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Sample records for fungemic vascular complications

  1. Renal posttransplant's vascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bašić Dragoslav

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Despite high graft and recipient survival figures worldwide today, a variety of technical complications can threaten the transplant in the postoperative period. Vascular complications are commonly related to technical problems in establishing vascular continuity or to damage that occurs during donor nephrectomy or preservation [13]. AIM The aim of the presenting study is to evaluate counts and rates of vascular complications after renal transplantation and to compare the outcome by donor type. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 463 kidneys (319 from living related donor LD and 144 from cadaveric donor - CD were transplanted during the period between June 1975 and December 1998 at the Urology & Nephrology Institute of Clinical Centre of Serbia in Belgrade. Average recipients' age was 33.7 years (15-54 in LD group and 39.8 (19-62 in CD group. Retrospectively, we analyzed medical records of all recipients. Statistical analysis is estimated using Hi-squared test and Fischer's test of exact probability. RESULTS Major vascular complications including vascular anastomosis thrombosis, internal iliac artery stenosis, internal iliac artery rupture obliterant vasculitis and external iliac vein rupture were analyzed. In 25 recipients (5.4% some of major vascular complications were detected. Among these cases, 22 of them were from CD group vs. three from LD group. Relative rate of these complications was higher in CD group vs. LD group (p<0.0001. Among these complications dominant one was vascular anastomosis thrombosis which occurred in 18 recipients (17 from CD vs. one from LD. Of these recipients 16 from CD lost the graft, while the rest of two (one from each group had lethal outcome. DISCUSSION Thrombosis of renal allograft vascular anastomosis site is the most severe complication following renal transplantation. In the literature, renal allograft thrombosis is reported with different incidence rates, from 0.5-4% [14, 15, 16]. Data from the

  2. Subclinical hypothyroidism after vascular complicated pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, M. van der; Hop-de Groot, R.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Ross, H.A.; Heijer, M. den; Spaanderman, M.E.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Women with a history of vascular complicated pregnancy are at risk for developing remote cardiovascular disease. It is associated with underlying cardiovascular risk factors both jeopardizing trophoblast and vascular function. Subclinical hypothyroidism may relate to both conditions.

  3. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the ..... cohort with nominal significance, and a recent meta-analysis ..... Whereas it is generally thought that lysine acetylation is.

  4. Vascular ring complicates accidental button battery ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Ronald W; Schwartz, Matthew C; Stephany, Joshua; Donnelly, Lane F; Franciosi, James P; Epelman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Button battery ingestion can lead to dangerous complications, including vasculoesophageal fistula formation. The presence of a vascular ring may complicate battery ingestion if the battery lodges at the level of the ring and its important vascular structures. We report a 4-year-old boy with trisomy 21 who was diagnosed with a vascular ring at the time of button battery ingestion and died 9 days after presentation due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal erosion and vasculoesophageal fistula formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Human genetics of diabetic vascular complications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diabetic vascular complications (DVC) affecting several important organ systems of human body such as the cardiovascular system constitute a major public health problem. There is evidence demonstrating that genetic factors contribute to the risk of DVC genetic variants, structural variants, and epigenetic changes play ...

  6. Pancreatic transplantation: Radiologic evaluation of vascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Kuni, C.C.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas is an increasingly common therapeutic option for preventing or delaying complications of type I diabetes mellitus. The authors studied the relative roles of various radiologic examinations in diagnosing vascular complications in these grafts including arterial and venous thrombosis, stenosis, and anastomotic leak (the most common vascular factors that necessitate pancreatectomy of the transplant), as defined with pathologic or arteriographic data. The results of 78 scintigraphic flow studies, 40 abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scans, 27 sonograms, and eight color Doppler studies were evaluated in 52 patients who received a total of 27 cadaveric and 26 living-donor grafts over a 12-year period. These results were correlated with the data from 45 gross and microscopic pathologic studies and 37 arteriograms to determine their relative value in enabling detection of graft thrombosis and other vascular complications. Scintigraphy, CT, sonography, and color Doppler were all sensitive in detection of generalized graft abnormalities but lacked specificity in defining the underlying etiologic factors

  7. Pancreatic transplantation: Radiologic evaluation of vascular complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Kuni, C.C.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G. (Univ. of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Transplantation of the pancreas is an increasingly common therapeutic option for preventing or delaying complications of type I diabetes mellitus. The authors studied the relative roles of various radiologic examinations in diagnosing vascular complications in these grafts including arterial and venous thrombosis, stenosis, and anastomotic leak (the most common vascular factors that necessitate pancreatectomy of the transplant), as defined with pathologic or arteriographic data. The results of 78 scintigraphic flow studies, 40 abdominal and pelvic computed tomographic (CT) scans, 27 sonograms, and eight color Doppler studies were evaluated in 52 patients who received a total of 27 cadaveric and 26 living-donor grafts over a 12-year period. These results were correlated with the data from 45 gross and microscopic pathologic studies and 37 arteriograms to determine their relative value in enabling detection of graft thrombosis and other vascular complications. Scintigraphy, CT, sonography, and color Doppler were all sensitive in detection of generalized graft abnormalities but lacked specificity in defining the underlying etiologic factors.

  8. Vascular complications of prosthetic inter-vertebral discs

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Kevin J.; Ross, E. Raymond S.; Norris, Heather; McCollum, Charles N.

    2006-01-01

    Five consecutive cases of prosthetic inter-vertebral disc displacement with severe vascular complications on revisional surgery are described. The objective of this case report is to warn spinal surgeons that major vascular complications are likely with anterior displacement of inter-vertebral discs. We have not been able to find a previous report on vascular complications associated with anterior displacement of prosthetic inter-vertebral discs. In all five patients the prosthetic disc had e...

  9. Subclinical hypothyroidism ups the risk of vascular complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subclinical hypothyroidism ups the risk of vascular complications in type 2 diabetes. ... hypothyroidism (SCH) and vascular complications of type 2 diabetes. ... However, gender (p = 0.076), BMI (p = 0.092), and smoking (P = 0.715) were not ...

  10. Vascular complications associated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, M Rizwan; Goldsweig, Andrew M; Abbott, J Dawn; Sharaf, Barry L; Gordon, Paul C; Ehsan, Afshin; Aronow, Herbert D

    2017-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an accepted pathway for aortic valve replacement for patients who are at prohibitive, severe and intermediate risk for traditional aortic valve surgery. However, with this rising uptrend and adaptation of this new technology, vascular complications and their management remain an Achilles heel for percutaneous aortic valve replacement. The vascular complications are an independent predictor of mortality for patients undergoing TAVR. Early recognition of these complications and appropriate management is paramount. In this article, we review the most commonly encountered vascular complications associated with currently approved TAVR devices and their optimal percutaneous management techniques.

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement and vascular complications definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Généreux, Philippe; van der Boon, Robert M A; Kodali, Susheel; Head, Stuart; Williams, Matthew; Daneault, Benoit; Kappetein, Arie-Pieter; de Jaegere, Peter P; Leon, Martin B; Serruys, Patrick W

    2014-03-20

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) requires large calibre catheters and is therefore associated with increased vascular complications. The aim of this study was to illustrate the impact of the different definitions of major vascular complications on their incidence and to underscore the importance of uniform reporting. We pooled dedicated databases of consecutive patients undergoing TAVR from two tertiary care facilities and looked for the incidence of major vascular complications using various previously reported definitions. The level of agreement (Kappa statistic) between the respective definitions and the Valve Academic Research Consortium (VARC) consensus definition of vascular complications was assessed. A total of 345 consecutive patients underwent transfemoral TAVR and were included in this analysis. A completely percutaneous access and closure technique was applied in 96% of cases. Arterial sheath size ranged between 18 and 24 Fr, the majority being 18 Fr (60%). Procedural success was reached in 94.5%. Depending on the definition used, major vascular complications occurred in 5.2-15.9% of patients. According to the VARC definitions, the rate of major and minor vascular complications was 9.0% and 9.6%, respectively. Major vascular complications according to VARC criteria demonstrated at least a substantial level of agreement with the SOURCE registry (k 0.80), the UK registry (k 0.82) the Italian registry (k 0.72) and "FRANCE" registry (k 0.70) definitions, compared to a moderate level of agreement with the definitions used in the German registry ( 0.47) and the 18 Fr Safety and Efficacy study (k 0.42). Minor complications according to VARC demonstrated a moderate agreement only with vascular complications using the German registry definition (k 0.54). Non-uniformity in how vascular complications are defined precludes any reliable comparison between previously reported TAVR registries. The VARC consensus document offers standardised endpoint

  12. Compartment syndrome and popliteal vascular injury complicating unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, Nanne Pieter; Van Raay, Jos J. J. A. M.; van Horn, Jim R.

    Popliteal vascular injury and the compartment syndrome of the leg are rare but important complications of knee arthroplasties. Early diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance in preventing the devastating complications of these conditions. To our knowledge, these complications have not

  13. Vascular access complications and risk factors in hemodialysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vascular access complications and risk factors in hemodialysis patients: A single center study. ... Stenosis was the most common risk factor for vascular failure as it occurred in (29%) of patients. ... Other risk factors for dialysis CRBSI include older age, low serum albumin, high BUN and decreasing the duration of dialysis.

  14. Arterial complications of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleton, Matthew J

    2016-12-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a relatively rare genetic syndrome that occurs owing to disorders in the metabolism of fibrillary collagen. These defects affect the soft connective tissues resulting in abnormalities in the skin, joints, hollow organs, and blood vessels. Patients with these defects frequently present at a young age with spontaneous arterial complications involving the medium-sized arteries. Complications involving the hollow organs, such as spontaneous colonic perforation, are observed as well. Given the fragility of the soft tissue, open and endovascular intervention on patients with vascular EDS is fraught with high complication rates. A PubMed search was performed to identify manuscripts published related to vascular EDS. This search included more than 747 articles. These findings were cross-referenced using key terms, including endovascular, embolization, surgery, genetics, pathophysiology, connective tissue disorders, vascular complications, systematic review, type III collagen, and COL3A1. The references in key articles and review articles were evaluated for additional resources not identified in the PubMed search. Care must be taken to balance the risk of intervention vs the risk of continued observation. Life-threatening hemorrhage, however, mandates intervention. With careful, altered approaches to tissue handling, endovascular approaches may provide a safer option for managing the arterial complications observed in patients with vascular EDS. Additional hope may also be found in the use of pharmacologic agents that reduce the incidence and severity of the arterial complications. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Role of Interventional Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barge, Jaideep U.; Lopera, Jorge E. [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management.

  16. Vascular complications after the treatment of carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormier, J.M.; Laurian, C.

    1980-01-01

    Vascular complications after this treatment are rare. Artery stenosis or occlusions, more often iliac, are well recognized complications of postoperative radiotherapy. These segmental lesions, sometimes, are pathological lesions similar to arteriosclerotic changes. These lesions may be corrected later on after the treatment of carcinoma of the cervix. The venous complications often present later and tall within the context of post thrombotic syndrome. Conservative treatment is indicated alone. A well recognized complication, lymphedema is usually mild; a superimposed iliofemoral thrombophlebitis often may be suspected [fr

  17. Genes associated with Type 2 Diabetes and vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesanto, Alberto; Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Crocco, Paolina; Garagnani, Paolo; De Luca, Maria; Boemi, Massimo; Marasco, Elena; Pirazzini, Chiara; Giuliani, Cristina; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe; Testa, Roberto; Olivieri, Fabiola; Rose, Giuseppina

    2018-02-04

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a chronic disease associated with a number of micro- and macrovascular complications that increase the morbidity and mortality of patients. The risk of diabetic complications has a strong genetic component. To this end, we sought to evaluate the association of 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 21 candidate genes with T2D and its vascular complications in 503 T2D patients and 580 healthy controls. The genes were chosen because previously reported to be associated with T2D complications and/or with the aging process. We replicated the association of T2D risk with I GF2BP rs4402960 and detected novel associations with TERT rs2735940 and rs2736098. The addition of these SNPs to a model including traditional risk factors slightly improved risk prediction. After stratification of patients according to the presence/absence of vascular complications, we found significant associations of variants in the CAT , FTO , and UCP1 genes with diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Additionally, a variant in the ADIPOQ gene was found associated with macrovascular complications. Notably, these genes are involved in some way in mitochondrial biology and reactive oxygen species regulation. Hence, our findings strongly suggest a potential link between mitochondrial oxidative homeostasis and individual predisposition to diabetic vascular complications.

  18. Vascular complications of prosthetic inter-vertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Kevin J; Ross, E Raymond S; Norris, Heather; McCollum, Charles N

    2006-10-01

    Five consecutive cases of prosthetic inter-vertebral disc displacement with severe vascular complications on revisional surgery are described. The objective of this case report is to warn spinal surgeons that major vascular complications are likely with anterior displacement of inter-vertebral discs. We have not been able to find a previous report on vascular complications associated with anterior displacement of prosthetic inter-vertebral discs. In all five patients the prosthetic disc had eroded into the bifurcation of the inferior vena cava and the left common iliac vein. In three cases the aortic bifurcation was also involved. The fibrosis was so severe that dissecting out the arteries and veins to provide access to the relevant disc proved impossible. Formal division of the left common iliac vein and artery with subsequent repair was our solution. Anterior inter-vertebral disc displacement was associated with severe vascular injury. Preventing anterior disc displacement is essential in disc design. In the event of anterior displacement, disc removal should be planned with a Vascular Surgeon.

  19. Risk factors and prevention of vascular complications in polycythemia vera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbui, T; Finazzi, G

    1997-01-01

    Risk factors for vascular complications in polycythemia vera (PV) include laboratory and clinical findings. Among laboratory values, the hematocrit has been clearly associated with thrombosis, particularly in the cerebral circulation. Platelet count is a possible but not yet clearly established predictor of vascular complications. Platelet function tests are of little help in prognostic evaluation because most attempts to correlate these abnormalities with clinical events have been disappointing. Clinical predictors of thrombosis include increasing age and a previous history of vascular events. Identifying risk factors for thrombosis is important to initiate therapy. Phlebotomy is associated with an increased incidence of thrombosis in the first 3 to 5 years, whereas chemotherapy may induce a higher risk of secondary malignancies after 7 to 10 years of follow-up. New cytoreductive drugs virtually devoid of mutagenic risk include interferon-alpha and anagrelide, but their role in reducing thrombotic complications remains to be demonstrated. Antithrombotic drugs, such as aspirin, are frequently used in PV, despite doubts regarding safety and efficacy. Two recent studies from the Gruppo Italiano Studio Policitemia Vera (GISP) assessed the rate of major thrombosis as well as the tolerability of low-dose aspirin in PV patients. These investigations created a favorable scenario for launching a European collaborative clinical trial (ECLAP study) aimed at testing the efficacy of low-dose aspirin in preventing thrombosis and prolonging survival in patients with PV.

  20. Prevention of cardiac complications in peripheral vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    The prevalence of severe coronary artery disease in peripheral vascular patients exceeds 50 per cent. Complications of coronary artery disease are the most common causes of mortality following peripheral vascular operations. To reduce the incidence of cardiac complications, it is first necessary to identify patients at risk through screening tests. Screening methods in current use include risk factor analysis, exercise testing, routine coronary angiography, and dipyridamole thallium-201 scintigraphy. The risk factor approach has the advantage of being widely applicable since it makes use of historical, physical, and electrocardiographic findings that are already familiar to surgeons and anesthesiologists. It is also inexpensive. However, it may overlook the patient who has no symptoms of coronary artery disease, possibly as a result of the sedentary lifestyle imposed by complications of peripheral vascular disease. The electrocardiographically monitored stress test will identify the asymptomatic patient with occult coronary disease and is helpful in predicting operative risk. However, a meaningful test is dependent on the patient's ability to exercise--an activity that is frequently limited by claudication, amputation, or arthritis. Exercise testing also suffers from a lack of sensitivity and specificity when compared with coronary arteriography. Routine preoperative coronary angiography overcomes the exercise limitation of treadmill testing but is not widely applicable as a screening test for reasons of cost and inherent risk. Dipyridamole thallium-201 scanning, on the other hand, is safe and of relatively low cost and does not require exercise

  1. [Vascular and neurological complications of supracondylar humeral fractures in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masár, J

    2007-10-01

    The author reports two cases of pediatric patients with supracondylar humeral fractures complicated by concomitant vascular injury. One of the patients also presented with neurological symptoms from compression of the ulnar and median nerves. In the case of vascular injury only, it was necessary to resect a 1-cm segment of the brachial artery which was thrombosed due to intimal disruption. In the other case, surgery was not indicated immediately; however, liberation of the nervus ulnaris and nervus medianus was later required because of nerve compression by the scar and bone. The author considers the exact diagnosis, precise reduction and stable fixation of a fracture to be most important for a good outcome of treatment. Any associated vascular injury is indicated for surgery only after a thorough diagnostic consideration, and may not be needed in every case. The most decisive factor is the clinical presentation. Injury to the nerve system is indicated for surgical treatment at a later period, at 3 months post-injury at the earliest.

  2. Shared constitutional risks for maternal vascular-related pregnancy complications and future cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Berends (Anne); C.J.M. de Groot (Christianne); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); M.P.S. Sie (Mark); S.H. Benneheij (Sofie); R. Pal (Richard); R. Heydanus (Rogier); B.A. Oostra (Ben); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); R.P.M. Steegers-Theunissen (Régine)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMaternal predisposition to vascular and metabolic disease may underlie both vascular-related pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction, as well as future maternal cardiovascular disease. We aimed to substantiate this hypothesis with biochemical and

  3. Vascular Complications and Diabetes: Current Therapies and Future Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbott L. Willard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinal complications, including macular edema (DME and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR, are the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74. Chronic hyperglycemia, considered the underlying cause of diabetic retinopathy, is thought to act first through violation of the pericyte-endothelial coupling. Disruption of microvascular integrity leads to pathologic consequences including hypoxia-induced imbalance in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling. Several anti-VEGF medications are in clinical trials for use in arresting retinal angiogenesis arising from DME and PDR. Although a review of current clinical trials shows promising results, the lack of large prospective studies, head-to-head therapeutic comparisons, and potential long-term and systemic adverse events give cause for optimistic caution. Alternative therapies including targeting pathogenic specific angiogenesis and mural-cell-based therapeutics may offer innovative solutions for currently intractable clinical problems. This paper describes the mechanisms behind diabetic retinal complications, current research supporting anti-VEGF medications, and future therapeutic directions.

  4. ACE gene in pregnancy complications: Insights into future vascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatini, Cinzia; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Sticchi, Elena; Rossi, Lorenza; Cellai, Anna Paola; Rogolino, Angela; Abbate, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    A history of placenta-mediated pregnancy complications (PMPCs) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease later in life, possibly related to the persistence of endothelial dysfunction. We performed this study in order to search for a common genetic background shared by women with a history of PMPC and vascular disorders, due to their common pathophysiologic pathway of endothelial dysfunction. We analyzed the prevalence of seven polymorphisms in ACE, AGTR1, AGT, and eNOS genes, endothelial-function related, in 290 women with a history of premature cardiovascular events (CVDs), and in 367 women with a history of PMPC (preeclampsia (PE), stillbirth (SB), and small for gestational age (SGA)), compared with 300 healthy women (HW) who delivered after uneventful pregnancy (HW). ACE D allele frequency was similar between women with history of CVD and PMPC, and significantly higher than that observed in HW [OR (95% CI) 1.91, p = 0.002, and OR (95% CI) 2.18, p ACE-240T or eNOS-786C allele, a two-fold increase in SB susceptibility was evidenced (p = 0.004 and p = 0.005, respectively). Women with a history of SB and premature CVD exhibited a significantly higher unfavorable allelic burden ≥ 3 in comparison to that observed in HW (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.002, respectively). Our findings demonstrate a common genetic background shared by women with a history of vascular disorders and PMPCs; pregnancy may be considered a window to future cardiovascular risk; therefore, "non-classic" genetic biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction might allow one to identify women who could have a greater benefit for an early cardiovascular screening and prevention.

  5. Placental vascular complications in HIV-infected pregnant women: a case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    CANLORBE, Geoffroy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Data from international literature suggest a link between HIV infection and placental vascular complications during pregnancy. Current studies on the subject are conflicting.Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of placental vascular complications during pregnancy among HIV+ and HIV- patients.Study Design: It is a single-center case-control study comparing the rates of gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, eclampsia and vascular intrauterine growth retard...

  6. Vascular complications following therapeutic and diagnostic cardiac catheterisation by the femoral artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, M; Liisberg-Larsen, Ole Christian; Schroeder, T V

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-one of 6327 (0.33%) patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation via the femoral artery had an acute vascular complication requiring surgical intervention. The complication rate was 0.1% after coronary angiography, 2% after PTCA and 6% after aortic ballon dilatation. The size of the cathete...... and evaluation of vascular injuries following diagnostic and therapeutic invasive interventions could have a self limitating effect on the complication rate....

  7. The influence of the telomere-telomerase system on diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi Nan, Wu; Ling, Zhang; Bing, Chen

    2015-06-01

    The telomere-telomerase system plays an important role in the pathogenesis and disease progression of diabetes mellitus as well as in its vascular complications. Recent studies suggest that telomere shortening and abnormal telomerase activity occur in patients with diabetes mellitus, and targeting the telomere-telomerase system has become a prospective treatment for diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. This review highlights the significance of the telomere-telomerase system and supports its role as a possible therapeutic target for patients with diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications Areas covered: This review covers the advances in understanding the telomere-telomerase system over the last 30 years and its significance in diabetes mellitus. In addition, it provides knowledge regarding the significance of the telomere-telomerase system in diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications as well as its role and mechanisms in oxidative stress, cell therapy and antioxidant activity Expert opinion: The telomere-telomerase system may be a potential therapeutic target that can protect against DNA damage and apoptosis in patients with diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. DNA damage and apoptosis are associated with oxidative stress and are involved in the dysfunction of pancreatic β cells, insulin resistance, and its vascular complications. Abnormalities in the telomere-telomerase system may be associated with diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. Therapies targeting telomere-telomerase system, telomerase reverse transcriptase transfection and alterative telomere lengthening must be identified before gene therapy can commence.

  8. Prevalence of blood type A and risk of vascular complications following transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofe, M-T; Shacham, Y; Steinvi, A; Barak, L; Hareuveni, M; Banai, S; Keren, G; Finkelstein, A; Shmilovich, H

    2016-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of blood type A among patients referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and whether it is related to vascular complications. Vascular complications following TAVI are associated with adverse outcomes. Various blood types, particularly type A, have been shown to be more prevalent in cardiovascular diseases and to be related to prognosis. The prevalence of various blood types in a cohort of 491 consecutive patients who underwent TAVI was compared with a control group of 6500 consecutive hospitalised patients. The prevalence and predictors of vascular complications and bleeding events were evaluated in the blood type A group and were compared with non-type A patients. The mean age of TAVI patients was 83 ± 6 years, and 40 % were males. Patients were divided into two groups: blood type A (n = 220) and non-type A (n = 271). Type A was significantly more prevalent in the TAVI group than in the control group (45 vs. 38 %, p = 0.023). Compared with the non-type A group, patients with blood type A had more major and fatal bleeding (14.5 vs. 8.1 %, p = 0.027) and more vascular complications (any vascular complication: 24.5 vs. 15.9 % p = 0.016; major vascular complications: 12.3 vs. 7 % p = 0.047). In a multivariable analysis, blood type A emerged as a significant and independent predictor for vascular complications and bleeding events. Blood type A is significantly more prevalent in TAVI patients than in the general population and is related to higher rates of vascular and bleeding complications.

  9. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) with multiple vascular complications misdiagnosed as Dubowitz syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dieks, Jana-Katharina; Baumer, Alessandra; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Rauch, Anita; Sigler, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    To date, the genetic basis of Dubowitz syndrome (short stature, microcephaly, facial abnormalities, eczema) is unknown and vascular complications are not known to be associated with this syndrome. In microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II; disproportionate short statue, microcephaly, facial abnormalities), however, cerebral aneurysms and other vascular abnormalities are frequent complications. MOPD II is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the pericentrin (PC...

  10. Burden and pattern of micro vascular complications in type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM) afflicts at least 5 million people in Nigeria, with more than 80% having type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Microvascular complications increase both morbidity and mortality inpatients with T2DM. The aims of this study were to report the burden of various microvascular complications in ...

  11. Complicação vascular de osteocondroma: relato de caso Vascular complication of osteochondroma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio André Tornquist

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteocondromas ou exostoses são os tumores benignos mais comuns do tecido ósseo. Eles surgem durante o período de crescimento e, raramente, são responsáveis por complicações vasculares. No presente relato, reportamos um caso de paciente com osteocondroma no membro inferior e complicação vascular provocada pela compressão da artéria poplítea. O paciente apresentava queixas de dor em membro inferior direito quando foi investigado com angiografia e radiografia, que identificaram a lesão vascular e a tumoração óssea. Os tratamentos cirúrgicos simultâneos de ambas as lesões foram realizados com boa evolução pós-operatória.Osteochondromas or exostoses are the most common benign tumors of the bone. They occur during the growth period and are rarely responsible for vascular complications. We report a case of a patient with osteochondroma in the lower limb and vascular complication caused by compression of the popliteal artery. The patient complained of pain at the right lower limb during angiography and radiography screening, which identified the vascular lesion and the bone tumor. A simultaneous surgical treatment of both lesions was performed with good postoperative evolution.

  12. Vascular access in pediatric patients in the emergency department: types of access, indications, and complications [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Rachel; Langhan, Melissa; Pade, Kathryn H

    2017-06-22

    Vascular access is a potentially life-saving procedure that is a mainstay of emergency medicine practice. There are a number of challenges associated with obtaining and maintaining vascular access, and the choice of the route of access and equipment used will depend on patient- and provider-specific factors. In this issue, the indications and complications of peripheral intravenous access, intraosseous access, and central venous access are reviewed. Timely and effective assessment and management of difficult-access patients, pain control techniques that can assist vascular access, and contraindications to each type of vascular access are also discussed. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  13. Vascular complications following 1500 consecutive living and cadaveric donor renal transplantations: A single center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehipour, Mehdi; Salahi, Heshmatollah; Jalaeian, Hamed; Bahador, Ali; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Barzideh, Ehsan; Ariafar, Ali; Malek-Hosseini, Seyed Ali

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document vascular complications that occurred following cadaveric and living donor kidney transplants in order to assess the overall incidence of these complications at our center as well as to identify possible risk factors. In a retrospective cohort study, 1500 consecutive renal transplant recipients who received a living or cadaveric donor kidney between December 1988 and July 2006 were evaluated. The study was performed at the Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, Iran. The assessment of the anatomy and number of renal arteries as well as the incidence of vascular complications was made by color doppler ultrasonography, angiography, and/or surgical exploration. Clinically apparent vascular complications were seen in 8.86% of all study patients (n = 133) with the most frequent being hemorrhage (n = 91; 6.1%) followed by allograft renal artery stenosis (n = 26; 1.7%), renal artery thrombosis (n = 9; 0.6%), and renal vein thrombosis (n = 7; 0.5%). Vascular complications were more frequent in recipients of cadaveric organs than recipients of allografts from living donors (12.5% vs. 7.97%; P0.017). The occurrence of vascular complications was significantly more frequent among recipients of renal allografts with multiple arteries when compared with recipients of kidneys with single artery (12.3% vs. 8.2%; P0.033). The same was true to venous complications as well (25.4% vs. 8.2%; P< 0.001). Our study shows that vascular complications were more frequent in allografts with multiple renal blood vessels. Also, the complications were much less frequent in recipients of living donor transplants. (author)

  14. Radionuclide assessment of vascular complications in renal transplant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanard, J.; Clavel, P.; Loboguerreros, A.; Toupance, O.; Lepailleur, A.; Brandt, B.; Liehn, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear medicine can make an efficient contribution to the diagnosis and monitoring of renal disease and to the assessment of therapeutic interventions in the field of renal transplantation. The new radio pharmaceutical MAG 3 labelled with 99m Tc provides renal imaging of quality in patients with impaired renal function and enables quantitative evaluation of renal function. We report on radionuclide evaluation, with special emphasis on the analysis of the vascular component of the scintigram, in the different clinical situations (i.e. renal failure) that may compromise the outcome of a successful renal transplant. (authors)

  15. The Role of High-Density Lipoproteins in Diabetes and Its Vascular Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan K. P. Wong

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Almost 600 million people are predicted to have diabetes mellitus (DM by 2035. Diabetic patients suffer from increased rates of microvascular and macrovascular complications, associated with dyslipidaemia, impaired angiogenic responses to ischaemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, and inflammation. Despite recent treatment advances, many diabetic patients remain refractory to current approaches, highlighting the need for alternative agents. There is emerging evidence that high-density lipoproteins (HDL are able to rescue diabetes-related vascular complications through diverse mechanisms. Such protective functions of HDL, however, can be rendered dysfunctional within the pathological milieu of DM, triggering the development of vascular complications. HDL-modifying therapies remain controversial as many have had limited benefits on cardiovascular risk, although more recent trials are showing promise. This review will discuss the latest data from epidemiological, clinical, and pre-clinical studies demonstrating various roles for HDL in diabetes and its vascular complications that have the potential to facilitate its successful translation.

  16. Vascular complications in diabetes: Microparticles and microparticle associated microRNAs as active players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandru, Nicoleta; Badila, Elisabeta; Weiss, Emma; Cochior, Daniel; Stępień, Ewa; Georgescu, Adriana

    2016-03-25

    The recognition of the importance of diabetes in vascular disease has greatly increased lately. Common risk factors for diabetes-related vascular disease include hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, inflammation, hypercoagulability, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. All of these factors contribute to the endothelial dysfunction which generates the diabetic complications, both macro and microvascular. Knowledge of diabetes-related vascular complications and of associated mechanisms it is becoming increasingly important for therapists. The discovery of microparticles (MPs) and their associated microRNAs (miRNAs) have opened new perspectives capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers. MPs known as submicron vesicles generated from membranes of apoptotic or activated cells into circulation have the ability to act as autocrine and paracrine effectors in cell-to-cell communication. They operate as biological vectors modulating the endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, coagulation, angiogenesis, thrombosis, subsequently contributing to the progression of macro and microvascular complications in diabetes. More recently, miRNAs have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which suggest their significant role in vascular physiology and disease. The contribution of MPs and also of their associated miRNAs to the development of vascular complications in diabetes was largely unexplored and undiscussed. In essence, with this review we bring light upon the understanding of impact diabetes has on vascular biology, and the significant role of MPs and MPs associated miRNAs as novel mediators, potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in vascular complications in diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Red cell 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate levels among diabetic patents with and without vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Y; Bessman, S P; Bessman, A

    1975-08-01

    There have been differences of opinion among authors concening in the levels of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and nucleotides in nonacidotic diabetic patients. Our data suggest that abnormal levels of 2, 3-DPG in diabetic patients are related to the presence of vascular complications and not to the duration of the disease per sec. 2,3-DPG levels are normal in diabetic patients with no evidence of vascular complications (group A). In ambulatory patients with vascular complications (group B), significantly higher levels of 2,3-DPG are found than in normal subjects and patients in group A. In hospitalized diabetic patients with active peripheral vascular complications (group C), levels of 2,3-DPG are likewise significantly increased over those of normal subjects and patients of group A. 2,3-DPG was found to be significantly elevated in patients of group C as compared with group B. 2,3-DPG levels in venous blood from infected legs as compared with those of the peripheral venous blood were not significantly different, thereby ruling out local factors. There were no differences in the blood lactate levels in any of the group studied. The elevation of the 2,3-DPG levels may be a reflection of attempted red blood cell compensation for tissue hypoxia in the diabetic with vascular disease.

  18. Loss of Renal Allografts Secondary to Candida Vascular Complications in Two Recipients from the Same Donor

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    Govardhana Rao Yannam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in transplant patients. Organ recipients are also susceptible to donor-derived pathogens and the majority of donor infections are easily treatable. Rarely, some pathogens have produced life-threatening complications by compromising the vascular anastomosis. In this case series we report loss of two kidney allografts secondary to vascular complications due to Candida albicans. Both recipients received grafts from a common donor, in whom Candida bacteremia in the donor was not apparent at the time of organ acceptance but became apparent on delayed cultures.

  19. Diabetes mellitus: The linkage between oxidative stress, inflammation, hypercoagulability and vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingueti, Caroline Pereira; Dusse, Luci Maria Sant'Ana; Carvalho, Maria das Graças; de Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Gomes, Karina Braga; Fernandes, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Vascular complications are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These vascular abnormalities result of a chronic hyperglycemic state, which leads to an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. This review addresses the relationships among endothelial dysfunction, hypercoagulability and inflammation and their biomarkers in the development of vascular complications in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and hypercoagulability are correlated to each other, playing an important role in the development of vascular complications in diabetic patients. Moreover, it has been observed that several endothelial, inflammatory and pro-coagulant biomarkers, such as VWF, IL-6, TNF-α, D-dimer and PAI-1, are increased in diabetic patients who have microvascular and macrovascular complications, including nephropathy or cardiovascular disease. It is promising the clinical and laboratory use of endothelial, inflammatory and pro-coagulant biomarkers for predicting the risk of cardiovascular and renal complications in diabetic patients and for monitoring these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) with multiple vascular complications misdiagnosed as Dubowitz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieks, Jana-Katharina; Baumer, Alessandra; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Rauch, Anita; Sigler, Matthias

    2014-09-01

    To date, the genetic basis of Dubowitz syndrome (short stature, microcephaly, facial abnormalities, eczema) is unknown and vascular complications are not known to be associated with this syndrome. In microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II; disproportionate short statue, microcephaly, facial abnormalities), however, cerebral aneurysms and other vascular abnormalities are frequent complications. MOPD II is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene (21q22). We report on a patient who came to our attention as a 22-year-old with subarachnoid bleeding due to a ruptured cranial aneurysm. Until then, the patient was thought and published to have Dubowitz syndrome; previously, he was treated with coronary bypass surgery for extensive coronary angiopathy. Consecutive genetic testing revealed MOPD II. After clinical stabilization, the patient was discharged to a specialized rehabilitation center where he died due to re-rupture of a cranial aneurysm. In patients with short stature-especially when clinical features are accompanied by vascular complications-MOPD II should be considered as a differential diagnosis leading to consecutive genetic testing. After detection of mutations in the PCNT gene, a full vascular status including cerebral imaging and cardiac evaluation needs to be determined in order to analyze vascular abnormalities and initiate prophylactic treatment.

  1. Pulseless supracondylar humeral fractures in children: vascular complications in a ten year series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon-Binder, Adeline; Jehanno, Pascal; Tribout, Laurent; Valenti, Philippe; Simon, Anne-Laure; Ilharreborde, Brice; Mazda, Keyvan

    2018-04-01

    The management of pulseless supracondylar fractures remains controversial. The aims of this study were to: (1) analyse functional and vascular outcomes of conservative treatment for cases with absent pulse before reduction, whether patients showed limb ischaemia or not; and (2) identify factors associated with vascular complications. Twenty-seven children with absent pulses on presentation were treated consecutively between 1999 and 2009. The brachial artery was surgically explored in cases of persistent signs of ischaemia after reduction. Signs of vascular impairment were recorded in the early post-operative period and at a mean final follow-up of 3.5 years. Recurrent ischaemia with a compartment syndrome occurred in a patient with initial ischaemia and a pink, pulseless hand after reduction. Patients with an initially well-perfused hand and those with pre-operative ischaemia and palpable pulses after reduction had satisfactory outcomes, as did patients with early arterial exploration. No patient showed signs of chronic vascular impairment. The need for vascular repair was significantly correlated with open fracture, initial ischaemia and nerve impairment. Conservative management of supracondylar fractures with absent pulses avoided long-term vascular complications provided that patients with a pulseless, well-perfused hand on presentation were closely monitored after reduction. Further study is necessary to determine whether a forearm Doppler would help identify children with absent pulses after reduction who need surgical revascularisation due to an insufficient collateral circulation.

  2. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targher, Giovanni; Lonardo, Amedeo; Byrne, Christopher D

    2018-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and diabetes mellitus are common diseases that often coexist and might act synergistically to increase the risk of hepatic and extra-hepatic clinical outcomes. NAFLD affects up to 70-80% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and up to 30-40% of adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The coexistence of NAFLD and diabetes mellitus increases the risk of developing not only the more severe forms of NAFLD but also chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. Indeed, substantial evidence links NAFLD with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and other cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus. NAFLD is also associated with an increased risk of developing microvascular diabetic complications, especially chronic kidney disease. This Review focuses on the strong association between NAFLD and the risk of chronic vascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus, thereby promoting an increased awareness of the extra-hepatic implications of this increasingly prevalent and burdensome liver disease. We also discuss the putative underlying mechanisms by which NAFLD contributes to vascular diseases, as well as the emerging role of changes in the gut microbiota (dysbiosis) in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and associated vascular diseases.

  3. Transient monocular blindness and the risk of vascular complications according to subtype : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, Eline J; Donders, Richard C J M; Koudstaal, Peter J; van Gijn, Jan; Algra, Ale; Jaap Kappelle, L

    Patients with transient monocular blindness (TMB) can present with many different symptoms, and diagnosis is usually based on the history alone. In this study, we assessed the risk of vascular complications according to different characteristics of TMB. We prospectively studied 341 consecutive

  4. Transient monocular blindness and the risk of vascular complications according to subtype: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, E.J. (Eline J.); R. Donders (Rogier); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); van Gijn, J. (Jan); A. Algra (Ale); L. Jaap Kappelle

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPatients with transient monocular blindness (TMB) can present with many different symptoms, and diagnosis is usually based on the history alone. In this study, we assessed the risk of vascular complications according to different characteristics of TMB. We prospectively studied 341

  5. Surgical treatment of complications associated with the Angio-Seal vascular closure device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikirikcioglu, Mustafa; Cherian, Sanjay; Keil, Vera; Manzano, Norman; Gemayel, Gino; Theologou, Thomas; Kalangos, Afksendiyos

    2011-05-01

    Vascular closure devices are used to provide quick hemostasis and early ambulation after percutaneous interventions. The Angio-Seal (AS) vascular closure device forms a mechanical seal by closing the puncture site located between a bioabsorbable anchor within the lumen and a collagen sponge on the adventitia. Although morbidities associated with AS are reportedly infrequent, even the slightest inaccuracy in device implantation may result in displacement of these device components, leading to sudden and severe complications. We report the surgical treatment of complications associated with the use of AS in four patients, including acute limb ischemia, pseudoaneurysm formation, significant hemorrhage, and hypovolemic shock. A common factor in all these cases was that the components of the AS device were displaced from their original site of implantation, stressing the importance of proper device placement. All patients underwent successful surgical vascular repair. Our report highlights the need for exercising extreme care during device implantation, and also the requirement for vigilant inspection for any associated vascular complications commencing immediately after device implantation. It is vital that these device components are actively looked for and removed during surgical exploration so as to prevent future complications. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Pulmonary vascular complications in portal hypertension and liver disease: A concise review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Porres-Aguilar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver disease and/or portal hypertension may be associated with one of the two pulmonary vascular complications: portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome. These pulmonary vascular disorders are notoriously underdiagnosed; however, they have a substantial negative impact on survival and require special attention in order to understand their diagnostic approach and to select the best therapeutic options. Portopulmonary hypertension results from excessive vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling, and proliferative and thrombotic events within the pulmonary circulation that lead to progressive right ventricular failure and ultimately to death. On the other hand, abnormal intrapulmonary vascular dilations, profound hypoxemia, and a wide alveolar-arterial gradient are the hallmarks of the hepatopulmonary syndrome, resulting in difficult-to-treat hypoxemia. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest pathophysiologic concepts, diagnostic approach, therapy, and prognosis of portopulmonary hypertension and hepatopulmonary syndrome, as well as to discuss the role of liver transplantation as a definitive therapy in selected patients with these conditions.

  7. Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma: vascular determinates for operative complications and tumor recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kenny H; Gao, Dexiang; Fernandez, Patrick G; Kingdom, Todd T; Kumpe, David A

    2014-03-01

    Operative complications and tumor recurrence in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) are measurable and meaningful outcomes. This study aimed to assess the association of these two outcomes to various clinical indices and in particular, vascular determinates. Retrospective cohort study. An 18-year retrospective chart review of an academic tertiary center was undertaken. Data from clinical notes, imaging studies, and arteriograms were analyzed. Thirty-seven male (mean age, 14.4 years) patients were included in the study. Tumor stages included: IA (three), IB (three), IIA (14), IIB (three), IIC (five), IIIA (five), and IIIB (four). Four complications (cerebrospinal fluid leak, cerebral vascular accident, and two transient ocular defects) occurred. Eight recurrences occurred within 24 months following surgery. Complications were associated with estimated intraoperative blood loss (EBL) (P = .045). Tumor recurrence was associated with feeding vessels from the contralateral internal carotid artery (ICA) (P = .017). EBL was significantly associated with surgical technique used. EBL, tumor stage, and tumor vascular supply were significantly associated with each other. Vascular factors were associated with JNA complication and tumor recurrence. EBL might affect complications, and contralateral ICA as a feeding vessel might affect recurrence. EBL was influenced by procedure choice and was interrelated to size and vascular supply of the tumor. This study bolsters the need to decrease intraoperative blood loss by preoperative embolization and use of endoscopic removal techniques. Furthermore, when branches of the ICA are found to be feeding vessels, greater surgical attention for a dry surgical field is encouraged. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. [Vascular complications following kidney transplant: the role of color-Doppler imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Antonio; Floccari, Fulvio; Lentini, Paolo; Vittoria, Salvatore; Di Pietro, Fabio; Zamboli, Pasquale; Fiorini, Fulvio; Fatuzzo, Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    The progressive decline in the incidence of graft rejection has made urological, surgical, parenchymal and vascular complications of kidney transplant more frequent. The latter, although accounting for only 5-10% of all post-transplant complications, are a frequent cause of graft loss. Ultrasonography, both in B-mode and with Doppler ultrasound, is an important diagnostic tool in case of clinical conditions which might impair kidney function. Even though ultrasonography is considered fundamental in the diagnosis of parenchymal and surgical complications of the transplanted kidney, its role is not fully understood in case of vascular complications of the graft. The specificity of Doppler ultrasound is very important in case of stenosis of the transplanted renal artery, pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous fistulas, and thrombosis with complete or partial artery or vein occlusion. Doppler and color determinations present high diagnostic accuracy, which is higher in case of successive measurements performed during the follow-up of the graft. Modern techniques including contrast-enhanced ultrasound increase the diagnostic power of ultrasonography in case of vascular complications of the transplanted kidney, planted kidney.

  9. Interventional method in diagnosis and treatment of vascular complication after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yonghui; Yang Jianyong; Chen Wei; Zhuang Wenquan; Yu Shenping; Chen Guihua

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of interventional method in the diagnosis and treatment of vascular complication after liver transplantation. Methods: Seven patients (3 vena cava stenosis, 1 hepatic artery stenosis, 2 hepatic artery thrombosis, and 1 hepatic artery pseudo-aneurysm) with vascular complication after liver transplantation had been studied retrospectively, including the correlative biochemistry data and angiographic signs. Results: Among the 7 patients, 6 patients had been successfully treated by interventional radiology procedure. The technical success rate was 85.56%. The renal functions of 3 patients with vena cava stenosis who had been treated by angioplasty improved satisfactorily. The survival time after this intervention of these 3 patients ranged from 10 days to 20 months. 1 patient still lived 20 months after the intervention, 2 died of other complications beside caval stenosis within one month after the intervention. The hepatic function of the 4 patients with hepatic artery complications treated by interventional procedures had not been redressed. Conclusion: Angiography played an important role in diagnosing the hepatic vascular complication after liver transplantation. The result of interventional radiology treatment of vena cava stenosis was encouraging

  10. Characterization of vascular complications in experimental model of fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bassossy, Hany M; Dsokey, Nora; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Vascular dysfunction is an important complication associated with metabolic syndrome (MS). Here we fully characterized vascular complications in a rat model of fructose-induced MS. MS was induced by adding fructose (10%) to drinking water to male Wistar rats of 6 weeks age. Blood pressure (BP) and isolated aorta responses phenylephrine (PE), KCl, acetylcholine (ACh), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were recorded after 6, 9, and 12 weeks of fructose administration. In addition, serum levels of glucose, insulin, uric acid, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), lipids, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and arginase activity were determined. Furthermore, aortic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, hemeoxygenase-1 expression, and collagen deposition were examined. Fructose administration resulted in a significant hyperinslinemia after 6 weeks which continued for 12 weeks. It was also associated with a significant increase in BP after 6 weeks which was stable for 12 weeks. Aorta isolated from MS animals showed exaggerated contractility to PE and KCl and impaired relaxation to ACh compared with control after 6 weeks which were clearer at 12 weeks of fructose administration. In addition, MS animals showed significant increases in serum levels of lipids, uric acid, AGEs, TNFα, and arginase enzyme activity after 12 weeks of fructose administration. Furthermore, aortae isolated from MS animals were characterized by increased ROS generation and collagen deposition. In conclusion, adding fructose (10%) to drinking water produces a model of MS with vascular complications after 12 weeks that are characterized by insulin resistance, hypertension, disturbed vascular reactivity and structure, hyperuricemia, dyslipidemia, and low-grade inflammation.

  11. The clinical impact of MTHFR polymorphism on the vascular complications of sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Moreira Neto

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease (SCD is one of the most common inherited diseases in the world and the patients present notorious clinical heterogeneity. It is known that patients with SCD present activation of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, especially during vaso-occlusive crises, but also during the steady state of the disease. We determined if the presence of the factor V gene G1691A mutation (factor V Leiden, the prothrombin gene G20210A variant, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T polymorphism may be risk factors for vascular complications in individuals with SCD. We studied 53 patients with SCD (60% being women, 29 with SS (sickle cell anemia; 28 years, range: 13-52 years and 24 with SC (sickle-hemoglobin C disease; 38.5 years, range: 17-72 years hemoglobinopathy. Factor V Leiden, MTHFR C677T polymorphism, and prothrombin G20210A variant were identified by PCR followed by further digestion of the PCR product with specific endonucleases. The following vascular complications were recorded: stroke, retinopathy, acute thoracic syndrome, and X-ray-documented avascular necrosis. Only one patient was heterozygous for factor V Leiden (1.8% and there was no prothrombin G20210A variant. MTHFR 677TT polymorphism was detected in 1 patient (1.8% and the heterozygous form 677TC was observed in 18 patients (34%, 9 with SS and 9 with SC disease, a prevalence similar to that reported by others. No association was detected between the presence of the MTHFR 677T allele and other genetic modulation factors, such as alpha-thalassemia, ß-globin gene haplotype and fetal hemoglobin. The presence of the MTHFR 677T allele was associated with the occurrence of vascular complications in SCD, although this association was not significant when each complication was considered separately. In conclusion, MTHFR C677T polymorphism might be a risk factor for vascular complications in SCD.

  12. Prevention and management of vascular complications in middle ear and cochlear implant surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lella, Filippo; Falcioni, Maurizio; Piccinini, Silvia; Iaccarino, Ilaria; Bacciu, Andrea; Pasanisi, Enrico; Cerasti, Davide; Vincenti, Vincenzo

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study is to illustrate prevention strategies and management of vascular complications from the jugular bulb (JB) and internal carotid artery (ICA) during middle ear surgery or cochlear implantation. The study design is retrospective case series. The setting is tertiary referral university hospital. Patients were included if presented pre- or intraoperative evidence of high-risk anatomical anomalies of ICA or JB during middle ear or cochlear implant surgery, intraoperative vascular injury, or revision surgery after the previous iatrogenic vascular lesions. The main outcome measures are surgical outcomes and complications rate. Ten subjects were identified: three underwent cochlear implant surgery and seven underwent middle ear surgery. Among the cochlear implant patients, two presented with anomalies of the JB impeding access to the cochlear lumen and one underwent revision surgery for incorrect positioning of the array in the carotid canal. Subtotal petrosectomy was performed in all cases. Anomalies of the JB were preoperatively identified in two patients with attic and external auditory canal cholesteatoma, respectively. In a patient, a high and dehiscent JB was found during myringoplasty, while another underwent revision surgery after iatrogenic injury of the JB. A dehiscent ICA complicated middle ear effusion in one case, while in another case, a carotid aneurysm determined a cholesterol granuloma. Rupture of a pseudoaneurysm of the ICA occurred in a child during second-stage surgery and required permanent balloon occlusion without neurological complications. Knowledge of normal anatomy and its variants and preoperative imaging are the basis for prevention of vascular complications during middle ear or cochlear implant surgery.

  13. Association between Fluorescent Advanced Glycation End-Products and Vascular Complications in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Guerin-Dubourg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Diabetes is a major health problem associated with hyperglycemia and chronically increased oxidative stress and enhanced formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. The aim of this study was to determine whether oxidative plasma biomarkers in diabetic patients could be evidenced and associated with vascular complications. Methods. Oxidative stress biomarkers such as thiols, ischemia-modified albumin (IMA, glycated albumin (GA, fructosamine, and AGEs were measured in 75 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c > 7.5% with (44 or without (31 vascular disease and in 31 nondiabetic controls. Results. Most biomarkers of oxidation and glycation were significantly increased in diabetic patients in comparison with nondiabetics. Fructosamines, GA, IMA, and AGEs were positively correlated and levels of fluorescent AGEs were significantly increased in the plasma from patients presenting vascular complication. Conclusions. These results bring new evidence for the potential interest of glycated albumin, oxidative stress, and glycoxidation parameters in the monitoring of type 2 diabetic patients. Furthermore, it emphasizes fluorescent AGEs as a putative indicator for vascular event prediction in diabetic patients.

  14. The Protective Effect of Antioxidants Consumption on Diabetes and Vascular Complications

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    Stéphanie Dal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes is generally accompanied by a chronic state of oxidative stress, disequilibrium in the redox balance, implicated in the development and progression of complications such as micro- and macro-angiopathies. Disorders in the inner layer of blood vessels, the endothelium, play an early and critical role in the development of these complications. Blunted endothelium-dependent relaxation and/or contractions are quietly associated to oxidative stress. Thus, preserving endothelial function and oxidative stress seems to be an optimization strategy in the prevention of vascular complications associated with diabetes. Diet is a major lifestyle factor that can greatly influence the incidence and the progression of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications. The notion that foods not only provide basic nutrition but can also prevent diseases and ensure good health and longevity is now attained greater prominence. Some dietary and lifestyle modifications associated to antioxidative supply could be an effective prophylactic means to fight against oxidative stress in diabesity and complications. A significant benefit of phytochemicals (polyphenols in wine, grape, teas, vitamins (ascorbate, tocopherol, minerals (selenium, magnesium, and fruits and vegetables in foods is thought to be capable of scavenging free radicals, lowering the incidence of chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in diabetes and complications, highlight the endothelial dysfunction, and examine the impact of antioxidant foods, plants, fruits, and vegetables, currently used medication with antioxidant properties, in relation to the development and progression of diabetes and cardiovascular complications.

  15. Clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter embolization for vascular complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Necdet; Balasar, Mehmet; Gökmen, İbrahim Erdem; Koç, Osman; Sönmez, Mehmet Giray; Aydın, Arif; Göger, Yunus Emre; Öztürk, Ahmet

    2017-12-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is the preferred procedure for safe and effective surgical treatment of kidney stones. Hemorrhage is the most serious complication of PNL, resulting from pseudoaneurysm (PA) or arteriovenous fistula (AVF), and can usually be controlled with conservative treatment. To evaluate endovascular treatments and outcomes of vascular complications observed after PNL. We retrospectively reviewed data on 19 patients who underwent renal embolization due to post-PNL renal artery bleeding between March 2005 and September 2016. Embolization materials included embolization coils and glue. The incidence of post-PNL vascular complications and their endovascular treatments, outcomes, and the follow-up data were analyzed. Nineteen (1.1%) of 1,609 patients (mean age: 44.9 years, range: 19-75 years) underwent angiography and subsequent transcatheter embolization to control bleeding. The mean time to onset of hemorrhage was 7.2 days after PNL (range: 3-18 days). The PNL entry site was the lower calyx in 15 patients, the middle calyx in 3, and the upper calyx in 1. PA, AVF, and PA plus AVF occurred in 14, 5, and 3 of the 19 renal angiography patients, respectively. Embolization of the affected vessels was successful in all 19 patients. The embolization materials of coil, glue, and coil plus glue were used in 16, 3, and 2 patients, respectively. Severe hematuria is a rare complication of PNL and can be successfully treated with transcatheter embolization.

  16. Peripancreatic vascular abnormalities complicating acute pancreatitis: contrast-enhanced helical CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortele, Koenraad J.; Mergo, Patricia J.; Taylor, Helena M.; Wiesner, Walter; Cantisani, Vito; Ernst, Michael D.; Kalantari, Babak N.; Ros, Pablo R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence and morphologic helical computed tomography (CT) features of peripancreatic vascular abnormalities in patients with acute pancreatic inflammatory disease in correlation with the severity of the pancreatitis. Materials and methods: One hundred and fifty-nine contrast-enhanced helical CT scans of 100 consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis were retrospectively and independently reviewed by three observers. CT scans were scored using the CT severity index (CTSI): pancreatitis was graded as mild (0-2 points), moderate (3-6 points), and severe (7-10 points). Interobserver agreement for both the CT severity index and the presence of peripancreatic vascular abnormalities was calculated (K-statistic). Correlation between the prevalence of complications and the degree of pancreatitis was estimated using Fisher's exact test. Results: The severity of pancreatitis was graded as mild (n=59 scans), moderate (n=82 scans), and severe (n=18 scans). Venous abnormalities detected included splenic vein (SV) thrombosis (31 scans, 19 patients), superior mesenteric vein (SMV) thrombosis (20 scans, 14 patients), and portal vein (PV) thrombosis (17 scans, 13 patients). Arterial hemorrhage occurred in five patients (6 scans). In our series, no cases of arterial pseudoaneurysm formation were detected. The interobserver agreement range for scoring the degree of pancreatitis and the overall presence of major vascular abnormalities was 75.5-79.2 and 86.2-98.8%, respectively. The presence of the vascular abnormalities in correlation with the severity of pancreatitis was variable. Conclusion: Vascular abnormalities are relatively common CT findings in association with acute pancreatitis. The CT severity index is insufficiently accurate in predicting some of these complications since no statistically significant correlation between their prevalence and the severity of pancreatitis could be established

  17. Heat Shock Proteins in Vascular Diabetic Complications: Review and Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Bellini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs are a large family of proteins highly conserved throughout evolution because of their unique cytoprotective properties. Besides assisting protein refolding and regulating proteostasis under stressful conditions, HSPs also play an important role in protecting cells from oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. Therefore, HSPs are crucial in counteracting the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in target organs of diabetes vascular complications. Changes in HSP expression have been demonstrated in diabetic complications and functionally related to hyperglycemia-induced cell injury. Moreover, associations between diabetic complications and altered circulating levels of both HSPs and anti-HSPs have been shown in clinical studies. HSPs thus represent an exciting therapeutic opportunity and might also be valuable as clinical biomarkers. However, this field of research is still in its infancy and further studies in both experimental diabetes and humans are required to gain a full understanding of HSP relevance. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and discuss future perspective.

  18. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: vascular anatomy, device selection, procedure, and procedure-specific complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Yolanda; Rogoff, Philip; Romanelli, Donald; Reichle, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is abnormal dilatation of the aorta, carrying a substantial risk of rupture and thereby marked risk of death. Open repair of AAA involves lengthy surgery time, anesthesia, and substantial recovery time. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) provides a safer option for patients with advanced age and pulmonary, cardiac, and renal dysfunction. Successful endovascular repair of AAA depends on correct selection of patients (on the basis of their vascular anatomy), choice of the correct endoprosthesis, and familiarity with the technique and procedure-specific complications. The type of aneurysm is defined by its location with respect to the renal arteries, whether it is a true or false aneurysm, and whether the common iliac arteries are involved. Vascular anatomy can be divided more technically into aortic neck, aortic aneurysm, pelvic perfusion, and iliac morphology, with grades of difficulty with respect to EVAR, aortic neck morphology being the most common factor to affect EVAR appropriateness. When choosing among the devices available on the market, one must consider the patient's vascular anatomy and choose between devices that provide suprarenal fixation versus those that provide infrarenal fixation. A successful technique can be divided into preprocedural imaging, ancillary procedures before AAA stent-graft placement, the procedure itself, postprocedural medical therapy, and postprocedural imaging surveillance. Imaging surveillance is important in assessing complications such as limb thrombosis, endoleaks, graft migration, enlargement of the aneurysm sac, and rupture. Last, one must consider the issue of radiation safety with regard to EVAR. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  19. To evaluate vascular complications of transplant kidney examined by multislice spiral CT angiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Qian; Fan Miao; Luo Xiaomei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) in vascular complications of transplant kidney. Methods: Six transplant kidneys were undergone enhanced MSCT scanning postoperation. MPR, CPR, VR and VP reformation were performed to observe transplant kidney's parenchyma, renal artery, and renal vein. To analysis all the reconstruction technique and find the advantage and shortage of them. Results: One case showed enhanced function of transplant kidney decreased. Vascular stenosis was found in one case and false aneurysm was found in another transplant kidney. Transplant kidney were enhanced normal in the left three cases. MPR couldn't reconstruct all the tortuous vessel of renal hilus in one plane. But all six cases could expose the vessel of renal hilus very clearly in coronal section and sagittal plane of CPR. Six cases of VR could observe the vessel direction and lesions outside vessel through rotate the reconstruction image. VP could see through inside the vessel of transplant kidney. Conclusion: MSCTA has an important role as an imaging technique to evaluate vascular complications of transplant kidney, it can replace DSA. (authors)

  20. Incidence of vascular complications during lateral lumbar interbody fusion: an examination of the mini-open access technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueper, Janina; Fantini, Gary A; Walker, Brendon R; Aichmair, Alexander; Hughes, Alexander P

    2015-04-01

    This article examines the incidence and management of vascular injury during Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion (LLIF). The details of the mini-open access technique are presented. A total of 900 patients who underwent a LLIF at an average 1.94 levels (range: 1-5 levels) by one of six fellowship trained surgeons on 1,754 levels from 2006 to 2013 were identified. The incidence of intraoperative vascular injury was retrospectively determined from the Operative Records. The management of vascular injury was evaluated. The mini-open access adapted by our institution for LLIF is described. The incidence of major vascular complication in our series was 1/900. The incidence of minor vascular injury was 4/900. The overall incidence of vascular injury was calculated to be 0.056 % per case and 0.029 % per level. All minor vascular injuries were identified to be segmental vessel lacerations, which were readily ligated under direct visualization without further extension of the incision with no clinical sequelae. The laceration of the abdominal aorta, the major vascular complication of this series, was emergently repaired through an exploratory laparotomy. None of the patients suffered long-term sequelae from their intraoperative vascular injuries. The mini-open lateral access technique for LLIF provides for minimal risk of vascular injury to the lumbar spine. In the rare event of minor vascular injury, the mini-open access approach allows for immediate visualization, confirmation and repair of the vessel with no long-term sequelae.

  1. Atherectomy-Associated Complications in the Southern California Vascular Outcomes Improvement Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Yara; DeRubertis, Brian; Baril, Donald; Woo, Karen

    2018-05-01

    Atherectomy has become an increasingly utilized modality for the endovascular treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for atherectomy-associated complications. A retrospective review was performed for all atherectomy procedures performed between January 2011 and December 2015 in the Southern California Vascular Outcomes Improvement Collaborative. Atherectomy was defined as laser, orbital, or excisional atherectomy. Complications were dissection, perforation, and distal embolization. Seven hundred twenty-nine atherectomy procedures were performed at 7 institutions by 27 practitioners. The mean age was 73 years with 415 (57%) males. Four hundred nineteen (57%) were diabetic, 673 (92%) hypertensive, 457 (63%) smokers, and 244 (34%) had coronary artery disease. Dissection occurred in 51 (7%) procedures, embolization in 23 (3.1%), and perforation in 12 (1.6%). The mean number of lesions treated per artery was the same at 1.6 in patients with any complication and no complication (P = 0.77). The total occluded length was 7.4 cm for complications versus 7.2 cm for no complication (P = 0.73). The total treated length was 12.9 cm for complications versus 11.3 cm for no complication (P = 0.03). The incidence of complications for Trans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) C/D lesions were 13% compared to 10% for TASC A/B lesions (P = 0.05). The incidence of complications in superficial femoral/popliteal lesions was 12.9% vs. 10.4% in tibial lesions (P = 0.13). In multivariable analysis, treatment length was associated with a small increased risk of complication (odds ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence interval = 1.0-1.04). Increased treatment length is associated with an increased risk of atherectomy-associated complications. Demographic factors and comorbidities were not predictors of complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Free vascularized flaps for reconstruction of the mandible: complications, success, and dental rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Johannes T M; van Es, Robert J J; Rosenberg, Antoine J W P; van der Bilt, Andries; Koole, Ron; Van Cann, Ellen M

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate complications and success of mandibular reconstruction with free fibula flaps, iliac crest flaps, and forearm flaps with reconstruction plates and to evaluate dental rehabilitation after these reconstructions. Eighty-three patients with segmental mandibular defects were included. Correlation analyses were used to determine the relationship between reconstruction type and clinical parameters with recipient-site complications and success. The dental rehabilitation was evaluated in successfully reconstructed survivors. Multivariate analyses showed significant correlations between flap type and success (P < .0001). Of the patients, 51 (61%) were alive 2 years after the reconstruction. Mandibular reconstruction with a free forearm flap and reconstruction plate was associated with higher complication rates at the recipient site and higher failure rates compared with reconstruction with free vascularized bone flaps. Of the 32 successfully reconstructed survivors, 14 (44%) had a complete dental rehabilitation, of which 10 had dental implants and 4 did not. Only 6 (29%) of the edentulous survivors ultimately had an implant-supported prosthesis. Reconstruction of the mandible with a free vascularized bone flap is superior to reconstruction with a free forearm flap with a reconstruction plate. Complete dental rehabilitation was reached in fewer than half of the surviving patients. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Type 1 and 2 Diabetes Mellitus: interference of vascular and neurological complications in occupational performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela Bertazo Viêro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia and associated with complications. It is considered a chronic degenerative disease. Objective: This study aimed to identify which areas of human occupation suffered performance changes as a result of vascular and neurological complications of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. Method: This is a quantitative study with exploratory approach. The data collection occurred in a University Hospital located in a city in the central region of Rio Grande do Sul, and used a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM. Data were analyzed by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient using the software Statistical Package for Social Science 15.0 (SPSS. Results: The sample consisted of 10 people with vascular and neurological complications resulting of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, with 80% men and 20% women. The most frequently cited occupational performance problems were in self-care activities (feeding, bathing and mobility, while the most affected productivity tasks were cooking and leisure activities such as walking and socializing. Conclusion: The data alert us to the work of occupational therapists caring for people with diabetes in all health care levels.

  4. Vascular access site complication in transfemoral coronary angiography between uninterrupted warfarin and heparin bridging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongcharoen, Wanwarang; Pinyosamosorn, Kittipong; Gunaparn, Siriluck; Boonnayhun, Suchada; Thonghong, Tasalak; Suwannasom, Pannipa; Phrommintikul, Arintaya

    2017-08-01

    Warfarin discontinuation with heparin bridging is a common practice in patients receiving warfarin prior to elective coronary angiography (CAG). The uninterrupted warfarin strategy has been suggested to be alternative option for patients with high thromboembolic risk. Therefore, we aimed to assess the safety of elective transfemoral CAG during uninterrupted warfarin therapy compared to heparin bridging. This study was a randomized open-label design with blinded event evaluation. The 110 consecutive patients (age ≥ 18 years) receiving warfarin before the planned transfemoral CAG were randomly assigned to either heparin bridging or uninterrupted warfarin with targeted INR (2.0-3.0). The primary outcome was the incidence of major vascular access site complications. The baseline characteristics were comparable between two groups (mean age was 60.1 ± 7.8 years, 49 males). The mean INR on the day of CAG of heparin bridging and uninterrupted warfarin groups was 1.2 ± 0.3 and 2.2 ± 0.5 (P warfarin patients (P = 0.243). The total vascular access site complications occurred in 6 (10.9%) heparin-bridging and one (1.8%) uninterrupted warfarin patients (P = 0.113). No patient developed either other bleeding or thromboembolic events during 7 days after CAG. We demonstrated that an uninterrupted warfarin strategy did not increase vascular access site complications in patients undergoing transfemoral CAG compared to heparin bridging therapy. Due to the safety and the ease of uninterrupted warfarin strategy, this approach should be encouraged in patients receiving long-term warfarin who undergo elective transfemoral CAG. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Significant complications occurred in the perioperative period of peripheral vascular interventions:an analysis of 1620 consecutive procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zicai; Liu Li; Zhang Haibo; Wang Ning; Li Yu; Yan Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To categorize the significant complications occurred in the perioperative period of peripheral vascular interventions and to analyze their causes, outcomes and managements in order to make a further understanding of the cause of occurrence and to improve the handling ability. Methods: Over the past five years a total of 1620 consecutive peripheral vascular interventions were carried out in our institute. Significant complications, which occurred in the perioperative period, and the clinical data were carefully examined. The occurrence, treatment, consequence and final outcome of each complication were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Of 1620 consecutive peripheral interventional procedures, significant complication which developed during the operation or within one week after the treatment was seen in 76 (4.69%). The significant complications could be classified into twelve kinds. After proper management most complications were cured without leaving any sequelae. Nevertheless, in some patients permanent damages such as paraplegia, lower limb paralysis, necrosis of gluteus, etc. were left over. Death occurred in six patients. Of the six patients, four died of concomitant hepatic failure and agranulocytosis, one of retroperitoneal hematoma and hemoperitoneum, and another one of pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: (1) Significant complications may occur in most peripheral vascular interventional therapies, which, in most cases, are mainly related to the insufficient understanding of the disease and improper manipulation. (2) A comprehensive and solid fundamental knowledge of the disease, strictly following the indications and careful handling the operation are the key points to reduce the occurrence of severe complications in the perioperative period of peripheral vascular interventions. (authors)

  6. Development and Validation of a Preprocedural Risk Score to Predict Access Site Complications After Peripheral Vascular Interventions Based on the Vascular Quality Initiative Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Access site complications following peripheral vascular intervention (PVI are associated with prolonged hospitalization and increased mortality. Prediction of access site complication risk may optimize PVI care; however, there is no tool designed for this. We aimed to create a clinical scoring tool to stratify patients according to their risk of developing access site complications after PVI. Methods: The Society for Vascular Surgery’s Vascular Quality Initiative database yielded 27,997 patients who had undergone PVI at 131 North American centers. Clinically and statistically significant preprocedural risk factors associated with in-hospital, post-PVI access site complications were included in a multivariate logistic regression model, with access site complications as the outcome variable. A predictive model was developed with a random sample of 19,683 (70% PVI procedures and validated in 8,314 (30%. Results: Access site complications occurred in 939 (3.4% patients. The risk tool predictors are female gender, age > 70 years, white race, bedridden ambulatory status, insulin-treated diabetes mellitus, prior minor amputation, procedural indication of claudication, and nonfemoral arterial access site (model c-statistic = 0.638. Of these predictors, insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and prior minor amputation were protective of access site complications. The discriminatory power of the risk model was confirmed by the validation dataset (c-statistic = 0.6139. Higher risk scores correlated with increased frequency of access site complications: 1.9% for low risk, 3.4% for moderate risk and 5.1% for high risk. Conclusions: The proposed clinical risk score based on eight preprocedural characteristics is a tool to stratify patients at risk for post-PVI access site complications. The risk score may assist physicians in identifying patients at risk for access site complications and selection of patients who may benefit from bleeding avoidance

  7. Sweet taste disorder and vascular complications in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Imai, Kenjiro; Kanda, Sayaka; Kakei, Masafumi; Kajio, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Takehiro

    2016-10-15

    It remains unknown whether taste disorders can be a risk factor for micro- and macro-vascular diseases in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance. A cross-sectional study in a nationally representative samples of 848 and 849 US adults (aged ≥40years) with diabetes or prediabetes who had sweet and salt taste disorders, respectively, from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011-2012. Among the study population, 5.7% had sweet taste disorder and 8.6% had salt taste disorder. These data correspond to approximately 1.5 million and 1.8 million individuals with abnormal glucose tolerance aged 40years or older in the US population, respectively. In the adjusted model, sweet taste disorder was significantly associated with complication of ischemic heart disease (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-5.81; P=0.04). Moreover, sweet taste disorder in patients with diabetes was significantly associated with diabetic retinopathy (adjusted OR, 2.89; 95% CI, 1.09-7.69; P=0.03) and diabetic nephropathy (adjusted OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.07-9.36; P=0.03). Meanwhile, salt taste disorder was not significantly associated with diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, ischemic heart disease, or stroke. Total sugar intake was significantly higher in patients with sweet taste disorder than in those without it, whereas total daily intake of carbohydrate did not differ significantly. No significant association was observed between salt taste disorder and daily intake of sodium after multivariate analysis. Sweet taste disorder in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance was associated with increased sugar intake and vascular complications. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Visceral, vascular, and wound complications following over 13,000 lateral interbody fusions: a survey study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Juan S; Deukmedjian, Armen R

    2015-04-01

    Minimally invasive lateral interbody fusion (MIS-LIF) has become a popular less invasive treatment option for degenerative spinal disease, deformity, and trauma. While MIS-LIF offers several advantages over traditional anterior and posterior approaches, the procedure is not without risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of visceral, vascular, and wound complications following MIS-LIF performed by experienced surgeons. A survey was conducted by experienced (more than 100 case experience) MIS-LIF surgeons active in the society of lateral access surgery (SOLAS) to collect data on wound infections and visceral and vascular injuries. Of 77 spine surgeons surveyed, 40 (52 %) responded, including 25 (63 %) orthopedic surgeons and 15 (38 %) neurosurgeons, with 20 % practicing at an academic institution and 80 % in community practice. Between 2003 and 2013, 13,004 patients were treated with MIS-LIF by the 40 surgeons who responded to the survey. Of those patients, 0.08 % experienced a visceral complication (bowel injury), 0.10 % experienced a vascular injury, 0.27 % experienced a superficial wound infection, and 0.14 % experienced a deep wound infection. The incidence of surgical site infections and vascular and visceral complications following MIS-LIF in this large series was low and compared favorably with rates for alternative interbody fusion approaches. Although technically demanding, MIS-LIF is a reproducible approach for interbody fusion with a low risk of vascular and visceral complications and infections.

  9. Glycated albumin as a marker of glycemia in diabetes and its vascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Warwas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective glycemic control is very important to prevent the onset and the progression of chronic complications in diabetic patients. It is known that glycation of various proteins is increased in diabetic patients compared with non-diabetics. Among these glycated proteins, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is commonly used as a gold standard index of glycemic control in the clinical setting. However, it can be unreliable in conditions affecting the lifespan of erythrocytes (120 days as well as in the clinical state in which glycemic control alleviates or deteriorates in a short period. By overcoming the shortcomings of HbA1c, glycated albumin (GA has gained interest as a useful index for an intermediate glycation period (2 weeks and pathogenic protein.After giving a brief overview of the key role of HbA1c as a long-term glycemic marker, this review focuses on (a glycation of human albumin and its main properties, (b methods of GA determination, (c the recent clinical status of GA as a glycemic index in diabetic patients and its association with vascular complications. Finally, conditions with a possible inaccurate GA level are also mentioned.

  10. Hyperhomocysteinaemia, vascular related pregnancy complications and the response to vitamin supplementation in pregnant women of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, S.B.; Ahmad, M.; Qureshi, P.M.A.; Memon, A.; Qazi, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    To elaborate the relationship between serum homocysteine (hcy) levels and vascular related pregnancy complications in pregnant women as well as to assess the homocysteine lowering effects of folate, vitamin B12 and B6. The secondary objectives were to establish a link between serum homocysteine levels and maternal age, parity, gestational age, foetal birth weight, mean arterial pressure and albuminuria. Methods: A total of 332 pregnant women (gestational age: >24 weeks) attending Liaquat University Hospital Hyderabad, Pakistan, were enrolled. Of these 112 were healthy normal pregnant women; 61 pregnant women had pre-eclampsia, 49 with eclampsia and 110 with placental abruption. A cohort of 30 patients with elevated hcy levels (>8.2 mu mol/liter), were given folate, vitamin B12 and B6 as supplements for 6 weeks. Fasting blood samples were collected, centrifuged and stored at 2 to 8 deg. C. Hcy levels were determined by IMx immunoassay. Results: Higher serum hcy levels, higher mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), pre-term deliveries and low foetal birth weights were noted in women with pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia and eclampsia as compared to control and those with placental abruption. Significant hcy lowering effects of folate, vitamin B12 and B6 supplementation were observed. Significant and positive correlation was found between hhcy and MAP (r = 0.001; p<0.001), albuminuria (r = 0.004; p< 0.01) and low birth weights (r= 0.05; p<0.06). Conclusion: Higher hcy levels in pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia and eclampsia have been noted. Data support the hypothesis that folate, vitamin B12 and B6 lower hcy levels in hyperhomocysteinaemic women. (author)

  11. Polymorphisms in glyoxalase 1 gene are not associated with vascular complications: the Hoorn and CoDAM studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, L.; Ferreira, I.; Brouwers, O.; Henry, R.M.A.; Dekker, J.M.; Nijpels, G.; Heine, R.J.; Greevenbroek, van M.M.J.; Kallen, van der C.J.H.; Blaak, E.E.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Cate, ten H.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Schalkwijk, C.G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Methylglyoxal is a major precursor in the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), which are known to contribute to vascular complications such as hypertension and arterial stiffness. Methylglyoxal can be detoxified by glyoxalase 1 (GLO1). Because genetic variation in the GLO1

  12. Cognition in type 2 diabetes: Association with vascular risk factors, complications of diabetes and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iype Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : The role of variables like duration of diabetes, diabetic control and microvascular complications in the causation of cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes is not well studied. The contribution of hypertension to the cognitive decline in nondemented diabetic patients is unclear. Aims: We wanted to see if cognition in patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with the duration of diabetes, control of diabetes, complications of diabetes, vascular risk factors, or depression. We also looked at association of noncompliance with cognition, and depression. Settings and Design: We recruited ambulant patients with type 2 diabetes who are 55 years or more in age from the weekly diabetic clinic. We excluded patients with past history of stroke. Methods and Material: We selected the time taken for the Trial A test, delayed recall on ten-word list from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer′s Disease (CERAD, Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale (RUDAS and Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D screening instrument to assess these patients. Statistical Analysis Used: We utilized mean, standard deviation, Chi-square test and Pearson′s correlation for statistical analysis. We considered P < 0.05 to be significant. Results: RUDAS scores inversely correlated ( r = -0.360 with CES-D scores ( P = 0.002. Scores of the screening instrument for depression, the CES-D was associated with the duration of diabetes mellitus ( P = 0.018, fasting blood glucose ( P = 0.029 as well as with 2-hour post prandial blood glucose ( P = 0.017. Conclusions: There is correlation between depression and global cognitive score. Depression seems to be associated with duration of diabetes and control of diabetes.

  13. [The changes of serum angiotensin converting enzyme activity in Type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Qu, S; Zhang, Y; Deng, J; Li, J; Zhou, J

    2000-09-01

    This investigation was made with reference to the changes of serum angiotensin converting enzyme (SACE) activity in type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications. SACE activity was studied in 127 type 2 diabetic patients and 90 healthy persons by using a spectrophotometric assay. The results showed SACE activity was obviously higher in diabetic patients (459.51 +/- 175.85 U) than in healthy persons (321.14 +/- 121.27 U); SACE activity was significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy (548.27 +/- 166.60 U) than in patients without diabetic nephropathy (383.2 +/- 139.00 U), but there was no difference between patients with microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria; no statistical difference was detected in SACE activity between diabetic patients with diabetic retinopathy (465.64 +/- 178.93 U) and without retinopathy (449.07 +/- 170.04 U); SACE activity was not associated with the course of diabetes, blood pressure, blood lipid and blood glucose. These data suggest that raised SACE activity might only play a role in the initiation of type 2 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy, but not relate to the progress of diabetic nephropathy, the onset of diabetic retinopathy and hypertension.

  14. Retinal vascular imaging technology to monitor disease severity and complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Ae Ra; Wong, Tien Yin; Li, Ling-Jun

    2017-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a major disease affecting a large number of young patients. In the recent years, retinal vascular imaging has provided an objective assessment of vascular health in patients with T1DM. Our study aimed to review the current literature on retinal vascular parameters in young patients with T1DM in order to understand the following: (i) How retinal vessels are affected in T1DM (ii) How such vascular changes can be predictive of future diabetic microvascular complications METHODS: We performed a systematic review and extracted relevant data from 17 articles. We found significant correlations between retinal vessel changes and diabetes-related risk factors (eg, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity), diabetes-related features (eg, diabetes duration and glycemic control), and diabetes-related microvascular complications (eg, diabetic retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy). Our findings suggest that retinal microvasculature is associated with both disease severity and complications in young patients with T1DM. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) (C677T and A1298C) Polymorphisms and Vascular Complications in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Mrissa, Najiba; Mrad, Meriem; Ibrahim, Hazard; Akremi, Imen; Sayeh, Aicha; Jaidane, Amel; Ouertani, Haroun; Zidi, Borni; Gritli, Nasreddine

    2017-08-01

    To assess whether 2 polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, C677T and A1298C, are risk factors for vascular complications in Tunisian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The MTHFR polymorphisms were genotyped, and plasma homocysteine levels were evaluated in 160 Tunisian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Prevalence of the 2 heterozygous polymorphisms of the thermolabile MTHFR gene (CT and AC) was encountered more commonly in patients with diabetes mellitus than in the healthy controls (phomocysteine (Hcy) levels than the control subjects; however, there was no statistical difference in plasma Hcy values between carriers of mutant genotypes (CT/TT for C677T and AC/CC for A1298C) and wild types (CC and AA) in patients with diabetes. Retinopathy was found to be a vascular complication in patients with either the 677CT or the 1298(AC+CC) genotype more commonly than in those with the wild-type genotypes (p=0.003; OR=3.2, 95% CI, 1.4 to 7.4; p<10 -3 ; OR=5.9, 95% CI, 2.7 to 13). Only patients who carry the A1298C mutation (AC+CC) are at risk for at least 1 complication (p=0.002). Double heterozygous mutants were at the greatest risk for retinopathy and for suffering at least 1 complication (p<10 -3 ). Studies involving a larger study population and various ethnic groups are required before ruling out the role of MTHFR gene in type 2 diabetes mellitus and in vascular complications. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Natural history of diabetes mellitus with special reference to age of onset and vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Y; Toyota, T; Masuda, M; Komatsu, K; Kuriki, A

    1976-06-01

    Age and sex distribution of diabetics, seasonal incidence of diabetes, grade of hyperglycemia, frequency of vascular complications and daily living conditions were studied of 2771 diabetic patients experienced at five clinics. The cases consisted of 1587 male and 1184 female diabetics. The distribution of age of diabetes onset revealed that males predominate among diabetics but females predominate among child diabetics, and that the precentage of child was extremely low. This pattern was emphasized as characteristic of Japanese diabetic population. Distribution of fasting blood sugar at the diagnosis of diabetes was compared among the age groups of diabetes-onset and the results showed that percentage of the value exceeding 300 mg/100 ml was highest in the under 10 year-onset cases and decreased with age. The frequency of diabetic retinopathy and of ischemic ECG changes was analysed from the view point of age of diabetes onset and also the duration of the disease. The frequency of the retinopathy at the diabetes-onset was zero in the under 10 year-onset cases, 4.2% in the 10s-onset cases and increased with age. The longer the duration of the disease the higher the frequency of the retinopathy was. This increase along with the duration was most remarkable in the 10s- and 20s-onset cases and less remarkable in the 30s-onset cases. The retinopathy was significantly more frequent in female diabetics. Daily of the patients were studied by a questionnaire and the analysis of 1022 cases with diabetes of more than three years revealed that cases of patients working uneventfully and/or feeling fit were most frequent among the 30s- or 40s-onset cases and that cases of bed-disability were frequent among the cases whose diabetes was found in their twenties or younger. This study showed that the prognosis of the patients is quite different according to whether their diabetes occurred before of after 30 years of age.

  17. Safety and efficacy of using the Viabahn endoprosthesis for percutaneous treatment of vascular access complications after transfemoral aortic valve implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Arnous, Samer; Sandholt, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Vascular access complications (VACs) remain one of the biggest challenges when performing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). This study aimed to investigate the short- and medium-term safety and efficacy of the Viabahn endoprosthesis (Gore, Flagstaff, AZ) when used to treat TAVI......-induced vascular injury. Over a 40-month period, 354 patients underwent true percutaneous transfemoral (TF)-TAVI using a CoreValve and Prostar-XL closure system; this was our study population. A VAC leading to acute intervention occurred in 72 patients (20.3%) - of these, 18 were managed by balloon angioplasty, 48...... were treated by Viabahn stenting (technical success rate 98%), and 6 needed surgical intervention. Overall, this approach resulted in a major VAC rate of 3.1% (n = 11) in our study cohort. Length of hospitalization and 30-day mortality rates were comparable in patients with a VAC treated by Viabahn...

  18. Correlation of serum angiogenin level with various vascular complications in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa F. Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    As angiogenin is one of most powerful angiogenic factors, we recommend further studies to evaluate the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic value of angiogenin in various microangiopathic and cardiovascular complications of type 2 diabetes.

  19. Hyperleptinemia May Protect From Cardio-Vascular Complications: A Small Georgian Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Zerekidze

    2014-12-01

    CONCLUSION: Leptin might act as a preventive measure for cardiovascular complications only in the presence of sufficient amount of fat mass. Further studies are warranted in order to support these results.

  20. Risk Factors for Complications after Peripheral Vascular Surgery in 3,202 Patient Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Mette; Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, Torben V.

    2016-01-01

    , high American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and general anesthetics. The 30-day mortality was 5% (1% for claudicants and 8% for acute ischemia) and the 30-day amputation rate was 7% (0.5% for claudicants and 21% for gangrene). Conclusions There is a high risk of complication in peripheral...

  1. Major femoral vascular access complications after coronary diagnostic and interventional procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Pedersen, Frants; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    surgery within 30 days were collected. Mortality data were collected for minimum 12 months. RESULTS: We identified 130 (0.54%) access complications requiring surgery; 65 pseudoaneurysms (0.28%), 46 arterial occlusions (0.19%), 15 hematomas (nine groin and six retroperitoneal hematomas) (0.06%), and 4...

  2. Mitigating micro- and macro-vascular complications of diabetes beginning in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Moore

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Moore1, Justin M Gregory2, Yaa A Kumah-Crystal1, Jill H Simmons11Department of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital, Nashville, TN, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis, TN, USAAbstract: Diabetes is a chronic disorder, which manifests when insulin levels or resistance to insulin action becomes insufficient to control systemic glucose levels. Although the number of available agents to manage diabetes continues to expand rapidly, the maintenance of euglycemia by individuals with diabetes remains a substantial challenge. Unfortunately, many patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes will ultimately experience diabetes complications. These complications result from the toxic effects of chronic hyperglycemia combined with other metabolic derangements that afflict persons with diabetes. This review will present a comprehensive look at the complications of diabetes, the risk factors for their progression, the mechanistic basis for their development, and the clinical approach to screening for, preventing, and treating these sequelae. In addition, since diabetes is commonly diagnosed in childhood, we will provide a special focus on the care of the adolescent patient.Keywords: diabetes, microvascular, macrovascular, complications, glycemia, pediatric, retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy

  3. A vascular necrosis of bone. A complication of agressive therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidya, S.; Saika, S.; Sirohi, B.; Pai, S.; Advani, S. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay (India). Dept. of Medical Oncology

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to report cases of avascular necrosis of bone (AVNB) arising as a complication of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). X-rays and {sup 99m}technicium-MDP bone scans were performed on patients with symptoms of bone pain, whereby five patients out of 850 patients were detected to have avascular necrosis of the femoral head. All had received aggressive chemotherapy with steroids. Two patients were still on therapy for the primary disease. In these patients further chemotherapy was continued without steroids. The medium period from diagnosis of ALL to development of AVNB was 29 months. Three patients underwent corrective surgical procedures. To conclude, the data suggest that patients receiving combination chemotherapy, especially those with high cumulative doses, run a risk of developing AVNB. Awarness of this complication is important in order to have an early diagnosis so as to limit disability. (orig.)

  4. A vascular necrosis of bone. A complication of agressive therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, S.; Saika, S.; Sirohi, B.; Pai, S.; Advani, S.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to report cases of avascular necrosis of bone (AVNB) arising as a complication of chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). X-rays and 99m technicium-MDP bone scans were performed on patients with symptoms of bone pain, whereby five patients out of 850 patients were detected to have avascular necrosis of the femoral he[. All h[ received aggressive chemotherapy with steroids. Two patients were still on therapy for the primary disease. In these patients further chemotherapy was continued without steroids. The medium period from diagnosis of ALL to development of AVNB was 29 months. Three patients underwent corrective surgical procedures. To conclude, the data suggest that patients receiving combination chemotherapy, especially those with high cumulative doses, run a risk of developing AVNB. Awarness of this complication is important in order to have an early diagnosis so as to limit disability. (orig.)

  5. The use of intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor injection and its complications in Chiang Mai University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunavisarut, Paradee; Saenpen, Nithiracht; Ittipunkul, Nimitr; Patikulsila, Direk; Choovuthayakorn, Janejit; Watanachai, Nawat; Pathanapitoon, Kessara

    2013-11-01

    To report the use of intravitreal (IVT) injections of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents (anti-VEGF) and its complications. The authors performed a retrospective review of consecutive patients treated with IVT injection of anti-VEGF between May 2006 and December 2010 at Chiang Mai University Hospital. Demographic data and complications were registered. The present study included 1,006 eyes of 878 patients. Mean age was 60 years (range 1 month to 91 years). Mean follow-up time was 12 months (range 1 month to 54 months). Total injections were 2,077 given as 47, 210, 399, 575, and 846 injection per year between 2006 and 2010, respectively. Anti-VEGF agents were bevacizumab (1,878; 90.42%), ranibizumab (190; 9.15%), and pegaptanib (9; 0.43%). Indications for injection based on primary diagnosis were neovascular macular degeneration (38.5%), diabetic retinopathy (38%), and retinal vein occlusion (15.9%). The incidence of endophthalmitis was 0.048% (1/2,077) for all injections and 0.053% (1/1878)for bevacizumab. The use of IVT injections of anti-VEGF is increasing, especially the use of bevacizumab. Incidence of ocular and systemic complications after IVT injection of anti- VEGF was low with no significant difference among the three anti-VEGFs agents.

  6. Retinal vascular geometry and its association to microvascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M L; Broe, Rebecca; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine associations between retinal vascular geometry (tortuosity, branching coefficient [BC] and length-diameter ratio [LDR]) and diabetic proliferative retinopathy (PDR), nephropathy, and peripheral neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). METHODS: A cohort...... of patients with T1DM participated in a clinical examination in 2011. Blood and urine analyses were done and retinal images taken. PDR was defined as Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study level 61 or above, nephropathy as albumin-creatinin ratio ≥300 mg/g, and neuropathy as vibration perception threshold.......8% were male. Prevalence of PDR, nephropathy, and neuropathy were 26.5%, 6.8%, and 10.1% , respectively. Patients with increased arteriolar BC had a higher risk of nephropathy (OR: 3.10, 95% CI: [1.01-9.54]). Patients with increased venular BC had a higher risk of neuropathy (OR: 2.11, 95% CI: [1...

  7. Telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes, partially through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ-dependent activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Kensuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Kataoka, Keiichiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Fukuda, Masaya; Tokutomi, Yoshiko; Dong, Yi-Fei; Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, acts as a partial PPARγ agonist. → The protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular injury were associated with attenuation of vascular NFκB activation and TNF α. → PPARγ activity of telmisartan was involved in the normalization of vascular PPARγ downregulation in diabetic mice. → We provided the first evidence indicating that PPARγ activity of telmisartan contributed to the protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular complication. -- Abstract: Experimental and clinical data support the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation is associated with anti-atherosclerosis as well as anti-diabetic effect. Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), acts as a partial PPARγ agonist. We hypothesized that telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications, through PPARγ activation. We compared the effects of telmisartan, telmisartan combined with GW9662 (a PPARγ antagonist), and losartan with no PPARγ activity on vascular injury in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Compared to losartan, telmisartan significantly ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, downregulation of phospho-eNOS, and coronary arterial remodeling in db/db mice. More vascular protective effects of telmisartan than losartan were associated with greater anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan, as shown by attenuation of vascular nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) activation and tumor necrosis factor α. Coadministration of GW9662 with telmisartan abolished the above mentioned greater protective effects of telmisartan against vascular injury than losartan in db/db mice. Thus, PPARγ activity appears to be involved in the vascular protective effects of telmisartan in db/db mice. Moreover, telmisartan, but not losartan, prevented the downregulation of vascular PPARγ in db/db mice and this effect of telmisartan was cancelled by the coadministration

  8. Telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes, partially through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma}-dependent activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Kensuke; Nakamura, Taishi; Kataoka, Keiichiro [Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Yasuda, Osamu [Department of Cardiovascular Clinical and Translational Research, Kumamoto University Hospital, Kumamoto (Japan); Fukuda, Masaya; Tokutomi, Yoshiko; Dong, Yi-Fei [Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Ogawa, Hisao [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei, E-mail: kimmitsu@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Therapeutics, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. {yields} The protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular injury were associated with attenuation of vascular NF{kappa}B activation and TNF {alpha}. {yields} PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan was involved in the normalization of vascular PPAR{gamma} downregulation in diabetic mice. {yields} We provided the first evidence indicating that PPAR{gamma} activity of telmisartan contributed to the protective effects of telmisartan against diabetic vascular complication. -- Abstract: Experimental and clinical data support the notion that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) activation is associated with anti-atherosclerosis as well as anti-diabetic effect. Telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), acts as a partial PPAR{gamma} agonist. We hypothesized that telmisartan protects against diabetic vascular complications, through PPAR{gamma} activation. We compared the effects of telmisartan, telmisartan combined with GW9662 (a PPAR{gamma} antagonist), and losartan with no PPAR{gamma} activity on vascular injury in obese type 2 diabetic db/db mice. Compared to losartan, telmisartan significantly ameliorated vascular endothelial dysfunction, downregulation of phospho-eNOS, and coronary arterial remodeling in db/db mice. More vascular protective effects of telmisartan than losartan were associated with greater anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan, as shown by attenuation of vascular nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B) activation and tumor necrosis factor {alpha}. Coadministration of GW9662 with telmisartan abolished the above mentioned greater protective effects of telmisartan against vascular injury than losartan in db/db mice. Thus, PPAR{gamma} activity appears to be involved in the vascular protective effects of telmisartan in db/db mice. Moreover, telmisartan, but not losartan, prevented the downregulation of

  9. Relationship between vitamin D status and vascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chan-Hee; Kim, Kyu-Jin; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Kim, Chul-Hee; Kang, Sung Koo; Mok, Ji-Oh

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. It was hypothesized that lower 25(OH)D would be associated with increased microvascular complications in T2DM. A total of 257 T2DM patients (111 men, 146 women) who underwent diabetic microvascular complication (peripheral neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy) studies were recruited. Patients were categorized into 3 groups according to vitamin D status: vitamin D sufficient (n = 41, 25[OH]D ≥ 20 ng/mL), vitamin D insufficient (n = 132, 10 ≤ 25[OH]D 10 ng/mL). In men, the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in those with insufficiency or sufficiency (38%, 11.7%, and 10%, respectively; P = .005). In addition, the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) was significantly higher in women with vitamin D deficiency than in the other 2 groups (40%, 20.6%, and 0%; P = .007). Compared with men in the vitamin D-sufficient group (reference), men in the vitamin D-deficient group had an increased risk of DPN after adjusting for confounding factors (odds ratio, 7.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.52-40.05). For women, when the vitamin D-sufficient group was used as a reference, those in the vitamin D-deficient group had an increased risk of DN after adjusting for confounding factors (odds ratio, 4.27; 95% confidence interval, 1.58-11.56). This present study found that a serum 25(OH)D level less than 10 ng/mL is independently associated with increased DPN in male patients and increased DN in female patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Determinants of developing diabetes mellitus and vascular complications in patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Sharifi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To detect the risk factors of diabetes mellitus (DM and cardiovascular complications in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty three subjects with proved IFG in Zanjan Healthy Heart Study (2002-2003 were recalled and participated in this study (2009-2010. Demographic and laboratoryinformation of the participants were collected.Ischemic heart disease (IHD was assessed by the exercise tolerance test (ETT. All the subjects with abnormal ETT or documented past history of IHD confirmed by angiographic evaluation. Ophthalmic complications including cataract, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy were estimated by an ophthalmologist. Results: Incidence of DM was 19.5%. All the diabetic and pre-diabetic patients had at least one of the other components of metabolic syndrome. Obesity (P: 0.04, OR: 1.8, 95%CI: 1.2-9 and low physical activity (P < 0.001, OR: 9.6, 95%CI: 3.4-32 were the only independent prognostic risk factors for progression to DM in patients with IFG. Total incidence of IHD was 14.6% and had a strong correlation with sex (P: 0.01, OR: 1.8, 95%CI: 1.2-1.5, age (P < 0.001, OR: 23, 95%CI: 2.1-67 and cigarette smoking (P < 0.001, OR: 36.5, 95%CI: 3.9-337. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy was shown in 2 (1.6% subjects who were all women. Conclusion: Obesity and low physical activity are the main factors of developing DM and its macrovascular complications in subjects with IFG.

  11. Postpneumonectomy Compression of the Mitral Annulus: Rare Vascular Complication in Sportive Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeaumont, David; Bota, Susana; Baste, Jean-Marc; Bellefleur, Marie; Stepowski, Dimitri; Vincent, Florence; Bonnevie, Tristan; Gravier, Francis-Edouard; Netchitailo, Marie; Tardif, Catherine; Boutry, Alain; Muir, Jean-François; Coquart, Jérémy

    2016-01-01

    Numerous postpneumonectomy complications exist. We present a rare clinical case of postpneumonectomy exertional dyspnea revealing compression of the mitral annulus by the descending aorta. The patient was 42-year-old former smoker with pulmonary emphysema. He has been operated on, in 2012 (i.e., right pneumonectomy). Before the surgery, the patient was a recreational runner. However, after some months, it was difficult for the patient to resume running. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing indicated moderate exercise intolerance with important oxygen desaturation. More interestingly, a decrease of low oxygen pulse was noticed from the first ventilatory threshold with no electrical modification on the electrocardiogram. This decrease was indicative of a decline in stroke volume. The thoracic scan revealed a right pneumonectomy pocket with a liquid abnormal content. Moreover, the mediastinum had shifted toward the pneumonectomy space and the left lung was distended and emphysematous. Echocardiography revealed a major change in the mediastinal anatomy. The mitral annulus was observed to be compressed by the rear wall of the descending aorta. The diagnosis of postpneumonectomy syndrome or platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome was ruled out in this patient. Mitral annular compression by the descending aorta is rare complication, which must be researched in patients with postpneumonectomy exertional dyspnea.

  12. Postpneumonectomy Compression of the Mitral Annulus: Rare Vascular Complication in Sportive Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Debeaumont

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous postpneumonectomy complications exist. We present a rare clinical case of postpneumonectomy exertional dyspnea revealing compression of the mitral annulus by the descending aorta. The patient was 42-year-old former smoker with pulmonary emphysema. He has been operated on, in 2012 (i.e., right pneumonectomy. Before the surgery, the patient was a recreational runner. However, after some months, it was difficult for the patient to resume running. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing indicated moderate exercise intolerance with important oxygen desaturation. More interestingly, a decrease of low oxygen pulse was noticed from the first ventilatory threshold with no electrical modification on the electrocardiogram. This decrease was indicative of a decline in stroke volume. The thoracic scan revealed a right pneumonectomy pocket with a liquid abnormal content. Moreover, the mediastinum had shifted toward the pneumonectomy space and the left lung was distended and emphysematous. Echocardiography revealed a major change in the mediastinal anatomy. The mitral annulus was observed to be compressed by the rear wall of the descending aorta. The diagnosis of postpneumonectomy syndrome or platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome was ruled out in this patient. Mitral annular compression by the descending aorta is rare complication, which must be researched in patients with postpneumonectomy exertional dyspnea.

  13. [Clinical characteristic of patients with acute kidney injury complicated severe cardio-vascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Paweł; Wyrwicz-Zielińska, Grażyna; Krzysztonek-Weber, Izabela; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular diseases are a group of increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI). Mortality in this group of patients with AKI, especially treated in intensive care units, is very high. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristic of patients with AKI complicated severe cardiovascular diseases. Retrospective evaluation of 246 questionnaire of patients with AKI in the course of severe cardiovascular diseases treated in the wards of nephrological profile from the malopolska and podkarpackie voivodships in the years 2000-2011 was performed. The group of patients consisted of 157 men and 89 women, with mean age 67.9 ± 14.8 years. The most common cause of AKI were: acute decompensated heart failure--24 (9.8%), chronic decompensated heart failure--94 (38.2%), cardiac arrest--29 (11.8%), myocardial infarction--48 (19.5%), CABG--12 (4.9%), cardiac valve implantation--14 (5.7), heart transplantation--4 (1.6%) and aortic aneurysm--21 (8.5%). Age distribution of patients with AKI revealed that most numerous group had 71-80 years. The most of patients (95.9%) with AKI were treated with hemodialysis. The mortality rate in the study group was very high (69.5%). Recovery of renal function was observed in 39 (27.3%) of patients. Signs of kidney disease before AKI was noted in 116 (47.2%) of patients. Patients with severe cardiovascular complications and AKI had high mortality rate instead of performed hemodialysis treatment.

  14. Retinal Vascular Fractals and Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Jakob; Green, Anders; Kawasaki, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    diabetes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS: This was a cross-sectional study of 208 long-term surviving type 1 diabetes patients from a population-based Danish cohort identified in 1973. METHODS: Retinal photographs were obtained at a clinical examination in 2007 or 2008. D(f) was measured......, respectively. Median D(f) was 1.4610 (range, 1.3774-1.5188). After adjustments for age, gender, duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, and smoking, persons with lower D(f) were more likely to have proliferative retinopathy (odds ratio [OR], 1.45 per standard deviation [SD] decrease in D(f); 95......PURPOSE: Fractal analysis is a method to quantify the geometric pattern and complexity of the retinal vessels. This study examined the association of retinal fractal dimension (D(f)) and microvascular and macrovascular complications in a population-based cohort of Danish patients with type 1...

  15. [Operative treatment of diabetics with vascular complications : Secondary data analysis of diagnosis-related groups statistics from 2005 to 2014 in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olm, M; Kühnl, A; Knipfer, E; Salvermoser, M; Eckstein, H-H; Zimmermann, A

    2018-03-27

    In Germany approximately 40,000 amputations per year are performed on patients with diabetes mellitus, often with accompanying vascular complications. The aim of this study was to present the various degrees of severity of the vascular complications and the temporal changes of the treatment options in diabetics with vascular complications in Germany. The microdata of the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) statistics of the Federal Statistical Office were analyzed over the period from 2005 to 2014. All cases were included in which the main or secondary diagnosis of diabetes mellitus with concurrent vascular complications (diabetic angiopathy and peripheral arterial disease) was encrypted. The median age of the 1,811,422 cases was 73 years and 62% were male. While the total number of amputations remained stable over time, there was a 41% reduction in knee-preserving and a 31% reduction in non-knee preserving major amputations with an 18% increase in minor amputations. Revascularization increased by 33% from 36 procedures in 2005 to 48 procedures per 100,000 inhabitants. The increase in revascularization was evident in the area of endovascular therapy alone where there was an increase of 78%. Due to the significant increase in endovascular revascularization measures, there was a significant increase in the proportion of diabetes patients with vascular pathologies in whom revascularization was carried out. As a result, improved limb preservation was achieved despite equally high amputation rates due to increasing minor amputation rates.

  16. Cell-derived microparticles and vascular pregnancy complications: a systematic and comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Palacio-Garcia, Carles; Llurba, Elisa; Vilardell-Tarres, Miquel

    2013-02-01

    To assess current studies on the relationship between cell-derived microparticles (cMP) and recurrent miscarriages (RM) and pre-eclampsia (PE), and review the relationships between cMP and inflammatory and clot pathways, antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), cytokines, and pregnancy complications. Systematic and comprehensive review of the literature from January 2000 to January 2012. Vall d'Hebron University Hospital. Women with recurrent miscarriages or PE, healthy nonpregnant women, and healthy pregnant women. None. Comparison of cMP numbers and types among groups. Platelet and endothelial cMP are increased in women with normal pregnancies compared with nonpregnant healthy women. Only five case-control studies regarding cMP and RM and 16 on cMP and PE were found to match our objective. Three of five articles referring to RM showed differences in cMP numbering, and 13 of 16 on cMP and PE showed differences in some type of cMP compared with controls. Cell-derived microparticles were raised in normal pregnancy. Recurrent miscarriage seems to be related to endothelial and platelet cell activation and/or consumption. An increase in almost all cMP types was observed in PE. A relationship between cMP and endothelial activation and proinflammatory status seems to exist. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic hyper-hemolysis in sickle cell anemia: association of vascular complications and mortality with less frequent vasoocclusive pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Taylor

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular hemolysis in sickle cell anemia could contribute to complications associated with nitric oxide deficiency, advancing age, and increased mortality. We have previously reported that intense hemolysis is associated with increased risk of vascular complications in a small cohort of adults with sickle cell disease. These observations have not been validated in other populations.The distribution of serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH values was used as a surrogate measure of intravascular hemolysis in a contemporaneous patient group and an historical adult population from the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease (CSSCD, all with sickle cell anemia. Chronic hyper-hemolysis was defined by the top LDH quartile and was compared to the lowest LDH quartile.Hyper-hemolysis subjects had higher systolic blood pressure, higher prevalence of leg ulcers (OR 3.27, 95% CI 1.92-5.53, P<0.0001, priapism (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.13-6.90, P = 0.03 and pulmonary hypertension (OR 4.32, 95% CI 2.12-8.60, P<0.0001, while osteonecrosis (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.19-0.54, P<0.0001 and pain (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.09-0.55, P = 0.0004 were less prevalent. Hyper-hemolysis was influenced by fetal hemoglobin and alpha thalassemia, and was a risk factor for early death in the CSSCD population (Hazard Ratio = 1.97, P = 0.02.Steady state LDH measurements can identify a chronic hyper-hemolysis phenotype which includes less frequent vasooclusive pain and earlier mortality. Clinicians should consider sickle cell specific therapies for these patients, as is done for those with more frequent acute pain. The findings also suggest that an important class of disease modifiers in sickle cell anemia affect the rate of hemolysis.

  18. Vascular Complications of Intercavernous Sinuses during Transsphenoidal Surgery: An Anatomical Analysis Based on Autopsy and Magnetic Resonance Venography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Deng

    Full Text Available Vascular complications induced by intercavernous sinus injury during dural opening in the transsphenoidal surgery may contribute to incomplete tumour resections. Preoperative neuro-imaging is of crucial importance in planning surgical approach. The aim of this study is to correlate the microanatomy of intercavernous sinuses with its contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography (CE-MRV.Eighteen human adult cadavers and 24 patients were examined based on autopsy and CE-MRV. Through dissection of the cadavers and CE-MRV, the location, shape, number, diameter and type of intercavernous sinuses were measured and compared.Different intercavernous sinuses were identified by their location and shape in all the cadavers and CE-MRV. Compared to the cadavers, CE-MRV revealed 37% of the anterior intercavernous sinus, 48% of the inferior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the posterior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the dorsum sellae sinus and 100% of the basilar sinus. The smaller intercavernous sinuses were not seen in the neuro-images. According to the presence of the anterior and inferior intercavernous sinus, four types of the intercavernous sinuses were identified in cadavers and CE-MRV, and the corresponding operative space in the transsphenoidal surgical approach was implemented.The morphology and classification of the cavernous sinus can be identified by CE-MRV, especially for the larger vessels, which cause bleeding more easily. Therefore, CE-MRV provides a reliable measure for individualized preoperative planning during transsphenoidal surgery.

  19. Comparison of Intra-arterial and Subcutaneous Testicular Hyaluronidase Injection Treatments and the Vascular Complications of Hyaluronic Acid Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Muyao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Weidong; Wang, Hang

    2017-02-01

    Hyaluronidase is a key preventative treatment against vascular complications of hyaluronic acid (HA) filler injection, but the degradation profile of HA to hyaluronidase is limited, and the comparison between intra-arterial and subcutaneous injections of hyaluronidase has not been studied. To evaluate HA degradation to hyaluronidase and compare different treatments between intra-arterial and subcutaneous testicular hyaluronidase injections. The authors observed HA degradation to hyaluronidase in vitro via microscopic examination and particle analysis. Rabbit ears were used for the in vivo study. There were 2 control groups receiving ligation or HA-induced embolism in the arteries, respectively, and 2 intervention groups receiving hyaluronidase treatments in different regions. The laser Doppler blood perfusion monitoring measurements were made at defined time points, and biopsies were taken on Day 2. Nearly, all of the HAs degraded in vitro at the 1-hour time point. Subcutaneous hyaluronidase treatment showed better recovery of blood perfusion. Histology showed severe inflammation in the embolism group and mild inflammation in the intervention groups. A complete enzymatic degradation of HA filler to hyaluronidase needs a certain time, and subcutaneous hyaluronidase treatment may be the better option.

  20. Vascular Complications of Intercavernous Sinuses during Transsphenoidal Surgery: An Anatomical Analysis Based on Autopsy and Magnetic Resonance Venography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xuefei; Chen, Shijun; Bai, Ya; Song, Wen; Chen, Yongchao; Li, Dongxue; Han, Hui; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Vascular complications induced by intercavernous sinus injury during dural opening in the transsphenoidal surgery may contribute to incomplete tumour resections. Preoperative neuro-imaging is of crucial importance in planning surgical approach. The aim of this study is to correlate the microanatomy of intercavernous sinuses with its contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography (CE-MRV). Eighteen human adult cadavers and 24 patients were examined based on autopsy and CE-MRV. Through dissection of the cadavers and CE-MRV, the location, shape, number, diameter and type of intercavernous sinuses were measured and compared. Different intercavernous sinuses were identified by their location and shape in all the cadavers and CE-MRV. Compared to the cadavers, CE-MRV revealed 37% of the anterior intercavernous sinus, 48% of the inferior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the posterior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the dorsum sellae sinus and 100% of the basilar sinus. The smaller intercavernous sinuses were not seen in the neuro-images. According to the presence of the anterior and inferior intercavernous sinus, four types of the intercavernous sinuses were identified in cadavers and CE-MRV, and the corresponding operative space in the transsphenoidal surgical approach was implemented. The morphology and classification of the cavernous sinus can be identified by CE-MRV, especially for the larger vessels, which cause bleeding more easily. Therefore, CE-MRV provides a reliable measure for individualized preoperative planning during transsphenoidal surgery.

  1. The outcome and complications of the DiaTAP bioCarbon button-graft vascular access device in haemodialysis patients: a two-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, M D; Parfrey, P; Marshall, D; Aldrete, V; Purchase, L; Gault, H

    1986-01-01

    The outcome and complications which developed in 8 hemodialysis patients who received 12 DiaTAP bioCarbon button vascular-access devices were reviewed. All patients had a poor vascular access history. Three of twelve devices have been replaced because of thrombosis and two because of infection. Four patients have had 10 episodes of reduced blood flow. Streptokinase infusion into the DiaTAP button led to improved blood flow in 8 of 10 episodes. The 6-month survival rate of the DiaTAP access device was 67% and the average functioning life was 9.4 months. It was a valuable form of access when others had failed.

  2. Vascular complications in patients with aldosterone producing adenoma in Japan: comparative study with essential hypertension. The Research Committee of Disorders of Adrenal Hormones in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, R; Matsubara, T; Miyamori, I; Hatakeyama, H; Morise, T

    1995-05-01

    The incidence of vascular complications in 224 patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) which was proven on adrenal surgery, was compared to that in 224 sex- and age-matched patients with essential hypertension (EHT). The incidence of cerebral hemorrhage was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the patients with APA when compared to the EHT group. On the other hand, the incidence of myocardial infarction and/or congestive heart failure in the APA group was lower, although this difference did not reach statistical significance. Diastolic blood pressure in the APA group was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the EHT group. However, a significant difference in diastolic blood pressure was not detected between the APA groups with and without vascular complications, whereas in the EHT group diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in cases with vascular complications as compared to those without complications. As a possible factor contributing to the higher incidence of cerebral hemorrhage in the APA group, proteinuria was suggested. It was recommended that patients with primary aldosteronism should undergo operation when localization of the APA is established.

  3. The unsuitability of implantable Doppler probes for the early detection of renal vascular complications - a porcine model for prevention of renal transplant loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdisen, Chris; Jespersen, Bente; Møldrup, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Vascular occlusion is a rare, but serious complication after kidney transplantation often resulting in graft loss. We therefore aimed to develop an experimental porcine model for stepwise reduction of the renal venous blood flow and to compare an implantable Doppler probe...... and microdialysis for fast detection of vascular occlusion. Methods: In 20 pigs, implantable Doppler probes were placed on the renal artery and vein and a microdialysis catheter was placed in the renal cortex. An arterial flowprobe served as gold standard. Following two-hour baseline measurements, the pigs were....../3 (66%) reduction in renal blood flow. The implantable Doppler probe was not able to detect flow changes until there was total venous occlusion. Microdialysis detected changes in local metabolism after both arterial and venous occlusion; the implantable Doppler probe could only detect vascular...

  4. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome With a Novel Missense COL3A1 Mutation Present With Pulmonary Complications and Iliac Arterial Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guangchao; Yang, Hang; Cui, Lijia; Fu, Yuanyuan; Li, Fangda; Zhou, Zhou; Zheng, Yuehong

    2018-02-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a life-threatening connective tissue disorder due to its high tendency of arterial and organ rupture. Pulmonary complications in vEDS are rare. We present a young male patient with vEDS who developed severe pulmonary complications and severe rupture of the iliac artery at different stages of his life. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and confirmed by the identification of COL3A1 gene mutation. Due to high bleeding tendency and weak cardiopulmonary capacity, conservative treatment was taken for him. To our knowledge, this is the first report of vEDS case in which the patient developed both pulmonary complications and dissection of large arteries. Our report emphasizes the importance of considering vEDS when an adolescent develops unexplained pulmonary cysts with fragility of lung tissues. Genetic counseling and close monitoring should be performed for earlier diagnosis and prevention of severe complications of large arteries. The typical presentations of vEDS were also discussed by means of a review of case reports on vEDS with pulmonary complications.

  5. Patients undergoing PCI from the femoral route by default radial operators are at high risk of vascular access-site complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafie, Ihsan M; Uddin, Muez M; Ossei-Gerning, Nicholas; Anderson, Richard A; Kinnaird, Timothy D

    2014-02-01

    Radial artery (RA) access for PCI has a lower incidence of vascular access-site (VAS) complications than the femoral artery (FA) approach. However, even for default radial operators certain patients are intervened upon from the FA. We examined the demographics and incidence of VAS complications when default radial operators resort to the FA for PCI. The demographics and VAS complications were compared by access site retrospectively for all PCI cases performed by default radial operators (n=1,392). A modified ACUITY trial definition of major VAS complication was used. FA puncture occurred in 25.2% (351/1,392) of cases. Patients were more likely to be female, older and weigh less than patients undergoing PCI from the RA. The FA procedure was likely to be more complex with larger sheaths, more left main stem, graft and multivessel intervention, and there was a greater proportion of emergency cases. Despite increased case complexity, glycoprotein inhibitors were used less frequently in femoral cases (26.5% vs. 36.8%, prisk factors for access-site bleeding are disproportionately high in the population requiring FA puncture by default radial operators, and as a result such patients have a high rate of vascular access-site complications.

  6. Activation of protein kinase C by elevation of glucose concentration: Proposal for a mechanism in the development of diabetic vascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tianshing; Saltsman, K.A.; Ohashi, Hiromi; King, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is believed to be the major cause of diabetic vascular complications involving both microvessels and arteries as in the retina, renal glomeruli, and aorta. It is unclear by which mechanism hyperglycemia is altering the metabolism and functions of vascular cells, although changes in nonenzymatic protein glycosylation and increases in cellular sorbitol levels have been postulated to be involved. Previously, the authors have reported that the elevation of extracellular glucose levels with cultured bovine retinal capillary endothelial cells causes an increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity of the membranous pool with a parallel decrease in the cytosol without alteration of its total activity. Now they demonstrate that the mechanism for the activation of PKC is due to an enhanced de novo synthesis of diacylglycerol as indicated by a 2-fold increase of [ 14 C]diacylglycerol labeling from [ 14 C]glucose. The elevated diacylglycerol de novo synthesis is secondarily due to increased formation of precursors derived from glucose metabolism; this formation is enhanced by hyperglycemia as substantiated by elevated [ 3 H]glucose conversion into water. This effect of hyperglycemia on PKC is also observed in cultured aortic smooth muscle and endothelial cells and the retina and kidney of diabetic rats, but not in the brain. Since PKC in vascular cells has been shown to modulate hormone receptor turnover, neovascularization in vitro, and cell growth, they propose that this mechanism of enhancing the membranous PKC activities by hyperglycemia plays an important role in the development of diabetic vascular complications

  7. [Clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular complications hospitalized at the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormeño Julca, Alexis Jose; Alvarez Murillo, Carlos Melchor; Amoretti Alvino, Pedro Miguel; Florian Florian, Angel Aladino; Castro Johanson, Rosa Aurora; Celi Perez, Maria Danisa; Huamán Prado, Olga Rocío

    2017-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and portopulmonary hypertension (PPHN) are distinct pulmonary vascular complications of portal hypertension (PHT) and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular complications hospitalized at the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño. We included patients with HTP hospitalized from January 2012 to June 2013 and that during its evolution progressed with SHP or HTPP. For analysis, they were divided into a first group of patients with liver cirrhosis and a second group with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. Of 22 patients with HPT 45.5% were male and the age range was between 1 month and 17 years. The etiology in the group of cirrhosis (n=14) was: autoimmune hepatitis (35.7%), cryptogenic cirrhosis (35.7%), inborn error of metabolism (14.3%), chronic viral hepatitis C (7.15%) virus and atresia extra-hepatic bile ducts (7.15%). Pulmonary vascular complications more frequently occurred in patients with liver cirrhosis (1 case of HPS and a case of PPHTN). They most often dyspnea, asthenia, edema, malnutrition, ascites, hypersplenism and gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal varices was found. Also, they had elevated ALT values, alkaline phosphatase and serum albumin values decreased. In children with pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary vascular complications are rare. In the evaluation of these patients pulse oximetry should be included to detect hypoxemia and ubsequently a Doppler echocardiography and contrast echocardiography necessary. Dueto the finding of systolic pulmonary hypertension it is necessary to perform right heart catheterization.

  8. Association of Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapy and the Risk of Vascular Complications in Patients With Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ai-Lin; Chen, Bor-Chyuan; Mou, Chih-Hsin; Sun, Mao-Feng; Yen, Hung-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With an increasing use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), evidence of long-term benefit with adjunctive TCM treatment is limited. This study investigated whether the concurrent TCM treatment reduces the risk of vascular complications in T2DM patients by using a large population from National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We identified 33,457 adult patients with newly diagnosed T2DM using anti-diabetic agents from a random sample of one million beneficiaries in the NHIRD between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011. We recruited 1049 TCM users (received TCM over 30 days with a diagnosis of T2DM) and randomly selected 4092 controls as the non-TCM cohort at a ratio of 1:4 frequency-matched by age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and index year. We investigated the prescription pattern of TCM and conducted a Cox proportional hazards regression to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of stroke, chronic kidney diseases (CKD), and diabetic foot between the 2 cohorts. In the TCM cohort, the prescription pattern of TCM was different between insulin and noninsulin patients. The most common herbs were Dan-Shen (Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae) in noninsulin group and Da-Huang (Radix et Rhizoma Rhei) in insulin group. The most common formulae were Liu-Wei-Di-Huang-Wan in noninsulin group and Yu-Quan-Wan in insulin group. Although no significant reduction in the hazard ratio of CKD and diabetic foot, the incidence rate of stroke was 7.19 per 1000 person-years in the TCM cohort and 10.66 per 1000 person-years in the control cohort, respectively. After adjustment of age, sex, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and antidiabetes agent use (including sulfonylureas, α-glucosidase, metformin, meglitinide, thiazolidinediones, and insulin), TCM cohorts were found to have a 33% decreased risk of stroke (95% CI = 0.46–0.97; P < 0.05). This population-based retrospective study showed that the complementary TCM therapy might

  9. Alterations in plasma soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (sFlt-1 concentrations during coronary artery bypass graft surgery: relationships with post-operative complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsel Isabelle

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasma concentrations of sFlt-1, the soluble form of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF, markedly increase during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery with extracorporeal circulation (ECC. We investigated if plasma sFlt-1 values might be related to the occurrence of surgical complications after CABG. Methods Plasma samples were collected from the radial artery catheter before vascular cannulation and after opening the chest, at the end of ECC just before clamp release, after cross release, after weaning from ECC, at the 6th and 24th post-operative hour. Thirty one patients were investigated. The presence of cardiovascular, haematological and respiratory dysfunctions was prospectively assessed. Plasma sFlt-1 levels were measured with commercially ELISA kits. Results Among the 31 investigated patients, 15 had uneventful surgery. Patients with and without complications had similar pre-operative plasma sFlt-1 levels. Lowered plasma sFlt-1 levels were observed at the end of ECC in patients with haematological (p = 0.001, ANOVA or cardiovascular (p = 0.006 impairments, but not with respiratory ones (p = 0.053, as compared to patients with uneventful surgery. Conclusion These results identify an association between specific post-CABG complication and the lower release of sFlt-1 during ECC. sFlt-1-induced VEGF neutralisation might, thus, be beneficial to reduce the development of post-operative adverse effects after CABG.

  10. Introduction of the DiaGene study: Clinical characteristics, pathophysiology and determinants of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.W. van Herpt (Thijs); Lemmers, R.F.H. (Roosmarijn F. H.); M. van Hoek (Mandy); J.G. Langendonk (Janneke); R.J. Erdtsieck (Ronald); B. Bravenboer (Bert); Lucas, A. (Annelies); M.T. Mulder (Monique); H.R. Haak (Harm); A. Lieverse (Aloysius); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Type 2 diabetes is a major healthcare problem. Glucose-, lipid-, and blood pressure-lowering strategies decrease the risk of micro- and macrovascular complications. However, a substantial residual risk remains. To unravel the etiology of type 2 diabetes and its complications,

  11. Impact of femoral artery puncture using digital subtraction angiography and road mapping on vascular and bleeding complications after transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mawardy, Mohamed; Schwarz, Bettina; Landt, Martin; Sulimov, Dmitriy; Kebernik, Julia; Allali, Abdelhakim; Becker, Bjoern; Toelg, Ralph; Richardt, Gert; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed

    2017-01-20

    The use of large-diameter sheaths carries the risk of significant vascular and bleeding complications after transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). In this analysis, we sought to assess the impact of a modified femoral artery puncture technique using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and road mapping during transfemoral TAVI on periprocedural vascular and bleeding events. This is a retrospective analysis of transfemoral TAVI patients included in a prospective institutional database. The modified femoral artery puncture technique using DSA-derived road mapping guidance was introduced in October 2012. Before the introduction of this technique, vascular puncture was acquired based on an integration of angiographic data, the bony iliofemoral landmarks and a radiopaque object. Consecutive patients who underwent TAVI with the road mapping technique (RM group, n=160) were compared with consecutive patients who underwent TAVI without road mapping (control group, n=160) prior to its introduction. A standardised strategy of periprocedural anticoagulation was adopted in both groups as well as the use of a single suture-based closure device. All endpoints were defined according to the VARC-2 criteria for event definition. The mean age in the RM group was 80±7.7 years compared to 81±5.9 years in the control group (p=0.19), and females were equally distributed between both groups (63.1% vs. 58.1%, p=0.36). The baseline logistic EuroSCORE was 20.7±14.4% vs. 24.9±15.2% in the RM and control group, respectively (p=0.01). Notably, sheath size was significantly larger in the RM compared to the control group due to the more frequent use of the 20 Fr sheath (23.8% vs. 1.8%, proad map group but did not reach statistical significance (8.1% vs. 13.8%, p=0.1). Other forms of vascular and bleeding complications as well as all-cause mortality were comparable in both groups. A modified femoral artery puncture technique using DSA and road mapping was associated

  12. Use of placental vascularization indices and uterine artery peak systolic velocity in early detection of pregnancies complicated by gestational diabetes, chronic or gestational hypertension, and preeclampsia at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altorjay, Ábel T; Surányi, Andrea; Nyári, Tibor; Németh, Gábor

    2017-04-14

    We aimed to investigate correlations between uterine artery peak systolic velocity (AUtPSV), and placental vascularization in groups of normal blood pressure (NBP) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (chronic hypertension (CHT), gestational hypertension (GHT) and preeclampsia (PE)) alone or in combination with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and hypothesized that AUtPSV rises when GDM complicates pregnancy hypertension. Placental 3-dimensional power Doppler indices, such as vascularization index (VI), flow index (FI), and vascularization-flow index (VFI), and uterine artery peak systolic velocity (AUtPSV) were measured in CHT (N=43), CHT+GDM (N=15), GHT (N=57), GHT+GDM (N=23) and PE (N=17) pregnancies, and compared to NBP (N=109). Correlations were analyzed between vascularization indices, AUtPSV, pregestational BMI and adverse pregnancy outcome rates. In our results VI was higher in CHT (P=0.010), while FI was lower in CHT (P=0.009), GHT and PE (P=0.001) compared to NBP. In case of VFI, significant difference was found between CHT and GHT (P=0.002), and NBP and PE (P=0.001). FI was found prognostic for umbilical pH and neonatal birth weight. Pre-gestational BMI was significantly higher in GHT+GDM compared to GHT, and in CHT+GDM compared to the CHT group. As for AUtPSV, significant difference was found between NBP and CHT (P=0.012), NBP and CHT+GDM (P=0.045), NBP and GHT+GDM (P=0.007), NBP and PE (P=0.032), and GHT and GHT+GDM (P=0.048) groups. Our study revealed that vascularization indices and AUtPSV show significant differences due to gestational pathology, and can be useful in detection of pregnancies at risk.

  13. Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1, Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1, and Cluster of Differentiation 146 Levels in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes with Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocaoglu-Emre, F Sinem; Saribal, Devrim; Yenmis, Guven; Guvenen, Guvenc

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a multisystemic, chronic disease accompanied by microvascular complications involving various complicated mechanisms. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and cluster of differentiation-146 (CD146) are mainly expressed by endothelial cells, and facilitate the adhesion and transmigration of immune cells, leading to inflammation. In the present study, we evaluated the levels of soluble adhesion molecules in patients with microvascular complications of T2DM. Serum and whole blood samples were collected from 58 T2DM patients with microvascular complications and 20 age-matched healthy subjects. Levels of soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble VCAM-1 (sVCAM-1) were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, while flow cytometry was used to determine CD146 levels. Serum sICAM-1 levels were lower in T2DM patients with microvascular complications than in healthy controls (Pmolecule levels were not correlated with the complication type. In the study group, most of the patients were on insulin therapy (76%), and 95% of them were receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitor agents. Insulin and ACE-inhibitors have been shown to decrease soluble adhesion molecule levels via various mechanisms, so we suggest that the decreased or unchanged levels of soluble forms of cellular adhesion molecules in our study group may have resulted from insulin and ACE-inhibitor therapy, as well as tissue-localized inflammation in patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2017 Korean Endocrine Society

  14. Magnitude of dyslipedemia and its association with micro and macro vascular complications in type 2 diabetes: a hospital based study from Bikaner (Northwest India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, R P; Sharma, Poornima; Pal, Mahender; Kochar, A; Kochar, D K

    2006-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes is not only associated with hyperglycemia but also with disorders of lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of dyslipedemia with micro and macro vascular complications of diabetes. Population based cross sectional study included 4067 diabetic patients who visited hospital during January 2000 to December 2002. Lipid profile was estimated by semi autoanalyser, Retinopathy was assessed by fundoscopy, Nephropathy by microalbuminurea, coronary artery disease (CAD) by electro cardiogram (ECG) changes, peripheral vascular disease (PVD) by doppler study and neuropathy by clinical examinations. The association of dyslipedemia with micro and macro vascular complications was assessed by regression analysis. The prevalence of dyslipedemia is high in diabetic population with high serum cholesterol >240mg/dl was seen in 15%, serum triglycerides >160mg/dl was seen in 42.41%, raised LDL >130mg/dl in 45.26%, VLDL >40mg/dl in 24.09% and low levels of HDL-C <40mg/dl were seen in 52.27%. On regression analysis, CAD had strong correlation with high levels of VLDL (0.76), triglycerides (0.82), LDL (0.23) and low HDL (-0.81). Similar association was seen with PVD. Diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy were found to have significant correlation with low HDL (-0.43) and raised LDL (0.37), respectively. Neuropathy was not found to have any significant correlation with lipid profile abnormalities. Lipid profile abnormalities are very common in type 2 diabetes and it has great influence on CAD and PVD. Hence, appropriate preventive and treatment strategies should be considered timely.

  15. Pheochromocytoma complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage - a case report; Feocromocitoma complicado com acidente vascular encefalico hemorragico - relato de um caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Aline Silva; Marchiori, Edson; Almeida, Fabiola Assuncao de; Martins, Renata Romano; Sales, Anderson Ribeiro; Santos, Tereza Cristina C.R.S. dos; Reis, Simone Teixeira [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Silveira, Sonia Marcelino T. da

    1999-06-01

    The authors report a case of pheochromocytoma that was complicated by intracerebral hemorrhage in a 17-year-old female patient. Computed tomography showed a solid mass, heterogeneous, on the right adrenal. The patient underwent a right adrenalectomy. She is being observed by our out-patients clinic, presenting normal blood pressure levels and a left hemiparesis. (author)

  16. Decreased bed rest post-percutaneous coronary intervention with a 7-French arterial sheath and its effects on vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Laura J; Bechtum, Elizabeth L; Hoffman, Jessica G; Kramer, Robert R; Bartel, David C; Slusser, Joshua P; Tilbury, Ralph Thomas

    2018-01-01

    To compare the incidence of femoral access puncture site complications in the control group, who underwent 6 hr of bed rest, with patients in the case group, who underwent 4 hr of bed rest. The ideal bed rest length after percutaneous coronary intervention with a 7-French arterial sheath has been investigated by nursing practice. However, in this larger-sheath-size group, best practices have not been determined, and bed rest time continues to vary markedly among institutions. Retrospective study. Data were retrieved from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry and electronic health records in this retrospective study. Sample size was 401 patients: 152 case patients with 4-hr bed rest and 249 controls with 6-hr bed rest. Case group data were obtained from 20 May 2013-31 December 2014; and control group data, 15 June 2011-20 May 2013. National Cardiovascular Data Registry event rates were generally low in both groups: Only three patients in each group had a bleeding event within 72 hr (2% vs. 1%) and no patient and only two controls had arteriovenous fistula (0% vs. 1%). Complications documented in the electronic health records with institutional femoral access puncture site complication definitions identified bleeding at the access site in eight case patients (5%) and nine controls (4%). Haematoma at the access site occurred in 21 case patients (14%) and 25 controls (10%). The practice change of decreasing bed rest from 6-4 hr for patients with 7-French arterial sheaths post-percutaneous coronary intervention was associated with no significant change in femoral access puncture site complications in either National Cardiovascular Data Registry data or institutional electronic health records data. This introduces expanded evidence of safety in decreasing bed rest length in larger (7-French) arterial sheaths post-percutaneous coronary intervention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) complicated by stroke: clinical report and review of cerebral vascular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancati, Francesco; Castori, Marco; Mingarelli, Rita; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2005-12-15

    We report on a 2 9/12-year-old boy with disproportionate short stature, microcephaly, subtle craniofacial dysmorphisms, and generalized skeletal dysplasia, who developed a left hemiparesis. Brain neuroimaging disclosed a complex cerebral vascular anomaly (CVA) with stenosis of the right anterior cerebral artery and telangiectatic collateral vessels supplying the cerebral cortex, consistent with moyamoya disease. Based on clinical and skeletal features, a diagnosis of Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) was established. Review of 16 published patients with CVA affected by either Seckel syndrome or MOPD II suggested that CVA is preferentially associated to the latter subtype affecting about 1/4 of the patients. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the phlebitis and infiltration scales for the assessment of complications of peripheral vascular access devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, Dianne; Davies, Barbara; Mac Donald, Joan; Nelson, Susanne; Virani, Tazim

    2010-01-01

    To prevent complications from peripheral vascular access device (PVAD) therapy, the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) developed 2 scales to measure the extent and severity of phlebitis and infiltration in PVADs. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of these scales to validate them with respect to their interrater reliability, concurrent validity, feasibility, and acceptability. A total of 182 patients at 2 sites were enrolled, and 416 observations of PVAD sites were made. Two nurses independently rated each PVAD site for the presence or absence of phlebitis and/or infiltration by using the INS scales. The interrater reliability was calculated, as was the agreement of the observed versus charted incidence of phlebitis and infiltration (concurrent validity) and the ease of use of the scales (feasibility, acceptability). Interrater reliability for both the Phlebitis and Infiltration scales and concurrent validity were found to be statistically significant (P Phlebitis and Infiltration scales have been shown to be easy to use, valid, and reliable scales.

  19. Observation and nursing of complications due to high re-perfusion injury occurring after balloon angioplasty for diabetic vascular diseases of lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lingling; Zhu Yueqi; Mou Ling

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the symptomatic nursing in treating the complications caused by high re-perfusion which develops after balloon angioplasty for the treatment of diabetic vascular diseases of lower extremity. Methods: Eighteen patients with lower limb ischemia caused by diabetes mellitus developed high re-perfusion injury complications after receiving balloon angioplasty. The patients were randomly and equally divided into study group and control group. The special nursing measures designed by the author's department, including raising the diseased lower limb, enforcing the flexion and extension movement of the leg, cold compress, wound exposure, etc. were carried out for patients of study group, while no special nursing measures were adopted for patients of control group. The clinical results, such as limb pain, swelling and subcutaneous petechia after re-perfusion injury, were evaluated and compared between two groups. Results: After the treatment, the limb pain, swelling and subcutaneous petechia due to high re-perfusion injury in study group were relieved more markedly than that in control group, the difference in evaluation score between two groups was statistically significant (P<0.01). Conclusion: The special symptomatic nursing measures are very effective in relieving the high re-perfusion injury after balloon angioplasty for the treatment of diabetic lower limb ischemia. (authors)

  20. Effect of Trimetazidine Dihydrochloride Tablets adjuvant therapy on inflammatory reaction, oxidative stress, vascular endothelial function and myocardial function in patients with coronary heart disease complicated with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Wen Wei

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of Trimetazidine Dihydrochloride Tablets on inflammatory reaction, oxidative stress, vascular endothelial function and myocardial function in patients with coronary heart disease complicated with heart failure. Methods: A total of 98 patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure who met the criteria of the study were selected as the subjects, based on the random data table they were divided into the control group (n=49 and observation group (n=49, the patients in the control group were treated with Metoprolol Tartrate Sustained-release Tablets treatment, and the patients in the observation group were treated with Metoprolol Tartrate Sustained-release Tablets combined with Trimetazidine Dihydrochloride Tablets, the levels of inflammatory reaction, oxidative stress, vascular endothelial function and myocardial function indexes were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: The difference of the CRP, TNF-α, MDA, SOD, NO, ET-1, LVEF, LVEDD and LVESD levels in the two groups before treatment were not statistically significant; Compared with the levels of the two groups before treatment, the two groups of CRP, TNF-α, MDA, ET-1, LVEDD and LVESD levels after treatment were significantly decreased, and the level of the observation group after treatment was significantly lower than those levels in the control group, the difference was statistically significant; The levels of SOD, NO and LVEF of the two groups after treatment were significantly higher than those in the same group before treatment, and the observation group levels [(88.09±7.51 U/ ml, (72.58±14.64 mol/L, (48.34±5.09% ] were significantly higher than the control group [(79.44±7.27 U/ml, (61.89±11.06 mol/L, (44.19±4.58%], the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: Trimetazidine Dihydrochloride Tablets in the treatment of coronary heart disease with heart failure can effectively inhibit the release

  1. Postpartum complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronthal, A.J.; Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the CT findings of major postpartum complications and determine what role CT plays in their evaluation. The CT scans of nine patients with major postpartum complications were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had been referred to CT for evaluation of postpartum fever, abdominal pain, and elevated results of liver function tests. Complications identified at CT included hepatic infarctions (n = 2), endometritis (n = 2), postoperative wound abscess (n = 1), massive abdominal hemorrhage (n = 1), septic thrombophlebitis (n = 1), and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). CT findings of hepatic infarction included wedge-shaped areas of decreased enhancement conforming to a vascular distribution

  2. Increased risk for vascular complications due to GP IIb/IIIa-antagonists in patients with cardiogenic shock supported by intraaortic balloon pump (IABP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Röther

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Vascular events with the use of IABP are common but in our study, not significantly associated with a higher mortality. Treatment with GP IIb/IIIa-antagonists is associated with a higher risk of vascular events.

  3. Early diagnosis of congenital vascular malformation as a condition to rapid prevention of complications – case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Jaguś

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome is a rare congenital condition characterised by a triad of symptoms: capillary-lymphatic-venous malformations, varicose veins and venous malformations as well as soft tissue and skeletal hypertrophy of the affected limb. In this article, we present a case of a 5-year-old boy with extensive vascular malformations of the lower limbs and the buttock region. In this case, manifestation of all three symptoms was gradual. At the age of 4 years, the patient was admitted to the Department of Imaging Diagnostics for further diagnosis, where the triad characteristic for Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome and popliteal vein agenesis were diagnosed. Currently, a multidisciplinary team takes care of the boy in the Children’s Memorial Health Institute. Early and accurate diagnosis allows for rapid prevention of complications associated with Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome and enables patient-tailored treatment.

  4. Hindlimb Suspension as a Model to Study Ophthalmic Complications in Microgravity Status Report: Optimization of Rat Retina Flat Mounts Staining to Study Vascular Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Corey A.; Zanello, Susana B.

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary data from a prior tissue-sharing experiment has suggested that early growth response protein-1 (Egr1), a transcription factor involved in various stress responses in the vasculature, is induced in the rat retina after 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HS) and may be evidence that mechanical stress is occurring secondary to the cephalad fluid shift. This mechanical stress could cause changes in oxygenation of the retina, and the subsequent ischemia- or inflammation-driven hypoxia may lead to microvascular remodeling. This microvascular remodeling process can be studied using image analysis of retinal vessels and can be then be quantified by the VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software, a computational tool that quantifies remodeling patterns of branching vascular trees and capillary or vasculogenic networks. Our project investigates whether rodent HS is a valid model to study the effects of simulated-weightlessness on ocular structures and their relationship with intracranial pressure (ICP). One of the hypotheses to be tested is that HS-induced cephalad fluid shift is accompanied by vascular engorgement that produces changes in retinal oxygenation, leading to oxidative stress, hypoxia, microvascular remodeling, and cellular degeneration. We have optimized the procedure to obtain flat mounts of rat retina, staining of the endothelial lining in vasculature and acquisition of high quality images suitable for VESGEN analysis. Briefly, eyes were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for 24 hours and retinas were detached and then mounted flat on microscope slides. The microvascular staining was done with endothelial cell-specific isolectin binding, coupled to Alexa-488 fluorophore. Image acquisition at low magnification and high resolution was performed using a new Leica SP8 confocal microscope in a tile pattern across the X,Y plane and multiple sections along the Z-axis. This new confocal microscope has the added capability of dye separation using the Linear

  5. Complicações da terapia anticoagulante com warfarina em pacientes com doença vascular periférica: estudo coorte prospectivo Complications of anticoagulant therapy with warfarin in patients with peripheral vascular disease: a cohort prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernada Cardoso Santos

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar prospectivamente a freqüência de complicações em pacientes tratados com warfarina e acompanhados no Ambulatório de Anticoagulação da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu da Universidade Estadual Paulista. MÉTODOS: Pacientes sorteados entre os agendados para consulta de junho de 2002 a fevereiro de 2004. Na primeira consulta, foi preenchida ficha com dados de identificação e clínicos. A cada retorno, ou quando o paciente procurou o hospital por intercorrência, foi preenchida ficha com a razão normatizada internacional, existência e tipo de intercorrência e condições de uso dos antagonistas da vitamina K. RESULTADOS: Foram acompanhados 136 pacientes (61 homens e 75 mulheres, 99 com tromboembolismo venoso e 37 com doença arterial; 59 pacientes eram de Botucatu, e 77, de outros municípios. Foram registradas 30 intercorrências: nove não relacionadas ao uso da warfarina e 21 complicações hemorrágicas (38,8 por 100 pacientes/ano. Uma hematêmese foi considerada grave (1,9 por 100 pacientes/ano. As demais foram consideradas moderadas ou leves. Não houve óbitos, hemorragia intracraniana ou necrose cutânea. A única associação significante foi da freqüência de hemorragia com nível médio de razão normatizada internacional. CONCLUSÃO: Nossos resultados mostram a viabilidade desse tratamento em pacientes vasculares em nosso meio, mesmo em população de baixo nível socioeconômico, quando tratados em ambulatório especializado.OBJECTIVE: To prospectively study the frequency of complications in patients treated with warfarin followed at Botucatu Medical School. METHODS: Patients randomly selected among those with appointments scheduled from June 2002 to February 2004. At the first appointment, a protocol was filled with identification and clinical data. At every return or when the patient went to the hospital due to clinical events, another form was filled with the international normalized ratio, existence

  6. Application of DCE-MRI in evaluating lower extremity capillary endothelial function in patients with diabetes mellitus complicated by peripheral vascular disease after PTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hao; Zhao Jinli; Chen Xiaohua; Wu Xianhua; Li Yuehua

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To quantify endothelial function of lower extremity capillary in patients with peripheral vascular disease associated with diabetes mellitus by using DCE-MRI, and to explore the feasibility of DCE-MRI in predicting vascular restenosis in lower extremity after PTA. Methods: During the period form May 2009 to Jan. 2012, a total of 51 patients (study group) with diabetic lower extremity vascular diseases (77 diseased legs in total) were admitted to the hospital and were treated with PTA. Another 20 volunteers were used as control group. K-trans values were measured in soleus muscle using DCE-MRI. Based on the results after 6 months follow-up, the patients were classified into restenosis group and non-restenosis group. The K -trans values and others clinical data were compared between the two groups. Results: Although clinical symptoms and signs were improved in both groups after the treatment, K-trans value of restenosis group showed no obvious changes after PTA, while K-trans value of non-restenosis group was improved significantly. Before PTA, the difference in K -trans value between the two groups was not statistically significant, while K-trans values of the two groups were significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: K-trans value can reflect the endothelial function in diabetes mellitus patients with peripheral vascular disease, and it can also predict the occurrence of restenosis, providing a useful evidence for clinical. therapy. (authors)

  7. Acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico em uma enfermaria de neurologia: complicações e tempo de internação Stroke in a neurology ward: etiologies, complications and length of stay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bomeny de Paulo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Os objetivos deste trabalho foram: avaliar as complicações e o tempo de internação de doentes com acidente vascular cerebral isquêmico (AVCI na fase aguda ou subaguda em uma enfermaria de Neurologia geral em São Paulo; investigar a influência de idade, fatores de risco para doença vascular, território arterial acometido e etiologia sobre as complicações e o tempo de internação. MÉTODOS: Foram coletados prospectivamente dados de 191 doentes com AVCI e posteriormente analisados. RESULTADOS: Cinquenta e um doentes (26,7% apresentaram alguma complicação clínica durante a internação. A pneumonia foi a complicação mais frequente. O tempo médio de internação na enfermaria foi de 16,8±13,8 dias. Na análise multivariável, o único fator que se correlacionou significativamente com menor taxa de complicações foi idade mais jovem (OR=0,92-0,97, p INTRODUCTION: Purposes of this study were: evaluate complications and length of stay of patients admitted with diagnosis of ischemic stroke (IS in the acute or subacute phase, in a general Neurology ward in São paulo, Brazil; investigate the influence of age, risk factors for vascular disease, arterial territory and etiology. METHODS: Data from 191 IS patients were collected prospectively. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients (26.7% presented at least one clinical complication during stay. pneumonia was the most frequent complication. Mean length of stay was 16.8+-13.8 days. Multivariate analysis revealed a correlation between younger age and lower complication rates (OR=0.92-0.97, p < 0.001. presence of complications was the only factor that independently influenced length of stay (OR=4.20; CI=1.928.84; p<0.0001. CONCLUSION: These results should be considered in the planning and organization of IS care in Brazil.

  8. Clinical Profile and Early Complications after Single and Dual Chamber Permanent Pacemaker Implantation at Manmohan Cardiothoracic Vascular and Transplant Centre, Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, J; Poudyal, R R; Devkota, S; Thapa, S; Dhungana, R R

    2015-01-01

    Permanent pacemaker implantation is a minimally invasive surgical procedure in the management of patients with cardiac problems. However, complications during and after implantation are not uncommon. There is lack of evidences in rate of complications with the selection of pacemakers in Nepal. Therefore, this study was performed to compare the frequency of implantation and complication rate between single chamber and dual chamber pacemaker. The present study is based on all consecutive pacemaker implantations in a single centre between April 2014 and May 2015. A total of 116 patients were categorized into two cohorts according to the type of pacemaker implanted- single chamber or dual chamber. All patients had regular 2-weeks follow-up intervals with standardized documentation of all relevant patient data till 6-week after implantation. Data were presented as means ± standard deviation (SD) for continuous variables and as proportions for categorical variables. Comparison of continuous variables between the groups was made with independent Student's t-test. For discrete variables distribution between groups were compared with Chi-square test. The mean age (±SD) of total population at implant was 64.08 (± 15.09) years. Dual chamber units were implanted in 44 (37.93%) of patients, single chamber in 72 (62.06%). Only 14 women (31.81%) received dual chamber compared with 42 women (58.33%) who received single chamber (Chi-square=18, DF=1, P = 0.0084). Complete atrioventricular block was the commonest (56.03%) indication for permanent pacemaker insertion followed by sick sinus syndrome (33.62%), symptomatic high-grade AV block (11.20%). Hypertension (dual chamber 21.55%, single chamber 40.51%) was the most common comorbidity in both cohorts. Complications occurred in 11 (9.48%) patients. More proportion of complication occurred in single chamber group (9 patients, 12.50%) than in dual chamber (2 patients, 4.54%). Complications occurring in dual chamber group include

  9. Vascular complications (splenic and hepatic artery aneurysms) in the occipital horn syndrome: report of a patient and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentzel, H.-J.; Seidel, J.; Vogt, L.; Vogt, S.; Kaiser, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    We report an 18-year-old boy with occipital horn syndrome who developed aneurysms of the splenic and hepatic arteries. Occipital horn syndrome, also called X-linked cutis laxa or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IX, is characterised by a skeletal dysplasia which includes occipital horns, broad clavicles, deformed radii, ulnae and humeri, narrow rib cage, undercalcified long bones and coxa valga. Distinctive features common to all patients are unusual facial appearance, hypermobility of finger joints, limitation of extension of elbows, chronic diarrhoea and genitourinary abnormalities. In this case report we describe the difficulties encountered in the diagnostic management of patients with EDS-related vascular lesions. (orig.)

  10. Early diagnosis of congenital vascular malformation as a condition to rapid prevention of complications – case study

    OpenAIRE

    Dominika Jaguś; Agata Rutkowska; Paweł Wareluk

    2017-01-01

    Klippel–Trénaunay syndrome is a rare congenital condition characterised by a triad of symptoms: capillary-lymphatic-venous malformations, varicose veins and venous malformations as well as soft tissue and skeletal hypertrophy of the affected limb. In this article, we present a case of a 5-year-old boy with extensive vascular malformations of the lower limbs and the buttock region. In this case, manifestation of all three symptoms was gradual. At the age of 4 years, the patient was ad...

  11. Vascular complications (splenic and hepatic artery aneurysms) in the occipital horn syndrome: report of a patient and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentzel, H.-J. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Jena (Germany)]|[Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bachstrasse 18, D-07 740 Jena (Germany); Seidel, J.; Vogt, L. [Department of Paediatrics, University of Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Jena/Thueringen (Germany); Vogt, S.; Kaiser, W.A. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Jena (Germany)

    1999-01-01

    We report an 18-year-old boy with occipital horn syndrome who developed aneurysms of the splenic and hepatic arteries. Occipital horn syndrome, also called X-linked cutis laxa or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IX, is characterised by a skeletal dysplasia which includes occipital horns, broad clavicles, deformed radii, ulnae and humeri, narrow rib cage, undercalcified long bones and coxa valga. Distinctive features common to all patients are unusual facial appearance, hypermobility of finger joints, limitation of extension of elbows, chronic diarrhoea and genitourinary abnormalities. In this case report we describe the difficulties encountered in the diagnostic management of patients with EDS-related vascular lesions. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 12 refs.

  12. Incidence of vascular complications in patients submitted to percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty by transradial and transfemoral arterial approach Incidencia de complicaciones vasculares en pacientes sometidos a angioplastía coronaria transluminal percutánea por vía arterial transradial y transfemoral Incidência de complicações vasculares em pacientes submetidos a angioplastia coronariana transluminal percutânea por via arterial transradial e transfemoral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinez Kellermann Armendaris

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the vascular complications of transradial and transfemoral artery punctures in patients submitted to percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA. METHODS: Prospective cohort study including patients submitted to PTCA. An interview was performed and an instrument applied to collect risk factors/predictors of complications. After the procedure, a physical examination was performed, vital signs were measured and the puncture site was assessed. RESULTS: 199 patients were included, age 64±10 years. Complications found for the radial and femoral approach were respectively: ecchymosis (18.29%, (17.14%; bruising (17.66%, (14.27%; urinary retention (2.43%, (25.71%; loss of vessel permeability (8.53%, (0%. CONCLUSION: The complications found were considered minor or secondary, depending on the classification found in literature. A higher rate of vascular complications related to transradial artery punctures compared to the interventions performed by transfemoral approach.OBJETIVO: Describir complicaciones vasculares relacionadas a punciones arteriales transradial y transfemoral en pacientes sometidos a angioplastía coronaria transluminal percutánea (ACTP. MÉTODOS: Se trata de un estudio de cohorte prospectivo realizado con pacientes sometidos a ACTP. Se llevó a cabo una entrevista y aplicó un instrumento para obtener factores de riesgo/predictores. Fue realizado un examen físico, medición de signos vitales y se evaluó el lugar de punción. RESULTADOS: Fueron incluidos 199 pacientes, edad 64±10 años. Las complicaciones encontradas para vía radial y femoral respectivamente, fueron: esquimosis (18,29%, (17,14%; hematoma (17,66%, (14,27%; retención urinaria (2,43%, (25,71%; pérdida de permeabilidad de vaso (8,53%, (0%. CONCLUSIÓN: Las complicaciones fueron consideradas menores o secundarias conforme clasificación literaria. Existe una mayor incidencia de complicaciones vasculares relacionadas a punciones

  13. ACCRETA COMPLICATING COMPLETE PLACENTA PREVIA IS CHARACTERIZED BY REDUCED SYSTEMIC LEVELS OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR AND EPITHELIAL-TO-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION OF THE INVASIVE TROPHOBLAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrum, Mark J.; Buhimschi, Irina A.; Salafia, Carolyn; Thung, Stephen; Bahtiyar, Mert O.; Werner, Erica F.; Campbell, Katherine H.; Laky, Christine; Sfakianaki, Anna K.; Zhao, Guomao; Funai, Edmund F.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize serum angiogenic factor profile of women with complete placenta previa and determine if invasive trophoblast differentiation characteristic of accreta, increta or percreta shares features of epitehelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT). STUDY DESIGN We analyzed gestational age matched serum samples from 90 pregnant women with either complete placenta previa (n=45) or uncomplicated pregnancies (n=45). Vascular-endothelial-growth-factor (VEGF), placental-growth-factor (PlGF) and soluble fms-like-tyrosine-kinase-1 (sFlt-1) were immunoassayed. VEGF and phosphotyrosine (P-Tyr) immunoreactivity was surveyed in histological specimens relative to expression of vimentin and cytokeratin-7. RESULTS Women with previa and invasive placentation [accreta (n=5); increta (n=6); percreta (n=2)] had lower systemic VEGF (invasive previa: median [IQR]: 0.8[0.02–3.4] vs. control: 6.5[2.7–10.5] pg/mL, P=0.02). VEGF and P-Tyr immunostaining predominated in the invasive extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) which co-expressed vimentin and cytokeratin-7, a EMT feature and tumor-like cell phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Lower systemic free VEGF and a switch of the interstitial EVT to a metastable cell phenotype characterize placenta previa with excessive myometrial invasion. PMID:21316642

  14. Acidente vascular cerebral e outras complicações do sistema nervoso central nas doenças falciformes Stroke and other vascular complications of the central nervous system in sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan L. Angulo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A principal complicação da doença falciforme na infância é a das artérias cerebrais, mas após os 20 anos também pode se manifestar, como seqüela de lesões anteriores ou neoformadas. A vasculopatia tem a maior importância no desenvolvimento da criança e na qualidade de vida. Além do acidente vascular cerebral completo ou incompleto ("silencioso", existem outras complicações do sistema nervoso central, porém não exclusivas. O diagnóstico da vasculopatia cerebral falciforme necessita auxílio neurorradiológico. O tratamento se faz basicamente com transfusões de eritrócitos contendo hemoglobina A. O objetivo deste trabalho é rever a literatura médica, procurando selecionar a melhor conduta em diagnóstico e tratamento que seja possível empregar de imediato, para reduzir a morbidade e mortalidade da vasculopatia cerebral e elevar a qualidade de vida dos pacientes, principalmente na infância. Os fatores de risco clínicos e laboratoriais, incluindo a triagem por ultra-sonografia Doppler das artérias cerebrais e imagens de ressonância magnética, devem influenciar a decisão de instituir transfusões crônicas e a quelação do ferro transfusional deve acompanhar este tratamento.In children with sickle cell disease, cerebral arteries are prone to lesions that may cause deficiencies and poor quality of life. After the age of 20, new lesions may also occur. Besides stroke and silent cerebral ischemia, other lesions may occur. Radiologic images are necessary to diagnose and blood transfusions to treat. We reviewed the literature to choose best practices and guidelines to reduce morbidity and mortality and improve the quality of life of children with sickle cell disease. Risk factors identified from clinical and laboratory data and screening by Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance must be used in order to make decisions about transfusion and iron chelation therapy.

  15. Comparison of vancomycin and linezolid in patients with peripheral vascular disease and/or diabetes in an observational European study of complicated skin and soft-tissue infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, C; Nathwani, D; Lawson, W; Corman, S; Solem, C; Stephens, J; Macahilig, C; Li, J; Charbonneau, C; Baillon-Plot, N; Haider, S

    2015-09-01

    Suboptimal antibiotic penetration into soft tissues can occur in patients with poor circulation due to peripheral vascular disease (PVD) or diabetes. We conducted a real-world analysis of antibiotic treatment, hospital resource use and clinical outcomes in patients with PVD and/or diabetes receiving linezolid or vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (MRSA cSSTIs) across Europe. This subgroup analysis evaluated data obtained from a retrospective, observational medical chart review study that captured patient data from 12 European countries. Data were obtained from the medical records of patients ≥ 18 years of age, hospitalized with an MRSA cSSTI between 1 July 2010 and 30 June 2011 and discharged alive by 31 July 2011. Hospital length of stay and length of treatment were compared between the treatment groups using inverse probability of treatment weights to adjust for clinical and demographic differences. A total of 485 patients had PVD or diabetes and received treatment with either vancomycin (n = 258) or linezolid (n = 227). After adjustment, patients treated with linezolid compared with vancomycin respectively had significantly shorter hospital stays (17.9 ± 13.6 vs. 22.6 ± 13.6 days; p linezolid and vancomycin groups, respectively (p linezolid compared with vancomycin. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Genito-Urinary Function and Quality of Life after Elective Totally Laparoscopic Sigmoidectomy after at Least One Episode of Complicated Diverticular Disease According to Two Different Vascular Approaches: the IMA Low Ligation or the IMA Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Giulio; Crippa, Jacopo; Costanzi, Andrea; Mazzola, Michele; Magistro, Carmelo; Ferrari, Giovanni; Maggioni, Dario

    2017-01-01

    The arterial ligation during elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for diverticular disease can affect genito-urinary function injuring the superior hypogastric plexus, and can weaken the distal colonic stump arterial perfusion. Ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery distal to the left colic artery or the complete preservation of the inferior mesenteric artery can therefore be compared in terms of preservation of the descending sympathetic fibres running along the aorta to the rectum resulting in a different post operative genito urinary function. From January 2015 to March 2016, 66 patients underwent elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for diverticular disease among two enrolling hospitals. In one centre 35 patients underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with the ligation of the inferior mesenteric artery distal to the left colic artery (low ligation). In the other centre 31 patient were operated on the same procedure with complete inferior mesenteric artery preservation (IMA preservation). There was no difference in terms of major complication occurred, first passage of stool and length of hospital stay between the two groups. Time of surgery was significantly shorter in LL group compared to IMA preserving group and intra operative blood loss was significantly lower in the LL group. There were no differences in the genito urinary function between the two group pre operatively, at 1 and 9 months post operatively. Genito urinary function did not significantly change across surgery in each groups. The low ligation and the IMA preserving vascular approach are safe end feasible techniques in elective laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for diverticular disease. They both prevent from genito-urinary post-operative disfunction and allow good post operative quality of life. The low ligation approach is related to shorter operative time and slower intra operative blood loss. Celsius.

  17. Thrombophilia and Pregnancy Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise E. Simcox

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a paucity of strong evidence associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and thrombophilia in pregnancy. These problems include both early (recurrent miscarriage and late placental vascular-mediated problems (fetal loss, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption and intra-uterine growth restriction. Due to poor quality case-control and cohort study designs, there is often an increase in the relative risk of these complications associated with thrombophilia, particularly recurrent early pregnancy loss, late fetal loss and pre-eclampsia, but the absolute risk remains very small. It appears that low-molecular weight heparin has other benefits on the placental vascular system besides its anticoagulant properties. Its use is in the context of antiphospholipid syndrome and recurrent pregnancy loss and also in women with implantation failure to improve live birth rates. There is currently no role for low-molecular weight heparin to prevent late placental-mediated complications in patients with inherited thrombophilia and this may be due to small patient numbers in the studies involved in summarising the evidence. There is potential for low-molecular weight heparin to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with prior severe vascular complications of pregnancy such as early-onset intra-uterine growth restriction and pre-eclampsia but further high quality randomised controlled trials are required to answer this question.

  18. Endovascular Management of Vascular Injury during Transsphenoidal Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Çinar, C.; Bozkaya, H.; Parildar, M.; Oran, I.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular injury is an unusual and serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery. We aimed to define the role of angiography and endovascular treatment in patients with vascular injuries occurring during transsphenoidal surgery.

  19. VASCULAR SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-02

    Jun 2, 2016 ... with the literature from South Africa over the last four decades, and reflects the high rate of interpersonal violence in the country.14,15 As expected, cervical ... via the intact circle of Willis in young patients is the most likely explanation for the lack of strokes. Five patients were referred to the Durban vascular ...

  20. Vascular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Vascular Disorders Email to a friend * required fields ...

  1. Skin Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Skin Complications Diabetes can affect every part of the ... lipoidica diabeticorum, diabetic blisters, and eruptive xanthomatosis. General Skin Conditions Bacterial Infections Several kinds of bacterial infections ...

  2. Diphtheria Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diphtheria Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Diphtheria Home About Diphtheria Causes and Transmission Symptoms Complications ...

  3. Venous thromboembolism and arterial complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandoni, Paolo; Piovella, Chiara; Pesavento, Raffaele

    2012-04-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests the likelihood of a link between venous and arterial thrombosis. The two vascular complications share several risk factors, such as age, obesity, smoking, diabetes mellitus, blood hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and metabolic syndrome. Moreover, there are many examples of conditions accounting for both venous and arterial thrombosis, such as the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, hyperhomocysteinemia, malignancies, infections, and the use of hormonal treatment. Finally, several recent studies have consistently shown that patients with venous thromboembolism are at a higher risk of arterial thrombotic complications than matched control individuals. We, therefore, speculate the two vascular complications are simultaneously triggered by biological stimuli responsible for activating coagulation and inflammatory pathways in both the arterial and the venous system. Future studies are needed to clarify the nature of this association, to assess its extent, and to evaluate its implications for clinical practice. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia), gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke) and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up. PMID:26473833

  5. Cardiovascular Complications of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Gongora

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy causes significant metabolic and hemodynamic changes in a woman’s physiology to allow for fetal growth. The inability to adapt to these changes might result in the development of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (hypertension, preeclampsia or eclampsia, gestational diabetes and preterm birth. Contrary to previous beliefs these complications are not limited to the pregnancy period and may leave permanent vascular and metabolic damage. There is in addition, a direct association between these disorders and increased risk of future cardiovascular disease (CVD, including hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke and diabetes mellitus. Despite abundant evidence of this association, women who present with these complications of pregnancy do not receive adequate postpartum follow up and counseling regarding their increased risk of future CVD. The postpartum period in these women represents a unique opportunity to intervene with lifestyle modifications designed to reduce the development of premature cardiovascular complications. In some cases it allows early diagnosis and treatment of chronic hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The awareness of this relationship is growing in the medical community, especially among obstetricians and primary care physicians, who play a pivotal role in detecting these complications and assuring appropriate follow up.

  6. Vascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, D B; Ricci, M A

    1998-04-01

    Surgeon-interpreted diagnostic ultrasound has become the preferred screening test and often the definitive test for the diagnosis of arterial stenosis, aneurysm, and venous thrombosis. As a modality for surveillance, its noninvasive quality makes it particularly appealing as the test of choice to screen patients for abdominal aortic aneurysms or to perform follow-up examinations on those patients with a carotid endartectomy or in situ bypass grafts. The increasing reliance on intraoperative duplex imaging of vascular procedures demands that the surgeon learn the skills to perform the studies without a technologist or radiologist to interpret the examination.

  7. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Pitale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke. It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD. These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ′Barker′s Hypothesis′. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological.

  8. Puberty as an accelerator for diabetes complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Hi; Craig, Maria E; Donaghue, Kim C

    2014-02-01

    Much is written about how difficult it is to deal with diabetes during adolescence, and rightly so. Less is understood as to how puberty may be an accelerator of vascular complications. With the increase in childhood diabetes, complication risks need to be revisited in relation to puberty and the secular increase in adiposity. Recent data suggest greater risk for severe vascular complications in those with diabetes during puberty, compared with young people who develop diabetes after puberty. It is also widely recognized that higher hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) results are often seen during the pubertal period. This article will review complication outcomes in relation to puberty and examine mechanisms by which puberty may modify risk above glycemic exposure, and possible gender disparities in the risk of complications in the adolescent period. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Complications of acucise endopyelotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, F J; Herrell, S D; Jahoda, A E; Albala, D M

    1998-10-01

    Endoscopic management of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction has a success rate of 80% to 86%. We have been performing a ureteral cutting balloon procedure under fluoroscopic control (Acucise endopyelotomy) for UPJ obstruction at Loyola University Medical Center since 1991. The overall success rate in 77 patients was 78%. All patients had a preoperative intravenous urogram or a retrograde pyelogram, but none had vascular imaging studies. Acucise endopyelotomy consisted of a posterolateral incision of the UPJ and placement of an endopyelotomy or double-J stent. Foley catheter placement at the end of the procedure demonstrated significant gross hematuria in three patients (4%). All three remained hemodynamically stable but with significant drops in postprocedure hemoglobin levels, which necessitated blood transfusion. Aggressive management included angiographic studies and embolization of lower-pole branching arteries in two patients (3%). One patient stopped bleeding after being given two units of blood. None of the patients required an open exploratory procedure. Although the risk of vascular injury is low with Acucise endopyelotomy, prolonged postoperative gross hematuria does mandate investigation and observation. Angiographic embolization appears to be the therapeutic modality of choice for patients with hemorrhagic complications after an Acucise endopyelotomy.

  10. [Localized purpura revealing vascular prosthetic graft infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureau, A S; Lescalie, F; Cassagnau, E; Clairand, R; Connault, J

    2013-07-01

    Prosthetic graft infection after vascular reconstruction is a rare but serious complication. We report a case of infection occurring late after implantation of an iliofemoral prosthetic vascular graft. The Staphylococcus aureus infection was revealed by vascular purpura localized on the right leg 7 years after implantation of a vascular prosthesis. This case illustrates an uncommonly late clinical manifestation presenting as an acute infection 7 years after the primary operation. In this situation, the presentation differs from early infection, which generally occurs within the first four postoperative months. Diagnosis and treatment remain a difficult challenge because prosthetic graft infection is a potentially life-threatening complication. Morbidity and mortality rates are high. Here we detail specific aspects of the clinical and radiological presentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Postoperative radiographic evaluation of vascularized fibular grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaster, B.J.; Coleman, D.A.; Bell, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on thirty-five patients with free vascularized fibular grafts examined postoperatively with plain radiography. Early graft incorporation is seen as a fuzziness of the cortex at the site of its insertion into the host bone. Causes of failure in grafting for bone defects include graft fracture, hardware failure, and infection. A high percentage of complications or at least delayed unions occurred when vascularized fibular grafts were used to fill defects in the lower extremity. Conversely, upper extremity defects bridged by vascularized grafts heal quickly and hypertrophy. Vascularized grafts placed in the femoral head and neck for a vascular necrosis incorporate early on their superior aspect. The osseous tunnel in which they are placed is normally wider than the graft and often becomes sclerotic; this appearance does not represent nonunion

  12. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture in Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batagini, Nayara Cioffi; Gornik, Heather; Kirksey, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (VEDS) is a rare autosomal dominant collagen vascular disorder. Different from other Ehler-Danlos Syndrome subtypes, VEDS has poor prognosis due to severe fragility of connective tissues and association with life-threatening vascular and gastrointestinal complications. Spontaneous splenic rupture is a rare but hazardous complication related to this syndrome. To date, only 2 cases have been reported in the literature. Here we present another case of this uncommon complication, occurring in a 54-year-old woman in clinical follow-up for VEDS who presented with sudden onset of abdominal pain and hypotension. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Vascular access: the impact of ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Saldanha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular punctures are often necessary in critically ill patients. They are secure, but not free of complications. Ultrasonography enhances safety of the procedure by decreasing puncture attempts, complications and costs. This study reviews important publications and the puncture technique using ultrasound, bringing part of the experience of the intensive care unit of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo (SP), Brazil, and discussing issues that should be considered in future studies. PMID:28076607

  14. [Vascular access guidelines for hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Hernández, J A; González Parra, E; Julián Gutiérrez, J M; Segarra Medrano, A; Almirante, B; Martínez, M T; Arrieta, J; Fernández Rivera, C; Galera, A; Gallego Beuter, J; Górriz, J L; Herrero, J A; López Menchero, R; Ochando, A; Pérez Bañasco, V; Polo, J R; Pueyo, J; Ruiz, Camps I; Segura Iglesias, R

    2005-01-01

    Quality of vascular access (VA) has a remarkable influence in hemodialysis patients outcomes. Dysfunction of VA represents a capital cause of morbi-mortality of these patients as well an increase in economical. Spanish Society of Neprhology, aware of the problem, has decided to carry out a revision of the issue with the aim of providing help in comprehensión and treatment related with VA problems, and achieving an homogenization of practices in three mayor aspects: to increase arteriovenous fistula utilization as first vascular access, to increment vascular access monitoring practice and rationalise central catheters use. We present a consensus document elaborated by a multidisciplinar group composed by nephrologists, vascular surgeons, interventional radiologysts, infectious diseases specialists and nephrological nurses. Along six chapters that cover patient education, creation of VA, care, monitoring, complications and central catheters, we present the state of the art and propose guidelines for the best practice, according different evidence based degrees, with the intention to provide help at the professionals in order to make aproppiate decissions. Several quality standars are also included.

  15. Hyperhomocysteinemia, pregnancy complications, and the timing of investigation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.; Iersel, C.A. van; Peer, P.G.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Steegers, E.A.P.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess associations between vitamin-dependent homocysteine metabolism and vascular-related pregnancy complications by considering interval between delivery and postpartum investigation and maternal age. METHODS: Case-control study performed at the University Medical Center Nijmegen in

  16. Bioprinting for vascular and vascularized tissue biofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pallab; Ayan, Bugra; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2017-03-15

    Bioprinting is a promising technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision. Bioprinting enables the deposition of various biologics including growth factors, cells, genes, neo-tissues and extra-cellular matrix-like hydrogels. Benefits of bioprinting have started to make a mark in the fields of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and pharmaceutics. Specifically, in the field of tissue engineering, the creation of vascularized tissue constructs has remained a principal challenge till date. However, given the myriad advantages over other biofabrication methods, it becomes organic to expect that bioprinting can provide a viable solution for the vascularization problem, and facilitate the clinical translation of tissue engineered constructs. This article provides a comprehensive account of bioprinting of vascular and vascularized tissue constructs. The review is structured as introducing the scope of bioprinting in tissue engineering applications, key vascular anatomical features and then a thorough coverage of 3D bioprinting using extrusion-, droplet- and laser-based bioprinting for fabrication of vascular tissue constructs. The review then provides the reader with the use of bioprinting for obtaining thick vascularized tissues using sacrificial bioink materials. Current challenges are discussed, a comparative evaluation of different bioprinting modalities is presented and future prospects are provided to the reader. Biofabrication of living tissues and organs at the clinically-relevant volumes vitally depends on the integration of vascular network. Despite the great progress in traditional biofabrication approaches, building perfusable hierarchical vascular network is a major challenge. Bioprinting is an emerging technology to fabricate design-specific tissue constructs due to its ability to create complex, heterocellular structures with anatomical precision

  17. Extravascular complications following abdominal organ transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, G.; Jaremko, J.L.; Lomas, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of transplants have been performed in the abdomen including liver, kidney, pancreas and islet, bowel, and multivisceral transplants. Imaging plays an important role in graft surveillance particularly to exclude post-transplant complications. When complications occur, therapeutic image-guided interventions are invaluable as these may be graft-saving and even life-saving. Vascular complications following transplantation have been extensively reported in recent reviews. The focus of this review is to discuss post-transplant complications that are primarily extravascular in location. This includes biliary, urological, intestinal, malignancy, infections, and miscellaneous complications. Familiarity with the imaging appearances of these complications is helpful for radiologists as accurate diagnosis and expedient treatment has an impact on graft and patient survival

  18. Vascularized osseous graft for scaphoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Daza, Carlos Hernan; Mathoulin, Cristophe

    2004-01-01

    The most commonly used technique for treatment of pseudo-arthrosis of the scaphoid is osteo-synthesis with Kirschnet wires and cortical sponge grafts. Results reported by different teams using this procedure show no more than 90% osseous consolidation, especially in cases where vascularisation of the proximal fragment of the scaphoid is compromised. Here we present a series of ten cases of pseudo-arthrosis of the scaphoid, treated using a new surgical technique involving a vascularized osseous graft of the distal radius. Using this procedure we obtained 100% consolidation, with no complications either during the procedure or immediately post-operatively. Patients returned to work in week 15 on average. In 4 cases we observed discomfort in the area of the scar, which was successfully treated using local cortisone injection. The results obtained are very similar to those seen in the literature on the different techniques for vascularized osseous grafts for pseudo-arthrosis of the scaphoid

  19. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Vascular phenotypes in nonvascular subtypes of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'hondt, Sanne; Van Damme, Tim; Malfait, Fransiska

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Within the spectrum of the Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), vascular complications are usually associated with the vascular subtype of EDS. Vascular complications are also observed in other EDS subtypes, but the reports are anecdotal and the information is dispersed. To better document the nature of vascular complications among “nonvascular” EDS subtypes, we performed a systematic review. Methods We queried three databases for English-language studies from inception until May 2017, documenting both phenotypes and genotypes of patients with nonvascular EDS subtypes. The outcome included the number and nature of vascular complications. Results A total of 112 papers were included and data were collected from 467 patients, of whom 77 presented with a vascular phenotype. Severe complications included mainly hematomas (53%), frequently reported in musculocontractural and classical-like EDS; intracranial hemorrhages (18%), with a high risk in dermatosparaxis EDS; and arterial dissections (16%), frequently reported in kyphoscoliotic and classical EDS. Other, more minor, vascular complications were reported in cardiac-valvular, arthrochalasia, spondylodysplastic, and periodontal EDS. Conclusion Potentially life-threatening vascular complications are a rare but important finding in several nonvascular EDS subtypes, highlighting a need for more systematic documentation. This review will help familiarize clinicians with the spectrum of vascular complications in EDS and guide follow-up and management. PMID:28981071

  1. The changing face of complicated infantile hemangioma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menapace, Deanna [Creighton University School of Medicine, Phoenix Regional Campus, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education-MN, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Rochester, MN (United States); Mitkov, Mario [Creighton University School of Medicine, Phoenix Regional Campus, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Towbin, Richard [Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Hogeling, Marcia [University of California, Los Angeles, Division of Dermatology, Santa Monica, CA (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Infantile hemangiomas are the most common vascular tumors of infancy. A multidisciplinary approach including dermatologists, otolaryngologists, plastic surgeons, hematologists/oncologists and interventional/diagnostic radiologists is crucial for appropriate management of children with complicated infantile hemangiomas. Since its unforeseen discovery in 2008, propranolol has become the first-line treatment for infantile hemangiomas, eclipsing systemic corticosteroids and radiologic intervention. There are still, however, uncommon indications for more aggressive interventional management. We review the 2014-updated International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) classification for vascular anomalies. Additionally, we suggest management algorithms for complicated lesions, including recommendations for radiologic and surgical intervention. (orig.)

  2. Imaging evaluation of complications after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Mingyue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is an effective treatment for end-stage chronic liver diseases and acute liver failure. With the rapid development of surgical techniques, organ preservation technology, and pharmacotherapy, patients' survival rates are improved constantly. However, postoperative complications are still major influencing factors for postoperative incidence and mortality rates. Since clinical and laboratory examinations lack specificity and it is difficult to diagnose various postoperative complications, the application of imaging techniques effectively solves such problems. This article summarizes the imaging findings of common complications after liver transplantation, such as vascular complications, biliary complications, liver parenchyma lesions, and postoperative infection, and points out that imaging examinations have significant advantages and can be used for comprehensive evaluation of disease progression.

  3. Experimental results and clinical impact of using autologous rectus fascia sheath for vascular replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobori, Laszlo; Nemeth, Tibor; Nagy, Peter; Dallos, Gabor; Sotonyi, Peter; Fehervari, Imre; Nemes, Balazs; Gorog, Denes; Patonai, Attila; Monostory, Katalin; Doros, Attila; Sarvary, Enikoe; Fazakas, Janos; Gerlei, Zsuzsanna; Benkoe, Tamas; Piros, Laszlo; Jaray, Jeno; De Jong, Koert P.

    Vascular complications are major causes of graft failure in liver transplantation. The use of different vascular grafts is common but the results are controversial. The aim of this study was to create an 'ideal' arterial interponate for vascular replacements in the clinical field. An autologous,

  4. Micro and macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of vascular complications among diabetes patients (DP), to find out the relationship with risk factors and to assess the effect of diabetic check-up (DC) in the onset of these complications. Methods: Clinical and laboratory data of DP followed between ...

  5. Insulin resistance: vascular function and exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Hyon Hwang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance associated with metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an epidemic metabolic disorder, which increases the risk of cardiovascular complications. Impaired vascular endothelial function is an early marker for atherosclerosis, which causes cardiovascular complications. Both experimental and clinical studies indicate that endothelial dysfunction in vasculatures occurs with insulin resistance. The associated physiological mechanisms are not fully appreciated yet, however, it seems that augmented oxidative stress, a physiological imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants, in vascular cells is a possible mechanism involved in various vascular beds with insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Regardless of the inclusion of resistance exercise, aerobic exercise seems to be beneficial for vascular endothelial function in both large conduit and small resistance vessels in both clinical and experimental studies with insulin resistance. In clinical cases, aerobic exercise over 8 weeks with higher intensity seems more beneficial than the cases with shorter duration and lower intensity. However, more studies are needed in the future to elucidate the physiological mechanisms by which vascular endothelial function is impaired in insulin resistance and improved with aerobic exercise.

  6. Arteriographic evaluation, in the perispheric vascular trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patino, Jairo Hernando; Granados, Ana Maria; Lopera B, Jorge; Prada W, Angela Maria

    1993-01-01

    136 patients were angiographically studied under the suspicion of perispheric vascular lesion submitted to the radiology department of the San Vicente de Paul University Hospital (H.U.S.VP.) Medellin Colombia. The majority of the patients were young with wounds caused by gunshots (79.4%). the must frequent angiographic indication was the proximity of the wound to a vascular path (44.5%). 63% of the patients with angiography indicative of abnormality needed surgery from which 21% were because of the proximity of the wound to a vascular path and 76% because of the mayor findings when admitted to the hospital. the possible complications as a result of the angiographic procedure were revised only find inc two mayor reactions to the contrast media. there were no late complications. Angiography is highlighting sensitive (100%) specific (98.5%) and secure in the evaluation of patients with perispheric vascular trauma. Due to the high number of false negatives when the physical examination is performed, every patient with a wound near a vascular path must be evaluated angiographically

  7. Cardiac, renal and vascular complications in the diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Zanchetti

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes has long been known to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes have also been shown to benefit more from antihypertensive therapy than do non-diabetics with hypertension. The benefits of aggressive antihypertensive therapy are reflected in the recent reduction of blood pressure (BP targets in international guidelines. Drugs acting on the reninangiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS have well-documented efficacy, and results from large-scale trials with highly selective angiotensin II (Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs, such as valsartan, are awaited. The VALUE trial will provide the largest body of information yet on the comparative benefits of using an ARB or calcium channel blocker in hypertensive patients with diabetes.

  8. Vascular access complications and risk factors in hemodialysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tarek A. Ghonemy

    2015-08-18

    Aug 18, 2015 ... BMI were significant in patients with central blood infection (p < 0.008, <0.008 and <0.001 ... grafts) for hemodialysis over using the venous catheter as they ... were subjected to the following: thorough full history taking.

  9. Subclinical hypothyroidism ups the risk of vascular complications in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghada A. Mohamed

    a Department of Internal Medicine, Assiut Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Egypt ... Undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction may affect the metabolic control and ..... thyroid dysfunction: a joint statement on management from the American.

  10. Burden and pattern of micro vascular complications in type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos University Teaching ... age, duration of diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidaemia for nephropathy and ... of diabetes related cardiovascular disease (CVD) espe- ... exudates, cotton wool spots or macula oedema23. ..... management of dyslipidemia and prevention of athero-.

  11. Bilirubin levels determine vascular complications in diabetes mellitus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu V Pankratova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по материалам статьи Katsiki N, Karagiannis A, Mikhailidis DP. Diabetes, bilirubin and amputations: is there a link? Diabetologia. DOI 10.1007/s00125-013-2840-1

  12. Intravitreal Bevacizumab: Indications and Complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, S.; Nazim, M.; Karim, S.; Hussain, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bevacizmab is still an unlicensed drug for intraocular use in spite of the fact that it has shown comparable efficacy to other anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF) medications in some large sample randomized control trails. Although repackaged bevacizumab has got safety concerns but its use is growing because of easy availability and low cost. Our study focuses on the diverse and growing indications of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) and its ocular complications in our geographical setting. Method: This interventional case series was carried out at my private practice in Said Anwar Medical Complex, Dabgari, Peshawar, from January 2008 to July 2015. Total of 6107 injections were given to 4352 eyes. Intravitreal bevacizumab was injected in proper operating room setting. Bevacizumab injections were prepared from same vial by multiple withdrawals taking care of aseptic precautions. Follow up was done at 1 week and 20 days and adverse effects were noted. Results: Diabetic macular oedema (36 percent), central retinal vein occlusion (17.6 percent) and branched retinal vein occlusion (11 percent) were the top three indications of IVB. Other common indications were proliferative diabetic retinopathy (9.6 percent), neo-vascular glaucoma (5.9 percent), proliferative diabetic retinopathy with vitreous bleed (4.4 percent), proliferative diabetic retinopathy with tractional retinal detachment (3.7 percent), neo-vascular age related macular degeneration (2.9 percent), central serous retinopathy (1.48 percent) and Eale disease (1.48 percent). Endohthalmitis occurred in 3 eyes (0.069 percent) while retinal detachment was found in only 2 eyes (0.046 percent).Conclusion: Common indications of bevacizumab are diabetic macular oedema, central retinal vein occlusion and branched retinal vein occlusion. Complications like endophthalmitis and retinal detachment are rare. (author)

  13. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  14. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0–14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1–2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only 5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters. PMID:20981425

  15. Enhanced Recovery after Vascular Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena D. Stojanovic

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The beginnings of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS program were first developed for patients in colorectal surgery, and after it was established as the standard of care in this surgical field, it began to be applied in many others surgical areas. This is multimodal, evidence-based approach program and includes simultaneous optimization of preoperative status of patients, adequate selection of surgical procedure and postoperative management. The aim of this program is to reduce complications, the length of hospital stay and to improve the patients outcome. Over the past decades, special attention was directed to the postoperative management in vascular surgery, especially after major vascular surgery because of the great risk of multiorgan failure, such as: respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, hemodynamic instability, coagulopathy, renal failure, neurological disorders, and intra-abdominal complications. Although a lot of effort was put into it, there is no unique acceptable program for ERAS in this surgical field, and there is still a need to point out the factors responsible for postoperative outcomes of these patients. So far, it is known that special attention should be paid to already existing diseases, type and the duration of the surgical intervention, hemodynamic and fluid management, nutrition, pain management, and early mobilization of patients.

  16. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taourel, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)], E-mail: p-taourel@chu-montpellier.fr; Vernhet, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier (France); Suau, A.; Granier, C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Lopez, F.M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Nimes (France); Aufort, S. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)

    2007-10-15

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications.

  17. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taourel, P.; Vernhet, H.; Suau, A.; Granier, C.; Lopez, F.M.; Aufort, S.

    2007-01-01

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications

  18. Perioperative smoking cessation in vascular surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, M.; Heesemann, Sabine; Tonnesen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effect of intensive smoking cessation programs on postoperative complications has never before been assessed in soft tissue surgery when smoking cessation is initiated on the day of surgery. Methods: A single-blinded randomized clinical trial conducted at two vascular surgery...... departments in Denmark. The intervention group was offered the Gold Standard Program (GSP) for smoking cessation intervention. The control group was offered the departments' standard care. Inclusion criteria were patients with planned open peripheral vascular surgery and who were daily smokers. According...

  19. Tube Thoracostomy: Complications and Its Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeka B. Kesieme

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended.

  20. Tube Thoracostomy: Complications and Its Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesieme, Emeka B.; Dongo, Andrew; Ezemba, Ndubueze; Irekpita, Eshiobo; Jebbin, Nze; Kesieme, Chinenye

    2012-01-01

    Background. Tube thoracostomy is widely used throughout the medical, surgical, and critical care specialities. It is generally used to drain pleural collections either as elective or emergency. Complications resulting from tube thoracostomy can occasionally be life threatening. Aim. To present an update on the complications and management of complications of tube thoracostomy. Methods. A review of the publications obtained from Medline search, medical libraries, and Google on tube thoracostomy and its complications was done. Results. Tube thoracostomy is a common surgical procedure which can be performed by either the blunt dissection technique or the trocar technique. Complication rates are increased by the trocar technique. These complications have been broadly classified as either technical or infective. Technical causes include tube malposition, blocked drain, chest drain dislodgement, reexpansion pulmonary edema, subcutaneous emphysema, nerve injuries, cardiac and vascular injuries, oesophageal injuries, residual/postextubation pneumothorax, fistulae, tumor recurrence at insertion site, herniation through the site of thoracostomy, chylothorax, and cardiac dysrhythmias. Infective complications include empyema and surgical site infection. Conclusion. Tube thoracostomy, though commonly performed is not without risk. Blunt dissection technique has lower risk of complications and is hence recommended. PMID:22028963

  1. Complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrù, Emanuele, E-mail: surgeon.ema@gmail.com [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Roccatagliata, Luca, E-mail: lroccatagliata@neurologia.unige.it [Neuroradiology Department, IRCCS San Martino University Hospital and IST, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, Genoa 16132 (Italy); Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa (Italy); Cester, Giacomo, E-mail: giacomo.cester@sanita.padova.it [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Causin, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.causin@sanita.padova.it [Neuroradiology Department, Padua University Hospital, Via Giustiniani 2, Padua 35128 (Italy); Castellan, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.castellan@hsanmartino.it [Neuroradiology Department, IRCCS San Martino University Hospital and IST, Largo Rosanna Benzi 10, Genoa 16132 (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    The number of neuroendovascular treatments of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has increased substantially in the last two decades. Complications of endovascular treatments of cerebral aneurysms are rare but can potentially lead to acute worsening of the neurological status, to new neurological deficits or death. Some of the possible complications, such as vascular access site complications or systemic side effects associated with contrast medium (e.g. contrast medium allergy, contrast induced nephropathy) can also be encountered in diagnostic angiography. The most common complications of endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms are related to acute thromboembolic events and perforation of the aneurysm. Overall, the reported rate of thromboembolic complications ranges between 4.7% and 12.5% while the rate of intraprocedural rupture of cerebral aneurysms is about 0.7% in patients with unruptured aneurysms and about 4.1% in patients with previously ruptured aneurysms. Thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications may occur during different phases of endovascular procedures and are related to different technical, clinical and anatomic reasons. A thorough knowledge of the different aspects of these complications can reduce the risk of their occurrence and minimize their clinical sequelae. A deep understanding of complications and of their management is thus part of the best standard of care.

  2. Intraoperative digital angiography: Peripheral vascular applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, K.; Reifsteck, J.E.; Binet, E.F.; Fleisher, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Intraoperative digital angiography is the procedure of choice for the peripheral vascular surgeon who wishes to evaluate his results before terminating anesthesia. Two operating suites at the John L. McClellan Memorial Veterans Hospital are equipped with permanent ceiling-mounted Philips C-arm fluoroscopes and share an ADAC 4100 digital angiographic system. In the last 18 months, 40 peripheral vascular intraoperative digital angiographic procedures have been performed, in all but two cases using direct arterial puncture. In 65% of cases, the intraoperative study showed no significant abnormality. In 12.5%, minor abnormalities not requiring reoperation were seen. In 22.5% of cases, the intraoperative digital angiogram revealed a significant abnormality requiring immediate operative revision. None of the patients who underwent reoperation experienced postoperative sequelae. Intraoperative digital angiography is useful in identifying complications of peripheral vascular operations

  3. Pediatric Liver Transplant: Techniques and Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Natally; Marcelino, Antonio Sergio Zafred; Horvat, Joao Vicente; Yamanari, Tássia Regina; Batista Araújo-Filho, Jose de Arimateia; Panizza, Pedro; Seda-Neto, Joao; Antunes da Fonseca, Eduardo; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Mendes de Oliveira Cerri, Luciana; Chapchap, Paulo; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2017-10-01

    Liver transplant is considered to be the last-resort treatment approach for pediatric patients with end-stage liver disease. Despite the remarkable advance in survival rates, liver transplant remains an intricate surgery with significant morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis of complications is crucial for patient survival but is challenging given the lack of specificity in clinical presentation. Knowledge of the liver and vascular anatomy of the donor and the recipient or recipients before surgery is also important to avoid complications. In this framework, radiologists play a pivotal role on the multidisciplinary team in both pre- and postoperative scenarios by providing a road map to guide the surgery and by assisting in diagnosis of complications. The most common complications after liver transplant are (a) vascular, including the hepatic artery, portal vein, hepatic veins, and inferior vena cava; (b) biliary; (c) parenchymal; (d) perihepatic; and (e) neoplastic. The authors review surgical techniques, the role of each imaging modality, normal posttransplant imaging features, types of complications after liver transplant, and information required in the radiology report that is critical to patient care. They present an algorithm for an imaging approach for pediatric patients after liver transplant and describe key points that should be included in radiologic reports in the pre- and postoperative settings. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2017.

  4. Pulmonary gangrene as a complication of mucormycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagoria, R.J.; Choplin, R.H.; Karstaedt, N.

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary gangrene, a rare complication of pneumonia occurs when vascular thrombosis leads to necrosis of a large portion of lung. The devitalized lung is then sloughed into a cavity, resulting in a characteristic radiographic appearance. The previously reported cases of pulmonary gangrene have been associated with either bacterial or tuberculous pneumonia; the authors describe a case resulting from mucormycosis. In addition to the plain-film findings, the computed tomographic (CT) appearance is described

  5. Complications associated with radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid Pérez, J M; García Barquín, P M; Villanueva Marcos, A J; García Bolao, J I; Bastarrika Alemañ, G

    Radiofrequency ablation is an efficacious alternative in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation who do not respond to or are intolerant to at least one class I or class III antiarrhythmic drug. Although radiofrequency ablation is a safe procedure, complications can occur. Depending on the location, these complications can be classified into those that affect the pulmonary veins themselves, cardiac complications, extracardiac intrathoracic complications, remote complications, and those that result from vascular access. The most common complications are hematomas, arteriovenous fistulas, and pseudoaneurysms at the puncture site. Some complications are benign and transient, such as gastroparesis or diaphragmatic elevation, whereas others are potentially fatal, such as cardiac tamponade. Radiologists must be familiar with the complications that can occur secondary to pulmonary vein ablation to ensure early diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...... for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer....

  7. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...... impact for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer....

  8. Endothelial dysfunction in metabolic and vascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovina, Marija M; Potpara, Tatjana S

    2014-03-01

    Vascular endothelium has important regulatory functions in the cardiovascular system and a pivotal role in the maintenance of vascular health and metabolic homeostasis. It has long been recognized that endothelial dysfunction participates in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis from early, preclinical lesions to advanced, thrombotic complications. In addition, endothelial dysfunction has been recently implicated in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Considering that states of insulin resistance (eg, metabolic syndrome, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and T2DM) represent the most prevalent metabolic disorders and risk factors for atherosclerosis, it is of considerable scientific and clinical interest that both metabolic and vascular disorders have endothelial dysfunction as a common background. Importantly, endothelial dysfunction has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with established cardiovascular disease, and a growing body of evidence indicates that endothelial dysfunction also imparts adverse prognosis in states of insulin resistance. In this review, we discuss the association of insulin resistance and T2DM with endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, with a focus on the underlying mechanisms and prognostic implications of the endothelial dysfunction in metabolic and vascular disorders. We also address current therapeutic strategies for the improvement of endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Congenital vascular malformations in scintigraphic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilecki, Stanisław; Gierach, Marcin; Gierach, Joanna; Świętaszczyk, Cyprian; Junik, Roman; Lasek, Władysław

    2014-01-01

    Congenital vascular malformations are tumour-like, non-neoplastic lesions caused by disorders of vascular tissue morphogenesis. They are characterised by a normal cell replacement cycle throughout all growth phases and do not undergo spontaneous involution. Here we present a scintigraphic image of familial congenital vascular malformations in two sisters. A 17-years-old young woman with a history of multiple hospitalisations for foci of vascular anomalies appearing progressively in the upper and lower right limbs, chest wall and spleen. A Parkes Weber syndrome was diagnosed based on the clinical picture. Due to the occurrence of new foci of malformations, a whole-body scintigraphic examination was performed. A 12-years-old girl reported a lump in the right lower limb present for approximately 2 years, which was clinically identified as a vascular lesion in the area of calcaneus and talus. Phleboscintigraphy visualized normal radiomarker outflow from the feet via the deep venous system, also observed in the superficial venous system once the tourniquets were released. In static and whole-body examinations vascular malformations were visualised in the area of the medial cuneiform, navicular and talus bones of the left foot, as well as in the projection of right calcaneus and above the right talocrural joint. People with undiagnosed disorders related to the presence of vascular malformations should undergo periodic follow-up to identify lesions that may be the cause of potentially serious complications and to assess the results of treatment. Presented scintigraphic methods may be used for both diagnosing and monitoring of disease progression

  10. Vascular access for home haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shakarchi, Julien; Day, C; Inston, N

    2018-03-01

    Home haemodialysis has been advocated due to improved quality of life. However, there are very little data on the optimum vascular access for it. A retrospective cohort study was carried on all patients who initiated home haemodialysis between 2011 and 2016 at a large university hospital. Access-related hospital admissions and interventions were used as primary outcome measures. Our cohort consisted of 74 patients. On initiation of home haemodialysis, 62 individuals were using an arteriovenous fistula as vascular access, while the remaining were on a tunnelled dialysis catheter. Of the 12 patients who started on a tunnelled dialysis catheter, 5 were subsequently converted to either an arteriovenous fistula ( n = 4) or an arteriovenous graft ( n = 1). During the period of home haemodialysis use, four arteriovenous fistula failed or thrombosed with patients continuing on home haemodialysis using an arteriovenous graft ( n = 3) or a tunnelled dialysis catheter ( n = 1). To maintain uninterrupted home haemodialysis, interventional rates were 0.32 per arteriovenous fistula/arteriovenous graft access-year and 0.4 per tunnelled dialysis catheter access-year. Hospital admission rates for patients on home haemodialysis were 0.33 per patient-year. Our study has shown that home haemodialysis can be safely and independently performed at home within a closely managed home haemodialysis programme. The authors also advocate the use of arteriovenous fistulas for this cohort of patients due to both low complication and intervention rates.

  11. Vascular Access in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh; Keller, Marc S.

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the “expert procedural pyramid” is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  12. Pediatric vascular access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiologists are ideally suited to provide vascular access services to children because of inherent safety advantages and higher success from using image-guided techniques. The performance of vascular access procedures has become routine at many adult interventional radiology practices, but this service is not as widely developed at pediatric institutions. Although interventional radiologists at some children's hospitals offer full-service vascular access, there is little or none at others. Developing and maintaining a pediatric vascular access service is a challenge. Interventionalists skilled in performing such procedures are limited at pediatric institutions, and institutional support from clerical staff, nursing staff, and technologists might not be sufficiently available to fulfill the needs of such a service. There must also be a strong commitment by all members of the team to support such a demanding service. There is a slippery slope of expected services that becomes steeper and steeper as the vascular access service grows. This review is intended primarily as general education for pediatric radiologists learning vascular access techniques. Additionally, the pediatric or adult interventional radiologist seeking to expand services might find helpful tips. The article also provides education for the diagnostic radiologist who routinely interprets radiographs containing vascular access devices. (orig.)

  13. Flu Symptoms & Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Flu Symptoms & Complications Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... not everyone with flu will have a fever. Flu Complications Most people who get influenza will recover ...

  14. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Shoulder dystocia Shoulder dystocia Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... women more likely than others to have shoulder dystocia? A pregnant woman may be at risk for ...

  15. Complications and Deaths - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  16. Complications and Deaths - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - state data. This data set includes state-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the CMS Patient Safety Indicators, and 30-day...

  17. Skin Complications of IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  18. Pregnancy Complications: Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Preeclampsia Preeclampsia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... even if you’re feeling fine. What is preeclampsia? Preeclampsia is a serious blood pressure condition that ...

  19. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  20. Complications and Deaths - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - provider data. This data set includes provider data for the hip/knee complication measure, CMS Patient Safety Indicators of serious...

  1. Complications and Deaths - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications and deaths - national data. This data set includes national-level data for the hip/knee complication measure, the CMS Patient Safety Indicators, and...

  2. Genetic examination of SETD7 and SUV39H1/H2 methyltransferases and the risk of diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syreeni, Anna; El-Osta, Assam; Forsblom, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Hyperglycemia plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of vascular complications, which are the major sources of morbidity and mortality in diabetes. Furthermore, these vascular complications often persist and progress despite improved glucose control, possibly as a result of prior......, and SUV39H2 methyltransferases as predictors of risk for micro- and macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes....

  3. Vascular malformations in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Shamdeen, M.G.

    2003-01-01

    Vascular malformations are the cause of nearly all non-traumatic intracranial hemorrhage in children beyond the neonatal stage. Therefore, any child presenting with spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage should be evaluated for child abuse and for vascular malformations. Intracerebral malformations of the cerebral vasculature include vein of Galen malformations, arteriovenous malformation (AVM), cavernomas, dural arteriovenous fistulas, venous anomalies (DVA), and capillary teleangiectasies. Although a few familial vascular malformation have been reported, the majority are sporadic. Clinical symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic options are discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Complicated Horseshoe Kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, K. S.; Kim, S. R.; Cha, K. S.; Park, S. S. [Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Horseshoe kidney is an important urological anomaly when it is complicated or accompanied by other diseases. Recently we have experienced four cases of horseshoe kidney which were complicated with hydronephrosis, renal stone and adrenal pheochromocytoma. With review of literatures, we emphasize the importance of detection of these complications.

  5. Complicated Horseshoe Kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. S.; Kim, S. R.; Cha, K. S.; Park, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    Horseshoe kidney is an important urological anomaly when it is complicated or accompanied by other diseases. Recently we have experienced four cases of horseshoe kidney which were complicated with hydronephrosis, renal stone and adrenal pheochromocytoma. With review of literatures, we emphasize the importance of detection of these complications.

  6. Vascular injuries after bear attacks: Incidence, surgical challenges and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Abdul Gani; Lone, Gh Nabi; Lone, Reyaz Ahmad; Ashraf, Hakeem Zubair; Dar, Abdul Majeed; Bhat, M A; Singh, Shyam; Bijli, Akram Hussain; Irshad, Ifat

    2011-01-01

    Bear mauling is rarely reported in medical literature due to its rare occurrence. Present study was undertaken to describe the pattern and management of bear maul vascular injuries in Kashmir. Study of patients with bear maul vascular injury from 1(st) Jan 2004 to 31(st) Dec. 2008. Fifteen patients with bear maul vascular injury were studied. All patients of bear maul without vascular injury were excluded from the study. Most of the patients were treated by reverse saphenous vein graft or end to end anastomosis. Most common complication was wound infection (20%) followed by graft occlusion (13.33%). There was no operative death. Bear attacks are very common in Kashmir. Vascular injury due to bear maul needs prompt resuscitation and revascularization. Results are very good provided timely intervention for revascularization is done.

  7. Metabolic complications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sycova-Mila, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, a lot of space and time is devoted to the therapy of oncologic diseases itself. To reach the good therapy results, complex care of the oncologic patient is needed. Management of complications linked with the disease itself and management of complications emerged after administration of chemotherapy, radiotherapy or targeted therapy, plays a significant role. In addition to infectious, hematological, neurological, cardiac or other complications, metabolic complications are relatively extensive and serious. One of the most frequent metabolic complications in oncology is tumor lysis syndrome, hyperuricemia, hypercalcaemia and syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. (author)

  8. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  9. Magnetic resonance vascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axel, L

    1989-01-01

    The basis principles of MRI are reviewed in order to understand how blood flow effects arise in conventional imaging. Then some of the ways these effects have ben used in MRI techniques specifically designed for vascular imaging, are considered. (author)

  10. Complications of wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Zahab S; Yao, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the incidence of complications associated with wrist arthroscopy. Given the paucity of information published on this topic, an all-inclusive review of published wrist arthroscopy complications was sought. Two independent reviewers performed a literature search using PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, and Academic Megasearch using the terms "wrist arthroscopy complications," "complications of wrist arthroscopy," "wrist arthroscopy injury," and "wrist arthroscopy." Inclusion criteria were (1) Levels I to V evidence, (2) "complication" defined as an adverse outcome directly related to the operative procedure, and (3) explicit description of operative complications in the study. Eleven multiple-patient studies addressing complications of wrist arthroscopy from 1994 to 2010 were identified, with 42 complications reported from 895 wrist arthroscopy procedures, a 4.7% complication rate. Four case reports were also found, identifying injury to the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve, injury to the posterior interosseous nerve, and extensor tendon sheath fistula formation. This systematic review suggests that the previously documented rate of wrist arthroscopy complications may be underestimating the true incidence. The report of various complications provides insight to surgeons for improving future surgical techniques. Level IV, systematic review of Levels I-V studies. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Surveillance of Hemodialysis Vascular Access with Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Lindskov Hansen, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    -functioning vascular access with as few complications as possible and preferred vascular access is an AVF. Dysfunction due to stenosis is a common complication, and regular monitoring of volume flow is recommended to preserve AVF patency. UDT is considered the gold standard for volume flow surveillance, but VFI has...... proven to be more precise, when performing single repeated instantaneous measurements. Three patients with AVF were monitored with UDT and VFI monthly for five months. A commercial ultrasound scanner with a 9 MHz linear array transducer with integrated VFI was used to obtain data. UDT values were...... be used for surveillance of volume flow....

  12. Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction and electrophysi......Cardiovascular complications of cirrhosis include cardiac dysfunction and abnormalities in the central, splanchnic and peripheral circulation, and haemodynamic changes caused by humoral and nervous dysregulation. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy implies systolic and diastolic dysfunction....... The clinical significance of cardiovascular complications and cirrhotic cardiomyopathy is an important topic for future research, and the initiation of new randomised studies of potential treatments for these complications is needed....

  13. Complications of mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Biljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation of the lungs, as an important therapeutic measure, cannot be avoided in critically ill patients. However, when machines take over some of vital functions there is always a risk of complications and accidents. Complications associated with mechanical ventilation can be divided into: 1 airway-associated complications; 2 complications in the response of patients to mechanical ventilation; and 3 complications related to the patient’s response to the device for mechanical ventilation. Complications of artificial airway may be related to intubation and extubation or the endotracheal tube. Complications of mechanical ventilation, which arise because of the patient’s response to mechanical ventilation, may primarily cause significant side effects to the lungs. During the last two decades it was concluded that mechanical ventilation can worsen or cause acute lung injury. Mechanical ventilation may increase the alveolar/capillary permeability by overdistension of the lungs (volutrauma, it can exacerbate lung damage due to the recruitment/derecruitment of collapsed alveoli (atelectrauma and may cause subtle damages due to the activation of inflammatory processes (biotrauma. Complications caused by mechanical ventilation, beside those involving the lungs, can also have significant effects on other organs and organic systems, and can be a significant factor contributing to the increase of morbidity and mortality in critically ill of mechanically ventilated patients. Complications are fortunately rare and do not occur in every patient, but due to their seriousness and severity they require extensive knowledge, experience and responsibility by health-care workers.

  14. Overview of vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisset, G.S. III

    1998-01-01

    Vascular disease in the pediatric population is a poorly understood process which is often underestimated in its incidence. The common beginnings of such ubiquitous diseases as atherosclerosis manifest themselves at a cellular level shortly after birth. Other common systemic disorders, including congestive heart failure and sepsis, are also intricately associated with dysfunctional vasculature. Progress in the understanding of normal and pathophysiologic processes within the vascular system begins with the 'control center' - the endothelial cell. The purpose of this review is to consolidate a body of knowledge on the processes that occur at the cellular level within the blood vessel wall, and to simplify the understanding of how imbalances in these physiologic parameters result in vascular disease. (orig.)

  15. Pathogenesis of diabetic vascular disease: evidence for the role of reduced heparan sulfate proteoglycan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tonny Joran

    1997-01-01

    that albuminuria is a marker of widespread vascular dysfunction. Increased transport of macromolecules across the vascular wall, elevated plasma levels of von Willebrand factor, and impaired fibrinolytic capacity have been demonstrated in albuminuric patients. The cause of this vascular vulnerability...... problems. What are the mechanisms of action of glycosaminoglycans at the molecular biology level, and how can we select compounds without anticoagulant activity suitable for long-term use in the prevention and treatment of late diabetic complications?...

  16. Sinogenic intracranial complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Mikkel Seremet; Fisker, Niels; Christensen, Anne Estmann

    2018-01-01

    We present two 11-year-old girls with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, treated with adalimumab. Both developed severe intracranial complications to sinusitis. Patient 1 had been treated with adalimumab for 15 months when she developed acute sinusitis complicated by an orbital abscess, ...

  17. Vascular Augmentation in Renal Transplantation: Supercharging and Turbocharging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euicheol C. Jeong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The most common anatomic variant seen in donor kidneys for renal transplantation is the presence of multiple renal arteries, which can cause an increased risk of complications. Accessory renal arteries should be anastomosed to the proper source arteries to improve renal perfusion via the appropriate vascular reconstruction techniques. In microsurgery, 2 kinds of vascular augmentation methods, known as ‘supercharging’ and ‘turbocharging,’ have been introduced to ensure vascular perfusion in the transferred flap. Supercharging uses a distant source of the vessels, while turbocharging uses vascular sources within the same flap territory. These technical concepts can also be applied in renal transplantation, and in this report, we describe 2 patients who underwent procedures using supercharging and turbocharging. In one case, the ipsilateral deep inferior epigastric artery was transposed to the accessory renal artery (supercharging, and in the other case, the accessory renal artery was anastomosed to the corresponding main renal artery with a vascular graft (turbocharging. The transplanted kidneys showed good perfusion and proper function. No cases of renal failure, hypertension, rejection, or urologic complications were observed. These microsurgical techniques can be safely utilized for renal transplantation with donor kidneys that have multiple arteries with a lower complication rate and better outcome.

  18. Vascular Augmentation in Renal Transplantation: Supercharging and Turbocharging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Euicheol C; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Eo, Su Rak

    2017-05-01

    The most common anatomic variant seen in donor kidneys for renal transplantation is the presence of multiple renal arteries, which can cause an increased risk of complications. Accessory renal arteries should be anastomosed to the proper source arteries to improve renal perfusion via the appropriate vascular reconstruction techniques. In microsurgery, 2 kinds of vascular augmentation methods, known as 'supercharging' and 'turbocharging,' have been introduced to ensure vascular perfusion in the transferred flap. Supercharging uses a distant source of the vessels, while turbocharging uses vascular sources within the same flap territory. These technical concepts can also be applied in renal transplantation, and in this report, we describe 2 patients who underwent procedures using supercharging and turbocharging. In one case, the ipsilateral deep inferior epigastric artery was transposed to the accessory renal artery (supercharging), and in the other case, the accessory renal artery was anastomosed to the corresponding main renal artery with a vascular graft (turbocharging). The transplanted kidneys showed good perfusion and proper function. No cases of renal failure, hypertension, rejection, or urologic complications were observed. These microsurgical techniques can be safely utilized for renal transplantation with donor kidneys that have multiple arteries with a lower complication rate and better outcome.

  19. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia.

  20. Type 2 diabetes mellitus : prevention of macrovascular complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwisse-Pasterkamp, Susanne H; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease that affects a rapidly increasing number of patients. Most patients with Type 2 diabetes will develop vascular complications. This may be microvascular disease, such as nephropathy, retinopathy or polyneuropathy, and also macrovascular disease, such as coronary

  1. Case Report: Corneal Pyogenic Granuloma: Rare Complication of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Slit lamp examination showed vascularized central corneal mass with surrounding stromal infiltrates. The mass was excised, and histopathological examination confirmed pyogenic granuloma of the cornea. Conclusion: Corneal pyogenic granuloma could be a rare complication of infectious keratitis. Therefore, it should be ...

  2. Matrix ageing and vascular impacts: focus on elastin fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duca, Laurent; Blaise, Sébastien; Romier, Béatrice; Laffargue, Muriel; Gayral, Stéphanie; El Btaouri, Hassan; Kawecki, Charlotte; Guillot, Alexandre; Martiny, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent; Maurice, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death worldwide and represent a major problem of public health. Over the years, life expectancy has considerably increased throughout the world, and the prevalence of CVD is inevitably rising with the growing ageing of the population. The normal process of ageing is associated with progressive deterioration in structure and function of the vasculature, commonly called vascular ageing. At the vascular level, extracellular matrix (ECM) ageing leads to molecular alterations in long half-life proteins, such as elastin and collagen, and have critical effects on vascular diseases. This review highlights ECM alterations occurring during vascular ageing with a specific focus on elastin fragmentation and also the contribution of elastin-derived peptides (EDP) in age-related vascular complications. Moreover, current and new pharmacological strategies aiming at minimizing elastin degradation, EDP generation, and associated biological effects are discussed. These strategies may be of major relevance for preventing and/or delaying vascular ageing and its complications. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Initial experience with the Cardiva Boomerang vascular closure device in diagnostic catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Brendan J; Godfrey, Michael J; Lennon, Ryan J; Ryan, James L; Bresnahan, John F; Rihal, Charanjit S; Ting, Henry H

    2007-02-01

    The authors studied the safety and efficacy of the Cardiva Boomerang vascular closure device in patients undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Conventional vascular closure devices (sutures, collagen plugs, or metal clips) have been associated with catastrophic complications including arterial occlusion and foreign body infections; furthermore, they cannot be utilized in patients with peripheral vascular disease or vascular access site in a vessel other than the common femoral artery. The Cardiva Boomerang device facilitates vascular hemostasis without leaving any foreign body behind at the access site, can be used in peripheral vascular disease, and can be used in vessels other than the common femoral artery A total of 96 patients undergoing transfemoral diagnostic cardiac catheterization were included in this study, including 25 (26%) patients with contraindications to conventional closure devices. Femoral angiography was performed prior to deployment of the Cardiva Boomerang closure device. Patients were ambulated at 1 hr after hemostasis was achieved. The device was successfully deployed and hemostasis achieved with the device alone in 95 (99%) patients. The device failed to deploy in 1 (1%) patient and required conversion to standard manual compression. Minor complications were observed in 5 (5%) patients. No patients experienced major complications including femoral hematoma > 4 cm, red blood cell transfusion, retroperitoneal bleed, arteriovenous fistula, pseudoaneurysm, infection, arterial occlusion, or vascular surgery. The Cardiva Boomerang device is safe and effective in patients undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization using the transfemoral approach, facilitating early ambulation with low rates of vascular complications. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/CT Scanning in Diagnosing Vascular Prosthetic Graft Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saleem, Ben R.; Pol, Robert A.; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular prosthetic graft infection (VPGI) is a severe complication after vascular surgery. CT-scan is considered the diagnostic tool of choice in advanced VPGI. The incidence of a false-negative result using CT is relatively high, especially in the presence of low-grade infections.

  5. Complications of hip fractures: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpintero, Pedro; Caeiro, Jose Ramón; Carpintero, Rocío; Morales, Angela; Silva, Samuel; Mesa, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fracture surgery represents a big part of the orthopedic surgeon workload, and usually has associated major clinical and social cost implications. These fractures have several complications. Some of these are medical, and other related to the surgical treatment itself. Medical complications may affect around 20% of patients with hip fracture. Cognitive and neurological alterations, cardiopulmonary affections (alone or combined), venous thromboembolism, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, urinary tract complications, perioperative anemia, electrolytic and metabolic disorders, and pressure scars are the most important medical complications after hip surgery in terms of frequency, increase of length of stay and perioperative mortality. Complications arising from hip fracture surgery are fairly common, and vary depending on whether the fracture is intracapsular or extracapsular. The main problems in intracapsular fractures are biological: vascularization of the femoral head, and lack of periosteum -a major contributor to fracture healing- in the femoral neck. In extracapsular fractures, by contrast, the problem is mechanical, and relates to load-bearing. Early surgical fixation, the role of anti-thromboembolic and anti-infective prophylaxis, good pain control at the perioperative, detection and management of delirium, correct urinary tract management, avoidance of malnutrition, vitamin D supplementation, osteoporosis treatment and advancement of early mobilization to improve functional recovery and falls prevention are basic recommendations for an optimal maintenance of hip fractured patients. PMID:25232517

  6. Radiographic complications of biologic response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miketic, L.M.; Bahnson, R.R.; Ernstoff, M.S.; Kirkwood, J.M.; Nair, S.; Logan, T.; Downs, M.A.; Neuhart, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Biologic response modifiers, such as the interferons, are increasingly used in the treatment of cancer as an adjunct to conventional chemotherapy. In certain malignancies, particularly renal cell carcinoma, they are becoming agents of choice due to higher tumor response rate. The authors have reviewed 202 patients. Protocols include interferon, interleukin, tumor necrosis factor, and monoclonal antibodies. The radiology of significant clinical complications is discussed, especially the vascular leak syndrome often seen with interleukin administration and the cardiac toxicity of interferon. Less common abnormalities include progressive splenomegaly in one interferon study and a hemorrhagic episode caused by tumor necrosis factor

  7. [Surgical complications of colostomies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, Hazem; Affes, Nejmeddine; Rejab, Haitham; Abid, Bassem; Boujelbene, Salah; Mzali, Rafik; Beyrouti, Mohamed Issam

    2014-07-01

    The colostomy may be terminal or lateral, temporary or permanent. It may have psychological, medical or surgical complications. reporting the incidence of surgical complications of colostomies, their therapeutic management and trying to identify risk factors for their occurrence. A retrospective study for a period of 5 years in general surgery department, Habib Bourguiba hospital, Sfax, including all patients operated with confection of a colostomy. Were then studied patients reoperated for stoma complication. Among the 268 patients who have had a colostomy, 19 patients (7%) developed surgical stoma complications. They had a mean age of 59 years, a sex ratio of 5.3 and a 1-ASA score in 42% of cases. It was a prolapse in 9 cases (reconfection of the colostomy: 6 cases, restoration of digestive continuity: 3 cases), a necrosis in 5 cases (reconfection of the colostomy), a plicature in 2 cases (reconfection of the colostomy) a peristomal abscess in 2 cases (reconfection of the colostomy: 1 case, restoration of digestive continuity: 1 case) and a strangulated parastomal hernia in 1 case (herniorrhaphy). The elective incision and the perineal disease were risk factors for the occurrence of prolapse stomial. Surgical complications of colostomies remain a rare event. Prolapse is the most common complication, and it is mainly related to elective approach. Reoperation is often required especially in cases of early complications, with usually uneventful postoperative course.

  8. Management of vascular trauma from dog bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akingba, A George; Robinson, Eric A; Jester, Andrea L; Rapp, Brian M; Tsai, Anthony; Motaganahalli, Raghu L; Dalsing, Michael C; Murphy, Michael P

    2013-11-01

    Vascular trauma from large-dog bites present with a combination of crush and lacerating injuries to the vessel, as well as significant adjacent soft tissue injury and a high potential for wound complications. This retrospective case series evaluates our 15 years of experience in managing this uncommonly seen injury into suggested treatment recommendations. From our database, 371 adult patients presented with dog bites between July 1997 and June 2012. Twenty (5.4%) of those patients had vascular injuries requiring surgical intervention. Patient demographics, anatomic location of injury, clinical presentation, imaging modality, method of repair, and complication rates were reviewed to assess efficacy in preserving limb function. Pediatric patients were managed at the regional children's hospital and, therefore, not included in this study. Among the 20 surgically treated vascular injuries, there were 13 arterial-only injuries, two venous-only injuries, and five combination arterial and venous injuries. Seventeen patients (85%) had upper extremity injuries; three patients had lower extremity injuries (15%). The axillobrachial artery was the most commonly injured single vessel (n = 9/20; 45%), followed by the radial artery (n = 4/20; 20%). Surgical repair of vascular injuries consisted of resection and primary anastomosis (four), interposition bypass of artery with autogenous vein (13), and ligation (two), with (one) being a combination of bypass and ligation. All patients had debridement of devitalized tissue combined with pulse lavage irrigation and perioperative antibiotics. Associated injuries requiring repair included muscle and skin (n = 10/20; 50%), bone (n = 1/20; 5%), nerve (n = 1/20; 5%), and combinations of the three (n = 5/20; 25%). Postoperative antibiotic therapy was administered for 14.7 ± 8.2 days in all 20 patients. Four patients (20%) developed postoperative wound infections, although this did not compromise their vascular repair. Of the patients

  9. Imaging of osteochondroma complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Fernando Santos Emerich; Lewin, Fabio; Mariotti, Guilherme Cayres; Capasso Filho, Mauro; Yamaguchi, Claudia Kazue; Cruz, Rafael O.; Baptista, Pedro Pericles Ribeiro; Yonamine, Eduardo Sadao; Prospero, Jose Donato

    2007-01-01

    Osteochondroma is the most common entity beyond all the known osseous tumors. It is a lesion with a high enlargement capacity and a continuous growing in some cases, and it may determine complications, mainly due to mass effect. It may be present in a solitary or multiple forms, and the last one is related with a higher tendency to sarcomatous transformation, which is the most frightening complication. The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate, through an iconographic assay, the most common complications caused by the osteochondromas, making the correlation of its clinical and radiological aspects. (author)

  10. Can femoral dialysis catheter insertion cause a life threatening complication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurkay Katrancıoğlu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous catheter (VC insertion may be necessary for the patients with renal failure facing vascular access problem. Femoral VCs are commonly used for their lower complication rates especially in emergency clinics. The incidence of bleeding associated with VC is reported 0.5-1.6%, however, life threatening hemorrhage and complications requiring surgical intervention are very rare. In this manuscript, we aimed to present a case with hemolytic uremic syndrome complicated with retroperitoneal hematoma after femoral VC insertion. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 472-474

  11. Complications of Laparoscopic Retroperitoneal Sutureless and Clampless Aortobifemoral Bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Segers

    Full Text Available : Introduction: This report describes our experience with early complications that occurred in two patients who underwent sutureless aortobifemoral bypass using the EndoVascular REtroperitoneoScopic Technique (EVREST. Report: Two patients who underwent EVREST for aortoiliac TASC D lesions experienced a dislocation of the proximal assembly. The first dislocation occurred four hours post-operatively and led to the death of the patient, and the second occurred during surgery and led to open conversion. Conclusion: As a result of these serious complications, we recommend the use of anchorage stitches while using an endograft connector in a sutureless aortobifemoral bypass. Keywords: Early complications, Sutureless, Clampless, Retroperitoneoscopy, Aortobifemoral bypass

  12. Biomaterial-mediated strategies targeting vascularization for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José R; García, Andrés J

    2016-04-01

    Repair of non-healing bone defects through tissue engineering strategies remains a challenging feat in the clinic due to the aversive microenvironment surrounding the injured tissue. The vascular damage that occurs following a bone injury causes extreme ischemia and a loss of circulating cells that contribute to regeneration. Tissue-engineered constructs aimed at regenerating the injured bone suffer from complications based on the slow progression of endogenous vascular repair and often fail at bridging the bone defect. To that end, various strategies have been explored to increase blood vessel regeneration within defects to facilitate both tissue-engineered and natural repair processes. Developments that induce robust vascularization will need to consolidate various parameters including optimization of embedded therapeutics, scaffold characteristics, and successful integration between the construct and the biological tissue. This review provides an overview of current strategies as well as new developments in engineering biomaterials to induce reparation of a functional vascular supply in the context of bone repair.

  13. Advanced Maternal Age Worsens Postpartum Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude S. Morton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The age at which women experience their first pregnancy has increased throughout the decades. Pregnancy has an important influence on maternal short- and long-term cardiovascular outcomes. Pregnancy at an advanced maternal age increases maternal risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, placenta previa and caesarian delivery; complications which predict worsened cardiovascular health in later years. Aging also independently increases the risk of cardiovascular disease; therefore, combined risk in women of advanced maternal age may lead to detrimental cardiovascular outcomes later in life. We hypothesized that pregnancy at an advanced maternal age would lead to postpartum vascular dysfunction. We used a reproductively aged rat model to investigate vascular function in never pregnant (virgin, previously pregnant (postpartum and previously mated but never delivered (nulliparous rats at approximately 13.5 months of age (3 months postpartum or equivalent. Nulliparous rats, in which pregnancy was spontaneously lost, demonstrated significantly reduced aortic relaxation responses (methylcholine [MCh] Emax: 54.2 ± 12.6% vs. virgin and postpartum rats (MCh Emax: 84.8 ± 3.5% and 84.7 ± 3.2% respectively; suggesting pregnancy loss causes a worsened vascular pathology. Oxidized LDL reduced relaxation to MCh in aorta from virgin and postpartum, but not nulliparous rats, with an increased contribution of the LOX-1 receptor in the postpartum group. Further, in mesenteric arteries from postpartum rats, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH-mediated vasodilation was reduced and a constrictive prostaglandin effect was apparent. In conclusion, aged postpartum rats exhibited vascular dysfunction, while rats which had pregnancy loss demonstrated a distinct vascular pathology. These data demonstrate mechanisms which may lead to worsened outcomes at an advanced maternal age; including early pregnancy loss and later life cardiovascular dysfunction.

  14. [Gastric vascular lesions in cirrhosis: gastropathy and antral vascular ectasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Meritxell; Calvet, Xavier; Vergara, Mercedes; Bella, Maria Rosa; Junquera, Félix; Martinez-Bauer, Eva; Campo, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Portal hypertensive gastropathy (GHP) is a complication of portal hypertension usually associated with liver cirrhosis. The pathogenesis is unclear but the presence of portal hypertension is an essential factor for its development. GHP may be asymptomatic or present as gastrointestinal bleeding or iron deficiency anemia. Endoscopic lesions vary from a mosaic pattern to diffuse red spots; the most common location is the fundus. Treatment is indicated when there is acute or chronic bleeding, as secondary prophylaxis. There is insufficient evidence to recommend primary prophylaxis in patients who have never bled. Drugs that decrease portal pressure, such as non-cardioselective beta-blockers, and/or endoscopic ablative treatments, such as argon-beam coagulation, may be used. The role of transarterial intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) or bypass surgery has been insufficiently analyzed. Antral vascular ectasia (EVA) is a rare entity in liver cirrhosis, whose pathophysiology is still unknown. Clinical presentation is similar to that of GHP and endoscopy usually shows red spots in the antrum. Biopsy is often required to differentiate EVA from GHP. There is no effective medical therapy, so endoscopic ablative therapy and, in severe cases, antrectomy are recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  15. Vascular access: a never-ending story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, U

    2014-12-01

    Vascular surgeons are more and more becoming responsible for "life-line" creation well functioning and maintenance of hemodialysis patients and to provide a well functioning and multidisciplinary access service together with nefrologists, dialysis staff, and interventional radiology. For many, this sometimes arduous surgery with associated complicated clinical decision making, becomes a constant and challenging burden but much through the appearance of national and international guidelines and especially the endovascular technology, feasible solutions are easily at hand and the life as an access surgeon more pleasant. Here, basics in dialysis access care are presented together with some examples of novel available solutions to troublesome clinical problems.

  16. Disruptive technological advances in vascular access for dialysis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Wee-Song; Ng, Qin Xiang

    2017-11-29

    End-stage kidney disease (ESKD), one of the most prevalent diseases in the world and with increasing incidence, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current available modes of renal replacement therapy (RRT) include dialysis and renal transplantation. Though renal transplantation is the preferred and ideal mode of RRT, this modality may not be available to all patients with ESKD. Moreover, renal transplant recipients are constantly at risk of complications associated with immunosuppression and immunosuppressant use, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Dialysis may be the only available modality in certain patients. However, dialysis has its limitations, which include issues associated with lack of vascular access, risks of infections and vascular thrombosis, decreased quality of life, and absence of biosynthetic functions of the kidney. In particular, the creation and maintenance of hemodialysis vascular access in children poses a unique set of challenges to the pediatric nephrologist owing to the smaller vessel diameters and vascular hyperreactivity compared with adult patients. Vascular access issues continue to be one of the major limiting factors prohibiting the delivery of adequate dialysis in ESKD patients and is the Achilles' heel of hemodialysis. This review aims to provide a critical overview of disruptive technological advances and innovations for vascular access. Novel strategies in preventing neointimal hyperplasia, novel bioengineered products, grafts and devices for vascular access will be discussed. The potential impact of these solutions on improving the morbidity encountered by dialysis patients will also be examined.

  17. Postoperative rectal anastomotic complications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polanecký, O.; Adámek, S.; Šedý, Jiří; Skořepa, J.; Hladík, P.; Šmejkal, M.; Pafko, P.; Lischke, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 12 (2014), s. 781-785 ISSN 0006-9248 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : human * complication * anastomosis * rectum Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2014

  18. Complications of Circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J. Krill

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, circumcision is a commonly performed procedure. It is a relatively safe procedure with a low overall complication rate. Most complications are minor and can be managed easily. Though uncommon, complications of circumcision do represent a significant percentage of cases seen by pediatric urologists. Often they require surgical correction that results in a significant cost to the health care system. Severe complications are quite rare, but death has been reported as a result in some cases. A thorough and complete preoperative evaluation, focusing on bleeding history and birth history, is imperative. Proper selection of patients based on age and anatomic considerations as well as proper sterile surgical technique are critical to prevent future circumcision-related adverse events.

  19. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Search Controls Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Pertussis Home About Pertussis Causes & Transmission Signs & Symptoms Complications ...

  1. Neurologic complications in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pace

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic side effects related to cancer therapy are a common problem in oncology practice. These complications can negatively affect the management of the patient, because they can inhibit treatment and diminish quality of life. Therefore specific skills are required to recognise symptoms and clinical manifestations. This review focuses on the most common neurologic complications to improve physician’s familiarity in determining the aetiology of these symptoms.

  2. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Complications in Hip Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent developments in hip arthroscopic techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical dislocation for treating a variety of pathology in the hip. Although early reports suggest favourable results’ using hip arthroscopy and it has been shown to be a relatively safe procedure, complications do exist and can sometimes lead to significant morbidity. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to present the most frequent and/or serious complications that could occur at or following hip arthroscopy and some guidelines to avoid these complications. Conclusion Most complications of hip arthroscopy are minor or transient but serious complications can occur as well. A lot of complication e.g. acetabular labral puncture go unreported. Appropriate education and training, precise and meticulous surgical technique with correct instrumentation, the right indication in the right patient and adherence to advice from mentors and experienced colleagues are all essential factors for a successful outcome. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066747

  4. On complicity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, A David

    2006-04-01

    The received account of whistleblowing, developed over the last quarter century, is identified with the work of Norman Bowie and Richard DeGeorge. Michael Davis has detailed three anomalies for the received view: the paradoxes of burden, missing harm and failure. In addition, he has proposed an alternative account of whistleblowing, viz., the Complicity Theory. This paper examines the Complicity Theory. The supposed anomalies rest on misunderstandings of the received view or misreadings of model cases of whistleblowing, for example, the Challenger disaster and the Ford Pinto. Nevertheless, the Complicity Theory is important for as in science the contrast with alternative competing accounts often helps us better understand the received view. Several aspects of the received view are reviewed and strengthened through comparison with Complicity Theory, including why whistleblowing needs moral justification. Complicity Theory is also critiqued. The fundamental failure of Complicity Theory is its failure to explain why government and the public encourage and protect whistleblowers despite the possibility of considerable harm to the relevant company in reputation, lost jobs, and lost shareholder value.

  5. Cerebral angiography in patients with complicated migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiler, K.; Wessely, P.; Holzner, F.

    1985-08-01

    38 patients (mean age: 29 years) were investigated by means of complete 4-vessel angiography: all of them were suffering from complicated migraine without detectable vascular malformation. Stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels were found in 11 patients (28.9%), but there was not a single case of vascular occlusion. A correlation between the localization of the stenosis, the localization of the headache and the presumed region of the transient cerebral function disturbance was found only in a few patients. Concerning the morphological changes of the small intracranial arterial branches, there was hardly an difference between clinically affected and non-affected territories of the middle cerebral artery. The angiograms of the 38 cases of complicated migraine were compared with the angiograms of 40 patients suffering from strokes in the young and those of 49 patients with transient ischaemic attacks. There were remarkably fewer stenoses or occlusions in the great craniocervical arteries of patients suffering from complicated migraine (28.9%) than in the vessels of cases of stroke in the young (52.5%). However, the incidence was comparable with the results in patients with transient ischaemic attacks (34.7%). The degree of morphological changes in the small intracranial arterial branches is likely to depend primarily on the patient's age and less on the diagnosis. The results suggest that in almost 30% of patients with complicated migraine - even at juvenile age-stenoses of the great craniocervical vessels might be found. However, considering the fact that most of the stenoses are without haemodynamic significance and their localization is not in agreement with the clinical data, the pathogenetic value of these vessel wall changes is highly questionable. (Author).

  6. Major Vascular Neurocognitive Disorder: A Reappraisal to Vascular Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Kumral

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Major vascular neurocognitive disorder (NCD is the second leading form of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, accounting for 17-20% of all dementias. Vascular NCD is a progressive disease caused by reduced cerebral blood flow related to multiple large volume or lacunar infarcts that induce a sudden onset and stepwise decline in cognitive abilities. Despite its prevalence and clinical importance, there is still controversy in the terminology of vascular NCD. Only after the release of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 (DSM-5 (2013 did the American Psychiatric Association define vascular dementia as “major vascular NCD”. This review includes an overview of risk factors, pathophysiology, types, diagnostic and clinical features of major vascular NCD, and current treatment options of vascular NCD regarding to DSM-5 criteria

  7. The use of bovine pericardial patch for vascular reconstruction in infected fields for transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Garcia Aroz, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Infectious vascular complications affecting transplant recipients may lead to severe morbidity and graft loss. This is a retrospective review of vascular repair with bovine pericardial patch (BPP in infected fields for immunosuppressed patients. BPP was used as either a patch or an interposition graft. Five cases of arterial reconstruction in infected fields using BPP were performed. There were no complications related to bleeding, thrombosis, or recurrent infection. In our limited experience, the use of BPP as a vascular patch is successful, and it represents an alternative when vascular reconstruction is needed in the context of infected fields.

  8. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  9. Vascular cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Vakhnina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular pathology of the brain is the second most common cause of cognitive impairment after Alzheimer's disease. The article describes the modern concepts of etiology, pathogenetic mechanisms, clinical features and approaches to diagnosis and therapy of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI. Cerebrovascular accident, chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency and their combination, sometimes in combination with a concomitant neurodegenerative process, are shown to be the major types of brain lesions leading to VCI. The clinical presentation of VCI is characterized by the neuropsychological status dominated by impairment of the executive frontal functions (planning, control, attention in combination with focal neurological symptoms. The diagnosis is based on comparing of the revealed neuropsychological and neurological features with neuroimaging data. Neurometabolic, acetylcholinergic, glutamatergic, and other vasoactive drugs and non-pharmacological methods are widely used to treat VCI. 

  10. Vascular Surgery and Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrani Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of robotics to Vascular surgery has not progressed as rapidly as of endovascular technology, but this is changing with the amalgamation of these two fields. The advent of Endovascular robotics is an exciting field which overcomes many of the limitations of endovascular therapy like vessel tortuosity and operator fatigue. This has much clinical appeal for the surgeon and hold significant promise of better patient outcomes. As with most newer technological advances, it is still limited by cost and availability. However, this field has seen some rapid progress in the last decade with the technology moving into the clinical realm. This review details the development of robotics, applications, outcomes, advantages, disadvantages and current advances focussing on Vascular and Endovascular robotics

  11. Vascular lesions following radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, L.F.; Berthrong, M.

    1988-01-01

    The special radiation sensitivity of the vascular system is mainly linked to that of endothelial cells, which are perhaps the most radiation-vulnerable elements of mesenchymal tissues. Within the vascular tree, radiation injures most often capillaries, sinusoids, and small arteries, in that order. Lesions of veins are observed less often, but in certain tissues the veins are regularly damaged (e.g., intestine) or are the most affected structures (i.e., liver). Large arteries do suffer the least; however, when significant damage does occur in an elastic artery (e.g., thrombosis or rupture), it tends to be clinically significant and even fatal. Although not always demonstrable in human tissues, radiation vasculopathy generally is dose and time dependent. Like other radiation-induced lesions, the morphology in the vessels is not specific, but it is characteristic enough to be often recognizable. Vascular injury, especially by therapeutic radiation is not just a morphologic marker. It is a mediator of tissue damage; perhaps the most consistent pathogenetic mechanism in delayed radiation injury

  12. Vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Eckhard; Axnick, Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    The vascular system developed early in evolution. It is required in large multicellular organisms for the transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products to and from tissues. The vascular system is composed of hollow tubes, which have a high level of complexity in vertebrates. Vasculogenesis describes the de novo formation of blood vessels, e.g., aorta formation in vertebrate embryogenesis. In contrast, angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels from preexisting ones, e.g., sprouting of intersomitic blood vessels from the aorta. Importantly, the lumen of all blood vessels in vertebrates is lined and formed by endothelial cells. In both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, lumen formation takes place in a cord of endothelial cells. It involves a complex molecular mechanism composed of endothelial cell repulsion at the cell-cell contacts within the endothelial cell cords, junctional rearrangement, and endothelial cell shape change. As the vascular system also participates in the course of many diseases, such as cancer, stroke, and myocardial infarction, it is important to understand and make use of the molecular mechanisms of blood vessel formation to better understand and manipulate the pathomechanisms involved.

  13. Pulmonary vascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedullo, P.F.; Shure, D.

    1987-01-01

    A wide range of pulmonary vascular imaging techniques are available for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease. The characteristics of any ideal technique would include high sensitivity and specificity, safety, simplicity, and sequential applicability. To date, no single technique meets these ideal characteristics. Conventional pulmonary angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute thromboembolic disease despite the introduction of newer techniques such as digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Improved noninvasive lower extremity venous testing methods, particularly impedance plethysmography, and ventilation-perfusion scanning can play significant roles in the noninvasive diagnosis of acute pulmonary emboli when properly applied. Ventilation-perfusion scanning may also be useful as a screening test to differentiate possible primary pulmonary hypertension from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. And, finally, angioscopy may be a useful adjunctive technique to detect chronic thromboembolic disease and determine operability. Optimal clinical decision-making, however, will continue to require the proper interpretation of adjunctive information obtained from the less-invasive techniques, applied with an understanding of the natural history of the various forms of pulmonary vascular disease and with a knowledge of the capabilities and shortcomings of the individual techniques

  14. Thrombophilia in complicated pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Şahin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the incidence and etiology of pregnancy complications associated with thrombophilic factors. Methods: Fifty-four patients with complicated pregnancy and 40 healthy pregnant subjects were included the study. Factor V Leiden (FVL mutation, protein S, protein C, anti-thrombin deficiency levels were investigated. Results: Of the 54 patients with complicated pregnancy, 29 had preeclampsia, 18 had intra uterine growth retardation, and 7 had intrauterine fetal loss. The most common defect was FVL mutation. FVL mutations in patient group and the control group were 27.2% and 10%, respectively, which were statistically significant. The protein S, protein C, and anti-thrombin deficiencies were found higher in the patient group compared to control (p>0.05 for each. Conclusion: FVL mutation was found higher in patient group compared to the control group, Protein C deficiency and anti-thrombin deficiency were related to preeclampsia but not other pregnancy complications. Clinicians should take into account the thrombophilia in complicated pregnancy, especially preeclampsia. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 497-502

  15. Complications of shoulder arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Todd C; Rudolph, Glen H; Caswell, Kyle; Espinoza, Christopher; Burkhead, Wayne Z; Krishnan, Sumant G

    2014-07-01

    Over the past 20 to 30 years, arthroscopic shoulder techniques have become increasingly popular. Although these techniques have several advantages over open surgery, surgical complications are no less prevalent or devastating than those associated with open techniques. Some of the complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder surgery include recurrent instability, soft-tissue injury, and neurapraxia. These complications can be minimized with thoughtful consideration of the surgical indications, careful patient selection and positioning, and a thorough knowledge of the shoulder anatomy. Deep infection following arthroscopic shoulder surgery is rare; however, the shoulder is particularly susceptible to Propionibacterium acnes infection, which is mildly virulent and has a benign presentation. The surgeon must maintain a high index of suspicion for this infection. Thromboemoblic complications associated with arthroscopic shoulder techniques are also rare, and studies have shown that pharmacologic prophylaxis has minimal efficacy in preventing these complications. Because high-quality studies on the subject are lacking, minimal evidence is available to suggest strategies for prevention. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  16. Complications of transcatheteral occlusion of abdominal arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Belz, J.; Buecheler, E.

    1981-01-01

    The number of transcatheteral occulsion of abdominal arteries reported so far enables us to differentiate between complications, which are specific for the methods used, or which are organ-specific and material-specific. Among the complications specific for the methods concerned are: complications occuring in angiography; tumour embolism in the lung; transport of embolic material into the lung; transport of embolic material into the arteries of the lower half of the body; renal insufficiency; necrosis; and, finally, abscess formation. Among the organ-specific complications are: necrosis (especially of the spleen and in the operated upper gastro-intestinal tract); abscess formation (spleen, kidneys, liver); retroperitoneal phlegmones (kidney); relapsing haemorrhages (gastro-intestinal tract, kidneys); renal insufficiency (in case of pre-existing renal damage); hypertension (described so far as transient blood pressure increase only); hypertensive crisis (after renal artery occulsion for malignant hypertension); hepatic insufficiency and gallbladder infarction (in embolisation of the liver); transport of embolic material into adjacent arteris (in case of embolisation, into the vessels of the truncus coeliacus); and, finally, hypoglycaemia (in embolisation of the liver). Among the material-specific complications are: adhesion of the catheter tip to the vascular wall (Bucrylate); dislocation of Gianturco's spiral; allergic (anaphylactic) reaction to the embolic material (not described so far); recanalisation (in case of absorbable substances such as Fibrospum and Gelfoam); substitutive blood supply via the formation or extension of collaterals; necrosis in peripherally (capillary) occluding substances such as Bucrylate and Ethibloc; and, finally, abscess formation (in case of non-sterile embolic material). Some of these complications can be classified under more than one category. (orig./APR) [de

  17. Complications of transcatheteral occlusion of abdominal arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, H; Belz, Buecheler, E.

    1981-09-01

    The number of transcatheteral occulsion of abdominal arteries reported so far enables us to differentiate between complications, which are specific for the methods used, or which are organ-specific and material-specific. Among the complications specific for the methods concerned are: complications occuring in angiography; tumour embolism in the lung; transport of embolic material into the lung; transport of embolic material into the arteries of the lower half of the body; renal insufficiency; necrosis; and, finally, abscess formation. Among the organ-specific complications are: necrosis (especially of the spleen and in the operated upper gastro-intestinal tract); abscess formation (spleen, kidneys, liver); retroperitoneal phlegmones (kidney); relapsing haemorrhages (gastro-intestinal tract, kidneys); renal insufficiency (in case of pre-existing renal damage); hypertension (described so far as transient blood pressure increase only); hypertensive crisis (after renal artery occulsion for malignant hypertension); hepatic insufficiency and gallbladder infarction (in embolisation of the liver); transport of embolic material into adjacent arteris (in case of embolisation, into the vessels of the truncus coeliacus); and, finally, hypoglycaemia (in embolisation of the liver). Among the material-specific complications are: adhesion of the catheter tip to the vascular wall (Bucrylate); dislocation of Gianturco's spiral; allergic (anaphylactic) reaction to the embolic material (not described so far); recanalisation (in case of absorbable substances such as Fibrospum and Gelfoam); substitutive blood supply via the formation or extension of collaterals; necrosis in peripherally (capillary) occluding substances such as Bucrylate and Ethibloc; and, finally, abscess formation (in case of non-sterile embolic material). Some of these complications can be classified under more than one category.

  18. Amplatzer vascular plugs in congenital cardiovascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barwad, Parag; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Kothari, Shyam S; Saxena, Anita; Gupta, Saurabh K; Juneja, Rajnish; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Jagia, Priya; Sharma, Sanjiv

    2013-01-01

    Amplatzer vascular plugs (AVPs) are devices ideally suited to close medium-to-large vascular communications. There is limited published literature regarding the utility of AVPs in congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVMs). To describe the use of AVPs in different CCVMs and to evaluate their safety and efficacy. All patients who required an AVP for the closure of CCVM were included in this retrospective review of our catheterization laboratory data. The efficacy and safety of AVPs are reported. A total of 39 AVPs were implanted in 31 patients. Thirteen (33%) were AVP type I and 23 (59%) were AVP type II. AVP type III were implanted in two patients and type IV in one patient. The major indications for their use included closure of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM) (n = 7), aortopulmonary collaterals (n = 7), closure of a patent Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 5), systemic AVM (n = 5), coronary AVM (n = 4), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) (n = 3), pulmonary artery aneurysms (n = 3), and venovenous collaterals (n = 2). Deployment of the AVP was done predominantly via the 5 – 7F Judkin's right coronary guide catheter. Overall 92% of the AVPs could be successfully deployed and resulted in occlusion of the target vessel in all cases, within 10 minutes. No procedure-related or access site complication occurred. AVPs are versatile, easy to use, and effective devices to occlude the vascular communications in a variety of settings. AVP II is especially useful in the closure of tubular structures with a high flow

  19. Head trauma and CT with special reference to diagnosis of complications of head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitose

    1979-01-01

    Cases in which CT was useful for the diagnosis of complications of head trauma were reported. First, complications of head trauma were given an outline, and then, cases of protrusion of the brain, traumatic pneumocephalus, and cerebro-vascular disorders caused by head trauma were mentioned. (Tsunoda, M.)

  20. Genetic Determinants of Macrovascular Complications and Mortality in Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Yazdanpanah (Mojgan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractEvidence is accumulating that there is a genetic predisposition for the development of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes. There is a large variation in the risk and onset of complication in patients, which may partly be explained by genetic susceptibility. Most likely

  1. A retrospective analysis of the impact of treatments and blood counts on survival and the risk of vascular events during the course of polycythaemia vera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enblom-Larsson, Anneli; Girodon, Francois; Bak, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Vascular and non-vascular complications are common in patients with polycythaemia vera. This retrospective study of 217 patients with polycythaemia vera aimed to determine whether blood counts with respect to different treatments influenced the complication rate and survival. We found that 78 (36...

  2. Luteolin Ameliorates Hypertensive Vascular Remodeling through Inhibiting the Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Preliminary researches showed that luteolin was used to treat hypertension. However, it is still unclear whether luteolin has effect on the hypertensive complication such as vascular remodeling. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of luteolin on the hypertensive vascular remodeling and its molecular mechanism. Method and Results. We evaluated the effect of luteolin on aorta thickening of hypertension in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs and found that luteolin could significantly decrease the blood pressure and media thickness of aorta in vivo. Luteolin could inhibit angiotensin II- (Ang II- induced proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA staining result showed that luteolin reduced Ang II-stimulated ROS production in VSMCs. Furthermore, western blot and gelatin zymography results showed that luteolin treatment leaded to a decrease in ERK1/2, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, MMP2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA protein level. Conclusion. These data support that luteolin can ameliorate hypertensive vascular remodeling by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of Ang II-induced VSMCs. Its mechanism is mediated by the regulation of MAPK signaling pathway and the production of ROS.

  3. Post dengue neurological complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hizlinda Tohid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain–Barre syndrome (GBS is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case.

  4. Neuromuscular complications of thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Annie W C

    2007-11-01

    Thyroid hormones exert multiple effects on the neuromuscular system and the brain, with the most important being their role in stimulating the development and differentiation of the neuromuscular system and brain in foetal and neonatal life. In the presence of hyperthyroidism, muscular and neurological symptoms may be the presenting clinical features of the disease. The frequency and severity of neuromuscular complications vary considerably and are probably related to the degree of hyperthyroidism, although in some patients the neuromuscular dysfunction is caused by associated disorders rather than by hyperthyroidism per se. This update focuses on the most common neurological and muscular disorders that occur in patients with thyrotoxicosis. It is beyond the scope of this paper to discuss thyroid eye disease and cardiac complications, in themselves separate complications of specific myocytes.

  5. Imaging of postpartum complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooholamini, S.A.; Au, A.H.; Hansen, G.C.; Kioumehr, F.; Yaghmai, I.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the efficacy of various imaging modalities in the detection of postpartum complications. Nineteen cases of postpartum complications, studied radiologically, form the basis of this exhibit. Plain abdominal radiography, US, CT, and MR imaging were performed alone or in combination. The abnormalities detected included uterine rupture, intramural uterine hematoma, hematomas of the broad ligaments and the abdominal rectus muscles, ovarian vein thrombosis, HELLP syndrome, pyometrium, retained placenta and blood clots, periappendiceal abscess, superior sagittal sinus thrombosis, and cerebral edema. Representative cases will be illustrated; and the effective value of each technique will be stressed

  6. Complications of cosmetic tattoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cuyper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic tattoos, which are better known as permanent make-up, have become popular in the last decades. This same procedure can be used to camouflage pathological skin conditions, to mask scars and to complete the aesthetic results of plastic and reconstructive surgeries. The risks and complications of tattooing procedures include infections and allergic reactions. Scarring can occur. Fanning and fading of the colorants and dissatisfaction with colour and shape are not unusual. Different lasers can offer solutions for the removal of unwanted cosmetic tattoos, but complications due to the laser treatment, such as paradoxical darkening and scarring, can arise. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Microvasular and macrovascular complications in diabetes mellitus: Distinct or continuum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aastha Chawla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and related complications are associated with long-term damage and failure of various organ systems. The line of demarcation between the pathogenic mechanisms of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes and differing responses to therapeutic interventions is blurred. Diabetes induces changes in the microvasculature, causing extracellular matrix protein synthesis, and capillary basement membrane thickening which are the pathognomic features of diabetic microangiopathy. These changes in conjunction with advanced glycation end products, oxidative stress, low grade inflammation, and neovascularization of vasa vasorum can lead to macrovascular complications. Hyperglycemia is the principal cause of microvasculopathy but also appears to play an important role in causation of macrovasculopathy. There is thought to be an intersection between micro and macro vascular complications, but the two disorders seem to be strongly interconnected, with micro vascular diseases promoting atherosclerosis through processes such as hypoxia and changes in vasa vasorum. It is thus imperative to understand whether microvascular complications distinctly precede macrovascular complications or do both of them progress simultaneously as a continuum. This will allow re-focusing on the clinical issues with a unifying perspective which can improve type 2 diabetes mellitus outcomes.

  8. Interventional radiological management of complications in renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovic, P.; Surlan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The most frequent radiologically evaluated and treated complications in renal transplantation are perirenal and renal fluid collection and abnormalities of the vasculature and collecting system. Renal and perirenal fluid collection is usually treated successfully with percutaneous drainage. Doppler US, MRA and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are most important in the evaluation of vascular complications of renal transplantation and management of the endovascular therapy. Conclusions. Stenosis, the most common vascular complication, occurs in 1% to 12% of transplanted renal arteries and represents a potentially curable cause of hypertension following transplantation and/or renal dysfunction. Treatment with percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) or PTRA with stent has been technically successful in 82 to 92% of the cases, and graft salvage rate has ranged from 80-100%. Complications such as arterial and vein thrombosis are uncommon. Intrarenal A/V fistulas and pseudoaneurysms are occasionally seen after biopsy, the treatment requires superselective embolisation. Urologic complications are relatively uncommon; they consist predominantly of the urinary leaks and urethral obstruction. Interventional treatment consists of percutaneous nephrostomy, balloon dilation, insertion of the double J stents, metallic stent placement and external drainage of the extrarenal collections. The aim of the paper is to review the role of interventional radiology in the management of complications in renal transplantation. (author)

  9. Foot Drop after Ethanol Embolization of Calf Vascular Malformation: A Lesson on Nerve Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Vincent Khwee-Soon; Mohan, P. Chandra; Liew, Wendy Kein Meng; Mahadev, Arjandas; Tay, Kiang Hiong

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol is often used in sclerotherapy to treat vascular malformations. Nerve injury is a known complication of this procedure. However, the management of this complication is not well described in literature. This case describes a 10-year-old boy with a slow flow vascular malformation in the right calf who underwent transarterial ethanol embolization following prior unsuccessful direct percutaneous sclerotherapy. The development of a dense foot drop that subsequently recovered is described, and the management of this uncommon but distressful complication is discussed

  10. Foot Drop after Ethanol Embolization of Calf Vascular Malformation: A Lesson on Nerve Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Vincent Khwee-Soon, E-mail: vincentkstay@gmail.com [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery (Singapore); Mohan, P. Chandra, E-mail: chandra.mohan@sgh.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore); Liew, Wendy Kein Meng, E-mail: wendy.liew.km@kkh.com.sg [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics (Neurology Service) (Singapore); Mahadev, Arjandas, E-mail: arjandas.mahadev@kkh.com.sg [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (Singapore); Tay, Kiang Hiong, E-mail: tay.kiang.hiong@sgh.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2013-08-01

    Ethanol is often used in sclerotherapy to treat vascular malformations. Nerve injury is a known complication of this procedure. However, the management of this complication is not well described in literature. This case describes a 10-year-old boy with a slow flow vascular malformation in the right calf who underwent transarterial ethanol embolization following prior unsuccessful direct percutaneous sclerotherapy. The development of a dense foot drop that subsequently recovered is described, and the management of this uncommon but distressful complication is discussed.

  11. Role of endovascular treatment in vascular injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M.M.; Haq, T.U.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate retrospectively the results, complications and follow-up of patients after endovascular treatment of vascular injuries. Methods: Fifty transcatheter embolisation procedures (TCE) were performed in 46 patients between 1999 and 2008 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Injuries in 14 (30.4%) patients were due to road traffic accident; iatrogenic in 13 (28%); accidental in 6 (13%). Firearms, bomb blasts and earthquake contributed to injuries in 8(17%), 4(8.8%) and 1(2.2%) patients respectively. All patients underwent angiography and had evidence of either active haemorrhage, pseudo-aneurysm, abnormal vascularity or arteriovenous fistula. Follow-up ranged from 1 day to 6 years with mean of 10.5 months. Medical record files, lab results and imaging reports were utilised for the study. Procedure was declared as technically successful when there was cessation of extravasation, occlusion of fistula or exclusion of pseudo-aneurysm in the post-embolisation angiograms. Treatment was deemed clinically successful if there was resolution of the indication for which the procedure was done. Results: Transcatheter embolisation was technically successful in occluding vascular lesions in all 46 (100%) patients. Lesions recurred in 4 (9%) patients who underwent initially successful TCE. These patients were treated effectively with repeated TCE. Three patients died during the same hospital stay and 3 patients died after being discharged from the hospital. All these patients were treated successfully with TCE and had factors other then TCE contributing to their mortality. Conclusion: Transcatheter embolisation for vascular injuries was found to be a satisfactory procedure, with low morbidity and mortality rates. (author)

  12. Complication with intraosseous access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2013-01-01

    with aspiration of bone marrow (12.3%), and bended/broken needle (4.0%). When using an established IO access the reported complications were difficulties with injection fluid and drugs after IO insertion (7.4%), slow infusion (despite use of pressure bag) (8.8%), displacement after insertion (8...

  13. Anticoagulation in pregnancy complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, Saskia

    2014-01-01

    Women with acquired and inherited thrombophilia are thought to be at increased risk for pregnancy complications, including recurrent pregnancy loss and, depending on the type of thrombophilia, severe preeclampsia. This review discusses the associations between the types of thrombophilia and types of

  14. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ureters, bladder, and urethra for the passage, storage, and voiding of urine. Serious kidney complications associated with IBD are rare, ... Proteinuria, an elevated level of protein in the urine, is one sign of amyloidosis. A biopsy (tissue sample) of the kidney can confirm the diagnosis. Various ...

  15. Atrial Fibrillation: Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Complications Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... has two major complications—stroke and heart failure. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Click to enlarge image This illustration ...

  16. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  17. Complications in ankle arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zengerink, Maartje; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    To determine the complication rate for ankle arthroscopy. A review of a consecutive series of patients undergoing ankle arthroscopy in our hospital between 1987 and 2006 was undertaken. Anterior ankle arthroscopy was performed by means of a 2-portal dorsiflexion method with intermittent soft tissue

  18. Medical complications following splenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzelé, R; Barbier, L; Sauvanet, A; Fantin, B

    2016-08-01

    Splenectomy is attended by medical complications, principally infectious and thromboembolic; the frequency of complications varies with the conditions that led to splenectomy (hematologic splenectomy, trauma, presence of portal hypertension). Most infectious complications are caused by encapsulated bacteria (Meningococcus, Pneumococcus, Hemophilus). These occur mainly in children and somewhat less commonly in adults within the first two years following splenectomy. Post-splenectomy infections are potentially severe with overwhelming post-splenectomy infection (OPSI) and this justifies preventive measures (prophylactic antibiotics, appropriate immunizations, patient education) and demands prompt antibiotic management with third-generation cephalosporins for any post-splenectomy fever. Thromboembolic complications can involve both the caval system (deep-vein thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism) and the portal system. Portal vein thrombosis occurs more commonly in patients with myeloproliferative disease and cirrhosis. No thromboembolic prophylaxis is recommended apart from perioperative low molecular weight heparin. However, some authors choose to prescribe a short course of anti-platelet medication if the post-splenectomy patient develops significant thrombocytosis. Thrombosis of the portal or caval venous system requires prolonged warfarin anticoagulation for 3 to 6 months. Finally, some studies have suggested an increase in the long-term incidence of cancer in splenectomized patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Pregnancy Complications: Placental Abruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at risk? Zika virus and pregnancy Folic acid Medicine safety and pregnancy Birth defects prevention Learn how to help reduce ... high blood pressure, not smoking or using street drugs, and always wearing a seatbelt when riding in a car. ... complications Preterm labor & premature birth The newborn intensive ...

  20. Treatment of complicated grief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Rosner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the death of a loved one, a small group of grievers develop an abnormal grieving style, termed complicated or prolonged grief. In the effort to establish complicated grief as a disorder in DSM and ICD, several attempts have been made over the past two decades to establish symptom criteria for this form of grieving. Complicated grief is different from depression and PTSD yet often comorbid with other psychological disorders. Meta-analyses of grief interventions show small to medium effect sizes, with only few studies yielding large effect sizes. In this article, an integrative cognitive behavioral treatment manual for complicated grief disorder (CG-CBT of 25 individual sessions is described. Three treatment phases, each entailing several treatment strategies, allow patients to stabilize, explore, and confront the most painful aspects of the loss, and finally to integrate and transform their grief. Core aspects are cognitive restructuring and confrontation. Special attention is given to practical exercises. This article includes the case report of a woman whose daughter committed suicide.

  1. Potential benefit of (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate for macrovascular complications in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Vascular problems are the most common complications in diabetes. Substantial evidence from epidemiological and pathophysiological studies show that hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for macrovascular complications in patients with diabetes. (--Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, the major catechin derived from green tea, is known to exert a variety of cardiovascular beneficial effects. The protective effects of EGCG in diabetes are also evident. However, whether EGCG is beneficial against macrovascular complications that occur in diabetes remains unknown. Our previous studies demonstrated that treatment of EGCG inhibits high glucose-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and suppresses high glucose-mediated vascular inflammation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that EGCG might be an effective potential candidate to reduce the macrovascular complications in diabetes.

  2. Vascular and valvular calcifications in chronic hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Bruzzone

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vascular and valvular calcifications are a frequent complication in dialyzed patients and are connected to an increased morbi-mortality. Many radiological methods (TAC multiple slices and with electrons emission have been used to investigate the presence of vascular calcifications in this population, but only few works have been focused on simple radiology. Objectives: The objectives of this work are to evaluate vascular calcifications by means of Kauppila index in hemodialysis prevalent patients, identify linked risk factors and determine their association with heart valves calcification. Methods: 95 stable patients under hemodialysis were surveyed during a period of 6 months longer. Abdominal Rx simple profile were performed on all patients to evaluate calcification of abdominal aorta by Kauppila index and twodimensional echocardiogram to detect valvular calcifications. Data were collected about sex, age, diabetes, Hypertension, tabaquism, dislipemia and bone-mineral metabolism. Results: 64.5% of the patients showed vascular calcifications. Average Kauppila index was 6.25. Age and time on dialysis correlated with vascular calcifications. In 31.6 % of individuals valvular calcifications were found, which presented significant association with diabetes and Kauppila Index. Conclusions: Vascular and valvular calcifications were frequent in the surveyed population. Kauppila index correlated with age, time on dialysis and valvular calcifications. Heart valves calcification was associated with diabetes.

  3. Spanish Clinical Guidelines on Vascular Access for Haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibeas, José; Roca-Tey, Ramon; Vallespín, Joaquín; Moreno, Teresa; Moñux, Guillermo; Martí-Monrós, Anna; Del Pozo, José Luis; Gruss, Enrique; Ramírez de Arellano, Manel; Fontseré, Néstor; Arenas, María Dolores; Merino, José Luis; García-Revillo, José; Caro, Pilar; López-Espada, Cristina; Giménez-Gaibar, Antonio; Fernández-Lucas, Milagros; Valdés, Pablo; Fernández-Quesada, Fidel; de la Fuente, Natalia; Hernán, David; Arribas, Patricia; Sánchez de la Nieta, María Dolores; Martínez, María Teresa; Barba, Ángel

    2017-11-01

    Vascular access for haemodialysis is key in renal patients both due to its associated morbidity and mortality and due to its impact on quality of life. The process, from the creation and maintenance of vascular access to the treatment of its complications, represents a challenge when it comes to decision-making, due to the complexity of the existing disease and the diversity of the specialities involved. With a view to finding a common approach, the Spanish Multidisciplinary Group on Vascular Access (GEMAV), which includes experts from the five scientific societies involved (nephrology [S.E.N.], vascular surgery [SEACV], vascular and interventional radiology [SERAM-SERVEI], infectious diseases [SEIMC] and nephrology nursing [SEDEN]), along with the methodological support of the Cochrane Center, has updated the Guidelines on Vascular Access for Haemodialysis, published in 2005. These guidelines maintain a similar structure, in that they review the evidence without compromising the educational aspects. However, on one hand, they provide an update to methodology development following the guidelines of the GRADE system in order to translate this systematic review of evidence into recommendations that facilitate decision-making in routine clinical practice, and, on the other hand, the guidelines establish quality indicators which make it possible to monitor the quality of healthcare. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxidative and inflammatory signals in obesity-associated vascular abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reho, John J; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2017-07-15

    Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in part due to vascular abnormalities such as endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffening. The hypertension and other health complications that arise from these vascular defects increase the risk of heart diseases and stroke. Prooxidant and proinflammatory signaling pathways as well as adipocyte-derived factors have emerged as critical mediators of obesity-associated vascular abnormalities. Designing treatments aimed specifically at improving the vascular dysfunction caused by obesity may provide an effective therapeutic approach to prevent the cardiovascular sequelae associated with excessive adiposity. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence supporting the role of oxidative stress and cytokines and inflammatory signals within the vasculature as well as the impact of the surrounding perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) on the regulation of vascular function and arterial stiffening in obesity. In particular, we focus on the highly plastic nature of the vasculature in response to altered oxidant and inflammatory signaling and highlight how weight management can be an effective therapeutic approach to reduce the oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling and improve vascular function. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Vascular remodeling and mineralocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K T; Sun, Y; Campbell, S E; Slight, S H; Ganjam, V K

    1995-01-01

    Circulating mineralocorticoid hormones are so named because of their important homeostatic properties that regulate salt and water balance via their action on epithelial cells. A broader range of functions in nonclassic target cellular sites has been proposed for these steroids and includes their contribution to wound healing following injury. A chronic, inappropriate (relative to intravascular volume and dietary sodium intake) elevation of these circulating hormones evokes a wound healing response in the absence of tissue injury--a wound healing response gone awry. The adverse remodeling of vascularized tissues seen in association with chronic mineralocorticoid excess is the focus of this review.

  6. Interventional vascular radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yune, H.Y.

    1984-01-01

    The papers published during this past year in the area of interventional vascular radiology presented some useful modifications and further experiences both in the area of thromboembolic therapy and in dilation and thrombolysis, but no new techniques. As an introductory subject, an excellent monograph reviewing the current spectrum of pharmacoangiography was presented in Radiographics. Although the presented material is primarily in diagnostic application of various pharmacologic agents used today to facilitate demonstration of certain diagnostic criteria of various disease processes, both vasodilatory and vasoconstrictive reaction to these agents are widely used in various therapeutic vascular procedures. This monograph should be reviewed by every angiographer whether or not he or she performs interventional procedures, and it would be very convenient to have this table available in the angiography suite. In a related subject, Bookstein and co-workers have written an excellent review concerning pharmacologic manipulations of various blood coagulative parameters during angiography. Understanding the proper method of manipulation of the bloodclotting factors during angiography, and especially during interventional angiography, is extremely important. Particularly, the method of manipulating the coagulation with the use of heparin and protamine and modification of the platelet activity by using aspirin and dipyridamole are succinctly reviewed. The systemic and selective thrombolytic activities of streptokianse are also discussed

  7. Vascular dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Lesley J; Morton, Jude S; Davidge, Sandra T

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a complex disorder which affects an estimated 5% of all pregnancies worldwide. It is diagnosed by hypertension in the presence of proteinuria after the 20th week of pregnancy and is a prominent cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. As delivery is currently the only known treatment, preeclampsia is also a leading cause of preterm delivery. Preeclampsia is associated with maternal vascular dysfunction, leading to serious cardiovascular risk both during and following pregnancy. Endothelial dysfunction, resulting in increased peripheral resistance, is an integral part of the maternal syndrome. While the cause of preeclampsia remains unknown, placental ischemia resulting from aberrant placentation is a fundamental characteristic of the disorder. Poor placentation is believed to stimulate the release of a number of factors including pro- and antiangiogenic factors and inflammatory activators into the maternal systemic circulation. These factors are critical mediators of vascular function and impact the endothelium in distinctive ways, including enhanced endothelial oxidative stress. The mechanisms of action and the consequences on the maternal vasculature will be discussed in this review. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Complication with Intraosseous Access: Scandinavian Users’ Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Intraosseous access (IO) is indicated if vascular access cannot be quickly established during resuscitation. Complication rates are estimated to be low, based on small patient series, model or cadaver studies, and case reports. However, user experience with IO use in real-life emergency situations might differ from the results in the controlled environment of model studies and small patient series. We performed a survey of IO use in real-life emergency situations to assess users’ experiences of complications. Methods: An online questionnaire was sent to Scandinavian emergency physicians, anesthesiologists and pediatricians. Results: 1,802 clinical cases of IO use was reported by n=386 responders. Commonly reported complications with establishing IO access were patient discomfort/pain (7.1%), difficulties with penetration of periosteum with IO needle (10.3%), difficulties with aspiration of bone marrow (12.3%), and bended/broken needle (4.0%). When using an established IO access the reported complications were difficulties with injection fluid and drugs after IO insertion (7.4%), slow infusion (despite use of pressure bag) (8.8%), displacement after insertion (8.5%), and extravasation (3.7%). Compartment syndrome and osteomyelitis occurred in 0.6% and 0.4% of cases respectively. Conclusion: In users’ recollection of real-life IO use, perceived complications were more frequent than usually reported from model studies. The perceived difficulties with using IO could affect the willingness of medical staff to use IO. Therefore, user experience should be addressed both in education of how to use, and research and development of IOs. PMID:24106537

  9. Complication with Intraosseous Access: Scandinavian Users' Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hallas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraosseous access (IO is indicated if vascular access cannot be quickly established during resuscitation. Complication rates are estimated to be low, based on small patient series, model or cadaver studies, and case reports. However, user experience with IO use in real-life emergency situations might differ from the results in the controlled environment of model studies and small patient series. We performed a survey of IO use in real-life emergency situations to assess users’ experiences of complications.Methods: An online questionnaire was sent to Scandinavian emergency physicians, anesthesiologists and pediatricians.Results: 1,802 clinical cases of IO use was reported by n=386 responders. Commonly reported complications with establishing IO access were patient discomfort/pain (7.1%, difficulties with penetration of periosteum with IO needle (10.3%, difficulties with aspiration of bone marrow (12.3%, and bended/broken needle (4.0%. When using an established IO access the reported complications were difficulties with injection fluid and drugs after IO insertion (7.4%, slow infusion (despite use of pressure bag (8.8%, displacement after insertion (8.5%, and extravasation (3.7%. Compartment syndrome and osteomyelitis occurred in 0.6% and 0.4% of cases respectively.Conclusion: In users’ recollection of real-life IO use, perceived complications were more frequent than usually reported from model studies. The perceived difficulties with using IO could affect the willingness of medical staff to use IO. Therefore, user experience should be addressed both in education of how to use, and research and development of IOs. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:440–443.

  10. Vascular Remodeling in Experimental Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma R. Risler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic hemodynamic abnormality in hypertension is an increased peripheral resistance that is due mainly to a decreased vascular lumen derived from structural changes in the small arteries wall, named (as a whole vascular remodeling. The vascular wall is an active, flexible, and integrated organ made up of cellular (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, adventitia cells, and fibroblasts and noncellular (extracellular matrix components, which in a dynamic way change shape or number, or reorganize in response to physiological and pathological stimuli, maintaining the integrity of the vessel wall in physiological conditions or participating in the vascular changes in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. Research focused on new signaling pathways and molecules that can participate in the mechanisms of vascular remodeling has provided evidence showing that vascular structure is not only affected by blood pressure, but also by mechanisms that are independent of the increased pressure. This review will provide an overview of the evidence, explaining some of the pathophysiologic mechanisms participating in the development of the vascular remodeling, in experimental models of hypertension, with special reference to the findings in spontaneously hypertensive rats as a model of essential hypertension, and in fructose-fed rats as a model of secondary hypertension, in the context of the metabolic syndrome. The understanding of the mechanisms producing the vascular alterations will allow the development of novel pharmacological tools for vascular protection in hypertensive disease.

  11. Vascular pattern formation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpella, Enrico; Helariutta, Ykä

    2010-01-01

    Reticulate tissue systems exist in most multicellular organisms, and the principles underlying the formation of cellular networks have fascinated philosophers, mathematicians, and biologists for centuries. In particular, the beautiful and varied arrangements of vascular tissues in plants have intrigued mankind since antiquity, yet the organizing signals have remained elusive. Plant vascular tissues form systems of interconnected cell files throughout the plant body. Vascular cells are aligned with one another along continuous lines, and vascular tissues differentiate at reproducible positions within organ environments. However, neither the precise path of vascular differentiation nor the exact geometry of vascular networks is fixed or immutable. Several recent advances converge to reconcile the seemingly conflicting predictability and plasticity of vascular tissue patterns. A control mechanism in which an apical-basal flow of signal establishes a basic coordinate system for body axis formation and vascular strand differentiation, and in which a superimposed level of radial organizing cues elaborates cell patterns, would generate a reproducible tissue configuration in the context of an underlying robust, self-organizing structure, and account for the simultaneous regularity and flexibility of vascular tissue patterns. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vascular Trauma Operative Experience is Inadequate in General Surgery Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huan; Maximus, Steven; Koopmann, Matthew; Keeley, Jessica; Smith, Brian; Virgilio, Christian de; Kim, Dennis Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular injuries may be challenging, particularly for surgeons who have not received formal vascular surgery fellowship training. Lack of experience and improper technique can result in significant complications. The objective of this study was to examine changes in resident experience with operative vascular trauma over time. A retrospective review was performed using Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) case logs of general surgery residents graduating between 2004 and 2014 at 2 academic, university-affiliated institutions associated with level 1 trauma centers. The primary outcome was number of reported vascular trauma operations, stratified by year of graduation and institution. A total of 112 residents graduated in the study period with a median 7 (interquartile range 4.5-13.5) vascular trauma cases per resident. Fasciotomy and exposure and/or repair of peripheral vessels constituted the bulk of the operative volume. Linear regression showed no significant trend in cases with respect to year of graduation (P = 0.266). Residents from program A (n = 53) reported a significantly higher number of vascular trauma cases when compared with program B (n = 59): 12.0 vs. 5.0 cases, respectively (P < 0.001). Level 1 trauma center verification does not guarantee sufficient exposure to vascular trauma. The operative exposure in program B is reflective of the national average of 4.0 cases per resident as reported by the ACGME, and this trend is unlikely to change in the near future. Fellowship training may be critical for surgeons who plan to work in a trauma setting, particularly in areas lacking vascular surgeons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neurological complications of alcoholism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Nikiforov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nervous system lesions associated with chronic alcohol intoxication are common in clinical practice. They lead to aggravated alcoholic disease, its more frequent recurrences, and intensified pathological craving for alcohol. Neurological pathology in turn occurs with frequent exacerbations. The interaction of diseases, age, and medical  pathomorphism modifies the clinical presentation and course of the  major pathology, as well as comorbidity, the nature and severity of  complications, worsens quality of life in a patient, and makes the  diagnostic and treatment process difficult. The paper discusses the  classification, clinical variants, biochemical and molecular biological  aspects of various complications of alcoholic disease. It considers its  most common form, in particular alcoholic polyneuropathy, as well as its rarer variants, such as hemorrhagic encephalopathy with a subacute course (Gayet–Wernicke encephalopathy.

  14. Gastrointestinal Complications of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Malhi, Harmeet; Acosta, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Obesity usually is associated with morbidity related to diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are many gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases for which obesity is the direct cause (eg, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) or is a significant risk factor, such as reflux esophagitis and gallstones. When obesity is a risk factor, it may interact with other mechanisms and result in earlier presentation or complicated diseases. There are increased odds ratios or relative risks of several gastrointestinal complications of obesity: gastroesophageal reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma, erosive gastritis, gastric cancer, diarrhea, colonic diverticular disease, polyps, cancer, liver disease including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, gallstones, acute pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer. Gastroenterologists are uniquely poised to participate in the multidisciplinary management of obesity as physicians caring for people with obesity-related diseases, in addition to their expertise in nutrition and endoscopic interventions. PMID:28192107

  15. Additive Manufacturing of Vascular Grafts and Vascularized Tissue Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elomaa, Laura; Yang, Yunzhi Peter

    2017-10-01

    There is a great need for engineered vascular grafts among patients with cardiovascular diseases who are in need of bypass therapy and lack autologous healthy blood vessels. In addition, because of the severe worldwide shortage of organ donors, there is an increasing need for engineered vascularized tissue constructs as an alternative to organ transplants. Additive manufacturing (AM) offers great advantages and flexibility of fabrication of cell-laden, multimaterial, and anatomically shaped vascular grafts and vascularized tissue constructs. Various inkjet-, extrusion-, and photocrosslinking-based AM techniques have been applied to the fabrication of both self-standing vascular grafts and porous, vascularized tissue constructs. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research on the use of AM for vascular applications and the key criteria for biomaterials in the AM of both acellular and cellular constructs. We envision that new smart printing materials that can adapt to their environment and encourage rapid endothelialization and remodeling will be the key factor in the future for the successful AM of personalized and dynamic vascular tissue applications.

  16. RAGE receptor and its soluble isoforms in diabetes mellitus complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauren Isfer Anghebem Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hyperglycemia, which is present in all types of diabetes, increases the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs. The interaction of AGEs with receptor of advanced glycation end-products (RAGE initiates a cascade of pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulant processes that result in oxidative stress, stimulating the formation and accumulation of more AGE molecules. This cyclic process, denominated metabolic memory, may explain the persistency of diabetic vascular complications in patients with satisfactory glycemic control. The RAGE found in several cell membranes is also present in soluble isoforms (esRAGE and cRAGE, which are generated by alternative deoxyribonucleic acid splicing or by proteolytic cleavage. This review focuses on new research into these mediators as potential biomarkers for vascular complications in diabetes.

  17. Interplay between coagulation and vascular inflammation in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the most common inherited hematologic disorder that leads to the irreversible damage of multiple organs. Although sickling of red blood cells and vaso-occlusion are central to the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease the importance of hemolytic anemia and vasculopathy has been recently recognized. Hypercoagulation state is another prominent feature of sickle cell disease and is mediated by activation of both intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways. Growing evidence demonstrates that coagulation may not only contribute to the thrombotic complications, but also to vascular inflammation associated with this disease. This article summarizes the role of vascular inflammation and coagulation activation, discusses potential mechanisms responsible for activation of coagulation and reviews recent data demonstrating the crosstalk between coagulation and vascular inflammation in sickle cell disease. PMID:23593937

  18. Cardiac and vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, S.; Ley-Zaporozhan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Malformations of the heart and great vessels show a high degree of variation. There are numerous variants and defects with only few clinical manifestations and are only detected by chance, such as a persistent left superior vena cava or a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Other cardiovascular malformations are manifested directly after birth and need prompt mostly surgical interventions. At this point in time echocardiography is the diagnostic modality of choice for morphological and functional characterization of malformations. Additional imaging using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is only required in a minority of cases. If so, the small anatomical structures, the physiological tachycardia and tachypnea are a challenge for imaging modalities and strategies. This review article presents the most frequent vascular, cardiac and complex cardiovascular malformations independent of the first line diagnostic imaging modality. (orig.) [de

  19. Multiple small pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis: angiographic diagnosis and transcatheter embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, G.; Stockx, L.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Wilms, G.; Marchal, G.; Steenbergen, W. van

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal hemorrhage due to multiple, small pseudoaneurysms complicating a chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and US could not clearly depict these vascular lesions. Selective arteriography of the superior mesenteric and gastroduodenal arteries clearly showed the small pseudoaneurysms and definitive treatment was performed by transcatheter embolization using coils. Eight months after successful embolization, the patient is asymptomatic without any recurrent bleeding. (orig.)

  20. [Fistulae or catheter for elderly who start hemodialysis without permanent vascular access?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Cortés, Ma J; Viedma, G; Sánchez Perales, M C; Borrego, F J; Borrego, J; Pérez del Barrio, P; Gil Cunquero, J M; Liébana, A; Pérez Bañasco, V

    2005-01-01

    Autologous access is the best vascular access for dialysis also in older patients and it should be mature when patient needs hemodialysis. It is not always possible. Surgeon availability and demographic characteristics of patients (age, diabetes, vascular disease...) are factors that determine primary vascular access. To analyse outcome and vascular access complications in elderly who start hemodialysis without vascular access. All patients older than 75 years who initiated hemodialysis without vascular access between January 2000 and June 2002 were included, They were divided en two groups depending on primary vascular access. GI: arterio-venous fistulae. GIIl: Tunnelled cuffed catheter. Epidemiological and analytical data, vascular access complications related, as well as patient and first permanent vascular access survival from their inclusion in dialysis up to December 2002 were analysed and compared in both groups. 32 patients were studied. GI: n = 17 (4 men) and GIIl: n =1 5 (8 men), age: 79.9 +/- 3.8 and 81.7 +/- 4 years respectively (ns). There were no differences in sex and comorbidity (diabetes, ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease and hypertension). It took GI 3 months to get a permanent vascular access suitable for using, while it took GIIl 1.3 months (p catheters was higher in GI (3.35 vs 1.87 p central venous thrombosis happen in GI (I: 25 CVT/100 patients-year) vs 30% in GIIl (I = 14.4/100 patients-year) (ns). No significant differences neither in bleeding (66.7% vs 33.3%) nor ischemia (75% vs 25%) were found. Dialysis dose (Kt/V) as well as anaemia degree were similar in both groups. Permanent vascular access survival after 2 years was 45.8% in GI and 24% in GII (ns). Patient survival was similar in GI and GII (72% vs 51% ns). Elderly who start hemodialysis without vascular access took longer to get a suitable permanent vascular access when arterio-venous fistulae is placed than with a tunnelled cuffed hemodialysis catheter. As a

  1. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reekers, Jim A.; Müller-Hülsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zeleňák, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. The CIRSE registry of closure devices

  2. Dynamic adaption of vascular morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2012-01-01

    The structure of vascular networks adapts continuously to meet changes in demand of the surrounding tissue. Most of the known vascular adaptation mechanisms are based on local reactions to local stimuli such as pressure and flow, which in turn reflects influence from the surrounding tissue. Here ...

  3. Diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheltens, P.; Hijdra, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    The term vascular dementia implies the presence of a clinical syndrome (dementia) caused by, or at least assumed to be caused by, a specific disorder (cerebrovascular disease). In this review, the various sets of criteria used to define vascular dementia are outlined. The various sets of criteria

  4. The vascular secret of Klotho

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewin, Ewa; Olgaard, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Klotho is an evolutionarily highly conserved protein related to longevity. Increasing evidence of a vascular protecting effect of the Klotho protein has emerged and might be important for future treatments of uremic vascular calcification. It is still disputed whether Klotho is locally expressed ...

  5. The Biocarbon vascular access device (DiaTAB) for haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, P J; Slooff, M J; Lichtendahl, D H; van der Hem, G K

    1985-01-01

    The Biocarbon vascular access device (DiaTAB) is a relatively new method in secondary access surgery. Punctures, often the cause of complications can be avoided because it is a no-needle method of dialysis. However thrombosis due to stenosis of the venous anastomosis or of the efferent vein is a continuing problem. A new experience is the fibrin flap formation under the plug of the device, which can be removed easily.

  6. Outcome of endovascular treatment in symptomatic intracranial vascular stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Kim, Sang Joon; Lee, Duk Hee; Kim, Won; Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kwon, Sun Uck; Kim, Jong Sung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jeong [Daejeon Catholic Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    The outcome evaluation for the revascularization of intracranial vascular stenoses has not been fully described due to the highly technical nature of the procedure. We report here on the early and late clinical outcome of angioplasty and/or stenting of symptomatic severe intracranial vascular stenoses at a single institute. Since 1995, we have treated 35 patients with symptomatic intracranial vascular stenosis (more than 70% stenosis, mean stenosis: 78.6% {+-} 6.2%). Angioplasty (n = 19) was performed for the horizontal segment of the middle cerebral artery (M1) (n = 16) and the basilar artery (BA) (n = 1), the intradural vertebral artery (VA) (n = 1), and the cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) (n = 1). Stenting (n = 16) was performed for the cavernous or petrous ICAs (n = 9), the intradural VA (n = 3), BA (n = 2), and M1 (n = 2) artery. We assessed the angiographic success (defined as residual stenosis < 50%) rate, the periprocedural complications during the 30-day periprocedural period, the symptomatic recurrence and restenosis during a mean 22-month follow-up (FU) period. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the cumulative even-free rate of the major cerebrovascular events, i.e. death, stroke or restenosis, was also done. Angiographic success was achieved in 97% of our patients (34/35). There were four procedure-related complications (11%) including a death and a minor stroke. During the mean 22-month FU, the asymptomatic restenosis rate was 9% and the symptomatic restenosis rate was 6% in the target lesion and 9% in all the vascular territories. The Kaplan-Meier estimate was 70.6% (95% confidence interval = 46.5-94.7) after 33 month of FU. In addition to a high angiographic success rate and an acceptable periprocedural complication rate, intracranial angioplasty and/or stenting revealed a relatively low symptomatic recurrence rate. Hemorrhage is a rare, but the physician must aware that potentially fatal periprocedural complications can occur.

  7. Social media in vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. Copyright © 2013 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lemierre's Syndrome Complicating Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thompson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemierre's syndrome is an anaerobic suppurative thrombophlebitis involving the internal jugular vein secondary to oropharyngeal infection. There is only one previous case report in pregnancy which was complicated by premature delivery of an infant that suffered significant neurological damage. We present an atypical case diagnosed in the second trimester with a live birth at term. By reporting this case, we hope to increase the awareness of obstetricians to the possibility of Lemierre's syndrome when patients present with signs of unabating oropharyngeal infection and pulmonary symptoms.

  10. [Complications of hemorrhoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    The most common and serious complications of haemorrhoids include perianal thrombosis and incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids with subsequent thrombosis. They are characterised by severe pain in the perianal region possibly with bleeding. In a short history of the perianal thrombosis, acute surgical incision or excision is indicated, which can result in rapid relief of the painful symptoms. In incarcerated prolapsed internal haemorrhoids, emergency haemorrhoidectomy may also be indicated. Segmental haemorrhoidectomy in the most affected quadrants followed by further elective surgery for haemorrhoids in the next stage is preferred.

  11. Complications of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, P.S.; Parker, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to review systematically the toxicity of contemporary chemotherapy and irradiation on normal tissues of growing children. Whenever possible, the separate toxicity of chemotherapy, irradiation, and combination therapy is addressed. However, it is not always possible to quantitate specifically such reactions in the face of multiple drug therapy, which may enhance radiation injury or reactivate prior radiation injury. Prior detailed reviews have provided important sources of information concerning radiation injury for this more general discussion. The information provided will assist both the clinician and the radiologist in the recognition of early and late complications of therapy in pediatric oncology

  12. Complications of Macular Peeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio-Duran, Mónica; Manzano-Muñoz, Beatriz; Vallejo-García, José Luis; García-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Macular peeling refers to the surgical technique for the removal of preretinal tissue or the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula for several retinal disorders, ranging from epiretinal membranes (primary or secondary to diabetic retinopathy, retinal detachment…) to full-thickness macular holes, macular edema, foveal retinoschisis, and others. The technique has evolved in the last two decades, and the different instrumentations and adjuncts have progressively advanced turning into a safer, easier, and more useful tool for the vitreoretinal surgeon. Here, we describe the main milestones of macular peeling, drawing attention to its associated complications. PMID:26425351

  13. Complications associated with orthognathic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    While most patients undergo orthognathic surgery for aesthetic purposes, aesthetic improvements are most often followed by postoperative functional complications. Therefore, patients must carefully decide whether their purpose of undergoing orthognathic surgery lies on the aesthetic side or the functional side. There is a wide variety of complications associated with orthognathic surgery. There should be a clear distinction between malpractice and complications. Complications can be resolved without any serious problems if the cause is detected early and adequate treatment provided. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must have a full understanding of the types, causes, and treatment of complications, and should deliver this information to patients who develop these complications. PMID:28280704

  14. Hemothorax in vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Kevin; Jordi, López; Jose Angel, Hernández

    2017-10-16

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS IV) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by an alteration in the COL3A1 gene which encodes type III collagen. It is the most common type of collagen in vessels of medium size and certain organs such as the intestines and the uterus. The alteration of this type of collagen produces aneurisms and ruptures of vessels and organs. A high level of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. It is a complex disease whose management requires a multidisciplinary team to treat the different complications that may occur. We report the case of a 50-year-old man diagnosed with EDS IV detected incidentally after hemothorax secondary to a coughing spell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  15. Diabetic Retinopathy: Vascular and Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, F.; Cancarini, A.; dell'Omo, R.; Rezzola, S.; Romano, M. R.; Costagliola, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment in the working-age population of the Western world. The pathogenesis of DR is complex and several vascular, inflammatory, and neuronal mechanisms are involved. Inflammation mediates structural and molecular alterations associated with DR. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways associated with DR are not completely characterized. Previous studies indicate that tissue hypoxia and dysregulation of immune responses associated with diabetes mellitus can induce increased expression of numerous vitreous mediators responsible for DR development. Thus, analysis of vitreous humor obtained from diabetic patients has made it possible to identify some of the mediators (cytokines, chemokines, and other factors) responsible for DR pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between inflammation and DR. Herein the main vitreous-related factors triggering the occurrence of retinal complication in diabetes are highlighted. PMID:26137497

  16. Amplatzer vascular plugs in congenital cardiovascular malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Barwad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amplatzer vascular plugs (AVPs are devices ideally suited to close medium-to-large vascular communications. There is limited published literature regarding the utility of AVPs in congenital cardiovascular malformations (CCVMs. Aims: To describe the use of AVPs in different CCVMs and to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Materials and Methods: All patients who required an AVP for the closure of CCVM were included in this retrospective review of our catheterization laboratory data. The efficacy and safety of AVPs are reported. Results: A total of 39 AVPs were implanted in 31 patients. Thirteen (33% were AVP type I and 23 (59% were AVP type II. AVP type III were implanted in two patients and type IV in one patient. The major indications for their use included closure of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (AVM (n = 7, aortopulmonary collaterals (n = 7, closure of a patent Blalock-Taussig shunt (n = 5, systemic AVM (n = 5, coronary AVM (n = 4, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA (n = 3, pulmonary artery aneurysms (n = 3, and venovenous collaterals (n = 2. Deployment of the AVP was done predominantly via the 5 - 7F Judkin′s right coronary guide catheter. Overall 92% of the AVPs could be successfully deployed and resulted in occlusion of the target vessel in all cases, within 10 minutes. No procedure-related or access site complication occurred. Conclusions: AVPs are versatile, easy to use, and effective devices to occlude the vascular communications in a variety of settings. AVP II is especially useful in the closure of tubular structures with a high flow.

  17. Experience of vascular trauma in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imtiaz, N.

    2010-01-01

    To highlight the presentation and management of various vascular injuries and their outcome. Thirty nine cases of vascular trauma were referred to vascular surgeon CMH Rawalpindi, in the above mentioned period. These cases were evaluated for mechanism of injury, age, gender and time of presentation. Out of these, only thirty cases were found suitable for surgical intervention. These thirty cases were evaluated for site of vascular injury, associated injuries, type of surgery performed and the outcome. Blunt trauma was the predominant cause of vascular injuries in our study 16/39 (41%). Fourteen cases (35.8%) had gun shot wounds. Only thirty patients (76.9 %) underwent various surgical procedures. Primary end to end anastomosis was possible in only 5/30 cases (16.6%) while reversed venous graft was used in 13/30 cases (43.3%). Wound infection occurred in 2/30(6.6%) cases out of which 1 case (3.3%) ultimately had an amputation. The time period between injury and surgical intervention ranged between 1 to 20 hours for most of the vascular injuries while delayed presentation in the form of traumatic arteriovenous fistula or pseudoaneurysm was between 48 hours to 3 months. There are reasonable numbers of vascular trauma cases being referred to a tertiary care hospital. Most of these cases reach us quite late due to unnecessary investigations, delayed referral and transportation. Early intervention and revascularization definitely reduces amputation and complication rate. All gunshot wounds not only require thorough surrounding soft tissue debridement but also liberal excision of traumatised vessel itself, resulting in interposition graft repair. (author)

  18. Vascular hemichorea: case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Martínez Alfonzo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chorea rarely complicates ischemic or hemorrhagic cerebral vascular lesions. Clinical symptoms usually involve one side of the body while the injury is situated on the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. Spontaneous remission is the norm, but sometimes symptomatic treatment is required. A 58-year-old male patient who suffers from untreated high blood pressure, type II obesity, smokes 6 packs of cigarettes per year and has a moderate intake of alcohol is presented. The patient’s recent history began three days before he appeared at the Emergency Department. His symptoms were ceaseless, involuntary movements in his left arm and foot during day and night with no restriction of voluntary movements. Physical examination and laboratory tests revealed no other findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed hyperintensity in the right posterolateral thalamic region consistent with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Symptomatic therapy was indicated and his underlying conditions were addressed. The importance of this case lies on the low prevalence as well as the scarcity of publications regarding vascular causes of hemichorea, including diagnosis, therapy and prognosis.

  19. Vascular disease in cocaine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachi, Keren; Mani, Venkatesh; Jeyachandran, Devi; Fayad, Zahi A; Goldstein, Rita Z; Alia-Klein, Nelly

    2017-07-01

    Cocaine, a powerful vasoconstrictor, induces immune responses including cytokine elevations. Chronic cocaine use is associated with functional brain impairments potentially mediated by vascular pathology. Although the Crack-Cocaine epidemic has declined, its vascular consequences are increasingly becoming evident among individuals with cocaine use disorder of that period, now aging. Paradoxically, during the period when prevention efforts could make a difference, this population receives psychosocial treatment at best. We review major postmortem and in vitro studies documenting cocaine-induced vascular toxicity. PubMed and Academic Search Complete were used with relevant terms. Findings consist of the major mechanisms of cocaine-induced vasoconstriction, endothelial dysfunction, and accelerated atherosclerosis, emphasizing acute, chronic, and secondary effects of cocaine. The etiology underlying cocaine's acute and chronic vascular effects is multifactorial, spanning hypertension, impaired homeostasis and platelet function, thrombosis, thromboembolism, and alterations in blood flow. Early detection of vascular disease in cocaine addiction by multimodality imaging is discussed. Treatment may be similar to indications in patients with traditional risk-factors, with few exceptions such as enhanced supportive care and use of benzodiazepines and phentolamine for sedation, and avoiding β-blockers. Given the vascular toxicity cocaine induces, further compounded by smoking and alcohol comorbidity, and interacting with aging of the crack generation, there is a public health imperative to identify pre-symptomatic markers of vascular impairments in cocaine addiction and employ preventive treatment to reduce silent disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [The future of vascular medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, K; Luther, B

    2014-10-01

    In the future vascular medicine will still have a great impact on health of people. It should be noted that the aging of the population does not lead to a dramatic increase in patient numbers, but will be associated with a changing spectrum of co-morbidities. In addition, vascular medical research has to include the intensive care special features of vascular patients, the involvement of vascular medicine in a holistic concept of fast-track surgery, a geriatric-oriented intensive monitoring and early geriatric rehabilitation. For the future acceptance of vascular medicine as a separate subject area under delimitation of cardiology and radiology is important. On the other hand, the subject is so complex and will become more complex in future specialisations that mixing of surgery and angiology is desirable, with the aim to preserve the vascular surgical knowledge and skills on par with the medical and interventional measures and further develop them. Only large, interdisciplinary guided vascular centres will be able to provide timely diagnosis and therapy, to deal with the growing multi-morbidity of the patient, to perform complex therapies even in an acute emergency and due to sufficient number of cases to present with well-trained and experienced teams. These requirements are mandatory to decrease patients' mortality step by step. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Contemporary vascular smartphone medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Thomas; O'Neill, Stephen; Johns, Neil; Brady, Richard R W

    2013-08-01

    Use of smartphones and medical mHealth applications (apps) within the clinical environment provides a potential means for delivering elements of vascular care. This article reviews the contemporary availability of apps specifically themed to major vascular diseases and the opportunities and concerns regarding their integration into practice. Smartphone apps relating to major vascular diseases were identified from the app stores for the 6 most popular smartphone platforms, including iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, Windows, and Samsung. Search terms included peripheral artery (arterial) disease, varicose veins, aortic aneurysm, carotid artery disease, amputation, ulcers, hyperhydrosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, vascular malformation, and lymphatic disorders. Forty-nine vascular-themed apps were identified. Sixteen (33%) were free of charge. Fifteen apps (31%) had customer satisfaction ratings, but only 3 (6%) had greater than 100. Only 13 apps (27%) had documented medical professional involvement in their design or content. The integration of apps into the delivery of care has the potential to benefit vascular health care workers and patients. However, high-quality apps designed by clinicians with vascular expertise are currently lacking and represent an area of concern in the mHealth market. Improvement in the quality and reliability of these apps will require the development of robust regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Long term complications of diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000327.htm Long-term complications of diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, ... other tests. All these may help you keep complications of diabetes away. You will need to check your blood ...

  3. Constructal vascularized structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  4. Complication of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imajo, Yoshinari; Suematsu, Toru; Narabayashi, Isamu; Gose, Kyuhei; Takimoto, Saeko

    1984-01-01

    The radiation pneumonitis is a major complication for patients recieving thoracic irradiation. This report describe the radiographic recognition, pathological change and imapired pulmonary functions of radiation pneumonitis. The 57 patients with lung cancer treated with radiation are analyzed on the pneumonitis by chest X-P. Among these, 50 patients (88%) develop radiation pneumonitis. Repeated CT scans give more detailed information than conventional radiograms as to exdative changes. The pathological analysis are made on the 35 patients of which affected lungs are resected after pre-operative irradiation. Three phases are recognized in the evolution of pneumonitis, the ongestive, the degenerative, and the fibrotic. Adding to the morphorogical damage, pulmonary functions also detrieorate both in ventilation and perfusion scans. (author)

  5. Tattoo complaints and complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Jørgen; Carlsen, Katrina Hutton; Sepehri, Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Tattoos cause a broad range of clinical problems. Mild complaints, especially sensitivity to sun, are very common and seen in 1/5 of cases. Medical complications are dominated by allergy to tattoo pigment haptens or haptens generated in the skin, especially in red tattoos but also in blue and green...... tattoos. Symptoms are major and can be compared to cumbersome pruritic skin diseases. Tattoo allergies and local reactions show distinct clinical manifestations, with plaque-like, excessive hyperkeratotic, ulcero-necrotic, lymphopathic, neuro-sensory, and scar patterns. Reactions in black tattoos......) transferred by tattooing remain a significant risk needing active prevention. It is noteworthy that cancer arising in tattoos, in regional lymph nodes, and in other organs due to tattoo pigments and ingredients has not been detected or noted as a significant clinical problem hitherto, despite millions...

  6. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J. [Saint Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author).

  7. Neurologic Complications of Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Rajat

    2018-02-01

    Neurologic disturbances including encephalopathy, seizures, and focal deficits complicate the course 10-30% of patients undergoing organ or stem cell transplantation. While much or this morbidity is multifactorial and often associated with extra-cerebral dysfunction (e.g., graft dysfunction, metabolic derangements), immunosuppressive drugs also contribute significantly. This can either be through direct toxicity (e.g., posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome from calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus in the acute postoperative period) or by facilitating opportunistic infections in the months after transplantation. Other neurologic syndromes such as akinetic mutism and osmotic demyelination may also occur. While much of this neurologic dysfunction may be reversible if related to metabolic factors or drug toxicity (and the etiology is recognized and reversed), cases of multifocal cerebral infarction, hemorrhage, or infection may have poor outcomes. As transplant patients survive longer, delayed infections (such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy) and post-transplant malignancies are increasingly reported.

  8. Hip complications following chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, P.J.; Sebag Montefiore, D.J.; Arnott, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy protocols are a recent development in the management of tumours where preservation of organ function is important. It is now recognized that such combined treatment may produce adverse effects below the accepted dose thresholds for either modality. This enhancement of toxicity is generally thought to reflect depletion of stem cells within the tissue concerned. We report four patients who have developed avascular necrosis or fractures of the hip following chemoradiotherapy for carcinoma of the vulva or anus. These complications developed after a radiation dose of 4500 cGy in 20 fractions. The possible role of cytotoxic agents in sensitizing bone to radiation damage is discussed, and a novel mechanism is proposed to account for this phenomenon. (author)

  9. Prognostic value of dynamic MRI in assessing post-traumatic femoral head vascularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, Abhishek; Varghese, Mathew [St Stephen' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Delhi, New Delhi (India); Sankaran, Balu [St Stephen' s Hospital, Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2009-06-15

    The vascular status of femoral heads in the post-traumatic period of intracapsular femoral neck fracture (ICFNF) remains uncertain until the patient actually develops avascular necrosis (AVN). Several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, that are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications, and technical difficulties. The present study involved the use of Dynamic MRI (DMRI) in assessing femoral head vascularity to predict AVN. The role of DMRI was studied prospectively in 30 patients with 31 ICFNF. Fractures were divided in to three types (Type A, B, or C) based on the femoral head vascularity shown by dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation. Type A was preserved vascularity, Type B was some decrease in vascularity but still viable while Type C was significantly reduced vascularity. These were followed-up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome in terms of union, non-union, or AVN. We found that Type A curves correlate well with vascular status and Type C curves correlate well with poor vascularity of the femoral heads. No AVN was seen in any of Type A (13/31) or Type B (eight out of 31). Five cases showed AVN and all of them were of Type C dynamic curves. Dynamic MRI is a reliable tool to evaluate vascularity of femoral heads and thus reduces the uncertainty of outcome of treatment of ICFNFs. DMRI can be a useful tool to formulate a treatment algorithm in management of ICFNF. (orig.)

  10. Prognostic value of dynamic MRI in assessing post-traumatic femoral head vascularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Abhishek; Varghese, Mathew; Sankaran, Balu

    2009-01-01

    The vascular status of femoral heads in the post-traumatic period of intracapsular femoral neck fracture (ICFNF) remains uncertain until the patient actually develops avascular necrosis (AVN). Several methods for predicting the viability of femoral head have been reported, that are not effective or widely used because of unreliability, potential complications, and technical difficulties. The present study involved the use of Dynamic MRI (DMRI) in assessing femoral head vascularity to predict AVN. The role of DMRI was studied prospectively in 30 patients with 31 ICFNF. Fractures were divided in to three types (Type A, B, or C) based on the femoral head vascularity shown by dynamic curve patterns on MRI evaluation. Type A was preserved vascularity, Type B was some decrease in vascularity but still viable while Type C was significantly reduced vascularity. These were followed-up for 6 months to 2 years to observe the final outcome in terms of union, non-union, or AVN. We found that Type A curves correlate well with vascular status and Type C curves correlate well with poor vascularity of the femoral heads. No AVN was seen in any of Type A (13/31) or Type B (eight out of 31). Five cases showed AVN and all of them were of Type C dynamic curves. Dynamic MRI is a reliable tool to evaluate vascularity of femoral heads and thus reduces the uncertainty of outcome of treatment of ICFNFs. DMRI can be a useful tool to formulate a treatment algorithm in management of ICFNF. (orig.)

  11. Hematological and vascular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, L.J.; Yochum, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous blood-related disorders will demonstrate skeletal alterations. These include various anemias, leukemias, lymphomas, and clotting-deficient diseases (hemophilia). Of all the various types of anemias only those that are chronic and severe will result in radiographically visible osseous changes. The skeletal alterations which are observed are invariably related to the direct effects on the bone marrow or are secondary to the inherent complications of the disease. The most notable osseous changes are seen in the congenital hemolytic anemias, especially thalassemia (Cooley's anemia), sickle cell anemia, and hereditary spherocytosis. Chronic iron deficiency anemia produces very minor skeletal changes, usually isolated to the skull. Leukemia demonstrates characteristic changes largely dependent on age. Hemophilia primarily alters joint function due to recurrent intraarticular hemorrhage. This chapter discusses blood-related disorders that affect the bones

  12. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui Seok Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR. We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR.

  13. Vascular graft infections with Mycoplasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi-Mazloum, Niels Donald; Skov Jensen, J; Prag, J

    1995-01-01

    laboratory techniques, the percentage of culture-negative yet grossly infected vascular grafts seems to be increasing and is not adequately explained by the prior use of antibiotics. We have recently reported the first case of aortic graft infection with Mycoplasma. We therefore suggest the hypothesis...... that the large number of culture-negative yet grossly infected vascular grafts may be due to Mycoplasma infection not detected with conventional laboratory technique....

  14. Limb vascular function in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Gliemann, Lasse

    2018-01-01

    Throughout life, women are subjected to both acute fluctuations in sex hormones, associated with the menstrual cycle, and chronic changes following the onset of menopause. Female sex hormones, and in particular estrogen, strongly influence cardiovascular function such as the regulation of vascular...... studies. Physical activity should be recommended for women of all ages, but the most essential timing for maintenance of vascular health may be from menopause and onwards....

  15. Facial vascular malformations in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunelle, F.O.; Lallemand, D.; Chaumont, P.; Teillac, D.; Manach, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present their experience with conventional and digital angiography of vascular malformations of the head and neck in children. 22 hemangioendotheliomas, 8 venous angiomas, and 3 arteriovenous fistula were studied. 22 patients were embolised. DSA offers many advantages during the diagnostic as well as during the therapeutic phase of angiography. Embolization appears to have a major role in treatment of such vascular malformations. (orig.)

  16. Thoracostomy tubes: A comprehensive review of complications and related topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatt, Michael; Tarbox, Abigail; Seamon, Mark J.; Swaroop, Mamta; Cipolla, James; Allen, Charles; Hallenbeck, Stacinoel; Davido, H. Tracy; Lindsey, David E.; Doraiswamy, Vijay A.; Galwankar, Sagar; Tulman, David; Latchana, Nicholas; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Cook, Charles H.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P.

    2014-01-01

    Tube thoracostomy (TT) placement belongs among the most commonly performed procedures. Despite many benefits of TT drainage, potential for significant morbidity and mortality exists. Abdominal or thoracic injury, fistula formation and vascular trauma are among the most serious, but more common complications such as recurrent pneumothorax, insertion site infection and nonfunctioning or malpositioned TT also represent a significant source of morbidity and treatment cost. Awareness of potential complications and familiarity with associated preventive, diagnostic and treatment strategies are fundamental to satisfactory patient outcomes. This review focuses on chest tube complications and related topics, with emphasis on prevention and problem-oriented approaches to diagnosis and treatment. The authors hope that this manuscript will serve as a valuable foundation for those who wish to become adept at the management of chest tubes. PMID:25024942

  17. Angiogenesis, Cancer, and Vascular Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Moriya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence have revealed that the angiogenic response to ischemic injury declines with age, which might account for the increased morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease (CVD among the elderly. While impairment of angiogenesis with aging leads to delayed wound healing or exacerbation of atherosclerotic ischemic diseases, it also inhibits the progression of cancer. Age-related changes of angiogenesis have been considered to at least partly result from vascular aging or endothelial cell senescence. There is considerable evidence supporting the hypothesis that vascular cell senescence contributes to the pathogenesis of age-related CVD, suggesting that vascular aging could be an important therapeutic target. Since therapeutic angiogenesis is now regarded as a promising concept for patients with ischemic CVD, it has become even more important to understand the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying impairment of angiogenesis in older patients. To improve the usefulness of therapeutic angiogenesis, approaches are needed that can compensate for impaired angiogenic capacity in the elderly while not promoting the development or progression of malignancy. In this review, we briefly outline the mechanisms of angiogenesis and vascular aging, followed by a description of how vascular aging leads to impairment of angiogenesis. We also examine potential therapeutic approaches that could enhance angiogenesis and/or vascular function in the elderly, as well as discussing the possibility of anti-senescence therapy or reversal of endothelial cell senescence.

  18. Vascular Closure Devices in Interventional Radiology Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Rafiuddin, E-mail: rafiuddin.patel@ouh.nhs.uk [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Muller-Hulsbeck, Stefan, E-mail: muehue@diako.de [Diakonissen Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology/Neuroradiology (Germany); Morgan, Robert, E-mail: robert.morgan@stgeorges.nhs.uk [St George’s Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Uberoi, Raman, E-mail: raman.uberoi@orh.nhs.uk [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Manual compression (MC) is a well-established technique for haemostasis following percutaneous arterial intervention. However, MC is labour and time intensive with potential limitations, particularly for patients who are coagulopathic, unable to comply with bed rest or obese and when large sheaths or anti-coagulants are used. There are a variety of vascular closure devices (VCDs) available to overcome these limitations. This review gives an overview of current VCDs, their mechanism of action, individual strengths and weaknesses, evidence base and utility in interventional radiology (IR) practice. The majority of the published evidence on VCDs is derived from patients undergoing cardiac interventions, which should be borne in mind when considering the applicability and transfer of this data for general IR practice. Overall, the evidence suggests that most VCDs are effective in achieving haemostasis with a similar rate of complications to MC although the complication profile associated with VCDs is distinct to that of MC. There is insufficient evidence to comparatively analyse the different types of VCDs currently available or reliably judge their cost-effectiveness. The interventional radiologist should have a thorough understanding of the available techniques for haemostasis and be able to identify and utilise the most appropriate strategy and closure technique for the individual patient.

  19. Renal complications of anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, J; Tyson, E; Forni, L G

    2018-01-01

    Peri-operative acute kidney injury is common, accounting for 30-40% of all in-hospital cases of acute kidney injury. It is associated with clinically significant morbidity and mortality even with what was hitherto regarded as relatively trivial increases in serum creatinine, and carries over a 12-fold relative risk of death following major abdominal surgery. Comorbid conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, liver disease and particularly pre-existing chronic kidney disease, as well as the type and urgency of surgery, are major risk factors for the development of postoperative acute kidney injury. As yet, there are no specific treatment options for the injured kidney, although there are several modifiable risk factors of which the anaesthetist should be aware. As well as the avoidance of potential nephrotoxins and appropriate volume balance, optimal anaesthetic management should aim to reduce the risk of postoperative renal complications. This may include careful ventilatory management and blood pressure control, as well as appropriate analgesic strategies. The choice of anaesthetic agent may also influence renal outcomes. Rather than concentrate on the classical management of acute kidney injury, this review focuses on the potential development of acute kidney injury peri-operatively, and the means by which this may be ameliorated. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Calcium dynamics in vascular smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Amberg, Gregory C.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are ultimately responsible for determining vascular luminal diameter and blood flow. Dynamic changes in intracellular calcium are a critical mechanism regulating vascular smooth muscle contractility. Processes influencing intracellular calcium are therefore important regulators of vascular function with physiological and pathophysiological consequences. In this review we discuss the major dynamic calcium signals identified and characterized in vascular smooth muscle cells....

  1. Treatment of Soft Tissue Filler Complications: Expert Consensus Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdiales-Gálvez, Fernando; Delgado, Nuria Escoda; Figueiredo, Vitor; Lajo-Plaza, José V; Mira, Mar; Moreno, Antonio; Ortíz-Martí, Francisco; Del Rio-Reyes, Rosa; Romero-Álvarez, Nazaret; Del Cueto, Sofía Ruiz; Segurado, María A; Rebenaque, Cristina Villanueva

    2018-04-01

    Dermal fillers have been increasingly used in minimally invasive facial esthetic procedures. This widespread use has led to a rise in reports of associated complications. The aim of this expert consensus report is to describe potential adverse events associated with dermal fillers and to provide guidance on their treatment and avoidance. A multidisciplinary group of experts in esthetic treatments convened to discuss the management of the complications associated with dermal fillers use. A search was performed for English, French, and Spanish language articles in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database, and Google Scholar using the search terms "complications" OR "soft filler complications" OR "injectable complications" AND "dermal fillers" AND "Therapy". An initial document was drafted by the Coordinating Committee, and it was reviewed and modified by the experts, until a final text was agreed upon and validated. The panel addressed consensus recommendations about the classification of filler complications according to the time of onset and about the clinical management of different complications including bruising, swelling, edema, infections, lumps and bumps, skin discoloration, and biofilm formation. Special attention was paid to vascular compromise and retinal artery occlusion. Clinicians should be fully aware of the signs and symptoms related to complications and be prepared to confidently treat them. Establishing action protocols for emergencies, with agents readily available in the office, would reduce the severity of adverse outcomes associated with injection of hyaluronic acid fillers in the cosmetic setting. This document seeks to lay down a set of recommendations and to identify key issues that may be useful for clinicians who are starting to use dermal fillers. Additionally, this document provides a better understanding about the diagnoses and management of complications if they do occur. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each

  2. Prevalence of diabetic complications in rural Goa, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafisa C Vaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and its associated diabetic complications in rural Goa, India. Materials and Methods: A community-based study was carried out in a rural setting in Goa, India. About 1,266 participants were selected by systematic random sampling. The participants were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire and were subjected to anthropometric, clinical evaluation and biochemical investigations. American Diabetes Association criteria were used to determine the prevalence of diabetes and standard operational definitions were used to define the diabetic complications. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 14.0 while chi-square and chi-square for trend were the tests used. Results: Among the total 1,266 study participants about 130 (10.3% were diabetics. The prevalence of the associated diabetic complications were as follows viz. neuropathy (60%, CHD (32.3% and cataract (20%, retinopathy (15.4%, peripheral vascular disease (11.5% and cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs (6.9%. A significant rising trend in the prevalence of all diabetic complications was observed with advancing duration of diabetes. Conclusion: The prevalence of DM and its associated complications was higher among the diabetic individuals in the rural setting of Goa, India. All the associated diabetic complications observed need to be addressed with appropriate prevention and control strategies.

  3. Complications of acromegaly: cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivonello, Rosario; Auriemma, Renata S; Grasso, Ludovica F S; Pivonello, Claudia; Simeoli, Chiara; Patalano, Roberta; Galdiero, Mariano; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-02-01

    Acromegaly is associated with an enhanced mortality, with cardiovascular and respiratory complications representing not only the most frequent comorbidities but also two of the main causes of deaths, whereas a minor role is played by metabolic complications, and particularly diabetes mellitus. The most prevalent cardiovascular complications of acromegaly include a cardiomyopathy, characterized by cardiac hypertrophy and diastolic and systolic dysfunction together with arterial hypertension, cardiac rhythm disorders and valve diseases, as well as vascular endothelial dysfunction. Biochemical control of acromegaly significantly improves cardiovascular disease, albeit completely recovering to normal mainly in young patients with short disease duration. Respiratory complications, represented mainly by sleep-breathing disorders, particularly sleep apnea, and respiratory insufficiency, frequently occur at the early stage of the disease and, although their severity decreases with disease control, this improvement does not often change the indication for a specific therapy directed to improve respiratory function. Metabolic complications, including glucose and lipid disorders, are variably reported in acromegaly. Treatments of acromegaly may influence glucose metabolism, and the presence of diabetes mellitus in acromegaly may affect the choice of treatments, so that glucose homeostasis is worth being monitored during the entire course of the disease. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of acromegaly, aimed at obtaining a strict control of hormone excess, are the best strategy to limit the development or reverse the complications and prevent the premature mortality.

  4. Chest complication after abdominal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, B. H.; Choi, J. Y.; Hahm, C. K.; Kang, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of many advances in medicine, anesthetic technique and surgical managements, pulmonary problems are the most frequent postoperative complications, particularly after abdominal surgery. As postoperative pulmonary complications, atelectasis, pleural effusion, pneumonia, chronic bronchitis and lung abscess can be occurred. This study include evaluation of chest films of 2006 patients (927 male, 1079 female), who had been operated abdominal surgery from Jan. 1979 to June, 1980 in the Hanyang university hospital. The results were as follows: 1. 70 cases out of total 2006 cases (3.5%) developed postoperative chest complications, 51 cases (5.5%) in male, 19 cases (1.8%) in female. 2. The complication rate was increased according to the increase of age. The incidence of the postoperative complications over 40 years of age was higher than the overall average complications rate. 3. The most common postoperative pulmonary complication was pleural effusion, next pneumonia, atelectasis and pulmonary edema respectively. 4. The complication rate of the group of upper abdominal surgery is much higher than the group of lower abdominal surgery. 5. Complication rate was increased according to increase of the duration of operation. 6. There were significant correlations between the operation site and side of the complicated hemithorax

  5. Injuries to the vascular endothelium: vascular wall and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Vascular endothelial injury has multiple elements, and this article focuses on ischemia-related processes that have particular relevance to ischemic stroke. Distinctions between necrotic and apoptotic cell death provide a basic science context in which to better understand the significance of classical core and penumbra concepts of acute stroke, with apoptotic processes particularly prominent in the penumbra. The mitochondria are understood to serve as a reservoir of proteins that mediate apoptosis. Oxidative stress pathways generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) are prominent in endothelial injury, both ischemic and nonischemic, with prominent roles of enzyme- and nonenzymemediated pathways; mitochondria once again have a critical role, particularly in the nonenzymatic pathways generating ROS. Inflammation also contributes to vascular endothelial injury, and endothelial cells have the capacity to rapidly increase expression of inflammatory mediators following ischemic challenge; this leads to enhanced leukocyte-endothelial interactions mediated by selectins and adhesion molecules. Preconditioning consists of a minor version of an injurious event, which in turn may protect vascular endothelium from injury following a more substantial event. Presence of the blood-brain barrier creates unique responses to endothelial injury, with permeability changes due to impairment of endothelial-matrix interactions compounding altered vasomotor tone and tissue perfusion mediated by nitric oxide. Pharmacological protection against vascular endothelial injury can be provided by several of the phosphodiesterases (cilostazol and dipyridamole), along with statins. Optimal clinical responses for protection of brain vascular endothelium may use preconditioning as a model, and will likely require combined protection against apoptosis, ROS, and inflammation.

  6. Non-invasive vascular imaging: assessing tumour vascularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, S.; Knopp, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    Non-invasive assessment of vascularity is a new diagnostic approach to characterise tumours. Vascular assessment is based on the pathophysiology of tumour angiogenesis and its diagnostic implications for tumour biology, prognosis and therapy response. Two current techniques investigating vascular features in addition to morphology are Doppler ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced MRI. Diagnostic differentiation has been shown to be possible with Doppler, and a high degree of observed vascularity could be linked to an aggressive course of the disease. Dynamic MRI using gadolinium chelates is already used clinically to detect and differentiate tumours. The histological correlation shows that capillary permeability is increased in malignant tumours and is the best criterion for differentiation from benign processes. Permeability and perfusion factors seem to be more diagnostic than overall vessel density. New clinical applications are currently being established for therapy monitoring. Further instrumental developments will bring harmonic imaging in Doppler, and faster imaging techniques, higher spatial resolution and novel pharmacokinetic concepts in MRI. Upcoming contrast agents for both Doppler and MRI will further improve estimation of intratumoural blood volume and vascular permeability. (orig.)

  7. StarClose Vascular Closure Device: Prospective Study on 222 Deployments in an Interventional Radiology Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imam, Atique; Carter, Ranjana M. S.; Phillips-Hughes, Jane; Boardman, Philip; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    The StarClose device (Abbott Vascular Devices; Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA) utilizes an externally placed Nitinol clip to achieve arterial closure following femoral artery puncture. The objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy and complications of the StarClose device in patients undergoing interventional radiological procedures. Preprocedural clotting status, pulse and blood pressure, severity of vessel calcification, sheath size, and time to deployment were recorded. Postdeployment complications immediately postprocedure, at 1 h, at 2 h, and at 1 week were recorded. A duplex scan was performed in the first 10 patients to assess any immediate vascular complications. Deployments were successful in 96% achieving immediate hemostasis. Mean deployment time was 48 s. There were no major complications. The StarClose device was found to have a high technical and clinical efficacy

  8. Vascular injuries of the upper extremity Lesões vasculares de membros superiores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raafat Shalabi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study analyzes the causes of injuries, presentations, surgical approaches, outcome and complications of vascular trauma of the upper limbs, in spite of limited hospital resources. METHODS: A 5-year retrospective analysis. From 01/01/2001 to 31/12/2005, 165 patients were operated for vascular injuries at King Fahd Hospital, Medina, Saudi Arabia. Of all peripheral vascular trauma patients (115, upper limb trauma was present in 58. Diagnosis was made by physical examination and hand-held Doppler alone or in combination with Doppler scan/angiography. Primary vascular repair was performed whenever possible; otherwise, the interposition vein graft was used. Fasciotomy was considered when required. Patients with unsalvageable lower extremity injury requiring primary amputation were excluded from the study. RESULTS: Fifty patients were male (86% and eight were female (14%, aged between 2.5-55 years (mean 23 years. Mean duration of presentation was 8 h after the injury. The most common etiological factor was road traffic accidents, accounting for 50.5% in the blunt trauma group and 33% among all penetrating and stab wound injuries. Incidence of concomitant orthopedic injuries was very high in our study (51%. The brachial artery was the most affected (51%. Interposition vein grafts were used in 53% of the cases. Limb salvage rate was 100%. CONCLUSION: Patients who suffer vascular injuries of the upper extremities should be transferred to vascular surgery centers as soon as possible. Decisive management of peripheral vascular trauma will maximize patient survival and limb salvage. Priorities must be established in the management of associated injuries, and delay must be avoided when ischemic changes are present.OBJETIVO: Este estudo analisa as causas de lesões, apresentação, abordagens cirúrgicas, desfechos e complicações do trauma vascular de membros superiores, apesar de recursos hospitalares limitados. MÉTODOS: An

  9. Outpatient Vascular Intervention: A Two-Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Sumaira; Thomas, Steven M.; Cleveland, Trevor J.; Gaines, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcome of a range of interventional vascular procedures performed on outpatients. Methods: Suitability for outpatient procedures was assessed according to agreed protocols. An episode was defined as any procedure/s through a single access site at one attendance. Retrospective case-note review was performed. Results: There were 693 outpatient episodes between April 1998 and May 2000 (290 interventional, and 403 diagnostic procedures),comprising 25% (693/2769) of the total workload. Follow-up is available in 214; 38 of these were transfers from outlying hospitals and were excluded from analysis. One hundred and seventy-six were true outpatients. There were 98 iliac and 46 femoropopliteal interventions,2 aortic stents, 1 renal and 5 upper-limb angioplasties (PTAs), 5 embolizations, 8 Hickman lines, 1 line stripping, 3 atherectomies, 1 dialysis-graft PTA and 6 bypass-graft PTAs. Sixty-eight closure devices were used. Twelve patients were converted to inpatients (6.8%,12/176). The readmission rate was 3.4% (6/176). The reattendance rate was 1.1% (2/176), both subsequently attending for outpatient duplex ultrasound examination to exclude pseudoaneurysm. The major complication rate was 3.4% and the delayed major complication rate was 1.7%. Conclusion: Outpatient vascular intervention is safe with appropriate protocols and with careful patient selection. Local vascular services benefit from the release of inpatient beds

  10. Complications in ankle fracture surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ovaska, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    Mikko Ovaska. Complications in Ankle Fracture Surgery. Helsinki Bone and Joint Research Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. Helsinki 2014. Ankle fractures are among the most frequently encountered surgically treated fractures. The operative treatment of this fracture may be associated with several complications. The most frequently encountered complications are related wound healing, and deep infection may have d...

  11. Pediatric interventional radiology: vascular interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery. (author)

  12. Wound Complications in Preoperatively Irradiated Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Lewis A.; Esther, Robert J.; Erfanian, Kamil; Green, Rebecca; Kim, Hong Jin; Sweeting, Raeshell; Tepper, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the involvement of plastic surgery and the use of vascularized tissue flaps reduces the frequency of major wound complications after radiation therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study evaluated patients with STS of the extremities who underwent radiation therapy before surgery. Major complications were defined as secondary operations with anesthesia, seroma/hematoma aspirations, readmission for wound complications, or persistent deep packing. Results: Between 1996 and 2010, 73 patients with extremity STS were preoperatively irradiated. Major wound complications occurred in 32% and secondary operations in 16% of patients. Plastic surgery closed 63% of the wounds, and vascularized tissue flaps were used in 22% of closures. When plastic surgery performed closure the frequency of secondary operations trended lower (11% vs 26%; P=.093), but the frequency of major wound complications was not different (28% vs 38%; P=.43). The use of a vascularized tissue flap seemed to have no effect on the frequency of complications. The occurrence of a major wound complication did not affect disease recurrence or survival. For all patients, 3-year local control was 94%, and overall survival was 72%. Conclusions: The rates of wound complications and secondary operations in this study were very similar to previously published results. We were not able to demonstrate a significant relationship between the involvement of plastic surgery and the rate of wound complications, although there was a trend toward reduced secondary operations when plastic surgery was involved in the initial operation. Wound complications were manageable and did not compromise outcomes.

  13. Wound Complications in Preoperatively Irradiated Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Lewis A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Esther, Robert J. [Department of Orthopedics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Erfanian, Kamil [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Green, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kim, Hong Jin; Sweeting, Raeshell [Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tepper, Joel E., E-mail: tepper@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the involvement of plastic surgery and the use of vascularized tissue flaps reduces the frequency of major wound complications after radiation therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study evaluated patients with STS of the extremities who underwent radiation therapy before surgery. Major complications were defined as secondary operations with anesthesia, seroma/hematoma aspirations, readmission for wound complications, or persistent deep packing. Results: Between 1996 and 2010, 73 patients with extremity STS were preoperatively irradiated. Major wound complications occurred in 32% and secondary operations in 16% of patients. Plastic surgery closed 63% of the wounds, and vascularized tissue flaps were used in 22% of closures. When plastic surgery performed closure the frequency of secondary operations trended lower (11% vs 26%; P=.093), but the frequency of major wound complications was not different (28% vs 38%; P=.43). The use of a vascularized tissue flap seemed to have no effect on the frequency of complications. The occurrence of a major wound complication did not affect disease recurrence or survival. For all patients, 3-year local control was 94%, and overall survival was 72%. Conclusions: The rates of wound complications and secondary operations in this study were very similar to previously published results. We were not able to demonstrate a significant relationship between the involvement of plastic surgery and the rate of wound complications, although there was a trend toward reduced secondary operations when plastic surgery was involved in the initial operation. Wound complications were manageable and did not compromise outcomes.

  14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor from Embryonic Status to Cardiovascular Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Azimi-Nezhad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is a multifunctional cytokine with distinct functions in angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, vascular permeability, and hematopoiesis. VEGF is a highly conserved, disulfide-bonded dimeric glycoprotein of 34 to 45 kDa produced by several cell types including fibroblasts, neutrophils, endothelial cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, particularly T lymphocytes and macrophages. Six VEGF isoforms are generated as a result of alternative splicing from a single VEGF gene, consisting of 121, 145, 165, 183, 189, or 206 amino acids. VEGF121, VEGF145, and VEGF165 are secreted whereas VEGF183, VEGF189, and VEGF206 are cell membrane-bound. VEGF145 has a key role during the vascularization of the human ovarian follicle and corpus luteum, in the placentation and embryonic periods, and in bone and wound healing, while VEGF165 is the most abundant and biologically active isoform. VEGF has been linked with a number of vascular pathologies including cardiovascular diseases such ischemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and diabetes and its related complications. In this review we aimed to present some important roles of VEGF in a number of clinical issues and indicate its involvement in several phenomena from the initial steps of the embryonic period to cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Tofacitinib Ameliorates Murine Lupus and Its Associated Vascular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Yasuko; Smith, Carolyne K; Blanco, Luz; Zhao, Wenpu; Brooks, Stephen R; Thacker, Seth G; Abdalrahman, Zarzour; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Tsai, Wanxia L; Trier, Anna M; Nunez, Leti; Mast, Laurel; Hoffmann, Victoria; Remaley, Alan T; O'Shea, John J; Kaplan, Mariana J; Gadina, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses contributes to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its associated premature vascular damage. No drug to date targets both systemic inflammatory disease and the cardiovascular complications of SLE. Tofacitinib is a JAK inhibitor that blocks signaling downstream of multiple cytokines implicated in lupus pathogenesis. While clinical trials have shown that tofacitinib exhibits significant clinical efficacy in various autoimmune diseases, its role in SLE and the associated vascular pathology remains to be characterized. MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice were administered tofacitinib or vehicle by gavage for 6 weeks (therapeutic arm) or 8 weeks (preventive arm). Nephritis, skin inflammation, serum levels of autoantibodies and cytokines, mononuclear cell phenotype and gene expression, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) release, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and endothelial differentiation were compared in treated and untreated mice. Treatment with tofacitinib led to significant improvement in measures of disease activity, including nephritis, skin inflammation, and autoantibody production. In addition, tofacitinib treatment reduced serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon responses in splenocytes and kidney tissue. Tofacitinib also modulated the formation of NETs and significantly increased endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and endothelial differentiation. The drug was effective in both preventive and therapeutic strategies. Tofacitinib modulates the innate and adaptive immune responses, ameliorates murine lupus, and improves vascular function. These results indicate that JAK inhibitors have the potential to be beneficial in SLE and its associated vascular damage. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Imaging after vascular gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Yang, Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    Targets for cardiovascular gene therapy currently include limiting restenosis after balloon angioplasty and stent placement, inhibiting vein bypass graft intimal hyperplasia/stenosis, therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiac and lower-limb ischemia, and prevention of thrombus formation. While catheter angiography is still standard method to follow-up vascular gene transfer, other modern imaging techniques, especially intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging provide complementary information about the therapeutic effect of vascular gene transfer in humans. Although molecular imaging of therapeutic gene expression in the vasculatures is still in its technical development phase, it has already offered basic medical science an extremely useful in vivo evaluation tool for non- or minimally invasive imaging of vascular gene therapy

  17. Skewed Epigenetics: An Alternative Therapeutic Option for Diabetes Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Togliatto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes patients. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and a lack of efficient antioxidant machinery, a result of hyperglycaemia, mainly contribute to this problem. Although advances in therapy have significantly reduced both morbidity and mortality in diabetic individuals, diabetes-associated vascular complications are still one of the most challenging health problems worldwide. New healing options are urgently needed as current therapeutics are failing to improve long-term outcomes. Particular effort has recently been devoted to understanding the functional relationship between chromatin structure regulation and the persistent change in gene expression which is driven by hyperglycaemia and which accounts for long-lasting diabetic complications. A detailed investigation into epigenetic chromatin modifications in type 2 diabetes is underway. This will be particularly useful in the design of mechanism-based therapeutics which interfere with long-lasting activating epigenetics and improve patient outcomes. We herein provide an overview of the most relevant mechanisms that account for hyperglycaemia-induced changes in chromatin structure; the most relevant mechanism is called “metabolic memory.”

  18. Multimodality imaging spectrum of complications of horseshoe kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik U Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Horseshoe kidney is the most common congenital renal fusion anomaly with an incidence of 1 in 400–600 individuals. The most common type is fusion at the lower poles seen in greater than 90% of the cases, with the rest depicting fusion at the upper poles, resulting in an inverted horseshoe kidney. Embryologically, there are two theories hypothesizing the genesis of horseshoe kidney – mechanical fusion theory and teratogenic event theory. As an entity, horseshoe kidney is an association of two anatomic anomalies, namely, ectopia and malrotation. It is also associated with other anomalies including vascular, calyceal, and ureteral anomalies. Horseshoe kidney is prone to a number of complications due to its abnormal position as well as due to associated vascular and ureteral anomalies. Complications associated with horseshoe kidney include pelviureteric junction obstruction, renal stones, infection, tumors, and trauma. It can also be associated with abnormalities of cardiovascular, central nervous, musculoskeletal and genitourinary systems, as well as chromosomal abnormalities. Conventional imaging modalities (plain films, intravenous urogram as well as advanced cross-sectional imaging modalities (ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging play an important role in the evaluation of horseshoe kidney. This article briefly describes the embryology and anatomy of the horseshoe kidney, enumerates appropriate imaging modalities used for its evaluation, and reviews cross-sectional imaging features of associated complications.

  19. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  20. Portulaca oleracea Ameliorates Diabetic Vascular Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in db/db Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, An Sook; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Yoon, Jung Joo; Kim, Jin Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with significantly accelerated rates of micro- and macrovascular complications such as diabetic vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of the aqueous extract of Portulaca oleracea L. (AP), an edible plant used as a folk medicine, on diabetic vascular complications. The db/db mice were treated with AP (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 10 weeks, and AP treatment markedly lowered blood glucose, plasma triglyceride, plasma level of LDL-cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure in diabetic db/db mice. Furthermore, AP significantly increased plasma level of HDL-cholesterol and insulin level. The impairment of ACh- and SNP-induced vascular relaxation of aortic rings were ameliorated by AP treatment in diabetic db/db mice. This study also showed that overexpression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, E-selectin, MMP-2, and ET-1 were observed in aortic tissues of untreated db/db mice, which were significantly suppressed by treatment with AP. We also found that the insulin immunoreactivity of the pancreatic islets remarkably increased in AP treated db/db mice compared with untreated db/db mice. Taken together, AP suppresses hyperglycemia and diabetic vascular inflammation, and prevents the development of diabetic endothelial dysfunction for the development of diabetes and its vascular complications. PMID:22474522

  1. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  2. Coloseminal fistula complicating sigmoid diverticulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Cuenod, Charles-André; Jian, Raymond; Cellier, Christophe; Berger, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We report on a 32-year-old man with a history of chronic lower abdominal pain and urogenital symptoms, leading to the diagnosis of coloseminal fistula complicating diverticular disease. We reviewed the literature on this rare clinical entity and would like to stress the role of pelvic imaging with rectal contrast to investigate complicated forms of diverticular disease. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Vascular malforma- tions part 1 — normal and abnormal vascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    to form the primitive vascular plexus. Angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels by sprouting or splitting of ... The differentiation of primitive vessels into arteries, veins or capillaries is determined by flow patterns .... identify, but it is probable that as time progresses further specific genetic defects related to the development ...

  4. Genetic Regulation of Vascular Development: Building the Zebrafish Vascular Tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L.J.M. Herpers (Robert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe extensive networks of blood and lymphatic vessels within the vertebrate body are essential for the transport and delivery of fluids, gases, macromolecules and cells, and play important roles in facilitating immune responses. The development of the vascular tree requires a highly

  5. Mechanistic insights into the vascular effects of blueberries: Evidence from recent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Brett Ronald; Petersen, Chrissa; Anandh Babu, Pon Velayutham

    2017-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Dietary habits influence a variety of cardiovascular complications such as peripheral artery disease, heart failure, and kidney disease. We along with others have previously reported the cardiovascular beneficial effects of dietary flavonoids. Anthocyanins, one class of flavonoids widely available in berries, have recently drawn wide scientific attention because of their diverse health benefits. Epidemiological, clinical, and animal studies indicate that blueberry anthocyanins exert protection against cardiovascular complications by acting on multiple targets in the vascular system. These include activating endothelial nitric oxide synthase signaling, reducing oxidative stress, improving inflammatory pathways, and ameliorating dyslipidemia. Anthocyanins are extensively metabolized in humans suggesting that their vascular benefits are likely mediated by their circulating metabolites. However, the bioactivities of blueberry metabolites are unknown. Evaluating the bioactivities of metabolites, analyzing their structure-activity relationship, and well-designed human trials are needed to understand the potential vascular effects of blueberries and their metabolites. Understanding the vascular effects will provide a solid scientific foundation to recommend blueberries to improve vascular health. This review highlights the recent developments in the understanding of the vascular effects of blueberries with special emphasis on the molecular mechanisms involved. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. [Experimental study of angiography using vascular interventional robot-2(VIR-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zeng-min; Lu, Wang-sheng; Liu, Da; Wang, Da-ming; Guo, Shu-xiang; Xu, Wu-yi; Jia, Bo; Zhao, De-peng; Liu, Bo; Gao, Bao-feng

    2012-06-01

    To verify the feasibility and safety of new vascular interventional robot system used in vascular interventional procedures. Vascular interventional robot type-2 (VIR-2) included master-slave parts of body propulsion system, image navigation systems and force feedback system, the catheter movement could achieve under automatic control and navigation, force feedback was integrated real-time, followed by in vitro pre-test in vascular model and cerebral angiography in dog. Surgeon controlled vascular interventional robot remotely, the catheter was inserted into the intended target, the catheter positioning error and the operation time would be evaluated. In vitro pre-test and animal experiment went well; the catheter can enter any branch of vascular. Catheter positioning error was less than 1 mm. The angiography operation in animal was carried out smoothly without complication; the success rate of the operation was 100% and the entire experiment took 26 and 30 minutes, efficiency was slightly improved compared with the VIR-1, and the time what staff exposed to the DSA machine was 0 minute. The resistance of force sensor can be displayed to the operator to provide a security guarantee for the operation. No surgical complications. VIR-2 is safe and feasible, and can achieve the catheter remote operation and angiography; the master-slave system meets the characteristics of traditional procedure. The three-dimensional image can guide the operation more smoothly; force feedback device provides remote real-time haptic information to provide security for the operation.

  7. Pulmonary complications in neurosurgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randeep Guleria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neurosurgical patients. The common pulmonary complications in neurosurgical patients include pneumonia, postoperative atelectasis, respiratory failure, pulmonary embolism, and neurogenic pulmonary edema. Postoperative lung expansion strategies have been shown to be useful in prevention of the postoperative complications in surgical patients. Low tidal volume ventilation should be used in patients who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. An antibiotic use policy should be put in practice depending on the local patterns of antimicrobial resistance in the hospital. Thromboprophylactic strategies should be used in nonambulatory patients. Meticulous attention should be paid to infection control with a special emphasis on hand-washing practices. Prevention and timely management of these complications can help to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with pulmonary complications.

  8. The importance of early diagnosis and treatment of kaposiform hemangioendothelioma complicated by Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas-Colmenares, Grecia V; Ramirez-Villar, Gema L; Bernabeu-Wittel, Jose; Matute de Cardenas, Jose A; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE) is a locally aggressive vascular tumor that may be complicated by Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon (KMP), a profound thrombocytopenia resulting from platelet trapping within a vascular tumor, either KHE or tufted angioma (TA). Typical features also include low fibrinogen and elevated D-dimers. It is well known that KMP is not caused by infantile hemangiomas. Management of vascular tumors complicated by KMP is challenging, and it is common for referral centers to receive patients in critical medical condition after multimodality treatment failure of vascular anomalies. Our aim is to communicate the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of KHE associated with KMP. A full-term male newborn with KHE complicated by KMP is reported. Treatment with vincristine, aspirin and ticlopidine normalized the coagulation parameters within one week, requiring a total of six doses of vincristine, seven months of ticlopidine and 17 months of aspirin. Early diagnosis and treatment of KHE complicated by KMP may allow the administration of fewer doses of vincristine and avoid the use of corticosteroids.

  9. A comparison of the boomerang wire vascular access management system versus manual compression alone during percutaneous diagnostic and interventional cardiovascular procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Angela; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Vascular closure devices allow for early sheath removal, allowing for earlier patient mobilization The Boomerang vascular access management system does not alter arterial integrity for future interventions Access site complications provide significant morbidity in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Avoiding foot complications in diabetes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preceded by a foot ulcer.1,2 Every 30 seconds a lower limb or part of a lower limb is ... of foot ulcers are peripheral neuropathy, deformity, peripheral vascular disease and ... Repetitive stresses cause hyperkeratosis, followed by subcutaneous ...

  11. Applications and complications of subclavian vein catheterization for hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, T.; Zaheer, K.; Khan, A.A.; Khalid, M.; Akhtar, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the indications, complications and duration of 605 subclavian catheters inserted over a period of 4 years as venous access for the management of renal failure in local setup. Results: Among the patients who underwent subclavian vien catheterization, 75.2% patients were suffering from chronic renal failure and 24.7% patients were admitted for acute renal failure. Among chronic renal failure patients, 21.9% catheters had to be replaced due to various complications e.g. thrombosis, infection or kinking of the catheter. The subclavian catheters remained in place for a mean duration of 4 weeks. Early complications encountered were arterial puncture, inability to cannulate the innominate vein, hemo thorax, punctures of thoracic duct, hemo mediastinum, arrhythmias and pulmonary hematoma in 10.7%, 16.5%, 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.6% and 0.2% of patients respectively. Mortality attributed to the procedure occurred in 0.1 % cases. Delayed complications included early infection in 15% catheterizations while delayed infection occurred in 39 % cases. Conclusion: Percutaneous subclavian catheterization is valuable, relatively easy to learn and safe method with acceptable rate of complications for patients necessitating hemodialysis and no established permanent vascular access. (author)

  12. PARP-1 inhibition alleviates diabetic cardiac complications in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Esraa M; El-Bassossy, Hany M; El-Maraghy, Nabila N; Ahmed, Ahmed F; Ali, Abdelmoneim A

    2016-11-15

    Cardiovascular complications are the major causes of mortality among diabetic population. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 enzyme (PARP-1) is activated by oxidative stress leading to cellular damage. We investigated the implication of PARP-1 in diabetic cardiac complications. Type 2 diabetes was induced in rats by high fructose-high fat diet and low streptozotocin dose. PARP inhibitor 4-aminobenzamide (4-AB) was administered daily for ten weeks after diabetes induction. At the end of study, surface ECG, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were studied. PARP-1 activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitrite contents were assessed in heart muscle. Fasting glucose, fructosamine, insulin, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were measured in serum. Finally, histological examination and collagen deposition detection in rat ventricular and aortic sections were carried out. Hearts isolated from diabetic animals showed increased PARP-1 enzyme activity compared to control animals while significantly reduced by 4-AB administration. PARP-1 inhibition by 4-AB alleviated cardiac ischemia in diabetic animals as indicated by ECG changes. PARP-1 inhibition also reduced cardiac inflammation in diabetic animals as evidenced by histopathological changes. In addition, 4-AB administration improved the elevated blood pressure and the associated exaggerated vascular contractility, endothelial destruction and vascular inflammation seen in diabetic animals. Moreover, PARP-1 inhibition decreased serum levels of TNF-α and cardiac nitrite but increased cardiac GSH contents in diabetic animals. However, PARP-1 inhibition did not significantly affect the developed hyperglycemia. Our findings prove that PARP-1 enzyme plays an important role in diabetic cardiac complications through combining inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Detection of vascular risk markers in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbekmez, Heves; Güven, Ayla; Yıldız, Metin; Dursun, Fatma; Cebeci, Nurcan; Hancili, Suna

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease that causes persistent vascular injury. This study investigates the benefits of surrogate markers in early detection of vascular injury in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Eighty-four patients (35 male, 49 female) with type 1 diabetes for 5 or more years were included. Serum lipid profile, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), lipoprotein (a) (Lpa) and homocystein, were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups according to the duration of diabetes. Patients with and without microvascular complications were also compared. Microvascular complications were present in 14 out of 48 patients in group-1 (29.1%; duration of diabetes: 5-10 years) and in 7 out of 36 patients in group-2 (19.4%; duration of diabetes: >10 years). Serum homocystein, Lpa, PAI-1 and serum lipids were not correlated with the duration of diabetes. Significantly increased triglyceride (TG) and HbA1C levels were associated with the presence of microvascular complications. Providing good glycemic control is very important for preventing vascular injury in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. It seems that traditional vascular surrogate markers like LDL/HDL ratio, triglycerides and HbA1C level correspond more to microvascular complications than newly defined surrogate markers that are not commonly available.

  14. From here to there, progenitor cells and stem cells are everywhere in lung vascular remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L. Heise

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The field of stem cell biology, cell therapy and regenerative medicine has expanded almost exponentially in the last decade. Clinical trials are evaluating the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in many adult and pediatric lung diseases with vascular component, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Extensive research activity is exploring lung resident and circulating progenitor cells and their contribution to vascular complications of chronic lung diseases, and researchers hope to use resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells to treat chronic lung diseases and their vascular complications. It is becoming more and more clear that progress in mechanobiology will help to understand the various influences of physical forces and extracellular matrix composition on the phenotype and features of the progenitor cells and stem cells. The current review provides an overview of current concepts in the field.

  15. Renal vessel reconstruction in kidney transplantation using a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) vascular graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Mohamed H; Thomas, Anil A; Mohan, Ponnusamy; Hickey, David P

    2007-04-01

    We report a rare experience in reconstructing short renal vessels in kidney transplantation using polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) vascular grafts. The short renal vessels in three kidney grafts were managed by the interposition of PTFE vascular grafts. Two grafts were from deceased donors and the third was a renal auto-transplant graft. PTFE grafts were used to lengthen short renal veins in two kidney grafts and a short renal artery in one. The warm ischaemia time was under 1 h and all kidneys functioned well post-operatively. Excellent blood perfusion in the three renal grafts was present on postoperative MAG 3 renal scan. No intra-operative or post-operative complications were encountered. In the three described patients, the use of PTFE vascular graft presented no additional morbidity to the kidney transplant operation and no post-oerative complication was related to its use. However, more data are necessary to conclude that PTFE graft can be used safely in kidney transplantation.

  16. 111In leukocyte scintigraphy in the diagnosis of vascular graft infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, E.A. van; Roevekamp, M.H.; Dongen, R.J.A.M. van; Schoot, J.B. van der; Hardeman, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Infection at the site of a vascular graft is a serious complication in vascular surgery especially when synthetic materials have been used. Prosthetic grafts are widely employed in aorto-iliac, aorto-femoral and femoro-popliteal bypasses. X-ray investigation, angiography, ultrasound and computer tomography are of limited value in the diagnosis of graft infection. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of this complication results in a high morbidity and mortality. Some reports are available on the use of gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy. However, its accumulation in normal intestinal structures is a serious drawback. The authors investigated the effectiveness of indium-111 leukocytes scintigraphy in the diagnosis of vascular graft infection. The possible accumulation of labelled leukocytes was assessed both subjectively by visual interpretation and quantitatively by computer evaluation. (Auth.)

  17. Image Quality in Vascular Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Struelens, L.

    2005-01-01

    In vascular radiology, the radiologists use the radiological image to diagnose or treat a specific vascular structure. From literature, we know that related doses are high and that large dose variability exists between different hospitals. The application of the optimization principle is therefore necessary and is obliged by the new legislation. So far, very little fieldwork has been performed and no practical instructions are available to do the necessary work. It's indisputable that obtaining quantitative data is of great interest for optimization purposes. In order to gain insight into these doses and the possible measures for dose reduction, we performed a comparative study in 7 hospitals. Patient doses will be measured and calculated for specific procedures in vascular radiology and evaluated against their most influencing parameters. In view of optimization purposes, a protocol for dose audit will be set-up. From the results and conclusions in this study, experimentally based guidelines will be proposed, in order to improve clinical practice in vascular radiology

  18. Vascular aspects of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'haeseleer, Miguel; Cambron, Melissa; Vanopdenbosch, Ludo; De Keyser, Jacques

    Three types of vascular dysfunction have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). First, findings from epidemiological studies suggest that patients with MS have a higher risk for ischaemic stroke than people who do not have MS. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but might involve endothelial

  19. Percutaneous embolization of varicocele: technique, indications, relative contraindications, and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Halpern

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several options for the treatment of varicocele, including surgical repair either by open or microsurgical approach, laparoscopy, or through percutaneous embolization of the internal spermatic vein. The ultimate goal of varicocele treatment relies on the occlusion of the dilated veins that drain the testis. Percutaneous embolization offers a rapid recovery and can be successfully accomplished in approximately 90% of attempts. However, the technique demands interventional radiologic expertise and has potential serious complications, including vascular perforation, coil migration, and thrombosis of pampiniform plexus. This review discusses the common indications, relative contraindications, technical details, and risks associated with percutaneous embolization of varicocele.

  20. Complications of pneumoconiosis: Radiologic overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Jae Sup; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hyo Rim; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Ko, Jeong Min; Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Arakawa, Hiroaki; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2013-01-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure

  1. Complications of pneumoconiosis: Radiologic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Jae Sup [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jung Im, E-mail: jijung@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Rim [Department of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, St. Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seog Hee; Lee, Hae Giu [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Arakawa, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine (Japan); Koo, Jung-Wan [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    A wide spectrum of pulmonary complications occurs in patients with pneumoconiosis. Those complications include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hemoptysis, pneumothorax, pleural disease, tuberculosis, autoimmune disease, anthracofibrosis, chronic interstitial pneumonia, and malignancy. Generally, imaging workup starts with plain chest radiography. However, sometimes, plain radiography has limited role in the diagnosis of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis because of overlapping pneumoconiotic infiltration. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are potentially helpful for the detection of pulmonary complications in patients with pneumoconiosis. CT, with its excellent contrast resolution, is more sensitive and specific method than plain radiograph in the evaluation of pulmonary abnormalities. CT is useful in detecting lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by infection, anthracofibrosis, and chronic interstitial pneumonia. Also, CT is valuable in distinguishing localized pneumothorax from bullae and aiding the identification of multiloculated effusions. US can be used in detection of complicated pleural effusions and guidance of the thoracentesis procedure. MRI is useful for differentiating between progressive massive fibrosis and lung cancer. Radiologists need to be familiar with the radiologic and clinical manifestations of, as well as diagnostic approaches to, complications associated with pneumoconiosis. Knowledge of the various imaging features of pulmonary complications of pneumoconiosis can enhance early diagnosis and improve the chance to cure.

  2. Design and application of model for training ultrasound-guided vascular cannulation in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Quevedo, O; López-Álvarez, J M; Limiñana-Cañal, J M; Loro-Ferrer, J F

    2016-01-01

    Central vascular cannulation is not a risk-free procedure, especially in pediatric patients. Newborn and infants are small and low-weighted, their vascular structures have high mobility because of tissue laxity and their vessels are superficial and with small diameter. These characteristics, together with the natural anatomical variability and poor collaboration of small children, make this technique more difficult to apply. Therefore, ultrasound imaging is increasingly being used to locate vessels and guide vascular access in this population. (a) To present a model that simulates the vascular system for training ultrasound-guided vascular access in pediatrics patients; (b) to ultrasound-guided vascular cannulation in the model. The model consisted of two components: (a) muscular component: avian muscle, (b) vascular component: elastic tube-like structure filled with fluid. 864 ecoguided punctures was realized in the model at different vessel depth and gauge measures were simulated, for two medical operators with different degree of experience. The average depth and diameter of vessel cannulated were 1.16 (0.42)cm and 0.43 (0.1)cm, respectively. The average number of attempts was of 1.22 (0.62). The percentage of visualization of the needle was 74%. The most frequent maneuver used for the correct location, was the modification of the angle of the needle and the relocation of the guidewire in 24% of the cases. The average time for the correct cannulations was 41 (35.8)s. The more frequent complications were the vascular perforation (11.9%) and the correct vascular puncture without possibility of introducing the guidewire (1.2%). The rate of success was 96%. The model simulates the anatomy (vascular and muscular structures) of a pediatric patient. It is cheap models, easily reproducible and a useful tool for training in ultrasound-guided puncture and cannulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. PEG tubes: dealing with complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Hardip; Thompson, Rosie

    A percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy tube can be used to deliver nutrition, hydration and medicines directly into the patient's stomach. Patients will require a tube if they are unable to swallow safely, putting them at risk of aspiration of food, drink and medicines into their lungs. It is vital that nurses are aware of the complications that may arise when caring for a patient with a PEG tube. It is equally important that nurses know how to deal with these complications or from where tc seek advice. This article provides a quick troubleshooting guide to help nurses deal with complications that can arise with PEG feeding.

  4. Pulmonary complications of cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, M.Y.; Flight, W.; Smith, E.

    2014-01-01

    The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has steadily increased over recent decades with a corresponding increase in the frequency of complications of the disease. Radiologists are increasingly involved with managing and identifying the pulmonary complications of CF. This article reviews the common manifestations of CF lung disease as well as updating radiologists with a number of less well-known complications of the condition. Early and accurate detection of the pulmonary effects of CF are increasingly important to prevent irreversible lung damage and give patients the greatest possibility of benefiting from the new therapies becoming available, which correct the underlying defect causing CF

  5. Ocular complications of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nihat Sayin; Necip Kara; Gokhan Pekel

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a important health problemthat induces ernestful complications and it causessignificant morbidity owing to specific microvascularcomplications such as, retinopathy, nephropathy andneuropathy, and macrovascular complications such as,ischaemic heart disease, and peripheral vasculopathy.It can affect children, young people and adults and isbecoming more common. Ocular complications associatedwith DM are progressive and rapidly becoming theworld's most significant cause of morbidity and arepreventable with early detection and timely treatment.This review provides an overview of five main ocularcomplications associated with DM, diabetic retinopathyand papillopathy, cataract, glaucoma, and ocular surfacediseases.

  6. Enhanced recovery after vascular surgery: protocol for a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotlib Conn Lesley

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS programme is a multimodal evidence-based approach to surgical care which begins in the preoperative setting and extends through to patient discharge in the postoperative period. The primary components of ERAS include the introduction of preoperative patient education; reduction in perioperative use of nasogastric tubes and drains; the use of multimodal analgesia; goal-directed fluid management; early removal of Foley catheter; early mobilization, and early oral nutrition. The ERAS approach has gradually evolved to become the standard of care in colorectal surgery and is presently being used in other specialty areas such as vascular surgery. Currently there is little evidence available for the implementation of ERAS in this field. We plan to conduct a systematic review of this literature with a view to incorporating ERAS principles into the management of major elective vascular surgery procedures. Methods We will search EMBASE (OVID, 1947 to June 2012, Medline (OVID, 1948 to June 2012, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Wiley, Issue 1, 2012. Searches will be performed with no year or language restrictions. For inclusion, studies must look at adult patients over 18 years. Major elective vascular surgery includes carotid, bypass, aneurysm and amputation procedures. Studies must have evaluated usual care against an ERAS intervention in the preoperative, perioperative or postoperative period of care. Primary outcome measures are length of stay, decreased complication rate, and patient satisfaction or expectations. Only randomized controlled trials will be included. Discussion Most ERAS approaches have been considered in the context of colorectal surgery. Given the increasing use of multiple yet different aspects of this pathway in vascular surgery, it is timely to systematically review the evidence for their independent or combined outcomes, with a view to implementing

  7. Ghrelin attenuates vascular calcification in diabetic patients with amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Suining; Ye, Fei; Li, Lihua; Yan, Jinchuan; Bao, Zhengyang; Sun, Zhen; Xu, Liangjie; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Zhongqun

    2017-07-01

    Vascular calcification is established to be a critical factor in diabetes mellitus, which causes cardiovascular and amputation complication of diabetic patients. OPG/RANKL/RANK axis serves as a regulatory role in vascular calcification. Ghrelin, an endogenous ligand of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), has been reported to exhibit potent cardiovascular protective effects. However, the role of ghrelin in the regulation of diabetic vascular calcification is still elusive. Here, we reported the role of ghrelin and its relationship with OPG/RANKL/RANK system in patients with diabetic foot amputation. In vivo and in vitro investigations were performed. Sixty type 2 diabetic patients with foot amputation were enrolled in vivo investigation, and they were divided into three groups through Doppler ultrasound: mild stenosis group (n=20), moderate stenosis group (n=20), and severe stenosis/occlusion group (n=20). Morphological analysis results showed diffused calcium depositions in the anterior tibial artery of diabetic amputees. Compared with the mild and moderate stenosis group, the severe stenosis/occlusion group had more spotty calcium depositions in atherosclerotic plaques. Western blot analysis indicated the expressions of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and ghrelin were downregulated, while the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) was upregulated with the vascular stenosis aggravation. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between calcium content and ghrelin levels (r=-0.58, Pghrelin levels and sRANKL levels (r=-0.57, Pghrelin levels (r=0.63, PGhrelin blunted calcification in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, ghrelin upregulated OPG expression and downregulated RANKL expression in VSMC calcification when anti-OPG antibody and RANKL were performed. Collectively, we therefore conclude serum ghrelin level may be a predictor of diabetic vascular calcification. The possible mechanism may be related with OPG

  8. Vascular endoprostheses for femoro-popliteal occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triller, J; Mahler, F; Do, D; Thalmann, R

    1989-03-01

    A self-expanding vascular endoprothesis (wall stent) was implanted in 26 patients with femoro-popliteal occlusive disease following recurrent stenosis or occlusion after percutaneous angioplasty. Implantation was successful in all cases and there were no complications. Five of the 26 patients developped a thrombosis in the first nine days; in four of these, thrombolysis was successful. Patency rate after one month was 96%, after three months 95%, after six months 85% and after nine months 87%. In order to prevent thrombosis after implantation, anticoagulant therapy is indicated. Poor distal flow encourages intimal hyperplasia and therefore recurrences.

  9. Vascular endoprostheses for femoro-popliteal occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triller, J.; Mahler, F.; Do, D.; Thalmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    A self-expanding vascular endoprothesis (wall stent) was implanted in 26 patients with femoro-popliteal occlusive disease following recurrent stenosis or occlusion after percutaneous angioplasty. Implantation was successful in all cases and there were no complications. Five of the 26 patients developped a thrombosis in the first nine days; in four of these, thrombolysis was successful. Patency rate after one month was 96%, after three months 95%, after six months 85% and after nine months 87%. In order to prevent thrombosis after implantation, anticoagulant therapy is indicated. Poor distal flow encourages intimal hyperplasia and therefore recurrences. (orig.) [de

  10. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, Ezra A.; Orbach, Darren B.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  11. Pediatric central nervous system vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, Ezra A. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Orbach, Darren B. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Neurointerventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric central nervous system (CNS) vascular anomalies include lesions found only in the pediatric population and also the full gamut of vascular lesions found in adults. Pediatric-specific lesions discussed here include infantile hemangioma, vein of Galen malformation and dural sinus malformation. Some CNS vascular lesions that occur in adults, such as arteriovenous malformation, have somewhat distinct manifestations in children, and those are also discussed. Additionally, children with CNS vascular malformations often have associated broader vascular conditions, e.g., PHACES (posterior fossa anomalies, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, eye anomalies and sternal anomalies), hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome (related to the RASA1 mutation). The treatment of pediatric CNS vascular malformations has greatly benefited from advances in endovascular therapy, including technical advances in adult interventional neuroradiology. Dramatic advances in therapy are expected to stem from increased understanding of the genetics and vascular biology that underlie pediatric CNS vascular malformations. (orig.)

  12. ESRD QIP - Vascular Access - Payment Year 2018

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset includes facility details, performance rates, vascular access topic measure score, and the state and national average measure scores for the vascular...

  13. Vascular Multiplicity Should Not Be a Contra-Indication for Live Kidney Donation and Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Lafranca

    Full Text Available Whether vascular multiplicity should be considered as contraindication and therefore 'extended donor criterion' is still under debate.Data from all live kidney donors from 2006-2013 (n = 951 was retrospectively reviewed. Vascular anatomy as imaged by MRA, CTA or other modalities was compared with intraoperative findings. Furthermore, the influence of vascular multiplicity on outcome of donors and recipients was studied.In 237 out of 951 donors (25%, vascular multiplicity was present. CTA had the highest accuracy levels regarding vascular anatomy assessment. Regarding outcome of donors with vascular multiplicity, warm ischemia time (WIT and skin-to-skin time were significantly longer if arterial multiplicity (AM was present (5.1 vs. 4.0 mins and 202 vs. 178 mins. Skin-to-skin time was significantly longer, and complication rates were higher in donors with venous multiplicity (203 vs. 180 mins and 17.2% vs. 8.4%. Outcome of renal transplant recipients showed a significantly increased WIT (30 vs. 26.7 minutes, higher rate of DGF (13.9% vs. 6.9% and lower rate of BPAR (6.9% vs. 13.9% in patients receiving a kidney with AM compared to kidneys with singular anatomy.We conclude that vascular multiplicity should not be a contra-indication, since it has little impact on clinical outcome in the donor as well as in renal transplant recipients.

  14. Vascular Multiplicity Should Not Be a Contra-Indication for Live Kidney Donation and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafranca, Jeffrey A; van Bruggen, Mark; Kimenai, Hendrikus J A N; Tran, Thi C K; Terkivatan, Türkan; Betjes, Michiel G H; IJzermans, Jan N M; Dor, Frank J M F

    2016-01-01

    Whether vascular multiplicity should be considered as contraindication and therefore 'extended donor criterion' is still under debate. Data from all live kidney donors from 2006-2013 (n = 951) was retrospectively reviewed. Vascular anatomy as imaged by MRA, CTA or other modalities was compared with intraoperative findings. Furthermore, the influence of vascular multiplicity on outcome of donors and recipients was studied. In 237 out of 951 donors (25%), vascular multiplicity was present. CTA had the highest accuracy levels regarding vascular anatomy assessment. Regarding outcome of donors with vascular multiplicity, warm ischemia time (WIT) and skin-to-skin time were significantly longer if arterial multiplicity (AM) was present (5.1 vs. 4.0 mins and 202 vs. 178 mins). Skin-to-skin time was significantly longer, and complication rates were higher in donors with venous multiplicity (203 vs. 180 mins and 17.2% vs. 8.4%). Outcome of renal transplant recipients showed a significantly increased WIT (30 vs. 26.7 minutes), higher rate of DGF (13.9% vs. 6.9%) and lower rate of BPAR (6.9% vs. 13.9%) in patients receiving a kidney with AM compared to kidneys with singular anatomy. We conclude that vascular multiplicity should not be a contra-indication, since it has little impact on clinical outcome in the donor as well as in renal transplant recipients.

  15. A COMPLICATED GRIEF INTERVENTION MODEL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-29

    Jul 29, 2010 ... of complicated grief as a contributing factor to impaired social functioning. This can ... includes a diagnosis of bereavement-related major depression if symptoms ..... networking, Social Sciences Citation Index, Social Sciences.

  16. Medical complications of bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Philip S; O'Melia, Anne; Brown, Carrie; Gibson, Dennis; Hollis, Jeff; Westmoreland, Patricia

    2017-12-02

    Bulimia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with many different medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa, and emphasizes the importance of a timely approach to diagnosis and management.

  17. A very complicated pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Gilbert*

    2013-12-01

    Discussion: Re-expansion pulmonary oedema is a recognised complication of large pleural effusion drainage. The mechanism remains unclear, although reduced left ventricular function, in this case from a possible pericardial effusion, may be a precipitant. To prevent this phenomenon the British Thoracic Society recommends draining a maximum of 1.5 litres of fluid. This case was further complicated by a pneumothorax; again a recognised complication, especially if there is underlying poor compliance of the lung parenchyma. Re-expansion pulmonary oedema has an incidence of <1% and pneumothorax <5%. Their occurrence has not previously been reported simultaneously. Large pleural effusions are commonly encountered in clinical practice in South Africa. The existence of multiple co-morbidities including tuberculosis, HIV and impaired cardiac function may complicate their management. This case highlights the need for close monitoring and controlled drainage of pleural effusions in emergency practice.

  18. A COMPLICATED GRIEF INTERVENTION MODEL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-29

    Jul 29, 2010 ... work approach to therapy) in an attempt to develop a model for complicated grief intervention ..... way feels right for them, thus making them equal partners with .... This question points out the benefits of success and affords the.

  19. Liver Transplant: Complications/Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transplant: Complications/Medications Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For Veterans and the Public Veterans and the Public Home Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis C Home Getting ...

  20. Awareness of diabetes complications in an Irish population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients\\' awareness of the increased cardiovascular risk associated with their diabetes is poorly documented. AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the awareness of diabetes complications among patients with diabetes in Ireland. METHODS: Patients attending diabetes outpatient clinics in two teaching hospitals in different regions of the country were invited to complete a questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 258 (59.3% male) patients completed the questionnaire; mean age 57.8 years. On questioning, 53.5% reported cardiovascular disease as a potential complication of diabetes, with awareness rates of 61.2, 17.1, 16.3 and 12% for retinopathy, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and amputation, respectively. Disappointingly, less than half of respondents felt that improvements in diet and exercise could potentially reduce their cardiovascular risk. CONCLUSIONS: Awareness of cardiovascular risk and knowledge of effective measures to reduce this were low in our study and an alternative means of education may need to be considered.

  1. Temporal bone trauma and complications: computed tomography findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Couto, Caroline Laurita Batista; Gomes, Natalia Delage; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira; Motta, Emilia Guerra Pinto Coelho, E-mail: anadoffemond@yahoo.com.br [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unit of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis

    2013-03-15

    Most temporal bone fractures result from high-energy blunt head trauma, and are frequently related to other skull fractures or to polytrauma. Fractures and displacements of ossicular chain in the middle ear represent some of the main complications of temporal bone injury, and hence they will be more deeply approached in the present article. Other types of injuries include labyrinthine fractures, dural fistula, facial nerve paralysis and extension into the carotid canal. Computed tomography plays a fundamental role in the initial evaluation of polytrauma patients, as it can help to identify important structural injuries that may lead to severe complications such as sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, dizziness and balance dysfunction, perilymphatic fistulas, facial nerve paralysis, vascular injury and others. (author)

  2. Temporal bone trauma and complications: computed tomography findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Couto, Caroline Laurita Batista; Gomes, Natalia Delage; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira; Motta, Emilia Guerra Pinto Coelho

    2013-01-01

    Most temporal bone fractures result from high-energy blunt head trauma, and are frequently related to other skull fractures or to polytrauma. Fractures and displacements of ossicular chain in the middle ear represent some of the main complications of temporal bone injury, and hence they will be more deeply approached in the present article. Other types of injuries include labyrinthine fractures, dural fistula, facial nerve paralysis and extension into the carotid canal. Computed tomography plays a fundamental role in the initial evaluation of polytrauma patients, as it can help to identify important structural injuries that may lead to severe complications such as sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, dizziness and balance dysfunction, perilymphatic fistulas, facial nerve paralysis, vascular injury and others. (author)

  3. Metabolic disorders in adipocytokine imbalance and gestational complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya B. Chabanova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue as an endocrine organ synthesizes a large number of biologically active substances, adipocytokines, which have both local and systemic effects influencing the vascular wall, tissue sensitivity to insulin, glucose metabolism, and systemic inflammation. The data obtained from clinical and experimental studies demonstrate the close relationship between the imbalance of adipocytokines and pregnancy complications such as insulin resistance, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia. In this connection, close attention of obstetrician-gynecologists and endocrinologists is focused on etiopathogenic aspects of the formation of gestational complications with metabolic disorders caused by an imbalance of adipocytokines with maternal obesity and to the search for markers of these disorders. The review presents the current literature data on adipose tissue hormones and their influence on the course of a gestational process.

  4. Unusual Complications of Quinalphos Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalin Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This 40-year-old man was treated for suicidal quinalphos 25%EC consumption. He developed intermediate syndrome with normal response to repetitive nerve stimulation, pancreatitis with high enzyme elevations, and normal computed tomography and excreted black, brown, and orange urine sequentially over the first nine days of hospitalization. The last complication has not been previously reported with any organophosphate compound. He finally succumbed to complication of ventilator associated pneumonia related septic shock and ventricular tachycardia.

  5. Complications of lower limb phlebography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitler, E; Milbert, L; Richter, E I; Ringelmann, W; Strohm, C

    1983-06-01

    Some rare, but serious, complications during leg and pelvic phlebography are described. One fatal pulmonary embolus and six cases of necrosis of the dorsum of the foot due to phlebography were encountered. The causes, pathogenetic factors and other possible complications are discussed. Extravasation of contrast due to puncture on the lateral side of the foot, or near the ankle joint, leads to the formation of a contrast bleb which may proceed to tissue necrosis.

  6. Eye Complications and Markers of Morbidity and Mortality in Long-term Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is rising all over the world. Furthermore, the increased life-expectancy of type 1 diabetic patients is likely to cause a higher number of diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications in the years to come. In order to examine the level of long......-term complications in type 1 diabetes as well as potential markers of micro- and macroangiopathy, a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients was examined in order to achieve the following aims: 1  To evaluate diabetic retinopathy as a long-term marker of all-cause mortality in type 1 diabetes...... (Paper I). 2  To estimate the long-term incidence and associated risk factors of blindness (Paper II) and cataract surgery (Paper III) in type 1 diabetes. 3  To use retinal vascular analyses in order to investigate the associations of long-term micro- and macrovascular complications and retinal vascular...

  7. Retinal vessel calibre and micro- and macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, J; Hodgson, L; Kawasaki, R

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between retinal vascular calibre and micro- and macrovascular complications in a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 208 long-surviving type 1 diabetic...... and a standardised protocol. Associations between retinal vascular calibre and micro- and macrovascular complications were examined after adjusting for confounding clinical characteristics. RESULTS: Retinal photographs were gradable for 188 of 208 patients (90.3%). The median age and duration of diabetes...... in CRAE), but not neuropathy (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.70-1.71, per SD decrease in CRAE). Retinal venular calibre was not associated with any micro- or macrovascular complications. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: In type 1 diabetic patients, retinal arteriolar narrowing is associated with nephropathy...

  8. Vascular neurocognitive disorders and the vascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen V. Albu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dementias are clinical neurodegenerative diseases characterized by permanent and progressive transformation of cognitive functions such as memory, learning capacity, attention, thinking, language, passing judgments, calculation or orientation. Dementias represent a relatively frequent pathology, encountered at about 10% of the population of 65-year olds and 20% of the population of 80-year olds. This review presents the main etiological forms of dementia, which include Alzheimer form of dementia, vascular dementia, dementia associated with alpha-synucleionopathies, and mixed forms. Regarding vascular dementia, the risk factors are similar to those for an ischemic or hemorrhagic cerebrovascular accident: arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, age, alcohol consumption, cerebral atherosclerosis/ arteriosclerosis. Several studies show that efficient management of the vascular risk factors can prevent the expression and/ or progression of dementia. Thus, lifestyle changes such as stress reduction, regular physical exercise, decreasing dietary fat, multivitamin supplementation, adequate control of blood pressure and serum cholesterol, and social integration and mental stimulation in the elderly population are important factors in preventing or limiting the symptoms of dementia, a disease with significant individual, social, and economic implications.

  9. [Macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetes patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosolová, H; Petrlová, B; Simon, J; Sifalda, P; Sípová, I; Sefrna, F

    2008-03-01

    The prevalence of chronic vascular complications is higher in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the incidence and types of macrovascular (MVC) and microvascular (mvc) complications and to analyse their relation to the different risk factors and biomarkers in order to improve their prevention. 415 patients (219 men and 196 women) with an average age of 66 +/- 9 years enrolled in the study. A total of 95% of patients with DM2 had a history of hypertension, 27% had MVC (of which 55% had ischaemic heart disease), and 54% had mvc (ofwhich 95% had diabetic nephropathy). The patients with vascular complications were significantly older and had a longer history of DM2; they did not differ for their systolic blood pressure, but had a higher pulse pressure and took more antihypertensives. They did not differ for their lipid levels or the respective therapy. Diabetic patients with MVC and mvc had higher insulin resistance, higher plasmatic levels of total homocysteine and a higher incidence ofalbuminuria or proteinuria. The factors which significantly and independently associated with MVC were male gender, age over 60 years, higher hs-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) exceeding 1 mg/l, glycaemia over 5.6 mmol/l, lower diastolic blood pressure and lower HDL-cholesterol; mvc associated with higher age over 60 years, a history of DM2 exceeding 8 years, and hs-CRP above 1 mg/l. Our results show that patients with DM2 have a high incidence ofvascular complications significantly associated with age, DM2 history and higher hs-CRP, irrespective of the other monitored parametres.

  10. Vascular manifestations of syndromic aortopathies: role of current and emerging imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerland, O.; Frigiola, A.; Robert, L.; Shaw, A.; Blakeway, L.; Katsanos, K.; Kiesewetter, C.; Chung, N.; Karunanithy, N.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with connective tissue diseases such as Marfan's syndrome, Loeys–Dietz syndrome, and vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome comprise a small but important group of patients who present early with acute aortic syndrome comprising aneurysmal dilation, rupture, or aortic dissection. Cardiovascular pathologies are an important yet treatable cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Imaging plays an important role in initial diagnosis, surveillance, and identification of complications. Furthermore, these patients are prone to developing complications in other vascular territories. Effective screening and surveillance will allow early diagnosis and elective treatment thus reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with presentation with acute complications. In this article, we will provide an overview of the role of magnetic resonance and computed tomography angiography in the management of syndromic aortopathies.

  11. Vascular Rupture Caused by a Molding Balloon during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hee Young; Do, Young Soo; Park, Hong Suk; Park, Kwang Bo; Kim, Young Wook; Kim, Dong Ik

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been accepted as an alternative to traditional open surgery in selected patients. Despite the minimally invasiveness of this treatment, several complications may occur during or after EVAR. Complications include endoleak, aortic dissection, distal embolism, or iatrogenic injury to the access artery. However, there are few reports on the vascular rupture caused by a molding balloon during EVAR. We report two cases of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms complicated by procedure-related aortic or iliac artery rupture by the molding balloon during EVAR. In our cases, we observed suddenly abrupt increase of the diameter of the endograft during balloon inflation, because we inflated the balloon rapidly. In conclusion, careful attention must be paid during inflation of the molding balloon to prevent vascular rupture.

  12. Minimizing complications of ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty: an initial experience with no related complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbetts, J B

    1998-10-01

    Numerous complications and increased operating times were reported with ultrasonically assisted lipoplasty in the first several months after introduction of the technology in the United States. The purpose of this study was to review early reported complications and management regimens, evaluate possible causes of problems, and apply indications and techniques to attempt to minimize complications during an initial experience with this technique beginning in January of 1997. Seven specific indications and modifications of existing techniques were developed and applied to an initial clinical series of 70 consecutive patients who underwent ultrasound-assisted suction lipoplasty between January 10, 1997, and August 1, 1997. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 7 months. No perioperative or postoperative complication occurred in any patient in this series. In this series of ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty cases, application of the following criteria resulted in a series of 70 patients with 1 to 7-month follow-up without complications: (1) selecting patients with well localized fat deposits who were no more than 20 percent above their ideal body weight; (2) infusing a solution of Ringer's Lactate containing 1 cc of 1:1000 epinephrine per 1000 cc into the area of fat removal, stopping infusion when the tissues first become firm, not infusing to marked tissue turgor or skin induration; (3) restricting the level of energy application to a minimum of 1 cm from the undersurface of the dermis; (4) limiting ultrasonic energy application in each area to approximately 1 minute per estimated 100 cc of total aspirate in a wet to superwet environment; (5) not performing ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty in the same area as another procedure that could potentially compromise tissue vascularity; (6) using a Lysonix 2000 generator and 5-mm golf tee tip probe at a power setting of 8 to apply ultrasonic energy to the area of fat removal, ceasing energy application when tissue resistance to the passage

  13. 'The Closer'-percutaneous vascular suture device: evaluation of safety and performance in neuroangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henk, Christine B.; Grampp, Stephan; Heimberger, Karl; Czerny, Christian; Schindler, Erwin; Mostbeck, Gerhard H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of the suture mediated vascular closure device concerning practicability and safety in clinical angiography practice. Material and methods: One hundred and seventeen patients (59 female, 58 male, mean age 40.9±13.4) underwent percutaneous closure of common femoral arterial puncture sites following diagnostic neuroangiography using the suture device 'the Closer' (Perclose Inc., Redwood City, CA, USA). Primary success, early problems (within 24 h) and late complications were evaluated. Complications were graded as minor and severe with or without need of surgical intervention and categorized by type. Parameters such as age, gender, sheath size and number of previous arterial punctures were evaluated with respect to complications. Results: Percutaneous closure was primary successful in 85% (100/117). The overall complication rate was 32% (28% mild n=35, 4% severe n=6, which needed surgical intervention). All but one problem occurred within the first 24 h after the suture. Additional manual compression was necessary in 32 cases (25%). There was no significant difference in age and gender between the groups with and without complications. Sheath size was significantly larger (P<0.01) and numbers of preceding angiograms were significantly higher (P<0.01) in the complications group compared with uncomplicated cases. Conclusion: The evaluated percutaneous vascular suture device is useful in clinical practice but limitations concerning patient selection seem to emerge in order to avoid complications

  14. [Menopause: Hypertension and vascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, J M

    Hypertension is the main cardiovascular risk factor affecting 25% of women. Hormone changes and hypertension after menopause may lead to higher target organ damage and cardiovascular disease such as increased arterial stiffness, coronary diseases, chronic heart failure and stroke. The physiopathological mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in menopausal women are controversial. There are pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences in both sexes, the women have more coughing when using the converting-enzyme inhibitors, more cramps when using thiazide diuretics and more oedema in the inferior limbs when using calcium antagonists. The aim of this review is to analyse possible physiopathological mechanisms involved in hypertension after menopause and to gain a better understanding of the biological effects mediated by vascular ageing in women when the level of oestrogen protective effect decreases over the vascular system. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Vascular diagnostics for Raynaud's phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinsdale G

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Graham Dinsdale, Ariane L Herrick Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, Institute of Inflammation and Repair, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Manchester, UK Abstract: Raynaud's phenomenon (RP is common, and in most patients is primary (idiopathic when due to reversible vasospasm and does not progress to irreversible tissue injury. However, in those patients for whom RP is secondary to an underlying disease (eg, systemic sclerosis or atherosclerosis, progression to digital ulceration or critical ischemia can occur. Therefore, the key question for the clinician is “Why does this patient have RP?” Vascular diagnostics play a key role in answering this. In this review, we firstly discuss the different vascular investigations relevant to clinical practice: nail fold capillaroscopy (including the different methodologies for examining the nail fold capillaries, and the role of capillaroscopy in helping to differentiate between primary and systemic sclerosis-related RP, thermography (available in specialist centers, and evaluation of large vessel disease (for example, due to atherosclerosis. We then discuss research tools, mainly laser Doppler methods, including laser Doppler imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging. These are commercially available as complete imaging systems and are (relatively easy to use. The main current goal in vascular imaging research is to validate these novel state-of-the-art techniques as outcome measures of digital vascular disease, and then apply them in early and later phase studies of new treatment approaches, thus facilitating drug development programs. Keywords: Raynaud's phenomenon, systemic sclerosis, nail fold capillaroscopy, thermography, laser Doppler, angiography

  16. Imaging and management of complications of open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayeemuddin, M.; Pherwani, A.D.; Asquith, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Open repair is still considered the reference standard for long-term repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). In contrast to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), patients with open surgical repair of AAA are not routinely followed up with imaging. Although complications following EVAR are widely recognized and routinely identified on follow-up imaging, complications also do occur following open surgical repair. With frequent use of multi-slice computed tomography (CT) angiography (CTA) in vascular patients, there is now improved recognition of the potential complications following open surgical repair. Many of these complications are increasingly being managed using endovascular techniques. The aim of this review is to illustrate a variety of potential complications that may occur following open surgical repair and to demonstrate their management using both surgical and endovascular techniques.

  17. Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & Fitness Home Food MyFoodAdvisor ... Fit Types of Activity Weight Loss Assess Your Lifestyle Getting Started Food Choices In My Community Home ...

  18. Pulmonary complications in renal transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Bin; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Seung Rho; Hahm, Chang Kok; Joo, Kyung Bin [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema arising from renal transplantation. Among 393 patients who had undergone renal transplantation at our hospital during a previous ten-year period, 23 with pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema were included in this study. The complications involved were infection caused by CMV (n=6), bacteria (n=4), fungus (n=4), tuberculosis (n=2), varicella (n=1) or chlamydia (n=1), and malignancy involving lung cancer (n=4) or Kaposi's sarcoma (n=1). Two chest radiologists reviewed all images. The complications manifesting mainly as pulmonary nodules were lung cancer (4/4), tuberculosis (1/2), and Kaposi's sarcoma (1/1). Pulmonary consolidation was a main feature in bacterial infection (4/4), fungal infection (3/4), tuberculosis (1/2), chlamydial infection (1/1), and varicellar pneumonia (1/1). Ground-glass attenuation was a main CT feature in CMV pneumonia (4/6), and increased interstitial making was a predominant radiographic feature in CMV pneumonia (2/6). The main radiologic features described above can be helpful for differential diagnosis of the pulmonary complications of renal transplantation.

  19. The metabolic vascular syndrome - guide to an individualized treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, Markolf; Pistrosch, Frank; Bornstein, Stefan R; Birkenfeld, Andreas L

    2016-03-01

    In ancient Greek medicine the concept of a distinct syndrome (going together) was used to label 'a group of signs and symptoms' that occur together and 'characterize a particular abnormality and condition'. The (dys)metabolic syndrome is a common cluster of five pre-morbid metabolic-vascular risk factors or diseases associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity, fatty liver disease and risk of cancer. The risk for major complications such as cardiovascular diseases, NASH and some cancers develops along a continuum of risk factors into clinical diseases. Therefore we still include hyperglycemia, visceral obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension as diagnostic traits in the definition according to the term 'deadly quartet'. From the beginning elevated blood pressure and hyperglycemia were core traits of the metabolic syndrome associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Thus metabolic and vascular abnormalities are in extricable linked. Therefore it seems reasonable to extend the term to metabolic-vascular syndrome (MVS) to signal the clinical relevance and related risk of multimorbidity. This has important implications for integrated diagnostics and therapeutic approach. According to the definition of a syndrome the rapid global rise in the prevalence of all traits and comorbidities of the MVS is mainly caused by rapid changes in life-style and sociocultural transition resp. with over- and malnutrition, low physical activity and social stress as a common soil.

  20. Elevated circulating homocyst(e)ine levels in placental vascular disease and associated pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Trudinger, B J; Duarte, N; Wilcken, D E; Wang, X L

    2000-07-01

    We examined the hypothesis that hyperhomocyst(e)inaemia in the maternal or fetal circulation is associated with placental vascular disease with either the maternal syndrome of pre-eclampsia and/or fetal syndrome of growth restriction. Maternal plasma homocyst(e)ine levels were significantly higher in pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia, pregnancies with evidence of umbilical placental vascular disease, and pregnancies with both complications compared with the normal pregnancy group. In the fetal circulation mean plasma homocyst(e)ine concentration was significantly higher in the pre-eclampsia group compared with the normal group. The results suggest that hyperhomocyst(e)inaemia may be a risk marker for placental vascular disease and maternal pre-eclampsia. The elevated fetal plasma homocyst(e)ine concentrations, found only in the group of pregnancies with pre-eclampsia in the absence of umbilical placental vascular disease, may be due to an effect of placental vascular disease on homocyst(e)ine transfer from the maternal to fetal circulation.

  1. Complication rates of diagnostic cerebral arteriography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Eva; Ganesan, Vijeya; Cox, Timothy S.C.; Chong, Wui Khean; Saunders, Dawn E.

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral arteriography (CA) remains the gold standard in delineating both intra- and extracranial vascular anatomy. Most data relating to the safety of CA are drawn from studies of adult patients in whom the practicalities of the procedure, range of potential pathologies and comorbid factors are different from those in children. To evaluate the current local and neurological complication rates of paediatric CA in the setting of a tertiary level children's hospital in the UK. Data from patients who had undergone CA between January 1998 and July 2003 were reviewed. The medical, anaesthetic and nursing records, and angiography reports were reviewed for all identified patients. The following parameters were extracted and entered into a proforma: gender, age, ethnicity, diagnosis, cerebrovascular diagnosis, referral source, date of CA, number of vessels catheterized and local and neurological complications. A total of 176 CA studies were undertaken in 150 patients (median age 7.3 years, range neonate to 19 years; 83 males, 67 females) during the 5.5-year study period. The majority of referrals originated from the neurology (58%) and neurosurgery services (27.8%). No neurological complications or deaths occurred. Local complications occurred in eight children (4.5%). Five children had a groin haematoma and two had bleeding at the puncture site. A single child had a reduced pedal pulse distal to the site of catheterization, but Doppler imaging was normal. CA has a continuing role in the evaluation of cerebrovascular pathologies in children. Neurological complications are rare and local complications are not uncommon (around 5%), but are not usually serious. (orig.)

  2. Complication rates of diagnostic cerebral arteriography in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Eva [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Neurology Department, London (United Kingdom); Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Paediatrics, Shatin (China); Ganesan, Vijeya [University College London, Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Cox, Timothy S.C.; Chong, Wui Khean; Saunders, Dawn E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-01

    Cerebral arteriography (CA) remains the gold standard in delineating both intra- and extracranial vascular anatomy. Most data relating to the safety of CA are drawn from studies of adult patients in whom the practicalities of the procedure, range of potential pathologies and comorbid factors are different from those in children. To evaluate the current local and neurological complication rates of paediatric CA in the setting of a tertiary level children's hospital in the UK. Data from patients who had undergone CA between January 1998 and July 2003 were reviewed. The medical, anaesthetic and nursing records, and angiography reports were reviewed for all identified patients. The following parameters were extracted and entered into a proforma: gender, age, ethnicity, diagnosis, cerebrovascular diagnosis, referral source, date of CA, number of vessels catheterized and local and neurological complications. A total of 176 CA studies were undertaken in 150 patients (median age 7.3 years, range neonate to 19 years; 83 males, 67 females) during the 5.5-year study period. The majority of referrals originated from the neurology (58%) and neurosurgery services (27.8%). No neurological complications or deaths occurred. Local complications occurred in eight children (4.5%). Five children had a groin haematoma and two had bleeding at the puncture site. A single child had a reduced pedal pulse distal to the site of catheterization, but Doppler imaging was normal. CA has a continuing role in the evaluation of cerebrovascular pathologies in children. Neurological complications are rare and local complications are not uncommon (around 5%), but are not usually serious. (orig.)

  3. Role of the decreased nitric oxide bioavailability in the vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masha, Andi; Dinatale, Stefano; Allasia, Stefano; Martina, Valentino

    2011-09-01

    This mini-review takes into consideration the physiology, synthesis and mechanisms of action of the nitric oxide (NO) and, subsequently, the causes and effects of the NO bioavailability impairment. In diabetes mellitus the reduced NO bioavailability is caused by the increased free radicals production, secondary to hyperglycemia. The reactive oxygen species oxidize the cofactors of the nitric oxide synthase, diminishing their active forms and consequently leading to a decreased NO production. Furthermore the decreased concentration of reduced glutathione results in a diminished production of nitrosoglutathione. These molecules are important intermediates of the NO pathway and physiologically activate the soluble guanylate cyclase. Their decrease in oxidative states of the cell, therefore, leads to a reduced cGMP production which represents the principal molecule that carries out NO's major effects. Finally we considered the eventual therapeutic strategies to improve NO bioavailability by acting on the causes of its decrease. Therefore the treatments proposed are based on the possibility to counteract the oxidation and, in this context, the physiopathological mechanisms strongly support the treatment with thiols.

  4. Systemic inflammation and complications of”vascular" comorbidity in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Skotnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors examine the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD from the standpoint of comorbidity — in close connection with other common diseases of modern social comorbid patient. This article presents the known and suspected, confirmed and studied basic mechanisms of the pathogenesis of COPD and a number of systemic diseases. Typical pathological process, which the authors explain the stages of formation of comorbidity is a chronic systemic inflammation. On the pages of this paper reviewed the most famous today inflammatory markers and a causal connection with the increase of their concentration and worsening destabilization of these disease entities and clinical conditions such as coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, atrial fibrillation, stroke, osteoporosis and malignant neoplasm.

  5. Retinal vascular fractals predict long-term microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca; Rasmussen, Malin L; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    : We included 180 patients with type 1 diabetes in a 16 year follow-up study. In baseline retinal photographs (from 1995), all vessels in a zone 0.5-2.0 disc diameters from the disc margin were traced using Singapore Institute Vessel Assessment-Fractal image analysis software. Artefacts were removed......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Fractal analysis of the retinal vasculature provides a global measure of the complexity and density of retinal vessels summarised as a single variable: the fractal dimension. We investigated fractal dimensions as long-term predictors of microvasculopathy in type 1 diabetes. METHODS....... Retinal fractal analysis therefore is a potential tool for risk stratification in type 1 diabetes....

  6. Multidisciplinary Treatment Approach for Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infection in the Thoracic Aortic Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic vascular graft infection in the thoracic aortic area is a rare but serious complication. Adequate management of the complication is essential to increase the chance of success of open surgery. While surgical site infection is suggested as the root cause of the complication, it is also related to decreased host tolerance, especially as found in elderly patients. The handling of prosthetic vascular graft infection has been widely discussed to date. This paper mainly provides a summary of literature reports published within the past 5 years to discuss issues related to multidisciplinary treatment approaches, including surgical site infection, timing of onset, diagnostic methods, causative pathogens, auxiliary diagnostic methods, antibiotic treatment, anti-infective structures of vascular prostheses, surgical treatment, treatment strategy against infectious aortic aneurysms, future surgical treatment, postoperative systemic therapy, and antimicrobial stewardship. A thorough understanding of these issues will enable us to prevent prosthetic vascular graft infection in the thoracic aortic area as far as possible. In the event of its occurrence, the early introduction of appropriate treatment is expected to cure the disease without worsening of the underlying pathological condition. PMID:26356686

  7. Broncho-vascular fistulas from self-expanding metallic stents: A retrospective case review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag Choudhary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To highlight a potentially fatal complication of broncho-vascular fistula arising from the self expanding metallic stent (SEMS placement. We retrospectively analyzed five patients with benign and malignant airway diseases, who developed tracheo/broncho-vascular fistulas following SEMS placement in our tertiary care setting. All patients received either Wallstent or Ultraflex® stent (Boston Scientific, Natick, MA between 1999 and 2007. All patients had received adjunct therapy such as balloon bronchoplasty, laser therapy or electrocautery. Most patients presented with massive hemoptysis. A total of 483 SEMS were placed during this period. SEMS placement can be complicated by Broncho-vascular fistula formation. True incidence and precise time interval between the insertion of stent and onset of this complication is unknown. Additional therapeutic modalities to maintain stent patency may enhance the risk of fistula formation. SEMS should only be used in a select sub-group of patients, after exhaustive evaluation of other treatment options. These cases provide evidence that broncho-vascular fistulas can develop at any time following SEMS placement, suggesting the need for a more cautious approach, especially while using them for a long term management. In benign airway disease, the stent should be removed as soon as healing has taken place.

  8. Intramuscular ketamine to facilitate pediatric central vascular access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmark, T Kent; Hargrove, Jenny R; Brown, Lance

    2004-07-01

    Obtaining prompt vascular access in young children presenting to the emergency department (ED) is frequently both necessary and technically challenging. The objective of our study was to describe our experience using intramuscular (IM) ketamine to facilitate the placement of central venous catheters in children presenting to our ED needing vascular access in a timely fashion. We performed a retrospective medical record review of all pediatric patients central venous catheter facilitated by the use of IM ketamine. Eleven children met our inclusion criteria. Most of the children were young and medically complicated. The children ranged in age from 6 months to 8 years. The only complication identified was vomiting experienced by an 8-year-old boy. Emergency physicians successfully obtained central venous access in all subjects in the case series. The use of IM ketamine to facilitate the placement of central venous catheters in children who do not have peripheral venous access appears to be helpful. Emergency physicians may find it useful to be familiar with this use of IM ketamine.

  9. Metabolomics window into diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Qiao, Shuxuan; Shi, Chenze; Wang, Shuya; Ji, Guang

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes has become a major global health problem. The elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during the diabetic progression is critical for better understanding its pathogenesis, and identifying potential biomarkers and drug targets. Metabolomics is a promising tool to reveal the metabolic changes and the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The present review provides an update on the application of metabolomics in diabetic complications, including diabetic coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy, and this review provides notes on the prevention and prediction of diabetic complications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Avoiding Complications with MPFL Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marvin K; Werner, Brian C; Diduch, David R

    2018-05-12

    To discuss the potentially significant complications associated with medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. Additionally, to review the most current and relevant literature with an emphasis on avoiding these potential complications. Multiple cadaveric studies have characterized the anatomy of the MPFL and the related morphologic abnormalities that contribute to recurrent lateral patellar instability. Such abnormalities include patella alta, excessive tibial tubercle to trochlear grove (TT-TG) distance, trochlear dysplasia, and malalignment. Recent studies have evaluated the clinical outcomes associated with the treatment of concomitant pathology in combination with MPFL reconstruction, which is critical in avoiding recurrent instability and complications. Although there remains a lack of consensus regarding various critical aspects of MPFL reconstruction, certain concepts remain imperative. Our preferred methods and rationales for surgical techniques are described. These include appropriate work up, a combination of procedures to address abnormal morphology, anatomical femoral insertion, safe and secure patellar fixation, appropriate graft length fixation, and thoughtful knee flexion during fixation.

  11. [Gastroplasty: complications and their prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlienger, J L; Meyer, L; Rohr, S; Pradignac, A; Perrin, A E; Meyer, C; Simon, C

    2003-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is now frequently proposed for the treatment of morbid or complicated obesity since the introduction of minimally invasive laparoscopic anti-obesity operations such as the adjustable silicone gastric binding gastroplasty. However this reversible procedure in not always as safe as presumed and the results in weight loss may be sometimes disappointing. Side effects are common and early or late complications occured in more than 20% out of the patients. They are favoured by post operative eating disorders. Nutritional consequences are probably underestimated and are not limited to uncomfortable digestive symptoms. Some deficiencies in micronutriments have been described. The worsening of previous eating disorders or psychosocial abnormalities are not seldom. Gastroplasty is not an harmless procedure. A good selection in patients, a regular follow up, nutritional advices and psychosocial management by a multidisciplinar team are required to reduce complications after gastroplasty.

  12. Neurological complications following bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It was to report on Brazilian cases of neurological complications from bariatric surgery. The literature on the subject is scarce. METHOD: Cases attended by neurologists in eight different Brazilian cities were collected and described in the present study. RESULTS: Twenty-six cases were collected in this study. Axonal polyneuropathy was the most frequent neurological complication, but cases of central demyelination, Wernicke syndrome, optical neuritis, radiculits, meralgia paresthetica and compressive neuropathies were also identified. Twenty-one patients (80% had partial or no recovery from the neurological signs and symptoms. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery, a procedure that is continuously increasing in popularity, is not free of potential neurological complications that should be clearly presented to the individual undergoing this type of surgery. Although a clear cause-effect relation cannot be established for the present cases, the cumulative literature on the subject makes it important to warn the patient of the potential risks of this procedure.

  13. Neurological complications of infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sonia A.A.; Yaqub, Basim A.; Al-Deeb, Saleh M.

    1996-01-01

    We reviewed the files of 80 successive patients with native and prosthetic valve endocarditis admitted to Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital. Neurolological complications (NC) occurred in 28 (35%) patients. The valves involved were mitral in 12 (43%), aortic in eight (29%), combined mitral and aortic lesions in six (21%) and others in two (7%). The common causative organisms were Streptococci in 12 (43%), Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermides, both occurring in four (14%). Compared to the 52 infective endocarditis patients with no neurological complications (NNC), the NC occurred more frequently in male patients, those with aortic valve lesion, those with atrial fibrillation, those with delayed therapy and those with causative organisms being Streptococci or Staphylococci. Eleven patients died (39%), 12 (43%) recovered with motor sequelae, six (21%) had seizure disorder and five (18%) had full recovery. The frequency of neurological complications and mortality is comparable to those reported in the literature: however, the frequency was higher in our patients. (author)

  14. Complications After Cosmetic Surgery Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Holger J; Simic, Dario; Fuchs, Nina; Schweizer, Riccardo; Mehra, Tarun; Giovanoli, Pietro; Plock, Jan A

    2017-04-01

    Cosmetic surgery tourism characterizes a phenomenon of people traveling abroad for aesthetic surgery treatment. Problems arise when patients return with complications or need of follow-up care. To investigate the complications of cosmetic surgery tourism treated at our hospital as well as to analyze arising costs for the health system. Between 2010 and 2014, we retrospectively included all patients presenting with complications arising from cosmetic surgery abroad. We reviewed medical records for patients' characteristics including performed operations, complications, and treatment. Associated cost expenditure and Diagnose Related Groups (DRG)-related reimbursement were analyzed. In total 109 patients were identified. All patients were female with a mean age of 38.5 ± 11.3 years. Most procedures were performed in South America (43%) and Southeast (29.4%) or central Europe (24.8%), respectively. Favored procedures were breast augmentation (39.4%), abdominoplasty (11%), and breast reduction (7.3%). Median time between the initial procedure abroad and presentation was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 9) for early, 81.5 days (IQR, 69.5) for midterm, and 4.9 years (IQR, 9.4) for late complications. Main complications were infections (25.7%), wound breakdown (19.3%), and pain/discomfort (14.7%). The majority of patients (63.3%) were treated conservatively; 34.8% became inpatients with a mean hospital stay of 5.2 ± 3.8 days. Overall DRG-related reimbursement premiums approximately covered the total costs. Despite warnings regarding associated risks, cosmetic surgery tourism has become increasingly popular. Efficient patients' referral to secondary/tertiary care centers with standardized evaluation and treatment can limit arising costs without imposing a too large burden on the social healthcare system. 4. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  15. Intracraneal complications after raquis surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, J J; Malillos, M

    Intracraneal bleeding is a rare complication after raquis surgery. It is believed to occur as a drop in the intracraneal pressure after a loss of CSF secondary to an iatrogenic dural tear. We report a patient who after surgery for lumbar stenosis presented a subarachnoid haemorrhage, an intraparenchymal haematoma, and a subdural haematoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature with such complications after this type of surgery. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. LVAD pannus complicating destination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Ignaszewski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in technology, ventricular assist devices still experience a number of complications limiting their long-term use. We present a 73-year-old woman implanted with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD five years prior due to end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy, who died several weeks after admission to the hospital. Post-mortem examination revealed a large obstructing pannus in the LVAD inflow. As a result of increased LVAD use, complications such as infection, device thrombosis and pannus must be promptly recognized and managed appropriately to ensure the greatest chance of patient survival.

  17. Sigmoid Volvulus Complicating Postpartum Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey E. Ward

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sigmoid volvulus is a rare complication of pregnancy and the puerperium. Case. A 19-year-old patient, gravida 1 para 0 at 41 0/7 weeks of gestation, admitted for late-term induction of labor underwent an uncomplicated primary low transverse cesarean delivery for arrest of descent. Her postoperative period was complicated by sudden onset of abdominal pain and the ultimate diagnosis of sigmoid volvulus. Conclusion. Prompt surgical evaluation of an acute abdomen in the postpartum period is essential; delayed diagnosis and treatment can lead to significant maternal morbidity and mortality.

  18. Revision of migrated pelvic acetabular components in THA with or without vascular involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ștefan Cristea

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The literature describes a high rate of mortality in cases of intrapelvic acetabular component migration, which is a rare but serious complication. Our aim is to establish and propose a treatment protocol according to our results and experience. Material and Methods. We performed eight (8 total hip revisions with acetabular cup migration between 2006 and 2012. A vascular graft was needed in four (4 of these cases. Two (2 cases were revisions after a spacer for infected arthroplasties. The protocol included the following: X-Ray examination (frontal and lateral views, CT angiography, a biological evaluation, a suitable pre-operative plan, at least six (6 units of blood stock, an experienced anesthesiologist, an experienced surgical team that included a vascular surgeon and a versatile arsenal of revision prostheses, bone grafts and vascular grafts. The anterolateral approach was generally used for hip revisions and the retroperitoneal approach in the dorsal decubitus position was used when vascular risk was involved. Results: The acetabular defect was reconstructed using bone grafts and tantalum revision cups in 4 cases, Burch-Schneider cages in 2 cases, a Kerboull ring in 1 case and a cementless oblong cup (Cotyle Espace in 1 case. In 4 cases, an iliac vessel graft procedure was conducted by the vascular surgeon. All patients survived the revision procedures and returned regularly for subsequent check-ups, during which they did not show any septic complications. Conclusions: Intrapelvic acetabular cup migration is a rare but serious complication that can occur after total hip arthroplasty in either septic or aseptic cases. An experienced, multidisciplinary team of surgeons should be involved in planning and conducting such complicated revisions.

  19. Relation of retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to other diabetic complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hui Chen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation between systemic complications and diabetic retinopathy in the patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.METHODS: Seven hundred and two hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were included. All patients were divided into two groups according to with or without retinopathy: NDR group and DR group. DR group was divided into group non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand group proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR. The relation between DR and other complications of diabetes, including diabetic macrovascular complications, diabetic nephropathy(DN, diabetic peripheral neuropathy(DPN, peripheral vascular disease of diabetes mellitus(PVD, diabetic foot(DF, diabetic ketoacidosis(DKA, was analyzed.RESULTS: The development of DR was related to hypertension, hyperlipemia, carotid atherosclerosis and plaque, lower extremity arteriosclerosis and plaque, DN, DPN, DF and PVD. PDR was closely associated with hypertension and DPN. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of DR increased in the diabetic patients with systemic complications, especially, the increase of prevalence of PDR in the patients with hypertension and DPN. Vascular endothelial injury and microcirculatory disturbance are the common pathologic base for DR and other complications. Therefore, it is important to carry out the regular fundus examination in the diabetic patients, especially in those with systemic complication, in order to decrease the rate of blindness.

  20. Judicious use of ethanol embolization to improve the curative rate of vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jingbing; Fan Xindong; Cheng Yongde

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of vascular malformations is very low, and its clinical manifestations are infinite in variety, from an asymptomatic birthmark to life-threatening massive bleeding, even to congestive heart failure. The pathogenesis of vascular malformations is still unknown, therefore, its effective treatment is a real challenge. With the development of interventional technology and the accumulation of clinical experience in ethanol embolization, in local direct puncture injection and in endovascular embolization, the ethanol embolization will hopefully become the therapy of first choice for this kind of complicate and intractable disorders. (authors)

  1. Spinal Anaesthesia for Cesarean Section in a Patient with Vascular Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Carness

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the administration of spinal anaesthesia for cesarean delivery in a parturient with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Parturients who genetically inherit this disorder are at risk for significant morbidity and mortality. Risks during pregnancy include premature labor, uterine prolapse, and uterine rupture. Additionally, such laboring parturients are at increased risk of hemodynamic volatility, vascular stress, and severe postpartum hemorrhage. Instrumented delivery and cesarean delivery bring additional risks. Nonpregnancy-related complications include excessive bleeding, intestinal rupture, cardiac valvular dysfunction, and arterial dissection. Despite the complexity of this condition, literature focusing on specific intraoperative anaesthetic management is sparse.

  2. Subclavian artery aneurysm in a patient with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Shota; Imoto, Kiyotaka; Uchida, Keiji; Uranaka, Yasuko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Masuda, Munetaka

    2016-02-01

    We describe our experience of surgical treatment in a 28-year-old woman with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A right subclavian artery aneurysm was detected. The right vertebral artery arose from the aneurysm. Digital subtraction angiography showed interruption of the left vertebral artery. The aneurysm was excised and the right vertebral artery was anastomosed end-to-side to the right common carotid artery under deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest. The patient remained very well 4 years after surgery, with no late vascular complication. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Presymptomatic genetic analysis during pregnancy for vascular type Ehlers–Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naing BT

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Banyar Than Naing,1 Atsushi Watanabe,1,2 Shinji Tanigaki,3 Masae Ono,4 Mitsutoshi Iwashita,3 Takashi Shimada1,21Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Division of Clinical Genetics, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Pediatrics, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The vascular type of Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS, EDS type IV (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [MIM] #130050 is characterized by thin, translucent skin, easy bruising, and arterial, intestinal, and/or uterine fragility during pregnancy, which may lead to sudden death. It is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder caused by type III procollagen gene (COL3A1: MIM #120180 mutations. Approximately 50% of the COL3A1 mutations are inherited from an affected parent, and 50% are de novo mutations. Each child of an affected individual has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation and developing the disorder. Pregnant women with vascular EDS are at an increased risk of uterine and arterial rupture during the peripartum period, with high maternal morbidity and mortality rates. We report the first case of an asymptomatic 35-year-old woman at a risk of complications of vascular EDS who underwent presymptomatic evaluation during pregnancy. The sequencing results of both her brother and mother had a one-base-pair deletion, resulting in Glutamate at position 730 changing to Lysine and causing a frame shift and premature termination codon at 61 amino acids from the mutation position (p. Glu730Lysfs*61 on exon 32 of COL3A1. This deletion caused frameshift, leading to a premature termination codon (TAG at 181 nucleotides downstream in exon 35, which could not be detected by previous total RNA (ribonucleic acid method. Thus, she was at risk of complications of vascular EDS, and diagnostic testing was employed

  4. Ghrelin improves vascular autophagy in rats with vascular calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mingming; Liu, Lin; Song, Chenfang; Chen, Wei; Gui, Shuyan

    2017-06-15

    This study aimed to investigate whether ghrelin ameliorated vascular calcification (VC) through improving autophagy. VC model was induced by nicotine plus vitamin D 3 in rats and β-glycerophosphate in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC). Calcium deposition was detected by von Kossa staining or alizarin red S staining. ALP activity was also detected. Western blot was used to assess the protein expression. Ghrelin treatment attenuated the elevation of calcium deposition and ALP activity in VC model both in vivo and in vitro. Interesting, the protein levels of autophagy markers, LC3 and beclin1 were significantly upregulated by ghrelin in VC model. An autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine blocks the ameliorative effect of ghrelin on VC. Furthermore, protein expressions of phosphate-AMPK were increased by ghrelin treatment both in calcified aorta and VSMC. The effect of ghrelin on autophagy induction and VC attenuation was prevented by AMPK inhibitor, compound C. Our results suggested that ghrelin improved autophagy through AMPK activation, which was resulted in VC amelioration. These data maybe throw light on prevention and therapy of VC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Teaching Energy Geography? It's Complicated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The premise of this essay is that energy geographies are complicated, and this in itself presents some pedagogical difficulties. As someone who wants students to critically examine and confront the complexity of energy systems, it can be frustrating when students react to demonstrate frustration, apathy, or even confusion. In what follows, I will…

  6. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); M.R. de Vries (Mark); M. van der Elst (Maarten)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of

  7. Complications of syndesmotic screw removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Tim; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; de Vries, Mark R.; van der Elst, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the metallic syndesmotic screw is the gold standard in the treatment of syndesmotic disruption. Whether or not this screw needs to be removed remains debatable. The aim of the current study was to determine the complications which occur following routine removal of the syndesmotic screw

  8. Radiotherapy of complicated diabetic osteoarthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlyashchuk, E.L.; Ustinova, V.F.; Machkovskaya, G.K.; Moskvicheva, G.P.; Shekhtman, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    The method of antiinflammatory X-ray therapy as a complex treatment of 50 patients with complicated diabetic osteoarthropathy is presented. High efficacy of antiinflammatory X-ray therapy was noted; it broadened the possibilities of treatment of the given pathology. There was no patient in whom a negative effect of irradiation on the course of diabetes mellitus had been observed

  9. Medical Treatment of Tattoo Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Tattooing is a skin trauma and involves a special vulnus punctatum (with inserted tattoo ink, a vulnus venenatum), which should heal with no infection and no local complication. Local treatment in the healing phase ideally builds on the 'moist wound' principle using plastic film, hydrocolloids...

  10. How to avoid sedation complications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To ensure patient safety, it is crucial that the airway is safeguarded. The single most important responsibility is to protect it. An unobstructed airway, with intact protective reflexes and respiratory drive, is essential to avoid complications. In some procedures, e.g. dental, the airway may need to be shared with the surgeon.

  11. Surgical Treatment of Tattoo Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepehri, Mitra; Jørgensen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    With a continuing increase in the number of tattoos performed worldwide, the need to treat tattoo complications is growing. Earlier treatments of chronic inflammatory tattoo reactions were dominated by a medical approach, or with no active intervention. In this chapter, we will address modern...

  12. Multipl Pregnancies and Their Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Turan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the complications observed in multipl pregnancies which are increasing in day by day. Material and method: We reviewed 173 multiple pregnancies that were followed up in the Department of Obstetric and Gynecology in Ege University during one year period and determined the preterm delivery ratio, discordance between fetuses and investigated the complications which occurred during pregnancy. Results: 148 twin, 24 triplet and 1 quadriplet pregnancies had been followed in a year. While 56 of twin pregnancies and 4 of the triplet pregnancies occurred spontaneously, others conceived with medical treatment or with assisted reproductive technology. Cerclage was performed in 11 pregnancies. Preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus and cholestasis were observed in 12,26 and 8 patients respectively. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome was present in 4 patients and one patient had acardiac-acephalic twin pregnancy. Four patients had emergency cesarean section due to ablatio placenta. While 54 patients were hospitalized for one week to twelve weeks because of preterm labour 36 women had preterm premature rupture of the membranes. Only 38 patients had any problem during pregnancy. Discussion: Developments in assisted reproductive technology have been increasing the number of multiple gestations and their complications. The complications due to preterm labor, increased requirement of Neonatal Intensive Care Units and hospital payments are all burden on the families as well as on the social insurance companies.

  13. Complications of occipital bone pneumatization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, Mary; Roche, Jim; Biggs, Michael; Forer, Martin; Fagan, Paul; Davis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Four cases of occipital bone pneumatization and subsequent complications are described, which include a pathological fracture of C 1 and the occipital bone, spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema and pneumatocele formation. Reviews of the published literature and possible aetiological factors have been discussed Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  14. Is this ?complicated? opioid withdrawal?

    OpenAIRE

    Parkar, S.R.; Seethalakshmi, R; Adarkar, S; Kharawala, S

    2006-01-01

    Seven patients with opioid dependence admitted in the de-addiction centre for detoxification developed convulsions and delirium during the withdrawal phase. After ruling out all other possible causes of these complications, opioid withdrawal seemed to emerge as the most likely explanation. The unpredictability of the course of opioid dependence and withdrawal needs to be considered when treating patients with opioid dependence.

  15. CNS complications of rotavirus gastroenteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volosinova, D.

    2010-01-01

    Rotavirus infection may be accompanied by serious complications, e.g. disabilities central nervous system (CNS). Theory rotavirus penetration across the blood-brain barrier and subsequent rota-associated convulsions by the 2-year case-history of the patient. Rotavirosis minor gastrointestinal symptoms may lead to erroneous diagnosis. (author)

  16. Complications of Prematurity - An Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Praveen; Rawat, Munmun; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2017-01-01

    Infographics or information graphics are easy-to-understand visual representation of knowledge. An infographic outlining the course of an extremely preterm infant and various potential complications encountered during a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stay was developed. This infographic can be used to discuss outcomes of prematurity during prenatal counseling and while the infant is in the NICU. PMID:29138522

  17. Vascular dementia: Facts and controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular dementia (VaD is the second most frequent dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, and is diagnosed during lifetime in 20% of demented patients. Five­year survival rate in VaD is 39%, while it is estimated to be 75% in healthy persons of the same age. It is therefore important to make correct diagnosis of VaD early in the course of the disease. Risk factors for VaD are identical to stroke risk factors, and there are significant possibilities for the prevention of vascular cognitive decline. Cognitive decline develops acutely or step­by­step within three months after stroke, but more gradual progression of intellectual decline is also possible. Neurological examination can reveal pyramidal and extrapyramidal signs, pseudobulbar palsy, gait disturbance and urinary incontinence. Neuropsychological profile comprises the loss of cognitive set shifting, decline in word fluency, verbal learning difficulties, perseverations, difficulties in complex figure copying, and in patients with cortically located lesions also problems with speech and praxia. The basis of the diagnosis is, besides history, neurological examination and neuropsychological assessment, computed tomography and/ or magnetic resonance brain imaging. Vascular risk factors control is the most important measure in VaD prevention. Modern guidelines for the treatment of cognitive decline in VaD emphasize that donepezil can be useful in the improvement of cognitive status at the level of Class IIa recommendation at the level of evidence A, while memantine may be useful in patients with mixed VaD and Alzheimer’s disease dementia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175022 i br. 175033

  18. Enhanced Prevalence of Plasmatic Soluble MHC Class I Chain-Related Molecule in Vascular Pregnancy Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Baptiste Haumonte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex class I related chain (MIC is a stress-inducible protein modulating the function of immune natural killer (NK cells, a major leukocyte subset involved in proper trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling. Aim of the study was to evaluate whether upregulation of soluble MIC (sMIC may reflect immune disorders associated to vascular pregnancy diseases (VPD. sMIC was more frequently detected in the plasma of women with a diagnostic of VPD (32% than in normal term-matched pregnancies (1.6%, P<0.0001, with highest prevalence in intrauterine fetal death (IUDF, 44% and vascular intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, 39%. sMIC levels were higher in preeclampsia (PE than in IUFD (P<0.01 and vascular IUGR (P<0.05. sMIC detection was associated with bilateral early diastolic uterine notches (P=0.037, thrombocytopenia (P=0.03, and high proteinuria (P=0.03 in PE and with the vascular etiology of IUGR (P=0.0038. Incubation of sMIC-positive PE plasma resulted in downregulation of NKG2D expression and NK cell-mediated IFN-γ production in vitro. Our work thus suggests that detection of sMIC molecule in maternal plasma may constitute a hallmark of altered maternal immune functions that contributes to vascular disorders that complicate pregnancy, notably by impairing NK-cell mediated production of IFN-γ, an essential cytokine favoring vascular modeling.

  19. Straight configuration saphenous vein transposition to popliteal artery for vascular access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caco, Gentian; Golemi, Dhurata; Likaj, Eriola

    2017-03-21

    The saphenous vein is commonly used as a vascular graft in peripheral artery surgery but rarely used for vascular access. The literature on straight configuration saphenous vein transposition to the popliteal artery is scarce. Here we present two cases of straight configuration saphenous vein transposition to the popliteal artery for vascular access, the surgical technique and respective follow-up. Two young men, aged 29 and 36 years, were chosen for lower-limb vascular access for hemodialysis. The first patient was paraplegic since birth. He used his arms to move so upper extremity vascular access was avoided. The second patient presented with an infected upper extremity arteriovenous graft (AVG) and after multiple closed AVFs he had no more available arm veins. Both patients received autologous lower extremity straight configuration saphenous vein transpositions to the popliteal artery under spinal anesthesia in May and October 2012, respectively. Cannulation of the fistula was allowed after one month. There were no early complications. Slight swelling on the leg appeared in one of the patients. Both fistulas were still functional after 36 and 32 months, respectively. The straight configuration saphenous vein transposition to popliteal artery is simple to perform, offers a long and straight segment for cannulation and may be a suitable autologous vascular access in selected patients.

  20. Vascular access in lipoprotein apheresis: a retrospective analysis from the UK's largest lipoprotein apheresis centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Daniel J; Pottle, Alison; Malietzis, George; Hakim, Nadey; Barbir, Mahmoud; Crane, Jeremy S

    2018-01-01

    Lipoprotein apheresis (LA) has proven to be an effective, safe and life-saving therapy. Vascular access is needed to facilitate this treatment but has recognised complications. Despite consistency in treatment indication and duration there are no guidelines in place. The aim of this study is to characterise vascular access practice at the UK's largest LA centre and forward suggestions for future approaches. A retrospective analysis of vascular access strategies was undertaken in all patients who received LA treatment in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) Apheresis Unit at Harefield Hospital (Middlesex, UK) from November 2000 to March 2016. Fifty-three former and current patients underwent 4260 LA treatments. Peripheral vein cannulation represented 79% of initial vascular access strategies with arteriovenous (AV) fistula use accounting for 15%. Last used method of vascular access was peripheral vein cannulation in 57% versus AV fistula in 32%. Total AV fistula failure rate was 37%. Peripheral vein cannulation remains the most common method to facilitate LA. Practice trends indicate a move towards AV fistula creation; the favoured approach receiving support from the expert body in this area. AV fistula failure rate is high and of great concern, therefore we suggest the implementation of upper limb ultrasound vascular mapping in all patients who meet treatment eligibility criteria. We encourage close ties between apheresis units and specialist surgical centres to facilitate patient counselling and monitoring. Further prospective data regarding fistula failure is needed in this expanding treatment field.

  1. Autoantigens targeted in scleroderma patients with vascular disease are enriched in endothelial lineage cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Zsuzsanna H.; Cottrell, Tricia R.; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Antiochos, Brendan; Zambidis, Elias T.; Park, Tea Soon; Halushka, Marc K.; Gutierrez-Alamillo, Laura; Cimbro, Raffaello; Rosen, Antony; Casciola-Rosen, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Objective Scleroderma patients with autoantibodies to centromere proteins (CENPs) and/or interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) are at increased risk of severe vascular complications. We set out to define whether these autoantigens are enriched in cells of the vasculature. Methods Successive stages of embryoid bodies (EBs) as well as vascular progenitors were used to evaluate the expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENP by immunoblotting. CD31 was included to mark early blood vessels. IFI16 and CD31 expression were defined in skin paraffin sections from scleroderma patients and from healthy controls. IFI16 expression was determined by flow cytometry in circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating progenitor cells (CPCs). Results Expression of CENP-A, IFI16 and CD31 was enriched in EBs at days 10 and 12 of differentiation, and particularly in cultures enriched in vascular progenitors (IFI16, CD31, CENPs A and-B). This pattern was distinct from that of comparator autoantigens. Immunohistochemical staining of skin paraffin sections showed enrichment of IFI16 in CD31-positive vascular endothelial cells in biopsies from scleroderma patients and normal controls. Flow cytometry analysis revealed IFI16 expression in CPCs, but minimal expression in CECs. Conclusion Expression of scleroderma autoantigens IFI16 and CENPs, which are associated with severe vascular disease, is increased in vascular progenitors and mature endothelial cells. High level, lineage-enriched expression of autoantigens may explain the striking association between clinical phenotypes and the immune targeting of specific autoantigens. PMID:27159521

  2. Non-vascular surgical mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavon, S.; Trenaghi, P.; Nardini, S.; Pagan, V.

    1989-01-01

    A review was made of the chest X-ray features of 120 patients who underwent surgical treatment for mediastinal non-vascular pathologies over the past 12 years in the Mestre Hospital. A method of analysis is proposed which takes into account not only the differences between the immediate post-operative period and the follow-up, but also the anatomotopographic partition and the surgical practice. Normal and pathological patterns for both of the above periods are described. The ''dimness'' of the arial tracheogram is emphasized as a usefull and early sign of mediastinal recurrence

  3. Vascular comorbidities in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Anja; Magyari, Melinda; Koch-Henriksen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence of vascular comorbidities before and after the clinical onset of multiple sclerosis. In this combined case-control and cohort study, all Danish born citizens with onset of multiple sclerosis 1980-2005 were identified from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Registry...... and randomly matched with controls regarding year of birth, gender, and municipality on January 1st in the year of multiple sclerosis (MS) onset (index date). Individual-level information on comorbidities was obtained from several independent nationwide registries and linked to the study population by unique...

  4. Heritability of Retinal Vascular Fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    2017-01-01

    , the retinal vascular fractal dimension was measured using the box-counting method and compared within monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs using Pearson correlation coefficients. Falconer's formula and quantitative genetic models were used to determine the genetic component of variation. Results: The mean...... fractal dimension did not differ statistically significantly between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs (1.505 vs. 1.495, P = 0.06), supporting that the study population was suitable for quantitative analysis of heritability. The intrapair correlation was markedly higher (0.505, P = 0...

  5. The Timing and Frequency of Complications After Peripheral Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty and Iliac Stenting: Is a Change from Inpatient to Outpatient Therapy Feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Briony J.; Phillips, Andrea J.; Fox, Anthony; Boardman, Phillip; Phillips-Hughes, Jane

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective study was performed to assess the frequency and timing of complications after transluminal angioplasty and stent placement with a view to changing our practice and performing these procedures on an outpatient basis.Method: A total of 266 angioplasties and 51 stent deployments were attempted on 240 consecutive patients. Immediate complications were documented by the radiologists. The timing and nature of any complications during and beyond the first 24 hr were reported by the vascular surgeons.Results: There were 14 complications in 240 patients, giving a complication rate of 4.8% per vessel segment dilated. There were five major and nine minor complications. Eighty-six percent of complications were evident before the patient had left the angiography suite. All complications were evident within 4.5 hr of the procedure.Conclusion: The timing of complications suggests it would be reasonable to perform percutaneous transluminal angioplasties and iliac stenting on an outpatient basis in suitable patients

  6. Exogenous BMP7 in aortae of rats with chronic uremia ameliorates expression of profibrotic genes, but does not reverse established vascular calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Eva; Lerche Mace, Maria; Nordholm, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia and vascular calcification are frequent complications of chronic renal failure and bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) has been shown to protect against development of vascular calcification in uremia. The present investigation examined the potential reversibility of established...... uremic vascular calcification by treatment of uremic rats with BMP7. A control model of isogenic transplantation of a calcified aorta from uremic rats into healthy littermates examined whether normalization of the uremic environment reversed vascular calcification. Uremia and vascular calcification were...... induced in rats by 5/6 nephrectomy, high phosphate diet and alfacalcidol treatment. After 14 weeks severe vascular calcification was present and rats were allocated to BMP7, vehicle or aorta transplantation. BMP7 treatment caused a significant decrease of plasma phosphate to 1.56 ± 0.17 mmol/L vs 2.06 ± 0...

  7. Neurological complications of drug abuse: pathophysiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, J; Haapaniemi, H M; Hillbom, M

    2000-11-01

    Drug abuse is associated with a variety of neurological complications. The use of certain recreational drugs shows a marked temporal association with the onset of both haemorrhagic and ischaemic strokes, the majority of which develop within minutes to 1 h after the administration of the index drug. Delayed onset of stroke has also been observed. Acute, severe elevation of blood pressure, cardiac dysrhythmias, cerebral vasospasm, vasculitis, embolization due to infective endocarditis or dilated cardiomyopathy, embolization due to foreign material injected with the diluents under non-sterile conditions and 'street drug' contaminants with cardiovascular effects have been suggested as possible underlying mechanisms. Rupture of aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations have been detected in up to half of the patients with haemorrhagic stroke due to cocaine abuse. The less common findings reported have included a mycotic cerebrovascular aneurysm in a patient with infective endocarditis and haemorrhagic stroke. In addition to stroke, cocaine seems to provoke vascular headache. Seizures precipitated by recreational drug abuse are usually caused by acute intoxication in contrast to the withdrawal seizures encountered in subjects with alcohol abuse. Movement disorders and cerebral atrophy correlating with the duration of abuse have been described. Snorting of organic solvents may cause encephalopathy. Cases of spongiform leukoencephalopathy in heroin addicts have also been reported. Peripheral neuropathy is occasionally precipitated by drug poisoning after intravenous administration. Impurities of the drug, risky administration techniques, and the use of mixtures of various drugs, frequently with simultaneous alcohol drinking, should be taken into account when assessing the background of the adverse event as well as the overall lifestyle of the addicted subjects.

  8. Vascular endothelial dysfunction in β-thalassemia occurs despite increased eNOS expression and preserved vascular smooth muscle cell reactivity to NO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekatherina Stoyanova

    Full Text Available The hereditary β-thalassemia major condition requires regular lifelong blood transfusions. Transfusion-related iron overloading has been associated with the onset of cardiovascular complications, including cardiac dysfunction and vascular anomalies. By using an untransfused murine model of β-thalassemia major, we tested the hypothesis that vascular endothelial dysfunction, alterations of arterial structure and of its mechanical properties would occur despite the absence of treatments.Vascular function and structure were evaluated ex vivo. Compared to the controls, endothelium-dependent vasodilation with acetylcholine was blunted in mesenteric resistance arteries of β-thalassemic mice while the endothelium-independent vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside produced comparable vessel dilation, indicating endothelial cell impairment with preserved smooth muscle cell reactivity to nitric oxide (NO. While these findings suggest a decrease in NO bioavailability, Western blotting showed heightened expression of aortic endothelial NO synthase (eNOS in β-thalassemia. Vascular remodeling of the common carotid arteries revealed increased medial elastin content. Under isobaric conditions, the carotid arteries of β-thalassemic mice exhibited decreased wall stress and softening due to structural changes of the vessel wall.A complex vasculopathy was identified in untransfused β-thalassemic mice characterized by altered carotid artery structure and endothelial dysfunction of resistance arterioles, likely attributable to reduced NO bioavailability despite enhanced vascular eNOS expression.

  9. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT): contribution of imaging and interventional radiology in preparing the transplantation and managing complications. Part 2: post-OLT complications and their treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golfieri, Rita; Gianpalma, Emanuela; Fusco, Francesca

    2005-01-01

    Despite standardisation of the surgical technique and refinement of immunosuppressive therapy, life-threatening complications are still frequent after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). These are caused by a number of factors: patients usually reach the day of the transplant in a debilitated condition, they undergo a complex surgical operation and then receive immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection. Post-OLT complications therefore usually have a nonspecific clinical presentation, which makes the role of imaging crucial for identifying and differentiating among the various possible clinical scenarios. The most common complications are rejection, vascular thrombosis or stenosis, biliary obstruction or leakage, infarction or haemorrhage, abscesses and, at a later stage, recurrence of the primary disease. If identified early on, some of these complications can be resolved by surgery or interventional radiology, thereby preventing irreversible damage to the graft that would require a repeat transplant or lead the patient to death. During the follow-up of the transplant patient, imaging enables: a) monitoring of the vascular (arterial, portal and hepatic) and biliary anastomoses to assess and treat possible complications; b) identification of conditions related to immunosuppressive therapy (infections or abscesses); c) identification of possible development of tumours or disease recurrence. In the immediate post-OLT period the patient is normally monitored by ultrasound and Doppler-ultrasound, carried out both immediately after the operation to evaluate the patency of the vascular anastomoses, and at the patient's bedside in the ICU unit during the first 24 hours and daily for the first week. If the sonographic findings are positive or there is a strong clinical suspicion of vascular complications, the patient is first studied by the less invasive techniques (CT-angiography and MR-angiography), reserving a confirmatory role for angiographic techniques

  10. Neuroradiological findings in vascular dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali; Miaux, Yves; Suhy, Joyce; Pauls, Jon; Lopez, Ria [Synarc, Inc., Department of Radiology Services, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rovira-Canellas, Alex [Hospital General Universitari Vall d' Hebron, Unita de Resonancia Magnetica, Barcelona (Spain); Posner, Holly [Eisai, Inc., Teaneck, NJ (United States)

    2007-01-15

    There are multiple diagnostic criteria for vascular dementia (VaD) that may define different populations. Utilizing the criteria of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences (NINDS-AIREN) has provided improved consistency in the diagnosis of VaD. The criteria include a table listing brain imaging lesions associated with VaD. The different neuroradiological aspects of the criteria are reviewed based on the imaging data from an ongoing large-scale clinical trial testing a new treatment for VaD. The NINDS-AIREN criteria were applied by a centralized imaging rater to determine eligibility for enrollment in 1,202 patients using brain CT or MRI. Based on the above data set, the neuroradiological features that are associated with VaD and that can result from cerebral small-vessel disease with extensive leukoencephalopathy or lacunae (basal ganglia or frontal white matter), or may be the consequence of single strategically located infarcts or multiple infarcts in large-vessel territories, are illustrated. These features may also be the consequence of global cerebral hypoperfusion, intracerebral hemorrhage, or other mechanisms such as genetically determined arteriopathies. Neuroimaging confirmation of cerebrovascular disease in VaD provides information about the topography and severity of vascular lesions. Neuroimaging may also assist with the differential diagnosis of dementia associated with normal pressure hydrocephalus, chronic subdural hematoma, arteriovenous malformation or tumoral diseases. (orig.)

  11. Diffuse and vascular hepatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreimeyer, S.; Grenacher, L.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to focal liver lesions, diffuse and vascular disorders of the liver represent a wide spectrum of liver diseases which are from the radiological point of view often difficult or nearly impossible to diagnose. Classical diagnostic methods are computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in addition to ultrasound. Diffuse parenchymal damage caused by diseases of various etiologies is therefore difficult to evaluate because it often lacks characteristic morphological features. For hepatic steatosis, hemochromatosis/siderosis as an example of a diffuse storage disease and sarcoidosis and candidiasis as infectious/inflammatory diseases, an image-based diagnosis is appropriate in some cases. For most diffuse liver diseases, however only nonspecific changes are visualized. Vascular pathologies of the liver, such as the Budd-Chiari syndrome and portal vein thrombosis, however, can usually be diagnosed very clearly using radiology and there is also a very effective interventional radiological treatment. Chronic diseases very often culminate in liver cirrhosis which is highly associated with an increased risk of liver cancer. (orig.) [de

  12. Vascularized bone transplant chimerism mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Wouter F; Larsen, Mikko; Friedrich, Patricia F; Bishop, Allen T

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces angiogenesis and osteogenesis in bone allotransplants. We aim to determine whether bone remodeling in VEGF-treated bone allotransplants results from repopulation with circulation-derived autogenous cells or survival of allogenic transplant-derived cells. Vascularized femoral bone transplants were transplanted from female Dark Agouti rats (DA;RT1(a) ) to male Piebald Viral Glaxo (PVG;RT1(c) ). Arteriovenous bundle implantation and short-term immunosuppression were used to maintain cellular viability. VEGF was encapsulated in biodegradable microspheres and delivered intramedullary in the experimental group (n = 22). In the control group (n = 22), no VEGF was delivered. Rats were sacrificed at 4 or 18 weeks. Laser capture microdissection of bone remodeling areas was performed at the inner and outer cortex. Sex-mismatched genes were quantified with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to determine the amount of male cells to total cells, defined as the relative expression ratio (rER). At 4 weeks, rER was significantly higher at the inner cortex in VEGF-treated transplants as compared to untreated transplants (0.622 ± 0.225 vs. 0.362 ± 0.081, P = 0.043). At 4 weeks, the outer cortex in the control group had a significantly higher rER (P = 0.038), whereas in the VEGF group, the inner cortex had a higher rER (P = 0.015). Over time, in the outer cortex the rER significantly increased to 0.634 ± 0.106 at 18 weeks in VEGF-treated rats (P = 0.049). At 18 weeks, the rER was >0.5 at all cortical areas in both groups. These in vivo findings suggest a chemotactic effect of intramedullary applied VEGF on recipient-derived bone and could imply that more rapid angiogenesis of vascularized allotransplants can be established with microencapsulated VEGF. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Future Trends in Vascular Access Creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Surendra

    2017-01-01

    Delivery of a prescribed dialysis dose, which is critical for longevity on hemodialysis, is directly dependent on vascular access (VA). However, VA is fraught with high failure rates and has room for innovation. Arteriovenous fistula (AVF), considered the 'best choice', has a high 'failure to mature' rate. Arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) are considered when patients are poor candidates for or have failed AVF, but have a high incidence of infections and thrombosis. Due to associated morbidity and mortality from complications, central venous catheters are considered only as 'bridging short-term access' when there is an urgent need for dialysis. The observation from current data that there is a significant center effect in the rate of AVF maturation supports investigation to identify factors that contribute to success in high-performing centers that create AVF and establish 'best practice' approaches to improve outcomes. Biocompatible AVG constructs that promote rapid tissue incorporation withstand needle punctures due to better integrity and can improve current AVG outcomes. Stenosis in the 'access circuit' is a major cause for short- and long-term permanent access failure. While the pathology of stenosis development is well understood, factors responsible for this problem are poorly studied. Increased flow in the access circuit likely plays a major role in the development of such stenosis. Investigation into understanding the hemodynamics of this flow may help identify etiology and stenosis sites perhaps even prior to the event, thus providing potential targets to mitigate the stenotic response. In summary, this chapter reflects on the shortcomings of current access modalities and discusses potential avenues to improve VA outcomes in the future. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Acute mesenteric ischemia: a vascular emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klar, Ernst; Rahmanian, Parwis B; Bücker, Arno; Hauenstein, Karlheinz; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Luther, Bernd

    2012-04-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia is still fatal in 50% to 70% of cases. This consensus paper was written with the participation of physicians from all of the involved specialties for the purpose of improving outcomes. Mesenteric ischemia must be recognized as a vascular emergency requiring rapid and efficient clinical evaluation and treatment. We reviewed pertinent literature that was retrieved by a PubMed search on the terms "mesenteric ischemia" AND "arterial" OR "venous" OR "clinical presentation" OR "diagnosis" OR "therapy" OR "surgery" OR " interventional radiology." Our review also took account of the existing guidelines of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association. Intensive discussions among the participating physicians, representing all of the specialties involved in the management of mesenteric ischemia, led to the creation of this interdisciplinary paper. Biphasic contrast-enhanced computerized tomography is the diagnostic tool of choice for the detection of arterial or venous occlusion. If non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia is suspected, angiography should be performed, with the option of intraarterial pharmacotherapy to induce local vasodilation. Endovascular techniques have become increasingly important in the treatment of arterial occlusion. Embolic central mesenteric artery occlusion requires surgical treatment; surgery is also needed in case of peritonitis. Portal-vein thrombosis can be treated by local thrombolysis through a transhepatically placed catheter. This should be done within 3 to 4 weeks of the event to prevent later complications of portal hypertension. Rapid diagnosis (within 4 to 6 hours of symptom onset) and interdisciplinary cooperation in the provision of treatment are required if the poor outcome of this condition is to be improved.

  15. Proatherogenic pathways leading to vascular calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzini, Michael J.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world and atherosclerosis is the major common underlying disease. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis involves local vascular injury, inflammation and oxidative stress as well as vascular calcification. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as a degenerative process leading to mineral deposition in the vascular wall characteristic for late stages of atherosclerosis. However, recent studies identified vascular calcification in early stages of atherosclerosis and its occurrence has been linked to clinical events in patients with cardiovascular disease. Its degree correlates with local vascular inflammation and with the overall impact and the progression of atherosclerosis. Over the last decade, diverse and highly regulated molecular signaling cascades controlling vascular calcification have been described. Local and circulating molecules such as osteopontin, osteoprogerin, leptin and matrix Gla protein were identified as critical regulators of vascular calcification. We here review the current knowledge on molecular pathways of vascular calcification and their relevance for the progression of cardiovascular disease

  16. World Federation of Vascular Societies: presidential address

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik Hegaard

    2010-01-01

    The presidential address describes briefly the history of the World Federation for Vascular Societies (WFVS) and its objectives. Vascular Surgery today includes interventional procedures (open surgical and endovascular) in addition to risk factor reduction and medical treatment. It is equally imp...... throughout the world. In addition, for introduction of new treatments, training issues and dissemination of science a global organisation like the WFVS is needed.......The presidential address describes briefly the history of the World Federation for Vascular Societies (WFVS) and its objectives. Vascular Surgery today includes interventional procedures (open surgical and endovascular) in addition to risk factor reduction and medical treatment. It is equally...

  17. The SK3 channel promotes placental vascularization by enhancing secretion of angiogenic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Cara C; Murray, Grace; England, Sarah K

    2014-11-15

    Proper placental perfusion is essential for fetal exchange of oxygen, nutrients, and waste with the maternal circulation. Impairment of uteroplacental vascular function can lead to pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Potassium channels have been recognized as regulators of vascular proliferation, angiogenesis, and secretion of vasoactive factors, and their dysfunction may underlie pregnancy-related vascular diseases. Overexpression of one channel in particular, the small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3), is known to increase vascularization in mice, and mice overexpressing the SK3 channel (SK3(T/T) mice) have a high rate of fetal demise and IUGR. Here, we show that overexpression of SK3 causes fetal loss through abnormal placental vascularization. We previously reported that, at pregnancy day 14, placentas isolated from SK3(T/T) mice are smaller than those obtained from wild-type mice. In this study, histological analysis reveals that SK3(T/-) placentas at this stage have abnormal placental morphology, and microcomputed tomography shows that these placentas have significantly larger and more blood vessels than those from wild-type mice. To identify the mechanism by which these vascularization defects occur, we measured levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor, and the soluble form of VEGF receptor 1 (sFlt-1), which must be tightly regulated to ensure proper placental development. Our data reveal that overexpression of SK3 alters systemic and placental ratios of the angiogenic factor VEGF to antiangiogenic factor sFlt-1 throughout pregnancy. Additionally, we observe increased expression of hypoxia-inducing factor 2α in SK3(T/-) placentas. We conclude that the SK3 channel modulates placental vascular development and fetal health by altering VEGF signaling. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, Divyesh; Kang, Mandeep; Sandhu, Manavjit Singh; Jain, Vanita; Kalra, Naveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD) are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS). As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG) and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions

  19. Rare complications of cesarean scar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyesh Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP and cesarean scar dehiscence (CSD are the most dreaded complications of cesarean scar (CS. As the incidence of CS is increasing worldwide, so is the incidence of CSP, especially in cases with assisted reproduction techniques. It is of utmost importance to diagnose CSP in the early first trimester, as it can lead to myometrial rupture with fatal outcome. On the other hand, CSD may be encountered during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. CSD in the postpartum period is very rare and can cause secondary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH leading to increased maternal morbidity or even death if not diagnosed and managed promptly. Both complications can be diagnosed on ultrasonography (USG and confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. These two conditions carry high morbidity and mortality. In this article, we highlight the role of imaging in the early diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  20. Complicity in International Criminal Law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksenova, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Complicity is a criminal law doctrine that attributes responsibility to those who do not physically perpetrate the crime. It is an essential mode of liability for core international crimes because it reaches out to senior political and military leadership. These persons do not usually engage...... in direct offending, yet in the context of mass atrocities they are often more culpable than foot soldiers. The Statutes of the ad hoc tribunals, hybrid courts and the International Criminal Court expressly provide for different forms of complicity, and domestic legal systems recognize it in one form...... or another. This is in contrast with alternative modes of liability implied from the Statutes to address the situations with multiple accused removed from the scene of the crime / (in)direct co-perpetration, extended perpetration and the joint criminal enterprise....

  1. Oral complications of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockhart, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    Comprehensive management of patients receiving radiotherapy to the head and neck dictates that they have a thorough dental evaluation as part of their overall treatment planning. Early and appropriate patient education and dental treatment, along with careful management during and after radiotherapy, will significantly decrease the incidence and severity of complications, improve quality of life, and increase tolerance to therapy. 49 refs.; 16 figs.; 1 table

  2. Oral complications in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, W.

    1983-01-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications

  3. Dengue-associated neuromuscular complications

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindra Kumar Garg; Hardeep Singh Malhotra; Amita Jain; Kiran Preet Malhotra

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is associated with many neurological dysfunctions. Up to 4% of dengue patients may develop neuromuscular complications. Muscle involvement can manifest with myalgias, myositis, rhabdomyolysis and hypokalemic paralysis. Diffuse myalgia is the most characteristic neurological symptom of dengue fever. Dengue-associated myositis can be of varying severity ranging from self-limiting muscle involvement to severe dengue myositis. Dengue-associated hypokalemic paralysis often has a rapidly evo...

  4. Smoking, Labor, & Delivery: It's Complicated

    Science.gov (United States)

    You probably have mixed feelings about going into labor. On one hand, bringing a new life into the world is really exciting. On the other, it can be really scary to have a baby, especially if this is your first child. Unfortunately, it can be even scarier if you smoke. Research shows that smoking during pregnancy can lead to serious complications for you and your baby during labor and delivery.

  5. Radiation-induced cerebrovascular complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Haruko; Koizumi, Nobuhiko; Nihei, Kenji; Taguchi, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Haruki.

    1982-01-01

    A 3-year-old boy with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma came to complete remission after combined chemotherapy, intrathecal methotrexate, and whole brain irradiation of 2,400 rad. Two years after diagnosis, he developed it hemiparesis. CT scan showed cerebral infarction and hydrocephalus, and angiography revealed obstruction of the left middle cerebral artery. He survived with marked neurological deficits and no relapse of lymphoma. The literature was reviewed concerning complications after radiation to the brain. (Kondo, M.)

  6. Preoperative Smoking Status and Postoperative Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Grønkjær; Eliasen, Marie; Skov-Ettrup, Lise Skrubbeltrang

    2014-01-01

    To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type.......To systematically review and summarize the evidence of an association between preoperative smoking status and postoperative complications elaborated on complication type....

  7. Postoperative Complications of Beger Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana Samejima Peternelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic pancreatitis (CP is considered an inflammatory disease that may cause varying degrees of pancreatic dysfunction. Conservative and surgical treatment options are available depending on dysfunction severity. Presentation of Case. A 36-year-old male with history of heavy alcohol consumption and diagnosed CP underwent a duodenal-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR or Beger procedure after conservative treatment failure. Refractory pain was reported on follow-up three months after surgery and postoperative imaging uncovered stones within the main pancreatic duct and intestinal dilation. The patient was subsequently subjected to another surgical procedure and intraoperative findings included protein plugs within the main pancreatic duct and pancreaticojejunal anastomosis stricture. A V-shaped enlargement and main pancreatic duct dilation in addition to the reconstruction of the previous pancreaticojejunal anastomosis were performed. The patient recovered with no further postoperative complications in the follow-up at an outpatient clinic. Discussion. Main duct and pancreaticojejunal strictures are an unusual complication of the Beger procedure but were identified intraoperatively as the cause of patient’s refractory pain and explained intraductal protein plugs accumulation. Conclusion. Patients that undergo Beger procedures should receive close outpatient clinical follow-up in order to guarantee postoperative conservative treatment success and therefore guarantee an early detection of postoperative complications.

  8. [Complications after refractive surgery abroad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, E; Kern, T; Kohnen, T

    2008-05-01

    In this article a retrospective analysis of patients presenting at a German university following refractive surgery abroad is presented. A total of 20 cases of patients who had undergone treatment between 1998 and 2006 in China (1 case), Greece (1 case), Iran (1 case), Russia (2 cases), Switzerland (1 case), Slovakia (1 case), Spain (2 cases), South Africa (3 cases), Turkey (6 cases) and the USA (2 cases) were analyzed retrospectively. The following complications were observed: epithelial ingrowth into the interface with or without melting of the flap (6 cases), corneal ectasia (2 cases), dislocation of a phakic posterior chamber intraocular lens and prolapse into the anterior chamber with endothelial cell loss (1 case), secondary increase of intraocular pressure following implantation of a phakic intraocular lens (1 case), flap-related complications following laser-in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) (2 cases), keratitis (1 case), dislocation of the complete flap (1 case), diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) grade IV (1 case), hyperopia as a consequence of radial keratotomy (1 case), and under correction/over correction and poor optical quality following laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) and LASIK for high myopia (5 cases) with possible early corneal ectasia. There are four important problems arising from refractive surgery abroad, often referred to as "LASIK tourism": wrong indications, insufficient management of complications, lack of postoperative care and the health economic aspect.

  9. Thromboembolic complications of thyroid storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, T; Benjamin, S; Cozma, L

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid storm is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of hyperthyroidism. Early recognition and prompt treatment are essential. Atrial fibrillation can occur in up to 40% of patients with thyroid storm. Studies have shown that hyperthyroidism increases the risk of thromboembolic events. There is no consensus with regard to the initiation of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation in severe thyrotoxicosis. Anticoagulation is not routinely initiated if the risk is low on a CHADS2 score; however, this should be considered in patients with thyroid storm or severe thyrotoxicosis with impending storm irrespective of the CHADS2 risk, as it appears to increase the risk of thromboembolic episodes. Herein, we describe a case of thyroid storm complicated by massive pulmonary embolism. Diagnosis of thyroid storm is based on clinical findings. Early recognition and prompt treatment could lead to a favourable outcome.Hypercoagulable state is a recognised complication of thyrotoxicosis.Atrial fibrillation is strongly associated with hyperthyroidism and thyroid storm.Anticoagulation should be considered for patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and atrial fibrillation irrespective of the CHADS2 score.Patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and clinical evidence of thrombosis should be immediately anticoagulated until hyperthyroidism is under control.

  10. Using vacuum in the treatment of surgical wounds complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Miroljub

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Using vacuum in medicine has been known from long ago, however, it has not been used for the treatment of wounds. The first experiments in this field were performed by Wagner Fleischmann, University of Ulm, Ulm, West Germany, in 1993. The aim of this study was to present our clinical experience with the treatment of surgical wounds complications in vascular patients by the use of controled vacuum. Method. In a period October 2006 - December 2009 a total of 18 patients with infection and surgical wound dehiscence were treated by the use of vacuum. Vacuum was applied to wounds by placing a polyurethane sponge on them and by fixing a polyurethane foil and a sponge to the surrounding healthy skin so to completely airtight wounds. Over a foil vacuum of - 150 mmHg was applied for a 5-day period, and on the day 6 a foil and a sponge were removed. Results. In all the 18 wounds treated by the use of vacuum secondary wound closing was achieved with no complications and with a significantly shortened time period treatment. Wound infections were healed using this method and only in 2 patients antibiotics were used at the same time. Conclusion. The use of vacuum in the treatment of operative wounds complications is an easy and reliable method contributing significantly to wounds better healing.

  11. Traumatic Rib Injury: Patterns, Imaging Pitfalls, Complications, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Brett S; Gange, Christopher P; Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Klionsky, Nina; Hobbs, Susan K; Chaturvedi, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    The ribs are frequently affected by blunt or penetrating injury to the thorax. In the emergency department setting, it is vital for the interpreting radiologist to not only identify the presence of rib injuries but also alert the clinician about organ-specific injury, specific traumatic patterns, and acute rib trauma complications that require emergent attention. Rib injuries can be separated into specific morphologic fracture patterns that include stress, buckle, nondisplaced, displaced, segmental, and pathologic fractures. Specific attention is also required for flail chest and for fractures due to pediatric nonaccidental trauma. Rib fractures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, both of which increase as the number of fractured ribs increases. Key complications associated with rib fracture include pain, hemothorax, pneumothorax, extrapleural hematoma, pulmonary contusion, pulmonary laceration, acute vascular injury, and abdominal solid-organ injury. Congenital anomalies, including supernumerary or accessory ribs, vestigial anterior ribs, bifid ribs, and synostoses, are common and should not be confused with traumatic pathologic conditions. Nontraumatic mimics of traumatic rib injury, with or without fracture, include metastatic disease, primary osseous neoplasms (osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and osteochondroma), fibrous dysplasia, and Paget disease. Principles of management include supportive and procedural methods of alleviating pain, treating complications, and stabilizing posttraumatic deformity. By recognizing and accurately reporting the imaging findings, the radiologist will add value to the care of patients with thoracic trauma. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2017.

  12. Reconstructive surgery for the complications of pelvic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bricker, E.M.; Johnston, W.D.; Kraybill, W.G.; Lopez, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Severe damage to the pelvic viscera is a complication of irradiation therapy that, unfortunately, cannot always be avoided. Resulting rectal and rectocolonic strictures, rectovaginal fistulas, and shortening and stenosis of the vagina present very difficult problems that frequently require a colostomy for relief and may permanently impair sexual function. The authors present a new approach to correction of these unfortunate lesions based on the use of proximal nonirradiated colon which serves as a vascular pedicle graft to correct the defect without a complicated and massive resection. Twenty-two such operations have been done with 19 satisfactory to excellent results and two total failures (one death from small bowel complications). All patterns and combinations of irradiation injury have been found amenable to this technique of repair. These have included both web and linear strictures with and without fistulas. In half of the patients, it was possible to make use of normal colon bypassed by a prior colostomy. Normal nonirradiated colon with good blood supply will heal satisfactorily to irradiated colon or rectum, thus making excision of all the irradiated tissue unnecessary. The results of this surgical approach have thus far been gratifying and warrant further trials for these distressing injuries

  13. Congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia: Management and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia (CPT is a rare pathology, which is usually associated with neurofibromatosis type I. The natural history of the disease is extremely unfavorable and once a fracture occurs, there is a little or no tendency for the lesion to heal spontaneously. It is challenging to treat effectively this difficult condition and its possible complications. Treatment is mainly surgical and it aims to obtain a long term bone union, to prevent limb length discrepancies, to avoid mechanical axis deviation, soft tissue lesions, nearby joint stiffness, and pathological fracture. The key to get primary union is to excise hamartomatous tissue and pathological periosteum. Age at surgery, status of fibula, associated shortening, and deformities of leg and ankle play significant role in primary union and residual challenges after primary healing. Unfortunately, none of invasive and noninvasive methods have proven their superiority. Surgical options such as intramedullary nailing, vascularized fibula graft, and external fixator, have shown equivocal success rate in achieving primary union although they are often associated with acceptable results. Amputation must be reserved for failed reconstruction, severe limb length discrepancy and gross deformities of leg and ankle. Distinct advantages, complications, and limitation of each primary treatment as well as strategies to deal with potential complications have been described. Each child with CPT must be followed up till skeletal maturity to identify and rectify residual problems after primary healing.

  14. Cirse Quality Assurance Document and Standards for Classification of Complications: The Cirse Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippiadis, D K; Binkert, C; Pellerin, O; Hoffmann, R T; Krajina, A; Pereira, P L

    2017-08-01

    Interventional radiology provides a wide variety of vascular, nonvascular, musculoskeletal, and oncologic minimally invasive techniques aimed at therapy or palliation of a broad spectrum of pathologic conditions. Outcome data for these techniques are globally evaluated by hospitals, insurance companies, and government agencies targeting in a high-quality health care policy, including reimbursement strategies. To analyze effectively the outcome of a technique, accurate reporting of complications is necessary. Throughout the literature, numerous classification systems for complications grading and classification have been reported. Until now, there has been no method for uniform reporting of complications both in terms of definition and grading. The purpose of this CIRSE guideline is to provide a classification system of complications based on combining outcome and severity of sequelae. The ultimate challenge will be the adoption of this system by practitioners in different countries and health economies within the European Union and beyond.

  15. Major intraoperative complications during video-assisted thoracoscopic anatomical lung resections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decaluwe, Herbert; Petersen, René Horsleben; Hansen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A multicentre evaluation of the frequency and nature of major intraoperative complications during video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) anatomical resections. METHODS: Six European centres submitted their series of consecutive anatomical lung resections with the intention to treat by VATS...... for technical reasons. In-hospital mortality was 1.4% (n = 43). Conversion to open thoracotomy was observed in 5.5% (n = 170), of whom 21.8% (n = 37) were for oncological reasons, 29.4% (n = 50) for technical reasons and 48.8% (n = 83) for complications. Vascular injuries were reported in 2.9% (n = 88) patients...... major surgery (n = 9) or immediate life-threatening complications (n = 17). Twenty-three percent of the in-hospital mortalities (n = 10/43) were related to major intraoperative complications. Eight pneumonectomies (five intraoperative and three postoperative at 0.3%) were a consequence of a major...

  16. [THE STATE OF HEPATIC AND SPLANCHNIC BLOOD FLOW IN VARIOUS TYPES OF COMPLICATED PANCREATIC PSEUDOCYSTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvoruchko, I A; Goncharova, N M; Andreyeshchev, S A; Yavorska, T P

    2015-05-01

    Investigations were conducted in 37 patients, suffering complicated pancreatic pseudocysts. In accordance to data of ultrasound Doppler flowmetry for the blood flow along portal vein, a. hepatis communis, a. mesenterica superior in complicated pancreatic pseudocysts compensatory--adaptive reactions on level of hepatic--spanchnic blood flow are directed towards restriction of the blood inflow through the portal vein system. This is accompanied by the common peripheral vascular resistence raising in basin of a. mesenterica superior, which have depended upon the patients' state severity, caused by reduction of the volume blood flow in a certan vascular collector. The oxygen debt of the liver in these patients is compensated by the volume blood flow enhancement along a. hepatis communis.

  17. Early and late complications in the reconstructed mandible with free fibula flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Johannes T M; Abbink, Jan H; van Es, Robert J J; Rosenberg, Antoine J W P; Koole, Ron; Van Cann, Ellen M

    2018-03-01

    Evaluation of mandibular reconstructions with free fibula flaps. Identification of factors associated with major recipient site complications, that is, necessitating surgical intervention under general anaesthesia. Seventy-nine reconstructions were included. The following factors were analyzed: fixation type, number of osteotomies, site of defect (bilateral/unilateral), surgeon, sex, ASA classification, continuous smoking, pathological N-stage, age, defect size, flap ischemic time, and postoperative radiotherapy. Proportional hazards regression was used to test the effect on the time between reconstruction and intervention. Sixty-nine (87%) of the 79 fibula flaps were successful at the last follow-up. Forty-eight major recipient site complications occurred in 41 reconstructions. Nineteen complications required surgical intervention within six weeks and were mostly vascular problems, necessitating immediate intervention. These early complications were associated with defects crossing the midline, with an estimated relative risk of 5.3 (CI 1.1-20, P = 0.01). Twenty-nine complications required surgical intervention more than 6 weeks after the reconstruction. These late complications generally occurred after months or years, and were associated with smoking, with an estimated relative risk of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3, P = 0.05). Fibula flaps crossing the midline have a higher risk of early major recipient site complications than unilateral reconstructions. Smoking increases the risk of late complications. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Surgical Oncology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Venous and arterial thrombo-embolic complications of hormonal treatment in a male-to-female transgender patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullins, G M

    2012-02-03

    We present a male-to-female (MTF) transgender patient admitted with a pulmonary embolism. The patient had been treated with high-dose oestrogens since the age of 16. Following a prolonged period of hypotension, our patient sustained cerebral border zone infarcts. There was evidence of bilateral carotid stenosis on Doppler ultrasound. We discuss the treatment and vascular complications of gender dysphoria.

  19. Closure Devices for Iatrogenic Thoraco-Cervical Vascular Injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makris, Gregory C.; Patel, Rafiuddin; Little, Mark; Tyrrell, Carina; Sutcliffe, James; Allouni, Kader; Bratby, Mark; Anthony, Susan; Uberoi, Raman

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionThe unintentional arterial placement of a central venous line can have catastrophic complications. The purpose of this systematic review is to assess and analyse the available evidence regarding the use of the various vascular closure devices (VCDs) for the management of iatrogenic thoraco-cervical arterial injuries (ITCAI).MethodsA systematic review was performed according to PRISMA guidelines.ResultsThirty-two relevant case series and case reports were identified with a total of 69 patients having being studied. In the majority of the studies, plug-based VCDs were used (81%) followed by suture-based devices (19%). The majority of studies reported successful outcomes from the use of VCDs in terms of achieving immediate haemostasis without any acute complications. Long-term follow-up data were only available in nine studies with only one case of carotid pseudoaneurysm being reported after 1-month post-procedure. All other cases had no reported long-term complications. Five studies performed direct or indirect comparisons between VCDs and other treatments (open surgery or stent grafting) suggesting no significant differences in safety or effectiveness.ConclusionAlthough there is limited evidence, VCDs appear to be safe and effective for the management of ITCAIs. Further research is warranted regarding the effectiveness of this approach in comparison to surgery and in order to identify those patients who are more likely to benefit from this minimally invasive approach.

  20. Closure Devices for Iatrogenic Thoraco-Cervical Vascular Injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makris, Gregory C., E-mail: g.makris09@doctors.org.uk; Patel, Rafiuddin; Little, Mark; Tyrrell, Carina; Sutcliffe, James; Allouni, Kader; Bratby, Mark; Anthony, Susan; Uberoi, Raman [Oxford University Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust, Interventional Radiology Department (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    IntroductionThe unintentional arterial placement of a central venous line can have catastrophic complications. The purpose of this systematic review is to assess and analyse the available evidence regarding the use of the various vascular closure devices (VCDs) for the management of iatrogenic thoraco-cervical arterial injuries (ITCAI).MethodsA systematic review was performed according to PRISMA guidelines.ResultsThirty-two relevant case series and case reports were identified with a total of 69 patients having being studied. In the majority of the studies, plug-based VCDs were used (81%) followed by suture-based devices (19%). The majority of studies reported successful outcomes from the use of VCDs in terms of achieving immediate haemostasis without any acute complications. Long-term follow-up data were only available in nine studies with only one case of carotid pseudoaneurysm being reported after 1-month post-procedure. All other cases had no reported long-term complications. Five studies performed direct or indirect comparisons between VCDs and other treatments (open surgery or stent grafting) suggesting no significant differences in safety or effectiveness.ConclusionAlthough there is limited evidence, VCDs appear to be safe and effective for the management of ITCAIs. Further research is warranted regarding the effectiveness of this approach in comparison to surgery and in order to identify those patients who are more likely to benefit from this minimally invasive approach.