearalenone (ZEN) and deoxynivalenol (DON). Feeding trials were carried out with growing pigs (n = 96; average initial live weight 22.2 +/- 1.5 kg [mean +/- SD]) to examine a possible influence on the animal performance and on mycotoxin residues. The data recorded were clinical conditions, performance, biochemical and hematological data. Residues of ZEN, alpha- and beta-zearalenol (ZEL) and of DON were determined in bile, liver and muscle after slaughtering. Conventionally cultivated wheat was more frequently contaminated with Fusarium and contained more frequently ZEN and DON in higher concentrations than the organically produced wheat. Hematological and biochemical parameters of pigs fed with organically cultivated diets were not different from those of conventionally fed pigs. Pigs fed with organically produced wheat showed a slightly higher daily weight gain, but a lower carcass yield than the conventionally fed animals. The highest residues of DON and total-ZEN (ZEN + alpha-ZEL + beta-ZEL) were found in bile. Bile samples of organically fed pigs contained lower concentrations of total-ZEN than those of conventionally fed pigs. Altogether, these data suggest that wheat from an organic farming does not have higher mycotoxin-contamination than wheat from the conventional farming system.

  2. Galacto-oligosaccharides Protect the Intestinal Barrier by Maintaining the Tight Junction Network and Modulating the Inflammatory Responses after a Challenge with the Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol in Human Caco-2 Cell Monolayers and B6C3F1 Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari, Peyman; Braber, Saskia; Alizadeh, Arash; Verheijden, Kim; Schoterman, Margriet Hc; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Garssen, Johan; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The integrity of the epithelial layer in the gastrointestinal tract protects organisms from exposure to luminal antigens, which are considered the primary cause of chronic intestinal inflammation and allergic responses. The common wheat-associated fungal toxin deoxynivalenol acts as a sp

  3. Ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric multimycotoxin method for quantitating 26 mycotoxins in maize silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pamel, Els; Verbeken, Annemieke; Vlaemynck, Geertrui; De Boever, Johan; Daeseleire, Els

    2011-09-28

    A multianalyte method was developed to identify and quantitate 26 mycotoxins simultaneously in maize silage by means of ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The extraction and cleanup procedure consists of two extraction steps followed by purification on a Waters Oasis HLB column. The method developed was validated with the requirements of Commission Decision 2002/657/EC taken into account. The limit of detection and quantitation ranges were 5-348 and 11-695 ng/g, respectively. Apparent recovery varied between 61 and 116%, whereas repeatability and reproducibility were within the ranges of 3-45 and 5-49%, respectively. The method developed was successfully applied for maize silage samples taken at the cutting surface and 1 m behind that surface. Mainly Fusarium toxins (beauvericin, deoxynivalenol, enniatins, fumonisins, fusaric acid, and zearalenone) were detected, but postharvest toxins such as mycophenolic acid and roquefortine C were identified as well.

  4. Climatic models to predict occurrence of Fusarium toxins in wheat and maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, A W; Hooker, D C

    2007-10-20

    Although forecasting Fusarium infections have useful implications, it may be argued that forecasting Fusarium toxins is more useful to help reduce their entry into the food chain. Several disease incidence models have been commercialized for wheat, but only one toxin prediction model from Ontario, Canada, "DONcast", has been validated extensively and commercialized to date for wheat, and another has been proposed for maize. In the development of these predictive tools, the variation in toxin levels associated with year and agronomic effects was estimated from simple linear models using wheat and maize samples taken from farm fields. In wheat, environment effects accounted for 48% of the variation in deoxynivalenol (DON) across all fields, followed by variety (27%), and previous crop (14 to 28%). In maize, hybrid accounted for 25% of the variation of either DON or fumonisin, followed by environment (12%), and when combined 42% of the variability was accounted for. The robust site-specific, DON forecast model accounted for up to 80% of the variation in DON, and has been used commercially for 5 years in Canada. Forecasting DON and fumonisins in maize is more difficult, because of its greater exposure to infection, the role of wounding in infection, the more important role of hybrid susceptibility, and the vast array of uncharacterized hybrids available in the marketplace. Nevertheless, using data collected from controlled experiments conducted in Argentina and the Philippines, a model was developed to predict fumonisin concentration using insect damage and weather variables, accounting for 82% of the variability of fumonisins. Using mycotoxins as a measure of disease outcome, as opposed to disease symptoms, offers a more robust prediction of mycotoxin risk, and it accounts for mycotoxin accumulation that occurs frequently in the absence of any change in Fusarium symptoms.

  5. 题目:盐城生物圈保护区越冬丹顶鹤受到真菌毒素威胁的研究%Potential natural exposure of endangered red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) to mycotoxins aflatoxin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and ochratoxin A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-wei LIU; Hong-yi LIU; Hai-bin ZHANG; Ming-chang CAO; Yong SUN; Wen-da WU; Chang-hu LU

    2016-01-01

    目的:调查在盐城生物圈保护区越冬的丹顶鹤食物是否受到真菌毒素污染以及评估丹顶鹤受到真菌毒素威胁的风险。创新点:首次证明在盐城生物圈保护区越冬的丹顶鹤受到真菌毒素的威胁。方法:2013年11月至2015年3月,两个越冬期内在盐城生物圈保护区采集丹顶鹤不同觅食生境内113份食物样品。使用高效液相色谱法对这些食物中毒素(黄曲霉毒素B1(AFB1)、脱氧雪腐镰刀菌烯醇(DON)、玉米赤霉烯酮(ZEN)、T-2毒素(T-2)和赭曲霉毒素A(OTA))含量进行检测。结论:盐城生物圈保护区内丹顶鹤食物受到真菌毒素的污染,人工湿地尤其是稻田不适宜作为鸟类的觅食地。%A survey was conducted to determine whether mycotoxins were present in the foods consumed by red-crowned cranes (Grus japonensis) in the Yancheng Biosphere Reserve, China. Collected in the reserve’s core, buffer, and experimental zones during overwintering periods of 2013 to 2015, a total of 113 food samples were analyzed for aflatoxin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and ochratoxin A using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The contamination incidences vary among different zones and the mycotoxins levels of different food samples also presented disparity. Average mycotoxin concentration from rice grain was greater than that from other food types. Among mycotoxin-positive samples, 59.3% were simultaneously contaminated with more than one toxin. This study demonstrated for the first time that red-crowned cranes were exposed to mycotoxins in the Yancheng Biosphere Reserve and suggested that artificial wetlands could not be considered good habitats for the birds in this reserve, especially rice fields.

  6. Mycotoxins and fermentation--beer production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf-Hall, Charlene E; Schwarz, Paul B

    2002-01-01

    Along with food safety issues due to mycotoxins, the effects of Fusarium infections on malt and beer quality can be disastrous. While some of the Fusarium head blight mycotoxins, such as DON, present in infected barley may be lost during steeping, the Fusarium mold is still capable of growth and mycotoxin production during steeping, germination and kilning. Therefore, detoxification of grain before malting may not be practical unless further growth of the mold is also prevented. Methods for reducing the amount of mold growth during malting are needed. Physical, chemical and biological methods exist for inhibiting mold growth in grain. Irradiation is a promising means for preventing Fusarium growth during malting, but its effects on malt quality and mycotoxin production in surviving mold need to be evaluated in more detail. Chemical treatments such as ozonation, which do not leave chemical residues in beer, also appear to be promising. Although biological control methods may be desirable, the effects of these inhibitors on malt and beer quality require further investigation. In addition, storage studies are needed to determine the effect of biological control on Fusarium viability and malt quality. It may also be possible to incorporate detoxifying genes into fermentation yeasts, which would result in detoxification of mycotoxins present in wort. Development of these types of technological interventions should help improve the safety of products, such as beer, made from Fusarium infected grain.

  7. IMPLICATIONS OF MYCOTOXINS IN LIVESTOCK FEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer DENLI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of foods and feeds is a significant problem in worldwide. Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi, particularly by many species of Aspergillus, Fusarium, Penicillium, Claviceps and Alternaria in many agricultural crops, especially in cereals and most oilseeds. Aflatoxins, ochratoxins, trichothecenes, zearelenone and fumonisins are the mycotoxins of greatest agro-economic importance. Mycotoxins have various acute and chronic effects on animals (especially monogastrics depending on species and susceptibility of an animal within a species. The most applied method to prevent mycotoxicosis in animals involves the addition to the diet of additives with the ability to bind or metabolize mycotoxin in the gastrointestinal digesta, aluminosilicates, activated charcoal, yeast and several polymers have been tested regarding the adsorption of mycotoxins in the gastrointestinal tract of different species. The efficiency of mycotoxin binders, however, differs considerably depending mainly on the chemical structure of both the adsorbent and the toxin. This review describes the most implications of mycotoxins in livestock feeds.

  8. The effect of environmental mycotoxins on selected ovarian tissue fragments of multiparous female wild boars at the beginning of astronomical winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, Łukasz; Gajęcka, Magdalena; Rozicka, Anna; Dąbrowski, Michał; Żmudzki, Jan; Gajęcki, Maciej

    2014-10-01

    The contamination of plant material with mycotoxins, in particular of the genus Fusarium, is common in the natural environment. Multiparous female wild boars are exposed to feed contaminated with zearalenone (ZEN) and deoxynivalenol throughout the year. The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of the above mycotoxins in multiparous female wild boars and to describe their effect on the histological structure of the ovaries at the beginning of astronomical winter. Toxicological examinations revealed 0.291 ng/ml of ZEN, 0.406 ng/ml of α-zearalenol (α-ZEL), 0.392 ng/ml β-zearalenol (β-ZEL) and an absence of deoxynivalenol (values below the sensitivity of the method) in the blood plasma of multiparous female wild boars. Numerous ovarian follicles at various stages of development, characterized by different degree of damage, were observed. Numerous deformed resting ovarian follicles were noted directly under the epithelium, and signs of follicular atresia and hyalinization were observed. Blood vessels in the medulla of the ovary were dilated, which probably improved the distribution of ZEN in the ovaries. Higher substrate (ZEN) concentrations in the ovaries led to an insignificant increase in the staining intensity of 3β-HSD and 17β-HSD clusters. The observed changes could contribute to prolonging the initial stage of late anestrus in multiparous female wild boars.

  9. Performance of winter triticale lines under high disease (Fusarium head blight) pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góral, Tomasz; Wiśniewska, Halina; Ochodzki, Piotr; Walentyn-Górall, Dorota; Grzeszczak, Iga; Beletr, Joanna; Banaszak, Zofia; Pojmaj, Mirosław; Kurleto, Danuta; Konieczny, Marcin; Budzianowski, Grzegorz; Cicha, Alicja; Paizert, Kazimier; Woś, Henryk

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to Fusarium head blight of 29 winter triticale lines and 3 cultivars was evaluated. Triticale was sown in field experiments in two locations. At flowering, triticale heads were inoculated with three Fusarium culmorum isolates. FHB index was scored and after the harvest percentage of Fusarium damaged kernels was assessed. Grain was analyzed for a content of trichothecenes B (deoxynivalenol and derivatives, nivalenol) and zearalenone. The average FHB indexes were similar in both locations and amounted 19.8% in Radzików, and 19.9%. in Cerekwica. Percentage of Fusarium damaged kernels was higher in Cerekwica (53.7%) than in Radzików (26.8%). An average content of DON in Radzików amounted to 8.690 ppm and was lower than in the second locaiion--19.543 ppm. In Cerekwica there were also large quantities of NIV in grain. The average content was 10.048 ppm, while in Radzików it was very low--0.324 ppm. Considerable amounts of DON derivatives in both locations were detected (1,815 ppm of 3AcDON and 1,913 ppm of 15AcDON). The content of the ZON in the grain from Cerekwica was very high and amounted to 1123 ppb, while in Radzików it was 6 times lower--200 ppb. Relationships between FHB index and mycotoxin contents were statistically insignificant in both locations. In contrast, FDK percentages correlated significantly with concentration of mycotoxins. In both locations the parallel experiments with 36 winter wheat were carried out. Triticale proved to be less infected than wheat. However, the content of trichothecenes, was higher in triticale grain than in wheat grain.

  10. Assessment and introduction of quantitative resistance to Fusarium head blight in elite spring barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkmeyer, A; Götz, M; Hu, L; Asam, S; Rychlik, M; Hausladen, H; Hess, M; Hückelhoven, R

    2013-12-01

    Breeding for resistance is a key task to control Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease of small cereals leading to economic losses and grain contamination with mycotoxins harmful for humans and animals. In the present work, FHB resistance of the six-rowed spring barley 'Chevron' to FHB in Germany was compared with those of adapted German spring barley cultivars. Both under natural infection conditions and after spray inoculation with conidia of Fusarium culmorum, F. sporotrichioides, and F. avenaceum under field conditions, Chevron showed a high level of quantitative resistance to the infection and contamination of grain with diverse mycotoxins. This indicates that Chevron is not only a little susceptible to deoxynivalenol-producing Fusarium spp. but also to Fusarium spp. producing type A trichothecenes and enniatins. Monitoring the initial infection course of F. culmorum on barley lemma tissue by confocal laser-scanning microscopy provided evidence that FHB resistance of Chevron is partially mediated by a preformed penetration resistance, because direct penetration of floral tissue by F. culmorum was observed rarely on Chevron but was common on susceptible genotypes. Alternatively, F. culmorum penetrated Chevron lemma tissue via stomata, which was unusual for susceptible genotypes. We generated double-haploid barley populations segregating for the major FHB resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL) Qrgz-2H-8 of Chevron. Subsequently, we characterized these populations by spray inoculation with conidia of F. culmorum and F. sporotrichioides. This suggested that Qrgz-2H-8 was functional in the genetic background of European elite barley cultivars. However, the degree of achieved resistance was very low when compared with quantitative resistance of the QTL donor Chevron, and the introgression of Qrgz-2H-8 was not sufficient to mediate the cellular resistance phenotype of Chevron in the European backgrounds.

  11. The potential effects of antioxidant feed additives in mitigating the adverse effects of corn naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on antioxidant systems in the intestinal mucosa, plasma, and liver in weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Le Thanh, Bich; Lemay, Michel; Bastien, Alexandre; Lapointe, Jérôme; Lessard, Martin; Chorfi, Younès; Guay, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Seventy-two piglets (6.0 kg BW) were randomly distributed within six different dietary treatments to evaluate the effect of deoxynivalenol (DON) and the potential of four antioxidant feed additives in mitigating the adverse effects of DON on growth performances and oxidative status. Dietary treatments were as follows: control diet 0.8 mg/kg DON; contaminated diet (DON-contaminated diet) 3.1 mg/kg DON; and four contaminated diets, each supplemented with a different antioxidant feed additive, DON + vitamins, DON + organic selenium (Se)/glutathione (GSH), DON + quercetin, and DON + COMB (vitamins + Se/GSH + quercetin from the other treatments). Although DON was the main mycotoxin in the contaminated diet, this diet also contained 1.8 mg/kg of zearalenone (ZEN). The "mycotoxin" effects therefore included the combined effect of these two mycotoxins, DON, and ZEN. The DON-ZEN ingestion did not affect growth performances, average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), and feed efficiency (G:F ratio), but partially induced oxidative stress in weaned pigs as shown by increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content in the plasma and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver (P  0.05). Supplementation with individual antioxidant feed additive had a limited effect in weaned pigs fed DON-ZEN-contaminated diets. Combination of antioxidants (vitamins A, C, and E, quercetin, and organic Se/GSH) reduced plasma and liver MDA content and SOD activity in liver (P < 0.05) of piglets fed DON-ZEN-contaminated diets. Furthermore, this combination also reduced MDA content in the ileum (P < 0.05), although activity of glutathione peroxidases (GPx), SOD or catalase (CAT) in the ileum was not affected by DON-ZEN contamination or antioxidant supplements. In conclusion, DON-ZEN contamination induced oxidative stress in weaned pigs and combination of antioxidant feed additives restored partially the oxidative status. Further studies will be necessary to assess whether the

  12. A Simple Method for the Assessment of Fusarium Head Blight Resistance in Korean Wheat Seedlings Inoculated with Fusarium graminearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyun Shin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB; scab caused mainly by Fusarium graminearum is a devastating disease of wheat and barley around the world. FHB causes yield reductions and contamination of grain with trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON which are a major health concern for humans and animals. The objective of this research was to develop an easy seed or seedling inoculation assay, and to compare these assays with whole plant resistance of twenty-nine Korean winter wheat cultivars to FHB. The clip-dipping assay consists of cutting off the coleoptiles apex, dipping the coleoptiles apex in conidial suspension, covering in plastic bag for 3 days, and measuring the lengths of lesions 7 days after inoculation. There were significant cultivar differences after inoculation with F. graminearum in seedling relative to the controls. Correlation coefficients between the lesion lengths of clip-dipping inoculation and FHB Type II resistance from adult plants were significant (r=0.45; P<0.05. Results from two other seedling inoculation methods, spraying and pin-point inoculation, were not correlated with adult FHB resistance. Single linear correlation was not significant between seed germination assays (soaking and soak-dry and FHB resistance (Type I and Type II, respectively. These results showed that clip-dipping inoculation method using F. graminearum may offer a real possibility of simple, rapid, and reliable for the early screening of FHB resistance in wheat.

  13. Solvent and Water Mediated Structural Variations in Deoxynivalenol and Their Potential Implications on the Disruption of Ribosomal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroud, Nora A.; Shank, Roxanne A.; Kiss, Douglas; Eudes, François; Hazendonk, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a disease of cereal crops caused by trichothecene producing Fusarium species. Trichothecenes, macrocylicic fungal metabolites composed of three fused rings (A–C) with one epoxide functionality, are a class of mycotoxins known to inhibit protein synthesis in eukaryotic ribosomes. These toxins accumulate in the kernels of infected plants rendering them unsuitable for human and animal consumption. Among the four classes of trichothecenes (A–D) A and B are associated with FHB, where the type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) is most relevant. While it is known that these toxins inhibit protein synthesis by disrupting peptidyl transferase activity, the exact mechanism of this inhibition is poorly understood. The three-dimensional structures and H-bonding behavior of DON were evaluated using one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques. Comparisons of the NMR structure presented here with the recently reported crystal structure of DON bound in the yeast ribosome reveal insights into the possible toxicity mechanism of this compound. The work described herein identifies a water binding pocket in the core structure of DON, where the 3OH plays an important role in this interaction. These results provide preliminary insights into how substitution at C3 reduces trichothecene toxicity. Further investigations along these lines will provide opportunities to develop trichothecene remediation strategies based on the disruption of water binding interactions with 3OH. PMID:27582730

  14. Thermal stability and kinetics of degradation of deoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol conjugates and ochratoxin A during baking of wheat bakery products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Arnau; Sanchis, Vicente; Ramos, Antonio J; Marín, Sonia

    2015-07-01

    The stability of deoxynivalenol (DON), deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON-3-glucoside), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), de-epoxy-deoxynivalenol (DOM-1) and ochratoxin A (OTA) during thermal processing has been studied. Baking temperature, time and initial mycotoxin concentration in the raw materials were assayed as factors. An improved UPLC-MS/MS method to detect DON, DON-3-glucoside, 3-ADON, 15-ADON and DOM-1 in wheat baked products was developed in the present assay. The results highlighted the importance of temperature and time in mycotoxin stability in heat treatments. OTA is more stable than DON in a baking treatment. Interestingly, the DON-3-glucoside concentrations increased (>300%) under mild baking conditions. On the other hand, it was rapidly reduced under harsh conditions. The 3-ADON decreased during the heat treatment; while DOM-1 increased after the heating process. Finally, the data followed first order kinetics for analysed mycotoxins and thermal constant rates (k) were calculated. This parameter can be a useful tool for prediction of mycotoxin levels.

  15. Chemical Synthesis of Deoxynivalenol-3-β-d-[13C6]-glucoside and Application in Stable Isotope Dilution Assays

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    Katharina Habler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Modified mycotoxins have been gaining importance in recent years and present a certain challenge in LC-MS/MS analysis. Due to the previous lack of a labeled isotopologue of the modified mycotoxin deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside, in our study we synthesized the first 13C-labeled internal standard. Therefore, we used the Königs-Knorr method to synthesize deoxynivalenol-3-β-d-[13C6]-glucoside originated from unlabeled deoxynivalenol and [13C6]-labeled glucose. Using the synthesized isotopically-labeled standard deoxynivalenol-3-β-d-[13C6]-glucoside and the purchased labeled standard [13C15]-deoxynivalenol, a stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method was firstly developed for deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside and deoxynivalenol in beer. The preparation and purification of beer samples was based on a solid phase extraction. The validation data of the newly developed method gave satisfying results. Intra- and interday precision studies revealed relative standard deviations below 0.5% and 7%, respectively. The recoveries ranged for both analytes between 97% and 112%. The stable isotope dilution assay was applied to various beer samples from four different countries. In summary, deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside and deoxynivalenol mostly appeared together in varying molar ratios but were quantified in rather low contents in the investigated beers.

  16. ALTERATIONS INDUCED BY LOW LEVELS OF DEOXYNIVALENOL IN WEANED PIGLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIELA ELIZA MARIN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON is a mycotoxin produced by different species of Fusarium genus that may contaminate feed and food. In the present study we investigated the effect of low levels of DON on the modulation of performance, hemodynamic parameters, cellular and humoral immune response in weaned pigs. Histological alterations in different organ tissues were also analyzed. Our results showed that a short in vivo exposure (14 days of weanling piglets to 0; 0.5; 1.5 mg/day of DON significantly induced a dose dependent increase of cellular immune response (lymphocytes proliferation and leucocytes numbers. The 0.5 and 1.5 mg/day of DON modulated also the humoral immune response by increasing the immunoglobulin A synthesis with 7.32 % and 37.98 % and by decreasing that of immunoglubulin G with 11.15 % and 36.87 %, respectively when compared with the control. DON produced also alterations in the hemodynamic parameters of intoxicated piglets; the activity of lactate dehydrogenase significantly increased while the activity of L-glutamate, alkaline phosphatase, urea and creatinine significantly decreased. Both doses of the toxin induced microscopic alterations of the internal organ structure. By contrast, ingestion of the contaminated material had no effect on the performance (weight gain, feed consumption, and feed efficiency, organ weights, and total serum concentration of cholesterol, calcium, sodium and potassium. Taken together these results suggest that even when present at low level DON can affect blood parameters, humoral and cellular immune response in weaned piglets with a significant importance for the swine health.

  17. Effect of plastic mulching on mycotoxin occurrence and mycobiome abundance in soil samples from asparagus crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, K; Schmidt-Heydt, M; Stoll, D; Diehl, D; Ziegler, J; Geisen, R; Schaumann, G E

    2015-11-01

    Plastic mulching (PM) is widely used in modern agriculture because of its advantageous effects on soil temperature and water conservation, factors which strongly influence the microbiology of the soil. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of PM on mycotoxin occurrence in relation with mycobiome abundance/diversity and soil physicochemical properties. Soil samples were collected from green (GA) and white asparagus (WA) crops, the last under PM. Both crops were cultivated in a ridge-furrow-ridge system without irrigation. Samples were analyzed for mycotoxin occurrence via liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Total colony-forming unit was indicative of mycobiome abundance, and analysis of mycobiome diversity was performed by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing. PM avoided the drop of soil temperature in winter and allowed higher soil temperature in early spring compared to non-covered soil. Moreover, the use of PM provided controlled conditions for water content in soil. This was enough to generate a dissimilar mycotoxin occurrence and mycobiome diversity/abundance in covered and non-covered soil. Mycotoxin soil contamination was confirmed for deoxynivalenol (DON), range LOD to 32.1 ng/g (LOD = 1.1 ng/g). The DON values were higher under PM (average 16.9 ± 10.1 ng/g) than in non-covered soil (9.1 ± 7.9 ng/g); however, this difference was not statically significant (p = 0.09). Mycobiome analysis showed a fungal compartment up to fivefold higher in soil under PM compared to GA. The diversity of the mycobiome varied between crops and also along the soil column, with an important dominance of Fusarium species at the root zone in covered soils.

  18. Transcriptome analysis of the barley-deoxynivalenol interaction: evidence for a role of glutathione in deoxynivalenol detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Stephanie A; Boddu, Jayanand; Berthiller, Franz; Hametner, Christian; Stupar, Robert M; Adam, Gerhard; Muehlbauer, Gary J

    2010-07-01

    Trichothecenes are a major group of toxins produced by phytopathogenic fungi, including Fusarium graminearum. Trichothecenes inhibit protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells and are toxicologically relevant mycotoxins for humans and animals. Because they promote plant disease, the role of host responses to trichothecene accumulation is considered to be an important aspect of plant defense and resistance to fungal infection. Our overall objective was to examine the barley response to application of the type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON). We found that DON is diluted by movement from the application site to acropetal and basipetal florets. A susceptible barley genotype converted DON to DON-3-O-glucoside, indicating that UDP-glucosyltransferases capable of detoxifying DON must exist in barley. RNA profiling of DON-treated barley spikes revealed strong upregulation of gene transcripts encoding ABC transporters, UDP-glucosyltransferases, cytochrome P450s, and glutathione-S-transferases. We noted that transcripts encoding cysteine synthases were dramatically induced by DON, and that toxin-sensitive yeast on glutathione- or cysteine-supplemented media or carrying a gene that encodes a cysteine biosynthetic enzyme exhibit DON resistance, suggesting that preventing glutathione depletion by increasing cysteine supply could play a role in ameliorating the impact of DON. Evidence for nonenzymatic formation of DON-glutathione adducts in vitro was found using both liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, indicating that the formation of DON-glutathione conjugates in vivo may reduce the impact of trichothecenes. Our results indicate that barley exhibits multiple defense mechanisms against trichothecenes.

  19. Toxigenic potential of Fusarium graminearum isolated from maize of northwest Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Sampietro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty six isolates of Fusarium graminearum from grains of maize hybrids harvested in ±west Argentina were grown on autoclaved rice grain to assess their ability to produce type B trichothecenes. Chemical analysis indicated that 38% of isolates were nivalenol (NIV producers only, 31% were major NIV producers with high DON(deoxynivalenol/NIV ratios, 8% were major DON producers with minor NIV production, and 23% were DON producers only. Isolates showed a high variability in their toxigenic potential which was not related to fungal biomass. The distribution of the different chemotypes as well as the high and the low trichothecene-producing Fusarium isolates could not be associated to a geographical origin. Our results confirmed for the first time that isolates of Fusarium graminearum from maize of northwest Argentina are able to produce DON and NIV. A substancial contamination with both NIV and DON is likely in maize from northwest Argentina. Their contents should be quantified in regional surveillances for mycotoxin contamination.

  20. Toxigenic potential of Fusarium graminearum isolated from maize of northwest Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampietro, D.A.; Apud, G.R.; Belizán, M.M.E.; Vattuone, M.A.; Catalán, C.A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty six isolates of Fusarium graminearum from grains of maize hybrids harvested in ±west Argentina were grown on autoclaved rice grain to assess their ability to produce type B trichothecenes. Chemical analysis indicated that 38% of isolates were nivalenol (NIV) producers only, 31% were major NIV producers with high DON(deoxynivalenol)/NIV ratios, 8% were major DON producers with minor NIV production, and 23% were DON producers only. Isolates showed a high variability in their toxigenic potential which was not related to fungal biomass. The distribution of the different chemotypes as well as the high and the low trichothecene-producing Fusarium isolates could not be associated to a geographical origin. Our results confirmed for the first time that isolates of Fusarium graminearum from maize of northwest Argentina are able to produce DON and NIV. A substancial contamination with both NIV and DON is likely in maize from northwest Argentina. Their contents should be quantified in regional surveillances for mycotoxin contamination. PMID:24294230

  1. Occurrence of Fusarium species and trichothecenes in Nigerian maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adejumo, Timothy O; Hettwer, Ursula; Karlovsky, Petr

    2007-05-30

    A total of 180 maize samples meant for human consumption from four maize-producing states of southwestern Nigeria were screened for twelve major Fusarium mycotoxins (trichothecenes). Mycological examination of the samples showed that Fusarium verticillioides was the most commonly isolated fungi (71%), followed by F. sporotrichioides (64%), F. graminearum (32%), F. pallidoroseum (15%), F. compactum (12%), F. equiseti (9%), F. acuminatum (8%), F. subglutinans (4%) and F. oxysporum (1%). The trichothecenes include deoxynivalenol (DON), 3, mono-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-AcDON), 15, mono-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-AcDON), nivalenol (NIV), HT-2 toxin (HT-2), neosolaniol (NEO), T-2 toxin (T-2), T-2 tetraol and T-2 triol, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS), MAS-monoacetoxyscirpenol (MAS) and fusarenone-X. Quantification was by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (HPLC/MS); the detection limits for each of the mycotoxins varied between 20 and 200 microg kg(-1). Sixty six samples (36.3%) were contaminated with trichothecenes, DON (mean: 226.2 microg kg(-1); range: 9.6-745.1 microg kg(-1)), 3-AcDON (mean: 17.3 microg kg(-1); range: 0.7-72.4 microg kg(-1)) and DAS (mean: 16.0 microg kg(-1); range: 1.0-51.0 microg kg(-1)) were detected in 22%, 17% and 9% of total samples respectively. There were no 15-AcDON, NIV, HT-2, NEO, T-2, T-2 tetraol, T-2 triol, MAS and fusarenone-X detected. This is the first comprehensive report about the natural occurrence of DON, AcDON and DAS in maize for direct human consumption in Nigeria.

  2. Influence of Mycotoxins and a Mycotoxin Adsorbing Agent on the Oral Bioavailability of Commonly Used Antibiotics in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siska Croubels

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It is recognized that mycotoxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects in animals, including altered gastrointestinal barrier function. It is the aim of the present study to determine whether mycotoxin-contaminated diets can alter the oral bioavailability of the antibiotics doxycycline and paromomycin in pigs, and whether a mycotoxin adsorbing agent included into diets interacts with those antibiotics. Experiments were conducted with pigs utilizing diets that contained blank feed, mycotoxin-contaminated feed (T-2 toxin or deoxynivalenol, mycotoxin-contaminated feed supplemented with a glucomannan mycotoxin binder, or blank feed supplemented with mycotoxin binder. Diets with T-2 toxin and binder or deoxynivalenol and binder induced increased plasma concentrations of doxycycline administered as single bolus in pigs compared to diets containing blank feed. These results suggest that complex interactions may occur between mycotoxins, mycotoxin binders, and antibiotics which could alter antibiotic bioavailability. This could have consequences for animal toxicity, withdrawal time for oral antibiotics, or public health.

  3. Influence of environmental factors on the biosynthesis of type B trichothecenes by isolates of Fusarium spp. from Spanish crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, A; Mateo, R; Hinojo, M J; Valle-Algarra, F M; Jiménez, M

    2004-07-01

    Various species of Fusarium can produce trichothecene mycotoxins that contaminate food commodities and can represent a risk for human and animal health. In this paper, a full factorial design was applied to study the influence of incubation temperature, water activity (a(w)) and type of isolate on the production of deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV) and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-AcDON) in corn kernel cultures by three isolates of Fusarium graminearum and three isolates of Fusarium culmorum from crops grown in Spain. The tested temperatures were 15, 20, 28 and 32 degrees C. The a(w)-values were 0.960, 0.970 and 0.980. Moisture of cultures (within the studied range) did not affect significantly production of trichothecenes; however, the temperature affected significantly mycotoxin production and the optimal values were 28, 20 and 15 degrees C for DON, NIV and 3-AcDON, respectively. Four additional isolates of F. graminearum and two additional isolates of F. culmorum were examined for production of these mycotoxins at the optimal temperatures. Of the seven isolates of F. graminearum, four produced DON (0.88-3.97 microg/g), seven produced NIV (1.53-124 microg/g), and three produced 3-AcDON (0.65-10.6 microg/g). Of the five isolates of F. culmorum, four produced DON (1.20-4.93 microg/g), four produced NIV (6.94-701 microg/g), and four produced 3-AcDON (0.83-7.70 microg/g). Practically all isolates seem to belong to the NIV-chemotype. This is the first study done with regard to interaction between strain and ecological variables on type B trichothecene production by isolates of these two species from crops grown in Spain.

  4. Acetylated Deoxynivalenol Generates Differences of Gene Expression that Discriminate Trichothecene Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Suzuki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON, which is a toxic secondary metabolite generated by Fusarium species, is synthesized through two separate acetylation pathways. Both acetylation derivatives, 3-acetyl-DON (3ADON and 15-acetyl-DON (15ADON, also contaminate grain and corn widely. These derivatives are deacetylated via a variety of processes after ingestion, so it has been suggested that they have the same toxicity as DON. However, in the intestinal entry region such as the duodenum, the derivatives might come into contact with intestinal epithelium cells because metabolism by microflora or import into the body has not progressed. Therefore, the differences of toxicity between DON and these derivatives need to be investigated. Here, we observed gene expression changes in the yeast pdr5Δ mutant strain under concentration-dependent mycotoxin exposure conditions. 15ADON exposure induced significant gene expression changes and DON exposure generally had a similar but smaller effect. However, the glucose transporter genes HXT2 and HXT4 showed converse trends. 3ADON also induced a different expression trend in these genes than DON and 15ADON. These differences in gene expression suggest that DON and its derivatives have different effects on cells.

  5. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effect of the feed contaminant deoxynivalenol on glucose absorption in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, W A; Ghareeb, K; Zentek, J

    2014-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a major contaminant of cereals and grains, is of public health concern worldwide and has been shown to reduce the electrogenic transport of glucose. However, the full effects of Fusarium mycotoxins on nutrient absorption are still not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether decreased nutrient absorption was due to specific effects on transporter trafficking in the intestine and whether inhibition of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) affected the electrogenic jejunal transport of glucose. Jejunal mucosa of 6-week-old broiler chickens were mounted in Ussing chambers and treated with DON, wortmannin (a specific inhibitor of PI-3-kinase), DON + wortmannin, phlorizin and cytochalasin B. DON was found to decrease the short-circuit current (Isc) after glucose addition. A similar decline in Isc after glucose addition was observed following pre-application of wortmannin, or phlorizin (Na(+)/glucose co-transporter, SGLT1 inhibitor). The results indicate that DON decreased glucose absorption in the absence of wortmannin or phlorizin but had no additional effect on glucose absorption in their presence. Glucose transport was not affected by cytochalasin B (facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT2 inhibitor). The study provides evidence that the suppressive effect of DON on the electrogenic transport of glucose may be due to an inhibitory activity of the PI3 kinase pathway and intestinal SGLT1. Furthermore, the effect of cytochalasin B on glucose transport in chicken tissues differs from that in mammals.

  6. Effect of deoxynivalenol and other Type B trichothecenes on the intestine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Philippe; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2014-05-21

    The natural food contaminants, mycotoxins, are regarded as an important risk factor for human and animal health, as up to 25% of the world's crop production may be contaminated. The Fusarium genus produces large quantities of fusariotoxins, among which the trichothecenes are considered as a ubiquitous problem worldwide. The gastrointestinal tract is the first physiological barrier against food contaminants, as well as the first target for these toxicants. An increasing number of studies suggest that intestinal epithelial cells are targets for deoxynivalenol (DON) and other Type B trichothecenes (TCTB). In humans, various adverse digestive symptoms are observed on acute exposure, and in animals, these toxins induce pathological lesions, including necrosis of the intestinal epithelium. They affect the integrity of the intestinal epithelium through alterations in cell morphology and differentiation and in the barrier function. Moreover, DON and TCTB modulate the activity of intestinal epithelium in its role in immune responsiveness. TCTB affect cytokine production by intestinal or immune cells and are supposed to interfere with the cross-talk between epithelial cells and other intestinal immune cells. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the effects of DON and other TCTB on the intestine.

  7. Effect of Deoxynivalenol and Other Type B Trichothecenes on the Intestine: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Pinton

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The natural food contaminants, mycotoxins, are regarded as an important risk factor for human and animal health, as up to 25% of the world’s crop production may be contaminated. The Fusarium genus produces large quantities of fusariotoxins, among which the trichothecenes are considered as a ubiquitous problem worldwide. The gastrointestinal tract is the first physiological barrier against food contaminants, as well as the first target for these toxicants. An increasing number of studies suggest that intestinal epithelial cells are targets for deoxynivalenol (DON and other Type B trichothecenes (TCTB. In humans, various adverse digestive symptoms are observed on acute exposure, and in animals, these toxins induce pathological lesions, including necrosis of the intestinal epithelium. They affect the integrity of the intestinal epithelium through alterations in cell morphology and differentiation and in the barrier function. Moreover, DON and TCTB modulate the activity of intestinal epithelium in its role in immune responsiveness. TCTB affect cytokine production by intestinal or immune cells and are supposed to interfere with the cross-talk between epithelial cells and other intestinal immune cells. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the effects of DON and other TCTB on the intestine.

  8. Beyond Ribosomal Binding: The Increased Polarity and Aberrant Molecular Interactions of 3-epi-deoxynivalenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Yousef I.; Zhu, Honghui; Zhu, Yan; Zhou, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a secondary fungal metabolite and contaminant mycotoxin that is widely detected in wheat and corn products cultivated around the world. Bio-remediation methods have been extensively studied in the past two decades and promising ways to reduce DON-associated toxicities have been reported. Bacterial epimerization of DON at the C3 carbon was recently reported to induce a significant loss in the bio-toxicity of the resulting stereoisomer (3-epi-DON) in comparison to the parental compound, DON. In an earlier study, we confirmed the diminished bio-potency of 3-epi-DON using different mammalian cell lines and mouse models and mechanistically attributed it to the reduced binding of 3-epi-DON within the ribosomal peptidyl transferase center (PTC). In the current study and by inspecting the chromatographic behavior of 3-epi-DON and its molecular interactions with a well-characterized enzyme, Fusarium graminearum Tri101 acetyltransferase, we provide the evidence that the C3 carbon epimerization of DON influences its molecular interactions beyond the abrogated PTC binding. PMID:27618101

  9. Fungal and mycotoxin assessment of dried edible mushroom in Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezekiel, C.N.; Sulyok, M.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2013-01-01

    and molecular studies, while the spectrum of microbial metabolites including mycotoxins was analyzed by a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric method covering 320 metabolites. Molds such as Fusarium, Penicillium, Trichoderma and aflatoxigenic species of Aspergillus (Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus...

  10. The use of near infrared transmittance kernel sorting technology to salvage high quality grain from grain downgraded due to Fusarium damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Kautzman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mycotoxins associated with specific Fusarium fungal infections of grains are a threat to global food and feed security. These fungal infestations are referred to as Fusarium Head Blight (FHB and lead to Fusarium Damaged Kernels (FDK. Incidence of FDK >0.25% will lower the grade, with a tolerance of 5% FDK for export feed grain. During infestation, the fungi can produce a variety of mycotoxins, the most common being deoxynivalenol (DON. Fusarium Damaged Kernels have been associated with reduced crude protein (CP, lowering nutritional, functional and grade value. New technology has been developed using Near Infrared Transmittance (NIT spectra that estimate CP of individual kernels of wheat, barley and durum. Our objective is to evaluate the technology's capability to reduce FDK and DON of downgraded wheat and ability to salvage high quality safe kernels. In five FDK downgraded sources of wheat, the lowest 20% CP kernels had significantly increased FDK and DON with the high CP fractions having decreased FDK and DON, thousand kernel weights (TKW and bushel weight (Bu. Strong positive correlations were observed between FDK and DON (r = 0.90; FDK and grade (r = 0.62 and DON and grade (r = 0.62. Negative correlations were observed between FDK and DON with CP (r = −0.27 and −0.32; TKW (r = −0.45 and −0.54 and Bu (r = −0.79 and −0.74. Results show improved quality and value of Fusarium downgraded grain using this technology.

  11. CELL-SURFACE BINDING OF DEOXYNIVALENOL TO Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans ISOLATED FROM SOURDOUGH STARTER CULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Yousef I.; Lloyd B. Bullerman

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and fumonisin B1 (FB1) are two contaminant-mycotoxins frequently found in food commodities produced under poor conditions. Several methods have been suggested for the detoxification of such mycotoxins. Among the proposed methods, biological detoxification seems to be the most promising and cost-efficient. This study explores the capability of one strain of lactic acid bacteria, identified as Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans, to bind both DON and FB1 in liquid cultu...

  12. In vitro glucuronidation kinetics of deoxynivalenol by human and animal microsomes and recombinant human UGT enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, Ronald; Warth, Benedikt; Schebb, Nils Helge; Krska, Rudolf; Koch, Matthias; Sulyok, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), formed by Fusarium species, is one of the most abundant mycotoxins contaminating food and feed worldwide. Upon ingestion, the majority of the toxin is excreted by humans and animal species as glucuronide conjugate. First in vitro data indicated that DON phase II metabolism is strongly species dependent. However, kinetic data on the in vitro metabolism as well as investigations on the specific enzymes responsible for DON glucuronidation in human are lacking. In the present study, the DON metabolism was investigated using human microsomal fractions and uridine-diphosphoglucuronyltransferases (UGTs) as well as liver microsomes from five animal species. Only two of the twelve tested human recombinant UGTs led to the formation of DON glucuronides with a different regiospecificity. UGT2B4 predominantly catalyzed the formation of DON-15-O-glucuronide (DON-15GlcA), while for UGT2B7 the DON-3-O-glucuronide (DON-3GlcA) metabolite prevailed. For human UGTs, liver, and intestinal microsomes, the glucuronidation activities were low. The estimated apparent intrinsic clearance (Clapp,int) for all human UGT as well as tissue homogenates was microsomes, moderate Clapp,int between 1.5 and 10 mL/min mg protein were calculated for carp, trout, and porcine liver. An elevated glucuronidation activity was detected for rat and bovine liver microsomes leading to Clapp,int between 20 and 80 mL/min mg protein. The obtained in vitro data points out that none of the animal models is suitable for estimating the human DON metabolism with respect to the metabolite pattern and formation rate.

  13. Mycoflora, Mycotoxin Contamination and Proximate Mineral Composition of Smoke-Dried Frog (Aubria sp. (Konko Sold in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukola Adebayo-Tayo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycoflora, mycotoxin contamination and proximate mineral composition of smoked-dried frog (Aubria sp. samples purchased from different markets in Ibadan, Oyo State were investigated. A total of 20 composite samples made up of 120 smoked-dried frog samples were collected. The total fungi count ranged from 1.0 x103 – 8.0 x 103 cfu/g. A total of 70 fungal strains including: Alternaria sp., Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus tamarii, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Fusarium compacticum, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium sacchari, Fusarium solani, Fusarium verticillioides, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium citrinum, Penicillium oxalicum, Trichoderma viridae and Rhizophus sp. were isolated from the samples. All the samples were contaminated with aflatoxin and 70% were contaminated with deoxynivalenol (DON. The total Aflatoxin and DON in the two sampling ranged from 5.06h – 9.17a ppb, 1.86h – 5.58a ppb and 0.00 – 0.96 ppm and 0.00 – 0.09 ppm. The levels of mycotoxins contamination were within the maximum limit permitted. The Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium spp. were able to produce aflatoxin and DON which ranged from 1.65 – 3.56 ppb and 0.05 – 0.19 ppm. The percentage crude protein, K, Ca and Fe content in the samples ranged from 40.79j – 53.93a, 217.85 – 1235.83 mg/100 g, 4201 – 437.25 mg/100 g and 431.75 – 1065.0 mg/100 g. The moisture content ranged from 11.58h – 16.31a. The Cd, Zn and Cu content ranged from 0.00 – 0.22 mg/100 g, 9.43 – 5.20 mg/100 g and 7.05 – 18.58 mg/100 g. The presence of mycotoxigenic fungi and mycotoxin levels in the dried frog samples is of public health concern and proper attention is needed for the control of quality and adequate preservation before sales and consumption.

  14. Characterization of effectors from Fusarium graminearum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which reduces crop yield and quality by producing various mycotoxins. Effectors play an important role in the pathogenesis of many bacterial and fungal pathogens. In this study, 26 effector candidates were selected for investiga...

  15. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETECTING THREE KINDS OF FUSARIUM MYCOTOXIN IN GRAINS%粮食中3种镰刀菌毒素的气相色谱测定法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温肇霞; 杨宗军; 宋扬

    2001-01-01

    ①目的建立一种简单、灵敏、高效的测定粮食中雪腐镰刀菌烯醇(NIV)、脱氧雪腐镰刀菌烯醇(DON)、新茄病镰刀菌烯醇(NS)的方法。②方法粮食样品用甲醇-水(95∶5,V∶V)提取,经Florisil柱净化,用9∶1的氯仿-甲醇进行洗脱,提取液经n-7氟丁酰咪唑衍生后,用配有SE-54弹性石英毛细管柱的气相色谱进行测定,检测器为电子捕获检测器。③结果建立了粮食中3种镰刀菌毒素的气相色谱测定方法,其最低检测限为 1× 10-11~1 × 10-10g,各毒素回收率均在85%以上。④结论该方法灵敏、简单、快速、回收率高,具有很好的实际应用价值。%Objective To set up a simple method for detecting three kinds of fusarium mycotoxin in grains. Methods Mycotoxins were extracted with methanol-water(95∶5,V∶V) and purified by chomatographic procedure using Florisil column. The column filters were concentrated and the residue was dissolved in methanol. A portion of the solution was reacted with n-heptaflurobylimidazol and analysed with gas chromatography. Results The limit for detection of the three mycotoxins was 1× 10-11-1×10-10g, and the recoveries were all over 85%. Conclusion This method was simple and highly efficient.

  16. Action and reaction of host and pathogen during Fusarium head blight disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Stephanie; Nicholson, Paul; Doohan, Fiona M

    2010-01-01

    The Fusarium species Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, Which are responsible for Fusarium head blight (FHB) disease, reduced world-wide cereal crop yield and, as a consequence of their mycotoxin production in cereal grain, impact on both human and animal health. Their study is greatly p...

  17. Are air-borne mycotoxins a public health concern in Portugal?

    OpenAIRE

    Viegas, Carla; Viegas, Susana; Sabino, Raquel; Casimiro, E.; Veríssimo, C

    2011-01-01

    Introduction - Microscopic filamentous fungi, under suitable environmental conditions, can lead to the production of highly toxic chemical substances, commonly known as mycotoxins. The most widespread and studied mycotoxins are metabolites of some genera of moulds such as Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium. Quite peculiar conditions may influence mycotoxin biosynthesis, such as climate, geographical location, cultivation practices, storage and type of substrate. Toxicity has been extensive...

  18. Global protein phosphorylation dynamics during deoxynivalenol-induced ribotoxic stress response in the macrophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Xiao [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Whitten, Douglas A. [Research Technology Support Facility, Proteomics Core, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Wu, Ming [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Chan, Christina [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Wilkerson, Curtis G. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Research Technology Support Facility, Proteomics Core, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium that commonly contaminates food, is capable of activating mononuclear phagocytes of the innate immune system via a process termed the ribotoxic stress response (RSR). To encapture global signaling events mediating RSR, we quantified the early temporal (≤ 30 min) phosphoproteome changes that occurred in RAW 264.7 murine macrophage during exposure to a toxicologically relevant concentration of DON (250 ng/mL). Large-scale phosphoproteomic analysis employing stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with titanium dioxide chromatography revealed that DON significantly upregulated or downregulated phosphorylation of 188 proteins at both known and yet-to-be functionally characterized phosphosites. DON-induced RSR is extremely complex and goes far beyond its prior known capacity to inhibit translation and activate MAPKs. Transcriptional regulation was the main target during early DON-induced RSR, covering over 20% of the altered phosphoproteins as indicated by Gene Ontology annotation and including transcription factors/cofactors and epigenetic modulators. Other biological processes impacted included cell cycle, RNA processing, translation, ribosome biogenesis, monocyte differentiation and cytoskeleton organization. Some of these processes could be mediated by signaling networks involving MAPK-, NFκB-, AKT- and AMPK-linked pathways. Fuzzy c-means clustering revealed that DON-regulated phosphosites could be discretely classified with regard to the kinetics of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The cellular response networks identified provide a template for further exploration of the mechanisms of trichothecenemycotoxins and other ribotoxins, and ultimately, could contribute to improved mechanism-based human health risk assessment. - Highlights: ► Mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces immunotoxicity via ribotoxic stress response. ► SILAC phosphoproteomics using

  19. Transformation of deoxynivalenol and its acetylated derivatives in Chinese steamed bread making, as affected by pH, yeast, and steaming time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Wang, Bujun

    2016-07-01

    We hereby report the transformation of deoxynivalenol (DON) and its acetylated derivatives (3-ADON and 15-ADON) by spiking targeted mycotoxins to Fusarium mycotoxin-free flour in the process of making Chinese steamed bread (CSB). The impacts of pH, yeast level, and steaming time on the transformation of 3-ADON to DON were investigated. DON, 3-ADON, and 15-ADON were analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. Spiked DON was stable throughout the CSB making process. Spiked 3-ADON and 15-ADON were partially deacetylated and transformed to DON during kneading (54.1-60.0% and 59.3-77.5%, respectively), fermentation (64.0-76.9% and 78.2-91.6%, respectively), and steaming (47.2-52.7% and 52.4-61.9%, respectively). The ADONs level increased after steaming compared with their level in the previous step. The pH level and steaming duration significantly (Pprocess. Briefly, alkaline conditions and short steaming times favored the deacetylation of 3-ADON. The level of yeast did not remarkably (Ptransformation between ADONs and DON.

  20. Occurrence of different trichothecenes and deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucoside in naturally and artificially contaminated Danish cereal grains and whole maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, P H; Nielsen, K F; Ghorbani, F; Spliid, N H; Nielsen, G C; Jørgensen, L N

    2012-08-01

    Fusarium mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) can occur in cereals conjugated to glucose and probably also to other sugars. These conjugates, which are often referred to as "masked mycotoxins", will not be detected with routine analytical techniques. Furthermore, it is suspected that the parent toxin may again be released after hydrolysis in the digestive tracts of animals and humans. Today, our knowledge of the occurrence of these compounds in cereal grains is limited. In this paper, a LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of DON, deoxynivalenol-3-β-D-glucoside (DON-3-glucoside), 3 acetyl-DON, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, diacetoxyscirpenol, HT-2 toxin, and T-2 toxin in naturally (n = 48) and artificially (n = 30) contaminated cereal grains (wheat, barley, oat, rye triticale) is reported. The method has also been applied to whole fresh maize plant intended for production of maize silage (n = 10). The samples were collected from the harvest years 2006-2010, The results show that DON-3-glucoside and DON co-occurred in cereal grains and, especially in several of the highly contaminated samples, the concentration of the glucoside can be relatively high, corresponding to over 37 % of the DON concentration. The DON-3-glucoside levels in both the naturally and in the artificially grain inoculated with Fusarium were second only to DON, and were generally higher than those of the other tested trichothecenes, which were found at low concentrations in most samples, in many cases even below the detection limit of the method. This argues for the importance of taking DON-3-glucoside into account in the ongoing discussion within the European Community concerning exposure re-evaluations for setting changed values for the tolerable intake for DON. Our results indicate that, in the naturally contaminated grains and in the Fusarium infested cereal grains (winter and spring wheat, oat, triticale), the concentration level of DON-3-glucoside is positively

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF DIFFERENT FUSARIUM SPP. IN ALLIUM SPP. IN GERMANY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, B; Karlovsky, P; Pfohl, K; Gamliel, A; Isack, Y; Dehne, H W

    2015-01-01

    In 2013 Allium cepa bulbs from different fields in Northern and Southern Germany, seeds and sets from onion breeders were analysed for infestation with Fusarium species. The same investigation was done in 2014 with different edible Allium spp. from local markets. Different Fusarium spp. were isolated and identified by morphological characterisation. 24 different Fusarium spp. were identified. The diversity of Fusarium spp. and the intensity of infestation was higher on edible bulbs compared to the younger sets and seeds. The analysed onions and other edible Allium spp. from local markets showed also high contents of different Fusarium species. The most prevalent identified Fusarium sp. in the analysed Allium spp. in Germany was Fusarium oxysporum which can cause the Fusarium Basal Rot, followed by Fusarium solani. Fusarium proliferatum, which can cause the Fusarium Salmon Blotch in onions, could be detected in about half of the sampled onion fields and in approximately 10% of all analysed onions from fields. Also in the onion sets, on the surface of the seeds and in other edible Allium spp. F. proliferatum could be identified. Besides F. proliferatum, further mycotoxin producing Fusarium spp. like Fusarium equiseti or Fusarium tricinctum were identified. Other Fusarium spp. like Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium poae were first described in Allium sp. in this study. The two most prevalent Fusarium spp. F. oxysporum and F. solani are able to produce mycotoxins like enniatins, fumonisins, moniliformin and T-2 toxins. Fusarium sp. like F. proliferatum, F. equiseti and F. tricinctum are able to produce additional toxins like beauvericins, zearalenone and diacetoscirpenol. This high number of Fusarium spp., which are able to produce a broad spectrum of different mycotoxins, could be a potential health risk for human beings and livestock.

  2. RNA Interference (RNAi) as a Potential Tool for Control of Mycotoxin Contamination in Crop Plants: Concepts and Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rajtilak; Rajasekaran, Kanniah; Cary, Jeffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxin contamination in food and feed crops is a major concern worldwide. Fungal pathogens of the genera Aspergillus. Fusarium, and Penicillium are a major threat to food and feed crops due to production of mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, 4-deoxynivalenol, patulin, and numerous other toxic secondary metabolites that substantially reduce the value of the crop. While host resistance genes are frequently used to introgress disease resistance into elite germplasm, either through traditional breeding or transgenic approaches, such resistance is often compromised by the evolving pathogen over time. RNAi-based host-induced gene silencing of key genes required by the pathogen for optimal growth, virulence and/or toxin production, can serve as an alternative, pre-harvest approach for disease control. RNAi represents a robust and efficient tool that can be used in a highly targeted, tissue specific manner to combat mycotoxigenic fungi infecting crop plants. Successful transgenic RNAi implementation depends on several factors including (1) designing vectors to produce double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) that will generate small interfering RNA (siRNA) species for optimal gene silencing and reduced potential for off-target effects; (2) availability of ample target siRNAs at the infection site; (3) efficient uptake of siRNAs by the fungus; (4) siRNA half-life and (5) amplification of the silencing effect. This review provides a critical and comprehensive evaluation of the published literature on the use of RNAi-based approaches to control mycotoxin contamination in crop plants. It also examines experimental strategies used to better understand the mode of action of RNAi with the aim of eliminating mycotoxin contamination, thereby improving food and feed safety.

  3. Utilising an LC-MS/MS-based multi-biomarker approach to assess mycotoxin exposure in the Bangkok metropolitan area and surrounding provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Benedikt; Petchkongkaew, Awanwee; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Human exposures to mycotoxins through dietary intake are a major health hazard and may result in various pathophysiological effects. Although Thailand is a country at increased risk due to its climatic conditions, no comprehensive dataset is available to perform proper exposure assessment of its population with regard to mycotoxins. Therefore, this pilot study was conducted to investigate and evaluate the exposure levels of major mycotoxins (aflatoxin B₁, ochratoxin A, fumonisins, zearalenone and trichothecenes). Sixty first-morning urine samples were collected from healthy volunteers who live in the Bangkok metropolitan area and surrounding provinces (Pathumthani, Nonthaburi, Samutprakarn and Samutsakorn). Urine samples were analysed by a LC-MS/MS-based multi-biomarker method following a so-called 'dilute and shoot' approach. Results generally indicated low mycotoxin exposures in most individuals through the determination of the four biomarkers that were detected in urine samples, i.e. aflatoxin M₁, ochratoxin A (OTA), as well as the deoxynivalenol (DON) metabolites DON-3-glucuronide and DON-15-glucuronide in 10 of 60 individuals. The maximum concentrations were used to estimate the daily intake confirming that none of the individuals exceeded the tolerable daily intake (TDI) of DON (maximum 26% of TDI) or OTA (maximum 22% of TDI). However, the maximum exposure of aflatoxin B₁, estimated to be 0.91 µg (kg bw)⁻¹ day⁻¹, should raise some concerns and suggests further studies utilising a more sensitive method. Low exposure to Fusarium toxins was also confirmed by the absence of zearalenone, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol and zearalenone-14-glucuronide as well as T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, nivalenol and free DON. This is the first multi-mycotoxin biomarker study performed in Southeast Asia.

  4. The Fusarium crown rot pathogen Fusarium pseudograminearum triggers a suite of transcriptional and metabolic changes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jonathan J; Carere, Jason; Fitzgerald, Timothy L; Stiller, Jiri; Covarelli, Lorenzo; Xu, Qian; Gubler, Frank; Colgrave, Michelle L; Gardiner, Donald M; Manners, John M; Henry, Robert J; Kazan, Kemal

    2017-03-01

    Fusarium crown rot caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium pseudograminearum is a disease of wheat and barley, bearing significant economic cost. Efforts to develop effective resistance to this disease have been hampered by the quantitative nature of resistance and a lack of understanding of the factors associated with resistance and susceptibility. Here, we aimed to dissect transcriptional responses triggered in wheat by F. pseudograminearum infection. We used an RNA-seq approach to analyse host responses during a compatible interaction and identified >2700 wheat genes differentially regulated after inoculation with F. pseudograminearum . The production of a few key metabolites and plant hormones in the host during the interaction was also analysed. Analysis of gene ontology enrichment showed that a disproportionate number of genes involved in primary and secondary metabolism, signalling and transport were differentially expressed in infected seedlings. A number of genes encoding pathogen-responsive uridine-diphosphate glycosyltransferases (UGTs) potentially involved in detoxification of the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) were differentially expressed. Using a F. pseudograminearum DON-non-producing mutant, DON was shown to play an important role in virulence during Fusarium crown rot. An over-representation of genes involved in the phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine biosynthesis pathways was observed. This was confirmed through metabolite analyses that demonstrated tryptamine and serotonin levels are induced after F. pseudograminearum inoculation. Overall, the observed host response in bread wheat to F. pseudograminearum during early infection exhibited enrichment of processes related to pathogen perception, defence signalling, transport and metabolism and deployment of chemical and enzymatic defences. Additional functional analyses of candidate genes should reveal their roles in disease resistance or susceptibility. Better understanding of host

  5. Review on biological degradation of mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide contamination of feeds and foods with mycotoxins is a significant problem. Mycotoxins pose huge health threat to animals and humans. As well, mycotoxins bring enormous economic losses in food industry and animal husbandry annually. Thus, strategies to eliminate or inactivate mycotoxins in food and feed are urgently needed. Traditional physical and chemical methods have some limitations such as limited efficacy, safety issues, losses in the nutritional value and the palatability of feeds, as well as the expensive equipment required to implement these techniques. Biological degradation of mycotoxins has shown promise because it works under mild, environmentally friendly conditions. Aflatoxin (AF, zearalenone (ZEA and deoxynivalenol (DON are considered the most economically important mycotoxins in terms of their high prevalence and significant negative effects on animal performance. Therefore, this review will comprehensively describe the biological degradation of AF, ZEA and DON by microorganisms (including fungi and bacteria and specific enzymes isolated from microbial systems that can convert mycotoxins with varied efficiency to non- or less toxic products. Finally, some strategies and advices on existing difficulties of biodegradation research are also briefly proposed in this paper.

  6. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Climate change increases deoxynivalenol contamination of wheat in north-western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Olesen, J.E.; Madsen, M.S.; Goedhart, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change will affect the development of cereal crops and the occurrence of mycotoxins in these crops, but so far little research has been done on quantifying the expected effects. The aim of this study was to assess climate change impacts on the occurrence of deoxynivalenol in wheat grown in

  8. Stability of mycotoxins during food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullerman, Lloyd B; Bianchini, Andreia

    2007-10-20

    The mycotoxins that commonly occur in cereal grains and other products are not completely destroyed during food processing operations and can contaminate finished processed foods. The mycotoxins most commonly associated with cereal grains are aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, fumonisins, deoxynivalenol and zearalenone. The various food processes that may have effects on mycotoxins include sorting, trimming, cleaning, milling, brewing, cooking, baking, frying, roasting, canning, flaking, alkaline cooking, nixtamalization, and extrusion. Most of the food processes have variable effects on mycotoxins, with those that utilize the highest temperatures having greatest effects. In general the processes reduce mycotoxin concentrations significantly, but do not eliminate them completely. However, roasting and extrusion processing show promise for lowering mycotoxin concentrations, though very high temperatures are needed to bring about much of a reduction in mycotoxin concentrations. Extrusion processing at temperatures greater than 150 degrees C are needed to give good reduction of zearalenone, moderate reduction of alfatoxins, variable to low reduction of deoxynivalenol and good reduction of fumonisins. The greatest reductions of fumonisins occur at extrusion temperatures of 160 degrees C or higher and in the presence of glucose. Extrusion of fumonisin contaminated corn grits with 10% added glucose resulted in 75-85% reduction in Fumonisin B(1) levels. Some fumonisin degredation products are formed during extrusion, including small amounts of hydrolyzed Fumonisin B(1) and N-(Carboxymethyl) - Fumonisin B(1) and somewhat higher amounts of N-(1-deoxy-d-fructos-1-yl) Fumonisin B(1) in extruded grits containing added glucose. Feeding trial toxicity tests in rats with extruded fumonisin contaminated corn grits show some reduction in toxicity of grits extruded with glucose.

  9. Mycotoxins in pathophysiology of cattle diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mašić Zoran

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on the age and production category, cattle show different sensitivity towards certain mycotoxins. Microflora of the rumen degrades to a different degree and inactivates mycotoxins. In the work are presented the most important mycotoxicoses of cattle caused by fungal metabolites from the genera Fusarium, Aspergillus and Penicillium. Poisoning of cattle in our area is most often caused by Zearalenone, Dioxinivalenol, T-2 toxin, Ochratoxin A and Aflatoxin, but in the work are also presented Fumonisin B1 and B2. The work also describes preventive possibilities and protection of animal health from the effects of mycotoxins.

  10. Deoxynivalenol & Deoxynivalenol-3-Glucoside Mitigation through Bakery Production Strategies: Effective Experimental Design within Industrial Rusk-Making Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generotti, Silvia; Cirlini, Martina; Malachova, Alexandra; Sulyok, Michael; Berthiller, Franz; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Suman, Michele

    2015-07-24

    In the scientific field, there is a progressive awareness about the potential implications of food processing on mycotoxins especially concerning thermal treatments. High temperatures may cause, in fact, transformation or degradation of these compounds. This work is aimed to study the fate of mycotoxins during bakery processing, focusing on deoxynivalenol (DON) and deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON3Glc), along the chain of industrial rusk production. Starting from naturally contaminated bran, we studied how concentrations of DON and DON3Glc are influenced by modifying ingredients and operative conditions. The experiments were performed using statistical Design of Experiment (DoE) schemes to synergistically explore the relationship between mycotoxin reduction and the indicated processing transformation parameters. All samples collected during pilot plant experiments were analyzed with an LC-MS/MS multimycotoxin method. The obtained model shows a good fitting, giving back relevant information in terms of optimization of the industrial production process, in particular suggesting that time and temperature in baking and toasting steps are highly relevant for minimizing mycotoxin level in rusks. A reduction up to 30% for DON and DON3Glc content in the finished product was observed within an acceptable technological range.

  11. The Response of Selected Triticum spp. Genotypes with Different Ploidy Levels to Head Blight Caused by Fusarium culmorum (W.G.Smith) Sacc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwart, Marian; Suchowilska, Elżbieta; Kandler, Wolfang; Sulyok, Michael; Wachowska, Urszula; Krska, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Several cultivars and pure lines of Triticum monococcum, T. dicoccon, T. polonicum, T. spelta and T. aestivum were inoculated with Fusarium culmorum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in wheat. During the three-year study, the infection decreased the values of the analyzed yield components: spike weight (by 5.6% to 15.8%), number of kernels per spike (by 2.8% to 11.8%) and one kernel weight (by 8.4% to 10.7%). T. spelta was characterized by the weakest average response to infection. The grain from inoculated spikes contained significantly higher concentrations of deoxynivalenol (DON) and its 3-β-d-glucoside (D3G) than control grain. The D3G/DON ratio ranged from 11.4% to 21.4% in control grain and from 8.1% to 11.6% in inoculated grain. The lowest levels of mycotoxins were found in spelt, and the highest in T. polonicum lines and Kamut. PCA revealed that the grain of T. polonicum was characterized by an entirely different mycotoxin profile. The weakest response to F. culmorum infections was noted in T. spelta, and the strongest response in T. polonicum breeding lines and Kamut. PMID:27092526

  12. The Response of Selected Triticum spp. Genotypes with Different Ploidy Levels to Head Blight Caused by Fusarium culmorum (W.G.Smith Sacc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Wiwart

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Several cultivars and pure lines of Triticum monococcum, T. dicoccon, T. polonicum, T. spelta and T. aestivum were inoculated with Fusarium culmorum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight in wheat. During the three-year study, the infection decreased the values of the analyzed yield components: spike weight (by 5.6% to 15.8%, number of kernels per spike (by 2.8% to 11.8% and one kernel weight (by 8.4% to 10.7%. T. spelta was characterized by the weakest average response to infection. The grain from inoculated spikes contained significantly higher concentrations of deoxynivalenol (DON and its 3-β-d-glucoside (D3G than control grain. The D3G/DON ratio ranged from 11.4% to 21.4% in control grain and from 8.1% to 11.6% in inoculated grain. The lowest levels of mycotoxins were found in spelt, and the highest in T. polonicum lines and Kamut. PCA revealed that the grain of T. polonicum was characterized by an entirely different mycotoxin profile. The weakest response to F. culmorum infections was noted in T. spelta, and the strongest response in T. polonicum breeding lines and Kamut.

  13. OFFICIAL CONTROL OF WHEAT MYCOTOXINS CONTAMINATION IN THE SLOVAK REPUBLIC

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    Jaroslav Remža

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is important for the protection of public health that maximum levels are set on unprocessed cereals in order to avoid, that highly contaminated cereals can enter the food chain and to encourage and ensure that all measures are taken during the field, harvest and storage stage of the production chain. The contamination of winter wheat grain by toxins with focus on the genus Fusarium was monitored within the years 2009 – 2011 under the official control according to EC Regulation 401/2006 and 178/2010 on the territory of the Slovak Republic. The concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON and nivalenol was determined by HPLC/DAD detector and concentration of zearalenone (ZEA by HPLC/FLD detector. Deoxynivalenol was the most common (dominant Fusarium toxins in 2009-2011 with a concentration ranging from 20 µg.kg-1 - 2 651.79 µg.kg-1. 4 samples contained the content of deoxynivalenol which was over the EC Regulation no. 1881/2006 about setting the maximum levels for certain contaminants in foodstuff. Trichothecenes nivalenol occurred regularly together with deoxynivalenol. 12 % of wheat samples were contaminated with two toxins deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, 7 % of samples were analyzed for concurrent occurrence of zearalenone + deoxynivalenol + nivalenol.

  14. Fate of Fusarium Toxins during the Malting Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habler, Katharina; Hofer, Katharina; Geißinger, Cajetan; Schüler, Jan; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Hess, Michael; Gastl, Martina; Rychlik, Michael

    2016-02-17

    Little is known about the fate of Fusarium mycotoxins during the barley malting process. To determine the fungal DNA and mycotoxin concentrations during malting, we used barley grain harvested from field plots that we had inoculated with Fusarium species that produce type A or type B trichothecenes or enniatins. Using a recently developed multimycotoxin liquid chromatography-tandem mass stable isotope dilution method, we identified Fusarium-species-specific behaviors of mycotoxins in grain and malt extracts and compared toxin concentrations to amounts of fungal DNA in the same samples. In particular, the type B trichothecenes and Fusarium culmorum DNA contents were increased dramatically up to 5400% after kilning. By contrast, the concentrations of type A trichothecenes and Fusarium sporotrichioides DNA decreased during the malting process. These data suggest that specific Fusarium species that contaminate the raw grain material might have different impacts on malt quality.

  15. Effect of fungal colonization of wheat grains with Fusarium spp. on food choice, weight gain and mortality of meal beetle larvae (Tenebrio molitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Guo

    Full Text Available Species of Fusarium have significant agro-economical and human health-related impact by infecting diverse crop plants and synthesizing diverse mycotoxins. Here, we investigated interactions of grain-feeding Tenebrio molitor larvae with four grain-colonizing Fusarium species on wheat kernels. Since numerous metabolites produced by Fusarium spp. are toxic to insects, we tested the hypothesis that the insect senses and avoids Fusarium-colonized grains. We found that only kernels colonized with F. avenaceum or Beauveria bassiana (an insect-pathogenic fungal control were avoided by the larvae as expected. Kernels colonized with F. proliferatum, F. poae or F. culmorum attracted T. molitor larvae significantly more than control kernels. The avoidance/preference correlated with larval feeding behaviors and weight gain. Interestingly, larvae that had consumed F. proliferatum- or F. poae-colonized kernels had similar survival rates as control. Larvae fed on F. culmorum-, F. avenaceum- or B. bassiana-colonized kernels had elevated mortality rates. HPLC analyses confirmed the following mycotoxins produced by the fungal strains on the kernels: fumonisins, enniatins and beauvericin by F. proliferatum, enniatins and beauvericin by F. poae, enniatins by F. avenaceum, and deoxynivalenol and zearalenone by F. culmorum. Our results indicate that T. molitor larvae have the ability to sense potential survival threats of kernels colonized with F. avenaceum or B. bassiana, but not with F. culmorum. Volatiles potentially along with gustatory cues produced by these fungi may represent survival threat signals for the larvae resulting in their avoidance. Although F. proliferatum or F. poae produced fumonisins, enniatins and beauvericin during kernel colonization, the larvae were able to use those kernels as diet without exhibiting increased mortality. Consumption of F. avenaceum-colonized kernels, however, increased larval mortality; these kernels had higher enniatin

  16. Forage as a primary source of mycotoxins in animal diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skládanka, Jiří; Nedělník, Jan; Adam, Vojtěch; Doležal, Petr; Moravcová, Hana; Dohnal, Vlastimil

    2011-01-01

    The issue of moulds and, thus, contamination with mycotoxins is very topical, particularly in connexion with forages from grass stands used at the end of the growing season. Deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEA), fumonisins (FUM) and aflatoxins (AFL) are among the most common mycotoxins. The aim of the paper was to determine concentrations of mycotoxins in selected grasses (Lolium perenne, Festulolium pabulare, Festulolium braunii) and their mixtures with Festuca rubra an/or Poa pratensis during the growing season as a marker of grass safety, which was assessed according to content of the aforementioned mycotoxins. During the growing season grass forage was contaminated with mycotoxins, most of all by DON and ZEA. The contents of AFL and FUM were zero or below the limit of quantification. Moreover, the level of the occurrence of mould was quantified as ergosterol content, which was higher at the specific date of cut. All results were statistically processed and significant changes were discussed.

  17. Changes in the concentrations of fumonisin, deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in corn silage during ensilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uegaki, Ryuichi; Tsukiboshi, Takao; Tohno, Masanori

    2013-09-01

    We assessed the production of the mycotoxins fumonisin, deoxynivalenol and zearalenone during the ensiling of corn. Corn was harvested at yellow-ripe or full-ripe stage and separated into the stem and leaf parts and the ear parts, including bracts. Each material was ensiled under five conditions: (1) no fungus added, anaerobic conditions; (2) no fungus added, aerobic conditions; (3) mycotoxin-producing fungus added, anaerobic conditions; (4) mycotoxin-producing fungus added, aerobic conditions; and (5) mycotoxin-producing fungus added to autoclaved material, aerobic conditions. After 40 days of ensilage, we analyzed the silage fermentative quality and mycotoxin concentration. The fermentative quality of all materials was good in treatments (1) and (3), because the pH < 4 increased the lactic acid content preventing mycotoxin levels from increasing. In treatments (2) and (4), fermentative quality of all materials was poor, and mycotoxin levels were slightly increased. In treatment (5), fermentative quality was poor, and mycotoxin levels were increased remarkably. These results indicate that mycotoxins are not produced under anaerobic conditions and are hardly produced under aerobic condition during the ensiling of corn. Our findings suggest that almost all mycotoxins in corn silage are produced pre-harvest.

  18. Predictive Modelling of Mycotoxins in Cereals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels, van der H.J.; Liu, C.

    2015-01-01

    In dit artikel worden de samenvattingen van de presentaties tijdens de 30e bijeenkomst van de Werkgroep Fusarium weergegeven. De onderwerpen zijn: Predictive Modelling of Mycotoxins in Cereals.; Microbial degradation of DON.; Exposure to green leaf volatiles primes wheat against FHB but boosts

  19. Predictive Modelling of Mycotoxins in Cereals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels, van der H.J.; Liu, C.

    2015-01-01

    In dit artikel worden de samenvattingen van de presentaties tijdens de 30e bijeenkomst van de Werkgroep Fusarium weergegeven. De onderwerpen zijn: Predictive Modelling of Mycotoxins in Cereals.; Microbial degradation of DON.; Exposure to green leaf volatiles primes wheat against FHB but boosts produ

  20. Predictive Modelling of Mycotoxins in Cereals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels, van der H.J.; Liu, C.

    2015-01-01

    In dit artikel worden de samenvattingen van de presentaties tijdens de 30e bijeenkomst van de Werkgroep Fusarium weergegeven. De onderwerpen zijn: Predictive Modelling of Mycotoxins in Cereals.; Microbial degradation of DON.; Exposure to green leaf volatiles primes wheat against FHB but boosts produ

  1. Risk assessment and risk management of mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Risk assessment is the process of quantifying the magnitude and exposure, or probability, of a harmful effect to individuals or populations from certain agents or activities. Here, we summarize the four steps of risk assessment: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Risk assessments using these principles have been conducted on the major mycotoxins (aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, and zearalenone) by various regulatory agencies for the purpose of setting food safety guidelines. We critically evaluate the impact of these risk assessment parameters on the estimated global burden of the associated diseases as well as the impact of regulatory measures on food supply and international trade. Apart from the well-established risk posed by aflatoxins, many uncertainties still exist about risk assessments for the other major mycotoxins, often reflecting a lack of epidemiological data. Differences exist in the risk management strategies and in the ways different governments impose regulations and technologies to reduce levels of mycotoxins in the food-chain. Regulatory measures have very little impact on remote rural and subsistence farming communities in developing countries, in contrast to developed countries, where regulations are strictly enforced to reduce and/or remove mycotoxin contamination. However, in the absence of the relevant technologies or the necessary infrastructure, we highlight simple intervention practices to reduce mycotoxin contamination in the field and/or prevent mycotoxin formation during storage.

  2. The influence of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone on steroid hormone production by porcine ovarian granulosa cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesarova, Adriana; Medvedova, Marina; Halenar, Marek; Sirotkin, Alexander V; Bulla, Jozef

    2017-09-25

    Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEA) are frequently occurring in feed of pigs together. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible in vitro effects of DON and ZEA, alone or their combination on steroid secretion of porcine ovarian granulosa cells (GCs). A species-specific model with porcine ovarian GCs was used to study the potential endocrine disrupting effects of DON and ZEA alone and in co-exposure. Progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results of this study demonstrate that DON alone at the higher concentrations may act to stimulate P4 (at 1,000, 2,000, 3,000 and 5,000 ng mL(-1) but not 10 and 100 ng mL(-1)) and E2 (at 2,000, 3,000 and 5,000 ng mL(-1) but not 10, 100 and 1000 ng mL(-1)) secretion. The effects of ZEA on P4 and E2 secretion were not confirmed. DON in combination with the other fusariotoxin ZEA may impair steroidogenesis. Results aslo demonstrate different toxicological effects of fusariotoxins on follicle stimulating hormone-induced secretion of P4 and E2. All these results taken together suggest that fusariotoxin and their interactions can impact ovarian steroidogenesis, thereby demonstrating their potential reproductive effects in pigs.

  3. Biological control of Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto, causal agent of Fusarium head blight of wheat, using formulated antagonists under field conditions in Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palazzini, Juan M.; Alberione, Enrique; Torres, Adriana; Donat, Christina; Kohl, Jurgen; Chulze, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum is a devastating disease that causes extensive yield and quality losses to wheat in humid and semi-humid regions of the world. The biocontrol effect of two bacterial strains on FHB incidence, severity and deoxynivalenol (DON) accumu

  4. Evaluation of an oral subchronic exposure of deoxynivalenol on the composition of human gut microbiota in a model of human microbiota-associated rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel J Saint-Cyr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Deoxynivalenol (DON, a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium species, is one of the most prevalent mycotoxins present in cereal crops worldwide. Due to its toxic properties, high stability and prevalence, the presence of DON in the food chain represents a health risk for both humans and animals. The gastrointestinal microbiota represents potentially the first target for these food contaminants. Thus, the effects of mycotoxins on the human gut microbiota is clearly an issue that needs to be addressed in further detail. Using a human microbiota-associated rat model, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a chronic exposure of DON on the composition of human gut microbiota. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four groups of 5 germ free male rats each, housed in 4 sterile isolators, were inoculated with a different fresh human fecal flora. Rats were then fed daily by gavage with a solution of DON at 100 µg/kg bw for 4 weeks. Fecal samples were collected at day 0 before the beginning of the treatment; days 7, 16, 21, and 27 during the treatment; and 10 days after the end of the treatment at day 37. DON effect was assessed by real-time PCR quantification of dominant and subdominant bacterial groups in feces. Despite a different intestinal microbiota in each isolator, similar trends were generally observed. During oral DON exposure, a significant increase of 0.5 log10 was observed for the Bacteroides/Prevotella group during the first 3 weeks of administration. Concentration levels for Escherichia coli decreased at day 27. This significant decrease (0.9 log10 CFU/g remained stable until the end of the experiment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have demonstrated an impact of oral DON exposure on the human gut microbiota composition. These findings can serve as a template for risk assessment studies of food contaminants on the human gut microbiota.

  5. Fusarium Toxins in Cereals: Occurrence, Legislation, Factors Promoting the Appearance and Their Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigo, Davide; Raiola, Alessandro; Causin, Roberto

    2016-05-13

    Fusarium diseases of small grain cereals and maize cause significant yield losses worldwide. Fusarium infections result in reduced grain yield and contamination with mycotoxins, some of which have a notable impact on human and animal health. Regulations on maximum limits have been established in various countries to protect consumers from the harmful effects of these mycotoxins. Several factors are involved in Fusarium disease and mycotoxin occurrence and among them environmental factors and the agronomic practices have been shown to deeply affect mycotoxin contamination in the field. In the present review particular emphasis will be placed on how environmental conditions and stress factors for the crops can affect Fusarium infection and mycotoxin production, with the aim to provide useful knowledge to develop strategies to prevent mycotoxin accumulation in cereals.

  6. Deoxynivalenol transport across the human placental barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jeanette K S; Vikström, Anna C; Turner, Paul; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2011-09-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most commonly detected mycotoxin contaminant of cereal crops and cereal based food products in temperate regions of the world. DON causes adverse health effects in animals, passes through to the foetus and causes foetal abnormalities in animals. Biomonitoring for DON has revealed frequent human exposure. This study reports on DON transfer across the human placenta. Firstly, in vitro studies with the BeWo b30 clone were used as a rapid screening model showing transfer of DON through a stable confluent cell monolayer. Five term placentas were then used to study DON transfer with the ex vivo dual perfusion model. The concentration of DON on the foetal side after 4h was about 21% of that on the maternal side at t=0. These results support the data from the BeWo monolayer model in respect to the transport rate of DON, and are consistent with our hypothesis of foetal exposure to DON during pregnancy.

  7. Development of a Rapid LC-MS/MS Method for the Determination of Emerging Fusarium mycotoxins Enniatins and Beauvericin in Human Biological Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Ana Belén; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Ventura, Salvatore; Laganà, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for the simultaneous determination of enniatins A, A1, B and B1 and beauvericin, both in human urine and plasma samples, was developed and validated. The method consisted of a simple and easy pretreatment, specific for each matrix, followed by solid phase extraction (SPE) and detection by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with an electrospray ion source. The optimized SPE method was performed on graphitized carbon black cartridges after suitable dilution of the extracts, which allowed high mycotoxin absolute recoveries (76%–103%) and the removal of the major interferences from the matrix. The method was extensively evaluated for plasma and urine samples separately, providing satisfactory results in terms of linearity (R2 of 0.991–0.999), process efficiency (>81%), trueness (recoveries between 85% and 120%), intra-day precision (relative standard deviation, RSD < 18%), inter-day precision (RSD < 21%) and method quantification limits (ranging between 20 ng·L−1 and 40 ng·L−1 in plasma and between 5 ng·L−1 and 20 ng·L−1 in urine). Finally, the highly sensitive validated method was applied to some urine and plasma samples from different donors. PMID:26371043

  8. Gene regulation of intestinal porcine epithelial cells IPEC-J2 is dependent on the site of deoxynivalenol toxicological action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Kathrin Diesing

    Full Text Available The intestinal epithelial cell layer represents the border between the luminal and systemic side of the gut. The decision between absorption and exclusion of substances is the quintessential function of the gut and varies along the gut axis. Consequently, potentially toxic substances may reach the basolateral domain of the epithelial cell layer via blood stream. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON is a Fusarium derived secondary metabolite known to enter the blood stream and displaying a striking toxicity on the basolateral side of polarised epithelial cell layers in vitro. Here we analysed potential mechanisms of apical and basolateral DON toxicity reflected in the gene expression. We used the jejunum-derived, polarised intestinal porcine epithelial cell line IPEC-J2 as an in vitro cell culture model. Luminal and systemic DON challenge of the epithelial cell layer was mimicked by a DON application from the apical or basolateral compartment of membrane inserts for 72 h. We compared the genome-wide gene expression of untreated and DON-treated IPEC-J2 cells with the GeneChip® Porcine Genome Array of Affymetrix. Low basolateral DON (200 ng/mL application triggered 10 times more gene transcripts in comparison to the corresponding apical application (2539 versus 267 despite the intactness of the challenged cell layer as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance. Analysis of the regulated genes by bioinformatic resource DAVID identified several groups of biochemical pathways modulated by concentration and orientation of DON application. Selected genes representing pathways of the cellular metabolism, information processing and structural design were analysed in detail by quantitative PCR. Our findings clearly show that apical and basolateral challenge of epithelial cell layers trigger different gene response profiles paralleled with a higher susceptibility towards basolateral challenge. The evaluation of toxicological potentials of mycotoxins

  9. Mycotoxins in Bovine Milk and Dairy Products: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Algeri, Tania Aparecida; Castagnaro, Denise; de Bortoli, Kennidy; de Souza, Camila; Drunkler, Deisy Alessandra; Badiale-Furlong, Eliana

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a literature review of the occurrence of several mycotoxins in bovine milk and dairy products, because it is the main type of milk produced and marketed worldwide. Mycotoxins are produced by different genera of filamentous fungi and present serious health hazards such as carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. Under favorable growth conditions, toxigenic fungi produce mycotoxins which contaminate the lactating cow's feedstuff. During metabolism, these mycotoxins undergo biotransformation and are secreted in milk. Data show that there is a seasonal trend in the levels of mycotoxins in milk, with these being higher in the cold months probably due to the prolonged storage required for the cattle feeds providing favorable conditions for fungal growth. Good agricultural and storage practices are therefore of fundamental importance in the control of toxigenic species and mycotoxins. Although aflatoxins (especially aflatoxin M1 ) are the mycotoxins of greater incidence in milk and dairy products, this review shows that other mycotoxins, such as fumonisin, ochratoxin A, trichothecenes, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and deoxynivalenol, can also be found in these products. Given that milk is widely consumed and is a source of nutrients, especially in childhood, a thorough investigation of the occurrence of mycotoxins as well the adoption of measures to minimize their contamination of milk is essential.

  10. Structural and functional characterization of TRI3 trichothecene 15-O-acetyltransferase from Fusarium sporotrichioides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, Graeme S.; McCormick, Susan P.; Alexander, Nancy J.; Rayment, Ivan; (US-Agriculture); (UW)

    2009-08-14

    Fusarium head blight is a devastating disease of cereal crops whose worldwide incidence is increasing and at present there is no satisfactory way of combating this pathogen or its associated toxins. There is a wide variety of trichothecene mycotoxins and they all contain a 12,13-epoxytrichothecene skeleton but differ in their substitutions. Indeed, there is considerable variation in the toxin profile across the numerous Fusarium species that has been ascribed to differences in the presence or absence of biosynthetic enzymes and their relative activity. This article addresses the source of differences in acetylation at the C15 position of the trichothecene molecule. Here, we present the in vitro structural and biochemical characterization of TRI3, a 15-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase isolated from F. sporotrichioides and the 'in vivo' characterization of Deltatri3 mutants of deoxynivalenol (DON) producing F. graminearum strains. A kinetic analysis shows that TRI3 is an efficient enzyme with the native substrate, 15-decalonectrin, but is inactive with either DON or nivalenol. The structure of TRI3 complexed with 15-decalonectrin provides an explanation for this specificity and shows that Tri3 and Tri101 (3-O-trichothecene acetyltransferase) are evolutionarily related. The active site residues are conserved across all sequences for TRI3 orthologs, suggesting that differences in acetylation at C15 are not due to differences in Tri3. The tri3 deletion mutant shows that acetylation at C15 is required for DON biosynthesis even though DON lacks a C15 acetyl group. The enzyme(s) responsible for deacetylation at the 15 position of the trichothecene mycotoxins have not been identified.

  11. Defense Responses to Mycotoxin-Producing Fungi Fusarium proliferatum, F. subglutinans, and Aspergillus flavus in Kernels of Susceptible and Resistant Maize Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanubile, Alessandra; Maschietto, Valentina; De Leonardis, Silvana; Battilani, Paola; Paciolla, Costantino; Marocco, Adriano

    2015-05-01

    Developing kernels of resistant and susceptible maize genotypes were inoculated with Fusarium proliferatum, F. subglutinans, and Aspergillus flavus. Selected defense systems were investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to monitor the expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes (PR1, PR5, PRm3, PRm6) and genes protective from oxidative stress (peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase) at 72 h postinoculation. The study was also extended to the analysis of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle and catalase, superoxide dismutase, and cytosolic and wall peroxidases enzymes. Furthermore, the hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde contents were studied to evaluate the oxidation level. Higher gene expression and enzymatic activities were observed in uninoculated kernels of resistant line, conferring a major readiness to the pathogen attack. Moreover expression values of PR genes remained higher in the resistant line after inoculation, demonstrating a potentiated response to the pathogen invasions. In contrast, reactive oxygen species-scavenging genes were strongly induced in the susceptible line only after pathogen inoculation, although their enzymatic activity was higher in the resistant line. Our data provide an important basis for further investigation of defense gene functions in developing kernels in order to improve resistance to fungal pathogens. Maize genotypes with overexpressed resistance traits could be profitably utilized in breeding programs focused on resistance to pathogens and grain safety.

  12. Impact of post-anthesis rainfall, fungicide and harvesting time on the concentration of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbikar, Lalit L; Dickin, Edward T; Edwards, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to identify the impact of post-anthesis rainfall on the concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZON) in harvested wheat grain. Winter wheat plots were inoculated with Fusarium graminearum at stem extension (GS31) and prothioconazole was applied at mid-anthesis (GS65) to split plots and plots were subsequently mist irrigated for 5 days. Plots were either covered by polytunnels, irrigated by sprinklers or left as non-irrigated uncovered control plots after medium-milk (GS75). Plots were harvested either when ripe (GS92; early harvest) or three weeks later (late harvest). Fusarium head blight (FHB) was assessed each week from inoculation. At harvest, yield and grain quality was measured and grains were analysed for DON and ZON. Differences in rainfall resulted in contrasting disease pressure in the two experiments, with low FHB in the first experiment and high FHB in the second. Difference in FHB resulted in large differences in grain yield, quality and mycotoxin content. DON concentration was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in irrigated compared to covered and control plots in the first experiment, whereas in the second experiment, DON was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the covered plots compared to the control and irrigated plots. ZON concentration was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in irrigated plots in both experiments. Later harvesting resulted in an approximate fivefold increase in ZON in the first experiment, but was not significantly different in the second experiment. Prothioconazole significantly (P < 0.05) reduced DON in both experiments, but gave inconsistent reductions to ZON. This is the first report to show that the post-anthesis rainfall can significantly increase ZON in wheat, which can increase further with a delayed harvest but may be significantly reduced with the application of prothioconazole. Importantly, in the absence of moisture late season, ZON remains at very low concentrations even when

  13. c-Fos immunoreactivity in the pig brain following deoxynivalenol intoxication: focus on NUCB2/nesfatin-1 expressing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaigé, Stéphanie; Bonnet, Marion S; Tardivel, Catherine; Pinton, Philippe; Trouslard, Jérôme; Jean, André; Guzylack, Laurence; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Dallaporta, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), produced by the cereal-contaminating Fusarium fungi, is a major trichothecene responsible for mycotoxicoses in farm animals, including swine. The main effect of DON-intoxication is food intake reduction and the consequent body weight loss. The present study aimed to identify brain structures activated during DON intoxication in pigs. To this goal, we used c-Fos staining which constitutes a useful approach to identify activated neurons. We showed that per os administration of Fusarium graminearum extracts (containing the equivalent of 1mg DON per kg of body weight) induced an increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in several central structures, including the ventrolateral medulla (VLM), dorsal vagal complex (DVC), paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), arcuate nucleus (Arc), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and amygdala (CeA). Moreover, we coupled c-Fos staining with phenotypic markers detection in order to specify the neuronal populations activated during DON intoxication. This phenotypic characterization revealed the activation of catecholaminergic but not of serotoninergic neurons in response to the toxin. In this context, we also paid a particular attention to NUCB2/nesfatin-1 positive cells, since nesfatin-1 is known to exert a satiety effect. We report here, for the first time in the pig brain, the presence of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 neurons in the VLM, DVC, PVN, Arc and SON, and their activation during DON intoxication. Taken together, these data show that DON stimulates the main structures involved in food intake in pigs and suggest that catecholaminergic and NUCB2/nesfatin-1 neurons could contribute in the anorexigenic effects of the mycotoxin.

  14. Genetic and phenotypic diversity within the Fusarium graminearum species complex in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    As has been observed in several European countries, the frequency of Fusarium head blight (FHB) caused by members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) has increased in Norwegian cereals in recent years, resulting in elevated levels of deoxynivalenol in cereal grains. The objective of t...

  15. Fungal diversity and natural occurrence of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in freshly harvested wheat grains from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralamazza, Sabina Moser; Bemvenuti, Renata Heidtmann; Zorzete, Patrícia; de Souza Garcia, Fábio; Corrêa, Benedito

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the fungal diversity and presence of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in 150 samples of freshly harvested wheat grains collected in three regions of Brazil (Sao Paulo, Parana, and Rio Grande do Sul). Analysis of the mycobiota showed a predominance of Alternaria sp., Fusarium sp. and Epicoccum sp. Microdochium nivale (23%), a fungus rarely found in Brazilian crops, was detected in Sao Paulo. Four members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex were isolated: F. graminearum s.s. (37%), Fusarium meridionale (46%), Fusarium cortaderiae (13%), and Fusarium austroamericanum (3%). Toxin analysis revealed 99% contamination with deoxynivalenol (mean 706 μg/kg). The frequency of zearalenone varied greatly across regions: wheat grains from Rio Grande do Sul (84%) and Sao Paulo (12%) had median concentrations of 70.9 and 57.9 μg/kg, respectively. ZEA was not detected in the samples from Parana. A total of six samples were above the maximum tolerated level recommended by the European Commission for ZEA in wheat grains. This study provided new insights into the natural mycobiota of Brazilian wheat, demonstrating contamination of most samples with deoxynivalenol and high frequency of zearalenone in samples from Rio Grande do Sul. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A review on the clean-up, determination, toxicity and biodetoxification of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone from cereals%谷物中DON、ZEA毒素的净化、检测、毒性与生物脱毒技术的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴丽; 王步军

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum colonizes cereals and produces toxic secondary metabolites, such as trichothecenes [deoxynivalenol (DON), nivalenol (NIV)] and zearalenone(ZEA). Mycotoxins contamination of cereal grains and cereal-based products is a major problem in agricultural grains production. Clean-up is necessary step for determining the mycotoxins extracted by solid-liquid extraction. There are kinds of clean-up methods applied to purify Fusarium toxins, including solid phase extraction (SPE) columns, such as specific immunoaffinity clean-up columns and mycosep multifunctional columns, as well as the cheap and effective QuEChERS-base method for cleaning-up complex samples. The determination of foods and feeds contaminated by mycotoxins, toxin-producing conditions, toxicity and biological detoxification of Fusarium graminearum toxins were also reviewed in this paper. It is crucial to develop and explore a safe, efficient and cost effective biological detoxification technology, with the purpose of supplying safety and high quality ce-reals and foods.%禾谷镰刀菌在侵染谷物过程中所产生的次生代谢产物——单端孢霉烯族毒素[脱氧雪腐镰刀菌烯醇(deoxynivalenol, DON)、雪腐镰刀菌烯醇(nivalenol, NIV)]以及玉米赤霉烯酮(zearalenone, ZEA)是世界上粮食安全的一个重大问题。毒素经固液萃取技术提取后,需要通过净化处理才能进行检测与分析。目前有多种净化技术用于毒素的净化,如免疫亲和柱、多功能净化柱等固相萃取柱等,以及广泛使用且简便经济的QuEChERS前处理技术。本文还介绍了禾谷镰刀菌毒素中DON、ZEA的检测方法、产毒条件、毒性以及生物脱毒技术等方面的研究进展,旨在开发与应用更安全、高效、经济的生物脱毒技术进行毒素的防御与去除,以提供安全、优质的粮食与食品。

  17. EFFECT OF DEOXYNIVALENOL ON SOME HAEMATOLOGICAL, BIOCHEMICAL AND ANTIOXIDANT PARAMETERS OF PORCINE BLOOD IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Zbyňovská

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The most important and the most common Fusarium mycotoxin is deoxynivalenol (DON. It occurs predominantly in grains such as wheat, barley, and maize and less often in oats, rice, rye, sorghum and triticale. It has adverse effects on humans, animals, and crops that result in illnesses and economic losses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DON on some haematological (red blood cells - RBC, white blood cells - WBC, platelets - PLT, haemoglobin - HGB, packed cell volume - PCV and lymphocyte - LYM, biochemical (cholesterol, triglycerides, total protein, urea, calcium and phosphorus and anti- and pro-oxidants parameters (superoxide dismutase - SOD, glutathione peroxidase - GPx and ROS – reactive oxygen species in porcine blood in vitro. Significantly decreased content of total protein in the group with dose of 1000 ng.l-1 DON was observed compared with the control group. In other groups (E1 with 10 ng.l-1 DON and E2 with 100 ng.l-1 slightly lower values were measures in comparison with the control group. PLT significantly decreased in the experimental group E3 when compared with E1, E2, and the control group. Concentration of GPx in porcine blood significantly (P < 0.05 decreased in E1 against the control group. Concentration of SOD significantly (P < 0.05 decreased in group E2 in comparison with E1 group. The highest value of ROS was in E2 group. Other parameters were not influenced by The most important and the most common Fusarium mycotoxin is deoxynivalenol (DON. It occurs predominantly in grains such as wheat, barley, and maize and less often in oats, rice, rye, sorghum and triticale. It has adverse effects on humans, animals, and crops that result in illnesses and economic losses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DON on some haematological (red blood cells - RBC, white blood cells - WBC, platelets - PLT, haemoglobin - HGB, packed cell volume - PCV and lymphocyte - LYM, biochemical

  18. Fusarium toxin-contaminated maize in diets of growing bulls: effects on performance, slaughtering characteristics, and transfer into physiological liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Janine; Gödde, Jens; Meyer, Ulrich; Frahm, Jana; Westendarp, Heiner; Dänicke, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The present feeding study was carried out to examine the effects of Fusarium toxin-contaminated diets on performance and slaughtering characteristics and on the transfer of the Fusarium toxins zearalenone (ZEN), deoxynivalenol (DON) and their metabolites into physiological matrices. A total of 61 bulls (483 ± 46 kg) were fed with graded proportions of Fusarium toxin-contaminated feed over a period of 10 weeks. The total mixed rations (TMR) consisted of 47 % grass silage, 20 % press pulp silage, and 33 % concentrate on dry matter (DM) basis. Increasing toxin concentrations were achieved by the exchange of control maize with Fusarium toxin-contaminated maize in the concentrates. Thus, dietary toxin concentrations between 0.08 and 0.69 mg ZEN and 0.36 and 8.31 mg DON per kg DM were covered by the four feeding groups. Based on increasing DM intake with increasing mycotoxin contaminations of the diet, the live weight gain and energy intake differed significantly between the groups. No effects were observed on slaughtering characteristics and organ weights. ZEN, α-zeralenol, β-zeralenol (β-ZEL), zeralanone, α-zearalanol, β-zearalanol, DON, and de-deepoxy-DON (de-DON) were simultaneously determined in urine, plasma, and liquor whereby quantifiable concentrations of ZEN, β-ZEL, DON, and de-DON were found in urine, of DON and de-DON in plasma, and solely of de-DON in liquor. Based on overall results it can be concluded that current EU-guidance values for critical concentrations of DON and ZEN can be regarded as safe levels also for growing bulls. Urine and blood toxin residue levels can be used to assess exposure of bulls.

  19. Effect of environmental factors on Fusarium population and associated trichothecenes in wheat grain grown in Jiangsu province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fei; Qiu, Jianbo; Xu, Jianhong; Yu, Mingzheng; Wang, Shufang; Sun, Yue; Zhang, Gufeng; Shi, Jianrong

    2016-08-02

    The present study was performed to identify prevailing Fusarium species and the environmental factors affecting their frequencies and the contamination of grain with major mycotoxins in Jiangsu province. The precipitation levels were 184.2mm, 156.4mm, and 245.8mm in the years 2013-2015, respectively, and the temperature fluctuated by an average of 10.6±7.2°C in 2013, 10.9±7.2°C in 2014, and 10.6±6.3°C in 2015. Co-occurrence of deoxynivalenol (DON), 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON), and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15ADON) were observed in wheat. The average concentrations of DON were 879.3±1127.8, 627.8±640.5, and 1628.6±2,168.0μg/kg in 2013-2015, respectively. The average concentrations of 3ADON were 43.5±59.0, 71.2±102.5, and 33.5±111.9μg/kg in 2013-2015, respectively. We found that the average concentration of DON in wheat was positively correlated with precipitation (r=0.998, pFusarium asiaticum is the primary pathogenic fungus prevalent in the Fusarium head blight disease nursery. The trichothecene chemotype composition differed between Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (s. str.) and F. asiaticum isolates. The 3ADON chemotype was found only among strains of F. asiaticum. The NIV chemotype was not observed among strains of F. graminearum, while the 15ADON chemotype represented 100% of the F. graminearum strains collected. The results of this study indicated no correlations between environmental conditions and the species or genetic chemotype composition of pathogens in Jiangsu province in 2013-2015. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diversity of Fusarium species isolated from UK forage maize and the population structure of F. graminearum from maize and wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Pre-harvest contamination of forage maize by mycotoxin producing Fusarium species was investigated in the UK in 2011 and 2012. A total of 15 Fusarium species were identified from a collection of 1,761 Fusarium isolates recovered from maize stalks and kernels. This study characterized the diversity of Fusarium species present in forage maize in the UK. The predominant species detected were F. graminearum (32.9%) and F. culmorum (34.1%). Along with those species; F. avenacem, F. cerealis, F. equiseti, F. langsethiae, F. napiforme, F. oxysporum, F. poae, F. proliferatum, F. scripi, F. solani, F. subglutinans, F. tricinctum and, F. verticillioides were occasionally isolated. The trichothecene genotypes for F. graminearum were determined to be 84.9% deoxynivalenol (DON) and 15.0% nivalenol (NIV) while F. culmorum isolates were determined to have 24.9% DON and 75.1% NIV genotypes. A Bayesian model-based clustering method with nine variable number of tandem repeat markers was used to evaluate the population genetic structure of 277 F. graminearum isolates from the maize and wheat in the UK. There were three genetic clusters detected which were DON in maize, NIV in maize and DON in wheat. There were high admixture probabilities for 14.1% of the isolates in the populations. In conclusion, increased maize production in the UK and the high admixture rates in a significant portion of F. graminearum populations in maize and wheat will contribute to a new pathogen population which will further complicate breeding strategies for tolerance or resistance to this pathogen in both crops.

  1. Fungi and mycotoxins: Food contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocić-Tanackov Sunčica D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of fungi on food causes physical and chemical changes which, further affect negatively the sensory and nutritive quality of food. Species from genera: Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, Alternariа, Cladosporium, Mucor, Rhizopus, Eurotium and Emericella are usually found. Some of them are potentially dangerous for humans and animals, due to possible synthesis and excretion of toxic secondary metabolites - mycotoxins into the food. Their toxic syndroms in animals and humans are known as mycotoxicoses. The pathologic changes can be observed in parenhimatic organs, and in bones and central nervous system also. Specific conditions are necessary for mycotoxin producing fungi to synthetize sufficient quantities of these compounds for demonstration of biologic effects. The main biochemical paths in the formation of mycotoxins include the polyketide (aflatoxins, sterigmatocystin, zearalenone, citrinine, patulin, terpenic (trichothecenes, aminoacid (glicotoxins, ergotamines, sporidesmin, malformin C, and carbonic acids path (rubratoxins. Aflatoxins are the most toxigenic metabolites of fungi, produced mostly by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus species. Aflatoxins appear more frequently in food in the tropic and subtropic regions, while the food in Europe is more exposed to also very toxic ochratoxin A producing fungi (A. ochraceus and some Penicillium species. The agricultural products can be contaminated by fungi both before and after the harvest. The primary mycotoxicoses in humans are the result of direct intake of vegetable products contaminated by mycotoxins, while the secondary mycotoxicoses are caused by products of animal origin. The risk of the presence of fungi and mycotoxin in food is increasing, having in mind that some of them are highly thermoresistent, and the temperatures of usual food sterilization is not sufficient for their termination. The paper presents the review of most important mycotoxins, their biologic effects

  2. Effect of processing on mycotoxin content in grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Geetanjali

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins that commonly occur in cereal grains and other products can contaminate finished processed foods on account of their high toxicity. The mycotoxins that are commonly associated with food grains include aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, fumonisins, deoxynivalenol, and zearalenone. Various food-processing operations include sorting, trimming, cleaning, cooking, baking, frying, roasting, flaking, and extrusion that have variable effects on mycotoxins. The nature of the processing operation viz. physical, chemical, or thermal plays an important role in this; usually, the processes that utilize the higher temperatures have greater effects on mycotoxin dissipation. In general, the processes are known to reduce mycotoxin concentrations significantly, but do not eliminate them completely. However, roasting and extrusion processing result in lowest mycotoxin concentrations, since these involve higher temperatures. It is observed that very high temperatures are needed to bring about high reduction in mycotoxin concentrations, approaching acceptable background levels. The treatment with chemicals like ammonia, bicarbonate, citric acid, or sodium bisulfite is also effective in resulting in significant decline in mycotoxin concentrations.

  3. An overview on mycotoxin contamination of foods in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Wageh Sobhy; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2014-06-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites that contaminate various feedstuffs and agricultural crops. The contamination of food by mycotoxins can occur before production, during storage, processing, transportation or marketing of the food products. High temperature, moisture content and water activity are among the predisposing factors that facilitate the production of mycotoxins in food. Aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, deoxynivalenol and zearalenone are all considered the major mycotoxins produced in food and feedstuffs. In Africa, mycotoxin contamination is considered to be a major problem with implications that affect human and animal health and economy. Aflatoxin-related hepatic diseases are reported in many African countries. Ochratoxin and fumonisin toxicity in humans and animals is widespread in Africa. The available, updated information on the incidence of mycotoxin contamination, decontamination and its public health importance in Africa is lacking. The aim of this review is to highlight, update and discuss the available information on the incidence of mycotoxins in African countries. The public health implications and the recommended strategies for control of mycotoxins in food and agricultural crops are also discussed.

  4. Fusarium head blight resistance QTL in the spring wheat cross Kenyon/86ISMN 2137

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt A McCartney

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB, caused by Fusarium graminearum, is a very important disease of wheat globally. Damage caused by F. graminearum includes reduced grain yield, reduced grain functional quality, and results in the presence of the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol in Fusarium-damaged kernels. The development of FHB resistant wheat cultivars is an important component of integrated management. The objective of this study was to identify QTL for FHB resistance in a recombinant inbred line (RIL population of the spring wheat cross Kenyon/86ISMN 2137. Kenyon is a Canadian spring wheat, while 86ISMN 2137 is an unrelated spring wheat. The RIL population was evaluated for FHB resistance in six FHB nurseries. Nine additive effect QTL for FHB resistance were identified, six from Kenyon and three from 86ISMN 2137. Rht8 and Ppd-D1a co-located with two FHB resistance QTL on chromosome arm 2DS. A major QTL for FHB resistance from Kenyon (QFhb.crc-7D was identified on chromosome 7D. The QTL QFhb.crc-2D.4 from Kenyon mapped to the same region as a FHB resistance QTL from Wuhan-1 on chromosome arm 2DL. This result was unexpected since Kenyon does not share common ancestry with Wuhan-1. Other FHB resistance QTL on chromosomes 4A, 4D, and 5B also mapped to known locations of FHB resistance. Four digenic epistatic interactions were detected for FHB resistance, which involved eight QTL. None of these QTL were significant based upon additive effect QTL analysis. This study provides insight into the genetic basis of native FHB resistance in Canadian spring wheat.

  5. Genomics and evolution of secondary metabolism in Fusarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium is a species-rich genus that causes disease on virtually all plant crops and produces diverse secondary metabolites (SMs), including pigments, plant hormones, and some of the mycotoxins of greatest concern to food and feed safety. To better understand the potential SM diversity in Fusarium ...

  6. Research Advancement on Biosynthesis and Biodegradation of Deoxynivalenol (DON)%呕吐毒素(DON)生物合成和降解研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧英; 伍松陵; 孙长坡

    2013-01-01

    Vomitoxin,also known as deoxynivalenol (DON),is a kind of secondary metabolites produced by certain Fusarium species;it is one of the common mycotoxins which polluted the food.With the frequent occurrence of climate disasters domestically,the trend of DON pollution exacerbates,so prevention and treatment of DON contamination are imminent.This peper covers the physical and chemical properties of DON,analysis of the DON biosynthetic pathways based on its chemical structure and genes,and summarizes biodegradation of DON by microorganism,speculates possible sites of degradation,degradation pathways and products.Based on a comprehensive understanding of DON,it aims to inspire to seek safe,efficient and cost effective biodegradation pathways using biotechnology,finally to ensure grain and food safety and protect health of consumers.%呕吐毒素(Vomitoxin),即脱氧雪腐镰刀菌烯醇(deoxynivalenol,DON),是镰刀菌产生的次生代谢物质,是污染粮食的主要真菌毒素.随着我国灾害气候的频频发生,DON的污染程度呈现加剧趋势,因此DON污染的控制迫在眉睫.本文阐述了DON的物理化学特性,结合化学结构和基因遗传分析了DON的生物合成途径,并综述了微生物对DON的生物降解研究,推测了DON可能的作用位点、降解途径及降解产物,以此启发利用生物技术,探求安全、高效,低成本的DON生物降解途径,确保粮食和食品安全、保护消费者健康.

  7. THE EFFECT OF DEOXYNIVALENOL ON RABBIT SPERMATOZOA MOTILITY IN VITRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marína Medveďová

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this in vitro study the effects of mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON on the motility parameters of rabbit spermatozoa were investigated. The spermatozoa motility was evaluated using CASA assay. Different concentrations of DON in the ejaculate was divided into four experimental group: 0 ng/mL, 10 ng/mL, 100 ng/mL and 1000 ng/mL. Significant differences have not been detected between control group and experimental groups after the detailed analysis of certain motility parameters – total motile spermatozoa (%, progressively motile spermatozoa (%, average path distance (DAP, µm, average path velocity (VAP, µm/s and amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH, µm. Observed data suggested that further experiments are needed to be done because of a lack of the evidence toxinogenic effects of mycotoxin DON during its constant detection in feed and food.

  8. Mycotoxins in crude building materials from water-damaged buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, T; Reijula, K; Johnsson, T; Hemminki, K; Hintikka, E L; Lindroos, O; Kalso, S; Koukila-Kähkölä, P; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H; Haahtela, T

    2000-05-01

    We analyzed 79 bulk samples of moldy interior finishes from Finnish buildings with moisture problems for 17 mycotoxins, as well as for fungi that could be isolated using one medium and one set of growth conditions. We found the aflatoxin precursor, sterigmatocystin, in 24% of the samples and trichothecenes in 19% of the samples. Trichothecenes found included satratoxin G or H in five samples; diacetoxyscirpenol in five samples; and 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol, verrucarol, or T-2-tetraol in an additional five samples. Citrinine was found in three samples. Aspergillus versicolor was present in most sterigmatocystin-containing samples, and Stachybotrys spp. were present in the samples where satratoxins were found. In many cases, however, the presence of fungi thought to produce the mycotoxins was not correlated with the presence of the expected compounds. However, when mycotoxins were found, some toxigenic fungi usually were present, even if the species originally responsible for producing the mycotoxin was not isolated. We conclude that the identification and enumeration of fungal species present in bulk materials are important to verify the severity of mold damage but that chemical analyses are necessary if the goal is to establish the presence of mycotoxins in moldy materials.

  9. Stachybotrys mycotoxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dosen, Ina; Andersen, Birgitte; Phippen, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    importantly, a link between mycotoxin concentrations found on contaminated surfaces and in settled dust was made. One dust sample, collected from a water-damaged room, contained 10 pg/cm2 macrocyclic trichothecenes (roridin E). For the first time, more than one spirocyclic drimane was detected in dust...

  10. Monitoring of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in cereals and cereal products from the state of Saxony-Anhalt, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woese, K

    2001-03-01

    A Fusarium and Fusarium toxin monitoring programme has been established within the food and feed control authorities of Saxony-Anhalt for the 2001-2003 period. The first results of the deoxynivalenol analyses of cereals and cereal products with assured origin in this federal state, showed a contamination rate of 42% for wheat and wheat products. The contamination incidence reached only 14% in rye and rye products. Zearalenone couldn't be detected at all in the analyzed samples.

  11. The Potential Role of Mycotoxins as a Contributor to Stunting in the SHINE Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura E; Prendergast, Andrew J; Turner, Paul C; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Mutasa, Kuda; Kembo, George; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2015-12-15

    Children in developing countries experience multiple exposures that are harmful to their growth and development. An emerging concern is frequent exposure to mycotoxins that contaminate a wide range of staple foods, including maize and groundnuts. Three mycotoxins are suspected to contribute to poor child health and development: aflatoxin, fumonisin, and deoxynivalenol. We summarize the evidence that mycotoxin exposure is associated with stunting, and propose that the causal pathway may be through environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) and disturbance of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) axis. The objectives of this substudy are to assess the relationship between agricultural and harvest practices and mycotoxin exposure; to evaluate associations between mycotoxin exposure and child stunting; and to investigate EED as a potential pathway linking mycotoxin exposure to child stunting, to inform potential areas for intervention.

  12. How Do Grass Species, Season and Ensiling Influence Mycotoxin Content in Forage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Nawrath

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by fungal species that have harmful effects on mammals. The aim of this study was to assess the content of mycotoxins in fresh-cut material of selected forage grass species both during and at the end of the growing season. We further assessed mycotoxin content in subsequently produced first-cutting silages with respect to the species used in this study: Lolium perenne (cv. Kentaur, Festulolium pabulare (cv. Felina, Festulolium braunii (cv. Perseus, and mixtures of these species with Festuca rubra (cv. Gondolin or Poa pratensis (Slezanka. The mycotoxins deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and T-2 toxin were mainly detected in the fresh-cut grass material, while fumonisin and aflatoxin contents were below the detection limits. July and October were the most risky periods for mycotoxins to occur. During the cold temperatures in November and December, the occurrence of mycotoxins in fresh-cut material declined. Although June was a period with low incidence of mycotoxins in green silage, contents of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in silages from the first cutting exceeded by several times those determined in their biomass collected directly from the field. Moreover, we observed that use of preservatives or inoculants did not prevent mycotoxin production.

  13. How do grass species, season and ensiling influence mycotoxin content in forage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skladanka, Jiri; Adam, Vojtech; Dolezal, Petr; Nedelnik, Jan; Kizek, Rene; Linduskova, Hana; Mejia, Jhonny Edison Alba; Nawrath, Adam

    2013-11-12

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by fungal species that have harmful effects on mammals. The aim of this study was to assess the content of mycotoxins in fresh-cut material of selected forage grass species both during and at the end of the growing season. We further assessed mycotoxin content in subsequently produced first-cutting silages with respect to the species used in this study: Lolium perenne (cv. Kentaur), Festulolium pabulare (cv. Felina), Festulolium braunii (cv. Perseus), and mixtures of these species with Festuca rubra (cv. Gondolin) or Poa pratensis (Slezanka). The mycotoxins deoxynivalenol, zearalenone and T-2 toxin were mainly detected in the fresh-cut grass material, while fumonisin and aflatoxin contents were below the detection limits. July and October were the most risky periods for mycotoxins to occur. During the cold temperatures in November and December, the occurrence of mycotoxins in fresh-cut material declined. Although June was a period with low incidence of mycotoxins in green silage, contents of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in silages from the first cutting exceeded by several times those determined in their biomass collected directly from the field. Moreover, we observed that use of preservatives or inoculants did not prevent mycotoxin production.

  14. Mycotoxins: diffuse and point source contributions of natural contaminants of emerging concern to streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpin, Dana W; Schenzel, Judith; Meyer, Michael T; Phillips, Patrick J; Hubbard, Laura E; Scott, Tia-Marie; Bucheli, Thomas D

    2014-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of mycotoxins in streams, 116 water samples from 32 streams and three wastewater treatment plant effluents were collected in 2010 providing the broadest investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of mycotoxins in streams conducted in the United States to date. Out of the 33 target mycotoxins measured, nine were detected at least once during this study. The detections of mycotoxins were nearly ubiquitous during this study even though the basin size spanned four orders of magnitude. At least one mycotoxin was detected in 94% of the 116 samples collected. Deoxynivalenol was the most frequently detected mycotoxin (77%), followed by nivalenol (59%), beauvericin (43%), zearalenone (26%), β-zearalenol (20%), 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (16%), α-zearalenol (10%), diacetoxyscirpenol (5%), and verrucarin A (1%). In addition, one or more of the three known estrogenic compounds (i.e. zearalenone, α-zearalenol, and β-zearalenol) were detected in 43% of the samples, with maximum concentrations substantially higher than observed in previous research. While concentrations were generally low (i.e. mycotoxin transport to streams. The ecotoxicological impacts from the long-term, low-level exposures to mycotoxins alone or in combination with complex chemical mixtures are unknown.

  15. Mycotoxins: diffuse and point source contributions of natural contaminants of emerging concern to streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Schenzel, Judith; Meyer, Michael T.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Hubbard, Laura E.; Scott, Tia-Marie; Bucheli, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of mycotoxins in streams, 116 water samples from 32 streams and three wastewater treatment plant effluents were collected in 2010 providing the broadest investigation on the spatial and temporal occurrence of mycotoxins in streams conducted in the United States to date. Out of the 33 target mycotoxins measured, nine were detected at least once during this study. The detections of mycotoxins were nearly ubiquitous during this study even though the basin size spanned four orders of magnitude. At least one mycotoxin was detected in 94% of the 116 samples collected. Deoxynivalenol was the most frequently detected mycotoxin (77%), followed by nivalenol (59%), beauvericin (43%), zearalenone (26%), β-zearalenol (20%), 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (16%), α-zearalenol (10%), diacetoxyscirpenol (5%), and verrucarin A (1%). In addition, one or more of the three known estrogenic compounds (i.e. zearalenone, α-zearalenol, and β-zearalenol) were detected in 43% of the samples, with maximum concentrations substantially higher than observed in previous research. While concentrations were generally low (i.e. food processing plants) sources are important environmental pathways for mycotoxin transport to streams. The ecotoxicological impacts from the long-term, low-level exposures to mycotoxins alone or in combination with complex chemical mixtures are unknown

  16. Occurrence, Toxicity, and Analysis of Major Mycotoxins in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alshannaq

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by certain filamentous fungi (molds. These low molecular weight compounds (usually less than 1000 Daltons are naturally occurring and practically unavoidable. They can enter our food chain either directly from plant-based food components contaminated with mycotoxins or by indirect contamination from the growth of toxigenic fungi on food. Mycotoxins can accumulate in maturing corn, cereals, soybeans, sorghum, peanuts, and other food and feed crops in the field and in grain during transportation. Consumption of mycotoxin-contaminated food or feed can cause acute or chronic toxicity in human and animals. In addition to concerns over adverse effects from direct consumption of mycotoxin-contaminated foods and feeds, there is also public health concern over the potential ingestion of animal-derived food products, such as meat, milk, or eggs, containing residues or metabolites of mycotoxins. Members of three fungal genera, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium, are the major mycotoxin producers. While over 300 mycotoxins have been identified, six (aflatoxins, trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, ochratoxins, and patulin are regularly found in food, posing unpredictable and ongoing food safety problems worldwide. This review summarizes the toxicity of the six mycotoxins, foods commonly contaminated by one or more of them, and the current methods for detection and analysis of these mycotoxins.

  17. Multi-mycotoxin contamination of couscous semolina commercialized in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinedine, Abdellah; Fernández-Franzón, Mónica; Mañes, Jordi; Manyes, Lara

    2017-01-01

    The multi-mycotoxin contamination of ninety-eight (98) couscous semolina samples collected from various areas in Morocco was investigated in this study. Samples were surveyed for the presence of 22 mycotoxins (four aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, diacetoxiscyrpenol (DAS), three fumonisins, beauvericin (BEA), deoxynivalenol (DON), 15-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (15-ADON), 3-acetyl-deoxynivalenol (3-ADON), nivalenol (NIV), sterigmatocystin (STG), zearalenone (ZEA), four enniatins, T-2 and HT-2 toxins). Results showed that 96 out of 98 total couscous samples (98%) were contaminated by at least one mycotoxin. Enniatin B (ENB), Enniatin B1 (ENB1), Enniatin A1 (ENA1) and zearalenone (ZEA) have shown the highest incidences in contaminated samples. The dietary exposure was estimated to be 1.02, 0.57, 0.06, 0.57 and 0.3μg/kgbw/day for the sum of (DON+3-ADON+15-ADON), fumonisins (FB1+FB2+FB3), the sum of (T2+HT-2), NIV and ZEA, respectively.

  18. Faces of a changing climate: semi-quantitative multi-mycotoxin analysis of grain grown in exceptional climatic conditions in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Silvio; Eriksen, Gunnar Sundstøl; Hofgaard, Ingerd Skow; Krska, Rudolf; Beltrán, Eduardo; Sulyok, Michael

    2013-09-27

    Recent climatological research predicts a significantly wetter climate in Southern Norway as a result of global warming. Thus, the country has already experienced unusually wet summer seasons in the last three years (2010-2012). The aim of this pilot study was to apply an existing multi-analyte LC-MS/MS method for the semi-quantitative determination of 320 fungal and bacterial metabolites in Norwegian cereal grain samples from the 2011 growing season. Such knowledge could provide important information for future survey and research programmes in Norway. The method includes all regulated and well-known mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, trichothecenes, ochratoxin A, fumonisins and zearalenone. In addition, a wide range of less studied compounds are included in the method, e.g., Alternaria toxins, ergot alkaloids and other metabolites produced by fungal species within Fusarium, Penicillium and Aspergillus. Altogether, 46 metabolites, all of fungal origin, were detected in the 76 barley, oats and wheat samples. The analyses confirmed the high prevalence and relatively high concentrations of type-A and -B trichothecenes (e.g., deoxynivalenol up to 7230 µg/kg, HT-2 toxin up to 333 µg/kg). Zearalenone was also among the major mycotoxins detected (maximum concentration 1670 µg/kg). Notably, several other Fusarium metabolites such as culmorin, 2-amino-14,16-dimethyloctadecan-3-ol and avenacein Y were co-occurring. Furthermore, the most prevalent Alternaria toxin was alternariol with a maximum concentration of 449 µg/kg. A number of Penicillium and Aspergillus metabolites were also detected in the samples, e.g., sterigmatocystin in concentrations up to 20 µg/kg.

  19. Bio-monitoring of mycotoxin exposure in Cameroon using a urinary multi-biomarker approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Wilfred A; Warth, Benedikt; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Tchana, Angele; Njobeh, Patrick B; Turner, Paul C; Kouanfack, Charles; Eyongetah, Mbu; Dutton, Mike; Moundipa, Paul F

    2013-12-01

    Bio-monitoring of human exposure to mycotoxin has mostly been limited to a few individually measured mycotoxin biomarkers. This study aimed to determine the frequency and level of exposure to multiple mycotoxins in human urine from Cameroonian adults. 175 Urine samples (83% from HIV-positive individuals) and food frequency questionnaire responses were collected from consenting Cameroonians, and analyzed for 15 mycotoxins and relevant metabolites using LC-ESI-MS/MS. In total, eleven analytes were detected individually or in combinations in 110/175 (63%) samples including the biomarkers aflatoxin M1, fumonisin B1, ochratoxin A and total deoxynivalenol. Additionally, important mycotoxins and metabolites thereof, such as fumonisin B2, nivalenol and zearalenone, were determined, some for the first time in urine following dietary exposures. Multi-mycotoxin contamination was common with one HIV-positive individual exposed to five mycotoxins, a severe case of co-exposure that has never been reported in adults before. For the first time in Africa or elsewhere, this study quantified eleven mycotoxin biomarkers and bio-measures in urine from adults. For several mycotoxins estimates indicate that the tolerable daily intake is being exceeded in this study population. Given that many mycotoxins adversely affect the immune system, future studies will examine whether combinations of mycotoxins negatively impact Cameroonian population particularly immune-suppressed individuals.

  20. Toxicokinetic study and absolute oral bioavailability of deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin and zearalenone in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osselaere, Ann; Devreese, Mathias; Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins lead to economic losses in animal production. A way to counteract mycotoxicosis is the use of detoxifiers. The European Food Safety Authority stated that the efficacy of detoxifiers should be investigated based on toxicokinetic studies. Little information is available on the absolute oral bioavailability and the toxicokinetic parameters of deoxynivalenol, T-2 and zearalenone in broilers. Toxins were administered intravenously and orally in a two-way cross-over design. For deoxynivalenol a bolus of 0.75mg/kg BW was administered, for T-2 toxin 0.02mg/kg BW and for zearalenone 0.3mg/kg BW. Blood was collected at several time points. Plasma levels of the mycotoxins and their metabolite(s) were quantified using LC-MS/MS methods and toxicokinetic parameters were analyzed. Deoxynivalenol has a low absolute oral bioavailability (19.3%). For zearalenone and T-2 no plasma levels above the limit of quantification were observed after an oral bolus. Volumes of distribution were recorded, i.e. 4.99, 0.14 and 22.26L/kg for deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin and zearalenone, respectively. Total body clearance was 0.12, 0.03 and 0.48L/minkg for deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin and zearalenone, respectively. After IV administration, T-2 toxin had the shortest elimination half-life (3.9min), followed by deoxynivalenol (27.9min) and zearalenone (31.8min). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Occurrence of Pre- and Post-Harvest Mycotoxins and Other Secondary Metabolites in Danish Maize Silage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Ida Marie Lindhardt Drejer; Rasmussen, Rie Romme; Rasmussen, Peter Have

    2014-01-01

    of the 27 analytes in detectable concentrations. The most common mycotoxins were zearalenone, enniatin B nivalenol and andrastin A, found in 34%, 28%, 16% and 15% of the samples, respectively. None of the samples contained mycotoxins above the EU recommended maximum concentrations for Fusarium toxins...

  2. Estimation of the deoxynivalenol and moisture contents of bulk wheat grain samples by FT-NIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) levels in harvested grain samples are used to evaluate the Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance of wheat cultivars and breeding lines. Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) calibrations were developed to estimate the DON and moisture content (MC) of bulk wheat grain samples ...

  3. Sulfation of deoxynivalenol, its acetylated derivatives, and T2-toxin ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Fruhmann, Philipp; Skrinjar, Philipp; Weber, Julia; Mikula, Hannes; Warth, Benedikt; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Adam, Gerhard; Erwin ROSENBERG; Hametner, Christian; Fröhlich, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of several sulfates of trichothecene mycotoxins is presented. Deoxynivalenol (DON) and its acetylated derivatives were synthesized from 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON) and used as substrate for sulfation in order to reach a series of five different DON-based sulfates as well as T2-toxin-3-sulfate. These substances are suspected to be formed during phase-II metabolism in plants and humans. The sulfation was performed using a sulfuryl imidazolium salt, which was synthesized prior t...

  4. The Food-Contaminant Deoxynivalenol Modifies Eating by Targeting Anorexigenic Neurocircuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Clémence Girardet; Marion S Bonnet; Rajae Jdir; Medhi Sadoud; Sylvie Thirion; Catherine Tardivel; Julien Roux; Bruno Lebrun; Nicolas Wanaverbecq; Lourdes Mounien; Jérôme Trouslard; André Jean; Michel Dallaporta; Jean-Denis Troadec

    2011-01-01

    Physiological regulations of energy balance and body weight imply highly adaptive mechanisms which match caloric intake to caloric expenditure. In the central nervous system, the regulation of appetite relies on complex neurocircuitry which disturbance may alter energy balance and result in anorexia or obesity. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene, is one of the most abundant mycotoxins found on contaminated cereals and its stability during processing and cooking explains its widespread pres...

  5. Anomericity of T-2 Toxin-glucoside: Masked Mycotoxin in Cereal Crops

    OpenAIRE

    Susan P. McCormick; Kato, Takayuki; Maragos, Chris M.; Busman, Mark; Lattanzio, Veronica M. T.; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall-Asta, Chiara; Crich, David; Price, Neil P. J.; Kurtzman, Cletus P.

    2014-01-01

    T-2 toxin is a trichothecene mycotoxin produced when Fusarium fungi infect grains, especially oats and wheat. Ingestion of T-2 toxin contaminated grain can cause diarrhea, hemorrhaging, and feed refusal in livestock. Cereal crops infected with mycotoxin-producing fungi form toxin glycosides, sometimes called masked mycotoxins, which are a potential food safety concern because they are not detectable by standard approaches and may be converted back to the parent toxin during digestion or food ...

  6. Integrated Control Sytems of Mycotoxin Contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Name\tRomsyah

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp . and Penicillium s pp . i n agricultural products has been a concern regarding their effect to health and economic impact. Integrated control system should be based on Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP approach involving Good Agricultural Practices (GAP and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP . Prevention should be carried out through pre harvest, harvest, post harvest, as well as control quality at all stages of production. Pre harvest control is conducted through the selection of resistant varieties, insect control and weeds management mechanically or applying fungicides and herbicides, plant rotation, irrigation and soil management, as well as biological control . Harvesting at the right time using clean equipments from fungal contamination and insect infestation avoids the contamination of mycotoxins . Post harvest control by physical selection, washing and dilution, drying, storage, application of chemicals and binding agents, natural products, nutrients and vitamins, microbiological control, heating and radiation could also minimize mycotoxin in food and feed . Although chemicals can effectively reduce mycotoxin, the use of those on food/feed should be considered the safety . The addition of natural products, nutrition supplements and vitamins suppress the negative effect of mycotoxin on animals . The use of non-toxigenic fungi and other microbes as biological control is the effective and safe methods for food/feed . The implementation of integrated mycotoxin control system by utilizing the HACCP concept would meet the qualified and safe food/feed products .

  7. Emerging nanotechnology for detection of mycotoxins in food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Mahendra; Jogee, Priti S; Ingle, Avinash P

    2015-01-01

    The term mycotoxin was coined for toxic metabolites secreted by some fungi in food, food products and feed. The most prominent mycotoxins include aflatoxins (AFs), deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, ochratoxin, fumonisin and patulin. Among these some are proved to be strong carcinogenic agents such as AFs B1 while others are under suspicion to have carcinogenic effects. Ingestion of such mycotoxin-contaminated food and feed pose to a threat, mycotoxicoses. Various conventional techniques are available for the detection of mycotoxins, but unfortunately as a consequence of their constraint, the development of new and rapid techniques is the need of the hour. The use of nanotechnology for the development of nanobiosensors would be the alternative sensitive methods for the rapid detection of mycotoxins. Implementation of nanomaterials in the fabrication of nanobiosensors and their use for the detection of the mycotoxins in food and feed is the centre of interest of this review. We have inventoried nanomaterials applied for weaving nanobiosensors, which includes carbon nanotubes, nanowires, nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanorods and nanofibers. In addition, we have extensively reviewed available nanobiosensors specific for different mycotoxins, their advantages and challenges.

  8. The Use of Isolated Human Lymphocytes in Mycotoxin Cytotoxicity Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike F. Dutton

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of selected mycotoxins against isolated human lymphocytes was investigated, as a means of detecting mycotoxins in extracts derived from cereal samples. The methodology was based on the ability of viable cells to reduce methyl tetrazolium bromide to a purple formazan dye that could be quantitated by spectrophometric means and hence give a measure of the cytotoxicity of added substances. The results showed that there was good correlation with the occurrence of identified mycotoxins with only a minimum of false positives. For example, of the 13 samples of barley or barley derivatives that were positive for the mycotoxins, fumonisin B1 (FB1 deoxynivalenol (DON and ochratoxin A (OTA, all gave positive cytotoxicity responses. Two samples negative for mycotoxins gave no cytotoxicity responses. There was little variation between the results for lymphocytes drawn from the same healthy volunteer on three different occasions. Furthermore, for two of the mycotoxins tested (FB1 and DON it was possible to correlate general levels of mycotoxins present to the cytotoxic response of the lymphocytes but not for OTA, where it was concluded that interfering substances prevented direct correlation. It was concluded that this method was suited for general application as it could handle relatively high number of samples in a short period of time.

  9. The mycotoxin distribution in maize milling fractions under experimental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, H-M; Shephard, G S; Louw, W; Rheeder, J P; Gelderblom, W C A

    2013-07-01

    Mycotoxin contamination of maize and maize-based food and feed products poses a health risk to humans and animals if not adequately controlled and managed. The current study investigates the effect of dry milling on the reduction of fumonisins (FB), deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEA) in maize. Five composite samples, constructed to represent different mycotoxin contamination levels were degermed yielding degermed maize and the germ. The degermed maize was milled under laboratory conditions and four major milling fractions (SPECIAL, SUPER, semolina (SEM) and milling hominy feed) collected. The whole maize, degermed maize and total hominy feed (germ+milling hominy feed) were reconstructed to ensure homogenous samples for mycotoxin analyses. For comparison, commercial dry milling fractions (whole maize, SPECIAL, SUPER and total hominy feed), collected from three South African industrial mills, were analysed for the same mycotoxins and hence a more accurate assessment of the distribution between the different milling fractions. The distribution of the mycotoxins during the experimental dry milling of the degermed maize differs, with FB mainly concentrated in the SPECIAL, DON in the SEM whereas ZEA was equally distributed between the two milling fractions. Distribution of mycotoxins between the fractions obtained during commercial dry milling generally provided similar results with the total hominy feed containing the highest and the SUPER milling fractions the lowest mycotoxin levels although variations existed. Although milling is an effective way to reduce mycotoxins in maize, kernel characteristics and resultant fungal colonisation may impact on the distribution of specific mycotoxins among the different milling fractions. Differences in industrial dry milling practices and problems encountered in sampling bulk maize remain a large problem in assessing mycotoxin contamination in milling fractions intended for human consumption.

  10. TaFROG Encodes a Pooideae Orphan Protein That Interacts with SnRK1 and Enhances Resistance to the Mycotoxigenic Fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perochon, Alexandre; Jianguang, Jia; Kahla, Amal; Arunachalam, Chanemougasoundharam; Scofield, Steven R; Bowden, Sarah; Wallington, Emma; Doohan, Fiona M

    2015-12-01

    All genomes encode taxonomically restricted orphan genes, and the vast majority are of unknown function. There is growing evidence that such genes play an important role in the environmental adaptation of taxa. We report the functional characterization of an orphan gene (Triticum aestivum Fusarium Resistance Orphan Gene [TaFROG]) as a component of resistance to the globally important wheat (T. aestivum) disease, Fusarium head blight. TaFROG is taxonomically restricted to the grass subfamily Pooideae. Gene expression studies showed that it is a component of the early wheat response to the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), which is a virulence factor produced by the causal fungal agent of Fusarium head blight, Fusarium graminearum. The temporal induction of TaFROG by F. graminearum in wheat spikelets correlated with the activation of the defense Triticum aestivum Pathogenesis-Related-1 (TaPR1) gene. But unlike TaPR1, TaFROG induction by F. graminearum was toxin dependent, as determined via comparative analysis of the effects of wild-type fungus and a DON minus mutant derivative. Using virus-induced gene silencing and overexpressing transgenic wheat lines, we present evidence that TaFROG contributes to host resistance to both DON and F. graminearum. TaFROG is an intrinsically disordered protein, and it localized to the nucleus. A wheat alpha subunit of the Sucrose Non-Fermenting1-Related Kinase1 was identified as a TaFROG-interacting protein based on a yeast two-hybrid study. In planta bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays confirmed the interaction. Thus, we conclude that TaFROG encodes a new Sucrose Non-Fermenting1-Related Kinase1-interacting protein and enhances biotic stress resistance.

  11. Development of a PCR-RFLP method based on the transcription elongation factor 1-a gene to differentiate Fusarium graminearum from other species within the Fusarium graminearum species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a destructive disease of cereals crops worldwide and a major food safety concern due to grain contamination with trichothecenes and other mycotoxins. Fusarium graminearum, a member of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) is the dominant FHB pathogen in many p...

  12. Toxigenic capacity and trichothecene production by Fusarium graminearum isolates from Argentina and their relationship with aggressiveness and fungal expansion in the wheat spike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbrán, I; Mourelos, C A; Girotti, J R; Balatti, P A; Lori, G A

    2014-04-01

    At least 20 epidemics of Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat have been registered in the last 50 years in Argentina, with variable intensity. Damage induced by the disease is further aggravated by the presence of mycotoxins in affected grains that may cause health problems to humans and animals. The trichothecene chemotype was analyzed for 112 isolates of Fusarium graminearum from Argentina by polymerase chain reaction and two field trials were conducted to study the aggressiveness of a subsample of 14 representative isolates and to analyze deoxynivalenol (DON) production in planta and in vitro. All isolates belonged to the 15-acetyl-DON chemotype. Significant differences were observed in both the symptom severity induced in wheat spikes and the in vivo DON production, and a close correlation was found between these two variables. However, in vitro toxigenic potential was not correlated with the capacity of F. graminearum isolates to produce DON under natural conditions. The progress of infection in the rachis of inoculated wheat spikes was analyzed and the pathogen presence verified in both symptomatic and symptomless spikes. Even isolates with a limited capacity to induce symptoms were able to colonize the vascular tissue and to produce considerable amounts of DON in planta.

  13. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg‑1 and 8 μg kg‑1, respectively.

  14. Portable Infrared Laser Spectroscopy for On-site Mycotoxin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieger, Markus; Kos, Gregor; Sulyok, Michael; Godejohann, Matthias; Krska, Rudolf; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of fungi that spoil food, and severely impact human health (e.g., causing cancer). Therefore, the rapid determination of mycotoxin contamination including deoxynivalenol and aflatoxin B1 in food and feed samples is of prime interest for commodity importers and processors. While chromatography-based techniques are well established in laboratory environments, only very few (i.e., mostly immunochemical) techniques exist enabling direct on-site analysis for traders and manufacturers. In this study, we present MYCOSPEC - an innovative approach for spectroscopic mycotoxin contamination analysis at EU regulatory limits for the first time utilizing mid-infrared tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. This analysis technique facilitates on-site mycotoxin analysis by combining QCL technology with GaAs/AlGaAs thin-film waveguides. Multivariate data mining strategies (i.e., principal component analysis) enabled the classification of deoxynivalenol-contaminated maize and wheat samples, and of aflatoxin B1 affected peanuts at EU regulatory limits of 1250 μg kg−1 and 8 μg kg−1, respectively. PMID:28276454

  15. Critical evaluation of LC-MS-based methods for simultaneous determination of deoxynivalenol, ochratoxin A, zearalenone, aflatoxins, fumonisins and T-2/HT-2 toxins in maize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girolamo, De A.; Solfrizzo, M.; Lattanzio, V.M.T.; Stroka, J.; Alldrick, A.; Egmond, van H.P.; Visconti, A.

    2013-01-01

    The results of a proficiency test for the LC-MS/(MS) determination of up to 11 mycotoxins (aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2, fumonisins B1 and B2, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, T-2 and HT-2 toxins and zearalenone) in maize were evaluated to identify possible strengths and weaknesses of various

  16. Critical evaluation of LC-MS-based methods for simultaneous determination of deoxynivalenol, ochratoxin A, zearalenone, aflatoxins, fumonisins and T-2/HT-2 toxins in maize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girolamo, De A.; Solfrizzo, M.; Lattanzio, V.M.T.; Stroka, J.; Alldrick, A.; Egmond, van H.P.; Visconti, A.

    2013-01-01

    The results of a proficiency test for the LC-MS/(MS) determination of up to 11 mycotoxins (aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2, fumonisins B1 and B2, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, T-2 and HT-2 toxins and zearalenone) in maize were evaluated to identify possible strengths and weaknesses of various methodolo

  17. Fungal species and multiple mycotoxin contamination of cultivated forage crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Kononenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The quality of grass samples used for animal feed by combining mycotoxin measures and mycological determination of mycobiota were explored. The samples of the plant material were collected in 2014 in two stages: before the first mowing (May–June and before the second one (July–August from the fields of stock-farms located in northwestern part of the Russia. All samples were divided into three types: grasses, mixture of different grasses and clover, alfalfa mixed with timothy. The occurrence of aflatoxin B1, alternariol, citrinin, cyclopiazonic acid, deoxynivalenol, diacetoxyscirpenol, emodin, ergot alkaloids, fumonisins, mycophenolic acid, ochratoxin A, PR-toxin, roridin A, sterigmatocystin, T-2 toxin, and zearalenone were determined using ELISA. The multiple fungal and mycotoxin contaminations are already formed in plant tissues by the moment of first mowing. The complexes of mycotoxins including up to 14–16 components and the combined character of plant contamination quite correspond to the taxonomic variety of mycobiota.

  18. Screening mycotoxins for quorum inhibition in a biocontrol bacterial endophyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial endophytes are used as biocontrol organisms for plant pathogens such as the maize endophyte Fusarium verticillioides and its production of fumonisin mycotoxins. However, such applications are not always predictable and efficient. Bacteria communicate via cell-dependent signals, which are r...

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters in 207 isolates of Fusarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium species are known for their ability to produce secondary metabolites (SMs), including plant hormones, pigments, mycotoxins, and other compounds with potential agricultural, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological impact. Understanding the distribution of SM biosynthetic gene clusters across th...

  20. Cytotoxicity and metabolic stress induced by deoxynivalenol in the porcine intestinal IPEC-J2 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, W A; Aschenbach, J R; Zentek, J

    2012-08-01

    The digestive tract is a target for the Fusarium toxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a major cereal grain contaminant of animal and public health concern. Toxic effects of DON range from diarrhoea, vomiting and gastrointestinal inflammation to necrosis of several tissues. Following ingestion of contaminated food or feed, intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to a high concentration of ingested DON, potentially affecting intestinal functions. Pigs are considered to be the species most sensitive to DON toxicity. However, only few studies directly evaluated DON effects on porcine intestinal epithelial cells. Therefore, we used the porcine intestinal cell line (IPEC-J2) to assess short-term effects of DON on functional characteristics of the intestinal epithelial cells. The cytotoxic effect of DON on IPEC-J2 cells was evaluated by measuring the count of living cells and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the culture media at a DON concentration range from 0, 0.5, 2.5 and 10 μm. We demonstrated that DON at concentrations of 2.5 and 10 μm decreased significantly (p < 0.001) the cell count in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 10 μm, DON caused cell damage, including rounding of cells, autolysis and cell loss from the monolayer. The mycotoxin, DON, increased LDH release into the culture medium compared with the control value. The alterations of LDH showed a good agreement with the decrease in cell count. Deoxynivalenol decreased the l-lactate concentration in the fluid supernatant of IPEC-J2 cells at 2.5 μm (p < 0.05) with a maximal effect at 10 μm of DON. To determine whether the altered lactate production may be linked to alterations of energy balance, we measured cellular ATP levels in IPEC-J2 cells. A significant decrease in ATP levels was seen at 48 h in a dose-dependent manner. It could be demonstrated that DON has a distinct cytotoxic effect on IPEC-J2 cells.

  1. Lateral-flow colloidal gold-based immunoassay for the rapid detection of deoxynivalenol with two indicator ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolosova, Anna Yu. [Laboratory of Food Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: anna_kolosova@hotmail.com; Sibanda, Liberty [TOXI-TEST NV, Industrielaan 9a, 9990 Maldegem (Belgium); Dumoulin, Frederic [Laboratory of Food Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Lewis, Janet; Duveiller, Etienne [International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Apdo. Postal 6-641, 06600 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Van Peteghem, Carlos; Saeger, Sarah de [Laboratory of Food Analysis, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Harelbekestraat 72, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-06-02

    A lateral-flow immunoassay using a colloidal gold-labelled monoclonal antibody was developed for the rapid detection of deoxynivalenol (DON). Different parameters, such as the amount of immunoreagents, type of the materials, composition of the blocking solution and of the detector reagent mixture, were investigated to provide the optimum assay performance. The experimental results demonstrated that such a visual test had an indicator range rather than a cut-off value. Thus, tests for DON determination with two different indicator ranges of 250-500 and 1000-2000 {mu}g kg{sup -1} were designed. The method allowed detection of DON at low and high concentration levels, which could be useful for research and practical purposes. The assay applied to spiked wheat and pig feed samples demonstrated accurate and reproducible results. The applicability of the developed lateral-flow test was also confirmed under real field conditions. The test strips prepared in Belgium were sent to Mexico, where they were used for the screening of DON contamination in different bread wheat entries from Fusarium Head Blight inoculated plots. The results were compared with those obtained by ELISA and LC-MS/MS. A poor correlation between ELISA and LC-MS/MS was observed. Visual results of the dipstick tests were in a good agreement with the results of the LC-MS/MS method. Coupled with a simple and fast sample preparation, this qualitative one-step test based on the visual evaluation of results did not require any equipment. Results could be obtained within 10 min. The described assay format can be used as a simple, rapid, cost-effective and robust on-site screening tool for mycotoxin contamination in different agricultural commodities.

  2. Effectiveness of hand sorting, flotation/washing, dehulling and combinations thereof on the decontamination of mycotoxin-contaminated white maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matumba, Limbikani; Van Poucke, Christof; Njumbe Ediage, Emmanuel; Jacobs, Bart; De Saeger, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Maize is one of the major staple foods of Sub-Saharan Africa and is consumed as whole or dehulled grain. In this region, where the environmental conditions favour fungal growth and mycotoxin production, the majority of the population are subsistence consumers who, unfortunately, have little or no access to mycotoxin testing of their food. In an attempt to develop feasible reduction strategies in dietary mycotoxin exposure of the population, a three-factorial design experiment was conducted to examine and compare the efficacy of hand sorting, flotation, dehulling and combinations thereof in removing naturally occurring aflatoxins, fumonisins, nivalenol, deoxynivalenol and alternariol in shelled white maize. Regression analysis was used to determine the significant (p mycotoxins from the maize. Results from this experiment indicated that hand sorting had the greatest effect on mycotoxin removal, while flotation yielded the least effect. In particular hand sorting left mycotoxin exposure among subsistence consumers.

  3. Occurrence, detection and detoxification of mycotoxins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Visenuo Aiko; Alka Mehta

    2015-12-01

    Mycotoxins have been identified as important toxins affecting animal species and humans ever since the discovery of aHatoxin Bl in 1960. Mycotoxigenic fungi are ubiquitous in nature and are held responsible for economic loss as they decrease crop yield and quality of food. The presence of fungi and their mycotoxins are reported not only in food grains but also in medicinal herbs and processed foods. Since prevention is not always possible, detoxification of mycotoxins have been attempted using several means; however, only few have been accepted for practical use, e.g. ammonia in the com industry. Organizations such as the World Health Organization, US Food and Drug Adminis-tration and European Union have set regulations and safety limits of important mycotoxins, viz. aHatoxins, fusarium toxins, ochratoxin, patulin zearalenone, etc., to ensure the safety of the consumers. This review article is a brief and up-to-date account of the occurrence, detection and detoxification of mycotoxins for those interested in and considering research in this area.

  4. Occurrence, detection and detoxification of mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiko, Visenuo; Mehta, Alka

    2015-12-01

    Mycotoxins have been identified as important toxins affecting animal species and humans ever since the discovery of aflatoxin B1 in 1960. Mycotoxigenic fungi are ubiquitous in nature and are held responsible for economic loss as they decrease crop yield and quality of food. The presence of fungi and their mycotoxins are reported not only in food grains but also in medicinal herbs and processed foods. Since prevention is not always possible, detoxification of mycotoxins have been attempted using several means; however, only few have been accepted for practical use, e.g. ammonia in the corn industry. Organizations such as the World Health Organization, US Food and Drug Administration and European Union have set regulations and safety limits of important mycotoxins, viz. aflatoxins, fusarium toxins, ochratoxin, patulin zearalenone, etc., to ensure the safety of the consumers. This review article is a brief and up-to-date account of the occurrence, detection and detoxification of mycotoxins for those interested in and considering research in this area.

  5. [Fusarium graminearum presence in wheat samples for human consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mauro; Castañares, Eliana; Dinolfo, María I; Pacheco, Walter G; Moreno, María V; Stenglein, Sebastián A

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important diseases in cereal crops is Fusarium head blight, being Fusarium graminearum the main etiological agent. This fungus has the ability to produce a wide spectrum and quantity of toxins, especially deoxynivalenol (DON). During the last crop season (2012-2013) the climatic conditions favored Fusarium colonization. The objective of this work was to determine the presence of this fungus as well as the DON content in 50 wheat grain samples. Our results showed that 80% of the samples were contaminated with Fusarium graminearum. Twenty four percent (24%) of the samples contained ≥ 1μg/g DON, 26% ranged from 0,5 and 0,99μg/g, and the remaining 50% had values lower than 0,5μg/g. Correlation was found between the presence of Fusarium graminearum and DON. It is necessary to establish DON limit values in wheat grains for human consumption.

  6. CELL-SURFACE BINDING OF DEOXYNIVALENOL TO Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans ISOLATED FROM SOURDOUGH STARTER CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef I. Hassan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deoxynivalenol (DON and fumonisin B1 (FB1 are two contaminant-mycotoxins frequently found in food commodities produced under poor conditions. Several methods have been suggested for the detoxification of such mycotoxins. Among the proposed methods, biological detoxification seems to be the most promising and cost-efficient. This study explores the capability of one strain of lactic acid bacteria, identified as Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. tolerans, to bind both DON and FB1 in liquid cultures. Here we report the ability of heat-inactivated cells to significantly reduce concentrations of DON in liquid cultures. Further mechanistic investigation showed that the detoxification process is a result of the physical binding of such mycotoxins to the cell wall of this bacterium.

  7. Do Plant-Bound Masked Mycotoxins Contribute to Toxicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia W. Gratz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Masked mycotoxins are plant metabolites of mycotoxins which co-contaminate common cereal crops. Since their discovery, the question has arisen if they contribute to toxicity either directly or indirectly through the release of the parent mycotoxins. Research in this field is rapidly emerging and the aim of this review is to summarize the latest knowledge on the fate of masked mycotoxins upon ingestion. Fusarium mycotoxins are the most prevalent masked mycotoxins and evidence is mounting that DON3Glc and possibly other masked trichothecenes are stable in conditions prevailing in the upper gut and are not absorbed intact. DON3Glc is also not toxic per se, but is hydrolyzed by colonic microbes and further metabolized to DOM-1 in some individuals. Masked zearalenone is rather more bio-reactive with some evidence on gastric and small intestinal hydrolysis as well as hydrolysis by intestinal epithelium and components of blood. Microbial hydrolysis of ZEN14Glc is almost instantaneous and further metabolism also occurs. Identification of zearalenone metabolites and their fate in the colon are still missing as is further clarification on whether or not masked zearalenone is hydrolyzed by mammalian cells. New masked mycotoxins continuously emerge and it is crucial that we gain detailed understanding of their individual metabolic fate in the body before we can assess synergistic effects and extrapolate the additive risk of all mycotoxins present in food.

  8. Control of seedling blight in winter wheat by seed treatments - impact on emergence, crop stand, yield and deoxynivalenol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lise N; K. Nielsen, Linda; Nielsen, Bent J

    2012-01-01

    Seedling blight caused by Fusarium spp. and Microdochium spp. is common on wheat grain, and severe attacks can lead to poor establishment of new crops. Several seed treatments using bitertanol, difenoconazole, triticonazole, maneb, fludioxonil or guazatine found to significantly control Fusarium...... seedling blight (Fusarium spp., Microdochium spp.) were improving germination and reducing seedling blight on roots and coleoptiles under field conditions in winter wheat. Some of the seed treatments were also shown to have an impact on soil-borne Fusarium in trials carried out under glasshouse conditions...... germination by approximately 100%, which led to an improved crop stand and yield increases in the range of 1.2–1.5 tonnes ha−1. Attacks of Fusarium head blight were relatively slight in the two trials and the content of deoxynivalenol was below the EU limits of 1250 ppb in the harvested grain. Even so, seed...

  9. Climate change impacts on the ecology of Fusarium graminearum species complex and susceptibility of wheat to Fusarium head blight: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat caused mainly by members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) is a major threat to agricultural grain production, food safety, and animal health. The severity of disease epidemics and accumulation of associated trichothecene mycotoxins in wheat kerne...

  10. Development of a multiplex flow cytometric microsphere immunoassay for mycotoxins and evaluation of its application in feed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.; Ploum, M.E.; Rijk, de T.C.; Haasnoot, W.

    2011-01-01

    A multi-mycotoxin immunoassay—using the MultiAnalyte Profiling (xMAP) technology—is developed and evaluated. This technology combines a unique color-coded microsphere suspension array, with a dedicated flow cytometer. We aimed for the combined detection of aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol,

  11. Analysis of mycotoxins in coffee and risk assessment in Spanish adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moraleja, A; Font, G; Mañes, J; Ferrer, E

    2015-12-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic compounds produced by fungal secondary metabolism that cause toxicological effects. Coffee is a highly popular beverage that is susceptible to contamination by mycotoxigenic fungi. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of the following 21 mycotoxins in coffee using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS-IT): aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2; ochratoxin A; nivalenol; deoxynivalenol; 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol; 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol; diacetoxyscirpenol; neosolaniol; T-2 and HT-2 toxin; sterigmatocystin; enniatin A, A1, B, and B1; beauvericin; and fumonisin B1 and B2. We aimed to determine differences by coffee process (coffee maker, electrical machine, soluble and traditional Turkish process) and to calculate the estimated daily intake (EDI) and risk assessment of mycotoxins from coffee consumption using deterministic approach at various scenarios of food consumption in Spanish adolescents and adults. The results demonstrate that all studied mycotoxins were detected in samples with mean concentrations ranging from 0.69 µg/kg to 282.89 µg/kg. Eleven percent of samples did not show contamination with legislated mycotoxins. Only 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, deoxynivalenol, neosolaniol, fumonisin B1, and ochratoxin A exhibited significant differences between methods of coffee brewing. The results show that coffee intake does not represent a potential risk for consumers with respect to individual mycotoxin contamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Systemic Growth of F. graminearum in Wheat Plants and Related Accumulation of Deoxynivalenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Moretti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB is an important disease of wheat worldwide caused mainly by Fusarium graminearum (syn. Gibberella zeae. This fungus can be highly aggressive and can produce several mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON, a well known harmful metabolite for humans, animals, and plants. The fungus can survive overwinter on wheat residues and on the soil, and can usually attack the wheat plant at their point of flowering, being able to infect the heads and to contaminate the kernels at the maturity. Contaminated kernels can be sometimes used as seeds for the cultivation of the following year. Poor knowledge on the ability of the strains of F. graminearum occurring on wheat seeds to be transmitted to the plant and to contribute to the final DON contamination of kernels is available. Therefore, this study had the goals of evaluating: (a the capability of F. graminearum causing FHB of wheat to be transmitted from the seeds or soil to the kernels at maturity and the progress of the fungus within the plant at different growth stages; (b the levels of DON contamination in both plant tissues and kernels. The study has been carried out for two years in a climatic chamber. The F. gramineraum strain selected for the inoculation was followed within the plant by using Vegetative Compatibility technique, and quantified by Real-Time PCR. Chemical analyses of DON were carried out by using immunoaffinity cleanup and HPLC/UV/DAD. The study showed that F. graminearum originated from seeds or soil can grow systemically in the plant tissues, with the exception of kernels and heads. There seems to be a barrier that inhibits the colonization of the heads by the fungus. High levels of DON and F. graminearum were found in crowns, stems, and straw, whereas low levels of DON and no detectable levels of F. graminearum were found in both heads and kernels. Finally, in all parts of the plant (heads, crowns, and stems at milk and vitreous ripening stages, and straw at

  13. Effects of elevated [CO2] on the defense response of wheat against Fusarium graminearum infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is one of the world’s most devastating wheat diseases, and results in significant yield loss and contamination of grain with harmful mycotoxins called trichothecenes. Despite emerging risks of increased mycotoxin contamination in food and feed associated with climate chang...

  14. The Genetic Basis for 3-ADON and 15-ADON Trichothecene Chemotypes in Fusarium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, N.J.; McCormick, S.P.; Waalwijk, C.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Proctor, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    Certain Fusarium species cause head blight of wheat and other small grains worldwide and produce trichothecene mycotoxins. These mycotoxins can induce toxicoses in animals and humans and can contribute to the ability of some fusaria to cause plant disease. Production of the trichothecene 3-acetyldeo

  15. Elevated [CO2] compromises both Type I and Type II wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is one of the world’s most devastating wheat diseases, and results in significant yield loss and contamination of grain with harmful mycotoxins called trichothecenes. Despite emerging risks of increased mycotoxin contamination in food and feed associated with climate chang...

  16. The fate of deoxynivalenol and ochratoxin A during the breadmaking process, effects of sourdough use and bran content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, A; Marín, S; Morales, H; Ramos, A J; Sanchis, V

    2014-06-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) and ochratoxin A (OTA) are mycotoxins produced by fungal species which can contaminate, alone or simultaneously, cereal-based products such as bread. Due to the increasing interest in the beneficial effects of dietary bran, bran bread has attained high consumption. Usually, the higher mycotoxin concentrations in cereals are found in the external layers of the grain (bran), leading to higher concentration of DON and OTA in breads with added bran. Moreover, the use of sourdough in breadmaking is increasing, but no studies about its effect in the mycotoxins content exist. The objective of this study was to determine the variation of concentration of these mycotoxins during the breadmaking process including the following factors: two initial mycotoxin concentrations in the initial mix of ingredients, four different bran contents, and use of sourdough. OTA was confirmed to be quite stable during the breadmaking process, regardless of the assayed factors. DON concentration during breadmaking was not significantly affected by bran content of bread. However, it was significantly affected by kneading and fermentation steps in opposite way depending on sourdough use and flour contamination level: if DON reduction occurs during fermentation, this leads to a safer situation, but the possible increase in DON should be considered with care, as it can compensate the expected dilution effect by recipe. Finally, the results on deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON-3-G), although preliminar, suggest an increase of this toxin during fermentation, but mainly during baking.

  17. Analysis of microbial taxonomical groups present in maize stalks suppressive to colonization by toxigenic Fusarium spp.: A strategy for the identification of potential antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhl, J.; Lombaers-van der Plas, C.H.; Moretti, A.; Bandyopadhyay, R.; Somma, S.; Kastelein, P.

    2015-01-01

    Pink ear rot of maize caused by Fusarium verticillioides, Fusariumproliferatum and Fusariumgraminearumcan lead to severe yield losses and contamination of grain with a range of mycotoxins. Maize stalks colonized by Fusarium spp. are the main primary inoculum source for Fusarium incited epidemics in

  18. Contamination of cattle feed with molds and mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjaja Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The total number of potentially toxigenic molds (fungi, total aflatoxins, zearalenone (ZON, and deoxynivalenol (DON, as well as the joint appearance of ZON and DON have been investigated in 67 samples of cattle feed (concentrate (n=21, silage of whole maize plant (n=18, beet pulp (n=4, brewer's malt (n=2, alfalfa and grass (n=1, alfalfa hay (n=12, meadow hay (n=7, pea and oat hay (n=1, and red clover hay (n=1 originating from private farms from 10 districts of the Republic of Serbia. The total number of fungi per 1 g feed ranged from 0 (silage of brewer’s malt to 12 x 104 (concentrate. Eight fungi genus species have been identified: Acremonium, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, Mucor, Penicillum, Rhizopus and Trichoderma. The presence of ZON (100% was established in all the examined cattle feed samples, while 98.5% samples were contaminated with total aflatoxins and 92.5% samples were DON positive. The joint appearance of ZON and DON was established in 92.5% samples. ZON was present in the highest average concentration in the sample of alfalfa and grass silage (2477.5 μg kg-1 and in the lowest in beet pulp silage samples (64.9 μg kg-1. Total aflatoxins were established in the highest average concentration in the pea and oat hay silage sample (7.9 μg kg-1 and in the lowest average concentration in beet pulp silage samples (1.6 μg kg-1. DON was detected in the highest average concentration in concentrate samples (694.2 μg kg-1 and in the lowest average concentration in the red clover hay sample (11.0 μg kg-1, while DON was not detected in brewer's malt silage samples (0.0 μg kg-1. In all the examined cattle feed samples, between moisture content (up to 20% and the concentration of examined mycotoxins, a negative correlation was established (r=-0.26 with total aflatoxins and a positive correlation with ZON (r=0,36 and DON (r=0,60. Furthermore, a positive correlation (r=0.22 was established between ZON and DON concentrations. [Projekat

  19. Jasmonate and ethylene dependent defence gene expression and suppression of fungal virulence factors: two essential mechanisms of Fusarium head blight resistance in wheat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottwald Sven

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fusarium head blight (FHB caused by Fusarium species like F. graminearum is a devastating disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum worldwide. Mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol produced by the fungus affect plant and animal health, and cause significant reductions of grain yield and quality. Resistant varieties are the only effective way to control this disease, but the molecular events leading to FHB resistance are still poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling was conducted for the winter wheat cultivars Dream (moderately resistant and Lynx (susceptible. The gene expressions at 32 and 72 h after inoculation with Fusarium were used to trace possible defence mechanisms and associated genes. A comparative qPCR was carried out for selected genes to analyse the respective expression patterns in the resistant cultivars Dream and Sumai 3 (Chinese spring wheat. Results Among 2,169 differentially expressed genes, two putative main defence mechanisms were found in the FHB-resistant Dream cultivar. Both are defined base on their specific mode of resistance. A non-specific mechanism was based on several defence genes probably induced by jasmonate and ethylene signalling, including lipid-transfer protein, thionin, defensin and GDSL-like lipase genes. Additionally, defence-related genes encoding jasmonate-regulated proteins were up-regulated in response to FHB. Another mechanism based on the targeted suppression of essential Fusarium virulence factors comprising proteases and mycotoxins was found to be an essential, induced defence of general relevance in wheat. Moreover, similar inductions upon fungal infection were frequently observed among FHB-responsive genes of both mechanisms in the cultivars Dream and Sumai 3. Conclusions Especially ABC transporter, UDP-glucosyltransferase, protease and protease inhibitor genes associated with the defence mechanism against fungal virulence factors are apparently active in different resistant

  20. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E McLaughlin

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin, a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1 contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  1. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, John E; Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; Widiez, Thomas; Finn, Daniel; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin), a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1) contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  2. Metabolomics analysis of the effect of elevated co2 on wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change is expected to intensify Fusarium head blight (FHB) contamination of wheat and increase the associated risk of mycotoxin contamination in food and feed. Rising CO2 levels are part of climate change with still unknown effects on natural wheat resistance mechanisms against Fusarium gram...

  3. Diallel analysis of resistance to fusarium ear rot and fumonisin contamination in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungus Fusarium verticillioides infects maize ears and kernels, resulting in Fusarium ear rot disease, reduced grain yields, and contamination of grain with the mycotoxin fumonisin. Typical hybrid maize breeding programs involve selection for both favorable inbred and hybrid performance, and the...

  4. Rapid detection method for fusaric acid-producing species of Fusarium by PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaric acid is a mycotoxin produced by species of the fungus Fusarium and can act synergistically with other Fusarium toxins. In order to develop a specific detection method for fusaric acid-producing fungus, PCR prim¬ers were designed to amplify FUB10, a transcription factor gene in fusaric acid ...

  5. Genetic population structure of Fusarium graminearum species complex in Korean cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small grain cereals are frequently contaminated with toxigenic Fusarium species. Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) are known as a head blight pathogens and mycotoxin producers. In order to characterize the FGSC populations associated with cereals in Korea, barley, corn, maiz...

  6. Aromatic polyketide synthases from 127 Fusarium: pas de deux for chemical diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium species collectively cause disease on almost all crop plants and produce numerous natural products (NPs), including mycotoxins, of great concern. Many Fusarium NPs are derived from polyketide synthases (PKSs), large enzymes that catalyze the condensation of simple carboxylic acids. To gain ...

  7. Validation of Fusarium Head Blight Resistance QTL in US Winter Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), primarily caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe [telemorph: Gibberella zeae Schw. (Petch)], can significantly reduce the grain quality of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) due to mycotoxin contamination. Two US soft red winter wheat cultivars, Bess and NC-Neuse, have moderate...

  8. Occurrence of mycotoxins in feed as analyzed by a multi-mycotoxin LC-MS/MS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monbaliu, Sofie; Van Poucke, Christof; Detavernier, Christ'l; Dumoulin, Frédéric; Van De Velde, Mario; Schoeters, Elke; Van Dyck, Stefaan; Averkieva, Olga; Van Peteghem, Carlos; De Saeger, Sarah

    2010-01-13

    Crops used for animal feed can be easily contaminated by fungi during growth, harvest, or storage, resulting in the occurrence of mycotoxins. Because animal feed plays an important role in the food safety chain, the European Commission has set maximum levels for aflatoxin B1 and recommended maximum levels for deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, ochratoxin A, and the sum of fumonisin B1 and B2. A multimycotoxin LC-MS/MS method was developed, validated according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC and EN ISO 17025 accredited for the simultaneous detection of 23 mycotoxins (aflatoxin-B1, aflatoxin-B2, aflatoxin-G1, aflatoxin-G2, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, fumonisin B1, fumonisin B2, fumonisin B3, T2-toxin, HT2-toxin, nivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, diacetoxyscirpenol, fusarenon-X, neosolaniol, altenuene, alternariol, alternariol methyl ether, roquefortine-C, and sterigmatocystin) in feed. The decision limits of the multimycotoxin method varied from 0.7 to 60.6 microg/kg. The apparent recovery and the results of the precision study fulfilled the performance criteria as set in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The analysis of three different feed matrices (sow feed, wheat, and maize) provided a good basis for the evaluation of the toxin exposure in animal production. In total, 67 samples out of 82 (82%) were contaminated; type B-trichothecenes and fumonisins occurred most often. The majority of the infected feed samples (75%) were contaminated with more than one type of mycotoxin.

  9. Development of a rapid method for the quantitative determination of deoxynivalenol using Quenchbody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinari, Tomoya [Division of Microbiology, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1, Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Abe, Ryoji; Kaigome, Rena [Biomedical Division, Ushio Inc., 1-12 Minamiwatarida-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0855 (Japan); Ohkawa, Hideo [Research Center for Environmental Genomics, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko, E-mail: y-konishi@azabu-u.ac.jp [Department of Food and Life Science, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5201 (Japan)

    2015-08-12

    Quenchbody (Q-body) is a novel fluorescent biosensor based on the antigen-dependent removal of a quenching effect on a fluorophore attached to antibody domains. In order to develop a method using Q-body for the quantitative determination of deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by some Fusarium species, anti-DON Q-body was synthesized from the sequence information of a monoclonal antibody specific to DON. When the purified anti-DON Q-body was mixed with DON, a dose-dependent increase in the fluorescence intensity was observed and the detection range was between 0.0003 and 3 mg L{sup −1}. The coefficients of variation were 7.9% at 0.003 mg L{sup −1}, 5.0% at 0.03 mg L{sup −1} and 13.7% at 0.3 mg L{sup −1}, respectively. The limit of detection was 0.006 mg L{sup −1} for DON in wheat. The Q-body showed an antigen-dependent fluorescence enhancement even in the presence of wheat extracts. To validate the analytical method using Q-body, a spike-and-recovery experiment was performed using four spiked wheat samples. The recoveries were in the range of 94.9–100.2%. The concentrations of DON in twenty-one naturally contaminated wheat samples were quantitated by the Q-body method, LC-MS/MS and an immunochromatographic assay kit. The LC-MS/MS analysis showed that the levels of DON contamination in the samples were between 0.001 and 2.68 mg kg{sup −1}. The concentrations of DON quantitated by LC-MS/MS were more strongly correlated with those using the Q-body method (R{sup 2} = 0.9760) than the immunochromatographic assay kit (R{sup 2} = 0.8824). These data indicate that the Q-body system for the determination of DON in wheat samples was successfully developed and Q-body is expected to have a range of applications in the field of food safety. - Highlights: • A rapid method for quantitation of DON using Q-body has been developed. • A recovery test using the anti-DON Q-body was performed. • The concentrations of DON in wheat

  10. Influence of prebiotics, probiotics and protein ingredients on mycotoxin bioaccessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, M; Manyes, L; Mañes, J; Meca, G

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of prebiotic compounds (cellulose and inulin), food ingredients (milk whey, β-lactoglobulin and calcium caseinate) and several probiotic microorganisms on the bioaccessibility of beauvericin (BEA), enniatins (ENs A, A1, B, B1), deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEA) present in wheat crispy bread produced with wheat flour previously fermented with F. tricinctum, F. culmorum and G. zeae. The bioaccessibility of mycotoxins was determined by a dynamic simulated gastrointestinal digestion system, imitating the human digestive physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Mycotoxins were determined in the simulated intestinal fluids by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). EN bioaccessibility ranged from 15.1 to 30.6%, whereas the values evidenced for BEA ranged from 12 to 19%. DON showed bioaccessibility data ranging from 0.8 to 5.6% whereas for ZEA the data evidenced ranged from 26 to 44%. The bioaccessibility reduction evidenced using probiotic microorganisms for the mycotoxins studied ranged from 21 to 27.1% for ENs, from 29 to 39.7% for DON, from 41 to 57% for ZEA and from 6.6 to 10.5% for BEA. The addition of prebiotic and bioactive microorganisms decreased the bioaccessibility of mycotoxins, with a concentration-dependent behavior, thus being a potential strategy for reducing human exposure to these minor mycotoxins.

  11. Identification of ABC transporter genes of Fusarium graminearum with roles in azole tolerance and/or virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Abou Ammar

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is a plant pathogen infecting several important cereals, resulting in substantial yield losses and mycotoxin contamination of the grain. Triazole fungicides are used to control diseases caused by this fungus on a worldwide scale. Our previous microarray study indicated that 15 ABC transporter genes were transcriptionally upregulated in response to tebuconazole treatment. Here, we deleted four ABC transporter genes in two genetic backgrounds of F. graminearum representing the DON (deoxynivalenol and the NIV (nivalenol trichothecene chemotypes. Deletion of FgABC3 and FgABC4 belonging to group I of ABC-G and to group V of ABC-C subfamilies of ABC transporters, respectively, considerably increased the sensitivity to the class I sterol biosynthesis inhibitors triazoles and fenarimol. Such effects were specific since they did not occur with any other fungicide class tested. Assessing the contribution of the four ABC transporters to virulence of F. graminearum revealed that, irrespective of their chemotypes, deletion mutants of FgABC1 (ABC-C subfamily group V and FgABC3 were impeded in virulence on wheat, barley and maize. Phylogenetic context and analyses of mycotoxin production suggests that FgABC3 may encode a transporter protecting the fungus from host-derived antifungal molecules. In contrast, FgABC1 may encode a transporter responsible for the secretion of fungal secondary metabolites alleviating defence of the host. Our results show that ABC transporters play important and diverse roles in both fungicide resistance and pathogenesis of F. graminearum.

  12. Ocorrência de desoxinivalenol em trigo nacional e importado utilizado no Brasil Occurrence of deoxynivalenol in national and imported wheat used in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonia Calori-Domingues

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A fusariose, também conhecida como giberela é uma doença importante, causada principalmente pelo fungo Fusarium graminearum, que afeta de forma generalizada as regiões produtoras de trigo do Brasil e dos principais países do qual o produto é importado. Além dos danos diretos causados pela doença, os grãos infectados podem ser tóxicos para o homem e animais devido à presença de micotoxinas especialmente o desoxinivalenol (DON. A contaminação com DON foi avaliada em 100 amostras de trigo, sendo 50 de trigo nacional (provenientes dos Estados de São Paulo, Paraná e Rio Grande do Sul e 50 de trigo importado (Argentina e Paraguai. As amostras foram coletadas durante o período de maio a dezembro de 2005 de empresas que normalmente comercializam ou processam trigo e foram analisadas por cromatografia em camada delgada. Os resultados indicaram que, do total de amostras avaliadas, 94% do trigo nacional e 88% do trigo importado apresentaram-se positivas quanto a presença de DON. Os níveis médios de contaminação com DON do trigo nacional (332 µg.kg- 1 foram maiores (p Fusarium Head Blight or scab is an important disease mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum that occurs in Brazil and the world's wheat-growing areas. Moreover, there are direct damages caused by this disease and the infected kernels may be toxic for humans and animals due to the presence of mycotoxins (e.g deoxynivalenol - DON. DON contamination was evaluated in a total of 100 wheat samples, and 50 were from national production (São Paulo, Paraná and Rio Grande do Sul states and 50 were imported (Argentina and Paraguay. The samples were collected during the period of May to December, 2005 from companies that normally commercialize or process wheat and are analyzed by a thin layer of chromatography. Ninety-four percent of national wheat samples and 88% of the imported samples were DON contaminated. The mean level of the national wheat samples (332 µg.kg -1 was higher

  13. Dietary mycotoxins, co-exposure, and carcinogenesis in humans: Short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruyck, Karl; De Boevre, Marthe; Huybrechts, Inge; De Saeger, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins, toxic secondary metabolites of fungi, affect global agriculture so prolifically that they are virtually ubiquitous at some concentration in the average human diet. Studies of in vitro and in vivo toxicity are discussed, leading to investigations of co-exposed mycotoxins, as well as carcinogenic effects. Some of the most common and toxicologically significant mycotoxins, such as the aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, patulin, zearalenone, and some ergot alkaloids are outlined. The wide variety of pathogenic mechanisms these compounds employ are shown capable of inducing a complex set of interactions. Of particular note are potential synergisms between mycotoxins with regard to carcinogenic attributable risk, indicating an important field for future study.

  14. Screening Cereals Quality by Electronic Nose: the Example of Mycotoxins Naturally Contaminated Maize and Durum Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnoli, Anna; Dell'Orto, Vittorio; Savoini, Giovanni; Cheli, Federica

    2009-05-01

    Mycotoxins represent an heterogeneous group of toxic compounds from fungi metabolism. Due to the frequent occurrence of mycotoxins in cereals commodities the develop of cost/effective screening methods represent an important topic to ensure food and feed safety. In the presented study a commercial electronic nose constituted by ten MOS (Metal Oxide Sensors) was applied to verify the possibility of discriminating between mycotoxins contaminated and non-contaminated cereals. The described analytical approach was able to discriminate contaminated and non-contaminated samples both in the case of aflatoxins infected maize and deoxynivalenol infected durum wheat samples. In the case of maize data two sensors from the array revealed a partial relation with the level of aflatoxins. These results could be promising for a further improvement of electronic nose application in order to develop a semi-quantitative screening approach to mycotoxins contamination.

  15. Multi-Toxic Endpoints of the Foodborne Mycotoxins in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhendong; Xue, Kathy S; Sun, Xiulan; Tang, Lili; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2015-12-02

    Aflatoxins B₁ (AFB₁), deoxynivalenol (DON), fumonisin B₁ (FB₁), T-2 toxin (T-2), and zearalenone (ZEA) are the major foodborne mycotoxins of public health concerns. In the present study, the multiple toxic endpoints of these naturally-occurring mycotoxins were evaluated in Caenorhabditis elegans model for their lethality, toxic effects on growth and reproduction, as well as influence on lifespan. We found that the lethality endpoint was more sensitive for T-2 toxicity with the EC50 at 1.38 mg/L, the growth endpoint was relatively sensitive for AFB₁ toxic effects, and the reproduction endpoint was more sensitive for toxicities of AFB₁, FB₁, and ZEA. Moreover, the lifespan endpoint was sensitive to toxic effects of all five tested mycotoxins. Data obtained from this study may serve as an important contribution to knowledge on assessment of mycotoxin toxic effects, especially for assessing developmental and reproductive toxic effects, using the C. elegans model.

  16. Impact of mycotoxin on immune response and consequences for pig health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alix Pierron

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are fungal secondary metabolites detected in many agricultural commodities, especially cereals. Due to their high consumption of cereals, pigs are exposed to these toxins. In the European Union, regulations and/or recommendations exist in pig feed for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, fumonisins, zearalenone, and trichothecenes, deoxynivalenol and T-2 toxin. These mycotoxins have different toxic effects, but they all target the immune system. They have immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive effects depending on the toxin, the concentration and the parameter investigated. The immune system is primarily responsible for defense against invading organisms. The consequences of the ingestion of mycotoxin-contaminated feed are an increased susceptibility to infectious diseases, a reactivation of chronic infection and a decreased vaccine efficacy. In this review we summarized the data available on the effect of mycotoxins on the immune system and the consequences for pig health.

  17. Genus-specific primers for study of Fusarium communities in field samples

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium is a large and diverse genus of fungi of great agricultural and economic importance, containing many plant pathogens and mycotoxin producers. To date, high-throughput sequencing of Fusarium communities has been limited by the lack of genus-specific primers targeting regions with high discriminatory power at the species level. In the present study, we evaluated two Fusarium- specific primer pairs targeting translation elongation factor 1 (TEF1). We also present the new primer pair Fa+...

  18. Climate change increases deoxynivalenol contamination of wheat in north-western Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Olesen, Jørgen E; Madsen, M S

    2012-01-01

    Climate change will affect the development of cereal crops and the occurrence of mycotoxins in these crops, but so far little research has been done on quantifying the expected effects. The aim of this study was to assess climate change impacts on the occurrence of deoxynivalenol in wheat grown...... will be earlier in the season because of climate change effects, about 1 to 2 weeks. Deoxynivalenol contamination was found to increase in most of the study region, with an increase of the original concentrations by up to 3 times. The study results may inform governmental and industrial risk managers to underpin...... in north-western Europe by 2040, considering the combined effects of shifts in wheat phenology and climate. The study used climate model data for the future period of 2031–2050 relative to the baseline period of 1975–1994. A weather generator was used for generating synthetic series of daily weather data...

  19. Mycotoxins in Meat and Processed Meat Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Jean-Denis; Guerre, Philippe

    Mycotoxins are toxic substances elaborated by fungi. They constitute a heterogeneous group of secondary metabolites with diverse potent pharmacological and toxic effects in humans and animals. More than 300 secondary metabolites have been identified but around 30 are of real concern for human and animal health (for review, see Bennett & Klich, 2003). These molecules are produced during mould development on plants in the field or during storage period. They can be found as natural contaminants of many vegetal foods or feeds, mainly cereals, but also fruits, nuts, grains, forage as well as compound foods intended for human or animal consumption. Most important mycotoxins are produced by moulds belonging to Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium genus (Bhatnagar, Yu, & Ehrlich, 2002; Conkova, Laciakova, Kovac, & Seidel, 2003; Pitt, 2002). These molecules are usually classified depending on the fungal species that produce them (Table 4.1)

  20. Fungal and mycotoxin assessment of dried edible mushroom in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekiel, C N; Sulyok, M; Frisvad, J C; Somorin, Y M; Warth, B; Houbraken, J; Samson, R A; Krska, R; Odebode, A C

    2013-04-01

    In order to determine whether dried mushrooms are a foodstuff that may be less susceptible to infection by toxigenic molds and consequently to mycotoxin contamination, 34 dried market samples were analyzed. Fungal population was determined in the samples by conventional mycological techniques and molecular studies, while the spectrum of microbial metabolites including mycotoxins was analyzed by a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric method covering 320 metabolites. Molds such as Fusarium, Penicillium, Trichoderma and aflatoxigenic species of Aspergillus (Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parvisclerotigenus) were recovered from all samples at varying levels. None of the mycotoxins addressed by regulatory limits in the EU was positively identified in the samples. However, 26 other fungal m