WorldWideScience

Sample records for fungal nuclear positioning

  1. Position paper on maintaining nuclear competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-04-15

    The ENS Higher Scientific Council (HSC) is concerned about the current negative developments within some Member States of the EU and the consequential reduced perspectives in the field of nuclear energy technology, education, research and development. The HSC believes that the use of nuclear energy provides an essential contribution to the secure, clean and affordable energy supply for electricity generation, and that this will remain for at least the rest of this century. The HSC, therefore, strongly recommends that within the EU the resources that are allocated to nuclear education and training and to nuclear R and D reflects the increasing globalization of nuclear power and the needs of Member States that will have nuclear power or decommissioning programmes for decades to come. In addition, the HSC recommends that the nuclear industry should actively encourage the setting up of knowledge transfer mechanisms to ensure that the knowledge, know-how and experiences of the current generation of professionals within the industry is not lost to the young people entering nuclear careers. Mobility programmes to support and encourage young professionals to work across the EU to gain wider experience of nuclear power operations should be set up. These activities should help young professionals working in the nuclear technology field to expand long-life networks and business connections and thereby be better prepared for the challenges of the 21{sup st} century. (orig.)

  2. Positive peritoneal fluid fungal cultures in postoperative peritonitis after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappella, N; Desmard, M; Chochillon, C; Ribeiro-Parenti, L; Houze, S; Marmuse, J-P; Montravers, P

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative peritonitis (POP) is a common surgical complication after bariatric surgery (BS). We assessed the importance of positive fungal cultures in these cases of POP admitted to the intensive care unit. Clinical features and outcome were compared in 25 (41%) Candida-positive patients (6 (22%) fluconazole-resistant Candida glabrata) and 36 patients without Candida infection. Candida infections were more commonly isolated in late-onset peritonitis and were often associated with multidrug-resistant bacteria. Risk factors for intensive care unit mortality (19.6%) were diabetes and superobesity. Candida infections, including fluconazole-resistant strains, are common in POP after BS. These data encourage the empirical use of a broad-spectrum antifungal agent. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Position paper on nuclear proliferation issues preventing nuclear proliferation. A duty for the nuclear community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, Pierre; Bonin, Bernard [ENS High Scientific Council, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    The production of electricity from nuclear power plants is widely seen today as having an increasing role to play in meeting global energy requirements in a sustainable manner. Conscious of the inherently sensitive nature of nuclear technology and materials the ENS-HSC (European Nuclear Society - High Scientific Council) is well aware that a severe safety, security, environmental or proliferation mishap stemming from nuclear energy anywhere in the world would undermine the potential for nuclear energy to contribute to the global energy supply and the minimization of harmful carbon emissions. While the safety of nuclear power plants has continuously improved over the last three decades, the same degree of success cannot be claimed when it comes to the achievements of the international community in stemming the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation. This unfortunate situation is due to both technical and political reasons. The European nuclear industry is committed to the exclusively peaceful use of nuclear energy and to export nuclear facilities and related materials, equipment and technology solely in accordance with relevant national export laws and regulations, Nuclear Suppliers Group guidelines and pertinent United Nations Security Council Resolutions. The ENS-HSC considers that, as a manifestation of their strong commitment to nonproliferation, it is important for the nuclear industry to pay special attention to and promote proliferation-resistant designs and to take IAEA safeguards requirements into account at the design stage. Preventing nuclear proliferation is primarily the responsibility of states but, as major stakeholders, the nuclear industry and scientific community should actively support nuclear disarmament as foreseen in the Non-Proliferation Treaty and measures necessary to strengthen the non-proliferation regime, particularly the international control of the flux of nuclear material and technology. (orig.)

  4. Nucleoporin mediated nuclear positioning and silencing of HMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia J Ruben

    Full Text Available The organization of chromatin domains in the nucleus is an important factor in gene regulation. In eukaryotic nuclei, transcriptionally silenced chromatin clusters at the nuclear periphery while transcriptionally poised chromatin resides in the nuclear interior. Recent studies suggest that nuclear pore proteins (NUPs recruit loci to nuclear pores to aid in insulation of genes from silencing and during gene activation. We investigated the role of NUPs at a native yeast insulator and show that while NUPs localize to the native tDNA insulator adjacent to the silenced HMR domain, loss of pore proteins does not compromise insulation. Surprisingly we find that NUPs contribute to silencing at HMR and are able to restore silencing to a silencing-defective HMR allele when tethered to the locus. We show that the perinuclear positioning of heterochromatin is important for the NUP-mediated silencing effect and find that loss of NUPs result in decreased localization of HMR to the nuclear periphery. We also show that loss of telomeric tethering pathways does not eliminate NUP localization to HMR, suggesting that NUPs may mediate an independent pathway for HMR association with the nuclear periphery. We propose that localization of NUPs to the tDNA insulator at HMR helps maintain the intranuclear position of the silent locus, which in turn contributes to the fidelity of silencing at HMR.

  5. Nucleoporin mediated nuclear positioning and silencing of HMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, Giulia J; Kirkland, Jacob G; MacDonough, Tracy; Chen, Miao; Dubey, Rudra N; Gartenberg, Marc R; Kamakaka, Rohinton T

    2011-01-01

    The organization of chromatin domains in the nucleus is an important factor in gene regulation. In eukaryotic nuclei, transcriptionally silenced chromatin clusters at the nuclear periphery while transcriptionally poised chromatin resides in the nuclear interior. Recent studies suggest that nuclear pore proteins (NUPs) recruit loci to nuclear pores to aid in insulation of genes from silencing and during gene activation. We investigated the role of NUPs at a native yeast insulator and show that while NUPs localize to the native tDNA insulator adjacent to the silenced HMR domain, loss of pore proteins does not compromise insulation. Surprisingly we find that NUPs contribute to silencing at HMR and are able to restore silencing to a silencing-defective HMR allele when tethered to the locus. We show that the perinuclear positioning of heterochromatin is important for the NUP-mediated silencing effect and find that loss of NUPs result in decreased localization of HMR to the nuclear periphery. We also show that loss of telomeric tethering pathways does not eliminate NUP localization to HMR, suggesting that NUPs may mediate an independent pathway for HMR association with the nuclear periphery. We propose that localization of NUPs to the tDNA insulator at HMR helps maintain the intranuclear position of the silent locus, which in turn contributes to the fidelity of silencing at HMR.

  6. Clash of kingdoms or why Drosophila larvae positively respond to fungal competitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohlfs Marko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Competition with filamentous fungi has been demonstrated to be an important cause of mortality for the vast group of insects that depend on ephemeral resources (e.g. fruit, dung, carrion. Recent data suggest that the well-known aggregation of Drosophila larvae across decaying fruit yields a competitive advantage over mould, by which the larvae achieve a higher survival probability in larger groups compared with smaller ones. Feeding and locomotor behaviour of larger larval groups is assumed to cause disruption of fungal hyphae, leading to suppression of fungal growth, which in turn improves the chances of larval survival to the adult stage. Given the relationship between larval density, mould suppression and larval survival, the present study has tested whether fungal-infected food patches elicit communal foraging behaviour on mould-infected sites by which larvae might hamper mould growth more efficiently. Results Based on laboratory experiments in which Drosophila larvae were offered the choice between fungal-infected and uninfected food patches, larvae significantly aggregated on patches containing young fungal colonies. Grouping behaviour was also visible when larvae were offered only fungal-infected or only uninfected patches; however, larval aggregation was less strong under these conditions than in a heterogeneous environment (infected and uninfected patches. Conclusion Because filamentous fungi can be deadly competitors for insect larvae on ephemeral resources, social attraction of Drosophila larvae to fungal-infected sites leading to suppression of mould growth may reflect an adaptive behavioural response that increases insect larval fitness and can thus be discussed as an anti-competitor behaviour. These observations support the hypothesis that adverse environmental conditions operate in favour of social behaviour. In a search for the underlying mechanisms of communal behaviour in Drosophila, this study highlights

  7. Clash of kingdoms or why Drosophila larvae positively respond to fungal competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfs, Marko

    2005-01-27

    BACKGROUND: Competition with filamentous fungi has been demonstrated to be an important cause of mortality for the vast group of insects that depend on ephemeral resources (e.g. fruit, dung, carrion). Recent data suggest that the well-known aggregation of Drosophila larvae across decaying fruit yields a competitive advantage over mould, by which the larvae achieve a higher survival probability in larger groups compared with smaller ones. Feeding and locomotor behaviour of larger larval groups is assumed to cause disruption of fungal hyphae, leading to suppression of fungal growth, which in turn improves the chances of larval survival to the adult stage. Given the relationship between larval density, mould suppression and larval survival, the present study has tested whether fungal-infected food patches elicit communal foraging behaviour on mould-infected sites by which larvae might hamper mould growth more efficiently. RESULTS: Based on laboratory experiments in which Drosophila larvae were offered the choice between fungal-infected and uninfected food patches, larvae significantly aggregated on patches containing young fungal colonies. Grouping behaviour was also visible when larvae were offered only fungal-infected or only uninfected patches; however, larval aggregation was less strong under these conditions than in a heterogeneous environment (infected and uninfected patches). CONCLUSION: Because filamentous fungi can be deadly competitors for insect larvae on ephemeral resources, social attraction of Drosophila larvae to fungal-infected sites leading to suppression of mould growth may reflect an adaptive behavioural response that increases insect larval fitness and can thus be discussed as an anti-competitor behaviour. These observations support the hypothesis that adverse environmental conditions operate in favour of social behaviour. In a search for the underlying mechanisms of communal behaviour in Drosophila, this study highlights the necessity of

  8. Potential role of nuclear receptor ligand all-trans retinoic acids in the treatment of fungal keratitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yan; Zhou; Wei; Zhong; Hong; Zhang; Miao-Miao; Bi; Shuang; Wang; Wen-Song; Zhang

    2015-01-01

    ·Fungal keratitis(FK) is a worldwide visual impairment disease. This infectious fungus initiates the primary innate immune response and, later the adaptive immune response. The inflammatory process is related to a variety of immune cells, including macrophages, helper T cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and Treg cells, and is associated with proinflammatory, chemotactic and regulatory cytokines. All-trans retinoic acids(ATRA)have diverse immunomodulatory actions in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. These retinoids regulate the transcriptional levels of target genes through the activation of nuclear receptors.Retinoic acid receptor α(RAR α), retinoic acid receptor γ(RAR γ), and retinoid X receptor α(RXR α) are expressed in the cornea and immune cells. This paper summarizes new findings regarding ATRA in immune and inflammatory diseases and analyzes the perspective application of ATRA in FK.

  9. Potential role of nuclear receptor ligand all-trans retinoic acids in the treatment of fungal keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yan Zhou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fungal keratitis (FK is a worldwide visual impairment disease. This infectious fungus initiates the primary innate immune response and, later the adaptive immune response. The inflammatory process is related to a variety of immune cells, including macrophages, helper T cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and Treg cells, and is associated with proinflammatory, chemotactic and regulatory cytokines. All-trans retinoic acids (ATRA have diverse immunomodulatory actions in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. These retinoids regulate the transcriptional levels of target genes through the activation of nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid receptor α (RAR α, retinoic acid receptor γ (RAR γ, and retinoid X receptor α (RXR α are expressed in the cornea and immune cells. This paper summarizes new findings regarding ATRA in immune and inflammatory diseases and analyzes the perspective application of ATRA in FK.

  10. Fungal rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netkovski, J; Shirgoska, B

    2012-01-01

    Fungi are a major part of the ecosystem. In fact, over 250 fungal species have been reported to produce human infections. More than ever, fungal diseases have emerged as major challenges for physicians and clinical microbiologists. The aim of this study was to summarize the diagnostic procedures and endoscopic surgical treatment of patients with fungal rhinosinusitis. Eleven patients, i.e. 10% of all cases with chronic inflammation of paranasal sinuses, were diagnosed with fungal rhinosinusitis. Ten of them were patients with a noninvasive form, fungus ball, while only one patient was classified in the group of chronic invasive fungal rhinosinusitis which was accompanied with diabetes mellitus. All patients underwent nasal endoscopic examination, skin allergy test and had preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans of the sinuses in axial and coronal plane. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in 10 patients with fungus ball, while a combined approach, endoscopic and external, was done in the immunocompromised patient with the chronic invasive form of fungal rhinosinusitis. Most cases (9/11) had unilateral infection. In 9 cases infection was restricted to a single sinus, and here the maxillary sinus was most commonly affected (8/9) with infections in other patients being restricted to the sphenoid sinus (1/9). Two patients had infections affecting two or more sinuses. In patients with an invasive form of the fungal disease there was involvement of the periorbital and orbital tissues. In patients with fungus ball the mycelia masses were completely removed from the sinus cavities. Long-term outcome was positive in all the operated patients and no recurrence was detected. The most frequent fungal agent that caused rhinosinusitis was Aspergillus. Mucor was identified in the patient with the invasive form. Endoscopic examination of the nasal cavity and CT scanning of paranasal sinuses followed by endoscopic sinus surgery were represented as valuable

  11. Strategic position and development prospects of nuclear energy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wenquan

    2007-01-01

    By analyzing the challenges of China's energy supply, an excellent perspective of nuclear power development in the country has been described. Taking into account the near-, mid-, and long-term development requirements,a comprehensive, coordinated and sustainable nuclear power program is proposed. Thus, our national nuclear industry can not only catch up with the world's advanced level in proper time, but also possess enough stamina for sustainability.

  12. Fungal Sinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Fungal Sinusitis Fungal Sinusitis Patient Health Information News media interested ... sinusitis results. There Are Four Types Of Fungal Sinusitis: Mycetoma Fungal Sinusitis produces clumps of spores, a " ...

  13. Break of symmetry in regenerating tobacco protoplasts is independent of nuclear positioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linda Brochhausen; Jan Maisch; Peter Nick

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear migration and positioning are crucial for the morphogenesis of plant cells. We addressed the potential role of nuclear positioning for polarity induction using an experimental system based on regenerating protoplasts, where the induction of a cell axis de novo can be followed by quantification of specific regeneration stages. Using overexpression of fluorescently tagged extranuclear (perinu-clear actin basket, kinesins with a calponin homology domain (KCH)) as well as intranuclear (histone H2B) factors of nuclear positioning and time-lapse series of the early stages of regeneration, we found that nuclear position is no prerequi-site for polarity formation. However, polarity formation and nuclear migration were both modulated in the transgenic lines, indicating that both phenomena depend on factors affecting cytoskeletal tensegrity and chromatin structure. We integrated these findings into a model where retrograde signals are required for polarity induction. These signals travel via the cytoskeleton from the nucleus toward targets at the plasma membrane.

  14. Blue light-dependent nuclear positioning in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Kosei; Sakai, Tatsuya; Takagi, Shingo

    2007-09-01

    The plant nucleus changes its intracellular position not only upon cell division and cell growth but also in response to environmental stimuli such as light. We found that the nucleus takes different intracellular positions depending on blue light in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells. Under dark conditions, nuclei in mesophyll cells were positioned at the center of the bottom of cells (dark position). Under blue light at 100 mumol m(-2) s(-1), in contrast, nuclei were located along the anticlinal walls (light position). The nuclear positioning from the dark position to the light position was fully induced within a few hours of blue light illumination, and it was a reversible response. The response was also observed in epidermal cells, which have no chloroplasts, suggesting that the nucleus has the potential actively to change its position without chloroplasts. Light-dependent nuclear positioning was induced specifically by blue light at >50 mumol m(-2) s(-1). Furthermore, the response to blue light was induced in phot1 but not in phot2 and phot1phot2 mutants. Unexpectedly, we also found that nuclei as well as chloroplasts in phot2 and phot1phot2 mutants took unusual intracellular positions under both dark and light conditions. The lack of the response and the unusual positioning of nuclei and chloroplasts in the phot2 mutant were recovered by externally introducing the PHOT2 gene into the mutant. These results indicate that phot2 mediates the blue light-dependent nuclear positioning and the proper positioning of nuclei and chloroplasts. This is the first characterization of light-dependent nuclear positioning in spermatophytes.

  15. Positive nuclear expression of KLF8 might be correlated with shorter survival in gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Sung; Wu, Pei-Ru; Yeh, Ken-Tu; Yeh, Chung-Min; Shen, Ko-Hung; Chen, Chih-Jun; Soon, Maw-Soan

    2014-04-01

    Krűppel-like factor 8 (KLF8) is important in cell proliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, cell migration, and invasion. Gastric adenocarcinoma is among the leading causes of cancer-related death in the world. In this study, the clinicopathologic correlation of KLF8 expression with gastric adenocarcinoma in Taiwan was investigated. The nuclear localization of KLF8 was correlated with advanced stage (P = .008) and 3-year survival rate (P = .043). The nuclear expression of KLF8 was significantly higher in the diffused type of gastric adenocarcinoma compared with the intestinal type (P = .036). Kaplan-Meier analysis results showed that patients with positive nuclear KLF8 had significantly lower overall survival rate compared with those with negative nuclear KLF8 (P = .011). Univariate analysis results indicated that positive nuclear KLF8 expression, advanced stage, and lymph node metastasis are correlated with lower overall survival. Positive nuclear KLF8 might be correlated with lower survival in gastric adenocarcinoma patients and might be an oncogene property in gastric adenocarcinoma carcinogenesis.

  16. A Fungal Effector With Host Nuclear Localization and DNA-Binding Properties Is Required for Maize Anthracnose Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Walter A; Sanz-Martín, José M; Rech, Gabriel E; Armijos-Jaramillo, Vinicio D; Rivera, Lina P; Echeverria, María Mercedes; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Thon, Michael R; Sukno, Serenella A

    2016-02-01

    Plant pathogens have the capacity to manipulate the host immune system through the secretion of effectors. We identified 27 putative effector proteins encoded in the genome of the maize anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola that are likely to target the host's nucleus, as they simultaneously contain sequence signatures for secretion and nuclear localization. We functionally characterized one protein, identified as CgEP1. This protein is synthesized during the early stages of disease development and is necessary for anthracnose development in maize leaves, stems, and roots. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical studies confirmed that this effector targets the host's nucleus and defines a novel class of double-stranded DNA-binding protein. We show that CgEP1 arose from a gene duplication in an ancestor of a lineage of monocot-infecting Colletotrichum spp. and has undergone an intense evolution process, with evidence for episodes of positive selection. We detected CgEP1 homologs in several species of a grass-infecting lineage of Colletotrichum spp., suggesting that its function may be conserved across a large number of anthracnose pathogens. Our results demonstrate that effectors targeted to the host nucleus may be key elements for disease development and aid in the understanding of the genetic basis of anthracnose development in maize plants.

  17. Fungal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000444.htm Fungal arthritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fungal arthritis is swelling and irritation (inflammation) of a joint ...

  18. Fungal Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Fungal Meningitis Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... the brain or spinal cord. Investigation of Fungal Meningitis, 2012 In September 2012, the Centers for Disease ...

  19. Large palpable ductal carcinoma in situ is Her-2 positive with high nuclear grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monabati, Ahmad; Sokouti, Ali-Reza; Noori, Sadat Noori; Safaei, Akbar; Talei, Abd-Rasul; Omidvari, Shapoor; Azarpira, Negar

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast is a heterogeneous group with variable clinical presentation. The exact molecular mechanism is not known why some ductal carcinomas may reach to such a large size but still remains in situ. Although, molecular classification of DCIS lesions and nuclear grading are important for identification of more aggressive lesions but it is not sufficient. Our aim was to examine the expression pattern of immunohistochemical (IHC) markers of ER, PR, HER-2 in palpable DCIS lesions and compare with clinicopathological findings. Our center is referral hospital from South of Iran. Samples were obtained from fifty four patients with a diagnosis of palpable DCIS. Equivocal (2+) case in HER-2 IHC testing was more characterized by chromogenic in situ hybridization. The positive frequency of HER2, ER, and PR was 92%, 48%, and 37% respectively. Palpable DCIS lesions were significantly more HER-2 positive (92%). The DCIS cases were more likely to be of high nuclear grade (grade III) and Her-2 positive cases were more likely to be of high nuclear grade than intermediate grade. All ER negative tumors had high nuclear grade. The Her-2 positivity is suggested as the most important factor responsible for marked in situ proliferation and production of palpable mass.

  20. The presence of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with FUS-positive inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gami-Patel, Priya; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Brelstaff, Jack; Revesz, Tamas; Lashley, Tammaryn

    2016-10-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with fused in sarcoma-positive inclusions (FTLD-FUS) is a disease with unknown cause. Transportin 1 is abundantly found in FUS-positive inclusions and responsible for the nuclear import of the FET proteins of which FUS is a member. The presence of all FET proteins in pathological inclusions suggests a disturbance of transportin 1-mediated nuclear import. FUS also belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) protein family. We investigated whether hnRNP proteins are associated with FUS pathology implicating dysfunctional nuclear export in the pathogenesis of FTLD-FUS. hnRNP proteins were investigated in affected brain regions in FTLD-FUS using immunohistochemistry, biochemical analysis, and the expression analysis. We demonstrated the presence of several hnRNP proteins in pathological inclusions including neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites. The biochemical analysis revealed a shift in the location of hnRNP A1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The expression analysis revealed an increase in several hnRNP proteins in FTLD-FUS. These results implicate a wider dysregulation of movement between intracellular compartments, than mechanisms only affecting the nuclear import of FUS proteins.

  1. Animal mitochondria, positive selection and cyto-nuclear coevolution: insights from pulmonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmakelis, Aristeidis; Kotsakiozi, Panayiota; Rand, David

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonate snails have remarkably high levels of mtDNA polymorphism within species and divergence between species, making them an interesting group for the study of mutation and selection on mitochondrial genomes. The availability of sequence data from most major lineages - collected largely for studies of phylogeography - provides an opportunity to perform several tests of selection that may provide general insights into the evolutionary forces that have produced this unusual pattern. Several protein coding mtDNA datasets of pulmonates were analyzed towards this direction. Two different methods for the detection of positive selection were used, one based on phylogeny, and the other on the McDonald-Kreitman test. The cyto-nuclear coevolution hypothesis, often implicated to account for the high levels of mtDNA divergence of some organisms, was also addressed by assessing the divergence pattern exhibited by a nuclear gene. The McDonald-Kreitman test indicated multiple signs of positive selection in the mtDNA genes, but was significantly biased when sequence divergence was high. The phylogenetic method identified five mtDNA datasets as affected by positive selection. In the nuclear gene, the McDonald-Kreitman test provided no significant results, whereas the phylogenetic method identified positive selection as likely present. Overall, our findings indicate that: 1) slim support for the cyto-nuclear coevolution hypothesis is present, 2) the elevated rates of mtDNA polymorphims and divergence in pulmonates do not appear to be due to pervasive positive selection, 3) more stringent tests show that spurious positive selection is uncovered when distant taxa are compared and 4) there are significant examples of positive selection acting in some cases, so it appears that mtDNA evolution in pulmonates can escape from strict deleterious evolution suggested by the Muller's ratchet effect.

  2. Nuclear Position and Shape Deformation of Chromosome 8 Territories in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Timme

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell type specific radial positioning of chromosome territories (CTs and their sub-domains in the interphase seem to have functional relevance in non-neoplastic human nuclei, while much less is known about nuclear architecture in carcinoma cells and its development during tumor progression. We analyzed the 3D-architecture of the chromosome 8 territory (CT8 in carcinoma and corresponding non-neoplastic ductal pancreatic epithelium. Fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization (FISH with whole chromosome painting (WCP probes on sections from formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissues from six patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas was used. Radial positions and shape parameters of CT8 were analyzed by 3D-microscopy. None of the parameters showed significant inter-individual changes. CT8 was localized in the nuclear periphery in carcinoma cells and normal ductal epithelial cells. Normalized volume and surface of CT8 did not differ significantly. In contrast, the normalized roundness was significantly lower in carcinoma cells, implying an elongation of neoplastic cell nuclei. Unexpectedly, radial positioning of CT8, a dominant parameter of nuclear architecture, did not change significantly when comparing neoplastic with non-neoplastic cells. A significant deformation of CT8, however, accompanies nuclear atypia of carcinoma cells. This decreased roundness of CTs may reflect the genomic and transcriptional alterations in carcinoma.

  3. [Fungal keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, T; Sauer, A; Letscher-Bru, V; Candolfi, E

    2011-10-01

    Fungal keratitis (keratomycosis) is a rare but severe cause of infectious keratitis. Its incidence is constant, due to steroids or immunosuppressive treatments and contact lenses. Pathogens often invade corneas with chronic diseases of the ocular surface but fungal keratitis is also observed following injuries with plant foreign objects. The poor prognosis of these infections is related both to fungal virulence, decreased host defense, as well as delays in diagnosis. However, new antimycotic treatments allow better management and prognosis.

  4. Mito-nuclear co-evolution: the positive and negative sides of functional ancient mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liron; Blumberg, Amit; Barshad, Gilad; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Most cell functions are carried out by interacting factors, thus underlying the functional importance of genetic interactions between genes, termed epistasis. Epistasis could be under strong selective pressures especially in conditions where the mutation rate of one of the interacting partners notably differs from the other. Accordingly, the order of magnitude higher mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation rate as compared to the nuclear DNA (nDNA) of all tested animals, should influence systems involving mitochondrial-nuclear (mito-nuclear) interactions. Such is the case of the energy producing oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and mitochondrial translational machineries which are comprised of factors encoded by both the mtDNA and the nDNA. Additionally, the mitochondrial RNA transcription and mtDNA replication systems are operated by nDNA-encoded proteins that bind mtDNA regulatory elements. As these systems are central to cell life there is strong selection toward mito-nuclear co-evolution to maintain their function. However, it is unclear whether (A) mito-nuclear co-evolution befalls only to retain mitochondrial functions during evolution or, also, (B) serves as an adaptive tool to adjust for the evolving energetic demands as species' complexity increases. As the first step to answer these questions we discuss evidence of both negative and adaptive (positive) selection acting on the mtDNA and nDNA-encoded genes and the effect of both types of selection on mito-nuclear interacting factors. Emphasis is given to the crucial role of recurrent ancient (nodal) mutations in such selective events. We apply this point-of-view to the three available types of mito-nuclear co-evolution: protein-protein (within the OXPHOS system), protein-RNA (mainly within the mitochondrial ribosome), and protein-DNA (at the mitochondrial replication and transcription machineries).

  5. Heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential is independent of the nuclear division cycle in multinucleate fungal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenberger, John P; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2012-03-01

    In the multinucleate filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei divide asynchronously in a common cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the division cycle machinery has a limited zone of influence in the cytoplasm to promote nuclear autonomy. Mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells undergo cell cycle-specific changes in morphology and membrane potential and therefore can serve as a reporter of the cell cycle state of the cytoplasm. To evaluate if the cell cycle state of nuclei in A. gossypii can influence the adjacent cytoplasm, we tested whether local mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in A. gossypii are associated with the division state of a nearby nucleus. We found that mitochondria exhibit substantial heterogeneity in both morphology and membrane potential within a single multinucleated cell. Notably, differences in mitochondrial morphology or potential are not associated with a specific nuclear division state. Heterokaryon mutants with a mixture of nuclei with deletions of and wild type for the mitochondrial fusion/fission genes DNM1 and FZO1 exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and severe growth and sporulation defects. This dominant effect suggests that the gene products may be required locally near their expression site rather than diffusing widely in the cell. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial dynamics are essential in these large syncytial cells, yet morphology and membrane potential are independent of nuclear cycle state.

  6. Hardware and Software Complexes for Automatic Position Pipe Welding at Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Makhlin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Achievements of the E.O. Paton Electric Welding Institute in development of domestic samples of equipment with elements of adaptive control for automatic position pipe welding during assembly and repair of power units of nuclear and heat power electric stations, in shipbuilding and chemical engineering, at enterprises of oil-and-gas complex and in other branches of industry are presented.

  7. Data partitions, Bayesian analysis and phylogeny of the zygomycetous fungal family Mortierellaceae, inferred from nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Petkovits

    Full Text Available Although the fungal order Mortierellales constitutes one of the largest classical groups of Zygomycota, its phylogeny is poorly understood and no modern taxonomic revision is currently available. In the present study, 90 type and reference strains were used to infer a comprehensive phylogeny of Mortierellales from the sequence data of the complete ITS region and the LSU and SSU genes with a special attention to the monophyly of the genus Mortierella. Out of 15 alternative partitioning strategies compared on the basis of Bayes factors, the one with the highest number of partitions was found optimal (with mixture models yielding the best likelihood and tree length values, implying a higher complexity of evolutionary patterns in the ribosomal genes than generally recognized. Modeling the ITS1, 5.8S, and ITS2, loci separately improved model fit significantly as compared to treating all as one and the same partition. Further, within-partition mixture models suggests that not only the SSU, LSU and ITS regions evolve under qualitatively and/or quantitatively different constraints, but that significant heterogeneity can be found within these loci also. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that the genus Mortierella is paraphyletic with respect to the genera Dissophora, Gamsiella and Lobosporangium and the resulting phylogeny contradict previous, morphology-based sectional classification of Mortierella. Based on tree structure and phenotypic traits, we recognize 12 major clades, for which we attempt to summarize phenotypic similarities. M. longicollis is closely related to the outgroup taxon Rhizopus oryzae, suggesting that it belongs to the Mucorales. Our results demonstrate that traits used in previous classifications of the Mortierellales are highly homoplastic and that the Mortierellales is in a need of a reclassification, where new, phylogenetically informative phenotypic traits should be identified, with molecular phylogenies playing a decisive role.

  8. Position control of active magnetic levitation using sphere-shaped HTS bulk for inertial nuclear fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, K.; Riku, K.; Agatsuma, K.; Ueda, H.; Ishiyama, A.

    2008-02-01

    We have developed an active magnetic levitation system that comprises a field-cooled disk-shaped or sphere-shaped HTS bulk and multiple ring-shaped electromagnets. In this system, the levitation height of HTS bulk can be controlled by adjusting the operating current of each electromagnet individually. Further, the application of the vertical noncontact levitation system is expected due to its levitation stability without mechanical supports. We assume that this system is applied to inertial nuclear fusion. However, one of the important issues is to achieve position control with high accuracy of the fusion fuel in order to illuminate the target evenly over the entire surface. Therefore, this system is applied to the levitation and position control of a sphere-shaped superconducting capsule containing nuclear fusion fuel. In this study, we designed and constructed a position control system for the sphere-shaped HTS bulk with a diameter of 5 mm by using numerical simulation based on hybrid finite element and boundary element analysis. We then carried out the experiment of levitation height and position control characteristics of the HTS bulk in this system. With regard to position control, accuracies within 59 ?m are obtained.

  9. Arabidopsis Elongator subunit 2 positively contributes to resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Ding, Yezhang; Yao, Jin; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Colee, James; Mou, Zhonglin

    2015-09-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Elongator complex functions in diverse biological processes including salicylic acid-mediated immune response. However, how Elongator functions in jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-mediated defense is unknown. Here, we show that Elongator is required for full induction of the JA/ET defense pathway marker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) and for resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. A loss-of-function mutation in the Arabidopsis Elongator subunit 2 (ELP2) alters B. cinerea-induced transcriptome reprogramming. Interestingly, in elp2, expression of WRKY33, OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS AP2/ERF59 (ORA59), and PDF1.2 is inhibited, whereas transcription of MYC2 and its target genes is enhanced. However, overexpression of WRKY33 or ORA59 and mutation of MYC2 fail to restore PDF1.2 expression and B. cinerea resistance in elp2, suggesting that ELP2 is required for induction of not only WRKY33 and ORA59 but also PDF1.2. Moreover, elp2 is as susceptible as coronatine-insensitive1 (coi1) and ethylene-insensitive2 (ein2) to B. cinerea, indicating that ELP2 is an important player in B. cinerea resistance. Further analysis of the lesion sizes on the double mutants elp2 coi1 and elp2 ein2 and the corresponding single mutants revealed that the function of ELP2 overlaps with COI1 and is additive to EIN2 for B. cinerea resistance. Finally, basal histone acetylation levels in the coding regions of WRKY33, ORA59, and PDF1.2 are reduced in elp2 and a functional ELP2-GFP fusion protein binds to the chromatin of these genes, suggesting that constitutive ELP2-mediated histone acetylation may be required for full activation of the WRKY33/ORA59/PDF1.2 transcriptional cascade.

  10. The Prevalence of Positive Fungal Cultures in Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis in a High Altitude Region of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Hashemian

    2012-01-01

    Our data show that 25.8% of patients tested positive for the presence of fungi. The results strengthen the theory regarding the role of fungi in the pathogenesis of CRS even in areas with low humidity. Aspergillus was the most commonly isolated fungus.

  11. Fungal allergens.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Airborne fungal spores occur widely and often in far greater concentrations than pollen grains. Immunoglobulin E-specific antigens (allergens) on airborne fungal spores induce type I hypersensitivity (allergic) respiratory reactions in sensitized atopic subjects, causing rhinitis and/or asthma. The prevalence of respiratory allergy to fungi is imprecisely known but is estimated at 20 to 30% of atopic (allergy-predisposed) individuals or up to 6% of the general population. Diagnosis and immuno...

  12. Tracking the position of the underwater robot for nuclear reactor inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeo, J. W.; Kim, C. H.; Seo, Y. C.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, S. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The tracking procedure of the underwater mobile robot moving and submerging ahead to nuclear reactor vessel for visual inspection, which is required to find the foreign objects such as loose parts, is described. The yellowish underwater robot body tends to present a big contrast to boron solute cold water of nuclear reactor vessel, tinged with indigo by the Cerenkov effect. In this paper, we have found and tracked the positions of underwater mobile robot using the two color information, yellow and indigo. From the horizontal and vertical profiles analysis of the color image, the blue, green, and the gray component have the inferior signal-to-noise characteristics compared to the red component. The center coordinates extraction procedures areas follows. The first step is to segment the underwater robot body to cold water with indigo background. From the RGB color components of the entire monitoring image taken with the color CCD camera, we have selected the red color component. In the selected red image, we extracted the positions of the underwater mobile robot using the following process sequences; binarization, labelling, and centroid extraction techniques. In the experiment carried out at the Youngkwang unit 5 nuclear reactor vessel, we have tracked the center positions of the underwater robot submerged near the cold leg and the hot leg way, which is fathomed to 10m deep in depth. When the position of the robot vehicle fluctuates between the previous and the current image frame due to the flickering noise and light source, installed temporally in the bottom of the reactor vessel, we adaptively adjusted the ROI window. Adding the ROI windows of the previous frame to the current frame, and then setting up the ROI window of the next image frame, we can robustly track the positions of the underwater robot and control the target position's divergence. From these facts, we can conclude that using the red component from color camera is more efficient tracking

  13. The MAGNUM survey: positive feedback in the nuclear region of NGC 5643 suggested by MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresci, G.; Marconi, A.; Zibetti, S.; Risaliti, G.; Carniani, S.; Mannucci, F.; Gallazzi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Capetti, A.; Cicone, C.; Feruglio, C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Nagao, T.; Oliva, E.; Salvato, M.; Sani, E.; Tozzi, P.; Urrutia, T.; Venturi, G.

    2015-10-01

    We study the ionization and kinematics of the ionized gas in the nuclear region of the barred Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5643 using MUSE integral field observations in the framework of the Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope (MAGNUM) survey. The data were used to identify regions with different ionization conditions and to map the gas density and the dust extinction. We find evidence for a double-sided ionization cone, possibly collimated by a dusty structure surrounding the nucleus. At the center of the ionization cone, outflowing ionized gas is revealed as a blueshifted, asymmetric wing of the [OIII] emission line, up to projected velocity v10 ~ -450 km s-1. The outflow is also seen as a diffuse, low-luminosity radio and X-ray jet, with similar extension. The outflowing material points in the direction of two clumps characterized by prominent line emission with spectra typical of HII regions, located at the edge of the dust lane of the bar. We propose that the star formation in the clumps is due to positive feedback induced by gas compression by the nuclear outflow, providing the first candidate for outflow-induced star formation in a Seyfert-like, radio-quiet AGN. This suggests that positive feedback may be a relevant mechanism in shaping the black hole-host galaxy coevolution. This work is based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program 60.A-9339).

  14. Fungal nail infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nails - fungal infection; Onychomycosis; Infection - fungal - nails; Tinea unguium ... hair, nails, and outer skin layers. Common fungal infections include: Athlete's foot Jock itch Ringworm on the ...

  15. Fungal keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal S Tuli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sonal S TuliUniversity of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA  Clinical question: What is the most appropriate management of fungal keratitis?Results: Traditionally, topical Natamycin is the most commonly used medication for filamentous fungi while Amphotericin B is most commonly used for yeast. Voriconazole is rapidly becoming the drug of choice for all fungal keratitis because of its wide spectrum of coverage and increased penetration into the cornea.Implementation: Repeated debridement of the ulcer is recommended for the penetration of topical medications. While small, peripheral ulcers may be treated in the community, larger or central ulcers, especially if associated with signs suggestive of anterior chamber penetration should be referred to a tertiary center. Prolonged therapy for approximately four weeks is usually necessary.Keywords: fungal keratitis, keratomycosis, antifungal medications, debridement

  16. Nuclear HER4 mediates acquired resistance to trastuzumab and is associated with poor outcome in HER2 positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nafi, Siti Norasikin; Generali, Daniele; Kramer-Marek, Gabriela; Gijsen, Merel; Strina, Carla; Cappelletti, Mariarosa; Andreis, Daniele; Haider, Syed; Li, Ji-Liang; Bridges, Esther; Capala, Jacek; Ioannis, Roxanis; Harris, Adrian L; Kong, Anthony

    2014-08-15

    The role of HER4 in breast cancer is controversial and its role in relation to trastuzumab resistance remains unclear. We showed that trastuzumab treatment and its acquired resistance induced HER4 upregulation, cleavage and nuclear translocation. However, knockdown of HER4 by specific siRNAs increased trastuzumab sensitivity and reversed its resistance in HER2 positive breast cancer cells. Preventing HER4 cleavage by a γ-secretase inhibitor and inhibiting HER4 tyrosine kinase activity by neratinib decreased trastuzumab-induced HER4 nuclear translocation and enhanced trastuzumab response. There was also increased nuclear HER4 staining in the tumours from BT474 xenograft mice and human patients treated with trastuzumab. Furthermore, nuclear HER4 predicted poor clinical response to trastuzumab monotherapy in patients undergoing a window study and was shown to be an independent poor prognostic factor in HER2 positive breast cancer. Our data suggest that HER4 plays a key role in relation to trastuzumab resistance in HER2 positive breast cancer. Therefore, our study provides novel findings that HER4 activation, cleavage and nuclear translocation influence trastuzumab sensitivity and resistance in HER2 positive breast cancer. Nuclear HER4 could be a potential prognostic and predictive biomarker and understanding the role of HER4 may provide strategies to overcome trastuzumab resistance in HER2 positive breast cancer.

  17. Fungal prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniforth, Gemma L; Tuite, Mick F

    2012-01-01

    For both mammalian and fungal prion proteins, conformational templating drives the phenomenon of protein-only infectivity. The conformational conversion of a protein to its transmissible prion state is associated with changes to host cellular physiology. In mammals, this change is synonymous with disease, whereas in fungi no notable detrimental effect on the host is typically observed. Instead, fungal prions can serve as epigenetic regulators of inheritance in the form of partial loss-of-function phenotypes. In the presence of environmental challenges, the prion state [PRION(+)], with its resource for phenotypic plasticity, can be associated with a growth advantage. The growing number of yeast proteins that can switch to a heritable [PRION(+)] form represents diverse and metabolically penetrating cellular functions, suggesting that the [PRION(+)] state in yeast is a functional one, albeit rarely found in nature. In this chapter, we introduce the biochemical and genetic properties of fungal prions, many of which are shared by the mammalian prion protein PrP, and then outline the major contributions that studies on fungal prions have made to prion biology.

  18. Fungal Entomopathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal entomopathogens are important biological control agents worldwide and have been the subject of intense research for more than100 years. They exhibit both sexual and asexual reproduction and produce different types of infective propagules. Their mode of action against insects involves attachme...

  19. Position and pose detection of active camera-head in a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Yasuyo; Kita, Nobuyuki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Research Institute of Intelligent Systems, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    A method to determine the position and pose of an active camera-head by aligning a 3D model of its surrounding environment with an observed 2D image is proposed. The camera-head is mounted on a mobile robot and freely moves in a 3D space. We aim at visual feedback to correct the estimation error of its position and pose obtained from dead reckoning. Since the nuclear power plant where the robot moves about consists of many pipes without particular marks, most of features in the observed images are occluding edges of the pipes. For robustly finding 3D-2D point correspondences on the occluding edges, two-type predicted images which are calculated from the 3D environmental model by a graphics system (eg. OpenGL etc) are used as follows: 1) 3D model points which correspond to the observed occluding edges are quickly obtained from the predicted depth image; 2) The predicted intensity image is used to select only the 3D model points which are expected to appear clearly in the observed image. As a result, point correspondences between the observed image and the 3D model can be robustly found even in complicated scenes. Preliminary experiments using actual plant mock-up have shown that the method is promising. (author)

  20. Regulation of β-catenin nuclear dynamics by GSK-3β involves a LEF-1 positive feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Cara; Sharma, Manisha; Henderson, Beric R

    2011-08-01

    Nuclear localization of β-catenin is integral to its role in Wnt signaling and cancer. Cellular stimulation by Wnt or lithium chloride (LiCl) inactivates glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), causing nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and transactivation of genes that transform cells. β-catenin is a shuttling protein; however, the mechanism by which GSK-3β regulates β-catenin nuclear dynamics is poorly understood. Here, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays were used to measure the β-catenin-green fluorescent protein dynamics in NIH 3T3 cells before and after GSK-3β inhibition. We show for the first time that LiCl and Wnt3a cause a specific increase in β-catenin nuclear retention in live cells and in fixed cells after detergent extraction. Moreover, LiCl reduced the rate of nuclear export but did not affect import, hence biasing β-catenin transport toward the nucleus. Interestingly, the S45A mutation, which blocks β-catenin phosphorylation by GSK-3β, did not alter nuclear retention or transport, implying that GSK-3β acts through an independent regulator. We compared five nuclear binding partners and identified LEF-1 as the key mediator of Wnt3a and LiCl-induced nuclear retention of β-catenin. Thus, Wnt stimulation triggered a LEF-1 positive feedback loop to enhance the nuclear chromatin-retained pool of β-catenin by 100-300%. These findings shed new light on regulation of β-catenin nuclear dynamics.

  1. [Clinically documented fungal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakeya, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2008-12-01

    Proven fungal infections are diagnosed by histological/microbiological evidence of fungi at the site of infection and positive blood culture (fungemia). However, invasive diagnosing examinations are not always applied for all of immunocompromised patients. Clinically documented invasive fungal infections are diagnosed by typical radiological findings such as halo sign on chest CT plus positive serological/molecular evidence of fungi. Serological tests of Aspergillus galactomannan antigen and beta-glucan for aspergillosis and cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan antigen for cryptococcosis are useful. Hence, none of reliable serological tests for zygomycosis are available so far. In this article, risk factors, sign and symptoms, and diagnostic methods for clinically documented cases of invasive aspergillosis, pulmonary cryptococcosis, and zygomycosis with diabates, are reviewed.

  2. Ultrastructural study of nuclear inclusions immunohistochemically positive for surfactant protein A in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with special reference to their morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shu-Hui; Ohtsuki, Yuji; Nonami, Yoshiki; Sasaguri, Shiro; Fujita, Jiro; Uomoto, Masashi; Tao, Fu-Shan; Kobayashi, Makoto; Furihata, Mutsuo

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the fine-structural nature of nuclear inclusions immunopositive for surfactant protein A (SP-A) antibody staining, a detailed ultrastructural study was performed, as well as immunohistochemical examination of pulmonary adenocarcinomas. Surgically resected tumor specimens from 31 patients were examined by immunohistochemistry focused on reactivity to SP-A and thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) antibodies. Only cases with >5% positive nuclear inclusions in cancer cells were considered positive, some of which were examined by electron microscopy. Immunohistochemically, 6 of 31 cases were doubly positive for SP-A and TTF-1 antibodies. On electron microscopy, SP-A-positive nuclei contained diffuse or globular fine granular substance as inclusions. Both types of globular and diffuse inclusions were sometimes connected to the inner nuclear membrane, in association with fragmented or stacked membranous structures. The findings of this study suggested that nuclear inclusions positive for SP-A antibody staining in adenocarcinomas of the lung were derived from accumulated content in the perinuclear cistern resembling pseudoinclusion processes and composed of proteins antigenically cross-reactive with SP-A.

  3. Systematic positions of Lamiophiomis and Paraphlomis (Lamiaceae) based on nuclear and chloroplast sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Zhi PAN; Li-Qin FANG; Gang HAO; Jie CAI; Xun GONG

    2009-01-01

    Genera Lamiophlomis and Paraphlomis were originally separated from genus Phlomis s.l. on the basis of particular morphological characteristics. However, their relationship was highly contentious, as evidenced by the literature. In the present paper, the systematic positions of Lamiophlomis, Paraphlomis, and their related genera were assessed based on nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and chloroplast rpl16 and trnL-F sequence data using maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian methods. In total, 24 species representing six genera of the ingroup and outgroup were sampled. Analyses of both separate and combined sequence data were conducted to resolve the systematic relationships of these genera. The results reveal that Lamiophlomis is nested within Phlomis sect. Phlomoides and its genetic status is not supported. With the inclusion of Lamiophlomis rotata in sect. Phlomoides, sections Phlomis and Phlomoides of Phlomis were resolved as monophyletic. Paraphlomis was supported as an inde-pendent genus. However, the resolution of its monophyly conflicted between MP and Bayesian analyses, suggesting the need for expended sampling and further evidence.

  4. The orphan nuclear receptor SHP is a positive regulator of osteoblastic bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byung-Chul; Lee, Yong-Soo; Bae, In-Ho; Lee, Chul-Ho; Shin, Hong-In; Ha, Hyun Jung; Franceschi, Renny T; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Koh, Jeong-Tae

    2010-02-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP; NR0B2) interacts with a diverse array of transcription factors and regulates a variety of cellular events such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. However, the role of SHP in bone formation has not yet been elucidated. SHP expression is significantly increased during osteoblast differentiation, and its expression is partially regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), which plays an important role in bone formation. In our study, inhibition of SHP expression significantly repressed BMP-2-induced osteoblast differentiation and ectopic bone formation. In accordance with these in vitro and in vivo results, osteoblast differentiation in SHP(-/-) mice primary osteoblasts was significantly repressed, and the mice showed decreased bone mass resulting from decreased numbers of osteoblasts. Finally, SHP physically interacts and forms a complex with runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) on the osteocalcin gene promoter, and overexpression of SHP increased Runx2 transactivity via competition with histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4), an enzyme that inhibits DNA binding of Runx2 to its target genes. Taken together, these results indicate that SHP acts as a novel positive regulator of bone formation by augmenting osteoblast differentiation through regulation of the transcriptional activity of Runx2.

  5. A case of anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 antibody positive myopathy associated with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shin; Unoda, Ki-Ichi; Nakajima, Hideto; Ikeda, Soichiro; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-08-31

    Myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) are associated with myositis. Anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 (NXP-2) antibody was recently identified as a major MSA and was observed mostly in juvenile dermatomyositis. We report the case of a 44-year-old man who presented with myopathy with anti-NXP-2 antibody and large cell carcinoma of the lung. He was hospitalized because of myalgia and edema of limbs. Neurological examination revealed mild proximal-dominant weakness in all four extremities, and laboratory studies showed elevated creatine kinase level (6,432 IU/l). Needle electromyography showed myogenic patterns. MRI of the lower limbs demonstrated inflammatory lesions in the thighs. Biopsied specimen from the left quadriceps femoris muscle showed mild mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate surrounding muscle fibres but no fiber necrosis. He was diagnosed with myopathy based on neurological examinations and clinical symptoms. His chest X-ray and CT showed tumor shadow on the right upper lung field, but CT didn't indicate the findings of interstitial lung disease. This was surgically removed, and a histological diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer was suspected. He was also treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy before and after operation. His symptoms of myopathy promptly remitted with the preoperative chemotherapy. His serum analysis was positive for the anti-NXP-2. Further investigation and experience of MSAs are necessary to evaluate the therapeutic strategy against cancer-associated myopathy/myositis.

  6. Tau-positive nuclear indentations in P301S tauopathy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Nogales, Marta; Santos-Galindo, María; Merchán-Rubira, Jesús; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M; Rábano, Alberto; Ferrer, Isidro; Avila, Jesús; Hernández, Félix; Lucas, José J

    2016-06-24

    Increased incidence of neuronal nuclear indentations is a well-known feature of the striatum of Huntington's disease (HD) brains and, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuronal nuclear indentations have recently been reported to correlate with neurotoxicity caused by improper cytoskeletal/nucleoskeletal coupling. Initial detection of rod-shaped tau immunostaining in nuclei of cortical and striatal neurons of HD brains and in hippocampal neurons of early Braak stage AD led us to coin the term "tau nuclear rods (TNRs)." Although TNRs traverse nuclear space, they in fact occupy narrow cytoplasmic extensions that fill indentations of the nuclear envelope and we will here refer to this histological hallmark as Tau-immunopositive nuclear indentations (TNIs). We reasoned that TNI formation is likely secondary to tau alterations as TNI detection in HD correlates with an increase in total tau, particularly of the isoforms with four tubulin binding repeats (4R-tau). Here we analyze transgenic mice that overexpress human 4R-tau with a frontotemporal lobar degeneration-tau point mutation (P301S mice) to explore whether tau alteration is sufficient for TNI formation. Immunohistochemistry with various tau antibodies, immunoelectron microscopy and double tau-immunofluorescence/DAPI-nuclear counterstaining confirmed that excess 4R-tau in P301S mice is sufficient for the detection of abundant TNIs that fill nuclear indentations. Interestingly, this does not correlate with an increase in the number of nuclear indentations, thus suggesting that excess total tau or an isoform imbalance in favor of 4R-tau facilitates tau detection inside preexisting nuclear indentations but does not induce formation of the latter. In summary, here we demonstrate that tau alteration is sufficient for TNI detection and our results suggest that the neuropathological finding of TNIs becomes a possible indicator of increased total tau and/or increased 4R/3R-tau ratio in the affected neurons apart from being an

  7. Initial Position, Personal Control, and Attributional Augmentation of Persuasive Communication on Nuclear Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, John H.; Shaver, Kelly G.

    The effectiveness of two alternative attitude change strategies--a traditional persuasive strategy and a combined attributional/persuasive strategy--in altering attitudes toward nuclear disarmament were compared. Seventeen male and 39 female undergraduate students at a small university participated. A nuclear disarmament attitude pretest was…

  8. Fungal Eye Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment & Outcomes Statistics More Resources Fungal Nail Infections Histoplasmosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & ... CDC at Work Global Fungal Diseases Cryptococcal Meningitis Histoplasmosis ... Resistance Resources Laboratory Submission Information Reportable Fungal ...

  9. Bicaudal D2, dynein, and kinesin-1 associate with nuclear pore complexes and regulate centrosome and nuclear positioning during mitotic entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël Splinter

    Full Text Available BICD2 is one of the two mammalian homologues of the Drosophila Bicaudal D, an evolutionarily conserved adaptor between microtubule motors and their cargo that was previously shown to link vesicles and mRNP complexes to the dynein motor. Here, we identified a G2-specific role for BICD2 in the relative positioning of the nucleus and centrosomes in dividing cells. By combining mass spectrometry, biochemical and cell biological approaches, we show that the nuclear pore complex (NPC component RanBP2 directly binds to BICD2 and recruits it to NPCs specifically in G2 phase of the cell cycle. BICD2, in turn, recruits dynein-dynactin to NPCs and as such is needed to keep centrosomes closely tethered to the nucleus prior to mitotic entry. When dynein function is suppressed by RNA interference-mediated depletion or antibody microinjection, centrosomes and nuclei are actively pushed apart in late G2 and we show that this is due to the action of kinesin-1. Surprisingly, depletion of BICD2 inhibits both dynein and kinesin-1-dependent movements of the nucleus and cytoplasmic NPCs, demonstrating that BICD2 is needed not only for the dynein function at the nuclear pores but also for the antagonistic activity of kinesin-1. Our study demonstrates that the nucleus is subject to opposing activities of dynein and kinesin-1 motors and that BICD2 contributes to nuclear and centrosomal positioning prior to mitotic entry through regulation of both dynein and kinesin-1.

  10. Positioning nuclear spins in interacting clusters for quantum technologies and bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Haase, Jan F.; Casanova, Jorge; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a method to measure the hyperfine vectors between a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center and an environment of interacting nuclear spins. Our protocol enables the generation of tunable electron-nuclear coupling Hamiltonians while suppressing unwanted internuclear interactions. In this manner, each nucleus can be addressed and controlled individually, thereby permitting the reconstruction of the individual hyperfine vectors. With this ability the three-dimensional (3D) structure of spin ensembles and spins in biomolecules can be identified without the necessity of varying the direction of applied magnetic fields. We demonstrate examples including the complete reconstruction of an interacting spin cluster in diamond and 3D imaging of all the nuclear spins in a biomolecule.

  11. Reporting nuclear cardiology: a joint position paper by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Hacker, Marcus; Verberne, Hein J; Edenbrandt, Lars; Delgado, Victoria; Donal, Erwan; Edvardsen, Thor; Galderisi, Maurizio; Habib, Gilbert; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Nieman, Koen; Rosenhek, Raphael; Agostini, Denis; Gimelli, Alessia; Lindner, Oliver; Slart, Riemert; Ubleis, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    The report of an imaging procedure is a critical component of an examination, being the final and often the only communication from the interpreting physician to the referring or treating physician. Very limited evidence and few recommendations or guidelines on reporting imaging studies are available; therefore, an European position statement on how to report nuclear cardiology might be useful. The current paper combines the limited existing evidence with expert consensus, previously published recommendations as well as current clinical practices. For all the applications discussed in this paper (myocardial perfusion, viability, innervation, and function as acquired by single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography or hybrid imaging), headings cover laboratory and patient demographics, clinical indication, tracer administration and image acquisition, findings, and conclusion of the report. The statement also discusses recommended terminology in nuclear cardiology, image display, and preliminary reports. It is hoped that this statement may lead to more attention to create well-written and standardized nuclear cardiology reports and eventually lead to improved clinical outcome.

  12. Syringe shape and positioning relative to efficiency volume inside dose calibrators and its role in nuclear medicine quality assurance programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, J.A.M. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: a.miranda@portugalmail.pt; Carrasco, M.F. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Lencart, J. [Servico de Fisica Medica, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal); Bastos, A.L. [Servico de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, E.P.E., Rua Dr. Antonio Bernardino de Almeida, 4200072 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-06-15

    A careful analysis of geometry and source positioning influence in the activity measurement outcome of a nuclear medicine dose calibrator is presented for {sup 99m}Tc. The implementation of a quasi-point source apparent activity curve measurement is proposed for an accurate correction of the activity inside several syringes, and compared with a theoretical geometric efficiency model. Additionally, new geometrical parameters are proposed to test and verify the correct positioning of the syringes as part of acceptance testing and quality control procedures.

  13. Regulation of Nuclear Positioning and Dynamics of the Silent Mating Type Loci by the Yeast Ku70/Ku80 Complex▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystricky, Kerstin; Van Attikum, Haico; Montiel, Maria-Dolores; Dion, Vincent; Gehlen, Lutz; Gasser, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    We have examined the hypothesis that the highly selective recombination of an active mating type locus (MAT) with either HMLα or HMRa is facilitated by the spatial positioning of relevant sequences within the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nucleus. However, both position relative to the nuclear envelope (NE) and the subnuclear mobility of fluorescently tagged MAT, HML, or HMR loci are largely identical in haploid a and α cells. Irrespective of mating type, the expressed MAT locus is highly mobile within the nuclear lumen, while silent loci move less and are found preferentially near the NE. The perinuclear positions of HMR and HML are strongly compromised in strains lacking the Silent information regulator, Sir4. However, HMLα, unlike HMRa and most telomeres, shows increased NE association in a strain lacking yeast Ku70 (yKu70). Intriguingly, we find that the yKu complex is associated with HML and HMR sequences in a mating-type-specific manner. Its abundance decreases at the HMLα donor locus and increases transiently at MATa following DSB induction. Our data suggest that mating-type-specific binding of yKu to HMLα creates a local chromatin structure competent for recombination, which cooperates with the recombination enhancer to direct donor choice for gene conversion of the MATa locus. PMID:19047366

  14. Microbiological diagnostics of fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Girmenia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory tests for the detection of fungal infections are easy to perform. The main obstacle to a correct diagnosis is the correlation between the laboratory findings and the clinical diagnosis. Among pediatric patients, the most common fungal pathogen is Candida. The detection of fungal colonization may be performed through the use of chromogenic culture media, which allows also the identification of Candida subspecies, from which pathogenicity depends. In neonatology, thistest often drives the decision to begin a empiric therapy; in this regard, a close cooperation between microbiologists and clinicians is highly recommended. Blood culture, if positive, is a strong confirmation of fungal infection; however, its low sensitivity results in a high percentage of false negatives, thus decreasing its reliability. Molecular diagnostics is still under evaluation, whereas the detection of some fungal antigens, such as β-D-glucan, galactomannan, mannoprotein, and cryptococcal antigen in the serum is used for adults, but still under evaluations for pediatric patients.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i1S.862

  15. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flotats, Albert; Gutberlet, Matthias; Knuuti, Juhani

    2011-01-01

    . The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients...

  16. Position paper nuclear cardiology: Update 2008. State-of-the-art of scintigraphic methods; Positionspapier Nuklearkardiologie: Update 2008. Aktueller Stand der szintigraphischen Methodik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefers, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Bengel, F. [Johns Hopkins Univ. Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States). Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine; Buell, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (DE). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin] (and others)

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology is well established in clinical diagnostic algorithms for many years. This is an update 2008 of the first common position paper of the German Association of Nuclear Medicine and the German Association of Cardiology, Heart and Circulation Research published in 2001 aiming at an overview of state-of-the-art scintigraphic methods.

  17. A positive anti-nuclear antibody result does not contraindicate living kidney donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C C; Goh, A

    2013-05-01

    Autoantibodies may precede the clinical onset of disease in up to two-thirds of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). There is thus concern that antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity in living kidney donors may eventuate in development of lupus nephritis post-uninephrectomy. Post-uninephrectomy, we routinely examine living kidney donors at 6 weeks, 6 months, 12 months, and annually thereafter. We performed a retrospective review of living kidney donors who had undergone uninephrectomy between July 1, 1999, and December 1, 2008. Data were collected for pre- and post-uninephrectomy renal function, proteinuria, hematuria, ANA, and anti-double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (anti-dsDNA) antibodies. Among 68 living donor uninephrectomies performed during the study period, we excluded patients with no pre- uninephrectomy ANA or defaulted postoperative follow-up (n = 2). Twelve (18.2%) living donors were ANA-positive (M:F = 4:8) with a median titer of 1:100 (range, 1:100-1:800); 1 was transiently anti-dsDNA-positive. There were no significant differences between ANA-positive and ANA-negative donors in baseline demographics or pre-uninephrectomy creatinine clearance (median 108.0, range 79-179 mL/min vs. 106, range 58-172 mL/min, P = NS). Only 1 ANA-positive patient displayed transient microscopic hematuria (8 red blood cells); none had proteinuria pre-nephrectomy. Median follow-up was 63.5 (range, 21.2-139.3) months. At last clinic review, none of the ANA-positive donors had developed clinical symptoms or signs of SLE. Comparing ANA-positive and ANA-negative live donors at 5 years post-uninephrectomy, there were no significant differences in creatinine clearance (median 86.5, range 67-112 mL/min vs. 85.0, range 35-154 mL/min, P = NS), total urine protein (median 0, range 0-0.196 g/24 h vs 0, range 0-0.190 g/24 h, P = NS), or presence of hematuria (16.7% vs 33.3%, P = NS). Isolated ANA positivity does not contraindicate living kidney donation. Up to 5 years

  18. Nuclear localization and cytosolic overexpression of LASP-1 correlates with tumor size and nodal-positivity of human breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietl Johannes

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP-1, initially identified from human breast cancer, is a specific focal adhesion protein involved in cell proliferation and migration, which was reported to be overexpressed in 8–12 % of human breast cancers and thought to be exclusively located in cytoplasm. Methods In the present work we analyzed the cellular and histological expression pattern of LASP-1 and its involvement in biological behavior of human breast cancer through correlation with standard clinicopathological parameters and expression of c-erbB2 (HER-2/neu, estrogen- (ER and progesterone-receptors (PR. For this purpose immunohistochemical staining intensity and percentage of stained cells were semi-quantitatively rated to define a LASP-1 immunoreactive score (LASP-1-IRS. LASP-1-IRS was determined in 83 cases of invasive ductal breast carcinomas, 25 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS and 18 fibroadenomas. Cellular LASP-1 distribution and expression pattern was visualized by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy and assessed through separate Western blots of nuclear and cytosol preparations of BT-20, MCF-7, MDA-MB231, and ZR-75/1 breast cancer cells. Results Statistical analysis revealed that the resulting LASP-1-IRS was significantly higher in invasive carcinomas compared to fibroadenomas (p = 0.0176. Strong cytoplasmatic expression of LASP-1 was detected in 55.4 % of the invasive carcinomas, which correlated significantly with nuclear LASP-1-positivity (p = 0.0014, increased tumor size (p = 0.0159 and rate of nodal-positivity (p = 0.0066. However, levels of LASP-1 expression did not correlate with average age at time point of diagnosis, histological tumor grading, c-erbB2-, ER- or PR-expression. Increased nuclear localization and cytosolic expression of LASP-1 was found in breast cancer with higher tumor stage as well as in rapidly proliferating epidermal basal cells. Confocal microscopy and separate Western blots of cytosolic and

  19. Entomopathogenic fungal endophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal endophytes are quite common in nature and some of them have been shown to have adverse effects against insects, nematodes, and plant pathogens. An introduction to fungal endophytes will be presented, followed by a discussion of research aimed at introducing Beauveria bassiana as a fungal endo...

  20. The MAGNUM survey: Positive feedback in the nuclear region of NGC 5643 suggested by MUSE

    CERN Document Server

    Cresci, G; Zibetti, S; Risaliti, G; Carniani, S; Mannucci, F; Gallazzi, A; Maiolino, R; Balmaverde, B; Brusa, M; Capetti, A; Cicone, C; Feruglio, C; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Nagao, T; Oliva, E; Salvato, M; Sani, E; Tozzi, P; Urrutia, T; Venturi, G

    2015-01-01

    We study the ionization and kinematics of the ionized gas in the nuclear region of the barred Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC~5643 using MUSE integral field observations in the framework of the MAGNUM (Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope) survey. The data were used to identify regions with different ionization conditions and to map the gas density and the dust extinction. We find evidence for a double sided ionization cone, possibly collimated by a dusty structure surrounding the nucleus. At the center of the ionization cone, outflowing ionized gas is revealed as a blueshifted, asymmetric wing of the [OIII] emission line, up to projected velocity v(10)~-450 km/s. The outflow is also seen as a diffuse, low luminosity radio and X-ray jet, with similar extension. The outflowing material points in the direction of two clumps characterized by prominent line emission with spectra typical of HII regions, located at the edge of the dust lane of the bar. We propose that the star formation in the clumps is due ...

  1. Recurrence of meningiomas versus proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positivity and AgNOR counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, E; Yilmaz, F; Ovül, I; Oner, K

    1996-01-01

    Meningiomas have a wide range of biological potential and clinical behaviour. Histological findings are helpful in recognizing the malignant potential but often fail to correlate with clinical behaviour. This study attempts to correlate the silver nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) with clinicopathological features of biological activity. Thirty-four completely resected meningiomas were classified as benign [19], atypical [6] and malignant [9]. Forty-eight initial and recurrent tumour materials were investigated for staining of AgNORs and immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against PCNA (clone 19A2 and PC10). There were no difference between the recurrent and non-recurrent cases with regards to AgNOR, PC10 and 19A2 values. Also, no significant difference was found between the primary and recurrent tumours. Both PC10 and 19A2 labelling indices (LI) showed a significant difference between benign and malignant meningiomas. The 19A2 LI was 0.56 +/- 0.21 in benign and 2.45 +/- 16 in atypical meningiomas. The 19 A2 counts showed significant difference between benign and atypical tumours but PC10 values failed to show such a correlation AgNOR and PCNA indices were not found to be useful in predicting recurrences compared to the surgical procedure and histopathological criteria.

  2. Intermediate Energies for Nuclear Astrophysics and the Development of a Position Sensitive Microstrip Detector System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobotka, Lee G. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Blackmon, J. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Bertulani, C. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-12-30

    The chemical elements are made at astrophysical sites through a sequence of nuclear reactions often involving unstable nuclei. The overarching aim of this project is to construct a system that allows for the inverse process of nucleosynthesis (i.e. breakup of heavier nuclei into lighter ones) to be studied in high efficiency. The specific problem to be overcome with this grant is inadequate dynamic range and (triggering) threshold to detect the products of the breakup which include both heavy ions (with large energy and large deposited energy in a detector system) and protons (with little energy and deposited energy.) Early on in the grant we provided both TAMU and RIKEN (the site of the eventual experiments) with working systems based on the existing technology. This technology could be used with either an external preamplifier that was to be designed and fabricated by our RIKEN collaborators or upgraded by replacing the existing chip with one we designed. The RIKEN external preamplifier project never can to completion but our revised chip was designed, fabricated, used in a test experiment and performs as required.

  3. Comparison on the sensitivity of laboratory diagnosis technology in the diagnosis of fungal keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Fei Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the correlation and clinical significance of fungal smear, fungal culture and pathological examination in the diagnosis of fungalkeratitis. METHODS:One hundred and ten cases(110 eyeswith fungal keratitis from January 2012 to December 2014 were collected. The results of fungal smear, fungal culture and pathological examination results were analyzed retrospectively. Fungal smear was detected by 10% KOH wet microscopy and gram staining microscopy. Fungal culture was used potato dextrose agar(PDAmedium. The specimens of pathological examination were from corneal transplantation surgery. paraffin section, HE and hexamine silver and PAS staining was used in the pathological examination. RESULTS:Of the 110 cases of fungal keratitis, fungal smear positive were observed in 50 cases(45.5%, fungal culture positive were observed in 55 cases(50.0%; pathological examination positive were observed in 88 cases(80.0%. Fifty cases were both fungal smear and pathological examination positive and 22 cases were both fungal smear and pathological examination negative. The coincidence rate of fungal smear and pathologic examination was 65.5%. Fifty-five cases were both fungal culture and pathological examination positive and 22 cases were both fungal culture and pathological examination negative. The coincidence rate of fungal culture and pathologic examination was 70.0%. In the 60 cases of fungal smear negative results, 38 cases(63.3%were confirmed positive through pathological examination. In the 55 cases of fungus culture negative results, 33 cases(60.0%were confirmed positive by pathological examination. CONCLUSION:The accuracy of pathological examination is the highest. The combined application of fungal smear, fungal culture and pathological examination can improve the diagnostic accuracy of fungal keratitis.

  4. Meeting report : fungal its workshop (october 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bates, Scott T; Ahrendt, Steven; Bik, Holly M; Bruns, Thomas D; Caporaso, J Gregory; Cole, James; Dwan, Michael; Fierer, Noah; Gu, Dai; Houston, Shawn; Knight, Rob; Leff, Jon; Lewis, Christopher; Maestre, Juan P; McDonald, Daniel; Nilsson, R Henrik; Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Robert, Vincent; Schoch, Conrad; Scott, James; Taylor, D Lee; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Stajich, Jason E

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes a meeting held in Boulder, CO USA (19-20 October 2012) on fungal community analyses using ultra-high-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. The meeting was organized as a two-day workshop, with the prima

  5. Meeting report : fungal its workshop (october 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bates, Scott T; Ahrendt, Steven; Bik, Holly M; Bruns, Thomas D; Caporaso, J Gregory; Cole, James; Dwan, Michael; Fierer, Noah; Gu, Dai; Houston, Shawn; Knight, Rob; Leff, Jon; Lewis, Christopher; Maestre, Juan P; McDonald, Daniel; Nilsson, R Henrik; Porras-Alfaro, Andrea; Robert, Vincent; Schoch, Conrad; Scott, James; Taylor, D Lee; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Stajich, Jason E

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes a meeting held in Boulder, CO USA (19-20 October 2012) on fungal community analyses using ultra-high-throughput sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes. The meeting was organized as a two-day workshop, with the

  6. Exposure to positively- and negatively-charged plasma cluster ions impairs IgE-binding capacity of indoor cat and fungal allergens

    OpenAIRE

    NISHIKAWA, Kazuo; Fujimura, Takashi; Ota, Yasuhiro; Abe, Takuya; ElRamlawy, Kareem Gamal; Nakano, Miyako; Takado, Tomoaki; Uenishi, Akira; Kawazoe, Hidechika; Sekoguchi, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Akihiko; Ono, Kazuhisa; Kawamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental control to reduce the amount of allergens in a living place is thought to be important to avoid sensitization to airborne allergens. However, efficacy of environmental control on inactivation of airborne allergens is not fully investigated. We have previously reported that positively- and negatively-charged plasma cluster ions (PC-ions) reduce the IgE-binding capacity of crude allergens from Japanese cedar pollen as important seasonal airborne allergens. Cat (Felis do...

  7. Freshwater Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Baumgardner

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections as a result of freshwater exposure or trauma are fortunately rare. Etiologic agents are varied, but commonly include filamentous fungi and Candida. This narrative review describes various sources of potential freshwater fungal exposure and the diseases that may result, including fungal keratitis, acute otitis externa and tinea pedis, as well as rare deep soft tissue or bone infections and pulmonary or central nervous system infections following traumatic freshwater exposure during natural disasters or near-drowning episodes. Fungal etiology should be suspected in appropriate scenarios when bacterial cultures or molecular tests are normal or when the infection worsens or fails to resolve with appropriate antibacterial therapy.

  8. Fungal genome sequencing: basic biology to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-08-01

    The genome sequences provide a first glimpse into the genomic basis of the biological diversity of filamentous fungi and yeast. The genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a small genome size, unicellular growth, and rich history of genetic and molecular analyses was a milestone of early genomics in the 1990s. The subsequent completion of fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and genetic model, Neurospora crassa initiated a revolution in the genomics of the fungal kingdom. In due course of time, a substantial number of fungal genomes have been sequenced and publicly released, representing the widest sampling of genomes from any eukaryotic kingdom. An ambitious genome-sequencing program provides a wealth of data on metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into medical science, agriculture science, ecology, bioremediation, bioenergy, and the biotechnology industry. Fungal genomics have higher potential to positively affect human health, environmental health, and the planet's stored energy. With a significant increase in sequenced fungal genomes, the known diversity of genes encoding organic acids, antibiotics, enzymes, and their pathways has increased exponentially. Currently, over a hundred fungal genome sequences are publicly available; however, no inclusive review has been published. This review is an initiative to address the significance of the fungal genome-sequencing program and provides the road map for basic and applied research.

  9. Isolated secondary fungal infections of pleural cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makbule Ergin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Pleural fungal infections are rare, but the incidence has been increasing with immunosuppressant diseases and use of immunosuppressive medications. In this report, we present 6 patients with pleural effusions that have been determined fungal infection. Methods: The medical records of patients with followed and treated due to fungal infection of the pleural were retrospectively reviewed. Result: The 6 cases whom was 58 of the value median for age were treated as surgical and medical due to fungal infection of the pleural cavity. Dyspnea, cough and chest pain were the most common symptoms. Fever, night sweats and expectoration are relatively rare. In 4 patients, the infections of pleural cavity developed on the bases of rheumatoid arthritis, tuberculosis, pleural mesothelioma and esophagopleural fistula. In two patients had isolated fungal infections. Cultural positivity was seen in 5 patients. Fungal hyphae were determined by cytopathology in all of the patients. As a surgical procedure, all of the patients underwent decortication or pleural biopsy and pleural irrigation. In all patients, antifungal agents were added to surgical procedures. Full recovery of infection was seen in 5 patients. One patient died. Conclusion: In immunosuppressive patients, the incidence of pleural effusions due to or associated with fungal infections are more common. Addition to culture of pleural fluid, histopathological evaluation of pleura will aid diagnosis. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 443-446

  10. Etiological Analysis of Fungal Keratitis and Rapid Identification of Predominant Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dan; Hao, Jilong; Gao, Song; Wan, Xue; Wang, Wanting; Shan, Qiushi; Wang, Li

    2016-02-01

    Fungal keratitis is a worldwide-distributed refractory and potentially blinding ocular infection caused by various fungi. It is necessary to investigate the etiological and epidemiological characteristics of this disease and establish a rapid and specific pathogenic identification method. Here, we isolated and identified fungal pathogens of 275 patients with presumed fungal keratitis from Jilin Province, China, and conducted statistical analyses of epidemiological information. The positive rate of fungal culture was 72.0 %. Fusarium sp. was the most common genus among 210 fungal isolates. The predominant species were Fusarium solani, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Candida glabrata, which accounted for over 50 % of the isolated organisms. Corneal trauma and previous use of drugs were the most important predisposing factors. In addition, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was designed with species-specific primers of the three species that could identify them with amplicons of approximately 330 bp from F. solani, 275 bp from A. fumigatus, and 230 bp from C. glabrata. Additionally, PCR with fungal universal primers and multiplex PCR were performed using DNA prepared by an improved DNA extraction method from corneal scrapings. With this method, fungal pathogens from corneal scrapings could be specifically and rapidly identified within 8 h. The culture-independent rapid identification of corneal scrapings may have great significance for the early diagnosis and treatment of fungal keratitis.

  11. Hypopyon in patients with fungal keratitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ling-juan; SONG Xiu-sheng; ZHAO Jing; SUN Shi-ying; XIE Li-xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypopyon is common in eyes with fungal keratitis.The evaluation of the clinical features,culture results and the risk factors for hypopyon and of the possible correlation between hypopyon and the treatment outcome could be helpful for making treatment decisions.Methods The medical records of 1066 inpatients (1069 eyes) with fungal keratitis seen at the Shandong Eye Institute from January 2000 to December 2009 were reviewed retrospectively for demographic features,risk factors,clinical characteristics,laboratory findings and treatment outcomes.The incidence of hypopyon,the fungal culture positivity for hypopyon,risk factors for hypopyon and the effect of hypopyon on the treatment and prognosis were determined.Results We identified 1069 eyes with fungal keratitis.Of the 850 fungal culture-positive eyes,the Fusarium species was the most frequent (73.6%),followed by Altemaria (10.0%) and Aspergillus (9.0%).Upon admission,562 (52.6%)eyes with hypopyon were identified.The hypopyon of 66 eyes was evaluated via fungal culturing,and 31 eyes (47.0%)were positive.A total of 194 eyes had ocular hypertension,and 172 (88.7%) of these eyes had hypopyon (P <0.001).Risk factors for incident hypopyon included long duration of symptoms (P <0.001),large lesion size (P <0.001) and infection caused by the Fusarium and Aspergillus species (P <0.001).The positivity of fungal culture for hypopyon was associated with duration of symptoms and lesion size.Surgical intervention was more common in cases with hypopyon (P <0.001).Hypopyon was a risk factor for the recurrence of fungal keratitis after corneal transplantation (P=0.002).Conclusions Hypopyon is common in patients with severe fungal keratitis and can cause ocular hypertension.About half of the hypopyon cases were positive based on fungal culture.Long duration of symptoms,large lesion size and infection with the Fusarium and Aspergillus species were risk factors for hypopyon.The presence of hypopyon

  12. Fungal Keratitis - Improving Diagnostics by Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esben Nielsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Introducing a simple image grading system to support the interpretation of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM images in filamentous fungal keratitis. Setting: Clinical and confocal studies took place at the Department of Ophthalmology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Histopathological analysis was performed at the Eye Pathology Institute, Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Methods: A recent series of consecutive patients with filamentous fungal keratitis is presented to demonstrate the results from in-house IVCM. Based upon our experience with IVCM and previously published images, we composed a grading system for interpreting IVCM images of filamentous fungal keratitis. Results: A recent case series of filamentous fungal keratitis from 2011 to 2012 was examined. There were 3 male and 3 female patients. Mean age was 44.5 years (range 12-69, 6 out of 17 (35% cultures were positive and a total of 6/7 (86% IVCM scans were positive. Three different categories of IVCM results for the grading of diagnostic certainty were formed. Conclusion: IVCM is a valuable tool for diagnosing filamentous fungal keratitis. In order to improve the reliability of IVCM, we suggest implementing a simple and clinically applicable grading system for aiding the interpretation of IVCM images of filamentous fungal keratitis.

  13. Fungal keratitis - improving diagnostics by confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Esben; Heegaard, S; Prause, J U;

    2013-01-01

    -69), 6 out of 17 (35%) cultures were positive and a total of 6/7 (86%) IVCM scans were positive. Three different categories of IVCM results for the grading of diagnostic certainty were formed. Conclusion: IVCM is a valuable tool for diagnosing filamentous fungal keratitis. In order to improve...

  14. Nuclear Gli1 expression is associated with pathological complete response and event-free survival in HER2-positive breast cancer treated with trastuzumab-based neoadjuvant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiwei; Duan, Xuening; Xu, Ling; Ye, Jingming; Cheng, Yuanjia; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Shuang; Zhu, Sainan; Li, Ting; Liu, Yinhua

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant activation of the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has shown predictive significance for treatment response and prognostic effect for survival in human tumors. However, the associations of the Hh signaling pathway with response to neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) and survival after NAT in breast cancer are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the correlation of pretherapeutic nuclear expression of glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (Gli1), a key transcriptional factor of the Hh signaling pathway, with pathological complete response (pCR) and event-free survival (EFS) in HER2-positive breast cancer treated with trastuzumab-based NAT. High nuclear Gli1 expression (OR 0.19; 95 % CI 0.07-0.54; P = 0.002) and positive hormone receptor (HR) status (OR 0.36; 95 % CI 0.14-0.90; P = 0.028) were independent and negative predictors of pCR in multivariate analysis. High nuclear Gli1 expression was significantly associated with lower pCR rates in both HR-positive and HR-negative tumors (P = 0.014 and 0.024, respectively). For survival analyses, multivariate analysis indicated that high nuclear Gli1 expression was the only independent predictor of poorer EFS in both the entire population (hazard ratio 2.97; 95 % CI 1.18-7.44; P = 0.020) and patients with non-pCR (hazard ratio 3.98; 95 % CI 1.35-11.68; P = 0.012). Our study is the first to demonstrate the associations of high nuclear Gli1 expression with resistance to trastuzumab-based NAT and subsequent worse prognosis in HER2-positive disease. These findings suggest that the nuclear Gli1 protein may be a novel target of NAT for HER2-positive breast cancer.

  15. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) on PET imaging of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucerius, Jan; Hyafil, Fabien; Verberne, Hein J; Slart, Riemer H J A; Lindner, Oliver; Sciagra, Roberto; Agostini, Denis; Übleis, Christopher; Gimelli, Alessia; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death not only in Europe but also in the rest of the World. Preventive measures, however, often fail and cardiovascular disease may manifest as an acute coronary syndrome, stroke or even sudden death after years of silent progression. Thus, there is a considerable need for innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the quality of care and limit the burden of cardiovascular diseases. During the past 10 years, several retrospective and prospective clinical studies have been published using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques. However, the current variety of imaging protocols used for vascular (arterial) imaging with FDG PET considerably limits the ability to compare results between studies and to build large multicentre imaging registries. Based on the existing literature and the experience of the Members of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Cardiovascular Committee, the objective of this position paper was to propose optimized and standardized protocols for imaging and interpretation of PET scans in atherosclerosis. These recommendations do not, however, replace the individual responsibility of healthcare professionals to make appropriate decisions in the circumstances of the individual study protocols used and the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and, where appropriate and necessary, the patient's guardian or carer. These recommendations suffer from the absence of conclusive evidence on many of the recommendations. Therefore, they are not intended and should not be used as "strict guidelines" but should, as already mentioned, provide a basis for standardized clinical atherosclerosis PET imaging protocols, which are subject to further and continuing evaluation and improvement. However, this EANM position paper might indeed be a first step towards "official" guidelines on

  16. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) on PET imaging of atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen, RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Department of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Institute (CARIM), P. Debyelaan 25, HX, Maastricht (Netherlands); Hyafil, Fabien [Bichat University Hospital, Inserm 1148, DHU FIRE, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Verberne, Hein J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, Department of Biomedical Photonic Imaging, Faculty of Science and Technology, Enschede (Netherlands); Lindner, Oliver [Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Institute of Radiology, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Sciagra, Roberto [University of Florence, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Florence (Italy); Agostini, Denis [Normandie Universite, Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU Cote de Nacre, Caen (France); Uebleis, Christopher [Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Gimelli, Alessia [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Hacker, Marcus [Medical University Vienna, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided therapy, Vienna (Austria); Collaboration: on behalf of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    2016-04-15

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death not only in Europe but also in the rest of the World. Preventive measures, however, often fail and cardiovascular disease may manifest as an acute coronary syndrome, stroke or even sudden death after years of silent progression. Thus, there is a considerable need for innovative diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the quality of care and limit the burden of cardiovascular diseases. During the past 10 years, several retrospective and prospective clinical studies have been published using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques. However, the current variety of imaging protocols used for vascular (arterial) imaging with FDG PET considerably limits the ability to compare results between studies and to build large multicentre imaging registries. Based on the existing literature and the experience of the Members of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Cardiovascular Committee, the objective of this position paper was to propose optimized and standardized protocols for imaging and interpretation of PET scans in atherosclerosis. These recommendations do not, however, replace the individual responsibility of healthcare professionals to make appropriate decisions in the circumstances of the individual study protocols used and the individual patient, in consultation with the patient and, where appropriate and necessary, the patient's guardian or carer. These recommendations suffer from the absence of conclusive evidence on many of the recommendations. Therefore, they are not intended and should not be used as ''strict guidelines'' but should, as already mentioned, provide a basis for standardized clinical atherosclerosis PET imaging protocols, which are subject to further and continuing evaluation and improvement. However, this EANM position paper might indeed be a first step towards &apos

  17. The hydrogen molecule and the H+2 molecular ion inside padded prolate spheroidal cavities with arbitrary nuclear positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-Rodríguez, R.; Díaz-García, C.; Cruz, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    A generalization of previous theoretical studies of molecular confinement based on the molecule-in-a-box model for the H+2 and H2 systems whereby the confining cavity is assumed to be prolate spheroidal in shape is presented. A finite height for the confining barrier potential is introduced and the independent variation of the nuclear positions from the cavity size and shape is allowed. Within this scheme, the non-separable Schrödinger problem for the confined H+2 and H2 molecules in their ground states is treated variationally. In both cases, an important dependence of the equilibrium bond length and total energy on the confining barrier height is observed for fixed cavity sizes and shapes. It is also shown that—given a barrier height—as the cavity size is reduced, the limit of stability of the confined molecule is attained for a critical size. The results of this work suggest the adequacy of the proposed method for more realistic studies of electronic and vibrational properties of confined one- and two-electron diatomics for proper comparison with experiment.

  18. Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  19. Fungal DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in both natural and human-made environments. They play important roles in the health of plants, animals, and humans, and in broad ecosystem functions. Thus, having an efficient species-level identification system could significantly enhance our ability to treat fungal diseases and to monitor the spatial and temporal patterns of fungal distributions and migrations. DNA barcoding is a potent approach for rapid identification of fungal specimens, generating novel species hypothesis, and guiding biodiversity and ecological studies. In this mini-review, I briefly summarize (i) the history of DNA sequence-based fungal identification; (ii) the emergence of the ITS region as the consensus primary fungal barcode; (iii) the use of the ITS barcodes to address a variety of issues on fungal diversity from local to global scales, including generating a large number of species hypothesis; and (iv) the problems with the ITS barcode region and the approaches to overcome these problems. Similar to DNA barcoding research on plants and animals, significant progress has been achieved over the last few years in terms of both the questions being addressed and the foundations being laid for future research endeavors. However, significant challenges remain. I suggest three broad areas of research to enhance the usefulness of fungal DNA barcoding to meet the current and future challenges: (i) develop a common set of primers and technologies that allow the amplification and sequencing of all fungi at both the primary and secondary barcode loci; (ii) compile a centralized reference database that includes all recognized fungal species as well as species hypothesis, and allows regular updates from the research community; and (iii) establish a consensus set of new species recognition criteria based on barcode DNA sequences that can be applied across the fungal kingdom.

  20. Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Rakhi; Hadley, Susan

    2005-12-01

    Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis are uncommon diseases and generally present in an indolent fashion. The incidence of fungal bone and joint dis-ease is increasing with an increase in the prevalence of factors predisposing to invasive fungal disease, such as the use of central venous catheters, broad spectrum antibiotics, immunosuppression, and abdominal surgery. Definitive diagnosis relies on bone or synovial culture or biopsy. Successful management has traditionally consisted of amphotericin B in combination with surgical debridement. Given the rarity of this disease, treatment is not well defined, but reports of success with the use of azole antifungal agents, including itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, are promising.

  1. Dissect Kif5b in nuclear positioning during myogenesis: The light chain binding domain and the autoinhibitory peptide are both indispensable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zai, E-mail: wangzai81@hotmail.com [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, China–Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Xue, Wenqian; Li, Xiuling; Lin, Raozhou [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Cui, Ju [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong); Beijing Institute of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital, Ministry of Health (China); Huang, Jian-Dong, E-mail: jdhuang@hku.hk [Department of Biochemistry, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam (Hong Kong)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Kif5b localizes at myonuclear membrane and is responsible for nuclear dispersion. ► Kif5b stalk/tail domain contains signal for nuclear membrane targeting. ► Kif5b stalk/tail domain directly binds to a nesprin 4 in vitro. ► KLC binding domain and autoinhibitory peptide are both functionally indispensable. -- Abstract: The microtubule motor kinesin-1 is responsible for the nuclear positioning during myogenesis. Here we show that the coiled-coil stalk/tail domain containing the kinesin light chain (KLC) binding sites targets to the perinuclear region like endogenous Kif5b, while the globular tail domain cannot. To investigate which fragments of kinesin heavy chain (Kif5b) is responsible for the myonuclear positioning, we transfect Kif5b expression constructs into Kif5b deficient myoblasts and test their ability to rescue the myonuclear phenotype. We find that the KLC binding domain and the autoinhibitory peptide in the globular tail region are both indispensable for the nuclear membrane localization of Kif5b and the kinesin-1-mediated myonuclear positioning. These results suggest that while the KLC binding domain may directly targets Kif5b to the myonuclear membrane, the autoinhibitory peptide may play an indirect role in regulating the kinesin-1-mediated myonuclear positioning.

  2. Burden of fungal infections in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiane, Aida S; Ndiaye, Daouda; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    Senegal has a high rate of tuberculosis and a low HIV seropositivity rate and aspergilloma, life-threatening fungal infections, dermatophytosis and mycetoma have been reported in this study. All published epidemiology papers reporting fungal infection rates from Senegal were identified. Where no data existed, we used specific populations at risk and fungal infection frequencies in each to estimate national incidence or prevalence. The results show that tinea capitis is common being found in 25% of children, ~1.5 million. About 191,000 Senegalese women get recurrent vaginal thrush, ≥4 times annually. We estimate 685 incident cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) following TB and prevalence of 2160 cases. Asthma prevalence in adults varies from 3.2% to 8.2% (mean 5%); 9976 adults have allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and 13,168 have severe asthma with fungal sensitisation (SAFS). Of the 59,000 estimated HIV-positive patients, 366 develop cryptococcal meningitis; 1149 develop Pneumocystis pneumonia and 1946 develop oesophageal candidiasis, in which oral candidiasis (53%) and dermatophytosis (16%) are common. Since 2008-2010, 113 cases of mycetoma were diagnosed. In conclusion, we estimate that 1,743,507 (12.5%) people in Senegal suffer from a fungal infection, excluding oral candidiasis, fungal keratitis, invasive candidiasis or aspergillosis. Diagnostic and treatment deficiencies should be rectified to allow epidemiological studies.

  3. Insect pathology and fungal entomopathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungi that occur inside asymptomatic plant tissues are known as fungal endophytes. Different genera of fungal entomopathogens have been reported as naturally occurring fungal endophytes, and it has been shown that it is possible to inoculate plants with fungal entomopathogens, making them endophytic...

  4. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  5. Picornaviruses and nuclear functions: targeting a cellular compartment distinct from the replication site of a positive-strand RNA virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eFlather

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The compartmentalization of DNA replication and gene transcription in the nucleus and protein production in the cytoplasm is a defining feature of eukaryotic cells. The nucleus functions to maintain the integrity of the nuclear genome of the cell and to control gene expression based on intracellular and environmental signals received through the cytoplasm. The spatial separation of the major processes that lead to the expression of protein-coding genes establishes the necessity of a transport network to allow biomolecules to translocate between these two regions of the cell. The nucleocytoplasmic transport network is therefore essential for regulating normal cellular functioning. The Picornaviridae virus family is one of many viral families that disrupt the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of cells to promote viral replication. Picornaviruses contain positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes and replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. As a result of the limited coding capacity of these viruses, cellular proteins are required by these intracellular parasites for both translation and genomic RNA replication. Being of messenger RNA polarity, a picornavirus genome can immediately be translated upon entering the cell cytoplasm. However, the replication of viral RNA requires the activity of RNA-binding proteins, many of which function in host gene expression, and are consequently localized to the nucleus. As a result, picornaviruses disrupt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to exploit protein functions normally localized to a different cellular compartment from which they translate their genome to facilitate efficient replication. Furthermore, picornavirus proteins are also known to enter the nucleus of infected cells to limit host-cell transcription and down-regulate innate antiviral responses. The interactions of picornavirus proteins and host-cell nuclei are extensive, required for a productive infection, and are the focus of this review.

  6. Picornaviruses and nuclear functions: targeting a cellular compartment distinct from the replication site of a positive-strand RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flather, Dylan; Semler, Bert L

    2015-01-01

    The compartmentalization of DNA replication and gene transcription in the nucleus and protein production in the cytoplasm is a defining feature of eukaryotic cells. The nucleus functions to maintain the integrity of the nuclear genome of the cell and to control gene expression based on intracellular and environmental signals received through the cytoplasm. The spatial separation of the major processes that lead to the expression of protein-coding genes establishes the necessity of a transport network to allow biomolecules to translocate between these two regions of the cell. The nucleocytoplasmic transport network is therefore essential for regulating normal cellular functioning. The Picornaviridae virus family is one of many viral families that disrupt the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of cells to promote viral replication. Picornaviruses contain positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes and replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. As a result of the limited coding capacity of these viruses, cellular proteins are required by these intracellular parasites for both translation and genomic RNA replication. Being of messenger RNA polarity, a picornavirus genome can immediately be translated upon entering the cell cytoplasm. However, the replication of viral RNA requires the activity of RNA-binding proteins, many of which function in host gene expression, and are consequently localized to the nucleus. As a result, picornaviruses disrupt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to exploit protein functions normally localized to a different cellular compartment from which they translate their genome to facilitate efficient replication. Furthermore, picornavirus proteins are also known to enter the nucleus of infected cells to limit host-cell transcription and down-regulate innate antiviral responses. The interactions of picornavirus proteins and host-cell nuclei are extensive, required for a productive infection, and are the focus of this review.

  7. [Pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Carratalà, Jordi

    2012-03-01

    Invasive fungal infections remain a life-threatening disease. The development of invasive fungal disease is dependent on multiple factors, such us colonization and efficient host immune response. We aimed to review the pathogenesis of invasive fungal infections, in particular, those caused by Candida and Aspergillus. For this we propose, to describe the fungal characteristics, to detail the host defence mechanisms against fungus and to analyse the host risk factors for invasive fungal infection.

  8. Fungal epiphytes and endophytes of coffee leaves (Coffea arabica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Johanna; Bayman, Paul

    2005-07-01

    Plants harbor diverse communities of fungi and other microorganisms. Fungi are known to occur both on plant surfaces (epiphytes) and inside plant tissues (endophytes), but the two communities have rarely been compared. We compared epiphytic and endophytic fungal communities associated with leaves of coffee (Coffea arabica) in Puerto Rico. We asked whether the dominant fungi are the same in both communities, whether endophyte and epiphyte communities are equally diverse, and whether epiphytes and endophytes exhibit similar patterns of spatial heterogeneity among sites. Leaves of naturalized coffee plants were collected from six sites in Puerto Rico. Epiphytic and endophytic fungi were isolated by placing leaf pieces on potato dextrose agar without and with surface sterilization, respectively. A total of 821 colonies were isolated and grouped into 131 morphospecies. The taxonomic affinities of the four most common nonsporulating fungi were determined by sequencing the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region: two grouped with Xylaria and one each with Botryosphaeria and Guignardia. Of the most common genera, Pestalotia and Botryosphaeria were significantly more common as epiphytes; Colletotrichum, Xylaria, and Guignardia were significantly more common as endophytes. Suprisingly, more morphospecies occurred as endophytes than as epiphytes. Differences among sites in number of fungi per plant were significant. Thus epiphytic and endophytic communities differed greatly on a single leaf, despite living only millimeters apart, and both communities differed from site to site. Significant correlations between occurrence of fungal morphospecies suggested that fungi may have positive or negative effects on their neighbors. This is the first quantitative comparison of epiphytic and endophytic fungal floras in any plant, and the first to examine endophytic fungi or epiphytic fungi in leaves of coffee, one of the world's most valuable crops.

  9. Fungal endocarditis: current challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattevin, Pierre; Revest, Matthieu; Lefort, Agnès; Michelet, Christian; Lortholary, Olivier

    2014-10-01

    Whilst it used to affect mostly intravenous drug users and patients who underwent valvular surgery with suboptimal infection control procedures, fungal endocarditis is now mostly observed in patients with severe immunodeficiency (onco-haematology), in association with chronic central venous access and broad-spectrum antibiotic use. The incidence of fungal endocarditis has probably decreased in most developed countries with access to harm-reduction policies (i.e. needle exchange programmes) and with improved infection control procedures during cardiac surgery. Use of specific blood culture bottles for diagnosis of fungal endocarditis has decreased due to optimisation of media and automated culture systems. Meanwhile, the advent of rapid techniques, including fungal antigen detection (galactomannan, mannan/anti-mannan antibodies and β-1,3-d-glucans) and PCR (e.g. universal fungal PCR targeting 18S rRNA genes), shall improve sensitivity and reduce diagnostics delays, although limited data are available on their use for the diagnosis of fungal endocarditis. New antifungal agents available since the early 2000s may represent dramatic improvement for fungal endocarditis: (i) a new class, the echinocandins, has the potential to improve the management of Candida endocarditis owing to its fungicidal effect on yeasts as well as tolerability of increased dosages; and (ii) improved survival in patients with invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole compared with amphotericin B, and this may apply to Aspergillus sp. endocarditis as well, although its prognosis remains dismal. These achievements may allow selected patients to be cured with prolonged medical treatment alone when surgery is considered too risky.

  10. Microtubule-actin crosslinking factor 1 (Macf1) domain function in Balbiani body dissociation and nuclear positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Aguirre, Matias; Zhang, Hong; Jamieson-Lucy, Allison; Mullins, Mary C

    2017-09-07

    Animal-vegetal (AV) polarity of most vertebrate eggs is established during early oogenesis through the formation and disassembly of the Balbiani Body (Bb). The Bb is a structure conserved from insects to humans that appears as a large granule, similar to a mRNP granule composed of mRNA and proteins, that in addition contains mitochondria, ER and Golgi. The components of the Bb, which have amyloid-like properties, include germ cell and axis determinants of the embryo that are anchored to the vegetal cortex upon Bb disassembly. Our lab discovered in zebrafish the only gene known to function in Bb disassembly, microtubule-actin crosslinking factor 1a (macf1a). Macf1 is a conserved, giant multi-domain cytoskeletal linker protein that can interact with microtubules (MTs), actin filaments (AF), and intermediate filaments (IF). In macf1a mutant oocytes the Bb fails to dissociate, the nucleus is acentric, and AV polarity of the oocyte and egg fails to form. The cytoskeleton-dependent mechanism by which Macf1a regulates Bb mRNP granule dissociation was unknown. We found that disruption of AFs phenocopies the macf1a mutant phenotype, while MT disruption does not. We determined that cytokeratins (CK), a type of IF, are enriched in the Bb. We found that Macf1a localizes to the Bb, indicating a direct function in regulating its dissociation. We thus tested if Macf1a functions via its actin binding domain (ABD) and plectin repeat domain (PRD) to integrate cortical actin and Bb CK, respectively, to mediate Bb dissociation at the oocyte cortex. We developed a CRISPR/Cas9 approach to delete the exons encoding these domains from the macf1a endogenous locus, while maintaining the open reading frame. Our analysis shows that Macf1a functions via its ABD to mediate Bb granule dissociation and nuclear positioning, while the PRD is dispensable. We propose that Macf1a does not function via its canonical mechanism of linking two cytoskeletal systems together in dissociating the Bb. Instead

  11. Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Alice E W; Borish, Larry; Gurrola, José; Payne, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the history of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and the clinical, pathologic, and radiographic criteria necessary to establish its diagnosis and differentiate this disease from other types of chronic rhinosinusitis. Allergic fungal rhinosinusitis is a noninvasive fungal form of sinus inflammation characterized by an often times unilateral, expansile process in which the typical allergic "peanut-butter-like" mucin contributes to the formation of nasal polyps, hyposmia/anosmia, and structural changes of the face. IgE sensitization to fungi is a necessary, but not sufficient, pathophysiologic component of the disease process that is also defined by microscopic visualization of mucin-containing fungus and characteristic radiological imaging. This article expounds on these details and others including the key clinical and scientific distinctions of this diagnosis, the pathophysiologic mechanisms beyond IgE-mediated hypersensitivity that must be at play, and areas of current and future research.

  12. Marsupialized fungal mycetoma masquerading as conjunctival melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyad, Fouad E; Karp, Carol L; Wong, James R; Weiss, Matthew J; Bermudez-Magner, J Antonio; Dubovy, Sander

    2014-07-01

    To report a case of a fungal mass misdiagnosed as a pigmented conjunctival melanoma. Case report. A 38-year-old woman was referred for a pigmented conjunctival lesion that was diagnosed as a melanoma. She had a history of a scleral buckle in that eye for retinal detachment 2 years before presentation. Slit-lamp examination revealed a pigmented mass from the 11- to 2-o'clock position. This was noted to be imbricated within the invagination of a conjunctival fold from the previous surgery. The mass was removed, cultured, and confirmed to be a fungal infection from Scytalidium sp. Scleral buckles can cause folds in the conjunctiva, which can be foci for fungal infection.

  13. Comparison of two position sensitive gamma-ray detectors based on continuous YAP and pixellated NaI(TI) for nuclear medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Ma, Hong-Guang; Ma, Wen-Yan; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Zhao-Min; Xu, Zi-Zhong

    2008-11-01

    Dedicated position sensitive gamma-ray detectors based on position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) coupled to scintillation crystals, have been used for the construction of compact gamma-ray imaging systems, suitable for nuclear medical imaging applications such as small animal imaging and single organ imaging and scintimammography. In this work, the performance of two gamma-ray detectors: a continuous YAP scintillation crystal coupled to a Hamamastu R2486 PSPMT and a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillation array crystal coupled to the same PSPMT, is compared. The results show that the gamma-ray detector based on a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillation array crystal is a promising candidate for nuclear medical imaging applications, since their performance in terms of position linearity, spatial resolution and effective field of view (FOV) is superior than that of the gamma-ray detector based on a continuous YAP scintillation crystal. However, a better photodetector (Hamamatau H8500 Flat Panel PMT, for example) coupled to the continuous crystal is also likely a good selection for nuclear medicine imaging applications. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (10275063)

  14. Comparison of two position sensitive gamma-ray detectors based on continuous YAP and pixellated NaI(TI) for nuclear medical imaging applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Dedicated position sensitive gamma-ray detectors based on position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) coupled to scintillation crystals, have been used for the construction of compact gamma-ray imaging systems, suitable for nuclear medical imaging applications such as small animal imaging and single organ imaging and scintimammography. In this work, the performance of two gamma-ray detectors: a continuous YAP scintillation crystal coupled to a Hamamastu R2486 PSPMT and a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillation array crystal coupled to the same PSPMT, is compared. The results show that the gamma-ray detector based on a pixellated NaI(TI) scintillation array crystal is a promising candidate for nuclear medical imaging applications,since their performance in terms of position linearity, spatial resolution and effective field of view (FOV) is superior than that of the gamma-ray detector based on a continuous YAP scintillation crystal. However, a better photodetector (Hamamatau H8500 Flat Panel PMT, for example) coupled to the continuous crystal is also likely a good selection for nuclear medicine imaging applications.

  15. Fungal infections in severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Rakesh; Noor, Mohd Talha; Wig, Jaidev

    2011-06-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The majority of deaths related to SAP are the result of infectious complications. Although bacterial infections are most commonly encountered, fungal infections are increasingly being recognized. Candida is the most common fungal infection. The occurrence of fungal infection in patients with acute pancreatitis adversely affects the clinical course, leading to a higher incidence of systemic complications, and possibly mortality as well. Important risk factors for fungal infection in patients with acute pancreatitis include broad-spectrum antibiotics, prolonged hospitalization and surgical/endoscopic interventions, use of total parenteral nutrition, and mechanical ventilation. Patients with higher severity of pancreatitis are at a greater risk. The pathogenesis of fungal infection in patients with acute pancreatitis is multifactorial. Translocation of microorganisms across the gut epithelium, lymphocyte dysfunction, and the virulence of the invading microorganisms play important roles. Histological demonstration of fungi remains the gold standard of diagnosis, but a positive biopsy is rarely obtained. The role of biomarkers in the diagnosis is being investigated. As early diagnosis and treatment can lead to improved outcome, a high index of suspicion is required for prompt diagnosis. Limiting the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, early introduction of enteral nutrition, and timely change of vascular catheters are important preventive strategies. The role of antifungal prophylaxis remains controversial. Surgical necrosectomy with antifungal therapy is the most widely used treatment approach. Clinical trials on antifungal prophylaxis are needed, and indications for surgical intervention need to be clearly defined.

  16. Fungal Wound Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-28

    Dr. David Tribble, acting director of the infectious disease clinical research program at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, discusses fungal wound infections after combat trauma.  Created: 1/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/28/2016.

  17. Fungal pathogens of Proteaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crous, P.W.; Summerell, B.A.; Swart, L.; Denman, S.; Taylor, J.E.; Bezuidenhout, C.M.; Palm, M.E.; Marincowitz, S.; Groenewald, J.Z.

    2011-01-01

    Species of Leucadendron, Leucospermum and Protea (Proteaceae) are in high demand for the international floriculture market due to their brightly coloured and textured flowers or bracts. Fungal pathogens, however, create a serious problem in cultivating flawless blooms. The aim of the present study

  18. Fungal pathogens of Proteaceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crous, P.W.; Summerell, B.A.; Swart, L.; Denman, S.; Taylor, J.E.; Bezuidenhout, C.M.; Palm, M.E.; Marincowitz, S.; Groenewald, J.Z.

    2012-01-01

    Species of Leucadendron, Leucospermum and Protea (Proteaceae) are in high demand for the international floriculture market due to their brightly coloured and textured flowers or bracts. Fungal pathogens, however, create a serious problem in cultivating flawless blooms. The aim of the present study

  19. The nuclear position of pericentromeric DNA of chromosome 11 appears to be random in G0 and non-random in G1 human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulspas, R; Houtsmuller, A B; Krijtenburg, P J; Bauman, J G; Nanninga, N

    1994-07-01

    The nuclear topography of pericentromeric DNA of chromosome 11 was analyzed in G0 (nonstimulated) and G1 [phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated] human lymphocytes by confocal microscopy. In addition to the nuclear center, the centrosome was used as a second point of reference in the three-dimensional (3D) analysis. Pericentromeric DNA of chromosome 11 and the centrosome were labeled using a combination of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunofluorescence. To preserve the 3D morphology of the cells, these techniques were performed on whole cells in suspension. Three-dimensional images of the cells were analyzed with a recently developed 3D software program (Interactive Measurement of Axes and Positioning in 3 Dimensions). The distribution of the chromosome 11 centromeres appeared to be random during the G0 stage but clearly non-random during the G1 stage, when the nuclear center was used as a reference point. Further statistical analysis of the G1 cells revealed that the centromeres were randomly distributed in a shell underlying the nuclear membrane. A topographical relationship between the centrosome and the centromeres appeared to be absent during the G0 and G1 stages of the cell cycle.

  20. Phylogenomic analyses of nuclear genes reveal the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade and the evidence of positive selection in Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Peng-Fei; Liu, Qi; Li, De-Zhu; Guo, Zhen-Hua

    2013-01-01

    BEP clade of the grass family (Poaceae) is composed of three subfamilies, i.e. Bambusoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae. Controversies on the phylogenetic relationships among three subfamilies still persist in spite of great efforts. However, previous evidence was mainly provided from plastid genes with only a few nuclear genes utilized. Given different evolutionary histories recorded by plastid and nuclear genes, it is indispensable to uncover their relationships based on nuclear genes. Here, eleven species with whole-sequenced genome and six species with transcriptomic data were included in this study. A total of 121 one-to-one orthologous groups (OGs) were identified and phylogenetic trees were reconstructed by different tree-building methods. Genes which might have undergone positive selection and played important roles in adaptive evolution were also investigated from 314 and 173 one-to-one OGs in two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. Our results support the ((B, P) E) topology with high supporting values. Besides, our findings also indicate that 24 and nine orthologs with statistically significant evidence of positive selection are mainly involved in abiotic and biotic stress response, reproduction and development, plant metabolism and enzyme etc. from two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. In summary, this study demonstrates the power of phylogenomic approach to shed lights on the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade, and offers valuable insights into adaptive evolution of the grass family.

  1. Phylogenomic analyses of nuclear genes reveal the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade and the evidence of positive selection in Poaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    Full Text Available BEP clade of the grass family (Poaceae is composed of three subfamilies, i.e. Bambusoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae. Controversies on the phylogenetic relationships among three subfamilies still persist in spite of great efforts. However, previous evidence was mainly provided from plastid genes with only a few nuclear genes utilized. Given different evolutionary histories recorded by plastid and nuclear genes, it is indispensable to uncover their relationships based on nuclear genes. Here, eleven species with whole-sequenced genome and six species with transcriptomic data were included in this study. A total of 121 one-to-one orthologous groups (OGs were identified and phylogenetic trees were reconstructed by different tree-building methods. Genes which might have undergone positive selection and played important roles in adaptive evolution were also investigated from 314 and 173 one-to-one OGs in two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. Our results support the ((B, P E topology with high supporting values. Besides, our findings also indicate that 24 and nine orthologs with statistically significant evidence of positive selection are mainly involved in abiotic and biotic stress response, reproduction and development, plant metabolism and enzyme etc. from two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. In summary, this study demonstrates the power of phylogenomic approach to shed lights on the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade, and offers valuable insights into adaptive evolution of the grass family.

  2. New mechanical samples positioning system for irradiations on a radial channel at nuclear research reactor in a full-power continuous operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gual, Maritza R., E-mail: mrgual@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, InSTEC, Havana (Cuba); Mas, Felix, E-mail: felix_mas_milian@yahoo.com [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, IF-USP, Rua do Matao, trav R., no. 187, Cidade Universitaria, Butanta, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Deppman, Airton, E-mail: deppman@if.usp.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Sao Paulo, IF-USP, Rua do Matao, trav R., no. 187, Cidade Universitaria, Butanta, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Coelho, Paulo R.P., E-mail: prcoelho@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Travessa R, 400, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    This paper describes a new mechanical samples positioning system that allows the safe placement and removal of biological samples for prolonged irradiation, in a nuclear reactor during full-power continuous operation. Also presented herein the materials of construction and operating principles. Additionally, this sample positioning system is compared with an existing pneumatic and automated transfer system, already available at the research reactors. The system consists of a mechanical arm with a claw, which can deliver the samples for irradiations without reactor shutdown. It was installed in the IEA-R1 research reactor at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, Brazil, and for the past 5 years, the system has successfully operated and allowed the conducting of important experiments. As a result of its introduction, the facility has been in a position to positively respond to the increased demand in studies of biology, medicine, physics, engineering, detector/dosimeter calibrations, etc. It is one example of the appropriated technologies that save energy and resources.

  3. Gas-filled position-sensitive detectors of thermal neutrons at the Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, V. A.; Ganzha, G. A.; Ivanov, E. A.; Ilyin, D. S.; Kovalenko, S. N.; Kolkhidashvili, M. R.; Krivshich, A. G.; Nadtochy, A. V.; Runov, V. V.; Soloveĭ, V. A.; Shabanov, G. D.

    2010-05-01

    The manufacturing line for the development and fabrication of position-sensitive detectors of thermal neutrons has been organized at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Three detectors with sensitive regions 300 × 170 (prototype), 200 × 200, and 300 × 300 mm in size have been constructed to date. The detectors represent multiwire proportional chambers with cathode data readout to a delay line. The devices are filled with the 3He/CF4 gas mixture. These detectors are intended for modernizing the detector systems of the Vector and Membrana-2 diffractometers (VVR-M reactor, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Gatchina, Russia).

  4. Fractal dimension based corneal fungal infection diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Perkins, A. Louise; Beuerman, Roger W.; Iyengar, S. Sitharama

    2006-08-01

    We present a fractal measure based pattern classification algorithm for automatic feature extraction and identification of fungus associated with an infection of the cornea of the eye. A white-light confocal microscope image of suspected fungus exhibited locally linear and branching structures. The pixel intensity variation across the width of a fungal element was gaussian. Linear features were extracted using a set of 2D directional matched gaussian-filters. Portions of fungus profiles that were not in the same focal plane appeared relatively blurred. We use gaussian filters of standard deviation slightly larger than the width of a fungus to reduce discontinuities. Cell nuclei of cornea and nerves also exhibited locally linear structure. Cell nuclei were excluded by their relatively shorter lengths. Nerves in the cornea exhibited less branching compared with the fungus. Fractal dimensions of the locally linear features were computed using a box-counting method. A set of corneal images with fungal infection was used to generate class-conditional fractal measure distributions of fungus and nerves. The a priori class-conditional densities were built using an adaptive-mixtures method to reflect the true nature of the feature distributions and improve the classification accuracy. A maximum-likelihood classifier was used to classify the linear features extracted from test corneal images as 'normal' or 'with fungal infiltrates', using the a priori fractal measure distributions. We demonstrate the algorithm on the corneal images with culture-positive fungal infiltrates. The algorithm is fully automatic and will help diagnose fungal keratitis by generating a diagnostic mask of locations of the fungal infiltrates.

  5. Inositol Polyphosphate Kinases, Fungal Virulence and Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic fungi are a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. Developing new treatments to combat invasive fungal disease is challenging given that fungal and mammalian host cells are eukaryotic, with similar organization and physiology. Even therapies targeting unique fungal cell features have limitations and drug resistance is emerging. New approaches to the development of antifungal drugs are therefore needed urgently. Cryptococcus neoformans, the commonest cause of fungal meningitis worldwide, is an accepted model for studying fungal pathogenicity and driving drug discovery. We recently characterized a phospholipase C (Plc1-dependent pathway in C. neoformans comprising of sequentially-acting inositol polyphosphate kinases (IPK, which are involved in synthesizing inositol polyphosphates (IP. We also showed that the pathway is essential for fungal cellular function and pathogenicity. The IP products of the pathway are structurally diverse, each consisting of an inositol ring, with phosphate (P and pyrophosphate (PP groups covalently attached at different positions. This review focuses on (1 the characterization of the Plc1/IPK pathway in C. neoformans; (2 the identification of PP-IP5 (IP7 as the most crucial IP species for fungal fitness and virulence in a mouse model of fungal infection; and (3 why IPK enzymes represent suitable candidates for drug development.

  6. Frequent gain and loss of introns in fungal cytochrome b genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Fen Yin

    Full Text Available In this study, all available cytochrome b (Cyt b genes from the GOBASE database were compiled and the evolutionary dynamics of the Cyt b gene introns was assessed. Cyt b gene introns were frequently present in the fungal kingdom and some lower plants, but generally absent or rare in Chromista, Protozoa, and Animalia. Fungal Cyt b introns were found at 35 positions in Cyt b genes and the number of introns varied at individual positions from a single representative to 32 different introns at position 131, showing a wide and patchy distribution. Many homologous introns were present at the same position in distantly related species but absent in closely related species, suggesting that introns of the Cyt b genes were frequently lost. On the other hand, highly similar intron sequences were observed in some distantly related species rather than in closely related species, suggesting that these introns were gained independently, likely through lateral transfers. The intron loss-and-gain events could be mediated by transpositions that might have occurred between nuclear and mitochondria. Southern hybridization analysis confirmed that some introns contained repetitive sequences and might be transposable elements. An intron gain in Botryotinia fuckeliana prevented the development of QoI fungicide resistance, suggesting that intron loss-and-gain events were not necessarily beneficial to their host organisms.

  7. 50-plus years of fungal viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghabrial, Said A., E-mail: saghab00@email.uky.edu [Plant Pathology Department, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Castón, José R. [Department of Structure of Macromolecules, Centro Nacional Biotecnologıa/CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Jiang, Daohong [State Key Lab of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei Province (China); Nibert, Max L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Suzuki, Nobuhiro [Institute of Plant Science and Resources, Okayama University, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    Mycoviruses are widespread in all major taxa of fungi. They are transmitted intracellularly during cell division, sporogenesis, and/or cell-to-cell fusion (hyphal anastomosis), and thus their life cycles generally lack an extracellular phase. Their natural host ranges are limited to individuals within the same or closely related vegetative compatibility groups, although recent advances have established expanded experimental host ranges for some mycoviruses. Most known mycoviruses have dsRNA genomes packaged in isometric particles, but an increasing number of positive- or negative-strand ssRNA and ssDNA viruses have been isolated and characterized. Although many mycoviruses do not have marked effects on their hosts, those that reduce the virulence of their phytopathogenic fungal hosts are of considerable interest for development of novel biocontrol strategies. Mycoviruses that infect endophytic fungi and those that encode killer toxins are also of special interest. Structural analyses of mycoviruses have promoted better understanding of virus assembly, function, and evolution. - Highlights: • Historical perspective of fungal virus research. • Description, classification and diversity of fungal virus families. • Structural features of fungal virus particles. • Hypovirulence and exploitation of mycoviruses in biological control of plant pathogenic fungi.

  8. Clinical Use of Fungal PCR from Deep Tissue Samples in the Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Diseases - A Retrospective, Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala-Houhala, Mari; Koukila-Kähkölä, Pirkko; Antikainen, Jenni; Valve, Jaana; Kirveskari, Juha; Anttila, Veli-Jukka

    2017-09-01

    We evaluated the clinical use of panfungal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases (IFDs). We focused on the deep tissue samples. We first described the design of panfungal PCR, which is in clinical use at Helsinki University Hospital. Secondly, we retrospectively evaluated the results of 307 fungal PCR tests performed from 2013-2015. Samples were taken from normally sterile tissues and fluids. The patient population was non-selected. We classified the likelihood of IFD according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG), compering the fungal PCR results to the likelihood of IFD along with the culture and microscopy results. There were 48 (16%) positive and 259 (84%) negative PCR results. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for diagnosing invasive fungal disease were 60.5% and 91.7%, respectively, while the NPV and PPV were 93.4% and 54.2%, respectively. The concordance between the PCR and the culture results was 86% and 87% between PCR and microscopy, respectively. Of the 48 patients with positive PCR results 23 had a proven or probable IFD. Fungal PCR can be useful for diagnosing IFDs in deep tissue samples. It is beneficial to combine fungal PCR with culture and microscopy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Present and future of clinical cardiovascular PET imaging in Europe - a position statement by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guludec, D. [Bichat Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); European Council of Nuclear Cardiology, Vienna (Austria); Lautamaeki, R.; Bengel, F.M. [Johns Hopkins University, Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Knuuti, J. [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Bax, J.J. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2008-09-15

    This position statement was prepared by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology and summarises the current and future potential of PET as a clinical cardiovascular diagnostic imaging tool. The first section describes how methodological developments have positively influenced the transition of PET from a research tool towards a clinical diagnostic test. In the second section, evidence in support of its superior diagnostic accuracy, its value to guide decision making and to predict outcome and its cost effectiveness is summarised. The third section finally outlines new PET-based approaches and concepts, which will likely influence clinical cardiovascular medicine in the future. The notion that integration of cardiac PET into healthcare systems and disease management algorithms will advance quality of care is increasingly supported by the literature highlighted in this statement. (orig.)

  10. Development and validation of an oligonucleotide microarray to characterise ectomycorrhizal fungal communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reich Marlis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In forest ecosystems, communities of ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM are influenced by several biotic and abiotic factors. To understand their underlying dynamics, ECM communities have been surveyed with ribosomal DNA-based sequencing methods. However, most identification methods are both time-consuming and limited by the number of samples that can be treated in a realistic time frame. As a result of ongoing implementation, the array technique has gained throughput capacity in terms of the number of samples and the capacity for parallel identification of several species. Thus far, although phylochips (microarrays that are used to detect species have been mostly developed to trace bacterial communities or groups of specific fungi, no phylochip has been developed to carry oligonucleotides for several ectomycorrhizal species that belong to different genera. Results We have constructed a custom ribosomal DNA phylochip to identify ECM fungi. Specific oligonucleotide probes were targeted to the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions from 95 fungal species belonging to 21 ECM fungal genera. The phylochip was first validated using PCR amplicons of reference species. Ninety-nine percent of the tested oligonucleotides generated positive hybridisation signals with their corresponding amplicons. Cross-hybridisation was mainly restricted at the genus level, particularly for Cortinarius and Lactarius species. The phylochip was subsequently tested with environmental samples that were composed of ECM fungal DNA from spruce and beech plantation fungal communities. The results were in concordance with the ITS sequencing of morphotypes and the ITS clone library sequencing results that were obtained using the same PCR products. Conclusion For the first time, we developed a custom phylochip that is specific for several ectomycorrhizal fungi. To overcome cross-hybridisation problems, specific filter and evaluation strategies that used spot

  11. Extraction of radioactive positive ions across the surface of superfluid helium : A new method to produce cold radioactive nuclear beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, WX; Dendooven, P; Gloos, K; Takahashi, N; Pekola, JP; Aysto, J

    2003-01-01

    Alpha-decay recoils Rn-219 were stopped in superfluid helium and positive ions were extracted by electric field into the vapour phase. This first quantitative observation of extraction was successfully conducted using highly sensitive radioactivity detection. The efficiency for extraction across the

  12. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens.

  13. High-throughput sequencing-based analysis of endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps reveals unexpectedly high fungal diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Chen, Xin; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Yan; Shen, Guang-Rong; Li, Yu-Ling; Lin, Juan; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2016-09-14

    Chinese Cordyceps, known in Chinese as "DongChong XiaCao", is a parasitic complex of a fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) and a caterpillar. The current study explored the endogenetic fungal communities inhabiting Chinese Cordyceps. Samples were collected from five different geographical regions of Qinghai and Tibet, and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 sequences from each sample were obtained using Illumina high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that Ascomycota was the dominant fungal phylum in Chinese Cordyceps and its soil microhabitat from different sampling regions. Among the Ascomycota, 65 genera were identified, and the abundant operational taxonomic units showed the strongest sequence similarity to Ophiocordyceps, Verticillium, Pseudallescheria, Candida and Ilyonectria Not surprisingly, the genus Ophiocordyceps was the largest among the fungal communities identified in the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. In addition, fungal communities in the soil microhabitats were clustered separately from the external mycelial cortices and fruiting bodies of Chinese Cordyceps from different sampling regions. There was no significant structural difference in the fungal communities between the fruiting bodies and external mycelial cortices of Chinese Cordyceps. This study revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of fungal communities inhabiting the Chinese Cordyceps and its microhabitats.

  14. The phylogenetic position of red algae revealed by multiple nuclear genes from mitochondria-containing eukaryotes and an alternative hypothesis on the origin of plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Matsuzaki, Motomichi; Takahara, Manabu; Misumi, Osami; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Hasegawa, Masami; Shin-i, Tadasu; Kohara, Yuji; Ogasawara, Naotake; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-04-01

    Red algae are one of the main photosynthetic eukaryotic lineages and are characterized by primitive features, such as a lack of flagella and the presence of phycobiliproteins in the chloroplast. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies using nuclear gene sequences suggest two conflicting hypotheses (monophyly versus non-monophyly) regarding the relationships between red algae and green plants. Although kingdom-level phylogenetic analyses using multiple nuclear genes from a wide-range of eukaryotic lineages were very recently carried out, they used highly divergent gene sequences of the cryptomonad nucleomorph (as the red algal taxon) or incomplete red algal gene sequences. In addition, previous eukaryotic phylogenies based on nuclear genes generally included very distant archaebacterial sequences (designated as the outgroup) and/or amitochondrial organisms, which may carry unusual gene substitutions due to parasitism or the absence of mitochondria. Here, we carried out phylogenetic analyses of various lineages of mitochondria-containing eukaryotic organisms using nuclear multigene sequences, including the complete sequences from the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. Amino acid sequence data for two concatenated paralogous genes (alpha- and beta-tubulin) from mitochondria-containing organisms robustly resolved the basal position of the cellular slime molds, which were designated as the outgroup in our phylogenetic analyses. Phylogenetic analyses of 53 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on a 1525-amino-acid sequence of four concatenated nuclear genes (actin, elongation factor-1alpha, alpha-tubulin, and beta-tubulin) reliably resolved the phylogeny only in the maximum parsimonious (MP) analysis, which indicated the presence of two large robust monophyletic groups (Groups A and B) and the basal eukaryotic lineages (red algae, true slime molds, and amoebae). Group A corresponded to the Opisthokonta (Metazoa and Fungi), whereas Group B included various

  15. [Diversity and tissue distribution of fungal endophytes in Alpinia officinarum: an important south-China medicinal plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ren-Chao; Huang, Juan; Li, Ze-En; Li, Shu-Bin

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) technique was applied to assess the diversity and tissue distribution of the fungal endophyte communities of Alpinia officinarum collected from Longtang town in Xuwen county, Guangdong province, China, at which the pharmacological effect of the medicine plant is traditional considered to be the significantly higher than that in any other growth areas in China. A total of 28 distinct Terminal-Restriction Fragment (T-RFs) were detected with HhaI Mono-digestion targeted amplified fungal nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region sequences (rDNA ITS) from the root, rhizome, stem, and leaf internal tissues of A. officinarum plant, indicating that at least 28 distinct fungal species were able to colonize the internal tissue of the host plant. The rDNA ITS-T-RFLP profiles obtained from different tissues of the host plant were obvious distinct. And the numbers of total T-RFs, and the dominant T-RFs detected from various tissues were significantly different. Based on the obtained T-RFLP profiles, Shannon's diversity index and the Shannon's evenness index were calculated, which were significantly different among tissues (P endophyte communities of the host plant (P = 0, Pearson correlation coefficient ≤ -0.962), and significant positive correlations between both of the tested active components contents and 325 bp dominant T-RF linkage to Pestalotiopsis (P = 0, Pearson correlation coefficient ≥ 0.975). In conclusion, A. officinarum is colonized by diverse fungal endophytes communities. The diversity of the fungal endophytes was found in the A. officinarum varied with differences of the tissue types of the host plants and was closely correlated with the accumulation of main active components, total volatile oils and galangin contents in the host plant tissue.

  16. The Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Latency-associated Nuclear Antigen DNA Binding Domain Dorsal Positive Electrostatic Patch Facilitates DNA Replication and Episome Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shijun; Tan, Min; Juillard, Franceline; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Correia, Bruno; Simas, J Pedro; Carrondo, Maria A; McVey, Colin E; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2015-11-20

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates persistence of viral episomes in latently infected cells. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and segregates episomes to progeny nuclei. The structure of the LANA DNA binding domain was recently solved, revealing a positive electrostatic patch opposite the DNA binding surface, which is the site of BET protein binding. Here we investigate the functional role of the positive patch in LANA-mediated episome persistence. As expected, LANA mutants with alanine or glutamate substitutions in the central, peripheral, or lateral portions of the positive patch maintained the ability to bind DNA by EMSA. However, all of the substitution mutants were deficient for LANA DNA replication and episome maintenance. Mutation of the peripheral region generated the largest deficiencies. Despite these deficiencies, all positive patch mutants concentrated to dots along mitotic chromosomes in cells containing episomes, similar to LANA. The central and peripheral mutants, but not the lateral mutants, were reduced for BET protein interaction as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. However, defects in BET protein binding were independent of episome maintenance function. Overall, the reductions in episome maintenance closely correlated with DNA replication deficiencies, suggesting that the replication defects account for the reduced episome persistence. Therefore, the electrostatic patch exerts a key role in LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence and may act through a host cell partner(s) other than a BET protein or by inducing specific structures or complexes.

  17. Fungal contamination of poultry litter: a public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, C; Carolino, E; Malta-Vacas, J; Sabino, R; Viegas, S; Veríssimo, C

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous studies have been conducted on microbial contaminants associated with various stages related to poultry and meat products processing, only a few reported on fungal contamination of poultry litter. The goals of this study were to (1) characterize litter fungal contamination and (2) report the incidence of keratinophilic and toxigenic fungi presence. Seven fresh and 14 aged litter samples were collected from 7 poultry farms. In addition, 27 air samples of 25 litters were also collected through impaction method, and after laboratory processing and incubation of collected samples, quantitative colony-forming units (CFU/m³) and qualitative results were obtained. Twelve different fungal species were detected in fresh litter and Penicillium was the most frequent genus found (59.9%), followed by Alternaria (17.8%), Cladosporium (7.1%), and Aspergillus (5.7%). With respect to aged litter, 19 different fungal species were detected, with Penicillium sp. the most frequently isolated (42.3%), followed by Scopulariopsis sp. (38.3%), Trichosporon sp. (8.8%), and Aspergillus sp. (5.5%). A significant positive correlation was found between litter fungal contamination (CFU/g) and air fungal contamination (CFU/m³). Litter fungal quantification and species identification have important implications in the evaluation of potential adverse health risks to exposed workers and animals. Spreading of poultry litter in agricultural fields is a potential public health concern, since keratinophilic (Scopulariopsis and Fusarium genus) as well as toxigenic fungi (Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium genus) were isolated.

  18. A novel model of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; An, Yunfang; Li, Zeqing; Zhao, Changqing

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFRS) is a life-threatening inflammatory disease that affects immunocompromised patients, but animal models of the disease are scarce. This study aimed to develop an IFRS model in neutropenic rats. The model was established in three consecutive steps: unilateral nasal obstruction with Merocel sponges, followed by administration of cyclophosphamide (CPA), and, finally, nasal inoculation with Aspergillus fumigatus. Fifty healthy Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, with group I as the controls, group II undergoing unilateral nasal obstruction alone, group III undergoing nasal obstruction with fungal inoculation, group IV undergoing nasal obstruction with administration of CPA, and group V undergoing nasal obstruction with administration of CPA and fungal inoculation. Hematology, histology, and mycology investigations were performed. The changes in the rat absolute neutrophil counts (ANCs) were statistically different across the groups. The administration of CPA decreased the ANCs, whereas nasal obstruction with fungal inoculation increased the ANCs, and nasal obstruction did not change them. Histological examination of the rats in group V revealed the hyphal invasion of sinus mucosa and bone, thrombosis, and tissue infarction. No pathology indicative of IFRS was observed in the remaining groups. Positive rates of fungal culture in tissue homogenates from the maxillary sinus (62.5%) and lung (25%) were found in group V, whereas groups I, II, III, and IV showed no fungal culture in the homogenates. A rat IFRS model was successfully developed through nasal obstruction, CPA-induced neutropenia, and fungal inoculation. The disease model closely mimics the pathophysiology of anthropic IFRS.

  19. Anti-proliferative effect of fungal taxol extracted from Cladosporium oxysporum against human pathogenic bacteria and human colon cancer cell line HCT 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokul Raj, K.; Manikandan, R.; Arulvasu, C.; Pandi, M.

    2015-03-01

    Cladosporium oxysporum a new taxol producing endophytic fungus was identified and production of taxol were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), infrared (IR) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR (13C and 1H)) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The taxol biosynthetic gene (dbat) was evaluated for new taxol producing fungus. Antibacterial activity against six different human pathogenic bacteria was done by agar well diffusion method. The anticancer efficacy of isolated fungal taxol were also evaluated in human colon cancer cell HCT 15 by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), cytotoxicity and nuclear morphology analysis. The isolated fungal taxol showed positive towards biosynthetic gene (dbat) and effective against both Gram positive as well as Gram negative. The fungal taxol suppress growth of cancer cell line HCT 15 with an IC50 value of 3.5 μM concentration by 24 h treatment. Thus, the result reveals that C. oxysporum could be a potential alternative source for production of taxol and have antibacterial as well as anticancer properties with possible clinical applications.

  20. The combination of a nuclear HMGB1-positive and HMGB2-negative expression is potentially associated with a shortened survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Toru; Izumi, Hiroto; Kitada, Shohei; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Tasaki, Takashi; Zhi, Li; Guo, Xin; Kawatsu, Yuichiro; Kimura, Tomoko; Horie, Seichi; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Noguchi, Hirotsugu; Wang, Ke-Yong; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Yamada, Sohsuke

    2014-10-01

    High-mobility group box (HMGB) proteins are ubiquitous, abundant nuclear non-histone chromosomal proteins that play a critical role in binding to distorted DNA structures and subsequently regulating DNA transcription, replication, repair, and recombination. Both HMGB1 and HMGB2 exhibit a high expression in several human cancers and are closely associated with tumor progression and a poor prognosis. However, the expression patterns of these molecules in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remain to be elucidated. As most cases of postoperative relapse of PDAC occur within the first 2 years, the clinical significance of accurate biomarkers is needed. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between the immunohistochemical HMGB1 and HMGB2 expression and the clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis using 62 paraffin-embedded tumor samples obtained from patients with surgically resected PDAC. The HMGB1/2 expression was considered to be positive when 10 % or more of the cancer cells showed positive nuclear, not merely cytoplasmic, staining. Consequently, the expression of HMGB1/2 was observed in 54 (87.1 %) and 31 (50.0 %) patients, respectively. Unexpectedly, a positive HMGB1 expression was found to have a significantly close relationship with a negative HMGB2 expression. The univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that the patients with a HMGB1+ and HMGB2- status had markedly lower disease-specific survival rates, especially within the first 2 years postoperatively, whereas those with a HMGB1+ status alone did not. Therefore, the combination of a HMGB1+ and HMGB2- expression potentially predicts a poor prognosis in patients with PDAC, and these new biomarkers may be useful parameters for clinical management in the early postoperative phase.

  1. NUCLEAR FACTOR Y, Subunit C (NF-YC Transcription Factors Are Positive Regulators of Photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A Myers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports suggest that NF-Y transcription factors are positive regulators of skotomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Three NF-YC genes (NF-YC3, NF-YC4, and NF-YC9 are known to have overlapping functions in photoperiod dependent flowering and previous studies demonstrated that they interact with basic leucine zipper (bZIP transcription factors. This included ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5, which has well-demonstrated roles in photomorphogenesis. Similar to hy5 mutants, we report that nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 triple mutants failed to inhibit hypocotyl elongation in all tested light wavelengths. Surprisingly, nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 hy5 mutants had synergistic defects in light perception, suggesting that NF-Ys represent a parallel light signaling pathway. As with other photomorphogenic transcription factors, nf-yc3 nf-yc4 nf-yc9 triple mutants also partially suppressed the short hypocotyl and dwarf rosette phenotypes of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (cop1 mutants. Thus, our data strongly suggest that NF-Y transcription factors have important roles as positive regulators of photomorphogenesis, and in conjunction with other recent reports, implies that the NF-Y are multifaceted regulators of early seedling development.

  2. Fungal biodiversity to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambergo, Felipe S; Valencia, Estela Y

    2016-03-01

    Fungal habitats include soil, water, and extreme environments. With around 100,000 fungus species already described, it is estimated that 5.1 million fungus species exist on our planet, making fungi one of the largest and most diverse kingdoms of eukaryotes. Fungi show remarkable metabolic features due to a sophisticated genomic network and are important for the production of biotechnological compounds that greatly impact our society in many ways. In this review, we present the current state of knowledge on fungal biodiversity, with special emphasis on filamentous fungi and the most recent discoveries in the field of identification and production of biotechnological compounds. More than 250 fungus species have been studied to produce these biotechnological compounds. This review focuses on three of the branches generally accepted in biotechnological applications, which have been identified by a color code: red, green, and white for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and industrial biotechnology, respectively. We also discuss future prospects for the use of filamentous fungi in biotechnology application.

  3. Identification and functional studies of Akirin, a potential positive nuclear factor of NF-κB signaling pathways in the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Fujun; Wang, Xianzong; Qian, Zhaoying; Liu, Qiao; Liu, Yongjie; He, Shulin; Mi, Xiao; Bai, Cheng; Sun, Chengbo; Liu, Xiaolin

    2013-12-01

    As conserved nuclear factors, Akirins play critical roles in regulating antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) transcription downstream of NF-κB dependent signaling pathways in insects and mammals. However, no any functional studies was reported in penaeid shrimp. The identification and functional analysis of Akirin in the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei were made in this research. The 833 nucleotides cDNA of Litopenaeus vannamei Akirin (LvAkirin) was obtained with an open reading frame of 639 bp, which encodes a putative protein of 212 amino acids. The molecular weight of LvAkirin is about 23.7 kDa with theoretical pI of 9.05. Two predicted nuclear localization signals (NLSs) were found and amino acid sequence alignments showed that Akirins are highly conserved between insects and mammals. The constitutive expression of LvAkirin mRNA was confirmed in all the examined tissues and high level appeared in testis followed by hemocytes and gill. LvAkirin mRNA was strongly induced in response to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection. Silencing LvAkirin by dsRNA significantly reduced the expression of NF-κB dependent anti-lipopolysaccharide factor, crustin and penaeidin3a as well as transcription factors, Dorsal and Relish post Vibrio anguillarum (V. anguillarum) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (M. lysodeikticus) challenge. Antibacterial activities of shrimp plasma was analyzed and high cumulative mortality was found in LvAkirin-silenced shrimps post bacteria challenge. Hence, we proposed LvAkirin might function as a positive nuclear factor of NF-κB dependent signaling pathways in shrimp innate immunity.

  4. Fungal atopy in adult cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henry, M

    2012-02-03

    This study set out to estimate the prevalence of atopy to a variety of common ubiquitous fungi, including A. fumigatus, in cystic fibrosis (CF), and to evaluate the investigations by which the diagnosis was made. Particular attention was paid to the usefulness of skin testing and immunoassays in detecting which patients had simple fungal atopy, and which patients were at high risk of developing allergic bronchopulmonary mycoses. This cross-sectional study included 21 adult CF patients and 20 matched controls. Serum samples were taken for the measurement of total serum IgE and specific serum IgE to nine common fungi. Immediate hypersensitivity skin prick testing to each of the fungi was also performed. Simple fungal atopy was described in subjects fulfilling the following criteria: total serum IgE > 100 KU l(-1) with specific radioimmunoassay > or = grade 1 to at least one fungus and a positive skin prick test (SPT) > or = 3 mm to the same fungus. \\'High risk\\' for developing allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) was described in subjects fulfilling the following criteria: total serum IgE > 200 KU l(-1) with specific radioimmunoassay > or = grade 2 to at least one fungus and a positive skin prick test (SPT) > or = 6 mm to the same fungus. The adult CF group had a significantly higher total SPT score (P=0.005) and mean total serum IgE (P<0.05) than controls. Forty-three percent of CF patients fulfilled the criteria for fungal atopy to at least a single fungus. Over half this group had an atopic tendency to more than one fungus. Nineteen percent of the CF group were at least \\'high risk\\' of developing ABPM. Skin prick testing is a better marker of fungal atopy and a better predictor of those adult CF patients at higher risk of developing ABPM than specific radioimmunoassay serum testing. There is a high prevalence of fungal atopy in the adult CF population. Total serum IgE and skin prick testing are good predictors of fungal atopy and help predict those at

  5. Key Determinants of the Fungal and Bacterial Microbiomes in Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettleson, Eric M.; Adhikari, Atin; Vesper, Stephen; Chatterjee, Kanistha; Indugula, Reshmi; Reponen, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Backgroundy The microbiome of the home is of great interest because of its possible impact on health. Our goal was to identify some of the factors that determine the richness, evenness and diversity of the home's fungal and bacterial microbiomes. Methods Vacuumed settled dust from homes (n=35) in Cincinnati, OH, were analyzed by pyrosequencing to determine the fungal and bacterial relative sequence occurrence. The correlation coefficients between home environmental characteristics, including age of home, Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) values, occupant number, relative humidity and temperature, as well as pets (dog and cat) were evaluated for their influence on fungal and bacterial communities. In addition, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used for identifying fungal and bacterial genera and species associated with those housing determinants found to be significant. Results The fungal richness was found to be positively correlated with age of home (p=0.002), ERMI value (p=0.003), and relative humidity (p=0.015) in the home. However, fungal evenness and diversity were only correlated with the age of home (p=0.001). Diversity and evenness (not richness) of the bacterial microbiome in the homes were associated with dog ownership. Linear discriminant analysis showed total of 39 putative fungal genera/species with significantly higher LDA scores in high ERMI homes and 47 genera/species with significantly higher LDA scores in homes with high relative humidity. When categorized according to the age of the home, a total of 67 fungal genera/species had LDA scores above the significance threshold. Dog ownership appeared to have the most influence on the bacterial microbiome, since a total of 130 bacterial genera/species had significantly higher LDA scores in homes with dogs. Conclusions Some key determinants of the fungal and bacterial microbiome appear to be excess moisture, age of the home and dog ownership. PMID:25707017

  6. Managing acute invasive fungal sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyhalo, Kristina M; Donald, Carrlene; Mendez, Anthony; Hoxworth, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Acute invasive fungal sinusitis is the most aggressive form of fungal sinusitis and can be fatal, especially in patients who are immunosuppressed. Early diagnosis and intervention are crucial and potentially lifesaving, so primary care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion for this disease. Patients may need to be admitted to the hospital for IV antifungal therapy and surgical debridement.

  7. Current management of fungal infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meis, J.F.G.M.; Verweij, P.E.

    2001-01-01

    The management of superficial fungal infections differs significantly from the management of systemic fungal infections. Most superficial infections are treated with topical antifungal agents, the choice of agent being determined by the site and extent of the infection and by the causative organism,

  8. The evolution of fungal epiphytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hongsanan, S.; Sánchez-Ramírez, S.; Crous, P.W.; Ariyawansa, H.A.; Zhao, R.L.; Hyde, K.D.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal epiphytes are a polyphyletic group found on the surface of plants, particularly on leaves, with a worldwide distribution. They belong in the phylum Ascomycota, which contains the largest known number of fungal genera. There has been little research dating the origins of the common ancestors o

  9. Interphase cell cycle dynamics of a late-replicating, heterochromatic homogeneously staining region: precise choreography of condensation/decondensation and nuclear positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Sudlow, G; Belmont, A S

    1998-03-09

    Recently we described a new method for in situ localization of specific DNA sequences, based on lac operator/repressor recognition (Robinett, C.C., A. Straight, G. Li, C. Willhelm, G. Sudlow, A. Murray, and A.S. Belmont. 1996. J. Cell Biol. 135:1685-1700). We have applied this methodology to visualize the cell cycle dynamics of an approximately 90 Mbp, late-replicating, heterochromatic homogeneously staining region (HSR) in CHO cells, combining immunostaining with direct in vivo observations. Between anaphase and early G1, the HSR extends approximately twofold to a linear, approximately 0.3-mum-diam chromatid, and then recondenses to a compact mass adjacent to the nuclear envelope. No further changes in HSR conformation or position are seen through mid-S phase. However, HSR DNA replication is preceded by a decondensation and movement of the HSR into the nuclear interior 4-6 h into S phase. During DNA replication the HSR resolves into linear chromatids and then recondenses into a compact mass; this is followed by a third extension of the HSR during G2/ prophase. Surprisingly, compaction of the HSR is extremely high at all stages of interphase. Preliminary ultrastructural analysis of the HSR suggests at least three levels of large-scale chromatin organization above the 30-nm fiber.

  10. The molecular evolution and structural organization of group I introns at position 1389 in nuclear small subunit rDNA of myxomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; Haugen, Peik; Lundblad, Eirik W; Haugli, Kari; Johansen, Steinar D

    2007-01-01

    The number of nuclear group I introns from myxomycetes is rapidly increasing in GenBank as more rDNA sequences from these organisms are being sequenced. They represent an interesting and complex group of intervening sequences because several introns are mobile (or inferred to be mobile) and many contain large and unusual insertions in peripheral loops. Here we describe related group I introns at position 1389 in the small subunit rDNA of representatives from the myxomycete family Didymiaceae. Phylogenetic analyses support a common origin and mainly vertical inheritance of the intron. All S1389 introns from the Didymiaceae belong to the IC1 subclass of nuclear group I introns. The central catalytic core region of about 100 nt appears divergent in sequence composition even though the introns reside in closely related species. Furthermore, unlike the majority of group I introns from myxomycetes the S1389 introns do not self-splice as naked RNA in vitro under standard conditions, consistent with a dependence on host factors for folding or activity. Finally, the myxomycete S1389 introns are exclusively found within the family Didymiaceae, which suggests that this group I intron was acquired after the split between the families Didymiaceae and Physaraceae.

  11. High nuclear level of Vav1 is a positive prognostic factor in early invasive breast tumors: a role in modulating genes related to the efficiency of metastatic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassilli, Silvia; Brugnoli, Federica; Lattanzio, Rossano; Rossi, Cosmo; Perracchio, Letizia; Mottolese, Marcella; Marchisio, Marco; Palomba, Maria; Nika, Ervin; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Piantelli, Mauro; Capitani, Silvano; Bertagnolo, Valeria

    2014-06-30

    Vav1 is one of the signalling proteins normally restricted to hematopoietic cells that results ectopically expressed in solid tumors, including breast cancer. By immunohistochemical analysis on TMAs containing invasive breast tumor from patients without lymph node involvement, we have found that Vav1 is expressed in almost all investigated cancers and shows a peculiar localization inside the nucleus of tumor cells. High amounts of nuclear Vav1 are positively correlated with low incidence of relapse, regardless phenotype and molecular subtype of breast neoplasia. In particular, Kaplan-Meier plots showed an elevated risk of distant metastasis in patients with low Vav1 expression compared with patients with high Vav1 expression in their tumors. Experiments performed with breast tumor-derived cells indicated that Vav1 negatively modulates their invasiveness in vitro and their metastatic efficiency in vivo, possibly by affecting the expression of genes involved in invasion and/or metastasis of breast tumors. Since the high heterogeneity of breast tumors makes difficult to predict the evolution of early breast neoplasias, the evaluation of nuclear Vav1 levels may help in the characterization and management of early breast cancer patients. In particular, Vav1 may serve as a prognostic biomarker and a target for new therapies aimed to prevent breast cancer progression.

  12. Evaluation of nested PCR in diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Badiee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Given the importance of rapid diagnosis for fungal rhinosinusitis, this study aimed to evaluate the use of nested PCR to identify Aspergillus and Mucor species in clinical samples from patients with suspected fungal rhinosinusitis.Methods: Functional endoscopic sinus surgery specimens were collected from 98 patients with rhinosinusitis from 2012 to 2013. All samples were ground and cultured on sabouraud dextrose agar. The isolated fungi were identified based on their macroscopic and microscopic features. Fungal DNA was extracted from the tissue samples and nested PCR was performedwith two sets of primers for Mucor and Aspergillus.Results: Direct microscopic showed that 5.1% contained fungal components and 9.2% exhibited growth of fungi in culture. The most common agents isolated were Aspergillus fumigatus (n= 3 , Aspergillus flavus (n=2, Penicillium sp (n=3 and Alternaria sp. (n=1. Mucor sp. was identified in the pathology smear from 1 patient. Positive results for fungal rhinosinusitis were obtained for a total of 10.2% by culture or pathology smear. Positive PCR results were obtained in 72 samples for Aspergillus and 31 samples for Mucor.Conclusion: Our results suggest that endoscopic sinus surgery specimens are not suitable for nested PCR, probably because of the accumulation of fungi that contaminate the environmental air. This drawback is a limiting factor for diagnosis with nasal cavity specimens. Therefore, molecular methods and conventional culture techniques are helpful complementarydiagnostic methods to detect fungal rhinosinusitis and determine appropriate management for these patients.

  13. The E3 deubiquitinase USP17 is a positive regulator of retinoic acid-related orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt) in Th17 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Xiuwen; Wu, Qingsi; Yin, Shuying; Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Jing; Xing, Yue; Chen, Zuojia; Tsun, Andy; Li, Dan; Piccioni, Miranda; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Qiang; Jiang, Lindi; Bao, Liming; Lv, Ling; Li, Bin

    2014-09-12

    Stable retinoic acid-related orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt) expression is pivotal for the development and function of Th17 cells. Here we demonstrate that expression of the transcription factor RORγt can be regulated through deubiquitination, which prevents proteasome-mediated degradation. We establish that USP17 stabilizes RORγt protein expression by reducing RORγt polyubiquitination at its Lys-360 residue. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous USP17 in Th17 cells resulted in decreased RORγt protein levels and down-regulation of Th17-related genes. Furthermore, USP17 expression was up-regulated in CD4(+) T cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Our data reveal a molecular mechanism in which RORγt expression in Th17 cells can be positively regulated by USP17, thereby modulating Th17 cell functions.

  14. Mass spectrometric proteomics reveals that nuclear protein positive cofactor PC4 selectively binds to cross-linked DNA by a trans-platinum anticancer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhifeng; Luo, Qun; Yang, Liping; Bing, Tao; Li, Xianchan; Guo, Wei; Wu, Kui; Zhao, Yao; Xiong, Shaoxiang; Shangguan, Dihua; Wang, Fuyi

    2014-02-26

    An MS-based proteomic strategy combined with chemically functionalized gold nanoparticles as affinity probes was developed and validated by successful identification and quantification of HMGB1, which is well characterized to interact selectively with 1,2-cross-linked DNA by cisplatin, from whole cell lysates. The subsequent application of this method to identify proteins responding to 1,3-cross-linked DNA by a trans-platinum anticancer complex, trans-PtTz (Tz = thiazole), revealed that the human nuclear protein positive cofactor PC4 selectively binds to the damaged DNA, implying that PC4 may play a role in cellular response to DNA damage by trans-PtTz.

  15. The Na+ transport in gram-positive bacteria defect in the Mrp antiporter complex measured with 23Na nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecki, Kamil; Hägerhäll, Cecilia; Drakenberg, Torbjörn

    2014-01-15

    (23)Na nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has previously been used to monitor Na(+) translocation across membranes in gram-negative bacteria and in various other organelles and liposomes using a membrane-impermeable shift reagent to resolve the signals resulting from internal and external Na(+). In this work, the (23)Na NMR method was adapted for measurements of internal Na(+) concentration in the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, with the aim of assessing the Na(+) translocation activity of the Mrp (multiple resistance and pH) antiporter complex, a member of the cation proton antiporter-3 (CPA-3) family. The sodium-sensitive growth phenotype observed in a B. subtilis strain with the gene encoding MrpA deleted could indeed be correlated to the inability of this strain to maintain a lower internal Na(+) concentration than an external one.

  16. Dispositivo de posicionamiento de muestras biológicas para su irradiación en un canal radial de un reactor nuclear // Biological samples positioning device for irradiations on a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Rodríguez - Gual

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ResumenPor la demanda de un dispositivo experimental para el posicionamiento de las muestras biológicaspara su irradiación en un canal radial de un reactor nuclear de investigaciones en funcionamiento, seconstruyó y se puso en marcha un dispositivo para la colocación y retirada de las muestras en laposición de irradiación de dicho canal. Se efectuaron las valoraciones económicas comparando conotro tipo de dispositivo con las mismas funciones. Este trabajo formó parte de un proyectointernacional entre Cuba y Brasil que abarcó el estudio de los daños inducidos por diferentes tipos deradiación ionizante en moléculas de ADN. La solución propuesta es comprobada experimentalmente,lo que demuestra la validez práctica del dispositivo. Como resultado del trabajo, el dispositivoexperimental para la irradiación de las muestras biológicas se encuentra instalado y funcionando yapor 5 años en el canal radial # 3(BH#3 Palabras claves: reactor nuclear de investigaciones, dispositivo para posicionamiento de muestras,___________________________________________________________________________AbstractFor the demand of an experimental device for biological samples positioning system for irradiationson a radial channel at the nuclear research reactor in operation was constructed and started up adevice for the place and remove of the biological samples from the irradiation channels withoutinterrupting the operation of the reactor. The economical valuations are effected comparing withanother type of device with the same functions. This work formed part of an international projectbetween Cuba and Brazil that undertook the study of the induced damages by various types ofionizing radiation in DNA molecules. Was experimentally tested the proposed solution, whichdemonstrates the practical validity of the device. As a result of the work, the experimental device forbiological samples irradiations are installed and operating in the radial beam hole #3(BH#3

  17. Cardiovascular outcomes of a positive nuclear stress test but negative coronary angiography in a multiethnic male predominant cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Addison

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients presenting with chest pain and evidence of functional ischemia by myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI, but lacking commensurate angiographic disease pose a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. They are often dismissed as having ′false-positive MPI′. Moreover, a majority of the available long-term outcome data for it has been derived from homogenous female populations. In this study, we sought to evaluate the long-term outcomes of this presentation in a multiethnic male-predominant cohort. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively identified 47 patients who presented to our institution between 2002 and 2005 with chest pain and evidence of ischemia on MPI, but with no significant angiographic disease on subsequent cardiac catheterization (cases. The occurrence of adverse cardiovascular outcomes (chest pain, congestive heart failure, acute myocardial infarction and stroke post-index coronary angiogram was tracked. Similar data was collected for 37 patients who also presented with chest pain, but normal MPI over the same period (controls. Overall average follow-up was over 22 months. Results: Fifty-three percent (26/47 of the cases had one or more of the adverse outcomes as compared with 22% (8/37 of controls (P < 0.01. Of these, 13 (50.0% and 3 (37.5% were males, respectively. Conclusions: Ischemia on MPI is predictive of long-term adverse cardiovascular outcomes despite normal (′false-negative′ coronary angiography. This appears to be gender-neutral.

  18. The molecular evolution and structural organization of self-splicing group I introns at position 516 in nuclear SSU rDNA of myxomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Peik; Coucheron, Dag H; Rønning, Sissel B; Haugli, Kari; Johansen, Steinar

    2003-01-01

    Group I introns are relatively common within nuclear ribosomal DNA of eukaryotic microorganisms, especially in myxomycetes. Introns at position S516 in the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene are particularly common, but have a sporadic occurrence in myxomycetes. Fuligo septica, Badhamia gracilis, and Physarum flavicomum, all members of the family Physaraceae, contain related group IC1 introns at this site. The F. septica intron was studied at the molecular level and found to self-splice as naked RNA and to generate full-length intron RNA circles during incubation. Group I introns at position S516 appear to have a particularly widespread distribution among protists and fungi. Secondary structural analysis of more than 140 S516 group I introns available in the database revealed five different types of organization, including IC1 introns with and without His-Cys homing endonuclease genes, complex twin-ribozyme introns, IE introns, and degenerate group I-like introns. Both intron structural and phylogenetic analyses indicate a multiple origin of the S516 introns during evolution. The myxomycete introns are related to S516 introns in the more distantly related brown algae and Acanthamoeba species. Possible mechanisms of intron transfer both at the RNA- and DNA-levels are discussed in order to explain the observed widespread, but scattered, phylogenetic distribution.

  19. Molecular phylogenetic position of endangered Wilfredomys within Sigmodontinae (Cricetidae) based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences and comments on Wiedomyini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Leonardo Ferreira; Passaia, Milena Henrique; Rodrigues, Fernando Pacheco; Peters, Felipe Bortolotto; Sponchiado, Jonas; Valiati, Victor Hugo; Christoff, Alexandre Uarth

    2015-07-20

    Wilfredomys, a monotypic genus of endangered sigmodontine rats, was historically related to the tribe Thomasomyini or considered "incertae sedis". Given no molecular data is available for Wilfredomys, the phylogenetic position of this taxon is uncertain in relation to modern, molecular hypotheses of sigmodontine relationships. We investigate the phylogeny of Wilfredomys to provide a hypothesis of its position within Sigmodontinae based on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses recovered Wilfredomys oenax as sister to Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos, and Wie. cerradensis fell out sister to this clade. At the genus level, Phaenomys is sister to Wilfredomys + Wiedomys, forming a novel and well-supported sigmodontine clade. Our results suggest that tribe Wiedomyini should encompass Wilfredomys in addition to Wiedomys and Cholomys, thus the hypothesis that Wiedomys is paraphyletic should be investigated further. Another plausible classification scheme consistent with our results would be to expand Wiedomyini to encompass the clade composed of Phaenomys + Wilfredomys + Wiedomys. Last, our recovery of an "Atlantic clade" composed of lineages restricted to eastern South America supports the idea that this region has likely played an important role in sigmodontine diversification.

  20. Ectomycorrhizal fungal richness declines towards the host species' range edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankau, Richard A; Keymer, Daniel P

    2016-07-01

    Plant range boundaries are generally considered to reflect abiotic conditions; however, a rise in negative or decline in positive species interactions at range margins may contribute to these stable boundaries. While evidence suggests that pollinator mutualisms may decline near range boundaries, little is known about other important plant mutualisms, including microbial root symbionts. Here, we used molecular methods to characterize root-associated fungal communities in populations of two related temperate tree species from across the species' range in the eastern United States. We found that ectomycorrhizal fungal richness on plant roots declined with distance from the centre of the host species range. These patterns were not evident in nonmycorrhizal fungal communities on roots nor in fungal communities in bulk soil. Climatic and soil chemical variables could not explain these biogeographic patterns, although these abiotic gradients affected other components of the bulk soil and rhizosphere fungal community. Depauperate ectomycorrhizal fungal communities may represent an underappreciated challenge to marginal tree populations, especially as rapid climate change pushes these populations outside their current climate niche.

  1. Fungal responses to elevated temperature and soil nitrogen availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, S.; Geyer, K.; Morrison, E. W.; Frey, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    The soil microbial community controls decomposition of organic residues which constitute a large portion of soil organic matter. Microbial growth is impacted by global changes such as warming and soil nitrogen (N) availability. Carbon use efficiency (CUE) is an important parameter that influences soil C dynamics by partitioning organic matter between soil C and CO2 pools. This research focuses on the growth of different fungal species' exposed to varying temperatures and N availabilities, while quantifying respiration (CO2 flux) and microbial growth. To assess individual fungal isolates, we constructed a sterilized artificial soil medium to mimic a sandy loam soil by mixing 70% sand, 20% silt, and 10% clay. Several fungal species of the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were individually grown in this media at different temperatures (15 and 25°C) and N levels. Soil respiration was measured over the incubation period. Fungal biomass was estimated by chloroform fumigation extraction and qPCR of the fungal ITS region. Our results indicate that fungi were able to grow effectively and reproducibly in the artificial soil medium, demonstrating that using an artificial soil is an effective method for assessing individual species responses. Temperature and N availability had a positive affect on C mineralization and biomass. CUE varied among fungal species and, in general, declined with temperature.

  2. Characteristics and determinants of ambient fungal spores in Hualien, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsiao-Man; Rao, Carol Y.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu; Liu, Chi-Ming; Chao, H. Jasmine

    Characteristics and determinants of ambient aeroallergens are of much concern in recent years because of the apparent health impacts of allergens. Yet relatively little is known about the complex behaviors of ambient aeroallergens. To address this issue, we monitored ambient fungal spores in Hualien, Taiwan from 1993-1996 to examine the compositions and temporal variations of fungi, and to evaluate possible determinants. We used a Burkard seven-day volumetric spore trap to collect daily fungal spores. Air pollutants, meteorological factors, and Asian dust events were included in the statistical analyses to predict fungal levels. We found that the most dominant fungal categories were ascospores, followed by Cladosporium and Aspergillus/Penicillium. The majority of the fungal categories had significant diurnal and seasonal variations. Total fungi, Cladosporium, Ganoderma, Arthrinium/Papularia, Cercospora, Periconia, Alternaria, Botrytis, and PM 10 had significantly higher concentrations ( p<0.05) during the period affected by Asian dust events. In multiple regression models, we found that temperature was consistently and positively associated with fungal concentrations. Other factors correlated with fungal concentrations included ozone, particulate matters with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM 10), relative humidity, rainfall, atmospheric pressure, total hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide. Most of the fungal categories had higher levels in 1994 than in 1995-96, probably due to urbanization of the study area. In this study, we demonstrated complicated interrelationships between fungi and air pollution/meteorological factors. In addition, long-range transport of air pollutants contributed significantly to local aeroallergen levels. Future studies should examine the health impacts of aeroallergens, as well as the synergistic/antagonistic effects of weather, and local and global-scale air pollutions.

  3. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These types of infections are called healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Hospital staff and healthcare providers do everything they can ... IV tube) can increase your risk for fungal infection. During your hospital stay you may need a central venous catheter, ...

  4. Fungal Entomopathogens in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entomopathogenic fungi are found in a wide variety of fungal groups. The order Hypocreales contains the largest number of entomogenous fungi, including two of the most widely studied, Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and Metarhizium anisopliae (Metchnikoff) Sorok...

  5. Fungal genomics beyond Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, Gerald; Mcintyre, Mhairi; Nielsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Fungi are used extensively in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the model organism for fungal research for many years, particularly in functional genomics. However, considering the diversity within the fungal kingdom, it is obvious that the a......Fungi are used extensively in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been the model organism for fungal research for many years, particularly in functional genomics. However, considering the diversity within the fungal kingdom, it is obvious...... that the application of the existing methods of genome, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis to other fungi has enormous potential, especially for the production of food and food ingredients. The developments in the past year demonstrate that we have only just started to exploit this potential....

  6. Fungal microbiota dysbiosis in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Harry; Leducq, Valentin; Aschard, Hugues; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Jegou, Sarah; Landman, Cecilia; Cohen, David; Liguori, Giuseppina; Bourrier, Anne; Nion-Larmurier, Isabelle; Cosnes, Jacques; Seksik, Philippe; Langella, Philippe; Skurnik, David; Richard, Mathias L; Beaugerie, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Objective The bacterial intestinal microbiota plays major roles in human physiology and IBDs. Although some data suggest a role of the fungal microbiota in IBD pathogenesis, the available data are scarce. The aim of our study was to characterise the faecal fungal microbiota in patients with IBD. Design Bacterial and fungal composition of the faecal microbiota of 235 patients with IBD and 38 healthy subjects (HS) was determined using 16S and ITS2 sequencing, respectively. The obtained sequences were analysed using the Qiime pipeline to assess composition and diversity. Bacterial and fungal taxa associated with clinical parameters were identified using multivariate association with linear models. Correlation between bacterial and fungal microbiota was investigated using Spearman's test and distance correlation. Results We observed that fungal microbiota is skewed in IBD, with an increased Basidiomycota/Ascomycota ratio, a decreased proportion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and an increased proportion of Candida albicans compared with HS. We also identified disease-specific alterations in diversity, indicating that a Crohn's disease-specific gut environment may favour fungi at the expense of bacteria. The concomitant analysis of bacterial and fungal microbiota showed a dense and homogenous correlation network in HS but a dramatically unbalanced network in IBD, suggesting the existence of disease-specific inter-kingdom alterations. Conclusions Besides bacterial dysbiosis, our study identifies a distinct fungal microbiota dysbiosis in IBD characterised by alterations in biodiversity and composition. Moreover, we unravel here disease-specific inter-kingdom network alterations in IBD, suggesting that, beyond bacteria, fungi might also play a role in IBD pathogenesis. PMID:26843508

  7. Algal and fungal diversity in Antarctic lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chae Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo; Elvebakk, Arve; Kim, Ok-Sun; Jeong, Gajin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The composition of lichen ecosystems except mycobiont and photobiont has not been evaluated intensively. In addition, recent studies to identify algal genotypes have raised questions about the specific relationship between mycobiont and photobiont. In the current study, we analyzed algal and fungal community structures in lichen species from King George Island, Antarctica, by pyrosequencing of eukaryotic large subunit (LSU) and algal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domains of the nuclear rRNA gene. The sequencing results of LSU and ITS regions indicated that each lichen thallus contained diverse algal species. The major algal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) defined at a 99% similarity cutoff of LSU sequences accounted for 78.7-100% of the total algal community in each sample. In several cases, the major OTUs defined by LSU sequences were represented by two closely related OTUs defined by 98% sequence similarity of ITS domain. The results of LSU sequences indicated that lichen-associated fungi belonged to the Arthoniomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Leotiomycetes, and Sordariomycetes of the Ascomycota, and Tremellomycetes and Cystobasidiomycetes of the Basidiomycota. The composition of major photobiont species and lichen-associated fungal community were mostly related to the mycobiont species. The contribution of growth forms or substrates on composition of photobiont and lichen-associated fungi was not evident.

  8. Effect of dosimeter's position on occupational radiation extremity dose measurement for nuclear medicine workers during (18)F-FDG preparation for PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salesses, Fabien; Perez, Paul; Maillard, Aline E; Blanchard, Julie; Mallard, Sabine; Bordenave, Laurence

    2016-12-01

    The recent spread of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) poses extremity dosimetry challenges. The question arose whether the radiation dose measured by the ring thermoluminescent dosimeter usually worn on the proximal phalanx (P1) of the index finger measures doses that are representative of the true doses received by the upper extremities of the operators. A prospective individual dosimetry study was performed in which the personal equivalent dose Hp (0.07) received during a specific 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) manual dose-dispensing procedure was measured in a paired design by two operational personal electronic dosimeters fitted on the palm side of the index finger, namely in the P1 and distal phalanx (P3) positions. The study participants were ten nuclear medicine technologists working in two nuclear medicine departments. The personal equivalent radiation doses received by the palm side of the proximal phalanx of the index finger [Hp (0.07)P1] and that received by the distal phalanx [Hp (0.07)P3] were compared. The median Hp (0.07)P3/Hp (0.07)P1 ratio per participant varied between 1.0 and 2.5 (based on 23 to 31 measurements per participant). The 271 paired measurements revealed a crude Hp (0.07)P3/Hp (0.07)P1 ratio of 1.67, significantly different from 1 (p = 0.0004, 95 % CI [1.35-2.07]). When adjusted on participant's gender and mother vial activity, the ratio was similar (1.53, p = 0.003, 95 % CI [1.22-1.92]). The study demonstrated a significant disparity that may exist between the radiation doses measured in the P1 and P3 positions of operators during (18)F-FDG manipulation. These findings emphasize the importance of performing workplace dosimetry studies adapted to each radiopharmaceutical and manipulation thereof, aiming to guarantee optimal workers' dosimetry monitoring schemes. Hospital Nursing and Paramedical Research Program (PHRIP, 2011-2013) from the French Ministry of Health (DGOS), http

  9. INVASIVE FUNGAL INFECTIONS OF HEAD AND NECK: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infection of the head and neck is an emerging problem with diverse presentation. It has recently gained clinical importance as it causes considerable morbidity and mortality. It is more common in patients with diabetics, chronic renal disease, patients undergoing chemotherapy etc. Early recognition of this entity will enable treating surgeon to institute appropriate treatment. AIM OF THE STUDY: To review the microbiological and clinicopathological profile of patients diagn osed as invasive fungal infections of the head and neck in a tertiary referral hospital. METHODOLOGY: In this retrospective study we reviewed the clinical data ( M icrobiology, clinical manifestations, radiological investigation, diagnosis, therapy and histolopathology of 25 patients diagnosed and treated for invasive fungal infection of the head and neck in our unit in a tertiary care hospital. The period of study was July 2006 to July 2010 (4 years. All cases with a diagnosis of invasive fungal infection of the head and neck region, confirmed either by fungal smear, culture or histopathological examination were included in the study. RESULTS: In this study, Of the 25 patients, majority had invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (52%, mucormycosis (32% and zygomycotic necrotizing fasciitis (12%. One patient had invasive subcutaneous aspergillosis. Most of the patients presented in the fifth decade of life, 86% of these patients had uncontrolled diabetes. The commonest presentation in mucormycosis was head ache or facial pain (100% along with ptosis (88%. Fungal smear was positive in 81%, fungi were isolated in culture in 54% and histopathological study was positive for fungal hyphae in all these patients (100%. Though all these patients had florid fungal infection of the head and neck only one patient had clinical and radiological evidence of cervical lymphadenitis. CONCLUSION: A clinical suspicion of mucormycosis should be kept in mind in an immunocompromised patient

  10. Diversity and bioprospecting of fungal communities associated with endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Valéria M; Furbino, Laura E; Santiago, Iara F; Pellizzari, Franciane M; Yokoya, Nair S; Pupo, Diclá; Alves, Tânia M A; Junior, Policarpo A S; Romanha, Alvaro J; Zani, Carlos L; Cantrell, Charles L; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2013-07-01

    We surveyed the distribution and diversity of fungi associated with eight macroalgae from Antarctica and their capability to produce bioactive compounds. The collections yielded 148 fungal isolates, which were identified using molecular methods as belonging to 21 genera and 50 taxa. The most frequent taxa were Geomyces species (sp.), Penicillium sp. and Metschnikowia australis. Seven fungal isolates associated with the endemic Antarctic macroalgae Monostroma hariotii (Chlorophyte) displayed high internal transcribed spacer sequences similarities with the psychrophilic pathogenic fungus Geomyces destructans. Thirty-three fungal singletons (66%) were identified, representing rare components of the fungal communities. The fungal communities displayed high diversity, richness and dominance indices; however, rarefaction curves indicated that not all of the fungal diversity present was recovered. Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6034 and Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6120, recovered from the endemic species Palmaria decipiens (Rhodophyte) and M. hariotii, respectively, yielded extracts with high and selective antifungal and/or trypanocidal activities, in which a preliminary spectral analysis using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicated the presence of highly functionalised aromatic compounds. These results suggest that the endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae of Antarctica shelter a rich, diversity and complex fungal communities consisting of a few dominant indigenous or mesophilic cold-adapted species, and a large number of rare and/or endemic taxa, which may provide an interesting model of algal-fungal interactions under extreme conditions as well as a potential source of bioactive compounds.

  11. Dual roles of nuclear receptor liver X receptor α (LXRα) in the CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes as a positive and negative regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Sakurai, Kaori; Tsuchiya, Yuri; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-01

    CYP3A4 is a major drug-metabolizing enzyme in humans, whose expression levels show large inter-individual variations and are associated with several factors such as genetic polymorphism, physiological and disease status, diet and xenobiotic exposure. Nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a key transcription factor for the xenobiotic-mediated transcription of CYP3A4. In this study, we have investigated a possible involvement of liver X receptor α (LXRα), a critical regulator of cholesterol homeostasis, in the hepatic CYP3A4 expression since several recent reports suggest the involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the cholesterol metabolism in humans and mice. Reporter assays using wild-type and mutated CYP3A4 luciferase reporter plasmids and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that LXRα up-regulated CYP3A4 through the known DNA elements critical for the PXR-dependent CYP3A4 transcription, suggesting LXRα as a positive regulator for the CYP3A4 expression and a crosstalk between PXR and LXRα in the expression. In fact, reporter assays showed that LXRα activation attenuated the PXR-dependent CYP3A4 transcription. Moreover, a PXR agonist treatment-dependent increase in CYP3A4 mRNA levels was suppressed by co-treatment with an LXRα agonist in human primary hepatocytes and HepaRG cells. The suppression was not observed when LXRα expression was knocked-down in HepaRG cells. In conclusion, the present results suggest that sterol-sensitive LXRα positively regulates the basal expression of CYP3A4 but suppresses the xenobiotic/PXR-dependent CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. Therefore, nutritional, physiological and disease conditions affecting LXRα might be one of the determinants for the basal and xenobiotic-responsive expression of CYP3A4 in human livers.

  12. Clinical use of quantitative cardiac perfusion PET: rationale, modalities and possible indications. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciagrà, Roberto; Passeri, Alessandro; Bucerius, Jan; Verberne, Hein J; Slart, Riemer H J A; Lindner, Oliver; Gimelli, Alessia; Hyafil, Fabien; Agostini, Denis; Übleis, Christopher; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-07-01

    Until recently, PET was regarded as a luxurious way of performing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, with excellent image quality and diagnostic capabilities that hardly justified the additional cost and procedural effort. Quantitative perfusion PET was considered a major improvement over standard qualitative imaging, because it allows the measurement of parameters not otherwise available, but for many years its use was confined to academic and research settings. In recent years, however, several factors have contributed to the renewal of interest in quantitative perfusion PET, which has become a much more readily accessible technique due to progress in hardware and the availability of dedicated and user-friendly platforms and programs. In spite of this evolution and of the growing evidence that quantitative perfusion PET can play a role in the clinical setting, there are not yet clear indications for its clinical use. Therefore, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, decided to examine the current literature on quantitative perfusion PET to (1) evaluate the rationale for its clinical use, (2) identify the main methodological requirements, (3) identify the remaining technical difficulties, (4) define the most reliable interpretation criteria, and finally (5) tentatively delineate currently acceptable and possibly appropriate clinical indications. The present position paper must be considered as a starting point aiming to promote a wider use of quantitative perfusion PET and to encourage the conception and execution of the studies needed to definitely establish its role in clinical practice.

  13. Enhanced forensic discrimination of pollutants by position-specific isotope analysis using isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Maxime; Nun, Pierrick; Höhener, Patrick; Parinet, Julien; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2016-01-15

    In forensic environmental investigations the main issue concerns the inference of the original source of the pollutant for determining the liable party. Isotope measurements in geochemistry, combined with complimentary techniques for contaminant identification, have contributed significantly to source determination at polluted sites. In this work we have determined the intramolecular (13)C profiles of several molecules well-known as pollutants. By giving additional analytical parameters, position-specific isotope analysis performed by isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-(13)C NMR) spectrometry gives new information to help in answering the major question: what is the origin of the detected contaminant? We have shown that isotope profiling of the core of a molecule reveals both the raw materials and the process used in its manufacture. It also can reveal processes occurring between the contamination site 'source' and the sampling site. Thus, irm-(13)C NMR is shown to be a very good complement to compound-specific isotope analysis currently performed by mass spectrometry for assessing polluted sites involving substantial spills of pollutant.

  14. MUC1 positive, Kras and Pten driven mouse gynecologic tumors replicate human tumors and vary in survival and nuclear grade based on anatomical location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirodkar, Tejas S; Budiu, Raluca A; Elishaev, Esther; Zhang, Lixin; Mony, Jyothi T; Brozick, Joan; Edwards, Robert P; Vlad, Anda M

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of Kras oncogene and deletions of Pten tumor suppressor gene play important roles in cancers of the female genital tract. We developed here new preclinical models for gynecologic cancers, using conditional (Cre-loxP) mice with floxed genetic alterations in Kras and Pten. The triple transgenic mice, briefly called MUC1KrasPten, express human MUC1 antigen as self and carry a silent oncogenic KrasG12D and Pten deletion mutation. Injection of Cre-encoding adenovirus (AdCre) in the ovarian bursa, oviduct or uterus activates the floxed mutations and initiates ovarian, oviductal, and endometrial cancer, respectively. Anatomical site-specific Cre-loxP recombination throughout the genital tract of MUC1KrasPten mice leads to MUC1 positive genital tract tumors, and the development of these tumors is influenced by the anatomical environment. Endometrioid histology was consistently displayed in all tumors of the murine genital tract (ovaries, oviducts, and uterus). Tumors showed increased expression of MUC1 glycoprotein and triggered de novo antibodies in tumor bearing hosts, mimicking the immunobiology seen in patients. In contrast to the ovarian and endometrial tumors, oviductal tumors showed higher nuclear grade. Survival for oviduct tumors was significantly lower than for endometrial tumors (p = 0.0015), yet similar to survival for ovarian cancer. Oviducts seem to favor the development of high grade tumors, providing preclinical evidence in support of the postulated role of fallopian tubes as the originating site for high grade human ovarian tumors.

  15. Frequency of transferrin receptor positive reticulocytes (TF-Ret) in blood as an indicator of total-body radiation exposure: a pilot study in nuclear medicine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Klaus; Haenscheid, Heribert; Biko, Johannes; Hategan, Maria; Kaiser, Franz; Kreissl, Michael; Lorenz, Reinhard; Samnick, Samuel; Schirbel, Andreas; Varazashvili, Lali; Verchenya, Stanislav; Reiners, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    Approximately 3-20% of all reticulocytes in blood of healthy persons are immature and transferrin receptor positive (Tf-Ret). Tf-Ret were measured by flow cytometry in 27 patients treated with three different radiopharmaceuticals labeled with (131)I and in 25 healthy controls. Patients were chronically exposed within 6 days to blood doses from 0.18-1.89 Gy (D6). Typically, two-thirds of D6 was administered within the first day (D1). The study had to be confined to intra-subject investigations due to high biological variability of Tf-Ret counts. A significant radiation-induced decline was found in patients D1 doses that were ≥0.5 Gy. Tf-Ret frequency declined during the first 4 to 5 days of nuclear therapy to about 30-60% of its initial value, and increased in the following 3 days without reaching the initial value. At the time of nadir, the relative frequency of Tf-Ret was more depressed than that of reticulocytes and lymphocytes. The relative Tf-Ret frequency at nadir could be fitted to the equation: %-Tf-Ret=exp-(D1/D(o)). D(o) was found to be 1.0 ± 0.4 Gy (Mean ± SEM). The study shows that Tf-Ret frequency in blood might be a good parameter for estimation of the radiation dose to red marrow.

  16. Fungal-Fungal Interactions in Leaf-Cutting Ant Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunshine A. Van Bael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many organisms participate in symbiotic relationships with other organisms, yet studies of symbioses typically have focused on the reciprocal costs and benefits within a particular host-symbiont pair. Recent studies indicate that many ecological interactions involve alliances of symbionts acting together as mutualistic consortia against other consortia. Such interacting consortia are likely to be widespread in nature, even if the interactions often occur in a cryptic fashion. Little theory and empirical data exist concerning how these complex interactions shape ecological outcomes in nature. Here, we review recent work on fungal-fungal interactions between two consortia: (i leaf-cutting ants and their symbiotic fungi (the latter grown as a food crop by the former and (ii tropical plants and their foliar endophytes (the cryptic symbiotic fungi within leaves of the former. Plant characteristics (e.g., secondary compounds or leaf physical properties of leaves are involved in leaf-cutting ant preferences, and a synthesis of published information suggests that these plant traits could be modified by fungal presence. We discuss potential mechanisms for how fungal-fungal interactions proceed in the leaf-cutting ant agriculture and suggest themes for future research.

  17. Serious fungal infections in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, J; Denning, D W; Paz-Y-Miño, A; Solís, M B; Arias, L M

    2017-06-01

    There is a dearth of data from Ecuador on the burden of life-threatening fungal disease entities; therefore, we estimated the burden of serious fungal infections in Ecuador based on the populations at risk and available epidemiological databases and publications. A full literature search was done to identify all epidemiology papers reporting fungal infection rates. WHO, ONU-AIDS, Index Mundi, Global Asthma Report, Globocan, and national data [Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos (INEC), Ministerio de Salud Pública (MSP), Sociedad de Lucha Contra el Cáncer (SOLCA), Instituto Nacional de Donación y Trasplante de Órganos, Tejidos y Células (INDOT)] were reviewed. When no data existed, risk populations were used to estimate frequencies of fungal infections, using previously described methodology by LIFE. Ecuador has a variety of climates from the cold of the Andes through temperate to humid hot weather at the coast and in the Amazon basin. Ecuador has a population of 15,223,680 people and an average life expectancy of 76 years. The median estimate of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) population at risk for fungal disease (<200 CD4 cell counts) is ∼10,000, with a rate of 11.1% (1100) of histoplasma, 7% (700) of cryptococcal meningitis, and 11% (1070) of Pneumocystis pneumonia. The burden of candidemia is 1037. Recurrent Candida vaginitis (≥4 episodes per year) affects 307,593 women aged 15-50 years. Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis probably affects ∼476 patients following tuberculosis (TB). Invasive aspergillosis is estimated to affect 748 patients (∼5.5/100,000). In addition, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) in asthma and severe asthma with fungal sensitization (SAFS) were estimated to affect 26,642 and 45,013 people, respectively. Our estimates indicate that 433,856 (3%) of the population in Ecuador is affected by serious fungal infection.

  18. Characterizations of atmospheric fungal aerosol in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Linlin; Engling, Guenter; He, Kebin; Du, Zhenyu

    2013-04-01

    reversed, indicating a high abundance of fungal spores in the urban area of Beijing, China. Meteorological conditions were shown to have complex effects on the ambient concentrations of fungal spores: the concentrations of arabitol exhibited positive correlation with temperature below 30.0 °C, negative correlation with wind speed higher than 0.6 m/s, no relationship with solar radiation and the highest arabitol levels were mainly associated with RH in the range of 51-70%.

  19. Applicability of an in-House Saponin-Based Extraction Method in Bruker Biotyper Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Species in Positively Flagged Blood Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Yien Chien

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We used an in-house saponin-based extraction method to evaluate the performance of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS system for the identification of bacteria and fungi in 405 positively flagged blood culture bottles. Results obtained from MALDI-TOF/MS were compared with those obtained using conventional phenotypic identification methods. Of the 405 positively flagged blood culture bottles, 365 showed monomicrobal growth and were correctly identified to the species (72.1% or genus (89.6% level using the Bruker Biotyper system. The remaining 40 positively flagged blood culture bottles showed polymicrobial growth. Of them, 82.5% (n=33 of the isolates were correctly identified to the species level and 92.5% (n=37 to the genus level using the Bruker Biotyper system. The overall accuracy of identification to the genus level in flagged blood cultures was 89.5% for Gram-positive organisms, 93.5% for Gram-negative pathogens and 71.9% for fungi. Confidence scores were 1.500 for 307 (75.8% bottles, 1.700 for 249 (61.5% bottles and 2.000 for 142 (35.1% bottles. None of the yeast cultures yielded scores 1.700. Using an identification-score cutoff of 1.500, the MALDI Biotyper correctly identified 99.2% of Gram-positive bacteria, 97.6% of Gram-negative bacteria and 100% of yeast isolates to the genus level and 77.6% of Gram-positive bacteria, 87.1% of Gram-negative bacteria and 100.0% of yeast isolates to the species level. The overall rate of identification using our protocol was 89.9% (364/405 for genus level identification and 73.1% (296/405 for species level identification. Yeast isolates yielded the lowest confidence scores, which compromised the accuracy of identification. Further optimization of the protein extraction procedure in positive blood cultures is needed to improve the rate of identification.

  20. Fungal artificial chromosomes for mining of the fungal secondary metabolome

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background With thousands of fungal genomes being sequenced, each genome containing up to 70 secondary metabolite (SM) clusters 30–80 kb in size, breakthrough techniques are needed to characterize this SM wealth. Results Here we describe a novel system-level methodology for unbiased cloning of intact large SM clusters from a single fungal genome for one-step transformation and expression in a model host. All 56 intact SM clusters from Aspergillus terreus were individually captured in self-rep...

  1. Management of recurrent postoperative fungal endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Vinekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the management of recurrent postoperative fungal endophthalmitis (POFE after failed pars plana vitrectomy (PPV and antifungal therapy. Settings and Design: Tertiary Care Referral Centre in North India. Retrospective, single institution, interventional case-series. Materials and Methods: Six patients with microbiologically proven recurrent post-operative fungal endophthalmitis refractory to conventional management were included. The final recurrence was managed with intraocular lens (IOL explantation and re-PPV. Main outcome measures included preserved globe anatomy, visual acuity and retinal status. ′Anatomical success′ was defined as preserved anatomy of the globe, and absence of signs of inflammation. ′Functional success′ was defined as an attached retina and a best corrected visual acuity of better than 20/400. Results: Of the six cases of POFE, five were culture positive [Aspergillus flavus (1, Aspergillus fumigatus (2, Candida albicans (1 and Candida glabrata (1] and one was smear positive for yeast. All recurred (mean recurrences, 4 despite a mean of 2.17 PPVs and intravitreal amphotericin B. No recurrences were observed after IOL explantation with re - PPV (median follow-up, 37 months. Pre-study defined criteria for successful ′anatomical′ and ′functional′ outcomes were achieved in 83.3% and 50% respectively. Conclusion: This report highlights the effective role of combined IOL explantation with PPV in managing recurrent POFE.

  2. The mycotoxin definition reconsidered towards fungal cyclic depsipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taevernier, Lien; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Vreese, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-04-01

    Currently, next to the major classes, cyclic depsipeptides beauvericin and enniatins are also positioned as mycotoxins. However, as there are hundreds more fungal cyclic depsipeptides already identified, should these not be considered as mycotoxins as well? The current status of the mycotoxin definition revealed a lack of consistency, leading to confusion about what compounds should be called mycotoxins. Because this is of pivotal importance in risk assessment prioritization, a clear and quantitatively expressed mycotoxin definition is proposed, based on data of widely accepted mycotoxins. Finally, this definition is applied to a set of fungal cyclic depsipeptides, revealing that some of these should indeed be considered as mycotoxins.

  3. [Viral-bacterial-fungal associations in chronic tonsillitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudima, I A; Vasil'eva, L I; Bragina, L E; Suchkov, I Iu

    2001-01-01

    The microflora of palatal tonsils was studied in 84 children with chronic tonsillitis in comparison with that in the control group of 38 healthy children. In most of the sick children viral-bacterial and less frequently viral-bacterial-fungal associations were detected with the prevalence of reo- and adenoviruses, Epstein-Barr viruses, coagulase negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as peptostreptococci. Adhesive activity and persistence factors among the main bacterial pathogens were shown to be widely prevalent. The depth of the lesion of tonsillar tissue by the infective agents of bacterial and fungal nature, as well as their persistence potential, depended on the taxonomic position of these microorganisms.

  4. Fungal Community Responses to Past and Future Atmospheric CO2 Differ by Soil Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J. Christopher; Fay, Philip A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Jackson, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Soils sequester and release substantial atmospheric carbon, but the contribution of fungal communities to soil carbon balance under rising CO2 is not well understood. Soil properties likely mediate these fungal responses but are rarely explored in CO2 experiments. We studied soil fungal communities in a grassland ecosystem exposed to a preindustrial-to-future CO2 gradient (250 to 500 ppm) in a black clay soil and a sandy loam soil. Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing of the rRNA gene cluster revealed that fungal community composition and its response to CO2 differed significantly between soils. Fungal species richness and relative abundance of Chytridiomycota (chytrids) increased linearly with CO2 in the black clay (P 0.7), whereas the relative abundance of Glomeromycota (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) increased linearly with elevated CO2 in the sandy loam (P = 0.02, R2 = 0.63). Across both soils, decomposition rate was positively correlated with chytrid relative abundance (r = 0.57) and, in the black clay soil, fungal species richness. Decomposition rate was more strongly correlated with microbial biomass (r = 0.88) than with fungal variables. Increased labile carbon availability with elevated CO2 may explain the greater fungal species richness and Chytridiomycota abundance in the black clay soil, whereas increased phosphorus limitation may explain the increase in Glomeromycota at elevated CO2 in the sandy loam. Our results demonstrate that soil type plays a key role in soil fungal responses to rising atmospheric CO2. PMID:25239904

  5. Molecular analysis of fungal populations in patients with oral candidiasis using internal transcribed spacer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieda, Shinsuke; Moriyama, Masafumi; Takeshita, Toru; Takashita, Toru; Maehara, Takashi; Imabayashi, Yumi; Shinozaki, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akihiko; Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Nakamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is closely associated with changes in the oral fungal flora and is caused primarily by Candida albicans. Conventional methods of fungal culture are time-consuming and not always conclusive. However, molecular genetic analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of fungal rRNA is rapid, reproducible and simple to perform. In this study we examined the fungal flora in patients with oral candidiasis and investigated changes in the flora after antifungal treatment using length heterogeneity-polymerization chain reaction (LH-PCR) analysis of ITS regions. Fifty-two patients with pseudomembranous oral candidiasis (POC) and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Fungal DNA from oral rinse was examined for fungal species diversity by LH-PCR. Fungal populations were quantified by real-time PCR and previously-unidentified signals were confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. Relationships between the oral fungal flora and treatment-resistant factors were also examined. POC patients showed significantly more fungal species and a greater density of fungi than control individuals. Sixteen fungi were newly identified. The fungal populations from both groups were composed predominantly of C. albicans, though the ratio of C. dubliniensis was significantly higher in POC patients than in controls. The diversity and density of fungi were significantly reduced after treatment. Furthermore, fungal diversity and the proportion of C. dubliniensis were positively correlated with treatment duration. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis and high fungal flora diversity might be involved in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. We therefore conclude that LH-PCR is a useful technique for diagnosing and assessing the severity of oral candidal infection.

  6. Fungal infection following renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, H A; Berman, R A; Cate, T R; Hamilton, J D; Gunnells, J C; Stickel, D L

    1975-09-01

    Twenty-seven deep fungal infections developed in 22 of 171 patients following renal transplantation. These infections included cryptococcosis (ten), nocardiosis (seven), candidiasis (four), aspergillosis (two), phycomycosis (two), chromomycosis (one), and subcutaneous infection with Phialophora gougeroti (one). Twelve infections occurred in living-related and ten in cadaveric recipients. Nineteen of the 22 patients were male. Infections occurred from 0 to 61 months after transplantation. Complicating non-fungal infections were present concomitantly in 15 patients. Thirteen patients died, eight probably as a result of fungal infection. Appropriate diagnostic procedures yielded a diagnosis in 20 of 27 infections, and therapy was begun in 18 patients. Serologic, culture, and biopsy procedures useful in making rapid diagnoses are advocated in the hope of increasing survival.

  7. The Fungal Defensin Family Enlarged

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fungi are an emerging source of peptide antibiotics. With the availability of a large number of model fungal genome sequences, we can expect that more and more fungal defensin-like peptides (fDLPs will be discovered by sequence similarity search. Here, we report a total of 69 new fDLPs encoded by 63 genes, in which a group of fDLPs derived from dermatophytes are defined as a new family (fDEF8 according to sequence and phylogenetic analyses. In the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpine, fDLPs have undergone extensive gene expansion. Our work further enlarges the fungal defensin family and will help characterize new peptide antibiotics with therapeutic potential.

  8. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibition activate transcription via transient release of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B Matija

    2012-10-19

    By phosphorylating elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) is the critical kinase for transcription elongation and co-transcriptional processing of eukaryotic genes. It exists in inactive small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (7SK snRNP) and active (free P-TEFb) complexes in cells. The P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of cellular activation, proliferation, and differentiation. Free P-TEFb, which is required for growth, can be recruited to RNA polymerase II via transcription factors, BRD4, or the super elongation complex (SEC). UV light, various signaling cascades, transcriptional blockade, or compounds such as hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), and other histone deacetylase inhibitors lead to a rapid release of free P-TEFb, followed by its reassembly into the 7SK snRNP. As a consequence, transcription of HEXIM1, a critical 7SK snRNP subunit, and HIV is induced. In this study, we found that a bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) bromodomain inhibitor, JQ1, which inhibits BRD4 by blocking its association with chromatin, also leads to the rapid release of free P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP. Indeed, JQ1 transiently increased levels of free P-TEFb and BRD4·P-TEFb and SEC·P-TEFb complexes in cells. As a consequence, the levels of HEXIM1 and HIV proteins rose. Importantly, the knockdown of ELL2, a subunit of the SEC, blocked the ability of JQ1 to increase HIV transcription. Finally, the effects of JQ1 and HMBA or SAHA on the P-TEFb equilibrium were cooperative. We conclude that HMBA, SAHA, and JQ1 affect transcription elongation by a similar and convergent mechanism.

  9. Release of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) activates hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein (HEXIM1) transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pingyang; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Nilson, Kyle A; Price, David H; Peterlin, B Matija

    2014-04-04

    By phosphorylating negative elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is composed of CycT1 or CycT2 and CDK9, activates eukaryotic transcription elongation. In growing cells, it is found in active and inactive forms. In the former, free P-TEFb is a potent transcriptional coactivator. In the latter, it is inhibited by HEXIM1 or HEXIM2 in the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), which contains, additionally, 7SK snRNA, methyl phosphate-capping enzyme (MePCE), and La-related protein 7 (LARP7). This P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of growth and proliferation of the cell. In this study, the release of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP led to increased synthesis of HEXIM1 but not HEXIM2 in HeLa cells, and this occurred only from an unannotated, proximal promoter. ChIP with sequencing revealed P-TEFb-sensitive poised RNA polymerase II at this proximal but not the previously annotated distal HEXIM1 promoter. Its immediate upstream sequences were fused to luciferase reporters and were found to be responsive to many P-TEFb-releasing compounds. The superelongation complex subunits AF4/FMR2 family member 4 (AFF4) and elongation factor RNA polymerase II 2 (ELL2) were recruited to this proximal promoter after P-TEFb release and were required for its transcriptional effects. Thus, P-TEFb regulates its own equilibrium in cells, most likely to maintain optimal cellular homeostasis.

  10. MUC1 positive, Kras and Pten driven mouse gynecologic tumors replicate human tumors and vary in survival and nuclear grade based on anatomical location.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas S Tirodkar

    Full Text Available Activating mutations of Kras oncogene and deletions of Pten tumor suppressor gene play important roles in cancers of the female genital tract. We developed here new preclinical models for gynecologic cancers, using conditional (Cre-loxP mice with floxed genetic alterations in Kras and Pten. The triple transgenic mice, briefly called MUC1KrasPten, express human MUC1 antigen as self and carry a silent oncogenic KrasG12D and Pten deletion mutation. Injection of Cre-encoding adenovirus (AdCre in the ovarian bursa, oviduct or uterus activates the floxed mutations and initiates ovarian, oviductal, and endometrial cancer, respectively. Anatomical site-specific Cre-loxP recombination throughout the genital tract of MUC1KrasPten mice leads to MUC1 positive genital tract tumors, and the development of these tumors is influenced by the anatomical environment. Endometrioid histology was consistently displayed in all tumors of the murine genital tract (ovaries, oviducts, and uterus. Tumors showed increased expression of MUC1 glycoprotein and triggered de novo antibodies in tumor bearing hosts, mimicking the immunobiology seen in patients. In contrast to the ovarian and endometrial tumors, oviductal tumors showed higher nuclear grade. Survival for oviduct tumors was significantly lower than for endometrial tumors (p = 0.0015, yet similar to survival for ovarian cancer. Oviducts seem to favor the development of high grade tumors, providing preclinical evidence in support of the postulated role of fallopian tubes as the originating site for high grade human ovarian tumors.

  11. Fungal Infections in Patients With Walled-off Pancreatic Necrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werge, Mikkel; Roug, Stine; Novovic, Srdan;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the influence of fungal infection and antifungal treatment on outcome in patients with walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WON). METHODS: A retrospective description of fungal infections in a cohort of consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic, transmural...... drainage and necrosectomy for WON, treated in a tertiary referral center was reviewed. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, fungal infection in WON was documented in 57 (46%) of 123 patients. The most common isolates at first positive culture were Candida albicans (55%) and Candida glabrata (20%). Thirty...... not treated or treated inadequately.The in-hospital mortality was 18% (10 patients). Concomitant fungemia was found in 6 patients, of which 3 died, as opposed to 7 with fungi in the necrosis only (50% vs 14%, P = 0.027). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a high incidence and associated high in-hospital...

  12. Fungal laryngitis in immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, A; Prasanna Kumar, S; Somu, L; Sudhir, B

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of fungal laryngitis is often overlooked in immunocompetent patients because it is commonly considered a disease of the immunocompromised. Further confusion is caused by clinical and histological similarity to more common conditions like Leukoplakia. Demonstration of hyperkeratosis particularly if associated with intraepithelial neutrophils on biopsy should trigger a search for fungus using specialized stains. These patients usually present with hoarseness of voice. Pain is present inconsistently along with dysphagia and odynophagia. We present three cases of fungal laryngitis in immunocompetent patients out of which one underwent microlaryngeal surgery with excision biopsy. All these patients responded well with oral antifungal therapy.

  13. A 5-Year Retrospective Review of Fungal Keratitis at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadzillah Mohd-Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Corneal blindness from healed infected keratitis is one of the most preventable causes of monocular blindness in developing countries, including Malaysia. Our objectives were to identify the causative fungi, predisposing risk factors, the proportion of correct clinical diagnosis, and visual outcome of patients treated in our hospital. Methods. A retrospective review of medical and microbiology records was conducted for all patients who were treated for fungal keratitis at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia from January 2007 until December 2011. Results. Forty-seven patients (47/186, 25.27% were treated for fungal keratitis during the study period. This demonstrated that the incidence of fungal keratitis has increased each year from 2007 to 2011 by 12.50%, 17.65%, 21.21%, 26.83%, and 28.57%, respectively. The most common predisposing factors were injury to the eye followed by use of topical steroid, and preexisting ocular surface disease. Fusarium species were the most common fungal isolated, followed by Candida species. Clinical diagnosis of fungal keratitis was made in 26 of the 41 (63.41% cases of positive isolates. Of these, in eleven cases (23.40% patients required surgical intervention. Clinical outcome of healed scar was achieved in 34 (72.34% cases. Conclusions. The percentage of positive fungal isolated has steadily increased and the trend of common fungal isolated has changed. The latest review regarding fungal keratitis is important for us to improve patients' outcome in the future.

  14. The Fungal Genetics Stock Center: a repository for 50 years of fungal genetics research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K McCluskey; A Wiest; M Plamann

    2010-03-01

    The Fungal Genetics Stock Center (FGSC) was established in 1960 to ensure that important strains used in early genetics research were available to subsequent generations of fungal geneticists. Originally, only mutant strains were held. At present, any organism that has had its genome sequenced is a genetic system and so the FGSC has added many new organisms. The FGSC is well integrated in its core community and, as research came to depend on cloned genes, vectors and gene libraries, the FGSC included these materials. When the community expanded to include plant and human pathogens, the FGSC adopted these systems as well. Wild isolates from around the world have also proven instrumental in answering important questions. The FGSC holds tremendous diversity of the Neurospora species, which form the core of the collection. The growth in the number of strains distributed illustrates the growth in research on fungi. Because of its position near the centre of the fungal genetics effort, the FGSC is also the first to see trends in research directions. One recent example is the 300% jump in requests for strains of Neurospora crassa carrying a mutation that makes them sensitive to high salt concentration. These strains were seldom requested over many years, but became among our most popular resources following the demonstration of their utility in studying fungicide resistance. This exemplifies why materials need to be preserved without regard to their immediate perceived value and reinforces the need for long-term support for preservation of a broad variety of genetic resources.

  15. Protective immune responses to fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, A

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of fungal infections has been on the rise over several decades. Fungal infections threaten animals, plants and humans alike and are thus of significant concern to scientists across disciplines. Over the last decade, significant advances on fungal immunology have lead to a better understanding of important mechanisms of host protection against fungi. In this article, I review recent advances of relevant mechanisms of immune-mediated protection to fungal infections.

  16. Imaging fungal infections in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankrah, Alfred O.; Sathekge, Mike M; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections in children rarely occur, but continue to have a high morbidity and mortality despite the development of newer antifungal agents. It is essential for these infections to be diagnosed at the earliest possible stage so appropriate treatment can be initiated promptly. The addition of

  17. Microbiology of systemic fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakrabarti A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased incidence of systemic fungal infections in the past two decades has been overwhelming. Earlier, it was pathogenic dimorphic fungi, which were known to cause systemic infections. However, starting from the 1960s, opportunistic fungi started causing more number of infections, especially in the immunocompromised host. More recently, newer and less common fungal agents are being increasingly associated with infection in immunosuppressed hosts. Amongst dimorphic fungi, infections due to Histoplasma capsulatum and Penicillium marneffei are increasingly reported in patients with AIDS in India. H. capsulatum is found country wide, but P. marneffei remains restricted to Manipur state. Although both varieties of C. neoformans , C. neoformans var. neoformans (serotypes A & D, and C. neoformans var. gattii (serotypes B & C are reported in India, most of the cases reported are of serotype A. Increased incidence of cryptococcosis is reported from all centers with the emergence of AIDS. Systemic infection due to species under Candida , Aspergillus and zygomycetes is widely prevalent in nosocomial setting, and outbreaks due to unusual fungi are reported occasionally from tertiary care centers. This global change in systemic fungal infections has emphasized the need to develop good diagnostic mycology laboratories in this country and to recognize this increasingly large group of potential fungal pathogens.

  18. Fungal endophyte diversity in Sarracenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal endophytes were isolated from four species of the carnivorous pitcher plant genus Sarracenia: S. minor, S. oreophila, S. purpurea, and S. psittacina. Twelve taxa of fungi, eight within the Ascomycota and four within the Basidiomycota, were identified based on PCR amplification and sequencing ...

  19. (Post-)genomics approaches in fungal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar-Pontes, María Victoria; de Vries, Ronald P; Zhou, M.; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    To date, hundreds of fungal genomes have been sequenced and many more are in progress. This wealth of genomic information has provided new directions to study fungal biodiversity. However, to further dissect and understand the complicated biological mechanisms involved in fungal life styles, functio

  20. Myco-fluidics: The fluid dynamics of fungal chimerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Marcus; Hickey, Patrick; Dressaire, Emilie; Roch, Sebastien

    2012-11-01

    Chimeras-fantastical creatures formed as amalgams of many animals-have captured the human imagination since Ancient times. But they are also surprisingly common in Nature. The syncytial cells of filamentous fungi harbor large numbers of nuclei bathed in a single cytoplasm. As a fungus grows these nuclei become genetically diverse, either from mutation or from exchange of nuclei between different fungal individuals, a process that is known to increase the virulence of the fungus and its adaptability. By directly measuring nuclear movement in the model ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, we show that the fungus' tolerance for internal genetic diversity is enabled by hydrodynamic mixing of nuclei acting at all length scales within the fungal mycelium. Mathematical modeling and experiments in a mutant with altered mycelial morphology reveal some of the exquisite hydraulic engineering necessary to create these mixing flows from spatially coarse pressure gradients.

  1. Bacterial and fungal markers in tobacco smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szponar, B., E-mail: szponar@iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Lund University, Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Soelvegatan 23, 223 62 Lund (Sweden); Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, Polish Academy of Sciences, Rudolfa Weigla 12, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland); Pehrson, C.; Larsson, L. [Lund University, Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Soelvegatan 23, 223 62 Lund (Sweden)

    2012-11-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that cigarette smoke contains bacterial and fungal components including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ergosterol. In the present study we used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze tobacco as well as mainstream and second hand smoke for 3-hydroxy fatty acids (3-OH FAs) of 10 to 18 carbon chain lengths, used as LPS markers, and ergosterol, used as a marker of fungal biomass. The air concentrations of LPS were 0.0017 nmol/m{sup 3} (N = 5) and 0.0007/m{sup 3} (N = 6) in the smoking vs. non-smoking rooms (p = 0.0559) of the studied private houses, and 0.0231 nmol/m{sup 3} (N = 5) vs. 0.0006 nmol/m{sup 3} (N = 5) (p = 0.0173), respectively, at the worksite. The air concentrations of ergosterol were also significantly higher in rooms with ongoing smoking than in rooms without smoking. A positive correlation was found between LPS and ergosterol in rooms with smoking but not in rooms without smoking. 3-OH C14:0 was the main 3-OH FA, followed by 3-OH C12:0, both in mainstream and second hand smoke and in phenol:water smoke extracts prepared in order to purify the LPS. The Limulus activity of the phenolic phase of tobacco was 3900 endotoxin units (EU)/cigarette; the corresponding amount of the smoke, collected on filters from 8 puffs, was 4 EU/cigarette. Tobacco smoking has been associated with a range of inflammatory airway conditions including COPD, asthma, bronchitis, alveolar hypersensitivity etc. Significant levels of LPS and ergosterol were identified in tobacco smoke and these observations support the hypothesis that microbial components of tobacco smoke contribute to inflammation and airway disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Air concentration of bacterial and fungal markers is significantly higher in rooms with ongoing smoking than without smoking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bacterial LPS correlates with fungal marker in rooms with ongoing smoking but not without smoking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS

  2. Subseafloor basalts as fungal habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, M.

    2012-09-01

    The oceanic crust is believed to host the largest potential habitat for microbial life on Earth, yet, still we lack substantial information about the abundance, diversity, and consequence of its biosphere. The last two decades have involved major research accomplishments within this field and a change in view of the ocean crust and its potential to harbour life. Here fossilised fungal colonies in subseafloor basalts are reported from three different seamounts in the Pacific Ocean. The fungal colonies consist of various characteristic structures interpreted as fungal hyphae, fruit bodies and spores. The fungal hyphae are well preserved with morphological characteristics such as hyphal walls, septa, thallic conidiogenesis, and hyphal tips with hyphal vesicles within. The fruit bodies consist of large (∼50-200 µm in diameter) body-like structures with a defined outer membrane and an interior filled with calcite. The fruit bodies have at some stage been emptied of their contents of spores and filled by carbonate-forming fluids. A few fruit bodies not filled by calcite and with spores still within support this interpretation. Spore-like structures (ranging from a few µm to ∼20 µm in diameter) are also observed outside of the fruit bodies and in some cases concentrated to openings in the membrane of the fruit bodies. The hyphae, fruit bodies and spores are all closely associated with a crust lining the vein walls that probably represent a mineralized biofilm. The results support a fungal presence in deep subseafloor basalts and indicate that such habitats were vital between ∼81 and 48 Ma.

  3. Disulfide bonds and glycosylation in fungal peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongi, P; Kjalke, M; Vind, J; Tams, J W; Johansson, T; Welinder, K G

    1995-01-15

    Four conserved disulfide bonds and N-linked and O-linked glycans of extracellular fungal peroxidases have been identified from studies of a lignin and a manganese peroxidase from Trametes versicolor, and from Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and recombinant C. cinereus peroxidase (rCIP) expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The eight cysteine residues are linked 1-3, 2-7, 4-5 and 6-8, and are located differently from the four conserved disulfide bridges present in the homologous plant peroxidases. CIP and rCIP were identical in their glycosylation pattern, although the extent of glycan chain heterogeneity depended on the fermentation batch. CIP and rCIP have one N-linked glycan composed only of GlcNAc and Man at residue Asn142, and two O-linked glycans near the C-terminus. The major glycoform consists of single Man residues at Thr331 and at Ser338. T. versicolor lignin isoperoxidase TvLP10 contains a single N-linked glycan composed of (GlcNAc)2Man5 bound to Asn103, whereas (GlcNAc)2Man3 was found in T. versicolor manganese isoperoxidase TvMP2 at the same position. In addition, mass spectrometry of the C-terminal peptide of TvMP2 indicated the presence of five Man residues in O-linked glycans. No phosphate was found in these fungal peroxidases.

  4. Fungal melanins differ in planar stacking distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Nakouzi, Antonio; Crippa, Pier R; Eisner, Melvin

    2012-01-01

    Melanins are notoriously difficult to study because they are amorphous, insoluble and often associated with other biological materials. Consequently, there is a dearth of structural techniques to study this enigmatic pigment. Current models of melanin structure envision the stacking of planar structures. X ray diffraction has historically been used to deduce stacking parameters. In this study we used X ray diffraction to analyze melanins derived from Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus niger, Wangiella dermatitides and Coprinus comatus. Analysis of melanin in melanized C. neoformans encapsulated cells was precluded by the fortuitous finding that the capsular polysaccharide had a diffraction spectrum that was similar to that of isolated melanin. The capsular polysaccharide spectrum was dominated by a broad non-Bragg feature consistent with origin from a repeating structural motif that may arise from inter-molecular interactions and/or possibly gel organization. Hence, we isolated melanin from each fungal species and compared diffraction parameters. The results show that the inferred stacking distances of fungal melanins differ from that reported for synthetic melanin and neuromelanin, occupying intermediate position between these other melanins. These results suggest that all melanins have a fundamental diffracting unit composed of planar graphitic assemblies that can differ in stacking distance. The stacking peak appears to be a distinguishing universal feature of melanins that may be of use in characterizing these enigmatic pigments.

  5. Model Predicts That MKP1 and TAB1 Regulate p38α Nuclear Pulse and Its Basal Activity through Positive and Negative Feedback Loops in Response to IL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raghvendra

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1 mediates inflammation and stress response through nuclear activity of p38α. Although IL-1 receptor is not degraded, p38α activation is transient. IL-1 also causes cell migration and EMT by modulating cell-cell junctions. Although molecules involved in p38 activation are known, mechanism of the transient nuclear response and its basal activity remains unknown. By mathematical modeling of IL1/p38 signaling network, we show that IL-1 induces robust p38α activation both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm/membrane. While nuclear response consists of an acute phase, membrane response resembles a step change. Following stimulation, p38α activity returns to a basal level in absence of receptor degradation. While nuclear pulse is controlled by MKP1 through a negative feedback to pp38, its basal activity is controlled by both TAB1 and MKP1 through a positive feedback loop. Our model provides insight into the mechanism of p38α activation, reason for its transient nuclear response, and explanation of the basal activity of MKK3/6 and p38α, which has been experimentally observed by other groups.

  6. The Chemical Basis of Fungal Bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtov, Konstantin V; Petushkov, Valentin N; Baranov, Mikhail S; Mineev, Konstantin S; Rodionova, Natalja S; Kaskova, Zinaida M; Tsarkova, Aleksandra S; Petunin, Alexei I; Bondar, Vladimir S; Rodicheva, Emma K; Medvedeva, Svetlana E; Oba, Yuichi; Oba, Yumiko; Arseniev, Alexander S; Lukyanov, Sergey; Gitelson, Josef I; Yampolsky, Ilia V

    2015-07-06

    Many species of fungi naturally produce light, a phenomenon known as bioluminescence, however, the fungal substrates used in the chemical reactions that produce light have not been reported. We identified the fungal compound luciferin 3-hydroxyhispidin, which is biosynthesized by oxidation of the precursor hispidin, a known fungal and plant secondary metabolite. The fungal luciferin does not share structural similarity with the other eight known luciferins. Furthermore, it was shown that 3-hydroxyhispidin leads to bioluminescence in extracts from four diverse genera of luminous fungi, thus suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for fungal bioluminescence.

  7. Missing checkerboards? An absence of competitive signal in Alnus-associated ectomycorrhizal fungal communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kennedy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of recent studies suggest that interspecific competition plays a key role in determining the structure of ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungal communities. Despite this growing consensus, there has been limited study of ECM fungal community dynamics in abiotically stressful environments, which are often dominated by positive rather than antagonistic interactions. In this study, we examined the ECM fungal communities associated with the host genus Alnus, which live in soils high in both nitrate and acidity. The nature of ECM fungal species interactions (i.e., antagonistic, neutral, or positive was assessed using taxon co-occurrence and DNA sequence abundance correlational analyses. ECM fungal communities were sampled from root tips or mesh in-growth bags in three monodominant A. rubra plots at a site in Oregon, USA and identified using Illumina-based amplification of the ITS1 gene region. We found a total of 175 ECM fungal taxa; 16 of which were closely related to known Alnus-associated ECM fungi. Contrary to previous studies of ECM fungal communities, taxon co-occurrence analyses on both the total and Alnus-associated ECM datasets indicated that the ECM fungal communities in this system were not structured by interspecific competition. Instead, the co-occurrence patterns were consistent with either random assembly or significant positive interactions. Pair-wise correlational analyses were also more consistent with neutral or positive interactions. Taken together, our results suggest that interspecific competition does not appear to determine the structure of all ECM fungal communities and that abiotic conditions may be important in determining the specific type of interaction occurring among ECM fungi.

  8. How the organization and human factors positively impact the contractors of nuclear power plants; Como la organizacion y los factores humanos repercuten positivamente en las empresas contratistas de las centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaldos, A.; Shannon, M.; Walter, J.; Mendoza, J.

    2012-11-01

    It is recognised that organisations that pay attention to creating a robust nuclear safety culture are likely to be a lower risk than those who do not. the same concept can be applied to contractors. In this article we will focus on the implementation of safety culture and programs to reduce human error in nuclear sector contractors and, on how these programs have a beneficial impact to achieve the safety goals, not only for the company, but for the client who owns the work site. (Author)

  9. Abundant and diverse fungal microbiota in the murine intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scupham, Alexandra J; Presley, Laura L; Wei, Bo; Bent, Elizabeth; Griffith, Natasha; McPherson, Michael; Zhu, Feilin; Oluwadara, Oluwadayo; Rao, Nagesh; Braun, Jonathan; Borneman, James

    2006-01-01

    Enteric microbiota play a variety of roles in intestinal health and disease. While bacteria in the intestine have been broadly characterized, little is known about the abundance or diversity of enteric fungi. This study utilized a culture-independent method termed oligonucleotide fingerprinting of rRNA genes (OFRG) to describe the compositions of fungal and bacterial rRNA genes from small and large intestines (tissue and luminal contents) of restricted-flora and specific-pathogen-free mice. OFRG analysis identified rRNA genes from all four major fungal phyla: Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. The largest assemblages of fungal rRNA sequences were related to the genera Acremonium, Monilinia, Fusarium, Cryptococcus/Filobasidium, Scleroderma, Catenomyces, Spizellomyces, Neocallimastix, Powellomyces, Entophlyctis, Mortierella, and Smittium and the order Mucorales. The majority of bacterial rRNA gene clones were affiliated with the taxa Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Acinetobacter, and Lactobacillus. Sequence-selective PCR analyses also detected several of these bacterial and fungal rRNA genes in the mouse chow. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with a fungal small-subunit rRNA probe revealed morphologically diverse microorganisms resident in the mucus biofilm adjacent to the cecal and proximal colonic epithelium. Hybridizing organisms comprised about 2% of the DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, dihydrochloride)-positive organisms in the mucus biofilm, but their abundance in fecal material may be much lower. These data indicate that diverse fungal taxa are present in the intestinal microbial community. Their abundance suggests that they may play significant roles in enteric microbial functions.

  10. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive ... NIBIB-funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that ...

  11. Fungal rhinosinusitis: what every allergist should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejas, C A; Douglas, R G

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between fungi and the sinonasal tract results in a diverse range of diseases with an equally broad spectrum of clinical severity. The classification of these interactions has become complex, and this review seeks to rationalize and simplify the approach to fungal diseases of the nose and paranasal sinuses. These conditions may be discussed under two major headings: non-invasive disease (localized fungal colonization, fungal ball and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis) and invasive disease (acute invasive rhinosinusitis, chronic invasive rhinosinusitis and granulomatous invasive rhinosinusitis). A diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis is established by combining findings on history, clinical examination, laboratory testing, imaging and histopathology. The immunocompetence of the patient is of great importance, as invasive fungal rhinosinusitis is uncommon in immunocompetent patients. With the exception of localized fungal colonization, treatment of all forms of fungal rhinosinusitis relies heavily on surgery. Systemic antifungal agents are a fundamental component in the treatment of invasive forms, but are not indicated for the treatment of the non-invasive forms. Antifungal drugs may have a role as adjuvant therapy in allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, but evidence is poor to support recommendations. Randomized controlled trials need to be performed to confirm the benefit of immunotherapy in the treatment of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis. In this article, we will summarize the current literature, addressing the controversies regarding the diagnosis and management of fungal rhinosinusitis, and focussing on those aspects which are important for clinical immunologists and allergists.

  12. The effects of weather on fungal abundance and richness among 25 communities in the Intermountain West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coley Phyllis D

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because moisture and temperature influence the growth of fungi, characterizing weather conditions favorable for fungi may be used to predict the abundance and richness of fungi in habitats with different climate conditions. To estimate habitat favorability to fungi, we examined the relationship of fungal abundance and species richness to various weather and environmental parameters in the Intermountain West. We cultured fungi from air and leaf surfaces, and collected continuous temperature and relative humidity measures over the growing season at 25 sites. Results Fungal richness was positively correlated with fungal abundance (r = 0.75. Measures of moisture availability, such as relative humidity and vapor pressure deficit, explained more of the variance in fungal abundance and richness than did temperature. Climate measurements from nearby weather stations were good predictors of fungal abundance and richness but not as good as weather measurements obtained in the field. Weather variables that took into account the proportion of time habitats experienced favorable or unfavorable relative humidity and temperatures were the best predictors, explaining up to 56% of the variation in fungal abundance and 72% for fungal richness. Conclusion Our results suggest that the abundance and richness of fungi in a habitat is limited by the duration of unfavorable weather conditions. Because fungal pathogens likely have similar abiotic requirements for growth as other fungi, characterizing weather conditions favorable for fungi also may be used to predict the selective pressures imposed by pathogenic fungi on plants in different habitats.

  13. EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly is an aggressive post-germinal center B-cell neoplasm characterized by prominent nuclear factor-kB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Odqvist, Lina; Diaz-Perez, Julio A; Lopez, Ana Batlle; de Villambrosía, Sonia Gonzalez; Mazorra, Francisco; Castillo, Maria E; Lopez, Mar; Pajares, Raquel; García, Juan F; Mollejo, Manuela; Camacho, Francisca I; Ruiz-Marcellán, Carmen; Adrados, Magdalena; Ortiz, Nazario; Franco, Renato; Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos; Suarez-Gauthier, Ana; Young, Ken H; Piris, Miguel A

    2012-07-01

    Here, we report a retrospective series of 47 EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with advanced age. Histopathology allowed to the identification of different histological patterns: cases with polymorphic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (29 cases), Hodgkin-like (8 cases) and polymorphic lymphoproliferative disorder-like (9 cases) patterns. One case was purely monomorphic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We show that this lymphoma type is a neoplasm with prominent classical and alternative nuclear factor-kB pathway activation in neoplastic cells (79% of the cases showed nuclear staining for p105/p50, 74% for p100/p52 and 63% for both proteins), with higher frequency than that observed in a control series of EBV-negative diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (χ(2) positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF SEQUENCE SPECIFIC PCR PRIMERS FOR DETECTION OF THE TOXIGENIC FUNGAL SPECIES STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nucleotide sequence of a 936 bp segment of the nuclear rRNA gene operon was determined for the toxigenic fungal species Stachybotrys chartarum and for other species of Stachybotrys and the related genus Memnoniella. This information was used to infer the phylogenitic relati...

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF PUTATIVE SEQUENCE SPECIFIC PCR PRIMERS FOR DETECTION OF THE TOXIGENIC FUNGAL SPECIES STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nucleotide sequence of a c 936 bp segment of the nuclear rRNA gene operon was determined for the toxigenic fungal species Stachybotrys chartarum and for other species of Stachbotrys and the related genus Memnoniella. This information was used to infer the phylogenetic relatio...

  16. 50-plus years of fungal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabrial, Said A; Castón, José R; Jiang, Daohong; Nibert, Max L; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-05-01

    Mycoviruses are widespread in all major taxa of fungi. They are transmitted intracellularly during cell division, sporogenesis, and/or cell-to-cell fusion (hyphal anastomosis), and thus their life cycles generally lack an extracellular phase. Their natural host ranges are limited to individuals within the same or closely related vegetative compatibility groups, although recent advances have established expanded experimental host ranges for some mycoviruses. Most known mycoviruses have dsRNA genomes packaged in isometric particles, but an increasing number of positive- or negative-strand ssRNA and ssDNA viruses have been isolated and characterized. Although many mycoviruses do not have marked effects on their hosts, those that reduce the virulence of their phytopathogenic fungal hosts are of considerable interest for development of novel biocontrol strategies. Mycoviruses that infect endophytic fungi and those that encode killer toxins are also of special interest. Structural analyses of mycoviruses have promoted better understanding of virus assembly, function, and evolution.

  17. Fungal keratitis in Lattice dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Samrat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of fungal keratitis occurring in a patient with lattice dystrophy. A 57-year-old farmer presented with a corneal ulcer following probable entry of paddy husk in the right eye, of one month duration. Corneal scraping revealed pigmented fungal filaments while culture grew Alternaria alternata. Treatment with 5% natamycin eye drops and 1% atropine healed the infection in four weeks. We would like to draw attention to the fact that the cornea in lattice dystrophy is prone to frequent erosions and is a compromised epithelial barrier to invasion by microorganisms. Patients must be made aware of this fact and should seek attention at the earliest following any trivial trauma. Management of minor corneal abrasions in them should be directed at healing the epithelium with adequate lubricants and preventing infection with topical antibiotic prophylaxis.

  18. Structural aspects of fungal allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crameri, Reto

    2015-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of solved crystal structures of allergens, the key question why some proteins are allergenic and the vast majority is not remains unanswered. The situation is not different for fungal allergens which cover a wide variety of proteins with different chemical properties and biological functions. They cover enzymes, cell wall, secreted, and intracellular proteins which, except cross-reactive allergens, does not show any evidence for structural similarities at least at the three-dimensional level. However, from a diagnostic point of view, pure allergens biotechnologically produced by recombinant technology can provide us, in contrast to fungal extracts which are hardly producible as standardized reagents, with highly pure perfectly standardized diagnostic reagents.

  19. Fungal metabolites with anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidente, Antonio; Kornienko, Alexander; Cimmino, Alessio; Andolfi, Anna; Lefranc, Florence; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Covering: 1964 to 2013. Natural products from bacteria and plants have played a leading role in cancer drug discovery resulting in a large number of clinically useful agents. In contrast, the investigations of fungal metabolites and their derivatives have not led to a clinical cancer drug in spite of significant research efforts revealing a large number of fungi-derived natural products with promising anticancer activity. Many of these natural products have displayed notable in vitro growth-inhibitory properties in human cancer cell lines and select compounds have been demonstrated to provide therapeutic benefits in mouse models of human cancer. Many of these compounds are expected to enter human clinical trials in the near future. The present review discusses the reported sources, structures and biochemical studies aimed at the elucidation of the anticancer potential of these promising fungal metabolites.

  20. Nattrassia mangiferae causing fungal keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kindo A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of fungal keratitis caused by the coelomycetous fungus Nattrassia mangiferae in a 70 year old gentleman, agriculturist by occupation, with a history of injury to his right eye. The scraping showed narrow septate fungal hyphae on a KOH mount, isolation of a fast growing black mould, which demonstrated hyphae and arthroconidia of varying widths typical of the Scytalidium synanamorph (S. dimidiatum. The formation of the pycnidia, which at maturity, expressed conidia. The patient was started on topical itraconazole one hourly and topical atropine thrice a day. The patient was lost to follow up hence we are not able to comment on the final outcome of the patient.

  1. The phylogenetic position of "Acomyinae" (Rodentia, Mammalia) as sister group of a Murinae plus Gerbillinae clade : Evidence from the nuclear ribonuclease gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, JYF; Catzeflis, FM; Beintema, JJ

    1999-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of Acomys and Uranomys within Muridae were investigated using nuclear pancreatic ribonuclease A gene sequences. The various kinds of substitutions in the data matrix (15 taxa x 375 nucleotides) were examined for saturation, in order to apply a weighted parsimony

  2. The phylogenetic position of "Acomyinae" (Rodentia, Mammalia) as sister group of a Murinae plus Gerbillinae clade : Evidence from the nuclear ribonuclease gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, JYF; Catzeflis, FM; Beintema, JJ

    1999-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of Acomys and Uranomys within Muridae were investigated using nuclear pancreatic ribonuclease A gene sequences. The various kinds of substitutions in the data matrix (15 taxa x 375 nucleotides) were examined for saturation, in order to apply a weighted parsimony approa

  3. 核电厂特殊工位耐振动铂电阻改进设计%Improved Design for Vibration-proof Platinum RTD in Special Position of Nuclear Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘琢; 麻金娜; 吴斌

    2014-01-01

    In accordance with the actual situation for the vibration of violence in a special position of nuclear power plant ,an improved design for platinum RTD was proposed . The structure design is verified to meet the measure requirement in the special position .%针对某核电厂特殊工位振动剧烈的实际情况,对铂电阻进行了改进设计。经实际验证,该结构可满足该工位的测温需求。

  4. Fungal contaminants in cytopathology specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Sharma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A pseudo-epidemic of environmental fungi, most likely by Fusarium spp., leading to inappropriate investigations for disseminated systemic mycosis is described. Subtle diagnostic clues, including the specimens affected, the nature of the host response, and the type of fungal elements noted helped to determine the nature of contaminants. The potential pitfall can be avoided by the knowledge of pertinent disease biology, prompt consultation for infectious diseases, and investigations of the potential environmental sources followed by source control.

  5. Systems biology of fungal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eHorn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Elucidation of pathogenicity mechanisms of the most important human pathogenic fungi, Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans, has gained great interest in the light of the steadily increasing number of cases of invasive fungal infections.A key feature of these infections is the interaction of the different fungal morphotypes with epithelial and immune effector cells in the human host. Because of the high level of complexity, it is necessary to describe and understand invasive fungal infection by taking a systems biological approach, i.e., by a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the non-linear and selective interactions of a large number of functionally diverse, and frequently multifunctional, sets of elements, e.g., genes, proteins, metabolites, which produce coherent and emergent behaviours in time and space. The recent advances in systems biology will now make it possible to uncover the structure and dynamics of molecular and cellular cause-effect relationships within these pathogenic interactions.We review current efforts to integrate omics and image-based data of host-pathogen interactions into network and spatio-temporal models. The modelling will help to elucidate pathogenicity mechanisms and to identify diagnostic biomarkers and potential drug targets for therapy and could thus pave the way for novel intervention strategies based on novel antifungal drugs and cell therapy.

  6. Fungal genome resources at NCBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbertse, B; Tatusova, T

    2011-09-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is well known for the nucleotide sequence archive, GenBank and sequence analysis tool BLAST. However, NCBI integrates many types of biomolecular data from variety of sources and makes it available to the scientific community as interactive web resources as well as organized releases of bulk data. These tools are available to explore and compare fungal genomes. Searching all databases with Fungi [organism] at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ is the quickest way to find resources of interest with fungal entries. Some tools though are resources specific and can be indirectly accessed from a particular database in the Entrez system. These include graphical viewers and comparative analysis tools such as TaxPlot, TaxMap and UniGene DDD (found via UniGene Homepage). Gene and BioProject pages also serve as portals to external data such as community annotation websites, BioGrid and UniProt. There are many different ways of accessing genomic data at NCBI. Depending on the focus and goal of research projects or the level of interest, a user would select a particular route for accessing genomic databases and resources. This review article describes methods of accessing fungal genome data and provides examples that illustrate the use of analysis tools.

  7. Allergen Immunotherapy in an HIV+ Patient with Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Patients with HIV/AIDS can present with multiple types of fungal rhinosinusitis, fungal balls, granulomatous invasive fungal rhinosinusitis, acute or chronic invasive fungal rhinosinusitis, or allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS). Given the variable spectrum of immune status and susceptibility to severe infection from opportunistic pathogens it is extremely important that clinicians distinguish aggressive fungal invasive fungal disease from the much milder forms such as AFRS. Here we descr...

  8. [Thoracic tumor-like fungal mycetoma: interest of large surgery with terbinafine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diatta, B A; Ndiaye, M; Sarr, L; Diatta, B J M; Gueye, A B; Diop, A; Bangoura, M; Diouf, A B; Djioumoi, H; Hakim, H; Diallo, M; Sané, A D; Dieng, M T; Kane, A

    2014-12-01

    Fungal mycetoma are inflammatory pseudo-tumors of subcutaneous tissues and possibly bones due to exogenous fungi. They have a chronic course, often poly-fistulated with an emission of fungal grains. We report the case of a 65-year-old farmer with a thoracic fungal mycetoma discovered incidentally, associated with bone involvement. The diagnosis was confirmed by the positive culture to Madurella mycetomatis. The outcome was favorable with terbinafine 1g per day for 12 months associated with complete excision of oncologic type followed by a skin graft. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenetic Distribution of Fungal Sterols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, John D.; Abril, Maritza; Blackwell, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Background Ergosterol has been considered the “fungal sterol” for almost 125 years; however, additional sterol data superimposed on a recent molecular phylogeny of kingdom Fungi reveals a different and more complex situation. Methodology/Principal Findings The interpretation of sterol distribution data in a modern phylogenetic context indicates that there is a clear trend from cholesterol and other Δ5 sterols in the earliest diverging fungal species to ergosterol in later diverging fungi. There are, however, deviations from this pattern in certain clades. Sterols of the diverse zoosporic and zygosporic forms exhibit structural diversity with cholesterol and 24-ethyl -Δ5 sterols in zoosporic taxa, and 24-methyl sterols in zygosporic fungi. For example, each of the three monophyletic lineages of zygosporic fungi has distinctive major sterols, ergosterol in Mucorales, 22-dihydroergosterol in Dimargaritales, Harpellales, and Kickxellales (DHK clade), and 24-methyl cholesterol in Entomophthorales. Other departures from ergosterol as the dominant sterol include: 24-ethyl cholesterol in Glomeromycota, 24-ethyl cholest-7-enol and 24-ethyl-cholesta-7,24(28)-dienol in rust fungi, brassicasterol in Taphrinales and hypogeous pezizalean species, and cholesterol in Pneumocystis. Conclusions/Significance Five dominant end products of sterol biosynthesis (cholesterol, ergosterol, 24-methyl cholesterol, 24-ethyl cholesterol, brassicasterol), and intermediates in the formation of 24-ethyl cholesterol, are major sterols in 175 species of Fungi. Although most fungi in the most speciose clades have ergosterol as a major sterol, sterols are more varied than currently understood, and their distribution supports certain clades of Fungi in current fungal phylogenies. In addition to the intellectual importance of understanding evolution of sterol synthesis in fungi, there is practical importance because certain antifungal drugs (e.g., azoles) target reactions in the synthesis of

  10. Phylogenetic distribution of fungal sterols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Weete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ergosterol has been considered the "fungal sterol" for almost 125 years; however, additional sterol data superimposed on a recent molecular phylogeny of kingdom Fungi reveals a different and more complex situation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The interpretation of sterol distribution data in a modern phylogenetic context indicates that there is a clear trend from cholesterol and other Delta(5 sterols in the earliest diverging fungal species to ergosterol in later diverging fungi. There are, however, deviations from this pattern in certain clades. Sterols of the diverse zoosporic and zygosporic forms exhibit structural diversity with cholesterol and 24-ethyl -Delta(5 sterols in zoosporic taxa, and 24-methyl sterols in zygosporic fungi. For example, each of the three monophyletic lineages of zygosporic fungi has distinctive major sterols, ergosterol in Mucorales, 22-dihydroergosterol in Dimargaritales, Harpellales, and Kickxellales (DHK clade, and 24-methyl cholesterol in Entomophthorales. Other departures from ergosterol as the dominant sterol include: 24-ethyl cholesterol in Glomeromycota, 24-ethyl cholest-7-enol and 24-ethyl-cholesta-7,24(28-dienol in rust fungi, brassicasterol in Taphrinales and hypogeous pezizalean species, and cholesterol in Pneumocystis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Five dominant end products of sterol biosynthesis (cholesterol, ergosterol, 24-methyl cholesterol, 24-ethyl cholesterol, brassicasterol, and intermediates in the formation of 24-ethyl cholesterol, are major sterols in 175 species of Fungi. Although most fungi in the most speciose clades have ergosterol as a major sterol, sterols are more varied than currently understood, and their distribution supports certain clades of Fungi in current fungal phylogenies. In addition to the intellectual importance of understanding evolution of sterol synthesis in fungi, there is practical importance because certain antifungal drugs (e.g., azoles target reactions in

  11. Mesonephric adenocarcinomas of the uterine cervix and corpus: HPV-negative neoplasms that are commonly PAX8, CA125, and HMGA2 positive and that may be immunoreactive with TTF1 and hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Sarah L; McBride, Hilary A; Jamison, Jackie; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2012-06-01

    Mesonephric adenocarcinomas are rare neoplasms that most commonly arise in the uterine cervix and exceptionally rarely in the uterine corpus. Although the morphologic features of these neoplasms are well described, there has been relatively limited investigation of the immunoprofile. We report a series of 8 mesonephric adenocarcinomas arising in the uterine cervix (7 cases) and corpus (1 case) and undertake a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis. This includes markers that have not been investigated previously in mesonephric adenocarcinomas but that are commonly used in gynecologic pathology and may be undertaken when other, mainly Mullerian, adenocarcinomas are considered in the differential diagnosis. Linear array human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping was also performed. Our results broadly confirm the immunohistochemical profile demonstrated in previous studies with the majority of mesonephric adenocarcinomas staining positively with CD10 (6 of 8), epithelial membrane antigen (8 of 8), vimentin (8 of 8), and calretinin (7 of 8). Estrogen receptor was positive in 2, carcinoembryonic antigen in 3, and inhibin in 4 cases. p16 was positive in 5 cases (1 diffuse and strong), despite all being HPV negative (in 1 case, there was insufficient DNA for HPV analysis). Novel findings in our study were the demonstration of nuclear positivity with PAX8 and HMGA2 in 7 cases, CA125 immunoreactivity in all 8 cases, and TTF1 and hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-β staining in 3 cases. As PAX8, CA125, HMGA2, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-β are commonly positive in a variety of Mullerian adenocarcinomas arising in the female genital tract, this may result in diagnostic confusion. All cases were WT1 negative.

  12. Nuclear tele medicine; Telemedicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, L.; Hernandez, F.; Fernandez, R. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Imagenologia Diagnostica, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The great majority of the digital images of nuclear medicine are susceptible of being sent through internet. This has allowed that the work in diagnosis cabinets by image it can benefit of this modern technology. We have presented in previous congresses works related with tele medicine, however, due to the speed in the evolution of the computer programs and the internet, becomes necessary to make a current position in this modality of work. (Author)

  13. Fungal rhinosinusitis: a retrospective analysis of clinicopathologic features and treatment outcomes at Ramathibodi Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soontrapa, Pannathat; Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Luxameechanporn, Thongchai; Cheewaruangroj, Wichit; Prakunhungsit, Supawadee; Sathapatayavong, Boonmee; Chongtrakool, Piriyaporn; Leopairut, Juvady

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinicopathologic findings of invasive and non-invasive fungal rhinosinusitis and to compare the features of the two diseases. The medical records of patients with invasive and noninvasive fungal rhinosinusitis at Ramathibodi Hospital between July 1999 and June 2009 were analyzed. The criterion for the diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis was the evidence of fungal elements from histopathologic section on sinonasal specimens. The age, gender, clinical manifestations, duration of symptoms, associated diseases, laboratory data, results of mycotic culture and treatment outcomes were analyzed. The relationship between fungal rhinosinusitis and patient characteristics as well as clinical presentations were assessed. The fungus-attributable mortality rate was determined. The study included 43 cases of invasive fungal rhinosinusitis and 68 cases of non-invasive fungal rhinosinusitis. There were 44 male, and 67 female patients. The mean age at diagnosis was 54.6 years (range: 5 to 86 years). A total of 70 (63.1%) were attributed to aspergillosis, 8 (7.2%) to candidiasis, 6 (5.4%) to zygomycosis, 4 (3.6%) to phaeohyphomycosis, 1 (0.9%) to pseudallescheriasis, 1 (0.9%) to entomophthoromycosis and 21 (18.9%) to nonspecific fungi. Cultures from sinonasal tissues were positive for fungus in 37 of 87 cases (42.5%). The clinical presentations of fungal rhinosinusitis included nasal stuffiness (27.9%), nasal discharge (27.9%), facial pain (27.9%), fever (24.3%) and headache (19.8%). One-fifth of cases had an underlying hematologic malignancy. Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis was significantly associated with hematologic malignancy and neutropenia. Fungus-attributable mortality rate was 44.2% in invasive fungal rhinosinusitis. Early antifungal therapy and surgical drainage were associated with a survival advantage.

  14. Pathogenic spectrum of fungal keratitis and specific identification of Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dan; Hao, Jilong; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Yanqiu; Song, Wengang; Zhang, Yunfeng; Yokoyama, Koji; Wang, Li

    2011-04-25

    To investigate the predominant causative pathogens and epidemiologic features of fungal keratitis and establish a rapid, specific molecular method to detect fungal keratitis caused by Fusarium solani. A total of 174 patients with presumed fungal keratitis and 174 affected eyes were examined. Isolates from corneal specimens were identified according to morphologic and physiological characteristics. The primers that were designed for F. solani were tested to confirm whether they had species specificity. Multiplex PCR with universal fungal and F. solani-specific primers was performed with fungal and bacterial strains and was used to detect microorganisms in the clinical specimens. A total of 160 patients (92.0%) were diagnosed with fungal infection by either potassium hydroxide wet-mount or microbiologic culture. Fungal cultures were positive in 128 patients (73.6%) with 139 fungal isolates. Fusarium (48.2%) was the most frequently isolated genus, in which F. solani (35.2%) was the most common species, followed by the Aspergillus (18.7%) and Candida (16.6%) genera. The PCR results showed that the designed primers were species specific and suitable for specific identification of F. solani. The multiplex PCR of 3-day broth cultures could identify and distinguish F. solani from other pathogens rapidly and specifically from clinical specimens. Fusarium species, especially F. solani, were found to be the predominant cause of fungal keratitis in northeast China. The established multiplex PCR method could have potential advantages for rapid detection of F. solani. These findings might have significance for early diagnosis and treatment of fungal keratitis.

  15. Proposal of a synchro panel meter instrument to replace the obsolete Synchro/Resolver reading device used as position indicator of safety rods assembly of the Brazilian IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, Fabio de; Brancaccio, Franco; Cardenas, Jose Patricio N., E-mail: fatoledo@ipen.br, E-mail: fbrancac@ipen.br, E-mail: ahiru@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares) was founded in 1956 (as Atomic Energy Institute - IEA) as a facility complex, for the research, development and application, in the nuclear technology field. The institute is recognized as a national leader in nuclear research and development (R and D), including the areas of reactor operation, radiopharmaceuticals, industrial and laboratory applications, materials science and laser technologies and applications. IPEN's main facility is the IEA-R1, nuclear research reactor (NRR), today, the only one in Brazil with a power level suitable for applications in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering. Some radioisotopes are also produced in IEA-R1, for medical and other applications. A common problem faced in the IEA-R1 maintenance is instrumentation obsolescence; spare parts are no more available, because of discontinued production, and an updating program is mandatory, aiming at modernization of old-aged I and C systems. In the presented context, an electronic system is here proposed, as a replacement for the reactor safety (shim) rods assembly position indicator, based on an open-source physical computing platform called Arduino, which includes a simple microcontroller board and a software-code development environment. A mathematical algorithm for the synchro-motor signal processing was developed, and the obtained resolution was better than 1.5%. (author)

  16. Positive effects of treatment of donor cells with aphidicolin on the preimplantation development of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in Chinese Bama mini-pig (Sus Scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting-Yu; Dai, Jian-Jun; Wu, Cai-Feng; Gu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Liang; Wu, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Yi-Ni; Wu, Bin; Chen, Hui-Lan; Li, Yao; Chen, Xue-Jin; Zhang, De-Fu

    2012-02-01

    To optimize somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) procedures in mini-pigs, the present study was designed to examine the effects of donor cell types and aphidicolin (APC) treatment on in vitro development of reconstructed embryos. Oviduct epithelial cells (OEC), ear fibroblast cells (EFC) and cumulus cells (CC) derived from mini-pigs were treated with serum starvation only or serum starvation followed by treatment of 0.1 µg/mL APC. The reconstructed embryos were cultured for 7 days to evaluate their developmental competency. Cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed embryos derived from the OEC by APC treatment were significantly higher than the serum starvation (61.82% vs. 56.25%, 24.55% vs. 17.86%; P cell types. Therefore, our results suggest that treatment of CC with serum starvation plus APC prior to nuclear transfer is more suitable in SCNT of mini-pigs.

  17. Exploring fungal diversity in deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough using high-throughput Illumina sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Guang-Hua; Xu, Xin-Ya; Nong, Xu-Hua; Wang, Jie; Amin, Muhammad; Qi, Shu-Hua

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated the fungal diversity in four different deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough using high-throughput Illumina sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1). A total of 40,297 fungal ITS1 sequences clustered into 420 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with 97% sequence similarity and 170 taxa were recovered from these sediments. Most ITS1 sequences (78%) belonged to the phylum Ascomycota, followed by Basidiomycota (17.3%), Zygomycota (1.5%) and Chytridiomycota (0.8%), and a small proportion (2.4%) belonged to unassigned fungal phyla. Compared with previous studies on fungal diversity of sediments from deep-sea environments by culture-dependent approach and clone library analysis, the present result suggested that Illumina sequencing had been dramatically accelerating the discovery of fungal community of deep-sea sediments. Furthermore, our results revealed that Sordariomycetes was the most diverse and abundant fungal class in this study, challenging the traditional view that the diversity of Sordariomycetes phylotypes was low in the deep-sea environments. In addition, more than 12 taxa accounted for 21.5% sequences were found to be rarely reported as deep-sea fungi, suggesting the deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough harbored a plethora of different fungal communities compared with other deep-sea environments. To our knowledge, this study is the first exploration of the fungal diversity in deep-sea sediments from Okinawa Trough using high-throughput Illumina sequencing.

  18. Conflicting phylogenetic position of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuramae, Eiko E.; Robert, Vincent; Snel, Berend; Boekhout, Teun

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe in the fungal Tree of Life is still controversial. Three alternative phylogenetic positions have been proposed in the literature, namely (1) a position basal to the Hemiascomycetes and Euascomycetes, (2) a position as a sister

  19. Mycological profile of fungal sinusitis: An audit of specimens over a 7-year period in a tertiary care hospital in Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rajiv

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fungi are being increasingly implicated in the etiopathology of rhinosinusitis. Fungal sinusitis is frequently seen in diabetic or immunocompromised patients, although it has also been reported in immunocompetent individuals. Invasive fungal sinusitis, unless diagnosed early and treated aggressively, has a high mortality rate. Aim: Our aim was to look at the mycological and clinical aspects of fungal sinusitis in a tertiary referral center in Tamil Nadu. Design: This is a retrospective audit conducted on fungal culture positive sinus samples submitted to the Microbiology department from January 2000 to August 2007. Relevant clinical and histopathological details were analysed. Results: A total of 211 culture-positive fungal sinusitis samples were analysed. Of these, 63% had allergic fungal sinusitis and 34% had invasive fungal sinusitis. Aspergillus flavus was the most common causative agent of allergic fungal sinusitis and Rhizopus arrhizus was the most common causative agent of acute invasive sinusitis. A significant proportion of these patients did not have any known predisposing factors. Conclusion: In our study, the etiology of fungal sinusitis was different than that of western countries. Allergic fungal sinusitis was the most common type of fungal sinusitis in our community. Aspergillus sp was the most common causative agent in both allergic and chronic invasive forms of the disease.

  20. Investigation of the fungal community structures of imported wheat using high-throughput sequencing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Guiming; Gao, Ruifang; Xiang, Caiyu; Feng, Jianjun; Lou, Dingfeng; Liu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    This study introduced the application of high-throughput sequencing techniques to the investigation of microbial diversity in the field of plant quarantine. It examined the microbial diversity of wheat imported into China, and established a bioinformatics database of wheat pathogens based on high-throughput sequencing results. This study analyzed the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of fungi through Illumina Miseq sequencing to investigate the fungal communities of both seeds and sieve-through. A total of 758,129 fungal ITS sequences were obtained from ten samples collected from five batches of wheat imported from the USA. These sequences were classified into 2 different phyla, 15 classes, 33 orders, 41 families, or 78 genera, suggesting a high fungal diversity across samples. Apairwise analysis revealed that the diversity of the fungal community in the sieve-through is significantly higher than those in the seeds. Taxonomic analysis showed that at the class level, Dothideomycetes dominated in the seeds and Sordariomycetes dominated in the sieve-through. In all, this study revealed the fungal community composition in the seeds and sieve-through of the wheat, and identified key differences in the fungal community between the seeds and sieve-through. PMID:28241020

  1. Invasive fungal infections after natural disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Park, Benjamin J

    2014-03-01

    The link between natural disasters and subsequent fungal infections in disaster-affected persons has been increasingly recognized. Fungal respiratory conditions associated with disasters include coccidioidomycosis, and fungi are among several organisms that can cause near-drowning pneumonia. Wound contamination with organic matter can lead to post-disaster skin and soft tissue fungal infections, notably mucormycosis. The role of climate change in the environmental growth, distribution, and dispersal mechanisms of pathogenic fungi is not fully understood; however, ongoing climate change could lead to increased disaster-associated fungal infections. Fungal infections are an often-overlooked clinical and public health issue, and increased awareness by health care providers, public health professionals, and community members regarding disaster-associated fungal infections is needed.

  2. Fungal diversity from various marine habitats deduced through culture-independent studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manohar, C.S.; Raghukumar, C.

    Author version: FEMS Microbiol. Lett., vol.341; 2013; 69-78 Fungal diversity from various marine habitats deduced through culture-independent studies Cathrine Sumathi Manohar* and Chandralata Raghukumar$ National Institute of Oceanography, (Council...: un-cultured fungal diversity from marine habitats Abstract Studies on the molecular diversity of the micro-eukaryotic community have shown that fungi occupy a central position in a large number of marine habitats. Environmental surveys using...

  3. Prevalence and clinical profile of fungal rhinosinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are only a few landmark studies from the Indian subcontinent on fungal rhinosinusitis. The lack of awareness among clinicians regarding the varying clinical presentations of fungal rhinosinusitis prompted us to undertake this study. Objective: To determine the prevalence, etiologic basis, clinical features, radiologic features, and microscopic features of fungal rhinosinusitis, and to evaluate the various treatment modalities available. Methods: This was a prospective study ...

  4. Reconstructing fungal natural product biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, C M; Williams, K; Bailey, A M

    2014-10-01

    Large scale fungal genome sequencing has revealed a multitude of potential natural product biosynthetic pathways that remain uncharted. Here we describe some of the methods that have been used to explore them via heterologous gene expression. We focus on filamentous fungal hosts and discuss the technological challenges and successes behind the reconstruction of fungal natural product pathways. Optimised, efficient heterologous expression of reconstructed biosynthetic pathways promises progress in the discovery of novel compounds that could be utilised by the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries.

  5. Nuclear education and training

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) first published in 2000 Nuclear Education and Training: Cause for Concern? , which highlighted significant issues in the availability of human resources for the nuclear industry. Ten years on, Nuclear Education and Training: From Concern to Capability considers what has changed in that time and finds that, while some countries have taken positive actions, in a number of others human resources could soon be facing serious challenges in coping with existing and potential new nuclear facilities. This is exacerbated by the increasing rate of retirement as the w

  6. N-termini of fungal CSL transcription factors are disordered, enriched in regulatory motifs and inhibit DNA binding in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Převorovský

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1 transcription factors are the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway, which is critical for metazoan development. The metazoan CSL proteins (class M can also function in a Notch-independent manner. Recently, two novel classes of CSL proteins, designated F1 and F2, have been identified in fungi. The role of the fungal CSL proteins is unclear, because the Notch pathway is not present in fungi. In fission yeast, the Cbf11 and Cbf12 CSL paralogs play antagonistic roles in cell adhesion and the coordination of cell and nuclear division. Unusually long N-terminal extensions are typical for fungal and invertebrate CSL family members. In this study, we investigate the functional significance of these extended N-termini of CSL proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identify 15 novel CSL family members from 7 fungal species and conduct bioinformatic analyses of a combined dataset containing 34 fungal and 11 metazoan CSL protein sequences. We show that the long, non-conserved N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins are likely disordered and enriched in phosphorylation sites and PEST motifs. In a case study of Cbf12 (class F2, we provide experimental evidence that the protein is proteolytically processed and that the N-terminus inhibits the Cbf12-dependent DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides insight into the characteristics of the long N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins that may be crucial for controlling DNA-binding and CSL function. We propose that the regulation of DNA binding by Cbf12 via its N-terminal region represents an important means by which fission yeast strikes a balance between the class F1 and class F2 paralog activities. This mode of regulation might be shared with other CSL-positive fungi, some of which are relevant to human disease and biotechnology.

  7. Fungal Endocarditis: Update on Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasha, Ahmed Khurshid; Lee, Justin Z; Low, See-Wei; Desai, Hem; Lee, Kwan S; Al Mohajer, Mayar

    2016-10-01

    Fungal endocarditis is an extremely debilitating disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. Candida spp. are the most common isolated organisms in fungal endocarditis. It is most prevalent in patients who are immunosuppressed and intravenous drug users. Most patients present with constitutional symptoms, which are indistinguishable from bacterial endocarditis, hence a high index of suspicion is required for pursuing diagnosis. Diagnosis of fungal endocarditis can be very challenging: most of the time, blood cultures are negative or take a long time to yield growth. Fungal endocarditis mandates an aggressive treatment strategy. A medical and surgical combined approach is the cornerstone of therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fungal infection risk groups among school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Ejdas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between ocurrence of fungi in children and living environment (city - countryside, sex, age, diet, undergone diseases therapy with antibiotics and exposure to hospital environment, and to indicate children potentially vulnerable to fungal infections. The material was consisted of swabs collected from the oral cavily, the throat and the nose of healthy children, aged 6-9 and 10-15, from both urban and rural environmens. Candida albicans, the basic aetiological factor in thc majority of mycoses recorded in humans, unquestionably prevailed in the group of the 13 speciec of yeast-like fungi and yeasts isolated. Records of C. glabrata and C. krusei increasing numbers of whose strains show resistance to basic antimycoties, as well as relatively frequent records of Trichosporon beigelii, Saccharomycopsis capsularis and Saccharomyces sp., fungi whose expansiveness and enzymatic activity have been growing, may be considered disconcerting. Vulnerability to fungal infection increases following anti-bacterial antibiotic therapy in the majority of subjects regardless season or age. This is particularly true primarily of the most stable ontocoenosis of the throat. Younger children, on the other hand, are the most vulnerable foUowing infection of the respiratory system. Fungi are likely to colonise the nose in this case. Children living in the countryside who had been ll immediately prior to the collection of the material constitute the highest risk group of the occurrence of fungi in any of the ontocoenoses studied. A greater number of positive inoculations were recorded in these children in comparison to the children from the city. It may be indicative of a more extensive spectrum of natural reservoirs of fungi and the vectors of their transmission in rural areas than those in the city, lower health hygiene and lower immunity or of a more common carriage of fungi among rural children.

  9. Regulation of the fungal secretome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCotter, Sean W; Horianopoulos, Linda C; Kronstad, James W

    2016-08-01

    The ability of countless representatives of the Kingdom Fungi to adapt to and proliferate in diverse environments is facilitated by regulation of their secretomes to respond to changes in environmental conditions and to mediate interactions with other organisms. Secretome changes often fulfill common functions of nutrient acquisition, facilitation of host/symbiont interactions, cell wall modification, and optimization of the enzyme suite to adapt to new environmental resources. In this review, we expand on our recent work on signaling and the secretome in the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans to consider a range of selected examples of regulation of fungal secretomes. These examples include the impact of carbon source and aspects of the response to plant and animal hosts. Additionally, the influence of key protein kinases (e.g., Pka1, Snf1) and transcription factors (e.g., Rim101/PacC) is highlighted to illustrate some underlying regulatory factors influencing the secretome. Although there is a wealth of information about fungal secretomes from both experimentation and genome sequence mining, there are also major gaps in our knowledge about the complete composition of fungal secretomes and mechanisms of dynamic change. For example, a more comprehensive understanding of the composition and regulation of the secretome will require consideration of the emerging roles of unconventional secretion and extracellular vesicles in delivering proteins outside the cell. Overall, changes in the secretome are well documented in diverse fungi and the underlying mechanisms are currently under investigation; however, there remain unknown steps in the regulation of secretory pathways and gaps in understanding the regulation of unconventional secretion, which warrant further research.

  10. 5.5.Fungal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930234 Penicilliosis marneffei report of a caseand review of literatures.KANG Xiaoming (康晓明),et al.Nanjing Army General Hosp,210002.Chin J Tuberc & Respir Dis 1992;15(6):336—338.Penicilliosis marneffei is a rare deep fungal in-fection.Southeast Asia is the endemic area.Inthe literatures before 1990,29 cases were re-ported and most of them were diagnosed patho-logically from autopsy.Since 1989 there havebeen more reports of P.marneffei in the HIV in-fected individuals or graft recipient,so far as

  11. Immune response to fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Jose L; Garcia, Marta E

    2008-09-15

    The immune mechanisms of defence against fungal infections are numerous, and range from protective mechanisms that were present early in evolution (innate immunity) to sophisticated adaptive mechanisms that are induced specifically during infection and disease (adaptive immunity). The first-line innate mechanism is the presence of physical barriers in the form of skin and mucous membranes, which is complemented by cell membranes, cellular receptors and humoral factors. There has been a debate about the relative contribution of humoral and cellular immunity to host defence against fungal infections. For a long time it was considered that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was important, but humoral immunity had little or no role. However, it is accepted now that CMI is the main mechanism of defence, but that certain types of antibody response are protective. In general, Th1-type CMI is required for clearance of a fungal infection, while Th2 immunity usually results in susceptibility to infection. Aspergillosis, which is a disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus, has been the subject of many studies, including details of the immune response. Attempts to relate aspergillosis to some form of immunosuppression in animals, as is the case with humans, have not been successful to date. The defence against Aspergillus is based on recognition of the pathogen, a rapidly deployed and highly effective innate effector phase, and a delayed but robust adaptive effector phase. Candida albicans, part of the normal microbial flora associated with mucous surfaces, can be present as congenital candidiasis or as acquired defects of cell-mediated immunity. Resistance to this yeast is associated with Th1 CMI, whereas Th2 immunity is associated with susceptibility to systemic infection. Dermatophytes produce skin alterations in humans and other animals, and the essential role of the CMI response is to destroy the fungi and produce an immunoprotective status against re-infection. The resolution

  12. Diagnosis of invasive fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Barbui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A proper diagnostic strategy of invasive fungal infections (IFI is a very important component in the management of infectious complications in hematological patients. A good diagnostic approach should be adapted to the patient in relation to the underlying disease, stage of disease, localization of infection and immune status. None of the diagnostic markers can be entirely adopted for medical decision making, and sometimes it’s useful to use the combination of several microbiological tests.The diagnosis of IFI must therefore have a multidisciplinary approach that includes clinical suspicion, microbiological results and radiological evidence.

  13. Allergic fungal rhino sinusitis with granulomas: A new entity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rijuneeta; Gupta, Ashok K; Patro, Sourabha Kumar; Yadav, Jagveer; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Das, Ashim; Chatterjee, Debajyoti

    2015-08-01

    Allergic fungal rhino sinusitis (AFS) is classically described as allergic manifestation to the fungal antigen present in sinuses with no evidence of invasion. Granulomas in histopathology, suspicious of invasion, are occasionally observed in AFS and the disease in these patients behaves like invasive fungal sinusitis even without histologic evidence of invasion. We retrospectively studied AFS patients to analyze whether AFS should be continued to be designated as an allergic entity. AFS patients operated from January 2009 to July 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Of the total 57 cases operated in last 4 years, nine showing presence of granuloma in histology were included in the AFS with granuloma Group (group 1) and the rest 48 were included in the AFS group (group 2). Both the groups were compared in terms of various parameters at presentation, treatment course and rate of recurrence. Group 1 had significantly high rates of orbital erosion (P = .000), with positive association of skull base erosion (P = .092) and high rates of telecanthus (P = .000), diplopia (P = .000), proptosis (P = .161) and facial pain. Recurrent surgery was needed in 8 of 9 patients in the group 1 as compared to 1 of 48 patients group 2. Granulomas suggests a more severe disease with a trend toward the invasive fungal sinusitis and alerts the clinician regarding the nature of progression. AFS seems to be a part of a continuous spectrum of fungal sinusitis rather than an allergic form as a distinct entity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. EPIDEMIOLOGIC, CLINICO-MYCOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF FUNGAL INFECTIONS OF SKIN AND ITS APPENDAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: The incidence of fungal infections is increasing at an alarming rate, presenting an enormous challenge to healthcare professionals. The prevalence of fungal infections seems to vary across the world because of various socioeconomic and cultural factors. AIM: This study was undertaken to analyze the epidemiological, clinical and mycological features of fungal infections of skin and its appendages. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Over a period of 1 year (Jan 2010 to Jan 2011 Samples were collected from 402 clinically suspected cases of fungal infections attending outpatient dermatology department of a tertiary care hospital & medical college Kashmir. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical samples (Skin, Hair and Nail from 402 clinically suspected cases were included in the study. All specimens were subjected to KOH examination and culture. Germ tube tests were performed on all growths identified as yeasts. RESULTS: 298 (74% samples showed evidence of fungal elements on direct microscopy, out of which 183 (61.40% turned out to be positive on culture. The most common dermatophyte isolated from different clinical samples were Trichophyton rubrum followed by Trichophyton mantagrophyte. CONCLUSION: The traditional methods of diagnosing fungal infections are still the best and important tool of diagnosis for the fungal infections in our setting. More studies are required in this part of the country.

  15. Bacterial and fungal keratitis in Upper Egypt: In vitro screening of enzymes, toxins and antifungal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A Gharamah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This work was conducted to study the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates from keratitis cases in Upper Egypt to produce enzymes, toxins, and to test the isolated fungal species sensitivity to some therapeutic agents. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients clinically diagnosed to have microbial keratitis were investigated. From these cases, 37 bacterial isolates and 25 fungal isolates were screened for their ability to produce extra-cellular enzymes in solid media. In addition, the ability of fungal isolates to produce mycotoxins and their sensitivity to 4 antifungal agents were tested. Results: Protease, lipase, hemolysins, urease, phosphatase, and catalase were detected respectively in 48.65%, 37.84%, 59.46%, 43.24%, 67.57%, and 100% out of 37 bacterial isolates tested. Out of 25 fungal isolates tested during the present study, 80% were positive for protease, 84% for lipase and urease, 28% for blood hemolysis, and 100% for phosphatase and catalase enzymes. Thirteen fungal isolates were able to produce detectable amounts of 7 mycotoxins in culture medium (aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2, sterigmatocystin, fumagillin, diacetoxyscirpenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and trichodermin. Among the antifungal agents tested in this study, terbinafine showed the highest effect against most isolates in vitro. Conclusion: In conclusion, the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and toxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues, which, in turn, lead to vision loss.

  16. Fungal growth and biomass development is boosted by plants in snow-covered soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Regina; Oberkofler, Irmgard; Peintner, Ursula

    2012-07-01

    Soil microbial communities follow distinct seasonal cycles which result in drastic changes in processes involving soil nutrient availability. The biomass of fungi has been reported to be highest during winter, but is fungal growth really occurring in frozen soil? And what is the effect of plant cover on biomass formation and on the composition of fungal communities? To answer these questions, we monitored microbial biomass N, ergosterol, and the amount of fungal hyphae during summer and winter in vegetated and unvegetated soils of an alpine primary successional habitat. The winter fungal communities were identified by rDNA ITS clone libraries. Winter soil temperatures ranged between -0.6°C and -0.1°C in snow-covered soil. We found distinct seasonal patterns for all biomass parameters, with highest biomass concentrations during winter in snow-covered soil. The presence of plant cover had a significant positive effect on the amount of biomass in the soil, but the type of plant cover (plant species) was not a significant factor. A mean hyphal ingrowth of 5.6 m g(-1) soil was detected in snow-covered soil during winter, thus clearly proving fungal growth during winter in snow-covered soil. Winter fungal communities had a typical species composition: saprobial fungi were dominating, among them many basidiomycete yeasts. Plant cover had no influence on the composition of winter fungal communities.

  17. [Fungal biomass estimation in soils from southwestern Buenos Aires province (Argentina) using calcofluor white stain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, María B; Amodeo, Martín R; Bianchinotti, María V

    Soil microorganisms are vital for ecosystem functioning because of the role they play in soil nutrient cycling. Agricultural practices and the intensification of land use have a negative effect on microbial activities and fungal biomass has been widely used as an indicator of soil health. The aim of this study was to analyze fungal biomass in soils from southwestern Buenos Aires province using direct fluorescent staining and to contribute to its use as an indicator of environmental changes in the ecosystem as well as to define its sensitivity to weather conditions. Soil samples were collected during two consecutive years. Soil smears were prepared and stained with two different concentrations of calcofluor, and the fungal biomass was estimated under an epifluorescence microscope. Soil fungal biomass varied between 2.23 and 26.89μg fungal C/g soil, being these values in the range expected for the studied soil type. The fungal biomass was positively related to temperature and precipitations. The methodology used was reliable, standardized and sensitive to weather conditions. The results of this study contribute information to evaluate fungal biomass in different soil types and support its use as an indicator of soil health for analyzing the impact of different agricultural practices. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacterial and fungal keratitis in Upper Egypt: in vitro screening of enzymes, toxins and antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharamah, Abdullah A; Moharram, Ahmed M; Ismail, Mady A; Al-Hussaini, Ashraf K

    2014-02-01

    This work was conducted to study the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates from keratitis cases in Upper Egypt to produce enzymes, toxins, and to test the isolated fungal species sensitivity to some therapeutic agents. One hundred and fifteen patients clinically diagnosed to have microbial keratitis were investigated. From these cases, 37 bacterial isolates and 25 fungal isolates were screened for their ability to produce extra-cellular enzymes in solid media. In addition, the ability of fungal isolates to produce mycotoxins and their sensitivity to 4 antifungal agents were tested. Protease, lipase, hemolysins, urease, phosphatase, and catalase were detected respectively in 48.65%, 37.84%, 59.46%, 43.24%, 67.57%, and 100% out of 37 bacterial isolates tested. Out of 25 fungal isolates tested during the present study, 80% were positive for protease, 84% for lipase and urease, 28% for blood hemolysis, and 100% for phosphatase and catalase enzymes. Thirteen fungal isolates were able to produce detectable amounts of 7 mycotoxins in culture medium (aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, and G2), sterigmatocystin, fumagillin, diacetoxyscirpenol, zearalenone, T-2 toxin, and trichodermin). Among the antifungal agents tested in this study, terbinafine showed the highest effect against most isolates in vitro. In conclusion, the ability of bacterial and fungal isolates to produce extracellular enzymes and toxins may be aid in the invasion and destruction of eye tissues, which, in turn, lead to vision loss.

  19. Management of fungal sinusitis: A retrospective study in a medical college hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir M Naik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/ objectives: Fungus balls are extra-mucosal collections of fungal elements, usually localized to a single sinus cavity, commonly the maxillary sinus. They appear as partial or complete heterogeneous opacification of the involved sinus with occasional metal dense opacities on CT scan. Here we report a case series of fungal sinusitis with multiple sinus involvement. Materials and methods: We report a case series analysis of 46 cases of fungal sinusitis managed in our department for the past 3 years. Mean age in our study group was 32.45 years, with 15 males(mean age – 35.46 yrs and 31 females ( mean age –31 yrs. All were operated with endoscopic sinus surgery after CT findings positive of fungal sinusitis. Result: Fungal ball was seen in 36 (78.26% cases and invasive fungal sinusitis were seen in 8 (17.39%cases. 4 cases did not yield any growth and only secondary bacterial infection were seen on bacterial culture. 34 cases had disease in the maxillary sinus. 9 cases had bilateral growth and the rest unilateral only. 16 cases had disease in the sphenoid while 6 cases had both maxillary and sphenoid disease. 2 cases had ethmoidal disease. Conclusion: Endoscopic sinus surgery is treatment of choice for non-invasive fungus ball. Local or systemic antifungal therapy are reserved for extensive and invasive fungal diseases.

  20. Conjunctival and cutaneous fungal flora in clinically normal dogs in southern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verneuil, M; Durand, B; Marcon, C; Guillot, J

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of the present study were to describe the fungal flora of the conjunctiva in clinically normal dogs in southern France and to compare the fungal flora from the conjunctiva and that from adjacent skin areas (medial canthus and nose). Fifty dogs aged from 5 months to 13 years were investigated for conjunctival fungal flora. Specimens were obtained from both conjunctivae and the skin of the medial canthus and from the surface of the nose using sterile cotton-wool swabs and a piece of sterile carpet, respectively. Identification of fungal colonies was achieved recording the genus level on the basis of macro- and microscopic features. Fourteen fungal genera (most frequently Alternaria, Cladosporium, Penicillium and Aspergillus) were isolated from the conjunctival fornix of 7 dogs (14%). There was no significant effect of sex or age on frequency of fungal isolation. Eleven dogs (22%) had a positive mycological culture from at least one eye. Fungi found in the conjunctival fornix of dogs might represent transient seeding from the environment, as suspected in other animal species. The presence of conjunctival fungal organisms was correlated to the presence of fungi on the skin.

  1. Nuclear Confidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident provides valuable lessons for China national nuclear Corp.as it continues to expand its operations AS Japan’s Fukushima nuclear crisis sparks a global debate over nuclear safety,China National Nuclear Corp. (CNNC),the country’s largest nuclear plant operator, comes under the spotlight.

  2. Standardization of fungal polymerase chain reaction for the early diagnosis of invasive fungal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Deshpande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: An early initiation of antifungal therapy in invasive fungal infections (IFIs is critical in reducing the high mortality rate. Current diagnosis of fungal infection relies on microscopy, culture, antigen, antibody specific tests and histological diagnosis. However, these tests either lack sensitivity or specificity. There is thus the need for a rapid, specific and accurate diagnostic method. Objective: The aim of our study was to establish PCR for the rapid detection of Candida and Aspergillus species in clinical specimens with improved sensitivity and specificity. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 proven cases of IFI (confirmed by culture were collected. A total of 15 healthy, 15 patients suffering from bacterial sepsis and 15 patients with HIV, HBV viral infections were included as controls. Clinical specimens were subjected to a standardized nested amplification to produce Round I (504 bp and Round II (150 bp amplicons. Restriction digestion was performed on these products for further identification. Results: Analytical sensitivity was determined using 10 6 -10 CFU/ml of cell suspension. The lower detection limit of the assay was 10 CFU/ml of blood. This test was 100% sensitive and specific with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 96.7%. Conclusion: The assay was found to be effective for the rapid detection of Candida and Aspergillus in clinical specimens.

  3. Changes in fungal community composition in response to experimental soil warming at the alpine treeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solly, Emily; Lindahl, Bjorn; Dawes, Melissa; Peter, Martina; Souza, Romulo; Rixen, Christian; Hagedorn, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Increased CO2 emissions and global warming may alter the composition of fungal communities through the reduction of low temperature limitation in the plant-soil system, faster nitrogen cycling and changes in the carbon allocation of host plants to the rhizosphere. Shifts in fungal community composition due to global changes are likely to affect the routes of carbon and nitrogen flows in the plant-soil system and alter the rates at which organic matter is decomposed. The main aim of our study was to estimate the effects of multiple years of free air CO2 enrichment (ambient concentration +200 ppm) and soil warming (+ 4°C) on the fungal community structure and composition. At an alpine treeline in Switzerland featuring two key high-elevation tree species, Larix decidua and Pinus uncinata, fungal communities within different organic horizons were analysed by high-throughput 454-pyrosequencing of ITS2 amplicons. In addition, we assessed the ectomycorrhizal community composition on root tips and monitored changes in sporocarp productivity of fungal species during the course of the experiment. Three years of experimental warming at the alpine treeline altered the composition of the fungal community in the organic horizons, whereas nine years of CO2 enrichment had only weak effects. Tree species influenced the composition of the fungal community and the magnitude of the responses of fungal functional groups to soil warming differed between plots with Larix and those with Pinus. The abundance of ectomycorrhizal fungi was positively correlated with nitrogen availability, and ectomycorrhizal taxa specialized for conditions of high nitrogen availability proliferated with warming, corresponding to considerable increases in extractable inorganic nitrogen in warmed soils. Changes in productivity of specific fungal fruiting bodies in response to soil warming (e.g. more Lactarius rufus sporocarps and less Hygrophorus speciousus sporocarps) were consistent with the 454-sequencing

  4. Optimal Fungal Space Searching Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenova, Elitsa; Lin, Hsin-Yu; Fu, Eileen; Nicolau, Dan V; Nicolau, Dan V

    2016-10-01

    Previous experiments have shown that fungi use an efficient natural algorithm for searching the space available for their growth in micro-confined networks, e.g., mazes. This natural "master" algorithm, which comprises two "slave" sub-algorithms, i.e., collision-induced branching and directional memory, has been shown to be more efficient than alternatives, with one, or the other, or both sub-algorithms turned off. In contrast, the present contribution compares the performance of the fungal natural algorithm against several standard artificial homologues. It was found that the space-searching fungal algorithm consistently outperforms uninformed algorithms, such as Depth-First-Search (DFS). Furthermore, while the natural algorithm is inferior to informed ones, such as A*, this under-performance does not importantly increase with the increase of the size of the maze. These findings suggest that a systematic effort of harvesting the natural space searching algorithms used by microorganisms is warranted and possibly overdue. These natural algorithms, if efficient, can be reverse-engineered for graph and tree search strategies.

  5. Fungal infections of the orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipasha Mukherjee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections of the orbit can lead to grave complications. Although the primary site of inoculation of the infective organism is frequently the sinuses, the patients can initially present to the ophthalmologist with ocular signs and symptoms. Due to its varied and nonspecific clinical features, especially in the early stages, patients are frequently misdiagnosed and even treated with steroids which worsen the situation leading to dire consequences. Ophthalmologists should be familiar with the clinical spectrum of disease and the variable presentation of this infection, as early diagnosis and rapid institution of appropriate therapy are crucial elements in the management of this invasive sino-orbital infection. In this review, relevant clinical, microbiological, and imaging findings are discussed along with the current consensus on local and systemic management. We review the recent literature and provide a comprehensive analysis. In the immunocompromised, as well as in healthy patients, a high index of suspicion must be maintained as delay in diagnosis of fungal pathology may lead to disfiguring morbidity or even mortality. Obtaining adequate diagnostic material for pathological and microbiological examination is critical. Newer methods of therapy, particularly oral voriconazole and topical amphotericin B, may be beneficial in selected patients.

  6. A novel class of fungal lipoxygenases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heshof, R.; Jylhä, S.; Haarmann, T.; Jørgensen, A.L.W.; Dalsgaard, T.K.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are well-studied enzymes in plants and mammals. However, fungal LOXs are less studied. In this study, we have compared fungal LOX protein sequences to all known characterized LOXs. For this, a script was written using Shell commands to extract sequences from the NCBI database an

  7. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-positive primary effusion lymphoma tumor formation in NOD/SCID mice is inhibited by neomycin and neamine blocking angiogenin's nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottero, Virginie; Sadagopan, Sathish; Johnson, Karen E; Dutta, Sujoy; Veettil, Mohanan Valiya; Chandran, Bala

    2013-11-01

    Angiogenin (ANG) is a 14-kDa multifunctional proangiogenic secreted protein whose expression level correlates with the aggressiveness of several tumors. We observed increased ANG expression and secretion in endothelial cells during de novo infection with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), in cells expressing only latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA-1) protein, and in KSHV latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) BCBL-1 and BC-3 cells. Inhibition of phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) mediated ANG's nuclear translocation by neomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic (not G418-neomicin), resulted in reduced KSHV latent gene expression, increased lytic gene expression, and increased cell death of KSHV(+) PEL and endothelial cells. ANG detection in significant levels in KS and PEL lesions highlights its importance in KSHV pathogenesis. To assess the in vivo antitumor activity of neomycin and neamine (a nontoxic derivative of neomycin), BCBL-1 cells were injected intraperitoneally into NOD/SCID mice. We observed significant extended survival of mice treated with neomycin or neamine. Markers of lymphoma establishment, such as increases in animal body weight, spleen size, tumor cell spleen infiltration, and ascites volume, were observed in nontreated animals and were significantly diminished by neomycin or neamine treatments. A significant decrease in LANA-1 expression, an increase in lytic gene expression, and an increase in cleaved caspase-3 were also observed in neomycin- or neamine-treated animal ascitic cells. These studies demonstrated that ANG played an essential role in KSHV latency maintenance and BCBL-1 cell survival in vivo, and targeting ANG function by neomycin/neamine to induce the apoptosis of cells latently infected with KSHV is an attractive therapeutic strategy against KSHV-associated malignancies.

  8. Delivering on Antimicrobial Resistance Agenda Not Possible without Improving Fungal Diagnostic Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, David S.; Muldoon, Eavan G.; Colombo, Arnaldo Lopes; Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Sorrell, Tania C.

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance, a major public health concern, largely arises from excess use of antibiotic and antifungal drugs. Lack of routine diagnostic testing for fungal diseases exacerbates the problem of antimicrobial drug empiricism, both antibiotic and antifungal. In support of this contention, we cite 4 common clinical situations that illustrate this problem: 1) inaccurate diagnosis of fungal sepsis in hospitals and intensive care units, resulting in inappropriate use of broad-spectrum antibacterial drugs in patients with invasive candidiasis; 2) failure to diagnose chronic pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis; 3) misdiagnosis of fungal asthma, resulting in unnecessary treatment with antibacterial drugs instead of antifungal drugs and missed diagnoses of life-threatening invasive aspergillosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and 4) overtreatment and undertreatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-positive patients. All communities should have access to nonculture fungal diagnostics, which can substantially benefit clinical outcome, antimicrobial stewardship, and control of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:27997332

  9. Anti-fungal activity of Morinda citrifolia (noni extracts against Candida albicans: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Barani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-fungal activity of Morinda citrifolia fruit extract on Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Juice extract from M. citrifolia fruit was lyophilized and used in anti-fungal testing. Anti-fungal activity of M. citrifolia fruit extract against C. albicans was tested in vitro at various concentrations. The inhibitory effect of M. citrifolia extract on C. albicans was determined by agar culture and applied broth dilution test. Results: M. citrifolia extract at 1000 μg/ml concentration effectively inhibited the growth of C. albicans (16.6 ± 0.3 compared with the positive control - amphotericin B (20.6 ± 0.6. It was found to be a dose-dependent reaction. Conclusion: M. citrifolia fruit extract had an anti-fungal effect on C. albicans and the inhibitory effect varied with concentration.

  10. Allergic fungal sinusitis causing nasolacrimal duct obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Charles; Kacker, Ashutosh; Chee, Ru-Ik; Lelli, Gary J

    2013-04-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis is thought to represent a chronic autoimmune reaction directed against fungal elements within the sinuses, and is commonly seen in individuals with a history of chronic sinusitis that is refractory to medical therapy. The authors present a case of allergic fungal sinusitis involving the lacrimal drainage system. A 54-year-old woman initially presented with recurrent erythema and induration of the left nasolacrimal sac due to dacryocystitis, which was unresponsive to treatment with topical and systemic antibiotics. Radiological evaluation demonstrated the presence of multiple soft tissue masses along the medial canthi. During subsequent endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy, significant amounts of allergic mucin were found within the sinuses and marked eosinophilia was present within tissue obtained from the lacrimal sac, findings highly suggestive of allergic fungal sinusitis. A diagnosis of allergic fungal sinusitis should be considered in patients presenting with epiphora in the appropriate clinical context. However, involvement of the lacrimal drainage system is an exceedingly unusual presentation.

  11. Histone Acetylation in Fungal Pathogens of Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhyun Jeon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation of histone lysine residues occurs in different organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals for the regulation of diverse cellular processes. With the identification of enzymes that create or reverse this modification, our understanding on histone acetylation has expanded at an amazing pace during the last two decades. In fungal pathogens of plants, however, the importance of such modification has only just begun to be appreciated in the recent years and there is a dearth of information on how histone acetylation is implicated in fungal pathogenesis. This review covers the current status of research related to histone acetylation in plant pathogenic fungi and considers relevant findings in the interaction between fungal pathogens and host plants. We first describe the families of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Then we provide the cases where histone acetylation was investigated in the context of fungal pathogenesis. Finally, future directions and perspectives in epigenetics of fungal pathogenesis are discussed.

  12. Fungal Adaptations to Mutualistic Life with Ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooij, Pepijn Wilhelmus

    . However, in rare occasions fungal symbionts might come into contact with symbionts from other colonies. I showed that in both leaf-cutting ant genera incompatibility reactions between fungal strains can avoid intermixing of different strains, and that these reactions strengthen when genetic distance...... successful. To understand the evolutionary development of domestication of the fungus over the phylogeny of the Attine ants, I compared the average number of nuclei per cell for the fungal symbionts, for each of the different groups of fungus-growing ants. I found that the fungal symbionts of the paleo...... is increased. This pattern, however, becomes distorted when fungal symbionts are contested across ant genera. The most important mechanism in the succession of this mutualism of leaf-cutting ants is the controlled degradation of plant material. I show that in the area of Gamboa, Panama, the two leaf...

  13. Soil fungal community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugwitz, Merian Skouw

    Global change will affect the functioning and structure of terrestrial ecosystems and since soil fungi are key players in organic matter decomposition and nutrient turnover, shifts in fungal community composition might have a strong impact on soil functioning. The main focus of this thesis...... and nutrient availability and storage. By combining molecular methods such as 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR of fungal ITS amplicons with analyses of soil enzymes, nutrient pools of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus we were able to characterize soil fungal communities as well as their impact on nutrient...... was therefore to investigate the impact of global environmental changes on soil fungal communities in a temperate and subartic heath ecosystem. The objective was further to determine global change effects on major functional groups of fungi and analyze the influence of fungal community changes on soil carbon...

  14. Nuclear safeguards; Salvaguardias nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurron, O.

    2015-07-01

    Safeguards control at the Juzbado Plant is implemented through the joint IAEA/EURATOM partnership approach in force within the European Union for all nuclear facilities. this verification agreement is designed to minimize burden on the operators whilst ensuring that both inspectorate achieve the objectives related to their respective safeguards regimes. This paper outlines the safeguards approaches followed by the inspectorate and the particularities of the Juzbado Plants nuclear material accountancy and control system. (Authors)

  15. Effect of topical application of terbinafine on fungal keratitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Qing-feng; JIN Xiu-ying; WANG Xiang-lan; SUN Xu-guang

    2009-01-01

    Background Fungal keratitis is a rare but serious corneal disease that may result in loss of vision.The poor prognosis might be due to limited treatment option.This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of 0.25% terbinafine eye drops comparing with 5% natamycin suspension on fungal keratitis.Methods A retrospective clinical trial was performed on 90 patients presenting with direct smear and/or culture positive fungal keratitis at Beijing Tongren Hospital,Beijing,China from January 2006 to May 2008.Corneal ulcers were categorized as mild or severe.Forty-five patients were treated with topical terbinafine and the next 45 cases received topical natamycin hourly.Results Filamentous fungi were found in corneal scrapings among all 90 cases.Fungal cultures were positive in 64 patients (71%).Species of Fusarium and Aspergillus were the principal isolates.Forty (89%) patients showed favorable response to terbinafine,while forty-two (93%) patients exhibited favorable response to natamycin (P >0.05).The mean course of treatment was significantly showed in the terbinafine treatment group than natamycin group ((26.5±11.2) days versus (19.3±6.4) days;P <0.05).In terbinafine group,twenty patients with ulcers smaller than 4 mm had favorable outcome,while 20 of 25 patients with ulcers more than 4 mm in diameter had favorable response (P <0.05).Twenty-seven patients with depth of infiltration less than half of stroma thickness had favorable response to terbinafine,while 13 of 18 patients with depth of infiltration more than half of stroma responded to terbinafine.This difference was statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusions Our findings suggest that topical terbinafine is an effective antifungal drug for the management of filamentous mycotic keratitis,particularly in cases with smaller and shallower ulcers.Its mean duration of treatment was longer than natamycin.

  16. Comparison on the sensitivity of laboratory diagnosis technology in the diagnosis of fungal keratitis%实验室诊断技术在真菌性角膜炎诊断敏感性的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鹏飞; 秦晓怡; 毛丽萍; 王友沛; 王大选; 郑美琴

    2015-01-01

      结论:病理检查的敏感性最好,真菌涂片、真菌培养及病理检查联合应用能够提高真菌性角膜炎的诊断水平,降低漏诊、误诊。%AIM:To analyze the correlation and clinical significance of fungal smear, fungal culture and pathological examination in the diagnosis of fungalkeratitis. METHODS:One hundred and ten cases (110 eyes) with fungal keratitis from January 2012 to December 2014 were collected. The results of fungal smear, fungal culture and pathological examination results were analyzed retrospectively. Fungal smear was detected by 10% KOH wet microscopy and gram staining microscopy. Fungal culture was used potato dextrose agar ( PDA ) medium. The specimens of pathological examination were from corneal transplantation surgery. paraffin section, HE and hexamine silver and PAS staining was used in the pathological examination. RESULTS:Of the 110 cases of fungal keratitis, fungal smear positive were observed in 50 cases ( 45. 5%), fungal culture positive were observed in 55 cases ( 50.0%); pathological examination positive were observed in 88 cases ( 80. 0%). Fifty cases were both fungal smear and pathological examination positive and 22 cases were both fungal smear and pathological examination negative. The coincidence rate of fungal smear and pathologic examination was 65. 5%. Fifty-five cases were both fungal culture and pathological examination positive and 22 cases were both fungal culture and pathological examination negative. The coincidence rate of fungal culture and pathologic examination was 70. 0%. In the 60 cases of fungal smear negative results, 38 cases ( 63. 3%) were confirmed positive through pathological examination. In the 55 cases of fungus culture negative results, 33 cases (60. 0%) were confirmed positive by pathological examination. CONCLUSION: The accuracy of pathological examination is the highest. The combined application of fungal smear, fungal culture and pathological examination can

  17. Colorimetric characterization for comparative analysis of fungal pigments and natural food colorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapari, Sameer A S; Meyer, Anne S; Thrane, Ulf

    2006-09-20

    Exogenous pigments produced by ascomycetous filamentous fungi belonging to the genera Penicillium, Epicoccum, and Monascus, preselected based on chemotaxonomic knowledge, have been extracted and characterized by quantitative colorimetry. The color characteristics of the fungal extracts were compared to water soluble natural colorants derived from sources currently in use. The tested fungal extracts also included some commercially available Monascus colorants. The a values for the fungal extracts were found to be both positive and negative, the b values were found to be positive, while the hue angles of the fungal color extracts ranged from 40 to 110 indicating the color distribution of fungal extracts over the red-orange-yellow region of the CIELAB color space. The fungal extracts exhibited additional color hues in the red spectrum and similar hues in the yellow spectrum as compared to the reference natural colorants. They were also found to be similar or brighter in terms of chroma to some of the reference natural colorants. Principal component analysis was performed to group and distinguish different colors based on the a and b values. The fungal color extracts could be grouped in accordance with the similarity or difference in the color to those of the existing natural colorants. The diversity of colors was not only found among different fungal genera and/or species but also within the same species on changing the media. There was a marked change in the color composition of the extracts resulting in relatively different hues. Our results, thus, indicate that there exists pigment-producing genera of ascomycetous fungi other than Monascus that produce color shades in the red and the yellow spectra in addition or similar to reference colorants. These color shades could add to the color palette of the natural colorants currently in use. In addition, the multivariate approach in distinguishing and classifying the colorants was shown to be a very useful tool in

  18. Chapter 8: Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Praveen; Wise, Sarah K

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal rhinosinusitis (IFRS) is a disease of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity that typically affects immunocompromised patients in the acute fulminant form. Early symptoms can often mimic rhinosinusitis, while late symptoms can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Swelling and mucosal thickening can quickly progress to pale or necrotic tissue in the nasal cavity and sinuses, and the disease can rapidly spread and invade the palate, orbit, cavernous sinus, cranial nerves, skull base, carotid artery, and brain. IFRS can be life threatening if left undiagnosed or untreated. While the acute fulminant form of IFRS is the most rapidly progressive and destructive, granulomatous and chronic forms also exist. Diagnosis of IFRS often mandates imaging studies in conjunction with clinical, endoscopic, and histopathological examination. Treatment of IFRS consists of reversing the underlying immunosuppression, antifungal therapy, and aggressive surgical debridement. With early diagnosis and treatment, IFRS can be treated and increase patient survival.

  19. Scabies, lice, and fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taplin, D; Meinking, T L

    1989-09-01

    Scabies and pediculosis capitis are frequent and often unrecognized causes of multiple streptococcal and staphylococcal pyodermas. Permethrin 1 per cent creme rinse (NIX) for head lice, and permethrin 5 per cent topical cream for scabies are new, highly effective, safe, and cosmetically elegant treatments which have shown superiority over older remedies. In populations in which pediculosis and scabies have resisted traditional lindane therapy, patients promptly responded to these permethrin products. Scabies in nursing homes is a persistent and expanding problem which demands a high level of diagnostic suspicion and an integrated approach to management. For fungal infections, several new broad-spectrum oral and topical agents have been introduced. Their successful use is enhanced by appropriate diagnostic tests which can be performed in the office setting. Recommendations and references are given to assist the physician in diagnosis and choice of therapy.

  20. Innate Defense against Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Rebecca A; Gaffen, Sarah L; Hise, Amy G; Brown, Gordon D

    2014-11-10

    Human fungal infections have been on the rise in recent years and proved increasingly difficult to treat as a result of the lack of diagnostics, effective antifungal therapies, and vaccines. Most pathogenic fungi do not cause disease unless there is a disturbance in immune homeostasis, which can be caused by modern medical interventions, disease-induced immunosuppression, and naturally occurring human mutations. The innate immune system is well equipped to recognize and destroy pathogenic fungi through specialized cells expressing a broad range of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review will outline the cells and PRRs required for effective antifungal immunity, with a special focus on the major antifungal cytokine IL-17 and recently characterized antifungal inflammasomes.

  1. Fractionation in position-specific isotope composition during vaporization of environmental pollutants measured with isotope ratio monitoring by ¹³C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Maxime; Parinet, Julien; Nun, Pierrick; Bayle, Kevin; Höhener, Patrick; Robins, Richard J; Remaud, Gérald S

    2015-10-01

    Isotopic fractionation of pollutants in terrestrial or aqueous environments is a well-recognized means by which to track different processes during remediation. As a complement to the common practice of measuring the change in isotope ratio for the whole molecule using isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry (irm-MS), position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA) can provide further information that can be exploited to investigate source and remediation of soil and water pollutants. Position-specific fractionation originates from either degradative or partitioning processes. We show that isotope ratio monitoring by (13)C NMR (irm-(13)C NMR) spectrometry can be effectively applied to methyl tert-butylether, toluene, ethanol and trichloroethene to obtain this position-specific data for partitioning. It is found that each compound exhibits characteristic position-specific isotope fractionation patterns, and that these are modulated by the type of evaporative process occurring. Such data should help refine models of how remediation is taking place, hence back-tracking to identify pollutant sources.

  2. Nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, David (Bishop Luffa Comprehensive School, Chichester (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Physics covers the aspects of radioactivity and nuclear physics dealt with in the syllabuses of all the A-level examination boards; in particular, it provides detailed coverage of the Joint Matriculation Board option in nuclear physics. It deals with the discovery of the atomic nucleus, the physics of nuclear processes, and nuclear technology. (author).

  3. Positive cross talk between protein kinase D and β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells: impact on β-catenin nuclear localization and phosphorylation at Ser552.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Han, Liang; Sinnett-Smith, James; Han, Li-Li; Stevens, Jan V; Rozengurt, Nora; Young, Steven H; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2016-04-01

    Given the fundamental role of β-catenin signaling in intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and the growth-promoting function of protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in these cells, we hypothesized that PKDs mediate cross talk with β-catenin signaling. The results presented here provide several lines of evidence supporting this hypothesis. We found that stimulation of intestinal epithelial IEC-18 cells with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonist angiotensin II (ANG II), a potent inducer of PKD activation, promoted endogenous β-catenin nuclear localization in a time-dependent manner. A significant increase was evident within 1 h of ANG II stimulation (Pnuclear localization and phosphorylation at Ser(552) in response to ANG II. GPCR stimulation also induced the formation of a complex between PKD1 and β-catenin, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation that depended on PKD1 catalytic activation, as it was abrogated by cell treatment with PKD family inhibitors. Using transgenic mice that express elevated PKD1 protein in the intestinal epithelium, we detected a marked increase in the localization of β-catenin in the nucleus of crypt epithelial cells in the ileum of PKD1 transgenic mice, compared with nontransgenic littermates. Collectively, our results identify a novel cross talk between PKD and β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Potential role of nuclear PD-L1 expression in cell-surface vimentin positive circulating tumor cells as a prognostic marker in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satelli, Arun; Batth, Izhar Singh; Brownlee, Zachary; Rojas, Christina; Meng, Qing H; Kopetz, Scott; Li, Shulin

    2016-07-01

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for cancer, determining their prognostic role in cancer patients undergoing treatment is a challenge. We evaluated the prognostic value of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in CTCs in colorectal and prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 metastatic colorectal cancer patients and 30 metastatic prostate cancer patients. CTCs were isolated from the samples using magnetic separation with the cell-surface vimentin(CSV)-specific 84-1 monoclonal antibody that detects epithelial-mesenchymal transitioned (EMT) CTCs. CTCs were enumerated and analyzed for PD-L1 expression using confocal microscopy. PD-L1 expression was detectable in CTCs and was localized in the membrane and/or cytoplasm and nucleus. CTC detection alone was not associated with poor progression-free or overall survival in colorectal cancer or prostate cancer patients, but nuclear PD-L1 (nPD-L1) expression in these patients was significantly associated with short survival durations. These results demonstrated that nPD-L1 has potential as a clinically relevant prognostic biomarker for colorectal and prostate cancer. Our data thus suggested that use of CTC-based models of cancer for risk assessment can improve the standard cancer staging criteria and supported the incorporation of nPD-L1 expression detection in CTCs detection in such models.

  5. A novel class of fungal lipoxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshof, Ruud; Jylhä, Sirpa; Haarmann, Thomas; Jørgensen, Ann Louise Worsøe; Dalsgaard, Trine Kastrup; de Graaff, Leo H

    2014-02-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) are well-studied enzymes in plants and mammals. However, fungal LOXs are less studied. In this study, we have compared fungal LOX protein sequences to all known characterized LOXs. For this, a script was written using Shell commands to extract sequences from the NCBI database and to align the sequences obtained using Multiple Sequence Comparison by Log-Expectation. We constructed a phylogenetic tree with the use of Quicktree to visualize the relation of fungal LOXs towards other LOXs. These sequences were analyzed with respect to the signal sequence, C-terminal amino acid, the stereochemistry of the formed oxylipin, and the metal ion cofactor usage. This study shows fungal LOXs are divided into two groups, the Ile- and the Val-groups. The Ile-group has a conserved WRYAK sequence that appears to be characteristic for fungal LOXs and has as a C-terminal amino acid Ile. The Val-group has a highly conserved WL-L/F-AK sequence that is also found in LOXs of plant and animal origin. We found that fungal LOXs with this conserved sequence have a Val at the C-terminus in contrast to other LOXs of fungal origin. Also, these LOXs have signal sequences implying these LOXs will be expressed extracellularly. Our results show that in this group, in addition to the Gaeumannomyces graminis and the Magnaporthe salvinii LOXs, the Aspergillus fumigatus LOX uses manganese as a cofactor.

  6. Fungal symbionts alter plant drought response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worchel, Elise R; Giauque, Hannah E; Kivlin, Stephanie N

    2013-04-01

    Grassland productivity is often primarily limited by water availability, and therefore, grasslands may be especially sensitive to climate change. Fungal symbionts can mediate plant drought response by enhancing drought tolerance and avoidance, but these effects have not been quantified across grass species. We performed a factorial meta-analysis of previously published studies to determine how arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and endophytic fungal symbionts affect growth of grasses under drought. We then examined how the effect of fungal symbionts on plant growth was influenced by biotic (plant photosynthetic pathway) and abiotic (level of drought) factors. We also measured the phylogenetic signal of fungal symbionts on grass growth under control and drought conditions. Under drought conditions, grasses colonized by AM fungi grew larger than those without mycorrhizal symbionts. The increased growth of grasses conferred from fungal symbionts was greatest at the lowest soil moisture levels. Furthermore, under both drought and control conditions, C3 grasses colonized by AM fungi grew larger than C3 grasses without symbionts, but the biomass of C4 grasses was not affected by AM fungi. Endophytes did not increase plant biomass overall under any treatment. However, there was a phylogenetically conserved increase in plant biomass in grasses colonized by endophytes. Grasses and their fungal symbionts seem to interact within a context-dependent symbiosis, varying with biotic and abiotic conditions. Because plant-fungal symbioses significantly alter plant drought response, including these responses could improve our ability to predict grassland functioning under global change.

  7. Fungal infection in organ transplant patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪微; 温海; 廖万清

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To review the characteristics and evolution of the fungal spectrum, and the risk factors causing fungal infection, and to make progress in diagnosing fungal infection after organ transplantation.Data sources An English-language literature search (MEDLINE 1990-2000) and bibliographic review of textbooks and review articles.Study selection Twenty-three articles were selected from the literature that specifically addressed the stated purpose.Results Fungal infections in organ transplant patients were generally divided into two types: ① disseminated primary or reactivation infection with one of the geographically restricted systemic mycoses; ② opportunistic infection by fungal species that rarely cause invasive infection in normal hosts. The risk factors of fungal infection after a transplant can be evaluated and predicted according to the organ recipient ’s conditions before, during and after the transplant. Progress in early diagnostic methods during the past 10 years has mainly revolved around two aspects, culture and non-culture. Conclusions It is important to undertake a systemic evaluation on the condition of the organ recipient before, during and after a transplant; should any risk factor for fungal infection be suspected, diagnosis should be made as early as possible by employing mycological techniques including culture and non-culture methods.

  8. Invasive fungal infections in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiee, Parisa; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2011-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a significant and often lethal problem in transplant patients. Infections caused by geographically limited endemic fungi are infrequent, and Aspergillus species, Mucorales species, Candida species, and Cryptococcus neoformans are the opportunistic fungi responsible for most such infections. The symptoms of systemic fungal infections are nonspecific, particularly in their early stages. The high rates of mortality and graft loss owing to fungal infections render early diagnosis and treatment imperative in immunosuppressed patients. Current methods for the diagnosis of systemic fungal infections include imaging procedures, endoscopic methods and biopsies, microscopic and culture techniques, antibody and antigen-based serologic testing, and the detection (via polymerase chain reaction) of fungal deoxyribonucleic acid in blood or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as the careful analysis of signs and symptoms. Antifungal therapy should be initiated early in patients with a suspected fungal infection (even before laboratory findings have confirmed that diagnosis) and should be administered with appropriate adjustment of immunosuppressive regimens. To manage fungal infections in patients with renal failure, optimizing the pharmacokinetics of antifungal drugs to reduce the risk of nephrotoxicity is crucial.

  9. Role of ERRF, a novel ER-related nuclear factor, in the growth control of ER-positive human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dan; Fu, Xiaoying; Fan, Songqing; Wu, Xiao; Wang, Xin-Xin; Fu, Liya; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Ni, Jianping Jenny; Fu, Li; Zhu, Zhengmao; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2012-03-01

    Whereas estrogen-estrogen receptor α (ER) signaling plays an important role in breast cancer growth, it is also necessary for the differentiation of normal breast epithelial cells. How this functional conversion occurs, however, remains unknown. Based on a genome-wide sequencing study that identified mutations in several breast cancer genes, we examined some of the genes for mutations, expression levels, and functional effects on cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. We present the data for C1orf64 or ER-related factor (ERRF) from 31 cell lines and 367 primary breast cancer tumors. Whereas mutation of ERRF was infrequent (1 of 79 or 1.3%), its expression was up-regulated in breast cancer, and the up-regulation was more common in lower-stage tumors. In addition, increased ERRF expression was significantly associated with ER and/or progesterone receptor (PR) positivity, which was still valid in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumors. In ER-positive tumors, ERRF expression was inversely correlated with HER2 status. Furthermore, higher ERRF protein expression was significantly associated with better disease-free survival and overall survival, particularly in ER- and/or PR-positive and HER2-negative tumors (luminal A subtype). Functionally, knockdown of ERRF in two ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, T-47D and MDA-MB-361, suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumorigenesis in xenograft models. These results suggest that ERRF plays a role in estrogen-ER-mediated growth of breast cancer cells and could, thus, be a potential therapeutic target.

  10. Fungal Identification Using Molecular Tools: A Primer for the Natural Products Research Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Huzefa A; Miller, Andrew N; Pearce, Cedric J; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2017-03-24

    Fungi are morphologically, ecologically, metabolically, and phylogenetically diverse. They are known to produce numerous bioactive molecules, which makes them very useful for natural products researchers in their pursuit of discovering new chemical diversity with agricultural, industrial, and pharmaceutical applications. Despite their importance in natural products chemistry, identification of fungi remains a daunting task for chemists, especially those who do not work with a trained mycologist. The purpose of this review is to update natural products researchers about the tools available for molecular identification of fungi. In particular, we discuss (1) problems of using morphology alone in the identification of fungi to the species level; (2) the three nuclear ribosomal genes most commonly used in fungal identification and the potential advantages and limitations of the ITS region, which is the official DNA barcoding marker for species-level identification of fungi; (3) how to use NCBI-BLAST search for DNA barcoding, with a cautionary note regarding its limitations; (4) the numerous curated molecular databases containing fungal sequences; (5) the various protein-coding genes used to augment or supplant ITS in species-level identification of certain fungal groups; and (6) methods used in the construction of phylogenetic trees from DNA sequences to facilitate fungal species identification. We recommend that, whenever possible, both morphology and molecular data be used for fungal identification. Our goal is that this review will provide a set of standardized procedures for the molecular identification of fungi that can be utilized by the natural products research community.

  11. Nuclear ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  12. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  13. Fungal glycans and the innate immune recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Tinoco Figueiredo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Polysaccharides such as α- and β-glucans, chitin and glycoproteins extensively modified with both N- and O-linked carbohydrates are the major components of fungal surfaces. The fungal cell wall is an excellent target for the action of antifungal agents, since most of its components are absent from mammalian cells. Recognition of these carbohydrate-containing molecules by the innate immune system triggers inflammatory responses and activation of microbicidal mechanisms by leukocytes. This review will discuss the structure of surface fungal glycoconjugates and polysaccharides and their recognition by innate immune receptors.

  14. Fungal Mating Pheromones: Choreographing the Dating Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen K.; Bennett, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Pheromones are ubiquitous from bacteria to mammals - a testament to their importance in regulating inter-cellular communication. In fungal species, they play a critical role in choreographing interactions between mating partners during the program of sexual reproduction. Here, we describe how fungal pheromones are synthesized, their interactions with G protein-coupled receptors, and the signals propagated by this interaction, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a reference point. Divergence from this model system is compared amongst the ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, which reveals the wealth of information that has been gleaned from studying pheromone-driven processes across a wide spectrum of the fungal kingdom. PMID:21496492

  15. Fungal colonization of air-conditioning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljaljević-Grbić Milica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi have been implicated as quantitatively the most important bioaerosol component of indoor air associated with contaminated air-conditioning systems. rarely, indoor fungi may cause human infections, but more commonly allergenic responses ranging from pneumonitis to asthma-like symptoms. From all air conditioner filters analyzed, 16 fungal taxa were isolated and identified. Aspergillus fumigatus causes more lethal infections worldwide than any other mold. Air-conditioning filters that adsorb moisture and volatile organics appear to provide suitable substrates for fungal colonization. It is important to stress that fungal colonization of air-conditioning systems should not be ignored, especially in hospital environments.

  16. Fungal mating pheromones: choreographing the dating game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephen K; Bennett, Richard J

    2011-07-01

    Pheromones are ubiquitous from bacteria to mammals - a testament to their importance in regulating inter-cellular communication. In fungal species, they play a critical role in choreographing interactions between mating partners during the program of sexual reproduction. Here, we describe how fungal pheromones are synthesized, their interactions with G protein-coupled receptors, and the signals propagated by this interaction, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a reference point. Divergence from this model system is compared amongst the ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, which reveals the wealth of information that has been gleaned from studying pheromone-driven processes across a wide spectrum of the fungal kingdom.

  17. Invasive Fungal Infections Secondary to Traumatic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Kronen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infection (IFI is a rare but serious complication of traumatic injury. The purpose of this article is to review the epidemiology, natural history, mycology, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes associated with post-traumatic IFI in military and civilian populations. The epidemiology of post-traumatic IFI is poorly characterized, but incidence appears to be rising. Patients often suffer from severe injuries and require extensive medical interventions. Fungi belonging to the order Mucorales are responsible for most post-traumatic IFI in both civilian and military populations. Risk factors differ between these cohorts but include specific injury patterns and comorbidities. Diagnosis of post-traumatic IFI typically follows positive laboratory results in the appropriate clinical context. The gold standard of treatment is surgical debridement in addition to systemic antifungal therapy. Patients with post-traumatic IFI may be at greater risk of amputation, delays in wound healing, hospital complications, and death as compared to trauma patients who do not develop IFI. More research is needed to understand the factors surrounding the development and management of post-traumatic IFI to reduce the significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  18. Advances and prospects for molecular diagnostics of fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-11-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods published for the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections are still not included in the revised European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) Consensus Group definitions of IA. This could be achieved with consensual PCR procedures. A checklist of items has been proposed to improve the reliability of the results and clinicians' confidence in them, with emphasis on limiting false-positive results from contamination with either previously amplified products or environmental commensals. Internal amplification controls are mandatory to expose false-negative results. However, our ignorance of the origin and the kinetics of fungal DNA during an infection hamper the choice of the best specimen and DNA extraction protocol. Evidence is increasing that serum could be a good compromise between sensitivity and ease of DNA extraction. Once a technical consensus is achieved, clinical studies should be initiated to integrate quantitative PCR in the diagnostic armamentarium.

  19. Expanding Fungal Diets Through Synthetic Algal-Fungal Mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alaisha; Galazka, Jonathan (Editor)

    2015-01-01

    Fungi can synthesize numerous molecules with important properties, and could be valuable production platforms for space exploration and colonization. However, as heterotrophs, fungi require reduced carbon. This limits their efficiency in locations such as Mars, where reduced carbon is scarce. We propose a system to induce mutualistic symbiosis between the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the filamentous fungi Neurospora crassa. This arrangement would mimic natural algal-fungal relationships found in lichens, but have added advantages including increased growth rate and genetic tractability. N. crassa would metabolize citrate (C6H5O7 (sup -3)) and release carbon dioxide (CO2) that C. reinhardtii would assimilate into organic sugars during photosynthesis. C. reinhardtii would metabolize nitrate (NO3-) and release ammonia (NH3) as a nitrogen source for N. crassa. A N. crassa mutant incapable of reducing nitrate will be used to force this interaction. This system eliminates the need to directly supply its participants with carbon dioxide and ammonia. Furthermore, the release of oxygen by C. reinhardtii via photosynthesis would enable N. crassa to respire. We hope to eventually create a system closer to lichen, in which the algae transfers not only nitrogen but reduced carbon, as organic sugars, to the fungus for growth and production of valuable compounds.

  20. Fungal infections as a contributing cause of death: An autopsy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha S Uppin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: With the continuing rise in the number of immunocompromised patients, the incidence of invasive mycoses has increased. Various studies have reported the trends of fungal infections in autopsies. Because of limitations in antemortem clinical diagnosis owing to lack of sensitive diagnostic tools, information regarding frequency and pathogenesis of fungal infections is largely dependent on autopsy studies. Aim: To study the prevalence of fungal infections at autopsy spanning a period of 20 years and to document recent trends, prevalence of various fungi over decades along with underlying predisposing factors and pathological findings. Settings and Design: Retrospective study. Materials and Methods:All autopsies between 1988 and 2007 were reviewed and all cases showing fungal infections were analyzed. The clinical details and demographic data were retrieved from medical records. Representative sections from all organs were stained with hematoxylin and eosin stain and special stains including Gomori′s silver methenamine (GMS and per-iodic acid Schiff (PAS. Culture details were noted, wherever available. Results: A total of 401 autopsies were performed during the study period. Fungal infections were identified in 35 (8.7% of these cases. Leukemia was the commonest risk factor. The commonest pathogen in the present study was Aspergillus sp. The commonest single organ involved was brain (n = 18. Culture positivity was seen in 23.8% cases. Conclusion: The study highlights various predisposing factors and organisms in autopsy series. Existing diagnostic modalities are not sensitive to ensure antemortem diagnosis of fungal infections.

  1. Allergic fungal sinusitis involving the lacrimal sac: a case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, Kristina Y; Yakopson, Vladimir; Flanagan, Joseph C; Eagle, Ralph C

    2014-08-01

    BACKGROUNd: We report a case of allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) involving the lacrimal sac and review the current English literature. A literature search for AFS involving the lacrimal sac revealed two reports with only one of the two cases demonstrating histological evidence of fungal elements. This is just the third such case and only the second reported case with histopathologic confirmation of fungal elements by Gomori methenamine silver (GMS) stain. A PubMed database search was performed using combinations of the following key words: allergic fungal sinusitis, lacrimal sac, nasolacrimal duct, ophthalmology, epiphora, orbit. A 70-year-old white man with a history of chronic conjunctivitis and nasal polyps presenting with chronic epiphora was found to have dacryostenosis on the left side. A CT scan of the orbits revealed mucoperiosteal thickening completely obliterating the frontal, ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses. A left external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) was performed and the lacrimal sac contents were studied histopathologically. Microscopic examination of the lacrimal sac contents disclosed allergic mucin with laminated aggregates of eosinophils in various stages of degeneration, Charcot-Leyden crystals and rare noninvasive fungal hyphae confirming the diagnosis of AFS. Fungal elements stained positively with Gomori methenamine silver stain. Although rarely reported, AFS can affect the lacrimal sac. AFS should be suspected in patients with a history of recurrent refractory sinusitis, recurrent dacryocystitis and nasal polyposis. Early diagnosis is important for adequate treatment and prevention of recurrence.

  2. [Nuclear medicine in Europe: education].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, D.; Freudenberg, L.S.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Franzius, C.; Krause, T.; Garai, I.; Biermann, M.; Gruning, T.; Leitha, T.; Gotthardt, M.

    2012-01-01

    The technical developments that have taken place in the preceding years (PET, hybrid imaging) have changed nuclear medicine. The future cooperation with radiologists will be challenging as well as positioning nuclear medicine in an European context. It can also be expected that education in nuclear

  3. Analysis of surfaces for characterization of fungal burden - Does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Carla; Faria, Tiago; Meneses, Márcia; Carolino, Elisabete; Viegas, Susana; Gomes, Anita Quintal; Sabino, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Mycological contamination of occupational environments can be a result of fungal spores' dispersion in the air and on surfaces. Therefore, it is very important to assess it in both types of the samples. In the present study we assessed fungal contamination in the air and in the surface samples to show relevance of surfaces sampling in complementing the results obtained in the air samples. In total, 42 settings were assessed by the analysis of air and surfaces samples. The settings were divided into settings with a high fungal load (7 poultry farms and 7 pig farms, 3 cork industries, 3 waste management plants, 2 wastewater treatment plants and 1 horse stable) and a low fungal load (10 hospital canteens, 8 college canteens and 1 maternity hospital). In addition to culture-based methods, molecular tools were also applied to detect fungal burden in the settings with a higher fungal load. From the 218 sampling sites, 140 (64.2%) presented different species in the examined surfaces when compared with the species identified in the air. A positive association in the high fungal load settings was found between the presence of different species in the air and surfaces. Wastewater treatment plants constituted the setting with the highest number of different species between the air and surface. We observed that surfaces sampling and application of molecular tools showed the same efficacy of species detection in high fungal load settings, corroborating the fact that surface sampling is crucial for a correct and complete analysis of occupational scenarios. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  4. Nuclear Theory - Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.; Kozier, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    The results from modern nuclear theory are accurate and reliable enough to be used for practical applications, in particular for scattering that involves few-nucleon systems of importance to nuclear power. Using well-established nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions that fit well the NN scattering data, and the AGS form of the three-body theory, we have performed precise calculations of low-energy neutron-deuteron (n+d) scattering. We show that three-nucleon force effects that have impact on the low-energy vector analyzing powers have no practical effects on the angular distribution of the n+d cross-section. There appear to be problems for this scattering in the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF) libraries, at the incident neutron energies less than 3.2 MeV. Supporting experimental data in this energy region are rather old (>25 years), sparse and often inconsistent. Our three-body results at low energies, 50 keV to 10.0 MeV, are compared to the ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) -3.3 evaluated angular distributions. The impact of these results on the calculated reactivity for various critical systems involving heavy water is shown.

  5. PNNL Fungal Biotechnology Core DOE-OBP Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Scott E.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Butcher, Mark G.; Collett, James R.; Culley, David E.; Dai, Ziyu; Magnuson, Jon K.; Panisko, Ellen A.

    2009-11-30

    In 2009, we continued to address barriers to fungal fermentation in the primary areas of morphology control, genomics, proteomics, fungal hyperproductivity, biomass-to-products via fungal based consolidated bioprocesses, and filamentous fungal ethanol. “Alternative renewable fuels from fungi” was added as a new subtask. Plans were also made to launch a new advanced strain development subtask in FY2010.

  6. 7 CFR 201.58d - Fungal endophyte test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fungal endophyte test. 201.58d Section 201.58d... REGULATIONS Examinations in the Administration of the Act § 201.58d Fungal endophyte test. A fungal endophyte test may be used to determine the amount of fungal endophyte (Acremonium spp.) in certain grasses....

  7. Organ Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... M, Practice ASTIDCo. Endemic fungal infections in solid organ transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation 2013;13 Suppl 4: ... Michaels MG. Strategies for safe living after solid organ transplantation. American Journal of Transplantation 2013;13 Suppl 4: ...

  8. HIV/AIDS and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch People living with HIV/AIDS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir As ... Page Preventing fungal infections in people living with HIV/AIDS Fungi are difficult to avoid because they ...

  9. Foreword: Special issue on fungal grapevine diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    An impressively large proportion of fungicides applied in European, North American and Australian agriculture has been used to manage grapevine powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator), grapevine downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola), and botrytis bunch rot (Botrytis cinerea). These fungal and oomycetous plan...

  10. Soil fungal community responses to global changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugwitz, Merian Skouw

    Global change will affect the functioning and structure of terrestrial ecosystems and since soil fungi are key players in organic matter decomposition and nutrient turnover, shifts in fungal community composition might have a strong impact on soil functioning. The main focus of this thesis...... composition of fungi, but the effects were generally limited to the litter layer and the uppermost humus layer (0-5 cm), which was unexpected considering the ecosystem had been manipulated for 18 years. Taken together the global change experiments altered the soil fungal communities and thereby highlight...... was therefore to investigate the impact of global environmental changes on soil fungal communities in a temperate and subartic heath ecosystem. The objective was further to determine global change effects on major functional groups of fungi and analyze the influence of fungal community changes on soil carbon...

  11. postharvest fungal deterioration of tomato (lycopersicum esculentum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr A.B.Ahmed

    the effect of some fungal species on the nutritional worth of tomatoes .... flask and then boiled for another 30minutes under the cold-finger condenser rotating the ..... mycotoxicoses, liver damage, suppression of the immune system and death ...

  12. (Post-)genomics approaches in fungal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Pontes, María Victoria; de Vries, Ronald P; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2014-11-01

    To date, hundreds of fungal genomes have been sequenced and many more are in progress. This wealth of genomic information has provided new directions to study fungal biodiversity. However, to further dissect and understand the complicated biological mechanisms involved in fungal life styles, functional studies beyond genomes are required. Thanks to the developments of current -omics techniques, it is possible to produce large amounts of fungal functional data in a high-throughput fashion (e.g. transcriptome, proteome, etc.). The increasing ease of creating -omics data has also created a major challenge for downstream data handling and analysis. Numerous databases, tools and software have been created to meet this challenge. Facing such a richness of techniques and information, hereby we provide a brief roadmap on current wet-lab and bioinformatics approaches to study functional genomics in fungi.

  13. The structure and function of fungal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and function of fungal cell walls were studied with particular emphasis on dermatophytes. Extraction, isolation, analysis, and observation of the cell wall structure and function were performed. The structure is described microscopically and chemically.

  14. Fungal contaminants observed during micropropagation of Lilium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micropropagation is a rapid propagation technique, but the greatest problem is contamination with fungi and bacteria. ... Fungal contaminants formed during the culture were determined. ... Bulb scales rinsed in water were surface sterilized, then solutions containing chemotherapeutic substances (Benomyl, ... Article Metrics.

  15. Fungal rhino sinusitisin in tehran, iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nazeri, M.; Hashemi, S.J.; Ardehali, M.; Rezaei, S.; Seyedmousavi, S.; Zareei, M.; Hosseinjani, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fungal rhino sinusitis (FRS) is an important infection of para nasal sinuses, which encompasses two main categories; invasive and noninvasive forms according to histopathological findings. Aspergillus spp are the most common species isolated from noninvasive form, while Mucorales are

  16. Air Contamination With Fungals In Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Iuliana; Haiducu, Maria; Stepa, Raluca

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the studies was to determine the level and kind of fungal contamination of air in museum, deposits patrimony, restoration and conservation laboratories and their effects on health of workers. Microbiological air purity was measured with a SAS-100 Surface Air System impactor. The fungal contamination was observed in all 54 rooms where we made determinations. The highest levels of fungal were recorded at rooms with hygroscopic patrimony objects, eg carpets, chairs, upholstered chairs, books etc. The most species identified included under common allergens: Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Mucor. There fungal species belonging to the genus identified in this study, can trigger serious diseases museum workers, such as for example Aspergillus fumigatus, known allergies and toxic effects that may occur. In some places of the museum, occupational exposure limit values to fungi present in the air in the work environment, recommended by the specialized literature, have been overcome.

  17. Zoosporic fungal parasites of marine biota

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RaghuKumar, C.

    laboratory media. In such instances, a detailed and careful examination of the disease symptoms and the endobiotic fungal parasites is to be recorded. Maintaining dual culture of the healthy and infected host also helps to fulfill these postulates partially....

  18. Spontaneous course of an untreated fungal spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, C.; Mueller, R.T.; Konermann, H.

    1989-06-09

    After 29 known cases in the world, we report another case of fungal spondylitis being not yet treated. Within four months with increasing clinical complaints and without neurological defects the disease led to a complete involvement of two vertebras and their partial resorption. An early radiologic hint in fungal spondylitis is possible, a sure diagnosis, however, depends on puncture. Pathogenetic aspects and the importance of a new method to identify candida infection in blood-sample are discussed. (orig.).

  19. Fungal Endophthalmitis Associated with Compounded Products

    OpenAIRE

    Mikosz, Christina A.; Rachel M. Smith; Kim, Moon; Tyson, Clara; Lee, Ellen H.; Adams, Eleanor; Straif-Bourgeois, Susanne; Sowadsky, Rick; Arroyo, Shannon; Grant-Greene, Yoran; Duran, Julie; Vasquez, Yvonne; Robinson, Byron F.; Harris, Julie R.; Lockhart, Shawn R.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal endophthalmitis is a rare but serious infection. In March 2012, several cases of probable and laboratory-confirmed fungal endophthalmitis occurring after invasive ocular procedures were reported nationwide. We identified 47 cases in 9 states: 21 patients had been exposed to the intraocular dye Brilliant Blue G (BBG) during retinal surgery, and the other 26 had received an intravitreal injection containing triamcinolone acetonide. Both drugs were produced by Franck’s Compounding Lab (Oc...

  20. Prospects for the development of fungal vaccines.

    OpenAIRE

    Deepe, G S

    1997-01-01

    In an era that emphasizes the term "cost-effective," vaccines are the ideal solution to preventing disease at a relatively low cost to society. Much of the previous emphasis has been on childhood scourges such as measles, mumps, rubella, poliomyelitis, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The concept of vaccines for fungal diseases has had less impact because of the perceived limited problem. However, fungal diseases have become increasingly appreciated as serious medical problems that require ...

  1. Fungal infections of the oral mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    P Anitha Krishnan

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections in humans occur as a result of defects in the immune system. An increasing emergence in oral Candidal and non-Candidal fungal infections is evident in the past decade owing to the rise in the immunodeficient and immunocompromised population globally. Oral Candidal infection usually involves a compromised host and the compromise may be local or systemic. Local compromising factors include decreased salivation, poor oral hygiene, wearing dentures among others while systemic fa...

  2. Association of fungal sepsis and galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjay; Bharti, Bhavneet; Inusha, P

    2010-06-01

    Galactosemia is one of the rare inborn errors of metabolism, which if detected early can be treated effectively. Galactosemic infants have a significant increased risk of developing sepsis. E. coli sepsis is a known entity, and also an important cause of early mortality in these children. But fungal sepsis in these patients is rarely reported. Here is a case of 45 day-old child who presented with fungal sepsis, which on investigation turned out to be galactosemia.

  3. Fungal Mating Pheromones: Choreographing the Dating Game

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Pheromones are ubiquitous from bacteria to mammals - a testament to their importance in regulating inter-cellular communication. In fungal species, they play a critical role in choreographing interactions between mating partners during the program of sexual reproduction. Here, we describe how fungal pheromones are synthesized, their interactions with G protein-coupled receptors, and the signals propagated by this interaction, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a reference point. Divergence fro...

  4. PKC-δ activation in neutrophils promotes fungal clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xun; Cullere, Xavier; Nishi, Hiroshi; Saggu, Gurpanna; Durand, Enrique; Mansour, Michael K; Tam, Jenny M; Song, Xiu-Yu; Lin, Xin; Vyas, Jatin M; Mayadas, Tanya

    2016-09-01

    The C-type lectin receptor dectin-1 and the integrin Mac-1 have key roles in controlling fungal infection. Here, we demonstrate that dectin-1- and Mac-1-induced activation of protein kinase Cδ in neutrophils, independent of the Card9 adaptor, is required for reactive oxygen species production and for intracellular killing upon Candida albicans uptake. Protein kinase Cδ was also required for zymosan-induced cytokine generation in neutrophils. In macrophages, protein kinase Cδ deficiency prevented fungi-induced reactive oxygen species generation but had no effect on activation of TGF-β-activated kinase-1, an effector of Card9, or nuclear factor κB activation, nor did it affect phagolysosomal maturation, autophagy, or intracellular C. albicans killing. In vivo, protein kinase Cδ-deficient mice were highly susceptible to C. albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus infection, which was partially rescued with adoptively transferred wild-type neutrophils. Thus, protein kinase Cδ activation downstream of dectin-1 and Mac-1 has an important role in neutrophil, but not macrophage, functions required for host defense against fungal pathogens.

  5. Molecular characterization of some lignicolous species from fungal culture collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stević Nevena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture collections of microorganisms, including fungi, are strain deposits recognised as Biological Resource Centers (BRCs with a great importance in science, industry and education. Their objective is to preserve the purity, viability and genomic integrity of every single strain as a member of such collection. Since improvement of molecular methods nowadays brought many novel approaches in manipulation with strains of microorganisms, they can also be useful for characterization of existing stored strains. ITS1 region in nuclear DNA is preferred barcoding marker for taxon identification, which can be explained by its great inter-species variability. This paper presents results from analysing ITS1 region sequences (17 obtained from fungal DNA of culture collection of autochthonous, lignicolous genera Piptoporus, Pleurotus, Ganoderma and Schizophyllum cultured on malt agar plates for 14 days at 25°C. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool was used for comparison with online databases, while alignment of sequences was made with MEGA 5.10 software. Morphological determination of species or genus was confirmed for 13 cultures, while the others were disproved. The resulting alignment indicated small intra-species variability of ITS1 region and pointed to it as an ideal marker for verification of fungal culture collections' authenticity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43002 and by the Provincial Secretariat for Science and Technological Development, Vojvodina, Serbia APV 114-4513592/2013-03: Molecular and phenotypic diversity of taxa of economical and epidemiological importance, and endangered and endemic species in Europe

  6. Evaluation of Diagnostic Sensitivity of Wet Preparation Microscopy Using KOH for Detection of Fungal Agents from Keratitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta D Khokhar, Summaiya A Mulla, Latika N Shah, Geeta M Vaghela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Keratitis is a common ophthalmic condition mostly caused by fungi. Apart from fungal culture, wet preparation using 10% Potassium hydroxide (KOH for microscopic detection of fungal elements is a rapid and accurate method of laboratory diagnosis. Purpose: This prospective study was undertaken in order to evaluate the diagnostic sensitivity of wet preparation microscopy using KOH for detection of fungal agents from keratitis patients. Methodology: 103 samples of clinically suspected patients of keratitis attending tertiary care hospital between march 2010 and june 2011 were included. Samples like corneal swabs, corneal scrapings, corneal button, and corneo-scleral rim were collected aseptically after slit lamp examination, then transported to microbiology laboratory. Samples were processed for direct microscopy (gram stain and 10% KOH wet mount preparation and culture. Culture positive isolates were identified based on morphology and standard biochemical tests. Data entry and analysis was done statistically. Results: From 103 samples, fungal culture was positive in 12%. Different fungus isolates include Aspergillus flavus (67% and Candida spp (25% were the leading fungi followed by Curvularis (8%. Direct microscopical examination using KOH wet preparation and gram’s stain had detected fungal elements in 83% and 75% samples respectively against culture results. Conclusion: Aspergillus flavus (67%, Candida spp (25% and Curvularia spp (8% was most common cause of fungal keratitis. Wet mount with KOH can be relied upon as the single most important screening tool for rapid diagnosis of fungal corneal ulcer and treatment should be dispensed on its basis.

  7. Fungal allelochemicals in insect pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holighaus, Gerrit; Rohlfs, Marko

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between insects and fungi are widespread, and important mediators of these interactions are fungal chemicals that can therefore be considered as allelochemicals. Numerous studies suggest that fungal chemicals can affect insects in many different ways. Here, we apply the terminology established by insect-plant ecologists for categorizing the effect of fungal allelochemicals on insects and for evaluating the application potential of these chemicals in insect pest management. Our literature survey shows that fungal volatile and non-volatile chemicals have an enormous potential to influence insect behavior and fitness. Many of them still remain to be discovered, but some recent examples of repellents and toxins could open up new ways for developing safe insect control strategies. However, we also identified shortcomings in our understanding of the chemical ecology of insect-fungus interactions and the way they have been investigated. In particular, the mode-of-action of fungal allelochemicals has often not been appropriately designated or examined, and the way in which induction by insects affects fungal chemical diversity is poorly understood. This review should raise awareness that in-depth ecological studies of insect-fungus interactions can reveal novel allelochemicals of particular benefit for the development of innovative insect pest management strategies.

  8. Structure and biological functions of fungal cerebrosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto-Bergter Eliana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramide monohexosides (CMHs, cerebrosides are glycosphingolipids composed of a hydrophobic ceramide linked to one sugar unit. In fungal cells, CMHs are very conserved molecules consisting of a ceramide moiety containing 9-methyl-4,8-sphingadienine in amidic linkage to 2-hydroxyoctadecanoic or 2-hydroxyhexadecanoic acids, and a carbohydrate portion consisting of one residue of glucose or galactose. 9-Methyl 4,8-sphingadienine-containing ceramides are usually glycosylated to form fungal cerebrosides, but the recent description of a ceramide dihexoside (CDH presenting phytosphingosine in Magnaporthe grisea suggests the existence of alternative pathways of ceramide glycosylation in fungal cells. Along with their unique structural characteristics, fungal CMHs have a peculiar subcellular distribution and striking biological properties. In Pseudallescheria boydii, Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, A. fumigatus, and Schizophyllum commune, CMHs are apparently involved in morphological transitions and fungal growth. The elucidation of structural and functional aspects of fungal cerebrosides may therefore contribute to the design of new antifungal agents inhibiting growth and differentiation of pathogenic species.

  9. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits tax-dependent activation of nuclear factor kappa B and of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 positive leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harakeh, Steve; Diab-Assaf, Mona; Azar, Rania; Hassan, Hani Mutlak Abdulla; Tayeb, Safwan; Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Abuzenadah, Adel; Chaudhary, Adeel; Kumosani, Taha; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Mathias; Yacoub, Haitham; Azhar, Esam; Barbour, Elie

    2014-01-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant polyphenol molecule from green tea and is known to exhibit antioxidative as well as tumor suppressing activity. In order to examine EGCG tumor invasion and suppressing activity against adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), two HTLV-1 positive leukemia cells (HuT-102 and C91- PL) were treated with non-cytotoxic concentrations of EGCG for 2 and 4 days. Proliferation was significantly inhibited by 100 μM at 4 days, with low cell lysis or cytotoxicity. HTLV-1 oncoprotein (Tax) expression in HuT- 102 and C91-PL cells was inhibited by 25 μM and 125 μM respectively. The same concentrations of EGCG inhibited NF-kB nuclearization and stimulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in both cell lines. These results indicate that EGCG can inhibit proliferation and reduce the invasive potential of HTLV-1- positive leukemia cells. It apparently exerted its effects by suppressing Tax expression, manifested by inhibiting the activation of NF-kB pathway and induction of MMP-9 transcription in HTLV-1 positive cells.

  10. Rapid detection of fungal keratitis with DNA-stabilizing FTA filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menassa, Nardine; Bosshard, Philipp P; Kaufmann, Claude; Grimm, Christian; Auffarth, Gerd U; Thiel, Michael A

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is increasingly important for the rapid detection of fungal keratitis. However, techniques of specimen collection and DNA extraction before PCR may interfere with test sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of DNA-stabilizing FTA filter paper (Indicating FTA filter paper; Whatman International, Ltd., Maidstone, UK) for specimen collection without DNA extraction in a single-step, nonnested PCR for fungal keratitis. Methods. Specimens were collected from ocular surfaces with FTA filter discs, which automatically lyse collected cells and stabilize nucleic acids. Filter discs were directly used in single-step PCR reactions to detect fungal DNA. Test sensitivity was evaluated with serial dilutions of Candida albicans, Fusarium oxysporum, and Aspergillus fumigatus cultures. Test specificity was analyzed by comparing 196 and 155 healthy individuals from Switzerland and Egypt, respectively, with 15 patients with a diagnosis of microbial keratitis. Results. PCR with filter discs detected 3 C. albicans, 25 F. oxysporum, and 125 A. fumigatus organisms. In healthy volunteers, fungal PCR was positive in 1.0% and 8.4% of eyes from Switzerland and Egypt, respectively. Fungal PCR remained negative in 10 cases of culture-proven bacterial keratitis, became positive in 4 cases of fungal keratitis, but missed 1 case of culture-proven A. fumigatus keratitis. Conclusions. FTA filter paper for specimen collection together with direct PCR is a promising method of detecting fungal keratitis. The analytical sensitivity is high without the need for a semi-nested or nested second PCR, the clinical specificity is 91.7% to 99.0%, and the method is rapid and inexpensive.

  11. Schizophyllum commune-induced allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and sinobronchial mycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Tsukatani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present 32- and 38-year-old males with Schizophyllum commune-induced allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS. S. commune-induced AFRS was diagnosed by clinical and radiographic findings, positive specific IgE antibodies against S. commune as measured by the ImmunoCAP system, and sequencing analysis of the fungus. Our two cases with S. commune-induced AFRS for the first time showed evidence for type 1 hypersensitivity to S. commune as determined by using specific IgE antibodies against S. commune, and the fungus was identified by sequence analysis.

  12. Spontaneous Fungal Peritonitis in Ascites of Cardiac Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Seema; Attar, Bashar M.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous fungal peritonitis (SFP) is an infrequent but severe complication most commonly described in patients with liver cirrhosis. We present the first case of culture-proven SFP occurring in cardiogenic ascites. The diagnosis of SFP was clinically challenging as the initial ascites was consistent with the more common diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). The patient did not respond to antibacterial therapy, however, and the final diagnosis was only made with positive ascitic cultures that grew Candida glabrata. SFP should be considered in patients with either cardiac or cirrhotic ascites and have a delayed or lack of response to traditional SBP treatment.

  13. Schizophyllum commune-induced allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and sinobronchial mycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukatani, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Haruhiko; Anzawa, Kazushi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Makimura, Koichi; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu; Ueda, Norishi

    2015-06-01

    We present 32- and 38-year-old males with Schizophyllum commune-induced allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS). S. commune-induced AFRS was diagnosed by clinical and radiographic findings, positive specific IgE antibodies against S. commune as measured by the ImmunoCAP system, and sequencing analysis of the fungus. Our two cases with S. commune-induced AFRS for the first time showed evidence for type 1 hypersensitivity to S. commune as determined by using specific IgE antibodies against S. commune, and the fungus was identified by sequence analysis.

  14. Obligatory group I introns with unusual features at positions 1949 and 2449 in nuclear LSU rDNA of Didymiaceae myxomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikmark, Odd-Gunnar; Haugen, Peik; Haugli, Kari; Johansen, Steinar D

    2007-05-01

    Myxomycetes (plasmodial slime molds) belonging to the order Physarales contain obligatory group I introns at positions 1949 and 2449 in their large subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Here, we report 36 group I introns from the Didymiaceae family (order Physarales) from 18 isolates representing three genera and seven species, and have reconstructed both host and intron phylogenies. The introns, named L1949 and L2449, were found in all isolates analyzed, consistent with an obligatory distribution in Didymiaceae. The introns fold at the RNA-level into typical group I ribozyme core structures that are relatively conserved, but contain large and highly variable extension sequences in peripheral domains without any detectable protein coding capacities. Furthermore, the L1949 and L2449 introns have probably become dependent on host factors for folding or activity. This assumption is based on that all introns tested for self-splicing in vitro failed to ligate the flanking exon regions. Phylogenies based on LSU rDNA and intron sequences are consistent with that the L1949 and L2449 introns follow a strict vertical inheritance within Didymiaceae. We suggest that the Didymiaceae L1949 and L2449 introns are well suited as high-resolution markers in genetic assessments at various taxonomic levels, from closely related strains of a single species to separating genera.

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) confers resistance to apoptosis in EBV-positive B-lymphoma cells through up-regulation of survivin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Murakami, Masanao; Verma, Subhash C; Cai, Qiliang; Haldar, Sabyasachi; Kaul, Rajeev; Wasik, Mariusz A; Middeldorp, Jaap; Robertson, Erle S

    2011-02-05

    Resistance to apoptosis is an important component of the overall mechanism which drives the tumorigenic process. EBV is a ubiquitous human gamma-herpesvirus which preferentially establishes latent infection in viral infected B-lymphocytes. EBNA1 is typically expressed in most forms of EBV-positive malignancies and is important for replication of the latent episome in concert with replication of the host cells. Here, we investigate the effects of EBNA1 on survivin up-regulation in EBV-infected human B-lymphoma cells. We present evidence which demonstrates that EBNA1 forms a complex with Sp1 or Sp1-like proteins bound to their cis-element at the survivin promoter. This enhances the activity of the complex and up-regulates survivin. Knockdown of survivin and EBNA1 showed enhanced apoptosis in infected cells and thus supports a role for EBNA1 in suppressing apoptosis in EBV-infected cells. Here, we suggest that EBV encoded EBNA1 can contribute to the oncogenic process by up-regulating the apoptosis suppressor protein, survivin in EBV-associated B-lymphoma cells.

  16. The Use of Frozen Section in the Early Diagnosis of Acute Invasive Fungal Sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melancon, C Claire; Clinger, John D

    2017-08-01

    Objectives Acute invasive fungal sinusitis (AIFS) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the immunocompromised patient population. Early diagnosis is key to improving patient outcomes. Frozen section biopsies have been shown to decrease time to diagnosis when compared with permanent pathology. However, its accuracy has not been adequately described in the literature, specifically in regard to AIFS. The aim of this study is to evaluate the statistical diagnostic accuracy of frozen sections and to review the etiology, clinical presentation, and current diagnostic protocols in management of AIFS. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects and Methods Retrospective review included 67 pathologic records in Co-Path, with search criteria including invasive fungal, clinical history, frozen section, and final diagnosis between the dates of 2006 and 2015. Results Sixty-seven cases were reviewed per the search criteria in Co-Path. Of these, 31 met further criteria of having had frozen section analysis. Variables such as sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were assessed. All 21 positive frozen sections correlated with positive permanent pathology, giving a positive predictive value of 100%. Frozen section biopsies were 87.5% sensitive and 100% specific. Conclusion Early diagnosis of AIFS has been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality. Frozen section biopsies remain key in obtaining an early diagnosis among patients with a high clinical suspicion for invasive fungal sinusitis. Frozen section biopsies positive for invasive fungal pathology were universally consistent with definitive diagnosis.

  17. Incongruent nuclear and mitochondrial genetic structure of new world screwworm fly populations due to positive selection of mutations associated with dimethyl- and diethyl-organophosphates resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamo, Luana Walravens; Fresia, Pablo; Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria L

    2015-01-01

    that these mutations evolved under positive selection.

  18. Nuclear control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wan Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    International cooperation in nuclear industries requires nuclear control as prerequisites. The concept of nuclear control is based on the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapon (NPT). The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays central role in implementing nuclear control. Nuclear control consists of nuclear safeguards, physical protection, and export/import control. Each member state of NPT is subject to the IAEA`s safeguards by concluding safeguards agreements with the IAEA. IAEA recommends member states to implement physical protection on nuclear materials by `The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material` and `The Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material` of IAEA. Export/Import Control is to deter development of nuclear weapons by controlling international trade on nuclear materials, nuclear equipments and technology. Current status of domestic and foreign nuclear control implementation including recent induction of national inspection system in Korea is described and functions of recently set-up Technology Center for Nuclear Control (TCNC) under the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) are also explained. 6 tabs., 11 refs. (Author).

  19. Unravelling soil fungal communities from different Mediterranean land-use backgrounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Orgiazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fungi strongly influence ecosystem structure and functioning, playing a key role in many ecological services as decomposers, plant mutualists and pathogens. The Mediterranean area is a biodiversity hotspot that is increasingly threatened by intense land use. Therefore, to achieve a balance between conservation and human development, a better understanding of the impact of land use on the underlying fungal communities is needed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used parallel pyrosequencing of the nuclear ribosomal its regions to characterize the fungal communities in five soils subjected to different anthropogenic impact in a typical mediterranean landscape: a natural cork-oak forest, a pasture, a managed meadow, and two vineyards. Marked differences in the distribution of taxon assemblages among the different sites and communities were found. Data analyses consistently indicated a sharp distinction of the fungal community of the cork oak forest soil from those described in the other soils. Each soil showed features of the fungal assemblages retrieved which can be easily related to the above-ground settings: ectomycorrhizal phylotypes were numerous in natural sites covered by trees, but were nearly completely missing from the anthropogenic and grass-covered sites; similarly, coprophilous fungi were common in grazed sites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Data suggest that investigation on the below-ground fungal community may provide useful elements on the above-ground features such as vegetation coverage and agronomic procedures, allowing to assess the cost of anthropogenic land use to hidden diversity in soil. Datasets provided in this study may contribute to future searches for fungal bio-indicators as biodiversity markers of a specific site or a land-use degree.

  20. Divergent and Convergent Evolution of Fungal Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yanfang; Xiao, Guohua; Zheng, Peng; Cen, Kai; Zhan, Shuai; Wang, Chengshu

    2016-05-12

    Fungal pathogens of plants and animals have multifarious effects; they cause devastating damages to agricultures, lead to life-threatening diseases in humans, or induce beneficial effects by reducing insect pest populations. Many virulence factors have been determined in different fungal pathogens; however, the molecular determinants contributing to fungal host selection and adaptation are largely unknown. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of seven ascomycete insect pathogens and performed the genome-wide analyses of 33 species of filamentous ascomycete pathogenic fungi that infect insects (12 species), plants (12), and humans (9). Our results revealed that the genomes of plant pathogens encode more proteins and protein families than the insect and human pathogens. Unexpectedly, more common orthologous protein groups are shared between the insect and plant pathogens than between the two animal group pathogens. We also found that the pathogenicity of host-adapted fungi evolved multiple times, and that both divergent and convergent evolutions occurred during pathogen-host cospeciation thus resulting in protein families with similar features in each fungal group. However, the role of phylogenetic relatedness on the evolution of protein families and therefore pathotype formation could not be ruled out due to the effect of common ancestry. The evolutionary correlation analyses led to the identification of different protein families that correlated with alternate pathotypes. Particularly, the effector-like proteins identified in plant and animal pathogens were strongly linked to fungal host adaptation, suggesting the existence of similar gene-for-gene relationships in fungus-animal interactions that has not been established before. These results well advance our understanding of the evolution of fungal pathogenicity and the factors that contribute to fungal pathotype formation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  1. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  2. Opportunistic fungi in lake water and fungal infections in associated human population in Dal Lake, Kashmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandh, Suhaib A; Kamili, Azra N; Ganai, Bashir A; Lone, Bashir A

    2016-04-01

    Natural habitats of opportunistic fungal pathogens are outside of the host; therefore, it is critically important to understand their ecology and routes of transmission. In this study, we investigated the presence of human pathogenic opportunistic fungi in lake water and incidence of fungal infections in associated population in Kashmir, India. Six hundred forty water samples were taken on seasonal basis from a wide network of sampling stations of the lake for an extended period of two years for screening their occurrence. The samples were inoculated onto rose bengal agar, malt extract agar, potato dextrose agar and other specified culture media supplemented with Chloramphenicol and Streptomycin followed by incubation at 37 °C. All the samples were positive for fungi, which were later identified by sequencing the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region aided by classical morphological culture techniques and physiological profiling. The whole process led to the isolation of sixteen species of opportunistic fungal pathogens belonging to genus Aspergillus, Candida, Penicillium, Cryptococcus, Fusarium, Rhizopus and Mucor in decreasing order of prevalence. Furthermore, 20% population (n = 384) of Dal inhabitants was examined for possible fungal infections and it was observed that only 8.07% individuals were positive for fungal infections with 4.68% skin infection cases, 2.34% onychomycosis cases and 1.04% candidiasis cases. Scrapings from onychomycosis and candidiasis patients showed the presence of Aversicolor and Calbicans respectively, resembling exactly the strains isolated from the lake water. However, the skin infection was because of a dermatophyte not isolated for the lake water. Higher prevalence of infection (6.77%) was seen in people using lake water followed by a positive prevalence of 1.30% using tap water. The results of present study suggest that the lake inhabitants are at a greater risk of getting life threatening fungal diseases which may lead to

  3. Burden of serious fungal infections in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrou, Katrien; Maertens, Johan; Van Even, Ellen; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to estimate the total number of serious fungal infections occurring yearly in Belgium. The number of cryptococcal infections was retrieved from the National Reference Center for Mycosis. Populations at risk and fungal infections frequencies in these populations were used to estimate incidence or prevalence of other fungal infections. The Belgian population consists of 11.10 million people. Cryptococcal meningitis is rare. In all, 15 of the 1227 newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS cases presented with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. This accounts for ±14% of total PCP cases (n = 120). The incidence of candidaemia is estimated as 5/100,000 resulting in 555 cases and 213 deaths. A total number of 675 invasive aspergillosis cases and ≥169 deaths attributed to this infection were calculated. Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis is estimated to be prevalent in 662 cases. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis cases were estimated to be 23,119 applying a 2.5% and 15% rate in adult asthma and cystic fibrosis patients respectively. Severe asthma with fungal sensitisation cases was estimated to be 30,402. There were 174,760 women with recurrent Candida vaginitis assuming a 6% rate in women aged between 15 and 50. Approximately 233,000 people of the Belgian population (2.1%) are estimated to suffer from a fungal infection on a yearly basis.

  4. Burden of fungal infections in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekiri-Talbi, M; Denning, D W

    2017-02-21

    We report for the first time in Algeria and provide burden estimates. We searched for existing data and estimated the incidence and prevalence of fungal diseases based on the population at risk and available epidemiological data. Demographic data were derived from the National Office of Statistics (Office National des Statistiques: ONS), World Health Organization (WHO), The Joint Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and national published reports. When no data existed, risk populations were used to estimate frequencies of fungal infections, using previously described methodology. Algeria has 40.4 million inhabitants, and probably at least 568,900 (1.41%) of Algerians have a serious fungal infection each year. Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (485,000) and fungal asthma (72,000) are probably the commonest problems, as there are over 1 million adult asthmatics. Candidaemia is estimated in 2,020 people, invasive aspergillosis in 2,865 people, and intra-abdominal candidiasis in 303 people; these are the most common life-threatening problems. AIDS is uncommon, but cancer is not (45,000 new cases of cancer including 1,500 in children), nor is COPD (an estimated 317,762 patients, of whom 20.3% are admitted to hospital each year). A focus on improving the diagnosis and epidemiological data related to fungal infection is necessary in Algeria.

  5. Fueling the Future with Fungal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-10-27

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the JGI Fungal Genomic Program. One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts and pathogens) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation and sugar fermentation) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Science Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 400 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics will lead to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such ‘parts’ suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  6. Fungal endophytes: modifiers of plant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Posy E; Ridout, Mary; Newcombe, George

    2016-04-01

    Many recent studies have demonstrated that non-pathogenic fungi within plant microbiomes, i.e., endophytes ("endo" = within, "phyte" = plant), can significantly modify the expression of host plant disease. The rapid pace of advancement in endophyte ecology warrants a pause to synthesize our understanding of endophyte disease modification and to discuss future research directions. We reviewed recent literature on fungal endophyte disease modification, and here report on several emergent themes: (1) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease span the full spectrum from pathogen antagonism to pathogen facilitation, with pathogen antagonism most commonly reported. (2) Agricultural plant pathosystems are the focus of research on endophyte disease modification. (3) A taxonomically diverse group of fungal endophytes can influence plant disease severity. And (4) Fungal endophyte effects on plant disease severity are context-dependent. Our review highlights the importance of fungal endophytes for plant disease across a broad range of plant pathosystems, yet simultaneously reveals that complexity within plant microbiomes presents a significant challenge to disentangling the biotic environmental factors affecting plant disease severity. Manipulative studies integrating eco-evolutionary approaches with emerging molecular tools will be poised to elucidate the functional importance of endophytes in natural plant pathosystems that are fundamental to biodiversity and conservation.

  7. [Pulmonary fungal infection in patients with AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, B; Lortholary, O

    2013-10-01

    Fungal infections are the most common opportunistic infections (OI) occurring during the course of HIV infection, though their incidence has decreased dramatically with the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (cART). Most cases occur in untreated patients, noncompliant patients or patients whose multiple antiretroviral regimens have failed and they are a good marker of the severity of cellular immunodepression. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is the second most frequent OI in France and cryptococcosis remains a major problem in the Southern Hemisphere. With the increase in travel, imported endemic fungal infection can occur and may mimic other infections, notably tuberculosis. Fungal infections often have a pulmonary presentation but an exhaustive search for dissemination should be made in patients infected with HIV, at least those at an advanced stage of immune deficiency. Introduction of cART in combination with anti-fungal treatment depends on the risk of AIDS progression and on the risk of cumulative toxicity and the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) if introduced too early. Fungal infections in HIV infected patients remain a problem in the cART era. IRIS can complicate the management and requires an optimised treatment regime. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Fungal keratitis associated with ocular rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vandana; Shome, Debraj; Sajnani, Manoj; Natarajan, Sundaram

    2010-06-01

    In order to report fungal keratitis in patients of ocular rosacea, a retrospective review of all cases of fungal keratitis was undertaken. Cases in which ocular rosacea coexisted were identified and included in the study. The clinical course of patients thus identified was studied from the medical records and outcomes were evaluated. A total of three cases of fungal keratitis with coexisting ocular rosacea were identified. All three patients were known cases of acne rosacea with an intermittent, irregular treatment for the same. Previous history of contact lens use, ocular surgery or trauma was not present in any of the cases. Microbiological evaluation revealed Aspergillus flavus as the causative organism in two patients and an unidentified hyaline fungus in the third. Patients received simultaneous therapy for fungal keratitis and ocular rosacea. The ocular surface completely stabilized and the infiltrate resolved in all three cases. The chronic ocular surface changes and induced inflammation in ocular rosacea, along with the instillation of topical steroids for therapy, may create an environmental milieu favorable for fungal keratitis. Microbiological evaluation should be considered, even in cases of suspected sterile keratitis, prior to treatment with topical steroids, so as to prevent the possible worsening of an associated infective corneal condition.

  9. Fungal Involvement in Patients with Paranasal Sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kordbacheh

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Fungal involvement of the paranasal sinuses is frequently observed in the immunocompromised host and it can become lifethreatening if it is not diagnosed. Definitive diagnosis is made by tissue biopsy and culture. In this study biopsy materials of maxillary, ethmoidal and frontal sinuses of 60 patients with clinical manifestation of sinusitis and no response to medical therapy were assessed by mycological and pathological methods for the presence of fungi. Invasive fungal sinusitis was diagnosed in 3 patients and etiologic agents were Candida albicans, Rhizopus sp. and Aspergillus fumigatus. Predisposing factors in these patients were leukemia, diabetes mellitus and previous sinus and polyp surgery, respectively. Allergic fungal sinusitis also was seen in one patient and Alternaria sp. isolated from the biopsy material. Only the patient with allergic form of disease survived but all the patients with invasive form of fungal infection were expired. This clearly underscores the need of early recognition of fungal sinusitis in at risk population in order to start urgent treatment. In this study Nocardia asteroids also was isolated from the biopsy sample in a patient with sinunasal adenocarcinoma.

  10. Modelling combat strategies in fungal mycelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Graeme P

    2012-07-07

    Fungal mycelia have a well-established role in nutrient cycling and are widely used as agents in biological control and in the remediation of polluted landscapes. Competition and combat between different fungal communities is common in these contexts and its outcome impacts on local biodiversity and the success of such biotechnological applications. In this investigation a mathematical model representing mycelia as a system of partial differential equations is used to simulate combat between two fungal colonies growing into a nutrient-free domain. The resultant equations are integrated numerically and the model simulates well-established outcomes of combat between fungal communities. The outcome of pairwise combat is shown to depend on numerous factors including the suppression of advancing hyphae in rivals, the degradation of a rival's established biomass and the utilization and redistribution of available nutrient resources. It is demonstrated how non-transitive hierarchies in fungal communities can be established through switching mechanisms, mirroring observations reported in experimental studies, and how specialized defensive structures can emerge through changes in the redistribution of internal resources.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal ABC transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Driessen Arnold JM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superfamily of ABC proteins is among the largest known in nature. Its members are mainly, but not exclusively, involved in the transport of a broad range of substrates across biological membranes. Many contribute to multidrug resistance in microbial pathogens and cancer cells. The diversity of ABC proteins in fungi is comparable with those in multicellular animals, but so far fungal ABC proteins have barely been studied. Results We performed a phylogenetic analysis of the ABC proteins extracted from the genomes of 27 fungal species from 18 orders representing 5 fungal phyla thereby covering the most important groups. Our analysis demonstrated that some of the subfamilies of ABC proteins remained highly conserved in fungi, while others have undergone a remarkable group-specific diversification. Members of the various fungal phyla also differed significantly in the number of ABC proteins found in their genomes, which is especially reduced in the yeast S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Conclusions Data obtained during our analysis should contribute to a better understanding of the diversity of the fungal ABC proteins and provide important clues about their possible biological functions.

  12. Fungal Genomics for Energy and Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2013-03-11

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). One of its projects, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts) by means of genome sequencing and analysis. New chapters of the Encyclopedia can be opened with user proposals to the JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP). Another JGI project, the 1000 fungal genomes, explores fungal diversity on genome level at scale and is open for users to nominate new species for sequencing. Over 200 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  13. Diagnostic pitfalls in cytological diagnosis of subcutaneous fungal infection in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sushila; Vij, Mukul; Prasad, Narayan; Kaul, Anupama; Marak, Rungmei S K; Pandey, Rakesh

    2012-03-01

    Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) are at increased risk of the development of a variety of skin infections that can result from graft-preserving immuno-suppressive therapy. In this study, we aimed to determine cytomorphological findings of fungal subcutaneous swelling in seven RTRs and to analyze diagnostic pitfalls in fungal cytology. A retrospective review of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) smears of subcutaneous swelling with positive fungal elements in RTRs from 2008 to 2010 was performed. We had seven cases (all males; age range, 34-58 years, mean, 46.3 years). The time interval between the renal transplantation and appearance of swelling ranged from 8 to 19 months (mean, 13.4 months). The swelling was located on lower limb (six cases) and arm (one case). The lesion was solitary (six cases) and multiple (one case). The cytology of aspirated material showed branched septate fungal hyphae in six cases. These were well delineated on Periodic acid schiffs (PAS) and chromic silver methenamine (CSM) stains. One case showed presence of faint, thin walled, broad ribbon like hyphae. Culture of aspirated material was performed in four cases which grew phaeohyphomycosis in all. Histology of excised tissue showed numerous septate, branched, pigmented fungal elements suggestive of pheohyphomycosis in four cases and broad ribbon hyphae suggestive of zygomycosis in one case. All of our cases responded well with anti-fungal treatment. Fungal infection can manifest as subcutaneous swelling in RTRs. It is often severe, rapidly progressive and difficult to diagnose. FNAC is an important diagnostic tool which is simple, cost effective and rapid method.

  14. Chromium immobilization by extra- and intraradical fungal structures of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Songlin [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamycká 129, Prague 6−Suchdol 165 21 (Czech Republic); Zhang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Li, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Hu, Yajun [State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Key Laboratory of Agro-ecological Processes in Subtropical Region, Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha, 410125 (China); Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhen, Xiangjun [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China); and others

    2016-10-05

    Highlights: • Cr immobilization in AM symbioses revealed by SEM-EDS, STXM and XAFS. • EPS like particles formed on fungal surface upon Cr(VI) stress. • Cr(VI) was reduced to mainly Cr(III)-phosphate analogues on fungal surface. • Cr can be retained by the intraradical fungal structures in mycorrhizal roots. - Abstract: Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can enhance plant Cr tolerance through immobilizing Cr in mycorrhizal roots. However, the detailed processes and mechanisms are unclear. The present study focused on cellular distribution and speciation of Cr in both extraradical mycelium (ERM) and mycorrhizal roots exposed to Cr(VI) by using field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (FE-SEM-EDS), scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy techniques. We found that amounts of particles (possibly extracellular polymeric substances, EPS) were produced on the AM fungal surface upon Cr(VI) stress, which contributed greatly to Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. With EDS of the surface of AM fungi exposed to various Cr(VI) levels, a positive correlation between Cr and P was revealed, suggesting that phosphate groups might act as counter ions of Cr(III), which was also confirmed by the XAFS analysis. Besides, STXM and XAFS analyses showed that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) in AM fungal structures (arbuscules, intraradical mycelium, etc.) and cell walls in mycorrhizal roots, and complexed possibly with carboxyl groups or histidine analogues. The present work provided evidence of Cr immobilization on fungal surface and in fungal structures in mycorrhizal roots at a cellular level, and thus unraveled the underlying mechanisms by which AM symbiosis immobilize Cr.

  15. Utility of frozen section analysis for fungal organisms in soft tissue wound debridement margin determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Nives; Hagen, Matthew C; Schrager, Jason J; Hebbeler-Clark, Renee S; Masineni, Sreeharsha

    2015-10-15

    Zygomycetes cause different patterns of infection in immunosuppressed individuals, including sino-orbito-cerebral, pulmonary, skin/soft tissue infection and disseminated disease. Infections with Zygomycetes have a high mortality rate, even with prompt treatment, which includes anti-fungal agents and surgical debridement. In some centers, clear margins are monitored by serial frozen sections, but there are no specific guidelines for the use of frozen sections during surgical debridement. Studies in fungal rhinosinusitis found 62.5-85 % sensitivity of frozen section analysis in margin assessment. However, the utility of frozen section analysis for margin evaluation in debridement of skin/soft tissue infection has not been published. We present a case of zygomycosis of decubitus ulcers in which we assessed statistical measures of performance of frozen section analysis for presence of fungal organisms on the margin, compared with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) sections as gold standard. A total of 33 specimens (94 blocks) were sectioned, stained with H&E and evaluated by both frozen and FFPE analysis. Negative interpretations were confirmed by Gomori methenamine silver stain on FFPE sections. H&E staining of frozen sections had 68.4 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity for assessing margins clear of fungal organisms. The negative and positive predictive values were 70.0 % and 100 %, respectively. Using presence of acute inflammation and necrosis as markers of fungal infection improved sensitivity (100 %) at the expense of specificity (42.9 %). Use of intraoperative assessment of skin and soft tissue margins for fungal infection is a valuable tool in the management of skin and soft tissue fungal infection treatment.

  16. Nuclear fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadowcroft, Ronald Ross; Bain, Alastair Stewart

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element wherein a tubular cladding of zirconium or a zirconium alloy has a fission gas plenum chamber which is held against collapse by the loops of a spacer in the form of a tube which has been deformed inwardly at three equally spaced, circumferential positions to provide three loops. A heat resistant disc of, say, graphite separates nuclear fuel pellets within the cladding from the plenum chamber. The spacer is of zirconium or a zirconium alloy.

  17. Histopathological Features Of Deep Fungal Infections : An Analysis Of Sixteen Skin Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Subhra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, skin biopsies in suspected cases of deep fungal infections were subjected to H &E and special stainings. In 2 of the 5 cases of sporotrichosis and in both cases of chromomycosis and of histoplasmosis, PAS positive fungal elements could be demonstrated. In both the cases of histoplasmosis, the fungi were also demonstrated by GMS staining. In 3 cases of sporotrichosis, 2 cases of mycetoma and 3 cases of subcutaneous phycomycosis, fungus could not be demonstrated by PAS staining. However, the histopathological features were corroborative.

  18. Reporting nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani

    2015-01-01

    are available; therefore, an European position statement on how to report nuclear cardiology might be useful. The current paper combines the limited existing evidence with expert consensus, previously published recommendations as well as current clinical practices. For all the applications discussed......, and conclusion of the report. The statement also discusses recommended terminology in nuclear cardiology, image display, and preliminary reports. It is hoped that this statement may lead to more attention to create well-written and standardized nuclear cardiology reports and eventually lead to improved clinical...

  19. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  20. Nuclear Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  1. Next-generation DNA sequencing reveals that low fungal diversity in house dust is associated with childhood asthma development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannemiller, K C; Mendell, M J; Macher, J M; Kumagai, K; Bradman, A; Holland, N; Harley, K; Eskenazi, B; Peccia, J

    2014-06-01

    Dampness and visible mold in homes are associated with asthma development, but causal mechanisms remain unclear. The goal of this research was to explore associations among measured dampness, fungal exposure, and childhood asthma development without the bias of culture-based microbial analysis. In the low-income, Latino CHAMACOS birth cohort, house dust was collected at age 12 months, and asthma status was determined at age 7 years.The current analysis included 13 asthma cases and 28 controls. Next-generation DNA sequencing methods quantified fungal taxa and diversity. Lower fungal diversity (number of fungal operational taxonomic units) was significantly associated with increased risk of asthma development: unadjusted odds ratio(OR) 4.80 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04–22.1). Control for potential confounders strengthened this relationship. Decreased diversity within the genus Cryptococcus was significantly associated with increased asthma risk (OR 21.0, 95% CI 2.16–204). No fungal taxon (species, genus, class) was significantly positively associated with asthma development, and one was significantly negatively associated. Elevated moisture was associated with increased fungal diversity, and moisture/mold indicators were associated with four fungal taxa. Next-generation DNA sequencing provided comprehensive estimates of fungal identity and diversity, demonstrating significant associations between low fungal diversity and childhood asthma development in this community. Early life exposure to low fungal diversity in house dust was associated with increased risk for later asthma developmen tin this low-income, immigrant community. No individual fungal taxon (species, genus, or class) was associated with asthma development, although exposure to low diversity within the genus Cryptococcus was associated with asthma development. Future asthma development studies should incorporate fungal diversity measurements, in addition to measuring individual fungal taxa

  2. Ecological constraints limit the fitness of fungal hybrids in the Heterobasidion annosum species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbelotto, Matteo; Gonthier, Paolo; Nicolotti, Giovanni

    2007-10-01

    The ability of two closely related species to maintain species boundaries in spite of retained interfertility between them is a documented driving force of speciation. Experimental evidence to support possible interspecific postzygotic isolation mechanisms for organisms belonging to the kingdom Fungi is still missing. Here we report on the outcome of a series of controlled comparative inoculation experiments of parental wild genotypes and F(1) hybrid genotypes between closely related and interfertile taxa within the Heterobasidion annosum fungal species complex. Results indicated that these fungal hybrids are not genetically unfit but can fare as well as parental genotypes when inoculated on substrates favorable to both parents. However, when placed in substrates favoring one of the parents, hybrids are less competitive than the parental genotypes specialized on that substrate. Furthermore, in some but not all fungus x plant combinations, a clear asymmetry in fitness was observed between hybrids carrying identical nuclear genomes but different cytoplasms. This work provides some of the first experimental evidence of ecologically driven postzygotic reinforcement of isolation between closely related fungal species characterized by marked host specificity. Host specialization is one of the most striking traits of a large number of symbiotic and parasitic fungi; thus, we suggest the ecological mechanism proven here to reinforce isolation among Heterobasidion spp. may be generally valid for host-specialized fungi. The validity of this generalization is supported by the low number of known fungal hybrids and by their distinctive feature of being found in substrates different from those colonized by parental species.

  3. Diversity of Marine-Derived Fungal Cultures Exposed by DNA Barcodes: The Algorithm Matters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Andreakis

    Full Text Available Marine fungi are an understudied group of eukaryotic microorganisms characterized by unresolved genealogies and unstable classification. Whereas DNA barcoding via the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS provides a robust and rapid tool for fungal species delineation, accurate classification of fungi is often arduous given the large number of partial or unknown barcodes and misidentified isolates deposited in public databases. This situation is perpetuated by a paucity of cultivable fungal strains available for phylogenetic research linked to these data sets. We analyze ITS barcodes produced from a subsample (290 of 1781 cultured isolates of marine-derived fungi in the Bioresources Library located at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS. Our analysis revealed high levels of under-explored fungal diversity. The majority of isolates were ascomycetes including representatives of the subclasses Eurotiomycetidae, Hypocreomycetidae, Sordariomycetidae, Pleosporomycetidae, Dothideomycetidae, Xylariomycetidae and Saccharomycetidae. The phylum Basidiomycota was represented by isolates affiliated with the genera Tritirachium and Tilletiopsis. BLAST searches revealed 26 unknown OTUs and 50 isolates corresponding to previously uncultured, unidentified fungal clones. This study makes a significant addition to the availability of barcoded, culturable marine-derived fungi for detailed future genomic and physiological studies. We also demonstrate the influence of commonly used alignment algorithms and genetic distance measures on the accuracy and comparability of estimating Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs by the automatic barcode gap finder (ABGD method. Large scale biodiversity screening programs that combine datasets using algorithmic OTU delineation pipelines need to ensure compatible algorithms have been used because the algorithm matters.

  4. Diversity of Marine-Derived Fungal Cultures Exposed by DNA Barcodes: The Algorithm Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreakis, Nikos; Høj, Lone; Kearns, Philip; Hall, Michael R; Ericson, Gavin; Cobb, Rose E; Gordon, Benjamin R; Evans-Illidge, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Marine fungi are an understudied group of eukaryotic microorganisms characterized by unresolved genealogies and unstable classification. Whereas DNA barcoding via the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) provides a robust and rapid tool for fungal species delineation, accurate classification of fungi is often arduous given the large number of partial or unknown barcodes and misidentified isolates deposited in public databases. This situation is perpetuated by a paucity of cultivable fungal strains available for phylogenetic research linked to these data sets. We analyze ITS barcodes produced from a subsample (290) of 1781 cultured isolates of marine-derived fungi in the Bioresources Library located at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). Our analysis revealed high levels of under-explored fungal diversity. The majority of isolates were ascomycetes including representatives of the subclasses Eurotiomycetidae, Hypocreomycetidae, Sordariomycetidae, Pleosporomycetidae, Dothideomycetidae, Xylariomycetidae and Saccharomycetidae. The phylum Basidiomycota was represented by isolates affiliated with the genera Tritirachium and Tilletiopsis. BLAST searches revealed 26 unknown OTUs and 50 isolates corresponding to previously uncultured, unidentified fungal clones. This study makes a significant addition to the availability of barcoded, culturable marine-derived fungi for detailed future genomic and physiological studies. We also demonstrate the influence of commonly used alignment algorithms and genetic distance measures on the accuracy and comparability of estimating Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) by the automatic barcode gap finder (ABGD) method. Large scale biodiversity screening programs that combine datasets using algorithmic OTU delineation pipelines need to ensure compatible algorithms have been used because the algorithm matters.

  5. Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing reveals considerable fungal diversity in dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, A J; Evanowski, R L; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2017-09-13

    Fungi are important spoilage organisms in dairy products. However, little is known about the diversity of naturally occurring spoilage fungi in raw milk and processed dairy products, due at least in part to the fact that classical fungal identification methods require considerable expertise. To gain further insight into the fungal diversity in the dairy system, we isolated fungi from raw milk, raw and pasteurized milk cheese, and yogurt using the selective dichloran rose bengal chloramphenicol agar. In total, 361 fungal isolates were obtained and further characterized by DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and the nuclear ribosomal large subunit (LSU) rRNA gene if needed. We conducted BLAST (https://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi) searches of the ITS region sequences against the UNITE Database (https://unite.ut.ee/analysis.php), and selected other databases if needed, which allowed identification to the species level of 183 isolates and to the genus level of 107 of the 346 isolates that were successfully ITS sequenced. The isolates characterized represented 3 phyla and 19 genera; the most common genera isolated were Penicillium (25% of isolates), Debaryomyces (18%), and Candida (9%). This study not only provides, by using modern molecular tools, a baseline understanding of the types of fungi in dairy products, but also confirms that ITS sequencing is a useful approach for identification of fungal organisms found in the dairy food chain. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of anti β glucan aptamers for use as radiopharmaceutical in the identification of fungal Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Camila Maria de Sousa; Reis, Mariana Flister; Correa, Cristiane Rodrigues; Andrade, Antero S.R., E-mail: cmsl@cdtn.br, E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Invasive fungal infections caused by Candida albicans, are recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immuno compromised individuals. Patients may not show obvious clinical signs or symptoms, making it difficult to detect its origin or new focus that developed through hematogenous spread. Nuclear medicine could contribute to an early diagnosis of fungal infections, since specific markers are available. The aim of this study was to develop, through SELEX technique (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), aptamers for beta glucan for subsequent labeling with {sup 99}mTc and evaluation of this radiopharmaceutical in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections, scintigraphy. To obtain aptamers were performed 15 cycles of SELEX technique, using centrifugation as separation method of oligonuclotideos linked to the beta-glucan is not connected. The DNA bands were observed in all 15 cycles. The oligonucleotides obtained after cycles were cloned using the standard protocol kit-Topo TA vector (Invitrogen), and subjected to sequencing Megabase. Three aptamers for yeast cells were selected for this study. Further, other studies should be performed to assess the specificity and affinity thereof for later use in the diagnosis of fungal infections. (author)

  7. Prospects for the development of fungal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepe, G S

    1997-10-01

    In an era that emphasizes the term "cost-effective," vaccines are the ideal solution to preventing disease at a relatively low cost to society. Much of the previous emphasis has been on childhood scourges such as measles, mumps, rubella, poliomyelitis, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. The concept of vaccines for fungal diseases has had less impact because of the perceived limited problem. However, fungal diseases have become increasingly appreciated as serious medical problems that require recognition and aggressive management. The escalation in the incidence and prevalence of infection has prompted a renewed interest in vaccine development. Herein, I discuss the most recent developments in the search for vaccines to combat fungal infections. Investigators have discovered several inert substances from various fungi that can mediate protection in animal models. The next challenge will be to find the suitable mode of delivery for these immunogens.

  8. EPICHLOE SPECIES: fungal symbionts of grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardl, C L

    1996-01-01

    Epichloë species and their asexual descendants (Acremonium endophytes) are fungal symbionts of C3 grasses that span the symbiotic continuum from antagonism to mutualism depending on the relative importance, respectively, of horizontal transmission of sexual spores versus vertical clonal transmission in healthy grass seeds. At least seven sexual Epichloë species are identifiable by mating tests, and many asexual genotypes are interspecific hybrids. Benefits conferred by the symbionts on host plants include protection from biotic factors and abiotic stresses such as drought. Four classes of beneficial alkaloids are associated with the symbionts: ergot alkaloids, indolediterpenes (lolitrems), peramine, and saturated aminopyrrolizidines (lolines). These alkaloids protect host plants from insect and vertebrate herbivores, including livestock. Genetic engineering of the fungal symbionts as more suitable biological protectants for forage grasses requires identification of fungal genes for alkaloid biosynthesis, and DNA-mediated transformation of the fungi.

  9. Immunological Consequences of Intestinal Fungal Dysbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Matthew L; Limon, Jose J; Bar, Agnieszka S; Leal, Christian A; Gargus, Matthew; Tang, Jie; Brown, Jordan; Funari, Vincent A; Wang, Hanlin L; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe; Underhill, David M; Iliev, Iliyan D

    2016-06-08

    Compared to bacteria, the role of fungi within the intestinal microbiota is poorly understood. In this study we investigated whether the presence of a "healthy" fungal community in the gut is important for modulating immune function. Prolonged oral treatment of mice with antifungal drugs resulted in increased disease severity in acute and chronic models of colitis, and also exacerbated the development of allergic airway disease. Microbiota profiling revealed restructuring of fungal and bacterial communities. Specifically, representation of Candida spp. was reduced, while Aspergillus, Wallemia, and Epicoccum spp. were increased. Oral supplementation with a mixture of three fungi found to expand during antifungal treatment (Aspergillus amstelodami, Epicoccum nigrum, and Wallemia sebi) was sufficient to recapitulate the exacerbating effects of antifungal drugs on allergic airway disease. Taken together, these results indicate that disruption of commensal fungal populations can influence local and peripheral immune responses and enhance relevant disease states.

  10. Overview: fungal infections in the transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, J A

    2002-01-01

    Fungal infection remains a major hurdle in solid organ transplantation. A variety of new antifungal agents have become available and new diagnostic tools are in development. This conference was convened to review current approaches to the prevention and treatment of fungal infection in transplantation. Among the keys to successful management of fungal infection are identification of patients at risk for infection (stratification), eradication or control of established infection in advance of transplantation, the demonstration of cure by radiologic and histopathologic means, and the use of surgical debridement, reduction in immune suppression, and fungicidal therapies whenever possible. The absence of sensitive diagnostic tools and standardization of antifungal susceptibility testing for the filamentous fungi are identified as major impediments to care in this area.

  11. Evolutionary and structural diversity of fungal laccases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, Brenda; Oliver, Patricia; Medrano-Soto, Arturo; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    Fungal laccases have been extensively exploited for industrial purposes and there is a wealth of information available regarding their reaction mechanism, biological role and several molecular aspects, including cloning, heterologous expression and transcriptional analyses. Here we present the reconstruction of the fungal laccase loci evolution inferred from the comparative analysis of 48 different sequences. The topology of the phylogenetic trees indicate that a single monophyletic branch exists for fungal laccases and that laccase isozyme genes may have evolved independently, possibly through duplication-divergence events. Laccases are copper-containing enzymes generally identified by the utilization of substituted p-diphenol substrates. Interestingly, our approach permitted the assignment of two copper-containing oxidases, preliminarily catalogued as laccases, to a different evolutionary group, distantly related to the main branch of bona fide laccases.

  12. [Fungal infections in children with malignant disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, G

    2011-05-01

    Intensified chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation result in severe and prolonged granulocytopenia with an increased risk of invasive fungal infections. The major fungal species that cause serious infections in cancer patients are Candida species and Aspergillus species. The main features of Candida infection in this context are oropharyngeal candidiasis and Candida esophagitis, chronic disseminated candidiasis, also known as hepatosplenic candidiasis, and candidemia. Aspergillus can cause severe lung infection but also sinusal or CNS infection. Because invasive fungal infections are severe and often life-threatening, preventive and empirical managements have become standard practice. An increasing number of antifungal drugs is now available, notably lipid formulations of amphotericin B (liposomal amphotericin B), new azoles with broad spectrum of activity and echinocandin.

  13. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  14. Nuclear Ambitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China will begin to build the world’s first third-generation nuclear power plant at the Sanmen Nuclear Power Project in Sanmen City, coastal Zhejiang Province, in March 2009, accord-ing to the State Nuclear Power Technology Corp.

  15. Nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarewicz, W

    1999-01-01

    Current developments in nuclear structure are discussed from a theoretical perspective. The studies of the nuclear many-body system provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction, nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales, and the modes of the nucleonic matter.

  16. Fungal infections in burns: Diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capoor Malini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn wound infection (BWI is a major public health problem and the most devastating form of trauma worldwide. Fungi cause BWI as part of monomicrobial or polymicrobial infection, fungaemia, rare aggressive soft tissue infection and as opportunistic infections. The risk factors for acquiring fungal infection in burns include age of burns, total burn size, body surface area (BSA (30-60%, full thickness burns, inhalational injury, prolonged hospital stay, late surgical excision, open dressing, artificial dermis, central venous catheters, antibiotics, steroid treatment, long-term artificial ventilation, fungal wound colonisation (FWC, hyperglycaemic episodes and other immunosuppressive disorders. Most of the fungal infections are missed owing to lack of clinical awareness and similar presentation as bacterial infection coupled with paucity of mycology laboratories. Expedient diagnosis and treatment of these mycoses can be life-saving as the mortality is otherwise very high. Emergence of resistance in non-albicans Candida spp., unusual yeasts and moulds in fungal BWI, leaves very few fungi susceptible to antifungal drugs, leaving many patients susceptible. There is a need to speciate fungi as far as the topical and systemic antifungal is concerned. Deep tissue biopsy and other relevant samples are processed by standard mycological procedures using direct microscopy, culture and histopathological examination. Patients with FWC should be treated by aggressive surgical debridement and, in the case of fungal wound infection (FWI, in addition to surgical debridement, an intravenous antifungal drug, most commonly amphotericin B or caspofungin, is prescribed followed by de-escalating with voriconazole or itraconazole, or fluconazole depending upon the species or antifungal susceptibility, if available. The propensity for fungal infection increases, the longer the wound is present. Therefore, the development of products to close the wound more rapidly

  17. Identification & Characterization of Fungal Ice Nucleation Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Jan Frederik; Kunert, Anna Theresa; Kampf, Christopher Johannes; Mauri, Sergio; Weidner, Tobias; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Freezing of water at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures is dependent on ice nucleation catalysis facilitated by ice nuclei (IN). These IN can be of various origins and although extensive research was done and progress was achieved, the nature and mechanisms leading to an effective IN are to date still poorly understood. Some of the most important processes of our geosphere like the water cycle are highly dependent on effective ice nucleation at temperatures between -2°C - -8°C, a temperature range which is almost exclusively covered by biological IN (BioIN). BioIN are usually macromolecular structures of biological polymers. Sugars as well as proteins have been reported to serve as IN and the best characterized BioIN are ice nucleation proteins (IN-P) from gram negative bacteria. Fungal strains from Fusarium spp. were described to be effective IN at subfreezing temperatures up to -2°C already 25 years ago and more and more fungal species are described to serve as efficient IN. Fungal IN are also thought to be proteins or at least contain a proteinaceous compound, but to date the fungal IN-P primary structure as well as their coding genetic elements of all IN active fungi are unknown. The aim of this study is a.) to identify the proteins and their coding genetic elements from IN active fungi (F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, M. alpina) and b.) to characterize the mechanisms by which fungal IN serve as effective IN. We designed an interdisciplinary approach using biological, analytical and physical methods to identify fungal IN-P and describe their biological, chemical, and physical properties.

  18. Identification of fungal pathogens in Formalin-fixed, Paraffin-embedded tissue samples by molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickerts, Volker

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of invasive fungal infections (IFI) is incompletely understood due to diagnostic limitations including insensitivity of cultures and failure of histopathology to discriminate between different species. This diagnostic gap precludes the optimal use of antifungals, leading to adverse patient outcomes. The identification of fungal pathogens from Formalin-fixed, Paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPE) blocks by molecular methods is emerging as an alternative approach to study the etiology of IFI. PCR assays, including species specific- and broadrange fungal tests are used with FFPE samples from patients with proven IFI. Fungal species identification is achieved in 15-90% of the samples. This heterogeneity may be explained by the samples studied. However, comparison of different studies is impaired, as controls ruling out false positive-, false negative test results or PCR inhibition are frequently not reported. Studies using in situ hybridization also vary in the clinical samples included and the targeted fungi. In addition, target sequences, the probe chemistry and the detection of hybridization signals also account for the differences in diagnostic sensitivity. Using both approaches in parallel yields additive insights, potentially leading to a superior identification of fungal etiology and awareness of the limitations of both molecular diagnostic approaches.

  19. Strong effect of climate on ectomycorrhizal fungal composition: evidence from range overlap between two mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yumiko; Sakai, Atsushi; Hattori, Masahira; Nara, Kazuhide

    2015-08-01

    Separating the effects of environmental factors and spatial distance on microbial composition is difficult when these factors covary. We examined the composition of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi along elevation gradients on geographically distant mountains to clarify the effect of climate at the regional scale. Soil cores were collected from various forest types along an elevation gradient in southwestern Japan. Fungal species were identified by the internal transcribed spacer regions of the rDNA using direct sequencing. The occurrence of fungal species in this study was compared with a previous study conducted on a mountain separated by ∼550 km. In total, we recorded 454 EM fungi from 330 of 350 soil cores. Forty-seven fungal species (∼20% of the total excluding singletons) were shared between two mountains, mostly between similar forest types on both mountains. Variation partitioning in redundancy analysis revealed that climate explained the largest variance in EM fungal composition. The similarity of forest tree composition, which is usually determined by climatic conditions, was positively correlated with the similarity of the EM fungal composition. However, the lack of large host effects implied that communities of forest trees and EM fungi may be determined independently by climate. Our data provide important insights that host plants and mutualistic fungi may respond to climate change idiosyncratically, potentially altering carbon and nutrient cycles in relation to the plant-fungus associations.

  20. Systematic characterization of the peroxidase gene family provides new insights into fungal pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Albely Afifa; Park, Sook-Young; Abu Sadat, Md; Kim, Seongbeom; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-07-02

    Fungal pathogens have evolved antioxidant defense against reactive oxygen species produced as a part of host innate immunity. Recent studies proposed peroxidases as components of antioxidant defense system. However, the role of fungal peroxidases during interaction with host plants has not been explored at the genomic level. Here, we systematically identified peroxidase genes and analyzed their impact on fungal pathogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. Phylogeny reconstruction placed 27 putative peroxidase genes into 15 clades. Expression profiles showed that majority of them are responsive to in planta condition and in vitro H2O2. Our analysis of individual deletion mutants for seven selected genes including MoPRX1 revealed that these genes contribute to fungal development and/or pathogenesis. We identified significant and positive correlations among sensitivity to H2O2, peroxidase activity and fungal pathogenicity. In-depth analysis of MoPRX1 demonstrated that it is a functional ortholog of thioredoxin peroxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for detoxification of the oxidative burst within host cells. Transcriptional profiling of other peroxidases in ΔMoprx1 suggested interwoven nature of the peroxidase-mediated antioxidant defense system. The results from this study provide insight into the infection strategy built on evolutionarily conserved peroxidases in the rice blast fungus.

  1. Nuclear exoticism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.

    2016-07-01

    Extreme states of nuclearmatter (such that feature high spins, large deformations, high density and temperature, or a large excess of neutrons and protons) play an important role in studying fundamental properties of nuclei and are helpful in solving the problem of constructing the equation of state for nuclear matter. The synthesis of neutron-rich nuclei near the nucleon drip lines and investigation of their properties permit drawing conclusions about the positions of these boundaries and deducing information about unusual states of such nuclei and about their decays. At the present time, experimental investigations along these lines can only be performed via the cooperation of leading research centers that possess powerful heavy-ion accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and the heavy-ion cyclotrons at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR, Dubna), where respective experiments are being conducted by physicists from about 20 JINR member countries. The present article gives a survey of the most recent results in the realms of super neutron-rich nuclei. Implications of the change in the structure of such nuclei near the nucleon drip lines are discussed. Information about the results obtained by measuring the masses (binding energies) of exotic nuclei, the nucleon-distribution radii (neutron halo) and momentum distributions in them, and their deformations and quantum properties is presented. It is shown that the properties of nuclei lying near the stability boundaries differ strongly from the properties of other nuclei. The problem of the stability of nuclei that is associated with the magic numbers of 20 and 28 is discussed along with the effect of new magic numbers.

  2. Fungal infections of the lung in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, Paolo; Colafati, Giovanna Stefania; D' Andrea, Maria Luisa [IRCCS Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Bertaina, Alice; Mastronuzzi, Angela [IRCCS Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Transfusion Medicine, Rome (Italy); Castagnola, Elio [IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Department of Infective Diseases, Genoa (Italy); Finocchi, Andrea [IRCCS Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Rome (Italy); Lucidi, Vincenzina [IRCCS Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Cystic Fibrosis Center, Rome (Italy); Granata, Claudio [IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Fungal infections of the lungs are relatively common and potentially life-threatening conditions in immunocompromised children. The role of imaging in children with lung mycosis is to delineate the extension of pulmonary involvement, to assess response to therapy, and to monitor for adverse sequelae such as bronchiectasis and cavitation. The aim of this paper is to show imaging findings in a series of patients with fungal pneumonia from two tertiary children's hospitals, to discuss differential diagnoses and to show how imaging findings can vary depending on the host immune response. (orig.)

  3. Tropospheric ozone as a fungal elicitor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paolo Zuccarini

    2009-03-01

    Tropospheric ozone has been proven to trigger biochemical plant responses that are similar to the ones induced by an attack of fungal pathogens, i.e. it resembles fungal elicitors. This suggests that ozone can represent a valid tool for the study of stress responses and induction of resistance to pathogens. This review provides an overview of the implications of such a phenomenon for basic and applied research. After an introduction about the environmental implications of tropospheric ozone and plant responses to biotic stresses, the biochemistry of ozone stress is analysed, pointing out its similarities with plant responses to pathogens and its possible applications.

  4. Fungal outbreak in a show cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, V; Porca, E; Cuezva, S; Fernandez-Cortes, A; Sanchez-Moral, S; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2010-08-01

    Castañar de Ibor Cave (Spain) was discovered in 1967 and declared a Natural Monument in 1997. In 2003 the cave was opened to public visits. Despite of extensive control, on 26 August 2008 the cave walls and sediments appeared colonized by long, white fungal mycelia. This event was the result of an accidental input of detritus on the afternoon of 24 August 2008. We report here a fungal outbreak initiated by Mucor circinelloides and Fusarium solani and the methods used to control it.

  5. Fungal and bacterial killing by neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, David; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Urban, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are professional phagocytes of the innate immune system that are essential to control bacterial and fungal infections. These cells engulf and kill invading microbes. Additionally, activated neutrophils are able to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These fibers consist of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to trap and kill microbes. Appropriate quantitative methods are required to understand the nature of interactions of neutrophils with pathogens. Here we present assays to measure killing mediated by phagocytosis, by NETs, by a combination of both, and by granular extract. As examples, we use Candida albicans for fungal and Shigella flexneri for bacterial pathogens.

  6. Report of the Eye Bank Association of America medical advisory board subcommittee on fungal infection after corneal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldave, Anthony J; DeMatteo, Jennifer; Glasser, David B; Tu, Elmer Y; Iliakis, Bernardino; Nordlund, Michael L; Misko, Jachin; Verdier, David D; Yu, Fei

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the incidence of fungal infections after corneal transplantation to determine whether storage media supplementation with an antifungal should be considered. Adverse reactions reported to the Eye Bank Association of America through the online adverse reaction reporting system between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2010, were reviewed to identify cases of recipient fungal infection. Data were collected regarding the donor, the donor cornea, recovery and processing, and mate culture and clinical course of the recipients. Thirty-one cases of culture-proven fungal keratitis (n = 14) and endophthalmitis (n = 17) were reported out of 221,664 corneal transplants performed using corneal tissue distributed by domestic eye banks (1.4 cases per 10,000 transplants performed). Although the annual incidence of postkeratoplasty fungal infection has not increased significantly since 2005, a trend toward an increasing rate of fungal infection has been observed. Fungal infections were more commonly reported after endothelial keratoplasty procedures (0.022%) than penetrating keratoplasty procedures (0.012%), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.076). Additionally, no association was found between fungal infection after endothelial keratoplasty and whether the lamellar tissue cut was performed by the surgeon or the eye bank technician. Seventy-three percent (16 of 22) of the fungal cultures performed on the mate corneas were positive, with infection developing in 67% (10 of 15) of recipient eyes (endophthalmitis in 6 eyes and keratitis in 4 eyes). Although a nonsignificant increasing trend in the rate of fungal infection has been observed over the past 6 years, it is not sufficiently compelling to pursue antifungal supplementation of donor storage media.

  7. [Effects of wheat root exudates on cucumber growth and soil fungal community structure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng-Zhi; Li, Min; Cao, Peng; Ma, Ya-Fei; Wang, Li-Li

    2014-10-01

    With wheat as the donor plant and cucumber as the receptor plant, this study investigated the effects of root exudates from wheat cultivars with different allelopathic potentials (positive or negative) and companion cropping with wheat on soil fungal community structure by PCR-DGGE method and cucumber growth. Results showed that the wheat root exudates with positive allelopathic potential increased height and stem diameter of cucumber seedlings significantly, compared to the control seedlings (W) after 6 days and 12 days treatment, respectively. Also, wheat root exudates with both positive and negative allelopathic potential increased the seedling height of cucumber significantly after 18 days treatment. The wheat root exudates with different allelopathic potentials decreased the band number, Shannon and evenness indices of soil fungal community significantly in cucumber seedling rhizosphere, and those in the soil with the control seedlings (W) were also significantly higher than that in the control soil without seedlings (Wn) after 6 days treatment. The band number, Shannon and evenness indices in all the treatments were significantly higher than those in the control soil without seedlings (Wn) after 18 days treatment. Companion cropping with negative allelopathic potential wheat decreased the Shannon and evenness indices of soil fungi community significantly in the cucumber seedling rhizosphere, suggesting the wheat root exudates and companion cropping with wheat changed soil fungal community structure in the cucumber seedling rhizosphere. The results of DGGE map and the principal component analysis showed that companion cropping with wheat cultivars with different allelopathic potentials changed soil fungal community structure in cucumber seedling rhizosphere.

  8. Nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ajzenberg-Selove, Fay

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear Spectroscopy, Part B focuses on the ways in which experimental data may be analyzed to furnish information about nuclear parameters and nuclear models in terms of which the data are interpreted.This book discusses the elastic and inelastic potential scattering amplitudes, role of beta decay in nuclear physics, and general selection rules for electromagnetic transitions. The nuclear shell model, fundamental coupling procedure, vibrational spectra, and empirical determination of the complex potential are also covered. This publication is suitable for graduate students preparing for exper

  9. Periglandula, a new fungal genus within the Clavicipitaceae and its association with Convolvulaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Ulrike; Leibner, Sarah; Schardl, Christopher Lewis; Leuchtmann, Adrian; Leistner, Eckhard

    2011-01-01

    We describe two newly discovered fungi living on the adaxial leaf surface of plants belonging to the Convolvulaceae, Ipomoea asarifolia and Turbina corymbosa. The fungi apparently are epibionts because hyphae were never observed to penetrate epidermal cells or stomata of their respective host plants, and most remarkably are intimately associated with secretory glands on the leaf surface. Hyphae and structures resembling chlamydospores and synnemata (but lacking conidia), formed by both fungal species are phenotypically nearly indistinguishable after in vitro growth or when examined in vivo on the leaf surface. Phylogenetic trees based on aligned DNA sequences from nuclear genes for β-tubulin (tubB) and RNA Polymerase II subunit 1 (rpbA), and the mitochondrial gene for ATP synthase F0 subunit A (atp6), grouped the fungal species in a clade within the Clavicipitaceae. Clavicipitaceous fungi isolated from the two different plant species could be distinguished by their atp6 and rpbA sequences, and nuclear genes for γ-actin (actG), translation elongation factor 1-α (tefA), and 4-(γ,γ-dimethylallyl)tryptophan synthase (dmaW), the determinant step in ergoline (i.e. ergot) alkaloid biosynthesis. Based on these findings we propose a new fungal genus, Periglandula, gen. nov., and describe two new species, Periglandula ipomoeae sp. nov., from host plant I. asarifolia, and Periglandula turbinae sp. nov., from T. corymbosa.

  10. Experimental Climate Change Modifies Degradative Succession in Boreal Peatland Fungal Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemaninejad, Asma; Thorn, R Greg; Lindo, Zoë

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands play an important role in global climate change through sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Climate-driven changes in the structure of fungal communities in boreal peatlands that favor saprotrophic fungi can substantially impact carbon dynamics and nutrient cycling in these crucial ecosystems. In a mesocosm study using a full factorial design, 100 intact peat monoliths, complete with living Sphagnum and above-ground vascular vegetation, were subjected to three climate change variables (increased temperature, reduced water table, and elevated CO2 concentrations). Peat litterbags were placed in mesocosms, and fungal communities in litterbags were monitored over 12 months to assess the impacts of climate change variables on peat-inhabiting fungi. Changes in fungal richness, diversity, and community composition were assessed using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of ribosomal DNA (rDNA). While general fungal richness reduced under warming conditions, Ascomycota exhibited higher diversity under increased temperature treatments over the course of the experiment. Both increased temperature and lowered water table position drove shifts in fungal community composition with a strong positive effect on endophytic and mycorrhizal fungi (including one operational taxonomic unit (OTU) tentatively identified as Barrenia panicia) and different groups of saprotrophs identified as Mortierella, Galerina, and Mycena. These shifts were observed during a predicted degradative succession in the decomposer community as different carbon substrates became available. Since fungi play a central role in peatland communities, increased abundances of saprotrophic fungi under warming conditions, at the expense of reduced fungal richness overall, may increase decomposition rates under future climate scenarios and could potentially aggravate the impacts of climate change.

  11. MycoCosm, an Integrated Fungal Genomics Resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabalov, Igor; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-16

    MycoCosm is a web-based interactive fungal genomics resource, which was first released in March 2010, in response to an urgent call from the fungal community for integration of all fungal genomes and analytical tools in one place (Pan-fungal data resources meeting, Feb 21-22, 2010, Alexandria, VA). MycoCosm integrates genomics data and analysis tools to navigate through over 100 fungal genomes sequenced at JGI and elsewhere. This resource allows users to explore fungal genomes in the context of both genome-centric analysis and comparative genomics, and promotes user community participation in data submission, annotation and analysis. MycoCosm has over 4500 unique visitors/month or 35000+ visitors/year as well as hundreds of registered users contributing their data and expertise to this resource. Its scalable architecture allows significant expansion of the data expected from JGI Fungal Genomics Program, its users, and integration with external resources used by fungal community.

  12. evaluation of indigenous fungal isolates and metarhizium anisopliae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    native fungal isolates against the lesser wax moth and assessing non target effect of one isolate of. Beauveria (IITA 18) and five ... widely distributed and devastating insect pest to ..... Non-Target. Invertebrates of Fungal Biocontrol Agents, PP.

  13. Modulation of host-cell MAPkinase signaling during fungal infection

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections contribute substantially to human suffering and mortality. The interaction between fungal pathogens and their host involves the invasion and penetration of the surface epithelium, activation of cells of the innate immune system and the generation of an effective response to block infection. Numerous host-cell signaling pathways are activated during fungal infection. This review will focus on the main fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans and Cryptococcus n...

  14. Kv3.3 immunoreactivity in the vestibular nuclear complex of the rat with focus on the medial vestibular nucleus: targeting of Kv3.3 neurones by terminals positive for vesicular glutamate transporter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Ruth Elizabeth; Corns, Laura; Edwards, Ian James; Deuchars, Jim

    2010-07-23

    Kv3 voltage-gated K(+) channels are important in shaping neuronal excitability and are abundant in the CNS, with each Kv3 gene exhibiting a unique expression pattern. Mice lacking the gene encoding for the Kv3.3 subunit exhibit motor deficits. Furthermore, mutations in this gene have been linked to the human disease spinocerebellar ataxia 13, associated with cerebellar and extra-cerebellar symptoms such as imbalance and nystagmus. Kv subunit localisation is important in defining their functional roles and thus, we investigated the distribution of Kv3.3-immunoreactivity in the vestibular nuclear complex of rats with particular focus on the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN). Kv3.3-immunoreactivity was widespread in the vestibular nuclei and was detected in somata, dendrites and synaptic terminals. Kv3.3-immunoreactivity was observed in distinct neuronal populations and dual labelling with the neuronal marker NeuN revealed 28.5+/-1.9% of NeuN labelled MVN neurones were Kv3.3-positive. Kv3.3-immunoreactivity co-localised presynaptically with the synaptic vesicle marker SV2, parvalbumin, the vesicular glutamate transporter VGluT2 and the glycine transporter GlyT2. VGluT1 terminals were scarce within the MVN (2.5+/-1.1 per 50 microm(2)) and co-localisation was not observed. However, 85.4+/-9.4% of VGluT1 terminals targeted and enclosed Kv3.3-immunoreactive somata. Presynaptic Kv3.3 co-localisation with the GABAergic marker GAD67 was also not observed. Cytoplasmic GlyT2 labelling was observed in a subset of Kv3.3-positive neurones. Electron microscopy confirmed a pre- and post-synaptic distribution of the Kv3.3 protein. This study provides evidence supporting a role for Kv3.3 subunits in vestibular processing by regulating neuronal excitability pre- and post-synaptically.

  15. Phylogenetic position of Linguatula arctica and Linguatula serrata (Pentastomida) as inferred from the nuclear 18S rRNA gene and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2013-10-01

    Genomic DNA was isolated from a Linguatula serrata female expelled from a dog imported to Norway from Romania and from four Linguatula arctica females collected from semi-domesticated reindeer from northern Norway and subjected to PCR amplification of the complete nuclear 18S rRNA gene and a 1,045-bp portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (cox1). The two species differed at two of 1,830 nucleotide positions (99.9% identity) of the complete 18S rRNA gene sequences and at 102 of 1,045 nucleotide positions (90.2% identity) of the partial cox1 sequences. The four isolates of L. arctica showed no genetic variation in either gene. The new cox1 primers may facilitate the diagnosis of various developmental stages of L. arctica and L. serrata in their hosts. In separate phylogenetic analyses using the maximum likelihood method on sequence data from either gene, L. arctica and L. serrata clustered with members of the order Cephalobaenida rather than with members of the order Porocephalida, in which the genus Linguatula is currently placed based on morphological characters. The phylogenetic relationship of L. arctica, L. serrata and other pentastomids to other metazoan groups could not be clearly resolved, but the pentastomids did not seem to have a sister relationship to crustaceans of the subclass Branchiura as found in other studies. A more extensive taxon sampling, including molecular characterisation of more pentastomid taxa across different genera, seems to be necessary in order to estimate the true relationship of the Pentastomida to other metazoan groups.

  16. Positive correlation between the efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cells and the development rate of nuclear transfer embryos when the same porcine embryonic fibroblast lines are used as donor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bingteng; Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Shichao; Wang, Jiaqiang; Xue, Binghua; Li, Jingyu; Wei, Renyue; Zhao, Yanhua; Liu, Zhonghua

    2014-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and nuclear transfer (NT) are two of the primary routes to reprogram differentiated cells back to the pluripotent state. However, it is still unknown whether there is any correlation between the reprogramming efficiency of iPSCs and NT if the same donor cells are employed. In this study, six porcine embryonic fibroblast (PEF) lines from Landrace (L1, L6, L9) or Congjiang local pigs (C4, C5, C6) were used for iPSC induction and NT. Furthermore, the resultant iPSCs from four PEF lines (L1, L6, C4, and C5) were used for NT (iPSC-NT), and the expression of exogenous genes was detected in iPSC-NT embryos by real-time PCR. The results showed that the efficiency of iPSC lines established from different PEF lines were significantly different. When the same PEF lines were used as donor cells for NT, the blastocysts rates were also different among different PEF lines and positively related with iPSCs induction efficiency. When the iPSCs were used as donor cells for NT, compared with the source PEFs, the blastocysts rates were significantly decreased. Real-time PCR results indicated that exogenous genes (Oct4, c-Myc) continued to be expressed in iPSC-NT embryos. In summary, our results demonstrate that there was a positive correlation between iPSCs and NT reprogramming efficiency, although the mechanism of these two routes is different. This may provide a new method to select the appropriate donor cells for inducing iPSCs.

  17. Fungal infections in corn picker hand injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Tomašev Milana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hand injuries caused by corn pickers are relatively rare but in most cases extensive, with massive tissue destruction. Severe wounds sustained during agricultural work are contaminated, with high incidence of infection. Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency and type of fungal infection in corn picker injuries and their impact on the course and outcome of treatment. Methods. Corn picker hand injuries for the period 2006-2012 were analyzed. After setting up clinical suspicion, direct examination of repeated swabs and histopathological analysis of biopsy material were done in order to detect fungi. Results. From the total number of 60 patients, there was a fungal infection in nine of them (which makes 15% of the total number of patients. Aspergillus spp. was isolated in seven patients, Candida spp. in three, and Mucor spp. in one patient. None of the patients had increased risk factors for developing a fungal infection. In most cases, there was loss of graft and tissue necrosis in previously normally looking wound, after seven or more days. All patients were treated with repeated surgical debridement and concomitant parenteral and topical application of appropriate antifungal agents. There was no need for reamputation in any patient. Conclusion. A high degree of suspicion and a multidisciplinary approach are needed for early diagnosis of fungal infection. Confirmation of diagnosis and the initiation of surgical and appropriate antifungal therapy are essential for a successful outcome.

  18. Fungal peritonitis in children on peritoneal dialysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, R.; Schroder, C.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Cornelissen, E.A.M.; Warris, A.

    2007-01-01

    Fungal peritonitis is a rare but serious complication in children on peritoneal dialysis (PD). In this study, risk factors were evaluated, and therapeutic measures were reviewed. A retrospective, multi-centre study was performed in 159 Dutch paediatric PD patients, between 1980 and 2005 (3,573 month

  19. FUNGAL ASSOCIATION WITH SESSILE MARINE INVERTEBRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded eYarden

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence and association of fungi with sessile marine animals such as coral and sponges has been well established, yet information on the extent of diversity of the associated fungi is still in its infancy. Culture- as well as metagenomic- and transcriptomic-based analyses have shown that fungal presence in association with these animals can be dynamic and can include core residents as well as shifts in fungal communities. Evidence for detrimental and beneficial interactions between fungi and their marine hosts is accumulating and current challenges include the elucidation of the chemical and cellular crosstalk between fungi and their associates within the holobionts. The ecological function of fungi in association with sessile marine animals is complex and is founded on a combination of factors such as fungal origin, host health, environmental conditions and the presence of other resident or invasive microorganisms in the host. Based on evidence from the much more studied terrestrial systems, the evaluation of marine animal-fungal symbioses under varying environmental conditions may well prove to be critical in predicting ecosystem response to global change, including effects on the health of sessile marine animals.

  20. Fungal Systematics and Evolution: FUSE 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crous, Pedro W; Schumacher, René K; Wingfield, Michael J; Lombard, Lorenzo; Giraldo, Alejandra; Christensen, Martha; Gardiennet, Alain; Nakashima, Chiharu; Pereira, Olinto L; Smith, Alexander J; Groenewald, Johannes Z

    2015-01-01

    Fungal Systematics and Evolution (FUSE) is introduced as a new series to expedite the publication of issues relating to the epitypification of formerly described species, report new sexual-asexual connections, the merging of sexual and asexual gen¬era following the end of dual nomenclature, and to

  1. Plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolton, M.D.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Over the course of evolution, fungi have adapted to occupy specific niches, from symbiotically inhabiting the flora of the intestinal tract of mammals to saprophytic growth on leaf litter resting on the forest floor. In Plant Fungal Pathogens: Methods and Protocols, expert researchers in the field d

  2. Grass fungal endophytes and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craven, Kelly

    2015-03-10

    The invention provides isolated fungal endophytes and synthetic combinations thereof with host grass plants. Methods for inoculating grass plant with the endophytes, for propagating the grass-endophyte combinations, and for producing feeds and biofuels from grass-endophyte combinations are also provided.

  3. Pre- and postharvest fungal apple diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The domesticated apple (Malus domestica) is the most significant pome fruit grown and consumed worldwide. China is the largest producer followed by the United States on a global scale. However, fungal plant pathogens cause significant economic losses in the field and in storage which negatively impa...

  4. Packaging conditions hindering fungal growth on cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Haasum, Iben

    1997-01-01

    Fungal contamination is one of the most important quality deteriorating factors on cheese. During the last 5 years we have studied in detail the underlying factors controlling these unwanted processes in a collaborative project financed by the Danish Dairy Board and the Ministry of Agriculture...

  5. Genetics of fungal resistance to systemic fungicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyl, van J.M.

    1977-01-01

    Since the introduction of the systemic fungicides, fungicide resistance has become a serious problem in plant disease control. This study was carried out in order to contribute to the knowledge about the genetics of fungal resistance to fungicides both from a practical and a fundamental point of vie

  6. Pulmonary fungal infections after bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, B.T.; Patton, D.; Ramsey, N.K.C.; Day, D.L.

    1988-02-01

    Of 319 pediatric patients treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) during a 10-year period, 27 developed pulmonary fungal infections (PFI). Only 2 patients (7%) survived. Twenty-three patients (85%) had been treated with systemic anti-fungal therapy immediately before or at the time of diagnosis. Nineteen patients (70%) were neutropenic, and 4 of the 8 patients who were not neutropenic were being treated with systemic steroids for graft vs. host disease (GVHD). Seven patients (26%) died within 7 days of diagnosis. The diagnosis was made ante-mortem in 9 patients (33%). Radiographic abnormalities were variable. At the onset of chest X-ray (CXR) change, the pulmonary infiltrates were unilateral in 14 patients (52%) and, at diagnosis, bilateral in 18 (66%). At diagnosis the infiltrates were interstitial in 3 patients (11%), alveolar in 20 (74%) and mixed in 4 (15%). Six patients (22%) developed cavitary lesions. The infecting agents were Aspergillus in 21 patients (78%), Candida in 7 (26%), Mucormycosis in 3 (11%), and Fusarium in 1 (4%). Five patients (19%) had mixed fungal infections and 7 (26%) had concurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) pulmonary infections. Although the radiographic changes are often nonspecific in PFI, alveolar or nodular infiltrates in neutropenic patients or in those being treated for GVHD should strongly suggest a fungal etiology.

  7. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Monteiro de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications.

  8. Fungal infections of the oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, P Anitha

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections in humans occur as a result of defects in the immune system. An increasing emergence in oral Candidal and non-Candidal fungal infections is evident in the past decade owing to the rise in the immunodeficient and immunocompromised population globally. Oral Candidal infection usually involves a compromised host and the compromise may be local or systemic. Local compromising factors include decreased salivation, poor oral hygiene, wearing dentures among others while systemic factors include diabetes mellitus, nutritional deficiency, HIV infection/AIDS and others. Oral candidiasis is generally a localized infection and rarely appears as a systemic fungal disease whereas oral non-Candidal fungal infections are usually signs of disseminated disease. Some of the non-Candidal fungi that were once considered exotic and geographically restricted are now seen worldwide, beyond their natural habitat, probably attributed to globalization and travels. Currently infections from these fungi are more prevalent than before and they may present either as primary oral lesions or as oral manifestations of systemic mycoses. This review discusses the various predisposing factors, clinical presentations, clinical differential diagnosis, diagnosis and management of oral candidiasis, as well as briefly highlights upon a few of the more exotic non-Candidal fungi that infect the oral mucosa.

  9. Fungal peritonitis in children on peritoneal dialysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, R.; Schroder, C.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Cornelissen, E.A.M.; Warris, A.

    2007-01-01

    Fungal peritonitis is a rare but serious complication in children on peritoneal dialysis (PD). In this study, risk factors were evaluated, and therapeutic measures were reviewed. A retrospective, multi-centre study was performed in 159 Dutch paediatric PD patients, between 1980 and 2005 (3,573 month

  10. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  11. Fungal biology and agriculture: revisiting the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarden, O.; Ebbole, D.J.; Freeman, S.; Rodriguez, R.J.; Dickman, M. B.

    2003-01-01

    Plant pathology has made significant progress over the years, a process that involved overcoming a variety of conceptual and technological hurdles. Descriptive mycology and the advent of chemical plant-disease management have been followed by biochemical and physiological studies of fungi and their hosts. The later establishment of biochemical genetics along with the introduction of DNA-mediated transformation have set the stage for dissection of gene function and advances in our understanding of fungal cell biology and plant-fungus interactions. Currently, with the advent of high-throughput technologies, we have the capacity to acquire vast data sets that have direct relevance to the numerous subdisciplines within fungal biology and pathology. These data provide unique opportunities for basic research and for engineering solutions to important agricultural problems. However, we also are faced with the challenge of data organization and mining to analyze the relationships between fungal and plant genomes and to elucidate the physiological function of pertinent DNA sequences. We present our perspective of fungal biology and agriculture, including administrative and political challenges to plant protection research.

  12. Fungal biology and agriculture: revisiting the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarden, O; Ebbole, D J; Freeman, S; Rodriguez, R J; Dickman, M B

    2003-10-01

    Plant pathology has made significant progress over the years, a process that involved overcoming a variety of conceptual and technological hurdles. Descriptive mycology and the advent of chemical plant-disease management have been followed by biochemical and physiological studies of fungi and their hosts. The later establishment of biochemical genetics along with the introduction of DNA-mediated transformation have set the stage for dissection of gene function and advances in our understanding of fungal cell biology and plant-fungus interactions. Currently, with the advent of high-throughput technologies, we have the capacity to acquire vast data sets that have direct relevance to the numerous subdisciplines within fungal biology and pathology. These data provide unique opportunities for basic research and for engineering solutions to important agricultural problems. However, we also are faced with the challenge of data organization and mining to analyze the relationships between fungal and plant genomes and to elucidate the physiological function of pertinent DNA sequences. We present our perspective of fungal biology and agriculture, including administrative and political challenges to plant protection research.

  13. Fungal Bioconversion of Lignocellulosic Residues; Opportunities & Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dashtban, Heidi Schraft, Wensheng Qin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of alternative energy technology is critically important because of the rising prices of crude oil, security issues regarding the oil supply, and environmental issues such as global warming and air pollution. Bioconversion of biomass has significant advantages over other alternative energy strategies because biomass is the most abundant and also the most renewable biomaterial on our planet. Bioconversion of lignocellulosic residues is initiated primarily by microorganisms such as fungi and bacteria which are capable of degrading lignocellulolytic materials. Fungi such as Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger produce large amounts of extracellular cellulolytic enzymes, whereas bacterial and a few anaerobic fungal strains mostly produce cellulolytic enzymes in a complex called cellulosome, which is associated with the cell wall. In filamentous fungi, cellulolytic enzymes including endoglucanases, cellobiohydrolases (exoglucanases and β-glucosidases work efficiently on cellulolytic residues in a synergistic manner. In addition to cellulolytic/hemicellulolytic activities, higher fungi such as basidiomycetes (e.g. Phanerochaete chrysosporium have unique oxidative systems which together with ligninolytic enzymes are responsible for lignocellulose degradation. This review gives an overview of different fungal lignocellulolytic enzymatic systems including extracellular and cellulosome-associated in aerobic and anaerobic fungi, respectively. In addition, oxidative lignocellulose-degradation mechanisms of higher fungi are discussed. Moreover, this paper reviews the current status of the technology for bioconversion of biomass by fungi, with focus on mutagenesis, co-culturing and heterologous gene expression attempts to improve fungal lignocellulolytic activities to create robust fungal strains.

  14. The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawksworth, D.L.; Crous, P.W.; Redhead, S.A.; Reynolds, D.R.; Samson, R.A.; Seifert, K.A.; Taylor, J.E.; Wingfield, M.J.; Abaci, Ö.; Aime, C.; Asan, A.; Bai, F.H.; de Beer, Z.W.; Begerow, D.; Berikten, D.; Boekhout, T.; Buchanan, P.K.; Burgess, T.I.; Buzina, W.; Cai, L.; Cannon, P.F.; Crane, J.L.; Damm, U.; Daniel, H.M.; van Diepeningen, A.D.; Druzhinina, I.; Dyer, P.S.; Eberhardt, U.; Fell, J.W.; Frisvad, J.C.; Geiser, D.M.; Geml, J.; Glienke, C.; Gräfenhan, T.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Groenewald, M.; de Gruyter, J.; Guého-Kellermann, E.; Guo, L-D.; Hibbett, D.S.; Hong, S.B.; de Hoog, G.S.; Houbraken, J.; Huhndorf, S.M.; Hyde, K.D.; Ismail, A.; Johnston, P.R.; Kadaifciler, D.G.; Kirk, P.M.; Kõljalg, U.; Kurtzman, C.P.; Lagneau, P-E.; Lévesque, C.A.; Liu, X.S.; Lombard, L.; Meyer, W.; Miller, A.N.; Minter, D.W.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Norvell, L.L.; Ozerskaya, S.M.; Öziç, R.; Pennycook, S.R.; Peterson, S.W.; Pettersson, O.V.; Quaedvlieg, W.; Robert, V.; Ruibal, C.; Schnürer, J.; Schroers, H.J.; Shivas, R.G.; Slippers, B.; Spierenburg, H.; Takashima, M.; Taşkın, E.; Thines, M.; Thrane, U.; Uztan, A.H.; van Raak, M.; Varga, J.; Vasco, A.; Verkley, G.J.M.; Videira, S.I.R.; de Vries, R.P.; Weir, B.S.; Yilmaz, N.; Yurkov, A.; Zhang, N.

    2011-01-01

    The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature was agreed at an international symposium convened in Amsterdam on 19-20 April 2011 under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). The purpose of the symposium was to address the issue of whether or how the current

  15. Fungal cultivation on glass-beads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droce, Aida; Sørensen, Jens Laurids; Giese, Henriette

    Transcription of various bioactive compounds and enzymes are dependent on fungal cultivation method. In this study we cultivate Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium solani on glass-beads with liquid media in petri dishes as an easy and inexpensive cultivation method, that resembles in secondary...

  16. Habitat filters in fungal endophyte community assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fungal endophytes can influence host health, and more broadly, can instigate trophic cascades with effects scaling to the ecosystem level. Despite this, biotic mechanisms of endophyte community assembly are largely unknown. We used maize to investigate three potential habitat filters in endophyte co...

  17. Standard methods for fungal brood disease research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Bruun; Aronstein, Kathrine; Manuel Flores, Jose;

    2013-01-01

    Chalkbrood and stonebrood are two fungal diseases associated with honey bee brood. Chalkbrood, caused by Ascosphaera apis, is a common and widespread disease that can result in severe reduction of emerging worker bees and thus overall colony productivity. Stonebrood is caused by Aspergillus spp. ...

  18. Metabolic priming by a secreted fungal effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamei, Armin; Schipper, Kerstin; Rabe, Franziska; Ghosh, Anupama; Vincon, Volker; Kahnt, Jörg; Osorio, Sonia; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Feussner, Ivo; Feussner, Kirstin; Meinicke, Peter; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Schwarz, Heinz; Macek, Boris; Mann, Matthias; Kahmann, Regine

    2011-10-05

    Maize smut caused by the fungus Ustilago maydis is a widespread disease characterized by the development of large plant tumours. U. maydis is a biotrophic pathogen that requires living plant tissue for its development and establishes an intimate interaction zone between fungal hyphae and the plant plasma membrane. U. maydis actively suppresses plant defence responses by secreted protein effectors. Its effector repertoire comprises at least 386 genes mostly encoding proteins of unknown function and expressed exclusively during the biotrophic stage. The U. maydis secretome also contains about 150 proteins with probable roles in fungal nutrition, fungal cell wall modification and host penetration as well as proteins unlikely to act in the fungal-host interface like a chorismate mutase. Chorismate mutases are key enzymes of the shikimate pathway and catalyse the conversion of chorismate to prephenate, the precursor for tyrosine and phenylalanine synthesis. Root-knot nematodes inject a secreted chorismate mutase into plant cells likely to affect development. Here we show that the chorismate mutase Cmu1 secreted by U. maydis is a virulence factor. The enzyme is taken up by plant cells, can spread to neighbouring cells and changes the metabolic status of these cells through metabolic priming. Secreted chorismate mutases are found in many plant-associated microbes and might serve as general tools for host manipulation.

  19. Thigmo Responses: The Fungal Sense of Touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Mariana Cruz; Brand, Alexandra C

    2017-04-01

    The growth and development of most fungi take place on a two-dimensional surface or within a three-dimensional matrix. The fungal sense of touch is therefore critical for fungi in the interpretation of their environment and often signals the switch to a new developmental state. Contact sensing, or thigmo-based responses, include thigmo differentiation, such as the induction of invasion structures by plant pathogens in response to topography; thigmonasty, where contact with a motile prey rapidly triggers its capture; and thigmotropism, where the direction of hyphal growth is guided by physical features in the environment. Like plants and some bacteria, fungi grow as walled cells. Despite the well-demonstrated importance of thigmo responses in numerous stages of fungal growth and development, it is not known how fungal cells sense contact through the relatively rigid structure of the cell wall. However, while sensing mechanisms at the molecular level are not entirely understood, the downstream signaling pathways that are activated by contact sensing are being elucidated. In the majority of cases, the response to contact is complemented by chemical cues and both are required, either sequentially or simultaneously, to elicit normal developmental responses. The importance of a sense of touch in the lifestyles and development of diverse fungi is highlighted in this review, and the candidate molecular mechanisms that may be involved in fungal contact sensing are discussed.

  20. October 2012 Multistate Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-10-17

    This podcast gives an overview of the October 2012 multistate fungal meningitis outbreak, including symptoms to watch for and a website for up-to-date information.  Created: 10/17/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/17/2012.

  1. Modelling Fungal Fermentations for Enzyme Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Mads Orla; Gernaey, Krist; Hansen, Morten S.

    We have developed a process model of fungal fed-batch fermentations for enzyme production. In these processes, oxygen transfer rate is limiting and controls the substrate feeding rate. The model has been shown to describe cultivations of both Aspergillus oryzae and Trichoderma reesei strains in 550...

  2. Fungal endophytes of sorghum in Burkina Faso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zida, E P; Thio, I G; Néya, B J

    2014-01-01

    A survey was conducted to assess the natural occurrence and distribution of fungal endophytes in sorghum in relation to plant performance in two distinct agro-ecological zones in Burkina Faso. Sorghum farm-saved seeds were sown in 48 farmers’ fields in Sahelian and North Sudanian zones to produce...

  3. The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawksworth, D.L.; Crous, P.W.; Redhead, S.A.; Reynolds, D.R.; Samson, R.A.; Seifert, K.A.; Taylor, J.E.; Wingfield, M.J.; Abaci, Ö.; Aime, C.; Asan, A.; Bai, F.H.; de Beer, Z.W.; Begerow, D.; Berikten, D.; Boekhout, T.; Buchanan, P.K.; Burgess, T.I.; Buzina, W.; Cai, L.; Cannon, P.F.; Crane, J.L.; Damm, U.; Daniel, H.M.; van Diepeningen, A.D.; Druzhinina, I.; Dyer, P.S.; Eberhardt, U.; Fell, J.W.; Frisvad, J.C.; Geiser, D.M.; Geml, J.; Glienke, C.; Gräfenhan, T.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Groenewald, M.; de Gruyter, J.; Guého-Kellermann, E.; Guo, L-D.; Hibbett, D.S.; Hong, S.B.; de Hoog, G.S.; Houbraken, J.; Huhndorf, S.M.; Hyde, K.D.; Ismail, A.; Johnston, P.R.; Kadaifciler, D.G.; Kirk, P.M.; Kõljalg, U.; Kurtzman, C.P.; Lagneau, P-E.; Lévesque, C.A.; Liu, X.S.; Lombard, L.; Meyer, W.; Miller, A.N.; Minter, D.W.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Norvell, L.L.; Ozerskaya, S.M.; Öziç, R.; Pennycook, S.R.; Peterson, S.W.; Pettersson, O.V.; Quaedvlieg, W.; Robert, V.; Ruibal, C.; Schnürer, J.; Schroers, H.J.; Shivas, R.G.; Slippers, B.; Spierenburg, H.; Takashima, M.; Taşkın, E.; Thines, M.; Thrane, U.; Uztan, A.H.; van Raak, M.; Varga, J.; Vasco, A.; Verkley, G.J.M.; Videira, S.I.R.; de Vries, R.P.; Weir, B.S.; Yilmaz, N.; Yurkov, A.; Zhang, N.

    2011-01-01

    The Amsterdam Declaration on Fungal Nomenclature was agreed at an international symposium convened in Amsterdam on 19-20 April 2011 under the auspices of the International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF). The purpose of the symposium was to address the issue of whether or how the current

  4. Estimated burden of fungal infections in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guto, John Abuga; Bii, Christine C; Denning, David W

    2016-08-31

    Kenya is a developing country with a high rate of tuberculosis (TB) and a moderate HIV infection burden. No estimate of the burden of fungal diseases in Kenya is published. We used specific populations at risk and fungal infection frequencies from the literature to estimate national incidence or prevalence of serious fungal infections. Used sources were: 2010 WHO TB statistics, Kenya Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Epidemic Update 2012, Kenya Facts and figures 2012, Kenya Demographic and Health Survey 2008-2009. Of Kenya's population of ~40 million, 43% are under 15 years old and approximately 594,660 Kenyan women get >4 episodes Candida vulvovaginitis annually (2,988/100,000). The HIV/AIDS population at risk of opportunistic infections (OI) is 480,000 and the OI estimates include 306,000 patients with oral thrush (768/100,000), 114,000 with oesophageal candidiasis (286/100,000), 11,900 with cryptococcal meningitis (29/100,000) and 17,000 patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (42/100,000). Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis following TB has a prevalence of 10,848 cases (32/100,000). The adult asthma prevalence is 3.1% and assuming 2.5% have allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis then 17,696 (44/100,000) are affected.  Invasive aspergillosis, candidaemia and Candida peritonitis are probably uncommon. Tinea capitis infects 9.6% of children in Kenya, while fungal keratitis and otomycoses are difficult to estimate. At any one time, about 7% of the Kenyan population suffers from a significant fungal infection, with recurrent vaginitis and tinea capitis accounting for 82% of the infections. These estimates require further epidemiological studies for validation.

  5. Fungal keratitis in the United Kingdom 2003-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuft, S J; Tullo, A B

    2009-06-01

    To describe the incidence and current management of fungal keratitis in the United Kingdom. Cases were identified prospectively through the British Ophthalmologic Surveillance Unit (BOSU) from December 2003 to November 2005. Questionnaire data were requested at diagnosis and at 6 months follow-up. Inclusion criteria were a positive culture or microsopic proof from a scraping or biopsy, and a normal residence in the United Kingdom. Data were available on 39 confirmed cases at diagnosis and 34 cases at follow-up. The minimum average annualised incidence was 0.32 (95% CI, 0.24-0.44) cases per million individuals. In 22 cases (56%), only Candida was isolated and 14 of these (63%) had prior ocular surface disease treated with topical steroid. A filamentary fungus infection was more common in male patients (P=0.02), often following trauma, and the differences in risk factors between types of fungal infection was statistically significant (PUnited Kingdom. It provides evidence of frequent delay in diagnosis after presentation to eye departments, inconsistent management, and poor outcome. Issues that can now be addressed.

  6. Immunological Aspects of Candida and Aspergillus Systemic Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Mueller-Loebnitz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT have a high risk of invasive fungal infections (IFIs even after neutrophil regeneration. Immunological aspects might play a very important role in the IFI development in these patients. Some data are available supporting the identification of high-risk patients with IFI for example patients receiving stem cells from TLR4 haplotype S4 positive donors. Key defense mechanisms against IFI include the activation of neutrophils, the phagocytosis of germinating conidia by dendritic cells, and the fight of the cells of the innate immunity such as monocytes and natural killer cells against germlings and hyphae. Furthermore, immunosuppressive drugs interact with immune effector cells influencing the specific fungal immune defense and antimycotic drugs might interact with immune response. Based on the current knowledge on immunological mechanism in Aspergillus fumigatus, the first approaches of an immunotherapy using human T cells are in development. This might be an option for the future of aspergillosis patients having a poor prognosis with conventional treatment.

  7. Fungal and mycotoxin assessment of dried edible mushroom in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekiel, C N; Sulyok, M; Frisvad, J C; Somorin, Y M; Warth, B; Houbraken, J; Samson, R A; Krska, R; Odebode, A C

    2013-04-01

    In order to determine whether dried mushrooms are a foodstuff that may be less susceptible to infection by toxigenic molds and consequently to mycotoxin contamination, 34 dried market samples were analyzed. Fungal population was determined in the samples by conventional mycological techniques and molecular studies, while the spectrum of microbial metabolites including mycotoxins was analyzed by a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric method covering 320 metabolites. Molds such as Fusarium, Penicillium, Trichoderma and aflatoxigenic species of Aspergillus (Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parvisclerotigenus) were recovered from all samples at varying levels. None of the mycotoxins addressed by regulatory limits in the EU was positively identified in the samples. However, 26 other fungal metabolites occurred at sub- to medium μg/kg levels in the samples, including aflatoxin/sterigmatocystin bio-precursors, bis-anthraquinone derivatives from Talaromyces islandicus, emerging toxins (e.g. enniatins) and other Fusarium metabolites, and clavine alkaloids. Although little is known on the toxicology of these substances, the absence of aflatoxins and other primary mycotoxins suggests that dried mushrooms may represent a relatively safe type of food in view of mycotoxin contamination.

  8. Diversity of fungal endophytes in non-native Phragmites australis in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Keith; Shearin, Zachery; Bourke, Kimberly; Bickford, Wesley A.; Kowalski, Kurt P.

    2016-01-01

    Plant–microbial interactions may play a key role in plant invasions. One common microbial interaction takes place between plants and fungal endophytes when fungi asymptomatically colonize host plant tissues. The objectives of this study were to isolate and sequence fungal endophytes colonizing non-native Phragmites australis in the Great Lakes region to evaluate variation in endophyte community composition among three host tissue types and three geographical regions. We collected entire ramets from multiple clones and populations, surface sterilized plant tissues, and plated replicate tissue samples from leaves, stems, and rhizomes on corn meal agar plates to culture and isolate fungal endophytes. Isolates were then subjected to Sanger sequencing of the ITS region of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Sequences were compared to fungal databases to define operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that were analyzed statistically for community composition. In total, we obtained 173 endophyte isolates corresponding to 55 OTUs, 39 of which were isolated only a single time. The most common OTU corresponded most closely to Sarocladium strictum and comprised 25 % of all fungal isolates. More OTUs were found in stem tissues, but endophyte diversity was greatest in rhizome tissues. PERMANOVA analyses indicated significant differences in endophyte communities among tissue types, geographical regions, and the interaction between those factors, but no differences among individual ramets were detected. The functional role of the isolated endophytes is not yet known, but one genus isolated here (Stagonospora) has been reported to enhance Phragmites growth. Understanding the diversity and functions of Phragmites endophytes may provide targets for control measures based on disrupting host plant/endophyte interactions.

  9. PHYMYCO-DB: a curated database for analyses of fungal diversity and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Mahé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In environmental sequencing studies, fungi can be identified based on nucleic acid sequences, using either highly variable sequences as species barcodes or conserved sequences containing a high-quality phylogenetic signal. For the latter, identification relies on phylogenetic analyses and the adoption of the phylogenetic species concept. Such analysis requires that the reference sequences are well identified and deposited in public-access databases. However, many entries in the public sequence databases are problematic in terms of quality and reliability and these data require screening to ensure correct phylogenetic interpretation. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To facilitate phylogenetic inferences and phylogenetic assignment, we introduce a fungal sequence database. The database PHYMYCO-DB comprises fungal sequences from GenBank that have been filtered to satisfy stringent sequence quality criteria. For the first release, two widely used molecular taxonomic markers were chosen: the nuclear SSU rRNA and EF1-α gene sequences. Following the automatic extraction and filtration, a manual curation is performed to remove problematic sequences while preserving relevant sequences useful for phylogenetic studies. As a result of curation, ~20% of the automatically filtered sequences have been removed from the database. To demonstrate how PHYMYCO-DB can be employed, we test a set of environmental Chytridiomycota sequences obtained from deep sea samples. CONCLUSION: PHYMYCO-DB offers the tools necessary to: (i extract high quality fungal sequences for each of the 5 fungal phyla, at all taxonomic levels, (ii extract already performed alignments, to act as 'reference alignments', (iii launch alignments of personal sequences along with stored data. A total of 9120 SSU rRNA and 672 EF1-α high-quality fungal sequences are now available. The PHYMYCO-DB is accessible through the URL http://phymycodb.genouest.org/.

  10. PHYMYCO-DB: A Curated Database for Analyses of Fungal Diversity and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahé, Stéphane; Duhamel, Marie; Le Calvez, Thomas; Guillot, Laetitia; Sarbu, Ludmila; Bretaudeau, Anthony; Collin, Olivier; Dufresne, Alexis; Kiers, E. Toby; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background In environmental sequencing studies, fungi can be identified based on nucleic acid sequences, using either highly variable sequences as species barcodes or conserved sequences containing a high-quality phylogenetic signal. For the latter, identification relies on phylogenetic analyses and the adoption of the phylogenetic species concept. Such analysis requires that the reference sequences are well identified and deposited in public-access databases. However, many entries in the public sequence databases are problematic in terms of quality and reliability and these data require screening to ensure correct phylogenetic interpretation. Methods and Principal Findings To facilitate phylogenetic inferences and phylogenetic assignment, we introduce a fungal sequence database. The database PHYMYCO-DB comprises fungal sequences from GenBank that have been filtered to satisfy stringent sequence quality criteria. For the first release, two widely used molecular taxonomic markers were chosen: the nuclear SSU rRNA and EF1-α gene sequences. Following the automatic extraction and filtration, a manual curation is performed to remove problematic sequences while preserving relevant sequences useful for phylogenetic studies. As a result of curation, ∼20% of the automatically filtered sequences have been removed from the database. To demonstrate how PHYMYCO-DB can be employed, we test a set of environmental Chytridiomycota sequences obtained from deep sea samples. Conclusion PHYMYCO-DB offers the tools necessary to: (i) extract high quality fungal sequences for each of the 5 fungal phyla, at all taxonomic levels, (ii) extract already performed alignments, to act as ‘reference alignments’, (iii) launch alignments of personal sequences along with stored data. A total of 9120 SSU rRNA and 672 EF1-α high-quality fungal sequences are now available. The PHYMYCO-DB is accessible through the URL http://phymycodb.genouest.org/. PMID:23028445

  11. Nuclear electronic instrumentation; Instrumentacion electronica nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez J, F. J., E-mail: francisco.ramirez@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Sistemas Electronicos, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The activities carried out in the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) in the field of the nuclear electronic instrumentation included those activities corresponding to the design and production of nuclear instruments in a first stage, as well as the internal activities of design, repair and maintenance that have supported to other projects of the institution during many years. It is mentioned of the presence and constant collaboration of the ININ with the IAEA in different projects and programs. Also, it is mentioned on the establishment of the Radiation Detectors Laboratory, which for their characteristics and repair capacities of radiation detectors of cooled semiconductor, it is only in their specialty. It is emphasized the investigation and the development in the field of new radiation detectors and applications, as well as the important contribution in this field, in institutions like: Mexican Petroleum, National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards and Federal Commission of Electricity. Finally a position of the future of these activities is made, considering the speed of the advances of the electronic and nuclear technology. (Author)

  12. Controversial reversal of nuclear option

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear option is in a unique position to restore its original role of the main source of energy with an increased attention paid to the security of electricity supply as well as regulatory changes affecting fossil fuels, particularly with due introduction of climate change prevention measures. Recent developments indicate the advantages of nuclear option over other possible options in terms of sustainable development. However, a large number of controversial issues on nuclear energy make its...

  13. Position of guide vane trailing edge of nuclear reactor coolant pump under gas-liquid two phase condition%气液两相条件下核主泵导叶出口边安放位置

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱荣生; 习毅; 袁寿其; 付强; 龙云

    2013-01-01

    为了研究气液两相条件下,不同导叶出口边安放位置对核主泵内部压力脉动、含气率脉动的影响,并最终找出最佳的导叶出口边安放位置,采用三维数值模拟软件CFX模拟泵内部的瞬态流场,在泵壳内壁面和出口不同位置设置监测点,以了解各模型内部不同时刻、不同位置的压力、含气率分布.对比不同模型相同点的压力脉动、含气率脉动的时域、频域图可以发现:导叶出口边在泵壳中心平面(C-C平面)时,泵壳壁面上各点所受压力较小且较平稳,即压力脉动引起的振动、噪声较小,从安全性方面考虑,此时导叶出口边安放位置最佳;泵壳壁面上的压力脉动主要受叶轮的转动影响;除了类似隔舌处外,叶轮的转动对泵壳壁面和出口含气率脉动的影响不大,沿着液体绕流方向泵壳内壁面上的含气率逐渐增大,到出口达到最大.%To study the influence of different positions of guide vane trailing edge on the pressure fluctuation and gas fraction fluctuation in volute wall of nuclear reactor coolant pump under gas-liquid phase condition,and find a best position of guide vane trailing edge,the three-dimensional numerical software CFX was used to simulate the internal transient flow field of pump,with monitoring points set in different positions,in the hope of learning pressures and gas fraction distributions at different times and different positions within each model pump.By comparing pressure fluctuations,frequency domains and time domains at the same position of each model,it was found that the pressure is lower and steadier when the guide vane trailing edge is in the center plane of volute.In another word,the vibration and noise caused by pressure fluctuation were lower; it is the best position for safety.At the same time,it was also found that the fluctuation frequency of volute wall was influenced by impeller rotation frequency.Except similar tongue,impeller rotation

  14. Nuclear Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  15. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  16. Fungal and Bacterial Pigments: Secondary Metabolites with Wide Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manik Prabhu Narsing Rao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The demand for natural colors is increasing day by day due to harmful effects of some synthetic dyes. Bacterial and fungal pigments provide a readily available alternative source of naturally derived pigments. In contrast to other natural pigments, they have enormous advantages including rapid growth, easy processing, and independence of weather conditions. Apart from colorant, bacterial and fungal pigments possess many biological properties such as antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activity. This review outlines different types of pigments. It lists some bacterial and fungal pigments and current bacterial and fungal pigment status and challenges. It also focuses on possible fungal and bacterial pigment applications.

  17. Fungal diversity and plant growth promotion of endophytic fungi from six halophytes in Suncheon Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Young-Hyun; Yoon, Hyeokjun; Kang, Sang-Mo; Shin, Jae-Ho; Choo, Yeon-Sik; Lee, In-Jung; Lee, Jin-Man; Kim, Jong-Guk

    2012-11-01

    Endophytic fungi were isolated from roots of six halophytes in Suncheon Bay. The endophytic fungi of 35 species isolated from halophytes were identified by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) containing the ITS1, 5.8s, and ITS2 regions. All fungal strains were analyzed to diversity at the genus level. Fungal culture filtrates (FCF) of endophytic fungi were treated to Waito-c rice (WR) seedling for plant growth-promoting verification. It was confirmed that fungal strain Sj-2-2 provided plant growth promotion (PGP) to WR seedling. Then, PGP of Suaeda japonica was confirmed by treating culture filtrate of Sj-2-2. As a result, it was verified that culture filtrate of Sj-2-2 had more advanced PGP than positive control when treated to S. japonica. The secondary metabolites involved in culture filtrate of Sj-2-2 were identified by HPLC and GC-MS SIM analysis. The presence of physiologically bioactive gibberellins (GAs) and other inactive GAs in culture filtrate of Sj-2-2 was detected. The molecular analysis of sequences of Sj-2-2 showed the similarity to Penicillium sp. of 99% homology. The PGP of Sj-2-2 as well as symbiosis between endophytic fungi and halophytes growing naturally in salt marsh was confirmed. Sj-2-2 was identified as a new fungal strain producing GAs by molecular analysis of sequences. Consequently, the Sj-2-2 fungal strain was named as Penicillium sp. Sj-2-2. In this study, the diversity of endophytic fungi isolated from roots of halophytes in salt marsh and the PGP of a new gibberellin-producing fungal strain were confirmed.

  18. Differentiation of pyogenic and fungal brain abscesses with susceptibility-weighted MR sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antulov, Ronald; Miletic, Damir [Clinical Hospital Centre Rijeka, Department of Radiology, Rijeka (Croatia); Dolic, Kresimir [Clinical Hospital Centre Split, Department of Radiology, Split (Croatia); Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia; Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University Vienna, University Hospital Vienna, Department of Radiology-Subdivision of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-11-15

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are insufficient to determine the causative agent of brain abscesses. We investigated: (1) the value of susceptibility-weighted MR sequences (SWMRS) in the differentiation of fungal and pyogenic brain abscesses; and (2) the effect of different SWMRS (susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) versus venous blood oxygen level dependent (VenoBOLD)) for the detection of specific imaging characteristics of pyogenic brain abscesses. We studied six patients with fungal and ten patients with pyogenic brain abscesses. Imaging characteristics on conventional MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and SWMRS were recorded in all abscesses. All lesions were assessed for the presence of a ''dual-rim sign'' on SWMRS. Homogenously hyperintense lesions on DWI were present in 60 % of patients with pyogenic abscesses, whereas none of the patients with fungal abscesses showed such lesions. On SWMRS, 90 % of patients with pyogenic abscesses and 60 % of patients with fungal abscesses had only lesions with a low-signal-intensity rim. On SWI, the dual-rim sign was apparent in all pyogenic abscesses. None of the fungal abscesses on SWI (P = 0.005) or any of the pyogenic abscesses on VenoBOLD (P = 0.005) were positive for a dual-rim sign. In fungal abscesses, the dual-rim sign is not present but a prominent peripheral rim or central susceptibility effects on SWI will be seen. The appearance of pyogenic abscesses on SWMRS depends on the used sequence, with the dual-rim sign a specific feature of pyogenic brain abscesses on SWI. (orig.)

  19. Different types of fungal sinusitis occurring concurrently: implications for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupa, V; Thomas, Meera

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical and histopathological features, management and outcome of a series of patients with simultaneous occurrence of invasive and non-invasive fungal sinusitis (mixed fungal sinusitis). The histopathological records of patients with fungal sinusitis seen over the last 6 years were reviewed. The clinical, histopathological, treatment and follow up details of all cases with mixed fungal sinusitis were noted. Six cases of mixed fungal sinusitis with concurrent occurrence of chronic granulomatous fungal sinusitis and allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) were seen during the study period. Most (83.3 %) had bilateral disease. All patients had undergone prior endoscopic sinus surgery at least once within the previous 2 years. Histopathological features showed predominance of invasive disease in half the patients. Except for one patient who did not report for follow up, all patients with predominant chronic granulomatous fungal sinusitis received systemic antifungal therapy and inhaled steroids. Those with predominant features of AFS received oral and inhaled steroids. Five patients with mixed fungal sinusitis who had follow up ranging from 6 months to 5 years were disease free following treatment. Mixed fungal sinusitis should be recognized by the surgeon and pathologist as a separate category of fungal sinusitis whose treatment depends on accurate histological diagnosis. A good outcome may be expected with appropriate therapy.

  20. Fungal endophyte-derived Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis: diversity, antioxidant capacities in vitro and relations to phenolic, flavonoid or saponin compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Su, Tian-Jiao; Cai, Shi-Mei; Wu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Diverse fungal endophytes are rich fungal resources for the production of an enormous quantity of natural products. In the present study, 53 fungal endophytes were isolated from the bulbs of Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis (FUW). Of these, 49 strains were identified and grouped into 17 different taxa, and priority was conferred to the Fusarium genus. All fungal fermented filtrates displayed antioxidant activities. The DPPH activity, total antioxidant capacities (ABTS), reduction power (FRAP), total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and total saponin content (TSC) were evaluated using petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, n-butyl alcohol and ethanol fractions extracted from five representative fungal cultures. The last three fractions showed more potent antioxidant activity than the first fraction. Significant positive correlations were found between the compositions (TPC, TFC and TSC) and antioxidant capacities (DPPH, ABTS and FRAP). In addition, multifarious natural antioxidant components were identified from the fungal extracts, including gallic acid, rutin, phlorizin, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol and 2,6-di-tert-butyl hydroquinone; these were determined preliminarily by TLC-bioautography, HPLC and GC-MS analysis. This study showed abundant fungal resources in FUW. Phenolics, flavonoids and saponins are crucial bioactive constituents in these abundant fungal endophytes and can be viewed as new potential antioxidant resources. PMID:28165019

  1. Fungal endophyte-derived Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis: diversity, antioxidant capacities in vitro and relations to phenolic, flavonoid or saponin compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Su, Tian-Jiao; Cai, Shi-Mei; Wu, Wei

    2017-02-06

    Diverse fungal endophytes are rich fungal resources for the production of an enormous quantity of natural products. In the present study, 53 fungal endophytes were isolated from the bulbs of Fritillaria unibracteata var. wabuensis (FUW). Of these, 49 strains were identified and grouped into 17 different taxa, and priority was conferred to the Fusarium genus. All fungal fermented filtrates displayed antioxidant activities. The DPPH activity, total antioxidant capacities (ABTS), reduction power (FRAP), total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and total saponin content (TSC) were evaluated using petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, n-butyl alcohol and ethanol fractions extracted from five representative fungal cultures. The last three fractions showed more potent antioxidant activity than the first fraction. Significant positive correlations were found between the compositions (TPC, TFC and TSC) and antioxidant capacities (DPPH, ABTS and FRAP). In addition, multifarious natural antioxidant components were identified from the fungal extracts, including gallic acid, rutin, phlorizin, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol and 2,6-di-tert-butyl hydroquinone; these were determined preliminarily by TLC-bioautography, HPLC and GC-MS analysis. This study showed abundant fungal resources in FUW. Phenolics, flavonoids and saponins are crucial bioactive constituents in these abundant fungal endophytes and can be viewed as new potential antioxidant resources.

  2. Unravelling the nuclear matrix proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Jimenez, Connie R

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear matrix (NM) model posits the presence of a protein/RNA scaffold that spans the mammalian nucleus. The NM proteins are involved in basic nuclear function and are a promising source of protein biomarkers for cancer. Importantly, the NM proteome is operationally defined as the proteins...

  3. Indicators of airborne fungal concentrations in urban homes: understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Judith A; Rosenbaum, Paula F; Anagnost, Susan E; Hunt, Andrew; Abraham, Jerrold L

    2015-06-01

    Indoor fungal exposure can compromise respiratory health. Low-income urban areas are of concern because of high asthma and allergy rates and housing disrepair. Understanding the conditions that affect indoor fungal exposures is important for assessing health risks and for developing mitigation strategies. We examined the types and concentrations of airborne fungi inside and outside of homes in low-income areas of Syracuse, NY as well as the effect of snow cover on fungal levels. At 103 homes, air samples for viable fungi were collected, occupants were interviewed and homes were inspected for visible mold, musty odors, water problems and other factors. Multivariable logistic regression was used to relate high fungal levels to home conditions. Predominant indoor fungi included Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Alternaria and hyaline unknowns. Basidiomycetes and an uncommon genus Acrodontium were also found frequently due to analysis methods developed for this project. With snow cover, outdoor total fungal levels were depressed and indoor concentrations were three times higher than outdoor on average with a maximum of 29 times higher. Visible mold was related to elevated levels of Penicillium (OR 4.11 95% CI 1.37-14.0) and bacteria (OR 3.79 95% CI 1.41-11.2). Musty, moldy odors were associated with elevated concentrations of total fungi (OR 3.48 95% CI 1.13-11.6) and basidiomycetes. Cockroaches, an indicator of moisture, were associated with elevated levels of Penicillium (OR 3.66 95% CI 1.16-13.1) and Aspergillus (OR 4.36 95% CI 1.60-13.4). Increasing relative humidity was associated with higher concentrations of Penicillium, yeasts and basidiomycetes. Visible mold, musty odors, indoor humidity and cockroaches are modifiable factors that were important determinants of indoor fungal exposures. Indoor air investigators should interpret indoor:outdoor fungal ratios cautiously when snow cover is present.

  4. Fungal plasma membrane H+-ATPase inhibitory activity of o-hydroxybenzylated flavanones and chalcones from Uvaria chamae P. Beauv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Kjellerup, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    extract of U. chamae was subjected to high-resolution fungal PM H+-ATPase inhibition screening followed by structural elucidation by high-performance liquid chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry–solid-phase extraction–nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HPLC–HRMS–SPE–NMR). This led...

  5. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Alessandro

    2005-04-01

    The activity of the Italian nuclear physicists community in the field of Nuclear Astrophysics is reported. The researches here described have been performed within the project "Fisica teorica del nucleo e dei sistemi a multi corpi", supported by the Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca.

  6. Inactivation of three genera of dominant fungal spores in groundwater using chlorine dioxide: Effectiveness, influencing factors, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Gang; Xu, Xiangqian; Huang, Tinglin; Zhu, Hong; Ma, Jun

    2017-08-18

    Fungi in aquatic environments received more attention recently; therefore, the characteristics of inactivation of fungal spores by widely used disinfectants are quite important. Nonetheless, the inactivation efficacy of fungal spores by chlorine dioxide is poorly known. In this study, the effectiveness of chlorine dioxide at inactivation of three dominant genera of fungal spores isolated from drinking groundwater and the effects of pH, temperature, chlorine dioxide concentration, and humic acid were evaluated. The inactivation mechanisms were explored by analyzing the leakage of intracellular substances, the increase in extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and proteins as well as the changes in spore morphology. The kinetics of inactivation by chlorine dioxide fitted the Chick-Watson model, and different fungal species showed different resistance to chlorine dioxide inactivation, which was in the following order: Cladosporium sp.>Trichoderma sp. >Penicillium sp., which are much more resistant than Escherichia coli. Regarding the three genera of fungal spores used in this study, chlorine dioxide was more effective at inactivation of fungal spores than chlorine. The effect of disinfectant concentration and temperature was positive, and the impact of pH levels (6.0 and 7.0) was insignificant, whereas the influence of water matrices on the inactivation efficiency was negative. The increased concentration of characteristic extracellular substances and changes of spore morphology were observed after inactivation with chlorine dioxide and were due to cell wall and cell membrane damage in fungal spores, causing the leakage of intracellular substances and death of a fungal spore. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Fungal enzymes in the attine ant symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    the more basal attine genera use substrates such as flowers, plant debris, small twigs, insect feces and insect carcasses. This diverse array of fungal substrates across the attine lineage implies that the symbiotic fungus needs different enzymes to break down the plant material that the ants provide...... or different efficiencies of enzyme function. Fungal enzymes that degrade plant cell walls may have functionally co-evolved with the ants in this scenario. We explore this hypothesis with direct measurements of enzyme activity in fungus gardens in 12 species across 8 genera spanning the entire phylogeny...... and diversity of life-styles within the attine clade. We find significant differences in enzyme activity between different genera and life-styles of the ants. How these findings relate to attine ant coevolution and crop optimization are discussed....

  8. Fungal natural products targeting chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladt, Tanja Thorskov; Kildgaard, Sara; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults from the western world. No curative treatments of CLL are presently known so the treatment strategy today is primarily to prolong patient survival,1 why we have initiated new activities towards discovery of novel compounds...... with potential tumor specificity. Our starting point is a diverse fungal collection of thousands of Penicillium and Aspergillus species. These fungi have proven to be a very rich source of various bioactive compounds and yet our dereplication investigations have demonstrated that there are still numerous unknown...... compounds to be identified within these species. Until now we have found that 11 out of 289 fungal extracts are active against CLL cells. Using our established chemotaxonomic discovery approach we have dereplicated and fractionated these extracts to track the activity into single fractions/compounds.2...

  9. Nail Histomycology, Onychochromobiology, and Fungal Thigmatropism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérald E. Piérard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thigmotropism is a biologic feature coping with the directional growth of cells following topographical guidance cues. This mechanism is involved in the invasive phase of pathogen and opportunistic fungi. It was shown experimentally with fungal hyphae of both dermatophytes and nondermatophyte molds, as well as with the mycelial phase of the dimorphic yeast Candida albicans. Objective: To revisit histomycology in onychomycoses of a diversity of fungal origins. Method: Histopathological section of nails plates were oriented parallel to the nail direction of growth. Result: Thigmotropism in part explains the patterns of orientations and shapes of fungi invading nail plates. It is probably influenced by onychochronobiology (speed of growth of the affected nails, and it governs various clinical presentations of onychomycoses.

  10. Standard methods for fungal brood disease research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Bruun; Aronstein, Kathrine; Manuel Flores, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Chalkbrood and stonebrood are two fungal diseases associated with honey bee brood. Chalkbrood, caused by Ascosphaera apis, is a common and widespread disease that can result in severe reduction of emerging worker bees and thus overall colony productivity. Stonebrood is caused by Aspergillus spp. ...... interactions. We give guidelines on the preferred methods used in current research and the application of molecular techniques. We have added photographs, drawings and illustrations to assist bee-extension personnel and bee scientists in the control of these two diseases....... tissues upon inhalation by humans. In the current chapter we describe the honey bee disease symptoms of these fungal pathogens. In addition, we provide research methodologies and protocols for isolating and culturing, in vivo and in vitro assays that are commonly used to study these host pathogen...

  11. ¹¹¹In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab with/without modification with nuclear translocation sequence (NLS) peptides: an Auger electron-emitting radioimmunotherapeutic agent for EGFR-positive and trastuzumab (Herceptin)-resistant breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasih, Aisha; Fonge, Humphrey; Cai, Zhongli; Leyton, Jeffrey V; Tikhomirov, Ilia; Done, Susan J; Reilly, Raymond M

    2012-08-01

    Increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in breast cancer (BC) is often associated with trastuzumab (Herceptin)-resistant forms of the disease and represents an attractive target for novel therapies. Nimotuzumab is a humanized IgG(1) monoclonal antibody that is in clinical trials for treatment of EGFR-overexpressing malignancies. We show here that nimotuzumab derivatized with benzylisothiocyanate diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid for labelling with the subcellular range Auger electron-emitter, (111)In and modified with nuclear translocation sequence (NLS) peptides ((111)In-NLS-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab) was bound, internalized and transported to the nucleus of EGFR-positive BC cells. Emission of Auger electrons in close proximity to the nucleus caused multiple DNA double-strand breaks which diminished the clonogenic survival (CS) of MDA-MB-468 cells that have high EGFR density (2.4 × 10(6) receptors/cell) to less than 3 %. (111)In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab without NLS peptide modification was sevenfold less effective for killing MDA-MB-468 cells. (111)In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab with/without NLS peptide modification were equivalently cytotoxic to MDA-MB-231 and TrR1 BC cells that have moderate EGFR density (5.4 × 10(5) or 4.2 × 10(5) receptors/cell, respectively) reducing their CS by twofold. MDA-MB-231 cells have intrinsic trastuzumab resistance due to low HER2 density, whereas TrR1 cells have acquired resistance despite HER2 overexpression. Biodistribution and microSPECT/CT imaging revealed that (111)In-NLS-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab exhibited more rapid elimination from the blood and lower tumour uptake than (111)In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab. Tumour uptake of the radioimmunoconjugates in mice with MDA-MB-468 xenografts was high (8-16 % injected dose/g) and was blocked by administration of an excess of unlabelled nimotuzumab, demonstrating EGFR specificity. We conclude that (111)In-Bn-DTPA-nimotuzumab with/without NLS peptide modification are promising Auger

  12. Fungal-specific PCR primers developed for analysis of the ITS region of environmental DNA extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rygiewicz Paul T

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS regions of fungal ribosomal DNA (rDNA are highly variable sequences of great importance in distinguishing fungal species by PCR analysis. Previously published PCR primers available for amplifying these sequences from environmental samples provide varying degrees of success at discriminating against plant DNA while maintaining a broad range of compatibility. Typically, it has been necessary to use multiple primer sets to accommodate the range of fungi under study, potentially creating artificial distinctions for fungal sequences that amplify with more than one primer set. Results Numerous sequences for PCR primers were tested to develop PCR assays with a wide range of fungal compatibility and high discrimination from plant DNA. A nested set of 4 primers was developed that reflected these criteria and performed well amplifying ITS regions of fungal rDNA. Primers in the 5.8S sequence were also developed that would permit separate amplifications of ITS1 and ITS2. A range of basidiomycete fruiting bodies and ascomycete cultures were analyzed with the nested set of primers and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP fingerprinting to demonstrate the specificity of the assay. Single ectomycorrhizal root tips were similarly analyzed. These primers have also been successfully applied to Quantitative PCR (QPCR, Length Heterogeneity PCR (LH-PCR and Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP analyses of fungi. A set of wide-range plant-specific primers were developed at positions corresponding to one pair of the fungal primers. These were used to verify that the host plant DNA was not being amplified with the fungal primers. Conclusion These plant primers have been successfully applied to PCR-RFLP analyses of forest plant tissues from above- and below-ground samples and work well at distinguishing a selection of plants to the species level. The complete set of primers was

  13. Molecular Identification of Human Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    no pigment seen on the hyphal walls on hematoxylin-eosin or melan A staining. The biopsy specimen was sent for bacterial and fungal cul- tures, but the...aim was to design universal primers and then develop a PCR mix, which would be able to reliably amplify template from any specimen, even pigmented ...which if accepted, will result in thirty journal publications. There was also one book chapter published. II. Seventeen abstracts have been

  14. Cunninghamella echinulata causing fatally invasive fungal sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Robert E; Meriden, Zina; Sutton, Deanna A; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Neofytos, Dionissios; Zhang, Sean X

    2013-08-01

    We report a fatal case of invasive fungal sinusitis caused by Cunninghamella echinulata in a febrile, neutropenic 15-year-old male with relapsing acute leukemia. The isolate was recovered from a nasal biopsy from the right middle meatus, and microscopic examination of the tissue revealed angioinvasion and necrosis. Human infection caused by this organism has not been well documented; however, this report alerts us to its life-threatening potential.

  15. Nuclear stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  16. Bacterial and fungal aerosols in the work environment of cleaners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Gołofit-Szymczak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cleaning services are carried out in almost all sectors and branches of industry. Due to the above, cleaners are exposed to various harmful biological agents, depending on the tasks performed and the commercial sector involved. The aim of this study was to assess the exposure of cleaning workers to biological agents based on quantitative and qualitative characteristics of airborne microflora. Material and methods: A six-stage Andersen sampler was used to collect bioaerosols during the cleaning activities in different workplaces, including schools, offices, car services, healthy services and shops. Standard Petri dishes filled with blood trypticase soy agar and malt extract agar were used for bacterial and fungal sampling, respectively. Results: The bioaerosol concentration values obtained during testing of selected workposts of cleaners were lower than the Polish recommended threshold limit values for microorganisms concentrations in public service. The most prevalent bacterial species in studied places were Gram-positive cocci (mainly of genera Micrococcus, Staphylococcus and endospore-forming Gram-positive rods (mainly of genera Bacillus. Among the most common fungal species were those from genera Penicillium and Aspergillus. The size distribution analysis revealed that bioaerosols present in the air of workposts at shops, schools and car services may be responsible for nose and eye mucosa irritation and allergic reactions in the form of asthma or allergic inflammation in the cleaning workers. Conclusions: The study shows that occupational activities of cleaning workers are associated with exposure to airborne biological agents classified into risk groups, 1. and 2., according to their level of infection risk, posing respiratory hazard. Med Pr 2015;66(6:779–791

  17. Nuclear questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, M. [Physics World (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01

    The future of nuclear power has returned to centre stage. Freezing weather on both sides of the Atlantic and last month's climate-change talks in Montreal have helped to put energy and the future of nuclear power right back on the political agenda. The issue is particularly pressing for those countries where existing nuclear stations are reaching the end of their lives. In the UK, prime minister Tony Blair has commissioned a review of energy, with a view to deciding later this year whether to build new nuclear power plants. The review comes just four years after the Labour government published a White Paper on energy that said the country should keep the nuclear option open but did not follow this up with any concrete action. In Germany, new chancellor and former physicist Angela Merkel is a fan of nuclear energy and had said she would extend the lifetime of its nuclear plants beyond 2020, when they are due to close. However, that commitment has had to be abandoned, at least for the time being, following negotiations with her left-wing coalition partners. The arguments in favour of nuclear power will be familiar to all physicists - it emits almost no carbon dioxide and can play a vital role in maintaining a diverse energy supply. To over-rely on imported supplies of oil and gas can leave a nation hostage to fortune. The arguments against are equally easy to list - the public is scared of nuclear power, it generates dangerous waste with potentially huge clean-up costs, and it is not necessarily cheap. Nuclear plants could also be a target for terrorist attacks. Given political will, many of these problems can be resolved, or at least tackled. China certainly sees the benefits of nuclear power, as does Finland, which is building a new 1600 MW station - the world's most powerful - that is set to open in 2009. Physicists, of course, are essential to such developments. They play a vital role in ensuring the safety of such plants and developing new types of

  18. Fungal Biodiversity in the Alpine Tarfala Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Coleine

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological soil crusts (BSCs are distributed worldwide in all semiarid and arid lands, where they play a determinant role in element cycling and soil development. Although much work has concentrated on BSC microbial communities, free-living fungi have been hitherto largely overlooked. The aim of this study was to examine the fungal biodiversity, by cultural-dependent and cultural-independent approaches, in thirteen samples of Arctic BSCs collected at different sites in the Alpine Tarfala Valley, located on the slopes of Kebnekaise, the highest mountain in northern Scandinavia. Isolated fungi were identified by both microscopic observation and molecular approaches. Data revealed that the fungal assemblage composition was homogeneous among the BSCs analyzed, with low biodiversity and the presence of a few dominant species; the majority of fungi isolated belonged to the Ascomycota, and Cryptococcus gilvescens and Pezoloma ericae were the most frequently-recorded species. Ecological considerations for the species involved and the implication of our findings for future fungal research in BSCs are put forward.

  19. Fungal Biodiversity in the Alpine Tarfala Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleine, Claudia; Selbmann, Laura; Ventura, Stefano; D'Acqui, Luigi Paolo; Onofri, Silvano; Zucconi, Laura

    2015-10-10

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are distributed worldwide in all semiarid and arid lands, where they play a determinant role in element cycling and soil development. Although much work has concentrated on BSC microbial communities, free-living fungi have been hitherto largely overlooked. The aim of this study was to examine the fungal biodiversity, by cultural-dependent and cultural-independent approaches, in thirteen samples of Arctic BSCs collected at different sites in the Alpine Tarfala Valley, located on the slopes of Kebnekaise, the highest mountain in northern Scandinavia. Isolated fungi were identified by both microscopic observation and molecular approaches. Data revealed that the fungal assemblage composition was homogeneous among the BSCs analyzed, with low biodiversity and the presence of a few dominant species; the majority of fungi isolated belonged to the Ascomycota, and Cryptococcus gilvescens and Pezoloma ericae were the most frequently-recorded species. Ecological considerations for the species involved and the implication of our findings for future fungal research in BSCs are put forward.

  20. Sebacinales everywhere: previously overlooked ubiquitous fungal endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael; Sýkorová, Zuzana; Garnica, Sigisfredo; Riess, Kai; Martos, Florent; Krause, Cornelia; Oberwinkler, Franz; Bauer, Robert; Redecker, Dirk

    2011-02-15

    Inconspicuous basidiomycetes from the order Sebacinales are known to be involved in a puzzling variety of mutualistic plant-fungal symbioses (mycorrhizae), which presumably involve transport of mineral nutrients. Recently a few members of this fungal order not fitting this definition and commonly referred to as 'endophytes' have raised considerable interest by their ability to enhance plant growth and to increase resistance of their host plants against abiotic stress factors and fungal pathogens. Using DNA-based detection and electron microscopy, we show that Sebacinales are not only extremely versatile in their mycorrhizal associations, but are also almost universally present as symptomless endophytes. They occurred in field specimens of bryophytes, pteridophytes and all families of herbaceous angiosperms we investigated, including liverworts, wheat, maize, and the non-mycorrhizal model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. They were present in all habitats we studied on four continents. We even detected these fungi in herbarium specimens originating from pioneering field trips to North Africa in the 1830s/40s. No geographical or host patterns were detected. Our data suggest that the multitude of mycorrhizal interactions in Sebacinales may have arisen from an ancestral endophytic habit by specialization. Considering their proven beneficial influence on plant growth and their ubiquity, endophytic Sebacinales may be a previously unrecognized universal hidden force in plant ecosystems.

  1. Sebacinales everywhere: previously overlooked ubiquitous fungal endophytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Weiss

    Full Text Available Inconspicuous basidiomycetes from the order Sebacinales are known to be involved in a puzzling variety of mutualistic plant-fungal symbioses (mycorrhizae, which presumably involve transport of mineral nutrients. Recently a few members of this fungal order not fitting this definition and commonly referred to as 'endophytes' have raised considerable interest by their ability to enhance plant growth and to increase resistance of their host plants against abiotic stress factors and fungal pathogens. Using DNA-based detection and electron microscopy, we show that Sebacinales are not only extremely versatile in their mycorrhizal associations, but are also almost universally present as symptomless endophytes. They occurred in field specimens of bryophytes, pteridophytes and all families of herbaceous angiosperms we investigated, including liverworts, wheat, maize, and the non-mycorrhizal model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. They were present in all habitats we studied on four continents. We even detected these fungi in herbarium specimens originating from pioneering field trips to North Africa in the 1830s/40s. No geographical or host patterns were detected. Our data suggest that the multitude of mycorrhizal interactions in Sebacinales may have arisen from an ancestral endophytic habit by specialization. Considering their proven beneficial influence on plant growth and their ubiquity, endophytic Sebacinales may be a previously unrecognized universal hidden force in plant ecosystems.

  2. Functional analysis of fungal polyketide biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Isao

    2010-05-01

    Fungal polyketides have huge structural diversity from simple aromatics to highly modified complex reduced-type compounds. Despite such diversty, single modular iterative type I polyketide synthases (iPKSs) are responsible for their carbon skeleton construction. Using heterologous expression systems, we have studied on ATX, a 6-methylsalicylic acid synthase from Aspergillus terreus as a model iPKS. In addition, iPKS functions involved in fungal spore pigment biosynthesis were analyzed together with polyketide-shortening enzymes that convert products of PKSs to shorter ketides by hydrolytic C-C bond cleavage. In our studies on reducing-type iPKSs, we cloned and expressed PKS genes, pksN, pksF, pksK and sol1 from Alternaria solani. The sol gene cluster was found to be involved in solanapyrone biosynthesis and sol5 was identified to encode solanapyrone synthase, a Diels-Alder enzyme. Our fungal PKS studies were further extended to identify the function of PKS-nonribosomal peptide synthase involved in cyclopiazonic acid biosynthesis.

  3. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Driskill, Brent R; Clenney, Timothy L; Gessler, Eric M

    2015-10-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a condition that has an allergic basis caused by exposure to fungi in the sinonasal tract leading to chronic inflammation. Despite standard treatment modalities, which typically include surgery and medical management of allergies, patients still have a high rate of recurrence. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been used as adjuvant treatment for AFS. Evidence exists to support the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a safe and efficacious method of treating allergies, but no studies have assessed the utility of SLIT in the management of allergic fungal sinusitis. A record review of cases of AFS that are currently or previously treated with sublingual immunotherapy from 2007 to 2011 was performed. Parameters of interest included serum IgE levels, changes in symptoms, Lund-McKay scores, decreased sensitization to fungal allergens associated with AFS, and serum IgE levels. Ten patients with diagnosed AFS were treated with SLIT. No adverse effects related to the use of SLIT therapy were identified. Decreases in subjective complaints, exam findings, Lund-McKay scores, and serum IgE levels were observed. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy appears to be a safe adjunct to the management of AFS that may improve patient outcomes.

  4. Preliminary laboratory report of fungal infections associated with contaminated methylprednisolone injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Shawn R; Pham, Cau D; Gade, Lalitha; Iqbal, Naureen; Scheel, Christina M; Cleveland, Angela A; Whitney, Anne M; Noble-Wang, Judith; Chiller, Tom M; Park, Benjamin J; Litvintseva, Anastasia P; Brandt, Mary E

    2013-08-01

    In September 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiated an outbreak investigation of fungal infections linked to injection of contaminated methylprednisolone acetate (MPA). Between 2 October 2012 and 14 February 2013, the CDC laboratory received 799 fungal isolates or human specimens, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), synovial fluid, and abscess tissue, from 469 case patients in 19 states. A novel broad-range PCR assay and DNA sequencing were used to evaluate these specimens. Although Aspergillus fumigatus was recovered from the index case, Exserohilum rostratum was the primary pathogen in this outbreak and was also confirmed from unopened MPA vials. Exserohilum rostratum was detected or confirmed in 191 specimens or isolates from 150 case patients, primarily from Michigan (n=67 patients), Tennessee (n=26), Virginia (n=20), and Indiana (n=16). Positive specimens from Michigan were primarily abscess tissues, while positive specimens from Tennessee, Virginia, and Indiana were primarily CSF. E. rostratum antifungal susceptibility MIC50 and MIC90 values were determined for voriconazole (1 and 2 μg/ml, respectively), itraconazole (0.5 and 1 μg/ml), posaconazole (0.5 and 1 μg/ml), isavuconazole (4 and 4 μg/ml), and amphotericin B (0.25 and 0.5 μg/ml). Thirteen other mold species were identified among case patients, and four other fungal genera were isolated from the implicated MPA vials. The clinical significance of these other fungal species remains under investigation. The laboratory response provided significant support to case confirmation, enabled linkage between clinical isolates and injected vials of MPA, and described significant features of the fungal agents involved in this large multistate outbreak.

  5. Fungal transformation of fluoranthene. [Cunninghamella elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pothuluri, J.V.; Freeman, J.P.; Evans, F.E.; Cerniglia, C.E. (Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The fungus Cunninghamella elegans ATCC 36112 metabolized approximately 80% of the 3-{sup 14}C-labeled fluoranthene (FA) added within 72 h of incubation. C. elegans metabolized FA to trans-2,3-dihydroxy-2,3-dihydrofluoranthene (trans-2,3-dihydrodiol), 8- and 9-hydroxyfluoranthene trans-2,3-dihydrodiol, 3-fluoranthene-{beta}-glucopyranoside, and 3-(8-hydroxyflouranthene)-{beta}-glucopyranoside. These metabolites were separated by thin-layer and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance, UV, and mass spectral techniques. The major pathway involved hydroxylation to form a glucoside conjugate of 3-hydroxyfluoranthene and a glucoside conjugate of 3,8-dihydroxyfluoranthene which together accounted for 52% of the total ethyl acetate-soluble metabolites. C. elegans initially metabolized FA in the 2,3 position to form fluoranthene trans-2,3-dihydrodiol, which has previously been shown to be a biologically active compound in mammalian and bacterial genotoxicity tests. However, C. elegans formed predominantly glucoside conjugates of the phenolic derivatives of FA, which suggests that this fungus has the potential to detoxify FA.

  6. Patterns of fungal diversity and composition along a salinity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Devon J; Martiny, Jennifer BH

    2011-01-01

    Estuarine salinity gradients are known to influence plant, bacterial and archaeal community structure. We sequenced 18S rRNA genes to investigate patterns in sediment fungal diversity (richness and evenness of taxa) and composition (taxonomic and phylogenetic) along an estuarine salinity gradient. We sampled three marshes—a salt, brackish and freshwater marsh—in Rhode Island. To compare the relative effect of the salinity gradient with that of plants, we sampled fungi in plots with Spartina patens and in plots from which plants were removed 2 years prior to sampling. The fungal sediment community was unique compared with previously sampled fungal communities; we detected more Ascomycota (78%), fewer Basidiomycota (6%) and more fungi from basal lineages (16%) (Chytridiomycota, Glomeromycota and four additional groups) than typically found in soil. Across marshes, fungal composition changed substantially, whereas fungal diversity differed only at the finest level of genetic resolution, and was highest in the intermediate, brackish marsh. In contrast, the presence of plants had a highly significant effect on fungal diversity at all levels of genetic resolution, but less of an effect on fungal composition. These results suggest that salinity (or other covarying parameters) selects for a distinctive fungal composition, and plants provide additional niches upon which taxa within these communities can specialize and coexist. Given the number of sequences from basal fungal lineages, the study also suggests that further sampling of estuarine sediments may help in understanding early fungal evolution. PMID:20882058

  7. Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Savage, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Lattice QCD is making good progress toward calculating the structure and properties of light nuclei and the forces between nucleons. These calculations will ultimately refine the nuclear forces, particularly in the three- and four-nucleon sector and the short-distance interactions of nucleons with electroweak currents, and allow for a reduction of uncertainties in nuclear many-body calculations of nuclei and their reactions. After highlighting their importance, particularly to the Nuclear Physics and High-Energy Physics experimental programs, I discuss the progress that has been made toward achieving these goals and the challenges that remain.

  8. Effect of an organophosphate pesticide, monocrotophos, on phosphate-solubilizing efficiency of soil fungal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rachna; Garg, Veena; Saxena, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Soil is a sink of pesticide residues as well as microorganisms. Fungi are well known for solubilization of inorganic phosphates, and this activity of fungal isolates may be affected by the presence of pesticide residues in the soil. In the present study, five generically different fungal isolates, viz. Aspergillus niger JQ660373, Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium aculeatum JQ660374, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Macrophomina sp., were tested and compared for their phosphate-solubilizing ability in the absence and presence of monocrotophos (500 mg L(-1)). After 168 h of incubation, four times high amount of tricalcium phosphate was solubilized by isolates in the growth medium containing monocrotophos in comparison to control (without monocrotophos). Concurrently, 78 % of the applied monocrotophos was degraded by these fungal isolates. Kinetics of phosphate solubilization shifted from logarithmic to power model in the presence of monocrotophos. Similarly, the phosphatase activity was also found significantly high in the presence of monocrotophos. The combined order of phosphate solubilization as well as monocrotophos degradation was found to be A. niger JQ660373 > P. aculeatum JQ660374 > A. flavus > F. pallidoroseum > Macrophomina sp. On the contrary, phosphate solubilization negatively correlated with the pH of the growth medium. Hence, it could be concluded that these fungal species efficiently solubilize inorganic phosphates and monocrotophos poses a positive effect on their ability and in turn degraded by them. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on P solubilization by Macrophomina sp. and F. pallidoroseum.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of the nail plate in onychomycosis patients with negative fungal culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xueping; Li, Qing; Wang, Hongwei; Sun, Yilin; Wang, Aiping; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Cuiping

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a common dermatological problem and can be identified by direct microscopic examination and fungal culture. However, the positive rate of fungal culture is low. This study investigated the application of scanning electron microscopy in the diagnosis of onychomycosis in 20 patients with negative fungal culture. In this study, a routine glutaraldehyde fixation method was used to prepare specimens for electron microscope examination. Results showed that under the scanning electron microscope, significant structural damage was observed in the nail plate in all patients. Hyphaes were seen in 70% of cases. A mixture of scattered hyphaes, pseudohyphaes, and spores was observed in 30% of cases. A mixture of spores and bacteria was observed in 10% of cases. A mixture of hyphaes and bacteria was observed in 20% of cases. The typical hyphae pierced a thin layer or single layer of corneocytes. Hyphaes could be smooth, sleek, and straight with visible separation, or dry, bent, and folded with a smooth surface. The diameter of hyphaes was 1-2 µm. The scattered spores were the main form of spore growth, and the growth of budding spores can be seen attached to the surface of layered armor. Most of the bacteria were gathered in clumps on the ventral surface, especially in grooves. In conclusion, scanning electron microscopy can be used to preliminarily identify the pathogen involved and the degree of damage in cases where onychomycosis is clinically diagnosed, but fungal culture is negative.

  10. Synthetic β-sheet forming peptide amphiphiles for treatment of fungal keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Ong, Zhan Yuin; Liu, Shaoqiong; Li, Yan; Wiradharma, Nikken; Yang, Yi Yan; Ying, Jackie Y

    2015-03-01

    Fungal keratitis is a leading cause of ocular morbidity. It is frequently misdiagnosed as bacterial keratitis, causing a delay in proper treatment. Furthermore, due to the lack of safe and effective anti-fungal agents for clinical use, treatment of fugal keratitis remains a challenge. In recent years, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have received considerable attention as potent and broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents with the potential to overcome antibiotics resistance. We previously reported the design of short synthetic β-sheet forming peptides (IKIK)2-NH2 and (IRIK)2-NH2 with excellent antimicrobial activities and selectivities against various clinically relevant microorganisms, including Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and yeast Candida albicans (C. albicans). In this study, we evaluated the application of the two most promising synthetic β-sheet forming peptide candidates for in vivo fungal keratitis treatment in comparison with the commercially available amphotericin B. It was found that topical solutions of the designed peptides are safe, and as effective as the clinically used amphotericin B. Compared to the costly and unstable amphotericin B, (IKIK)2-NH2 and (IRIK)2-NH2 are water-soluble, less expensive and stable. Thus, the synthetic β-sheet forming peptides are presented as promising candidates for the treatment of fungal keratitis.

  11. Strong linkage between plant and soil fungal communities along a successional coastal dune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Bolduc, Alice; Laliberté, Etienne; Boudreau, Stéphane; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Complex interactions between plants and soil microorganisms drive key ecosystem and community properties such as productivity and diversity. In nutrient-poor systems such as sand dunes, plant traits and fungal symbioses related to nutrient acquisition can strongly influence vegetation dynamics. We investigated plant and fungal communities in a relic foredune plain located on an archipelago in Québec, Canada. We detected distinct communities across the edaphic and successional gradient. Our results showed a clear increase in plant species richness, as well as in the diversity of nutrient-acquisition strategies. We also found a strong correlation between aboveground vegetation and soil fungal communities, and both responded similarly to soil physicochemical properties. Soil pH influenced the composition of plant and fungal communities, and could act as an important environmental filter along this relic foredune plain. The increasing functional diversity in plant nutrient-acquisition strategies across the gradient might favor resource partitioning and facilitation among co-occurring plant species. The coordinated changes in soil microbial and plant communities highlight the importance of aboveground-belowground linkages and positive biotic interactions during ecological succession in nutrient-poor environments.

  12. Chromium immobilization by extra- and intraradical fungal structures of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songlin; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Yuqing; Wu, Zhaoxiang; Li, Tao; Hu, Yajun; Lv, Jitao; Li, Gang; Zhang, Zhensong; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhen, Xiangjun; Chen, Baodong

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can enhance plant Cr tolerance through immobilizing Cr in mycorrhizal roots. However, the detailed processes and mechanisms are unclear. The present study focused on cellular distribution and speciation of Cr in both extraradical mycelium (ERM) and mycorrhizal roots exposed to Cr(VI) by using field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (FE-SEM-EDS), scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy techniques. We found that amounts of particles (possibly extracellular polymeric substances, EPS) were produced on the AM fungal surface upon Cr(VI) stress, which contributed greatly to Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. With EDS of the surface of AM fungi exposed to various Cr(VI) levels, a positive correlation between Cr and P was revealed, suggesting that phosphate groups might act as counter ions of Cr(III), which was also confirmed by the XAFS analysis. Besides, STXM and XAFS analyses showed that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) in AM fungal structures (arbuscules, intraradical mycelium, etc.) and cell walls in mycorrhizal roots, and complexed possibly with carboxyl groups or histidine analogues. The present work provided evidence of Cr immobilization on fungal surface and in fungal structures in mycorrhizal roots at a cellular level, and thus unraveled the underlying mechanisms by which AM symbiosis immobilize Cr.

  13. Morphological and molecular characterization of fungal pathogen, Magnaphorthe oryzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Nor’Aishah, E-mail: aishahnh@ns.uitm.edu.my [Faculty of Applied Science, UniversitiTeknologi MARA (UiTM), Kuala Pilah, Negeri Sembilan (Malaysia); Rafii, Mohd Y., E-mail: mrafii@upm.edu.my [Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Crop Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahim, Harun A. [Agrotechnology & Bioscience Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ali, Nusaibah Syd [Department of Plant Protection, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mazlan, Norida [Department of Agriculture Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Abdullah, Shamsiah [Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, UniversitiTeknologi MARA (UiTM), Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-02-01

    Rice is arguably the most crucial food crops supplying quarter of calories intake. Fungal pathogen, Magnaphorthe oryzae promotes blast disease unconditionally to gramineous host including rice species. This disease spurred an outbreaks and constant threat to cereal production. Global rice yield declining almost 10-30% including Malaysia. As Magnaphorthe oryzae and its host is model in disease plant study, the rice blast pathosystem has been the subject of intense interest to overcome the importance of the disease to world agriculture. Therefore, in this study, our prime objective was to isolate samples of Magnaphorthe oryzae from diseased leaf obtained from MARDI Seberang Perai, Penang, Malaysia. Molecular identification was performed by sequences analysis from internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of nuclear ribosomal RNA genes. Phylogenetic affiliation of the isolated samples were analyzed by comparing the ITS sequences with those deposited in the GenBank database. The sequence of the isolate demonstrated at least 99% nucleotide identity with the corresponding sequence in GenBank for Magnaphorthe oryzae. Morphological observed under microscope demonstrated that the structure of conidia followed similar characteristic as M. oryzae. Finding in this study provide useful information for breeding programs, epidemiology studies and improved disease management.

  14. Isolation and molecular characterization of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic degrading fungal isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Ishtiaq; Ahmed, Safia; Robson, Geoff; Javed, Imran; Ali, Naeem; Atiq, Naima; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    The recalcitrant nature of polyvinyl chloride creates serious environmental concerns during manufacturing and waste disposal. The present study was aimed to isolate and screen different soil fungi having potential to biodegrade PVC films. After 10 months of soil burial experiment, it was observed that a number of fungal strains were flourishing on PVC films. On morphological as well as on 18rRNA gene sequence and phylogenetic basis they were identified as Phanerochaete chrysosporium PV1, Lentinus tigrinus PV2, Aspergillus niger PV3, and Aspergillus sydowii PV4. The biodegradation ability of these fungal isolates was further checked in shake flask experiments by taking thin films of PVC (C source) in mineral salt medium. A significant change in color and surface deterioration of PVC films was confirmed through visual observation and Scanning electron microscopy. During shake flask experiments, P. chrysosporium PV1 produced maximum biomass of about 2.57 mg ml(-1) followed by A. niger PV3. P. chrysosporium PV1 showed significant reduction (178,292 Da(-1)) in Molecular weight of the PVC film than control (200,000 Da(-1)) by gel permeation chromatography. Furthermore more Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance also revealed structural changes in the PVC. It was concluded that isolated fungal strains have significant potential for biodegradation of PVC plastics.

  15. Fungal endophyte diversity and bioactivity in the Mediterranean cypress Cupressus sempervirens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Jalal; Hosseyni Moghaddam, Mahdieh S

    2015-04-01

    Fungal endophytes were isolated from the Mediterranean cypress Cupressus sempervirens. Eleven taxa of fungi, all within the Ascomycota, were identified based on PCR amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS rDNA) with taxonomic identity assigned using the NCBI nucleotide megablast search tool. The endophytic fungi included Alternaria multiformis, Didymella sp., Phoma sp., Phoma herbarum, Pyrenochaeta sp. (Dothideomycetes), Penicillium brevicompactum, Talaromyces sp. (Eurotiomycetes), Ascorhizoctonia sp. (Pezizomycetes), Thielavia microspora, and Thielavia spp. (Sordariomycetes). Considering the former findings in US, this indicates that similar ascomycetous classes of fungi, all from Pezizomycotina, associate with the healthy Cupressaceous trees in Iran. The recovered endophytes produced antifungal and antiproliferative metabolites which may contribute to the protection and survival of the host. We speculate that endophyte-infected C. sempervirens may benefit from their fungal associates by their influence on the ecology and biotic stress tolerance of the host plant. Moreover, a novel niche for the identified fungal species is being introduced.

  16. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  17. Nuclear Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher

    1982-01-01

    Material about nuclear disarmament and the arms race should be included in secondary school curricula. Teachers can present this technical, controversial, and frightening material in a balanced and comprehensible way. Resources for instructional materials are listed. (PP)

  18. Nuclear Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  19. Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Angela

    2003-04-01

    An account of recent studies in the field of theoretical nuclear structure is reported. These studies concern essentially research activities performed under the Italian project "Fisica Teorica del Nucleo e dei Sistemi a Molti Corpi". Special attention is addressed to results obtained during the last two years as regards the development of new many-body techniques as well as the interpretation of new experimental aspects of nuclear structure.

  20. Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles (Belgium); Takahashi, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  1. Nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  2. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  3. Solving the aerodynamics of fungal flight: how air viscosity slows spore motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Mark W F; Stolze-Rybczynski, Jessica L; Davis, Diana J; Cui, Yunluan; Money, Nicholas P

    2010-01-01

    Viscous drag causes the rapid deceleration of fungal spores after high-speed launches and limits discharge distance. Stokes' law posits a linear relationship between drag force and velocity. It provides an excellent fit to experimental measurements of the terminal velocity of free-falling spores and other instances of low Reynolds number motion (Reprojectile sizes, launch speeds, and discharge distances, from microscopic mushroom ballistospores discharged at 10 m s(-1) and travel as far as 2.5m (Re>100).

  4. Etiological analysis on ocular fungal infection in the period of 1989-2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙旭光; 张岩; 李然; 王智群; 罗时运; 金秀英; 张文华

    2004-01-01

    Background This study was to review the distribution and shifting trend of fungal of culture specimens isolated from eyes of patients at the Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Tongren Hospital,Beijing, China.Methods The fungal culture-positive rate, the distribution and change of isolates of 2609 specimens collected in a 12-year period (1989 - 2000) were retrospectively analyzed.Results In 775 positive cultures, 707 specimens (91.2%) were from the cornea, 22 (2.8%) from the conjunctiva, 15 (1.9%) from the anterior chamber, 9 (1.2%) from the vitreous body, 3(0.4%)from the lacrimal sac, and 19 (2.5%) from other parts of the eye. The average culture-positive rate was 29.7%. The ratio of the positive cultures in the first half year (from January to June) to those in the second half (from July to December) was 1: 2. 1. The main genus cultured was Fusarium sp (58.7%), followed by Aspergirum sp (16. 8%). The percentage of Fusarium sp was increased from 53. 6% (1989 -1994) to 60.2% (1995 -2000), whereas the percentage of Aspergirum sp was decreased from 22.3% (1989 -1994) to 15. 1% (1995 -2000).Conclusions Fusaruim sp is one of the most predominant pathogens of ocular fungal infection in northern China and its incidence tends to increase, but that of Aspergirum sp to decrease. It is very important to recognize the distribution and shifting trend of pathogenic fungi in the diagnosis,prevention and treatment of fungal keratitis.

  5. Genome size analyses of Pucciniales reveal the largest fungal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eTavares

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rust fungi (Basidiomycota, Pucciniales are biotrophic plant pathogens which exhibit diverse complexities in their life cycles and host ranges. The completion of genome sequencing of a few rust fungi has revealed the occurrence of large genomes. Sequencing efforts for other rust fungi have been hampered by uncertainty concerning their genome sizes. Flow cytometry was recently applied to estimate the genome size of a few rust fungi, and confirmed the occurrence of large genomes in this order (averaging 151.5 Mbp, while the average for Basidiomycota was 49.9 Mbp and was 37.7 Mbp for all fungi. In this work, we have used an innovative and simple approach to simultaneously isolate nuclei from the rust and its host plant in order to estimate the genome size of 30 rust species by flow cytometry. Genome sizes varied over 10-fold, from 70 to 893 Mbp, with an average genome size value of 380.2 Mbp. Compared to the genome sizes of over 1,800 fungi, Gymnosporangium confusum possesses the largest fungal genome ever reported (893.2 Mbp. Moreover, even the smallest rust genome determined in this study is larger than the vast majority of fungal genomes (94 %. The average genome size of the Pucciniales is now of 305.5 Mbp, while the average Basidiomycota genome size has shifted to 70.4 Mbp and the average for all fungi reached 44.2 Mbp. Despite the fact that no correlation could be drawn between the genome sizes, the phylogenomics or the life cycle of rust fungi, it is interesting to note that rusts with Fabaceae hosts present genomes clearly larger than those with Poaceae hosts. Although this study comprises only a small fraction of the more than 7,000 rust species described, it seems already evident that the Pucciniales represent a group where genome size expansion could be a common characteristic. This is in sharp contrast to sister taxa, placing this order in a relevant position in fungal genomics research.

  6. Nuclear choreography: interpretations from living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Susan M; Spector, David L

    2003-04-01

    The advent of green fluorescent protein technology, its use in photobleaching experiments and the development of methods to rapidly acquire images and analyze complex datasets have opened the door to unraveling the mechanisms of nuclear functions in living cells. Studies over the past few years have characterized the movement of chromatin, nuclear proteins and nuclear bodies and, in some cases, correlated their dynamics with energy dependence, cell cycle progression, developmental changes, factor targeting and nuclear position. The mechanisms by which nuclear components move or are restrained have important implications for understanding not only the efficacy of nuclear functions but also the regulation of developmental programs and cellular growth.

  7. Sensitization to fungal allergens: Resolved and unresolved issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuma Fukutomi

    2015-10-01

    Despite its importance in the management of allergic diseases, precise recognition of species-specific IgE sensitization to fungal allergens is often challenging because the majority of fungal extracts exhibit broad cross-reactivity with taxonomically unrelated fungi. Recent progress in gene technology has contributed to the identification of specific and cross-reactive allergen components from different fungal sources. However, data demonstrating the clinical relevance of IgE reactivity to these allergen components are still insufficient.

  8. Fungal symbionts of grasses: evolutionary insights and agricultural potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, B; Schardl, C

    1993-08-01

    Some filamentous fungal endophytes confer on their grass hosts important biological properties including resistance to grazing herbivores and resistance to nematodes and some fungal pathogens, as well as drought tolerance and greater field persistence. The production of alkaloids toxic to grazing animals is an undesirable aspect of the association in agronomic situations. Consequently, genetic strategies are being pursued to manipulate fungal endophytes and their hosts for agricultural benefit.

  9. Allergic Fungal Rhinosinusitis: A Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to study the occurrence and clinical presentation of allergic fungal rhinosinusitis (AFRS, characterize the same, and correlate with the microbiological profile. Clinically suspected cases of fungal rhinosinusitis (FRS depending upon their clinical presentation, nasal endoscopy, and radiological evidences were included. Relevant clinical samples were collected and subjected to direct microscopy and culture and histopathological examination. 35 patients were diagnosed to have AFRS. The average age was 28.4 years with a range of 18–48 years. Allergic mucin was seen in all the AFRS patients but fungal hyphae were detected in only 20%. 80% of cases were positive for IgE. All the patients had nasal obstruction followed by nasal discharge (62.8%. Polyps were seen in 95% (unilateral (48.57% and bilateral (45.71%, deviated nasal septum was seen in 28.57%, and greenish yellow secretion was seen in 17.14%. Direct microscopy and septate hyphae were positive in 71.42% of cases. 91.4% of cases were positive by culture. 5.7% yielded mixed growth of A. flavus and A. niger. Prompt clinical suspicion with specific signs and symptoms along with timely sampling of the adequate patient specimens and the optimal and timely processing by microscopy and culture and histopathological examination is a must for early diagnosis and management.

  10. Fungal community dynamics and driving factors during agricultural waste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Man; Zhang, Jiachao; Xu, Yuxin; Xiao, Hua; An, Wenhao; Xi, Hui; Xue, Zhiyong; Huang, Hongli; Chen, Xiaoyang; Shen, Alin

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to identify the driving factors behind fungal community dynamics during agricultural waste composting. Fungal community abundance and structure were determined by quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis combined with DNA sequencing. The effects of physico-chemical parameters on fungal community abundance and structure were evaluated by least significant difference tests and redundancy analysis. The results showed that Cladosporium bruhnei, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Scytalidium thermophilum, Tilletiopsis penniseti, and Coprinopsis altramentaria were prominent during the composting process. The greatest variation in the distribution of fungal community structure was statistically explained by pile temperature and total organic carbon (TOC) (P composting.

  11. [Diagnosis and treatment of fungal ball rhino-sinusitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jun; Liu, Fenfang; Zhang, Hanwu; Li, Li

    2013-07-01

    To explore the diagnosis and treatment of the fungal ball rhino-sinusitis. The clinical data of 128 cases with the fungal ball rhino-sinusitis in our hospital between September 2005 and January 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were accepted nasal endoscopic surgery and followed up after surgery. The diagnosis were confirmed by postoperative pathological examination. The sinus of all patients epithelialized after the surgery from fourth to ninth weeks, one case recurred eight months later. Sinus CT scan and nasal endoscopy were very important to the diagnosis of the fungal ball rhino-sinusitis, and nasal endoscopic surgery is the most important treatment method to fungal ball rhino-sinusitis.

  12. Immunology of fungal infections: lessons learned from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Chad; Wormley, Floyd L

    2012-08-01

    The continuing AIDS epidemic coupled with increased usage of immunosuppressive drugs to prevent organ rejection or treat autoimmune diseases has resulted in an increase in individuals at risk for acquiring fungal diseases. These concerns highlight the need to elucidate mechanisms of inducing protective immune responses against fungal pathogens. Consequently, several experimental models of human mycoses have been developed to study these diseases. The availability of transgenic animal models allows for in-depth analysis of specific components, receptors, and signaling pathways that elicit protection against fungal diseases. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of immune responses to fungal infections gained using animal models.

  13. Fungal biogeography. Global diversity and geography of soil fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedersoo, Leho; Bahram, Mohammad; Põlme, Sergei; Kõljalg, Urmas; Yorou, Nourou S; Wijesundera, Ravi; Villarreal Ruiz, Luis; Vasco-Palacios, Aída M; Thu, Pham Quang; Suija, Ave; Smith, Matthew E; Sharp, Cathy; Saluveer, Erki; Saitta, Alessandro; Rosas, Miguel; Riit, Taavi; Ratkowsky, David; Pritsch, Karin; Põldmaa, Kadri; Piepenbring, Meike; Phosri, Cherdchai; Peterson, Marko; Parts, Kaarin; Pärtel, Kadri; Otsing, Eveli; Nouhra, Eduardo; Njouonkou, André L; Nilsson, R Henrik; Morgado, Luis N; Mayor, Jordan; May, Tom W; Majuakim, Luiza; Lodge, D Jean; Lee, Su See; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Kohout, Petr; Hosaka, Kentaro; Hiiesalu, Indrek; Henkel, Terry W; Harend, Helery; Guo, Liang-dong; Greslebin, Alina; Grelet, Gwen; Geml, Jozsef; Gates, Genevieve; Dunstan, William; Dunk, Chris; Drenkhan, Rein; Dearnaley, John; De Kesel, André; Dang, Tan; Chen, Xin; Buegger, Franz; Brearley, Francis Q; Bonito, Gregory; Anslan, Sten; Abell, Sandra; Abarenkov, Kessy

    2014-11-28

    Fungi play major roles in ecosystem processes, but the determinants of fungal diversity and biogeographic patterns remain poorly understood. Using DNA metabarcoding data from hundreds of globally distributed soil samples, we demonstrate that fungal richness is decoupled from plant diversity. The plant-to-fungus richness ratio declines exponentially toward the poles. Climatic factors, followed by edaphic and spatial variables, constitute the best predictors of fungal richness and community composition at the global scale. Fungi show similar latitudinal diversity gradients to other organisms, with several notable exceptions. These findings advance our understanding of global fungal diversity patterns and permit integration of fungi into a general macroecological framework.

  14. Vertical evolution and intragenic spread of lichen-fungal group I introns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debashish; Friedl, Thomas; Helms, Gert

    2002-07-01

    One family within the Euascomycetes (Ascomycota), the lichen-forming Physciaceae, is particularly rich in nuclear ribosomal [r]DNA group I introns. We used phylogenetic analyses of group I introns and lichen-fungal host cells to address four questions about group I intron evolution in lichens, and generally in all eukaryotes: 1) Is intron spread in the lichens associated with the intimate association of the fungal and photosynthetic cells that make up the lichen thallus? 2) Are the multiple group I introns in the lichen-fungi of independent origins, or have existing introns spread into novel sites in the rDNA? 3) If introns have moved to novel sites, then does the exon context of these sites provide insights into the mechanism of intron spread? and 4) What is the pattern of intron loss in the small subunit rDNA gene of lichen-fungi? Our analyses show that group I introns in the lichen-fungi and in the lichen-algae (and lichenized cyanobacteria) do not share a close evolutionary relationship, suggesting that these introns do not move between the symbionts. Many group I introns appear to have originated in the common ancestor of the Lecanorales, whereas others have spread within this lineage (particularly in the Physciaceae) putatively through reverse-splicing into novel rRNA sites. We suggest that the evolutionary history of most lichen-fungal group I introns is characterized by rare gains followed by extensive losses in descendants, resulting in a sporadic intron distribution. Detailed phylogenetic analyses of the introns and host cells are required, therefore, to distinguish this scenario from the alternative hypothesis of widespread and independent intron gains in the different lichen-fungal lineages.

  15. Fungal genes related to calcium homeostasis and signalling are upregulated in symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhiza interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Arnould, Christine; Wipf, Daniel; Zhao, Bin; van Tuinen, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuations in intracellular calcium levels generate signalling events and regulate different cellular processes. Whilst the implication of Ca(2+) in plant responses during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) interactions is well documented, nothing is known about the regulation or role of this secondary messenger in the fungal symbiont. The spatio-temporal expression pattern of putatively Ca(2+)-related genes of Glomus intraradices BEG141 encoding five proteins involved in membrane transport and one nuclear protein kinase, was investigated during the AM symbiosis. Expression profiles related to successful colonization of host roots were observed in interactions of G. intraradices with roots of wild-type Medicago truncatula (line J5) compared to the mycorrhiza-defective mutant dmi3/Mtsym13. Symbiotic fungal activity was monitored using stearoyl-CoA desaturase and phosphate transporter genes. Laser microdissection based-mapping of fungal gene expression in mycorrhizal root tissues indicated that the Ca(2+)-related genes were differentially upregulated in arbuscules and/or in intercellular hyphae. The spatio-temporal variations in gene expression suggest that the encoded proteins may have different functions in fungal development or function during symbiosis development. Full-length cDNA obtained for two genes with interesting expression profiles confirmed a close similarity with an endoplasmic reticulum P-type ATPase and a Vcx1-like vacuolar Ca(2+) ion transporter functionally characterized in other fungi and involved in the regulation of cell calcium pools. Possible mechanisms are discussed in which Ca(2+)-related proteins G. intraradices BEG141 may play a role in mobilization and perception of the intracellular messenger by the AM fungus during symbiotic interactions with host roots. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fungal pretreatment of straw for enhanced biogas yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xinmei; Pilar Castillo, Maria del; Schnuerer, Anna

    2013-07-01

    Among lignocellulosic materials from the agricultural sector, straw is considered to have the biggest potential as a biofuel and therefore also represents a big potential for biogas production. However, the degradation of lignocellulosic materials is somewhat restricted due to the high content of lignin that binds cellulose and hemicellulose and makes them unavailable for microbial degradation. Consequently, low methane yields are achieved. The biodegradability of the lignocellulosic material can be increased by a pretreatment. Optimally the pre-treatment should give an increase in the formation of sugars while avoiding the degradation or loss of carbohydrates and the formation of inhibitory by-products. The treatment should also be cost-effective. Different methods for pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material have been explored, for example thermal, acid, alkaline and oxidative pretreatments. However, they often have a high energy demand. Biological treatment with fungi represents an alternative method for pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials that could be comparably more environmentally friendly, easier to operate and with low energy input. The fungal groups of interest for lignocellulose degradation are the wood decaying fungi, such as the white-, brown-rot and cellulose degraders. The purpose with this work was to increase the biogas potential of straw by using a pretreatment with fungi. Straw was incubated with fungi at aerobic conditions under certain periods of time. The growth and colonization of the straw by the fungi was expected to increase the availability of the lignocellulosic structure of the straw and thus positively affect the biogas potential. In addition also, the spent lignocellulosic material from the cultivation of edible fungi was investigated. We hypothesized that also growth of edible fungi could give a more accessible material and thus give higher biogas potential compared to the substrate before fungal growth.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  19. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of ... limitations of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  4. Isolation from the Sorghum bicolor Mycorrhizosphere of a Bacterium Compatible with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Development and Antagonistic towards Soilborne Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, S. W.; van Tuinen, D.; Martinotti, G.; Gianinazzi, S.

    1999-01-01

    A gram-positive bacterium with antagonistic activity towards soilborne fungal pathogens has been isolated from the mycorrhizosphere of Sorghum bicolor inoculated with Glomus mosseae. It has been identified as Paenibacillus sp. strain B2 based on its analytical profile index and on 16S ribosomal DNA analysis. Besides having antagonistic activity, this bacterium stimulates mycorrhization. PMID:10543835

  5. Sensitization to Airborne Ascospores, Basidiospores, and Fungal Fragments in Allergic Rhinitis and Asthmatic Subjects in San Juan, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Mariani, Félix E.; Nazario-Jiménez, Sylvette; López-Malpica, Fernando; Bolaños-Rosero, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Background Fungal spores are the predominant biological particulate in the atmosphere of Puerto Rico, yet their potential as allergens has not been studied in subjects with respiratory allergies. The purpose of this study was to determine the level of sensitization of subjects with respiratory allergies to these particles. Methods Serum samples were drawn from 33 subjects with asthma, allergic rhinitis, or nonallergic rhinitis and 2 controls with different skin prick test reactivity. An MK-3 sampler was used to collect air samples and the reactivity of the sera to fungal particles was detected with a halogen immunoassay. Results All subjects reacted to at least 1 fungal particle. Thirty-one subjects reacted to ascospores, 29 to basidiospores, 19 to hyphae/fungal fragments, and 12 to mitospores. The median percentage of haloes in allergic rhinitis subjects was 4.82% while asthma or nonallergic rhinitis subjects had values of 1.09 and 0.39%, respectively. Subjects with skin prick tests positive to 3, 2, 1, or no extract had 5.24, 1.09, 1.61, and, 0.57% of haloed particles, respectively. If skin prick tests were positive to basidiomycetes, pollen, animals, or deuteromycetes, the percentages of haloes were 4.72, 4.15, 3.63, and 3.31%, respectively. Of all haloed particles, 46% were unidentified, 25% ascospores, 20% basidiospores, 7% hyphae/fungal fragments, and 2% mitospores. IgE levels and the number of positive skin prick test extracts correlated with the percentage of haloes. Conclusion In tropical environments, sensitization to airborne basidiomycetes, ascomycetes, and fungal fragments seems to be more prevalent than sensitization to mitospores in subjects with active allergies, suggesting a possible role in exacerbations of respiratory allergies. PMID:21346362

  6. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Zaragoza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  7. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  8. Fungal infections of Adonis vernalis L. fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljaljević-Grbić Milica V.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Yellow pheasant´s Eye is a herbaceous plant from dry ressy areas. Owing to habitat destruction and over- collection for ornamental and medical purposes A. vernalis L. has became scarce in central and south Europe. The reasons for A. vernalis threatened are manyfold. The low seeds germination rate is significant. According to our investigation the main cause of fruit destruction is fungal infection. From the surface of the fruits, collected in Deliblato Sands, the following micromycetes has been isolated and determinated: Fusarium solani (Mart Sacc., Fusarium sporotrichioides Sherb., Alternaria sp. and Drechslera sp. Histologycal analysis showed the presence of conidiomata and conidia Phoma sp. in the seeds.

  9. Fungal Adaptations to Mutualistic Life with Ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kooij, Pepijn Wilhelmus

    that forage on crude substrates such as insect frass and dry plant material, to large colonies of the leaf-cutting ants with several thousands to several million workers that provide live plant material to their fungus gardens. Leaf-cutting ants are the dominant herbivores of the Neo-tropics, and have a major...... on specific enzyme groups and Acromyrmex having an overall high enzyme activity. Finally, I show that the fungal symbiont of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior produces large amounts of biodegrading enzymes in special structures called gongylidia. The ants eat these structures, but enzymes pass...

  10. Fungal infections of the urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, J D; Vazquez, J A

    1999-12-01

    Funguria, fungal urinary tract infections, are most commonly caused by Candida species but may also be caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus species, and the endemic mycoses. Candiduria presents as an increasingly common nosocomial infection, which may involve all anatomic levels of the urinary tract, resulting in a spectrum of disease varying from asymptomatic candiduria to clinical sepsis. Although several successful systemic or local therapeutic options exist for the eradication of candiduria, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of candiduria has lagged. This has resulted in confusion among practitioners as to when antifungal therapy is indicated. Treatment guidelines have recently been formulated and are described herein.

  11. Plant genetics and interspecific competitive interactions determine ectomycorrhizal fungal community responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Catherine; Flores-Rentería, Dulce; Sthultz, Christopher M; Leonard, Tierra M; Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Whipple, Amy V; Whitham, Thomas G

    2014-03-01

    Although the importance of plant-associated microbes is increasingly recognized, little is known about the biotic and abiotic factors that determine the composition of that microbiome. We examined the influence of plant genetic variation, and two stressors, one biotic and one abiotic, on the ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal community of a dominant tree species, Pinus edulis. During three periods across 16 years that varied in drought severity, we sampled the EM fungal communities of a wild stand of P. edulis in which genetically based resistance and susceptibility to insect herbivory was linked with drought tolerance and the abundance of competing shrubs. We found that the EM fungal communities of insect-susceptible trees remained relatively constant as climate dried, while those of insect-resistant trees shifted significantly, providing evidence of a genotype by environment interaction. Shrub removal altered the EM fungal communities of insect-resistant trees, but not insect-susceptible trees, also a genotype by environment interaction. The change in the EM fungal community of insect-resistant trees following shrub removal was associated with greater shoot growth, evidence of competitive release. However, shrub removal had a 7-fold greater positive effect on the shoot growth of insect-susceptible trees than insect-resistant trees when shrub density was taken into account. Insect-susceptible trees had higher growth than insect-resistant trees, consistent with the hypothesis that the EM fungi associated with susceptible trees were superior mutualists. These complex, genetic-based interactions among species (tree-shrub-herbivore-fungus) argue that the ultimate impacts of climate change are both ecological and evolutionary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Superficial Fungal Infections in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Ülgen Altay

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Dermatophytes, yeasts and some moulds settle on the skin and mucosal surfaces in immunocompetent individuals as commensals. Patients with diabetes mellitus, HIV-positive patients, organ transplant recipients and the patients with malignancies are predisposed to develop superficial fungal infections. We aimed to determine the prevalence, clinical and mycological features of superficial fungal infections in patients with hematologic malignancies in this case-control study.Material and Method: Eighty patients with hematologic malignancies (49 men, 31 women and 50 healthy individuals (22 men, 28 women randomly selected at our clinical department as controls were included to this study between 2003 and 2004. The mean age was 52±1.85 years in patients and 41.56±2.04 years in controls. All patients were inspected for superficial fungal infections. Skin scrapings and mucosal swabs were obtained from the toe web, inguinal region, any suspicious lesion and oral mucosa. Nail samples were also collected. All samples were examined by direct microscopy and cultured in Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA. The yeasts were established in germ-tube production. Results: Fifty-six (70% of 80 patients with hematologic malignancies had fungal colonization, whereas 21 (42% of 50 controls had. For both groups, oral mucosa was the predominant area that fungus was mostly isolated from. A rising number of non-dermatophyte moulds (26% was observed. Candida albicans was the predominant agent isolated from the culture.Conclusion: The prevalence of superficial fungal infection was higher in patients with hematologic malignancies (being immunosuppressed than in the normal population. Candida albicans was the predominant isolated agent that was found in our study. We observed oral mucosa candidal infection mostly. The rising number of non-dermatophyte moulds is attributed to long-term use of antibiotics, cytotoxic chemotherapies and antifungals.

  13. Risk factors for early invasive fungal disease in critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurmeet; Pitoyo, Ceva Wicaksono; Aditianingsih, Dita; Rumende, Cleopas Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD) is increasing worldwide in the past two to three decades. Critically ill patients in Intensive Care Units are more vulnerable to fungal infection. Early detection and treatment are important to decrease morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Objective: Our study aimed to assess factors associated with early IFD in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted in critically ill patients, from March to September 2015. Total number of patients (74) in this study was drawn based on one of the risk factors (human immunodeficiency virus). Specimens were collected on day 5–7 of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was performed for factors, with P < 0.25 in bivariate analysis. Results: Two hundred and six patients were enrolled in this study. Seventy-four patients were with IFD, majority were males (52.7%), mean age was 58 years (range 18–79), mean Leon's score was 3 (score range 2–5), majority group was nonsurgical/nontrauma (72.9%), and mean fungal isolation was positive on day 5. Candida sp. (92.2%) is the most frquently isolated fungal infection. Urine culture yielded the highest number of fungal isolates (70.1%). Mortality rate in this study was 50%. In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus (DM) (P = 0.018, odds ratio 2.078, 95% confidence interval 1.135–3.803) was found as an independent factor associated with early IFD critically ill patients. Conclusion: DM is a significant factor for the incidence of early IFD in critically ill patients. PMID:27994377

  14. Risk factors for early invasive fungal disease in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurmeet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of invasive fungal disease (IFD is increasing worldwide in the past two to three decades. Critically ill patients in Intensive Care Units are more vulnerable to fungal infection. Early detection and treatment are important to decrease morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Objective: Our study aimed to assess factors associated with early IFD in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This prospective cohort study was conducted in critically ill patients, from March to September 2015. Total number of patients (74 in this study was drawn based on one of the risk factors (human immunodeficiency virus. Specimens were collected on day 5–7 of hospitalization. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression was performed for factors, with P< 0.25 in bivariate analysis. Results: Two hundred and six patients were enrolled in this study. Seventy-four patients were with IFD, majority were males (52.7%, mean age was 58 years (range 18–79, mean Leon's score was 3 (score range 2–5, majority group was nonsurgical/nontrauma (72.9%, and mean fungal isolation was positive on day 5. Candida sp. (92.2% is the most frquently isolated fungal infection. Urine culture yielded the highest number of fungal isolates (70.1%. Mortality rate in this study was 50%. In multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus (DM (P = 0.018, odds ratio 2.078, 95% confidence interval 1.135–3.803 was found as an independent factor associated with early IFD critically ill patients. Conclusion: DM is a significant factor for the incidence of early IFD in critically ill patients.

  15. Nuclear DNA Contents of Some Endemic Hedysarum L. Species

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear DNA contents and nuclear areas of some endemic Hedysarum L. species were investigated. A significant variation in the DNA content of Hedysarum species was established. The 2C nuclear DNA amount in the Hedysarum species (x = 8) ranged from approximately 4 to 6 picograms. It was found that the variation in the 2C nuclear DNA content was not related to chromosome numbers. However, there was a very high positive linear relationship between nuclear DNA content and nuclear area.

  16. Elevated atmospheric CO2 stimulates soil fungal diversity through increased fine root production in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, David A; Kuske, Cheryl R; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Oechel, Walter C

    2014-08-01

    Soil fungal communities are likely to be central in mediating microbial feedbacks to climate change through their effects on soil carbon (C) storage, nutrient cycling, and plant health. Plants often produce increased fine root biomass in response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ), but the responses of soil microbial communities are variable and uncertain, particularly in terms of species diversity. In this study, we describe the responses of the soil fungal community to free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) in a semiarid chaparral shrubland in Southern California (dominated by Adenomstoma fasciculatum) using large subunit rRNA gene sequencing. Community composition varied greatly over the landscape and responses to FACE were subtle, involving a few specific groups. Increased frequency of Sordariomycetes and Leotiomycetes, the latter including the Helotiales, a group that includes many dark septate endophytes known to associate positively with roots, was observed in the FACE plots. Fungal diversity, both in terms of richness and evenness, increased consistently in the FACE treatment, and was relatively high compared to other studies that used similar methods. Increases in diversity were observed across multiple phylogenetic levels, from genus to class, and were distributed broadly across fungal lineages. Diversity was also higher in samples collected close to (5 cm) plants compared to samples in canopy gaps (30 cm away from plants). Fungal biomass correlated well with soil organic matter (SOM) content, but patterns of diversity were correlated with fine root production rather than SOM. We conclude that the fungal community in this ecosystem is tightly linked to plant fine root production, and that future changes in the fungal community in response to elevated CO2 and other climatic changes will be primarily driven by changes in plant belowground allocation. Potential feedbacks mediated by soil fungi, such as soil C sequestration, nutrient cycling, and

  17. Seasonal Variation of Fungal Spores in Size-fractionated Ambient Particulate Matter in Beijing, China, Based on Molecular Tracer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L.; Engling, G.; He, K.

    2015-12-01

    Fungal aerosols were found to be the dominant fraction of biological aerosol components in the coarse mode in the atmosphere, influencing human health, the biosphere, atmospheric chemistry and climate. However, the total abundance of fungal spores in the atmosphere is rather uncertain and likely underestimated to a large extent by traditional Colony Forming Units (CFU) assays. Flow cytometry (FCM) was utilized in combination with fluorescent stains for the rapid counting of ambient fungal spores in this study. And, the sugar alcohols, mannitol and arabitol, proposed as molecular tracers for fungal aerosol were measured in PM2.5 and PM10 at an urban site in Beijing, China. The annual average concentrations of arabitol in PM2.5 and PM10 at the urban site were 7.4±9.4 ng m-3 and 21.0±20.4 ng m-3, and the respective mannitol concentrations were 10.3±9.5 ng m-3 and 31.9±26.9 ng m-3. Compared to PM2.5, the seasonal average concentrations of arabitol and mannitol in PM10 were varied more significantly. During summer and autumn higher arabitol and mannitol levels than during spring and winter were observed in coarse particles. Statistics analysis was further grouped into typical dry season (December 2010 to March 2011) and typical wet season (July 2011 to September 2011), revealed the different variation of fungal spores in different seasons. Moreover, the FCM results had significant positive correlation with the concentrations of the fungal tracers (R2 was 0.75 and 0.70 for arabitol and mannitol, respectively), supporting the utility of these sugar alcohols as effective fungal tracers.

  18. In vivo confocal microscopy appearance of Fusarium and Aspergillus species in fungal keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Jaya Devi; Prajna, Namperumalsamy Venkatesh; Larke, Natasha; Macleod, David; Srikanthi, Palepu; Lanjewar, Shruti; Shah, Manisha; Lalitha, Prajna; Elakkiya, Shanmugam; Burton, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    Clinical outcomes in fungal keratitis vary between Fusarium and Aspergillus spp, therefore distinguishing between species using morphological features such as filament branching angles, sporulation along filaments (adventitious sporulation) or dichotomous branching may be useful. In this study, we assessed these three features within Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) images from culture-positive Fusarium and Aspergillus spp keratitis participants. Prospective observational cohort study in Aravind Eye Hospital (February 2011-February 2012). Eligibility criteria: age ≥18 years, stromal infiltrate ≥3 mm diameter, Fusarium or Aspergillus spp culture-positive. previous/current herpetic keratitis, visual acuity 80% corneal thinning. IVCM was performed and images analysed for branch angle, presence/absence of adventitious sporulation or dichotomous branching by a grader masked to the microbiological diagnosis. 98 participants were included (106 eligible, 8 excluded as no measurable branch angles); 68 were positive for Fusarium spp, 30 for Aspergillus spp. Mean branch angle for Fusarium spp was 59.7° (95% CI 57.7° to 61.8°), and for Aspergillus spp was 63.3° (95% CI 60.8° to 65.8°), p=0.07. No adventitious sporulation was detected in Fusarium spp ulcers. Dichotomous branching was detected in 11 ulcers (7 Aspergillus spp, 4 Fusarium spp). There was very little difference in the branching angle of Fusarium and Aspergillus spp. Adventitious sporulation was not detected and dichotomous branching was infrequently seen. Although IVCM remains a valuable tool to detect fungal filaments in fungal keratitis, it cannot be used to distinguish Fusarium from Aspergillus spp and culture remains essential to determine fungal species. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Autophagy contributes to regulation of nuclear dynamics during vegetative growth and hyphal fusion in Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Ramos, Cristina; Roca, M Gabriela; Di Pietro, Antonio; Roncero, M Isabel G; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, vegetative hyphal fusion triggers nuclear mitotic division in the invading hypha followed by migration of a nucleus into the receptor hypha and degradation of the resident nucleus. Here we examined the role of autophagy in fusion-induced nuclear degradation. A search of the F. oxysporum genome database for autophagy pathway components identified putative orthologs of 16 core autophagy-related (ATG) genes in yeast, including the ubiquitin-like protein Atg8, which is required for the formation of autophagosomal membranes. F. oxysporum Foatg8Δ mutants were generated in a strain harboring H1-cherry fluorescent protein (ChFP)-labeled nuclei to facilitate analysis of nuclear dynamics. The Foatg8Δ mutants did not show MDC-positive staining in contrast to the wild type and the FoATG8-complemented (cFoATG8) strain, suggesting that FoAtg8 is required for autophagy in F. oxysporum. The Foatg8Δ strains displayed reduced rates of hyphal growth, conidiation, and fusion, and were significantly attenuated in virulence on tomato plants and in the nonvertebrate animal host Galleria mellonella. In contrast to wild-type hyphae, which are almost exclusively composed of uninucleated hyphal compartments, the hyphae of the Foatg8Δ mutants contained a significant fraction of hyphal compartments with 2 or more nuclei. The increase in the number of nuclei per hyphal compartment was particularly evident after hyphal fusion events. Time-lapse microscopy analyses revealed abnormal mitotic patterns during vegetative growth in the Foatg8Δ mutants. Our results suggest that autophagy mediates nuclear degradation after hyphal fusion and has a general function in the control of nuclear distribution in F. oxysporum.

  20. Land use practices and ectomycorrhizal fungal communities from oak woodlands dominated by Quercus suber L. considering drought scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azul, Anabela Marisa; Sousa, João Paulo; Agerer, Reinhard; Martín, María P; Freitas, Helena

    2010-02-01

    Oak woodlands in the Mediterranean basin have been traditionally converted into agro-silvo-pastoral systems and exemplified sustainable land use in Europe. In Portugal, in line with the trend of other European countries, profound changes in management options during the twentieth century have led to landscape simplification. Landscapes are dynamic and the knowledge of future management planning combining biological conservation and soil productivity is needed, especially under the actual scenarios of drought and increasing evidence of heavy oak mortality. We examined the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal community associated with cork oak in managed oak woodlands (called montado) under different land use practices, during summer. ECM fungal richness and abundance were assessed in 15 stands established in nine montados located in the Alentejo region (southern Portugal), using morphotyping and ITS rDNA analysis. Parameters related to the montados landscape characteristics, land use history over the last 25 years, climatic and edaphic conditions were taken into account. Fifty-five ECM fungal taxa corresponding to the most abundant fungal symbionts were distinguished on cork oak roots. Cenococcum geophilum and the families Russulaceae and Thelephoraceae explained 56% of the whole ECM fungal community; other groups were represented among the community: Cortinariaceae, Boletaceae, Amanita, Genea, Pisolithus, Scleroderma, and Tuber. There were pronounced differences in ECM fungal community structure among the 15 montados stands: C. geophilum was the only species common to all stands, tomentelloid and russuloid species were detected in 87-93% of the stands, Cortinariaceae was detected in 60% of the stands, and the other groups were more unequally distributed. Ordination analysis revealed that ECM fungal richness was positively correlated with the silvo-pastoral exploitation regime and low mortality of cork oak, while ECM fungal abundance was positively correlated with extensive