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Sample records for fundamental mechanism underlying

  1. Fundamental Mechanisms Affecting Friction Welding under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    z Professor Koichi Masubuchi Ocean Engineering Dept., Thesis Supervisor ~Certified by - CProfessor Ltmest Rabinowicz Mechanical Engineering Dept...welding and oxide layer affects. 60 REFERENCES 1. Rabinowicz ,E., "Friction and Wear of Materials", Wiley, 1964 2. SmithM., "Effect of Vacuum on the...Professor ELnest Rabinowicz Mechanical Engineering Dept., Thesis Reader Accepted by- 14,~/G 1, ~ Z a- ’A. Douglas Carn-chtir,-hirman Departmental Graduate

  2. Fundamental study of failure mechanisms of pressure vessels under thermo-mechanical cycling in multiphase environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penso Mula, Jorge Antonio

    Cracking and bulging in welded and internally lined pressure vessels that work in thermal-mechanical cycling services have been well known problems in the petrochemical, power and nuclear industries. Published literature and industry surveys show that similar problems have been occurring during the last 50 years. Understanding the causes of cracking and bulging would lead to improvements in the reliability of these pressure vessels. This study attempts to add information required for improving the knowledge and fundamental understanding of these problems. Cracking and bulging, most often in the weld areas, commonly experienced in delayed coking units (e.g. coke drums) in oil refineries are typical examples. The coke drum was selected for this study because of the existing field experience and past industrial investigation results that were available to serve as the baseline references for the analytical studies performed for this dissertation. Another reason for selecting the delayed coking units for this study was due to their high economical yields. Shutting down these units would cause a high negative economic impact on the refinery operations. Several failure mechanisms were hypothesized. The finite element method was used to analyze these significant variables and to verify the hypotheses. In conclusion, a fundamental explanation of the occurrence of bulging and cracking in pressure vessels in multiphase environments has been developed. Several important factors have been identified, including the high convection coefficient of the boiling layer during filling and quenching, the mismatch in physical, thermal and mechanical properties in the dissimilar weld of the clad plates and process conditions such as heating and quenching rate and warming time. Material selection for coke drums should consider not only fatigue strength but also corrosion resistance at high temperatures and low temperatures. Cracking occurs due to low cycle fatigue and corrosion. The FEA

  3. Fundamentals of continuum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rudnicki, John W

    2014-01-01

    A concise introductory course text on continuum mechanics Fundamentals of Continuum Mechanics focuses on the fundamentals of the subject and provides the background for formulation of numerical methods for large deformations and a wide range of material behaviours. It aims to provide the foundations for further study, not just of these subjects, but also the formulations for much more complex material behaviour and their implementation computationally.  This book is divided into 5 parts, covering mathematical preliminaries, stress, motion and deformation, balance of mass, momentum and energ

  4. Fundamentals of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    House, J E

    2017-01-01

    Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics, Third Edition is a clear and detailed introduction to quantum mechanics and its applications in chemistry and physics. All required math is clearly explained, including intermediate steps in derivations, and concise review of the math is included in the text at appropriate points. Most of the elementary quantum mechanical models-including particles in boxes, rigid rotor, harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, hydrogen atom-are clearly and completely presented. Applications of these models to selected “real world” topics are also included. This new edition includes many new topics such as band theory and heat capacity of solids, spectroscopy of molecules and complexes (including applications to ligand field theory), and small molecules of astrophysical interest.

  5. CO2 sequestration in deep coal seams: experimental characterization of the fundamental underlying mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, R.; Mazzotti, M.

    2012-04-01

    The process of injecting and storing carbon dioxide (CO2) into suitable deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers, (depleted) oil or gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal seams, is referred to as CO2 sequestration. In little more than a decade, this technology has emerged as one of the most important options for reducing CO2 emissions. Among the different options, unmineable coal seams are not as broadly distributed as saline aquifers or oil/gas reservoirs, but their peculiarity resides in the proven capacity of retaining significant amount of gas (mainly methane, CH4) for a very long time. Additionally, the injection of CO2 into the coal reservoir would enhance the recovery of this natural gas, a source of energy that will most likely play a key role in the power sector over the next 20 years from now. This process is called Enhanced Coal Bed Methane (ECBM) recovery and, as for enhanced oil recovery, it allows in principle offsetting the costs associated to the storage operation. A study was undertaken aimed at the experimental characterization of the fundamental mechanisms that take place during the process of injection and storage in coal reservoirs, namely adsorption and swelling (Pini et al 2010), and of their effects on the coal's permeability (Pini et al. 2009), the property that plays a dominant role in controlling fluid transport in a porous rock. An apparatus has been built that allows measuring the permeability of rock cores under typical reservoir conditions (high pressure and temperature) by the so-called transient step method. For this study, a coal core from the Sulcis coal mine in Sardinia (Italy) has been used. In the experiments, an inert gas (helium) was used to investigate the effects of the effective pressure on the permeability of the coal sample, whereas two adsorbing gases (CO2 and N2) to quantify those of adsorption and swelling. The experiments have been interpreted by a one-dimensional model that describes the fluid transport

  6. Fundamental mechanism underlying subwavelength optics of metamaterials: Charge oscillation-induced light emission and interference

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, X R; Wang, Mu

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between light and conducting nanostructures can result in a variety of novel and fascinating phenomena. These properties may have wide applications, but their underlying mechanisms have not been completely understood. From calculations of surface charge density waves on conducting gratings and by comparing them with classical surface plasmons, we revealed a general yet concrete picture about coupling of light to free electron oscillation on structured conducting surfaces that can lead to oscillating subwavelength charge patterns (i.e., spoof surface plasmons but without the dispersion property of classical surface plasmons). New wavelets emitted from these light sources then destructively interfere to form evanescent waves. This principle, usually combined with other mechanisms (e.g. resonance), is mainly a geometrical effect that can be universally involved in light scattering from all periodic and nonperiodic structures containing free electrons, including perfect conductors. The spoof surface ...

  7. Quantum mechanics I the fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, S

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Mechanics I: The Fundamentals provides a graduate-level account of the behavior of matter and energy at the molecular, atomic, nuclear, and sub-nuclear levels. It covers basic concepts, mathematical formalism, and applications to physically important systems.

  8. Fundamental mechanisms of micromachine reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; REDMOND,JAMES M.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; MAYER,THOMAS K.

    2000-01-01

    independent of RH up to a threshold value, depending on the coating chemistry. The mechanism for the adhesion increase beyond this threshold value is that the coupling agent reconfigures from a surface to a bulk phase (Chapter 3). To investigate the details of how the adhesion increase occurs, the authors developed the mechanics for adhesion hysteresis measurements. These revealed that near-crack tip compression is the underlying cause of the adhesion increase (Chapter 4). A vacuum deposition chamber for silane coupling agent deposition was constructed. Results indicate that vapor deposited coatings are less susceptible to degradation at high RH (Chapter 5). To address issues relating to surfaces in relative motion, a new test structure to measure friction was developed. In contrast to other surface micromachined friction test structures, uniform apparent pressure is applied in the frictional contact zone (Chapter 6). The test structure will enable friction studies over a large pressure and dynamic range. In this LDRD project, the authors established an infrastructure for MEMS adhesion and friction metrology. They then characterized in detail the performance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic films under humid conditions, and determined mechanisms which limit this performance. These studies contribute to a fundamental understanding for MEMS reliability design rules. They also provide valuable data for MEMS packaging requirements.

  9. Fluid mechanics fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cengel, Yunus

    2013-01-01

    Cengel and Cimbala's Fluid Mechanics Fundamentals and Applications, communicates directly with tomorrow's engineers in a simple yet precise manner. The text covers the basic principles and equations of fluid mechanics in the context of numerous and diverse real-world engineering examples. The text helps students develop an intuitive understanding of fluid mechanics by emphasizing the physics, using figures, numerous photographs and visual aids to reinforce the physics. The highly visual approach enhances the learning of Fluid mechanics by students. This text distinguishes itself from others by the way the material is presented - in a progressive order from simple to more difficult, building each chapter upon foundations laid down in previous chapters. In this way, even the traditionally challenging aspects of fluid mechanics can be learned effectively. McGraw-Hill is also proud to offer ConnectPlus powered by Maple with the third edition of Cengel/Cimbabla, Fluid Mechanics. This innovative and powerful new sy...

  10. BOOK REVIEWS: Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, A.

    2004-02-01

    mechanics, which is assumed, but to examine whether it gives a consistent account of measurement. The conclusion is that after a measurement, interference terms are ‘effectively’ absent; the set of ‘one-to-one correlations between states of the apparatus and the object’ has the same form as that of everyday statistics and is thus a probability distribution. This probability distribution refers to potentialities, only one of which is actually realized in any one trial. Opinions may differ on whether their treatment is any less vulnerable to criticisms such as those of Bell. To sum up, Gottfried and Yan’s book contains a vast amount of knowledge and understanding. As well as explaining the way in which quantum theory works, it attempts to illuminate fundamental aspects of the theory. A typical example is the ‘fable’ elaborated in Gottfried’s article in Nature cited above, that if Newton were shown Maxwell’s equations and the Lorentz force law, he could deduce the meaning of E and B, but if Maxwell were shown Schrödinger’s equation, he could not deduce the meaning of Psi. For use with a well-constructed course (and, of course, this is the avowed purpose of the book; a useful range of problems is provided for each chapter), or for the relative expert getting to grips with particular aspects of the subject or aiming for a deeper understanding, the book is certainly ideal. It might be suggested, though, that, even compared to the first edition, the isolated learner might find the wide range of topics, and the very large number of mathematical and conceptual techniques, introduced in necessarily limited space, somewhat overwhelming. The second book under consideration, that of Schwabl, contains ‘Advanced’ elements of quantum theory; it is designed for a course following on from one for which Gottfried and Yan, or Schwabl’s own `Quantum Mechanics' might be recommended. It is the second edition in English, and is a translation of the third German edition

  11. Fundamental fluid mechanics and magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hosking, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    This book is primarily intended to enable postgraduate research students to enhance their understanding and expertise in Fluid Mechanics and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), subjects no longer treated in isolation. The exercises throughout the book often serve to provide additional and quite significant knowledge or to develop selected mathematical skills, and may also fill in certain details or enhance readers’ understanding of essential concepts. A previous background or some preliminary reading in either of the two core subjects would be advantageous, and prior knowledge of multivariate calculus and differential equations is expected.

  12. DOE fundamentals handbook: Mechanical science. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The Mechanical Science Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of mechanical components and mechanical science. The handbook includes information diesel engines, heat exchangers, pumps, valves, and miscellaneous mechanical components. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the construction and operation of mechanical components that are associated with various DOE nuclear facility operations and maintenance.

  13. Quantum Mechanics Fundamentals and Applications to Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Jasprit

    1996-01-01

    Explore the relationship between quantum mechanics and information-age applications. This volume takes an altogether unique approach to quantum mechanics. Providing an in-depth exposition of quantum mechanics fundamentals, it shows how these concepts are applied to most of today's information technologies, whether they are electronic devices or materials. No other text makes this critical, essential leap from theory to real-world applications. The book's lively discussion of the mathematics involved fits right in with contemporary multidisciplinary trends in education: Once the basic formulati

  14. Calculations in fundamental physics mechanics and heat

    CERN Document Server

    Heddle, T

    2013-01-01

    Calculations in Fundamental Physics, Volume I: Mechanics and Heat focuses on the mechanisms of heat. The manuscript first discusses motion, including parabolic, angular, and rectilinear motions, relative velocity, acceleration of gravity, and non-uniform acceleration. The book then discusses combinations of forces, such as polygons and resolution, friction, center of gravity, shearing force, and bending moment. The text looks at force and acceleration, energy and power, and machines. Considerations include momentum, horizontal or vertical motion, work and energy, pulley systems, gears and chai

  15. Specker's fundamental principle of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, Adan

    2012-01-01

    I draw attention to the fact that three recently proposed physical principles, namely "local orthogonality", "global exclusive disjunction", and "compatible orthogonality" are not new principles, but different versions of a principle that Ernst Specker noticed long ago. I include a video of Specker stating this principle in 2009 in the following terms: "Do you know what, according to me, is the fundamental theorem of quantum mechanics? (...) That is, if you have several questions and you can answer any two of them, then you can also answer all of them". I overview some results that suggest that Specker's principle may be of fundamental importance for explaining quantum contextuality. Specker passed away in December 10, 2011, at the age of 91.

  16. Are All Probabilities Fundamentally Quantum Mechanical?

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Rajat Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The subjective and the objective aspects of probabilities are incorporated in a simple duality axiom inspired by observer participation in quantum theory. Transcending the classical notion of probabilities, it is proposed and demonstrated that all probabilities may be fundamentally quantum mechanical in the sense that they may all be derived from the corresponding amplitudes. The classical coin-toss and the quantum double slit interference experiments are discussed as illustrative prototype examples. Absence of multi-order quantum interference effects in multiple-slit experiments and the Experimental tests of complementarity in Wheeler's delayed-choice type experiments are explained using the involvement of the observer.

  17. Nonrelativistic Quantum Mechanics with Fundamental Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkyan, Ashot S.

    2011-03-01

    Spontaneous transitions between bound states of an atomic system, "Lamb Shift" of energy levels and many other phenomena in real nonrelativistic quantum systems are connected within the influence of the quantum vacuum fluctuations ( fundamental environment (FE)) which are impossible to consider in the limits of standard quantum-mechanical approaches. The joint system "quantum system (QS) + FE" is described in the framework of the stochastic differential equation (SDE) of Langevin-Schrödinger (L-Sch) type, and is defined on the extended space R 3 ⊗ R { ξ}, where R 3 and R { ξ} are the Euclidean and functional spaces, respectively. The density matrix for single QS in FE is defined. The entropy of QS entangled with FE is defined and investigated in detail. It is proved that as a result of interaction of QS with environment there arise structures of various topologies which are a new quantum property of the system.

  18. Fundamental Material Properties Underlying Solid Oxide Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Hansen, Karin Vels; Holtappels, Peter

    2012-01-01

    and electronic conductor (MIEC) the electrode is. Selected examples of literature studies of specific electrodes in solid oxide cells (SOC) are discussed. The reported effects of impurities - both impurities in the electrode materials and in the gases – point to high reactivity and mobility of materials...... in the TPB region. Also, segregations to the surfaces and interfaces of the electrode materials, which may affect the electrode reaction mechanism, are very dependent on the exact history of fabrication and operation. The positive effects of even small concentrations of nanoparticles in the electrodes may...

  19. Fundamental Material Properties Underlying Solid Oxide Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Hansen, Karin Vels; Holtappels, Peter

    2012-01-01

    and electronic conductor (MIEC) the electrode is. Selected examples of literature studies of specific electrodes in solid oxide cells (SOC) are discussed. The reported effects of impurities - both impurities in the electrode materials and in the gases – point to high reactivity and mobility of materials...... place. The length of the TPB is a key factor even though the width and depth of the zone, in which the rate limiting reactions take place, may vary depending of the degree of the electrode materials ability to conduct both electrons and ions, i.e. the TPB zone volume depends on how good a mixed ionic...... in the TPB region. Also, segregations to the surfaces and interfaces of the electrode materials, which may affect the electrode reaction mechanism, are very dependent on the exact history of fabrication and operation. The positive effects of even small concentrations of nanoparticles in the electrodes may...

  20. Fundamentals of the mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Mariano, Paolo Maria

    2015-01-01

    This distinctive textbook aims to introduce readers to the basic structures of the mechanics of deformable bodies, with a special emphasis on the description of the elastic behavior of simple materials and structures composed by elastic beams.  The authors take a deductive rather than inductive approach and start from a few first, foundational principles.  A wide selection of exercises, many with hints and solutions, are provided throughout and organized in a way that will allow readers to form a link between abstract mathematical concepts and real-world applications. The text begins with the definition of bodies and deformations, keeping the kinematics of rigid bodies as a special case; the authors also distinguish between material and spatial metrics, defining each one in the pertinent space.  Subsequent chapters cover observers and classes of possible changes; forces, torques, and related balances, which are derived from the invariance under classical changes in observers of the power of the external ...

  1. Theoretical and quantum mechanics fundamentals for chemists

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Provides the basics of theoretical and quantum mechanics in one place and emphasizes the continuity between themUniquely presented to be used for self-taught courses covering theoretical and quantum mechanicsEach chapter includes a detailed outline, a summary, self-assessment questions for which answers can be found in the textInvaluable for chemistry undergraduate and graduate students, chemists, other non-physical scientists, engineering students of modern techniques and technology, specialists who need a better understanding of quantum mechanics.

  2. Fundamentals of machine theory and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Simón Mata, Antonio; Cabrera Carrillo, Juan Antonio; Ezquerro Juanco, Francisco; Guerra Fernández, Antonio Jesús; Nadal Martínez, Fernando; Ortiz Fernández, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic contents for an introductory course in Mechanism and Machine Theory. The topics dealt with are: kinematic and dynamic analysis of machines, introduction to vibratory behaviour, rotor and piston balance, kinematics of gears, ordinary and planetary gear trains and synthesis of planar mechanisms. A new approach to dimensional synthesis of mechanisms based on turning functions has been added for closed and open path generation using an optimization method based on evolutionary algorithms. The text, developed by a group of experts in kinematics and dynamics of mechanisms at the University of Málaga, Spain, is clear and is supported by more than 350 images. More than 60 outlined and explained problems have been included to clarify the theoretical concepts. .

  3. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  4. Continuum mechanics using Mathematica fundamentals, methods, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This textbook's methodological approach familiarizes readers with the mathematical tools required to correctly define and solve problems in continuum mechanics. Covering essential principles and fundamental applications, this second edition of Continuum Mechanics using Mathematica® provides a solid basis for a deeper study of more challenging and specialized problems related to nonlinear elasticity, polar continua, mixtures, piezoelectricity, ferroelectricity, magneto-fluid mechanics, and state changes (see A. Romano, A. Marasco, Continuum Mechanics: Advanced Topics and Research Trends, Springer (Birkhäuser), 2010, ISBN 978-0-8176-4869-5). Key topics and features: * Concise presentation strikes a balance between fundamentals and applications * Requisite mathematical background carefully collected in two introductory chapters and one appendix * Recent developments highlighted through coverage of more significant applications to areas such as wave propagation, fluid mechanics, porous media, linear elasticity....

  5. Fundamental phenomena of quantum mechanics explored with neutron interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Klepp, J.; Sponar, S.; Hasegawa, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing fascination with quantum mechanics keeps driving the development of the wide field of quantum-optics, including its neutron-optics branch. Application of neutron-optical methods and, especially, neutron interferometry and polarimetry has a long-standing tradition for experimental investigations of fundamental quantum phenomena. We give an overview of related experimental efforts made in recent years.

  6. Fundamentals of robotic mechanical systems theory, methods, and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Angeles, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    The 4th edition includes updated and additional examples and exercises on the core fundamental concepts of mechanics, robots, and kinematics of serial robots. New images of CAD models and physical robots help to motivate concepts being introduced. Each chapter of the book can be read independetly of others as it addresses a seperate issue in robotics.

  7. 2006 Fundamental Research Underlying Solid-State Lighting: Contractors Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering; Kini, Arvind [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering; Kelley, Dick [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering

    2006-02-01

    This volume highlights the scientific content of the 2006 Fundamental Research Underlying Solid-State Lighting Contractors Meeting sponsored by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering (DMS&E) in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This meeting is the second in a series of research theme-based Contractors Meetings and will focus on BES/DMS&E-funded research that underpins solid-state lighting technology. The meeting will feature research that cuts across several DMS&E core research program areas. The major programmatic emphasis is on developing a fundamental scientific base, in terms of new concepts and new materials that could be used or mimicked in designing novel materials, processes or devices.

  8. Fundamental scaling properties of electro-mechanical switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, A. W.; Grogg, D.; Despont, M.; Duerig, U.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss the fundamental processes including electron conduction and adhesion of metallic contacts pertaining to the scaling of the performance metrics of nano-electro-mechanical switches. In particular, we show that under most circumstances, the switching energy is governed by the force that is needed in order to break the electrical contact when opening the switch. For an optimally designed parallel plate capacitor switch, the energy consumption does not depend on the actuation voltage. However, stray capacitances degrade the energy efficiency if a high operating voltage is chosen. The limit is of the order of 1 V for an aggressively scaled Si device, for which an overall switching energy of the order of 150 eV, a footprint area of 2500 nm2 and a switching time of 200 ps are predicted. The scaling analysis also stipulates that materials with a low free electron density and high effective mass should be used for the electrical contact, which is counter-intuitive, as such materials are known to be poor conductors on the macroscopic scale.

  9. Finnie's notes on fracture mechanics fundamental and practical lessons

    CERN Document Server

    Dharan, C K H; Finnie, Iain

    2016-01-01

    This textbook consists primarily of notes by Iain Finnie who taught a popular course on fracture mechanics at the University of California at Berkeley. It presents a comprehensive and detailed exposition of fracture, the fundamentals of fracture mechanics and procedures for the safe design of engineering components made from metal alloys, brittle materials like glasses and ceramics, and composites. Interesting and practical problems are listed at the end of most chapters to give the student practice in applying the theory. A solutions manual is provided to the instructor. The text presents a unified perspective of fracture with a strong fundamental foundation and practical applications. In addition to its role as a text, this reference would be invaluable for the practicing engineer who is involved in the design and evaluation of components that are fracture critical. This book also: Presents details of derivations of the basic equations of fracture mechanics and the historical context of the development of f...

  10. Riskfactors and underlying mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Childhood interpersonal traumatizations increase the risk for revictimizations as well as for psychological disorders like the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Different variables and mechanisms underlying revictimization are discussed in current literature. However, empiri-cal data on revictimization is poor and inconsistant. Guilt and shame following traumatic events are considered as risk factors for the development and persistence of PTSD. PTSD is frequently associated with trauma-re...

  11. Information hiding in communication networks fundamentals, mechanisms, applications, and countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Mazurczyk, Wojciech; Zander, Sebastian; Houmansadr, Amir; Szczypiorski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Describes Information Hiding in communication networks, and highlights their important issues, challenges, trends, and applications. This book provides the fundamental concepts, terminology, and classifications of information hiding in communication networks along with its historical background. Information Hiding In Communication Networks: Fundamentals, Mechanisms, Applications, and Countermeasures begins with introducing data concealment methods and their evolution. Chapter two discusses the existing terminology and describes the model for hidden communication and related communication scenarios. Chapters three to five present the main classes of information hiding in communication networks accompanied by a discussion of their robustness and undetectability. The book concludes with a discussion of potential countermeasures against information hiding techniques, which includes different types of mechanisms for the detection, limitation and prevention of covert co munication channels.

  12. Fundamental Complex Plasma Research on Ground and under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hubertus; Fortov, Vladimir; Thoma, Markus; Pustylnik, Mikhail; Lipaev, Andrey; Morfill, Gregor; Molotkov, Vladimir; Usachev, Alexander; Nosenko, Vladimir; Fink, Martin; Petrov, Oleg; Rubin-Zuzic, Milenko

    2016-07-01

    Complex (dusty) plasma is plasma containing small solid particles in the sub-mm range. Those "dust" particles are highly charged due to the collection of electrons and ions and they interact electrostatically. Depending on the charge, density, and kinetic temperature of the particles, the interaction may be strong leading to collective effects and the emergence of liquid or solid behavior. In that sense complex plasmas are perfect model systems for the investigation of fundamental processes in classical condensed matter physics since their constituent mesoscopic particles are individually observable and can be regarded as classically interacting "proxy atoms". The term "complex plasmas" is widely used in the literature to distinguish dusty plasmas composed of a weakly ionized gas and charged microparticles specially "designed" for investigations in classical condensed matter, from naturally occurring systems. Gravity influences the complex plasma, the microparticles sediment and stable systems can only be achieved through counteracting gravity with other volume forces, e.g. electric or thermophoretic force. This allows producing two-dimensional - monolayer - systems, or three-dimensional systems under stress. Only under weightlessness conditions, large and homogeneous 3D systems can be formed. Although phenomena in classical condensed matter physics are in the forefront of complex plasma research the basic know-how gained from experiments, theory and numerical simulations can be of importance for the understanding of naturally occurring dusty plasmas in space. Thus, in this presentation I will show recent work on complex plasmas from the ground and first results from the PK-4 facility onboard the International Space Station ISS. Acknowledgements: We would like to acknowledge the joint ESA-ROSCOSMOS Experiment «Plasma Kristall-4» onboard the International Space Station ISS. This work is partly supported by DLR grant 50WM1441/ 50WM1442 and by the Russian Science

  13. Fundamentals of undervoltage breakdown through the Townsend mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, James E.

    The conditions under which an externally supplied pulse of electrons will induce breakdown in an undervoltaged, low-gain, DC discharge gap are experimentally and theoretically explored. The phenomenon is relevant to fundamental understanding of breakdown physics, to switching applications such as triggered spark gaps and discharge initiation in pulsed-plasma thrusters, and to gas-avalanche particle counters. A dimensionless theoretical description of the phenomenon is formulated and solved numerically. It is found that a significant fraction of the charge on the plates must be injected for breakdown to be achieved at low avalanche-ionization gain, when an electron undergoes fewer than approximately 10 ionizing collisions during one gap transit. It is also found that fewer injected electrons are required as the gain due to electron-impact ionization (alpha process) is increased, or as the sensitivity of the alpha process to electric field is enhanced by decreasing the reduced electric field (electric field divided by pressure, E/p). A predicted insensitivity to ion mobility implies that breakdown is determined during the first electron avalanche when space charge distortion is greatest. A dimensionless, theoretical study of the development of this avalanche reveals a critical value of the reduced electric field to be the value at the Paschen curve minimum divided by 1.6. Below this value, the net result of the electric field distortion is to increase ionization for subsequent avalanches, making undervoltage breakdown possible. Above this value, ionization for subsequent avalanches will be suppressed and undervoltage breakdown is not possible. Using an experimental apparatus in which ultraviolet laser pulses are directed onto a photo-emissive cathode of a parallel-plate discharge gap, it is found that undervoltage breakdown can occur through a Townsend-like mechanism through the buildup of successively larger avalanche generations. The minimum number of injected

  14. 47 CFR 36.2 - Fundamental principles underlying procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....e., operator systems, switching plant, truck equipment and subscriber plant. Subscriber plant...-kilometers is the basic fundamental allocation factor for interexchange circuit plant and exchange...

  15. Mechanisms underlying uremic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaini, Giselli; Ferreira, Gabriela Kozuchovski; Streck, Emilio Luiz

    2010-06-01

    In patients with renal failure, encephalopathy is a common problem that may be caused by uremia, thiamine deficiency, dialysis, transplant rejection, hypertension, fluid and electrolyte disturbances or drug toxicity. In general, encephalopathy presents with a symptom complex progressing from mild sensorial clouding to delirium and coma. This review discusses important issues regarding the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy. The pathophysiology of uremic encephalopathy up to now is uncertain, but several factors have been postulated to be involved; it is a complex and probably multifactorial process. Hormonal disturbances, oxidative stress, accumulation of metabolites, imbalance in excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, and disturbance of the intermediary metabolism have been identified as contributing factors. Despite continuous therapeutic progress, most neurological complications of uremia, like uremic encephalopathy, fail to fully respond to dialysis and many are elicited or aggravated by dialysis or renal transplantation. On the other hand, previous studies showed that antioxidant therapy could be used as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of these neurological complications.

  16. Fundamentals of physics II electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, R

    2016-01-01

    R. Shankar, a well-known physicist and contagiously enthusiastic educator, was among the first to offer a course through the innovative Open Yale Course program. His popular online video lectures on introductory physics have been viewed over a million times. In this second book based on his online Yale course, Shankar explains essential concepts, including electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. The book begins at the simplest level, develops the basics, and reinforces fundamentals, ensuring a solid foundation in the principles and methods of physics. It provides an ideal introduction for college-level students of physics, chemistry, and engineering; for motivated AP Physics students; and for general readers interested in advances in the sciences.

  17. Fundamental Entangling Operators in Quantum Mechanics and Their Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao-Ming, Lu

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, we introduce so-called fundamental entangling operators e^{iQ1 P2} and e^{iP1 Q2 } for composing bipartite entangled states of continuum variables, where Q i and P i ( i = 1, 2) are coordinate and momentum operator, respectively. We then analyze how these entangling operators naturally appear in the quantum image of classical quadratic coordinate transformation ( q 1, q 2) → ( A q 1 + B q 2, C q 1 + D q 2), where A D- B C = 1, which means even the basic coordinate transformation ( Q 1, Q 2) → ( A Q 1 + B Q 2, C Q 1 + D Q 2) involves entangling mechanism. We also analyse their Lie algebraic properties and use the integration technique within an ordered product of operators to show they are also one- and two- mode combinatorial squeezing operators.

  18. A taxonomy for mechanical ventilation: 10 fundamental maxims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatburn, Robert L; El-Khatib, Mohamad; Mireles-Cabodevila, Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    The American Association for Respiratory Care has declared a benchmark for competency in mechanical ventilation that includes the ability to "apply to practice all ventilation modes currently available on all invasive and noninvasive mechanical ventilators." This level of competency presupposes the ability to identify, classify, compare, and contrast all modes of ventilation. Unfortunately, current educational paradigms do not supply the tools to achieve such goals. To fill this gap, we expand and refine a previously described taxonomy for classifying modes of ventilation and explain how it can be understood in terms of 10 fundamental constructs of ventilator technology: (1) defining a breath, (2) defining an assisted breath, (3) specifying the means of assisting breaths based on control variables specified by the equation of motion, (4) classifying breaths in terms of how inspiration is started and stopped, (5) identifying ventilator-initiated versus patient-initiated start and stop events, (6) defining spontaneous and mandatory breaths, (7) defining breath sequences (8), combining control variables and breath sequences into ventilatory patterns, (9) describing targeting schemes, and (10) constructing a formal taxonomy for modes of ventilation composed of control variable, breath sequence, and targeting schemes. Having established the theoretical basis of the taxonomy, we demonstrate a step-by-step procedure to classify any mode on any mechanical ventilator.

  19. Fundamental Studies of Fluid Mechanics: Stability in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George M. Homsy

    2005-04-28

    This work has been concerned with theoretical, computational and experimental studies of a variety of flow and transport problems that are of generic interest and applicability in energy-related and energy-intensive processes. These include the following. (1) Problems associated with oil recovery: the global economy continues to be dependent on the stable and predictable supply of oil and fossil fuels. This will remain the case for the near term, as current estimates are that world production of oil will peak between 2025 and 2100, depending on assumptions regarding growth. Most of these resources reside in porous rocks and other naturally occurring media. Studies of flow-induced instabilities are relevant to the areas of secondary and enhanced oil recovery. (2) Small scale and Stokes flows: flows in microgeometries and involving interfaces and surfactants are of interest in a myriad of energy-related contexts. These include: pore-level modeling of the fundamental processes by which oil held in porous materials is mobilized and produced; heating and cooling energy cycles involving significant expenditure of energy in conditioning of human environments, heat pipes, and compact heat exchangers; and energy efficiency in large scale separation processes such as distillation and absorption-processes that underlie the chemical process industries. (3) Coating flows: these are of interest in information technologies, including the manufacture of integrated circuits and data storage and retrieval devices. It is estimated that 50-70% of the starting raw materials and intermediate devices in information technology processes must be discarded as a result of imperfections and failure to meet specifications. These in turn are often the result of the inability to control fluid-mechanical processes and flow instabilities. Our work over the grant period is primarily fundamental in nature. We are interested in establishing general principles and behaviors that relate to a variety of

  20. Fundamental principles of classical mechanics a geometrical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Kai S

    2014-01-01

    This book is written with the belief that classical mechanics, as a theoretical discipline, possesses an inherent beauty, depth, and richness that far transcends its immediate applications in mechanical systems. These properties are manifested, by and large, through the coherence and elegance of the mathematical structure underlying the discipline, and are eminently worthy of being communicated to physics students at the earliest stage possible. This volume is therefore addressed mainly to advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate physics students who are interested in the application of modern mathematical methods in classical mechanics, in particular, those derived from the fields of topology and differential geometry, and also to the occasional mathematics student who is interested in important physics applications of these areas of mathematics. Its main purpose is to offer an introductory and broad glimpse of the majestic edifice of the mathematical theory of classical dynamics, not only in the time-h...

  1. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics with consideration of influence of fundamental environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorkyan, A. S., E-mail: g_ashot@sci.am [NAS of Armenia, Institute for Informatics and Automation Problems (Armenia)

    2013-08-15

    Spontaneous transitions between bound states of an atomic system, the 'Lamb Shift' of energy levels and many other phenomena in real nonrelativistic quantum systems are connected with the influence of the quantum vacuum fluctuations (fundamental environment (FE)), which are impossible to consider in the framework of standard quantum-mechanical approaches. The joint system quantum system (QS) and FE is described in the framework of the stochastic differential equation (SDE) of Langevin-Schroedinger type and is defined on the extended space Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup 3} Circled-Times {Xi}{sup n}, where Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup 3} and {Xi}{sup n} are the Euclidean and functional spaces, respectively. The method of stochastic density matrix is developed and the von Neumann equation for reduced density matrix of QS with FE is generalized. The entropy of QS entangled with FE is defined and investigated. It is proved that the interaction of QS with the environment leads to emerging structures of various topologies which present new quantum-field properties of QS. It is shown that when the physical system (irrelatively to its being micro ormacro) breaks up into two fragments by means of FE, there arises between these fragments a nonpotential interaction which does not disappear at large distances.

  2. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics with consideration of influence of fundamental environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkyan, A. S.

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous transitions between bound states of an atomic system, the "Lamb Shift" of energy levels and many other phenomena in real nonrelativistic quantum systems are connected with the influence of the quantum vacuum fluctuations ( fundamental environment (FE)), which are impossible to consider in the framework of standard quantum-mechanical approaches. The joint system quantum system (QS) and FE is described in the framework of the stochastic differential equation (SDE) of Langevin-Schrödinger type and is defined on the extended space ℝ3⊗Ξ n , where ℝ3 and Ξ n are the Euclidean and functional spaces, respectively. The method of stochastic density matrix is developed and the von Neumann equation for reduced density matrix of QS with FE is generalized. The entropy of QS entangled with FE is defined and investigated. It is proved that the interaction of QS with the environment leads to emerging structures of various topologies which present new quantum-field properties of QS. It is shown that when the physical system (irrelatively to its being micro ormacro) breaks up into two fragments by means of FE, there arises between these fragments a nonpotential interaction which does not disappear at large distances.

  3. Fundamental consolidation mechanisms during selective beam melting of powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, Carolin; Bauereiß, Andreas; Attar, Elham

    2013-12-01

    During powder based additive manufacturing processes, a component is realized layer upon layer by the selective melting of powder layers with a laser or an electron beam. The density of the consolidated material, the minimal spatial resolution as well as the surface roughness of the resulting components are complex functions of the material and process parameters. So far, the interplay between these parameters is only partially understood. In this paper, the successive assembling in layers is investigated with a recently described 2D-lattice Boltzmann model, which considers individual powder particles. This numerical approach makes several physical phenomena accessible, which cannot be described in a standard continuum picture, e.g. the interplay between capillary effects, wetting conditions and the local stochastic powder configuration. In addition, the model takes into account the influence of the surface topology of the previous consolidated layer on the subsequent powder layer. The influence of the beam power, beam velocity and layer thickness on the formation and quality of simple walls is investigated. The simulation results are compared with experimental findings during selective electron beam melting. The comparison shows that our model, although 2D, is able to predict the main characteristics of the experimental observations. In addition, the numerical simulation elucidates the fundamental mechanisms responsible for the phenomena that are observed during selective beam melting.

  4. Asset Return Dynamics under Bad Environment Good Environment Fundamentals

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a "bad environment-good environment" technology for consumption growth in a consumption- based asset pricing model. Using the preference structure from Campbell and Cochrane (1999), the model generates realistic time-varying volatility, skewness and kurtosis in fundamentals while still permitting closed-form solutions for asset prices. The model not only fits standard salient asset prices features including means and volatilities for equity returns and risk free rates, but also g...

  5. Biochemical mechanisms underlying atherogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.P.V.L.N. Srinivasa Rao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis remains one of the major causes of death and premature disability in developed countries. Though atherosclerosis was formerly considered a bland lipid storage disease, substantial advances in basic and experimental sciences have illuminated the role of endothelium, inflammation and immune mechanisms in its pathogenesis. Current concept of atherosclerosis is that of a dynamic and progressive disease arising from in- jury to endothelium, also known as endothelial dysfunction and an inflammatory response to that injury. The lesions of atherosclerosis occur principally in large and medium sized arteries. Atherosclerosis affects various regions of the circulation preferentially and can lead to ischemia of heart, brain or extremities resulting in in- farction.This produces distinct clinical manifestations depending on the vessel involved. Several predisposing factors to cardiovascular diseases such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, infections act as triggers to the devel- opment of atherosclerosis by causing endothelial dysfunction and/or promoting inflammatory response. The evolution of pathogenetic mechanisms has passed through various directions such as oxidative stress, inflam- mation and immune responses. It is now known that all these are not acting independently but are interrelated and getting unified in the current concept of atherogenesis. The following discussion aims at providing an in- sight into these developments which can help in a better comprehension of the disease and management of its clinical complications

  6. Effects of fundamental structure parameters on dynamic responses of submerged floating tunnel under hydrodynamic loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Long; Fei Ge; Lei Wang; Youshi Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of structure parameters on dynamic responses of submerged floating tunnel (SFT) under hydrodynamic loads. The structure parameters includes buoyancy-weight ratio (BWR), stiffness coefficients of the cable systems, tunnel net buoyancy and tunnel length. First, the importance of structural damp in relation to the dynamic responses of SFT is demonstrated and the mechanism of structural damp effect is discussed. Thereafter, the fundamental structure parameters are investi-gated through the analysis of SFT dynamic responses under hydrodynamic loads. The results indicate that the BWR of SFT is a key structure parameter. When BWR is 1.2, there is a remarkable trend change in the vertical dynamic response of SFT under hydrodynamic loads. The results also indicate that the ratio of the tunnel net buoyancy to the cable stiffness coefficient is not a characteristic factor affecting the dynamic responses of SFT under hydrodynamic loads.

  7. Fundamental studies on the Cs dynamics under ion source conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedl, R., E-mail: roland.friedl@physik.uni-augsburg.de; Fantz, U. [AG Experimentelle Plasmaphysik (EPP), Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The performance of surface conversion based negative hydrogen ion sources is mainly determined by the caesium dynamics. Therefore, fundamental investigations in vacuum and plasma are performed at a flexible laboratory setup with ion source parameters. Studies on the influence of Cs on the plasma parameters of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} plasmas showed that n{sub e} and T{sub e} in the bulk plasma are not affected by relevant amounts of Cs and no isotopic differences could be observed. The coating of the vessel surfaces with Cs, however, leads to a considerable gettering of hydrogen atoms from the plasma volume and to the decrease of n{sub e} close to a sample surface due to the formation of negative ions.

  8. Fundamental Mechanisms of Roughening and Smoothing During Thin Film Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Headrick, Randall [Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)

    2016-03-18

    In this research program, we have explored the fundamental limits for thin film deposition in both crystalline and amorphous (i.e. non-crystalline) materials systems. For vacuum-based physical deposition processes such as sputter deposition, the background gas pressure of the inert gas (usually argon) used as the process gas has been found to be a key variable. Both a roughness transition and stress transition as a function of pressure have been linked to a common mechanism involving collisions of energetic particles from the deposition source with the process inert gas. As energetic particles collide with gas molecules in the deposition process they lose their energy rapidly if the pressure (and background gas density) is above a critical value. Both roughness and stress limit important properties of thin films for applications. In the area of epitaxial growth we have also discovered a related effect; there is a critical pressure below which highly crystalline layers grow in a layer-by-layer mode. This effect is also though to be due to energetic particle thermalization and scattering. Several other important effects such as the observation of coalescence dominated growth has been observed. This mode can be likened to the behavior of two-dimensional water droplets on the hood of a car during a rain storm; as the droplets grow and touch each other they tend to coalesce rapidly into new larger circular puddles, and this process proceeds exponentially as larger puddles overtake smaller ones and also merge with other large puddles. This discovery will enable more accurate simulations and modeling of epitaxial growth processes. We have also observed that epitaxial films undergo a roughening transition as a function of thickness, which is attributed to strain induced by the crystalline lattice mismatch with the substrate crystal. In addition, we have studied another physical deposition process called pulsed laser deposition. It differs from sputter deposition due to the

  9. Relating fundamental creep mechanisms in Waspaloy to the Wilshire equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deen C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Creep tests of the polycrystalline nickel alloy Waspaloy have been conducted at Swansea University, for varying stress conditions at 700 ∘C. Investigation through use of Transmission Electron Microscopy at Cambridge University has examined the dislocation networks formed under these conditions, notably those with stresses above and below the yield stress. This paper highlights how the dislocation structures vary throughout creep and proposes a dislocation mechanism theory for creep in Waspaloy. In particular, the roles of recovery, tertiary gamma prime particles and dislocation foresting are examined, and related back to observations from the Wilshire fits. The virgin (untested material has been forged and heat treated, containing some recrystallised material together with areas of more heavily deformed and recovered material clustered around the grain boundaries. Observations from tests below the 0.2% proof stress show relatively low dislocation densities away from grain boundaries and dislocation movement can be seen to be governed by interactions with the γ′ precipitates. In contrast, above the 0.2% proof stress, TEM observations show a substantially greater density of dislocations. The increased density provides an increment of strength through forest hardening. At stresses above the original yield point, determined by the precipitates, the creep rate is controlled by inter-action with the dislocation forest and results in an apparent activation energy change. It is proposed that the activation energy change is related to the stress increment provided by work hardening, as can be observed from Ti, Ni and steel results.

  10. Neutron Stars: Laboratories for Fundamental Physics Under Extreme Astrophysical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2017-09-01

    We discuss different exotic phases and components of matter from the crust to the core of neutron stars based on theoretical models for equations of state relevant to core collapse supernova simulations and neutron star merger. Parameters of the models are constrained from laboratory experiments. It is observed that equations of state involving strangeness degrees of freedom such as hyperons and Bose-Einstein condensates are compatible with 2{M}_{solar} neutron stars. The role of hyperons is explored on the evolution and stability of the protoneutron star in the context of SN1987A. Moment of inertia, mass and radius which are direct probes of neutron star interior are computed and their observational consequences are discussed. We continue our study on the dense matter under strong magnetic fields and its application to magnetoelastic oscillations of neutron stars.

  11. Randomness Amplification under Minimal Fundamental Assumptions on the Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Ravishankar; Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Wojewódka, Hanna

    2016-12-01

    Recently, the physically realistic protocol amplifying the randomness of Santha-Vazirani sources producing cryptographically secure random bits was proposed; however, for reasons of practical relevance, the crucial question remained open regarding whether this can be accomplished under the minimal conditions necessary for the task. Namely, is it possible to achieve randomness amplification using only two no-signaling components and in a situation where the violation of a Bell inequality only guarantees that some outcomes of the device for specific inputs exhibit randomness? Here, we solve this question and present a device-independent protocol for randomness amplification of Santha-Vazirani sources using a device consisting of two nonsignaling components. We show that the protocol can amplify any such source that is not fully deterministic into a fully random source while tolerating a constant noise rate and prove the composable security of the protocol against general no-signaling adversaries. Our main innovation is the proof that even the partial randomness certified by the two-party Bell test [a single input-output pair (u* , x* ) for which the conditional probability P (x*|u*) is bounded away from 1 for all no-signaling strategies that optimally violate the Bell inequality] can be used for amplification. We introduce the methodology of a partial tomographic procedure on the empirical statistics obtained in the Bell test that ensures that the outputs constitute a linear min-entropy source of randomness. As a technical novelty that may be of independent interest, we prove that the Santha-Vazirani source satisfies an exponential concentration property given by a recently discovered generalized Chernoff bound.

  12. Grain coarsening of calcite: Fundamental mechanisms and biogenic inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    grain diameter: The small particle size was similar to coccolith elements in chalk. Calcite was aged in saturated solutions for up to 261 days at temperatures up to 200 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and BET surface area data showed fundamental insight into grain...... coarsening – small grains coarsen by aggregation at high temperatures, followed by Ostwald ripening. Alginate, a model for the acidic polysaccharides produced by coccolithiphores, inhibited coarsening at a steady rate. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm preserved particles for at least 60 days before...

  13. The role of orbital mechanics in fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exertier, Pierre; Metris, Gilles

    The contribution of space techniques to fundamental physics is at two levels. First, very interesting results have been obtained using precise tracking and orbitography of natural bodies or space probes not initially designed for this aim; this is the case, for example, of the precise estimation of the GM gravitational constant and of some PPN parameters, of the confirmation of the Lense-Thirring effect, and of the test of the strong Equivalence Principle. Second, dedicated missions have been settled to perform in space, experiments which cannot be realized on the ground, at least at the same level of precision; this is in particular the case of the time transfer experiment T2L2 and of the MicroSCOPE mission for the test of the weak EP.

  14. Fundamental electronic mechanisms limiting the performance of solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Sah, C.-T.

    1977-01-01

    Attention is focused on distortion in the energy band, and carrier recombination and generation rates (lifetimes), as the two dominant mechanisms. Spatial dependences associated with these two mechanisms, in the direction normal to the surface illuminated by the sun and in the direction tangential to that surface, are also emphasized as crucial factors in governing the efficiency of solar cells. Electronic parameters for the set of differential equations characterizing transport, recombination, and generation of carriers, and interband and band-bound transition rates, are studied.

  15. Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals; Advanced Quantum Mechanics; Mathematical Concepts of Quantum Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, A [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2004-02-27

    . The second book under consideration, that of Schwabl, contains 'Advanced' elements of quantum theory; it is designed for a course following on from one for which Gottfried and Yan, or Schwabl's own 'Quantum Mechanics' might be recommended. Many useful student problems are included. The presentation is said to be rigorous, but again this is a book for the physicist rather than the mathematician. The third book under consideration, that by Gustafson and Sigal is very different from the others. In academic level, at least the initial sections may actually be slightly lower; the book covers a one-term course taken by senior undergraduates or junior graduate students in mathematics or physics, and the initial chapters are on basic topics, such as the physical background, basic dynamics, observables and the uncertainty principle. However the level of mathematical sophistication is far higher than in the other books. While the mathematical prerequisites are modest, a third of the book is made up of what are called mathematical supplements. On the basis of these supplements, the level of mathematical sophistication and difficulty is increased substantially in the middle section of the book, where the topics considered are many-particle systems, density matrices, positive temperatures, the Feynman path integral, and quasi-classical analysis, and there is a final substantial step for the concluding chapters on resonances, an introduction to quantum field theory, and quantum electrodynamics of non-relativistic particles. A supplementary chapter contains an interesting approach to the renormalization group due to Bach, Froehlich and Sigal himself. This book is well-written, and the topics discussed have been well thought-out. It would provide a useful approach to quantum theory for the mathematician, and would also provide access for the physicist to some mathematically advanced methods and topics, but the physicist would definitely have to be prepared to

  16. Understanding Irreversible Degradation of Nb3Sn Wires with Fundamental Fracture Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yuhu [PPPL; Calzolaio, Ciro [Univ of Geneva; Senatore, Carmine [Univ of Geneva

    2014-08-01

    Irreversible performance degradation of advanced Nb3Sn superconducting wires subjected to transverse or axial mechanical loading is a critical issue for the design of large-scale fusion and accelerator magnets such as ITER and LHC. Recent SULTAN tests indicate that most cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER coils made of Nb3Sn wires processed by various fabrication techniques show similar performance degradation under cyclic loading. The irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and local strain accumulation in Nb3Sn wires cannot be described by the existing strand scaling law. Fracture mechanic modeling combined with X-ray diffraction imaging of filament micro-crack formation inside the wires under mechanical loading may reveal exciting insights to the wire degradation mechanisms. We apply fundamental fracture mechanics with a singularity approach to study influence of wire filament microstructure of initial void size and distribution to local stress concentration and potential crack propagation. We report impact of the scale and density of the void structure on stress concentration in the composite wire materials for crack initiation. These initial defects result in an irreversible degradation of the critical current beyond certain applied stress. We also discuss options to minimize stress concentration in the design of the material microstructure for enhanced wire performance for future applications.

  17. Electronics: Mott Transistor: Fundamental Studies and Device Operation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    hopping transport . It is well known that localized states exist in the forbidden gap of doped semiconductors /disordered insulators. For a semiconductor , σ... semiconductors and their response to electric fields. This is relevant to their eventual use as advanced semiconductors in microwave devices or high speed...transistors where collective effects are exploited to design switches.The report presents our progress in studying electron transport mechanisms in

  18. Variational principles of continuum mechanics. Vol. 1. Fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdichevsky, Victor L. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The book reviews the two features of the variational approach: its use as a universal tool to describe physical phenomena and as a source for qualitative and quantitative methods of studying particular problems. Berdichevsky's work differs from other books on the subject in focusing mostly on the physical origin of variational principles as well as establishing their interrelations. For example, the Gibbs principles appear as a consequence of the Einstein formula for thermodynamic fluctuations rather than as the first principles of the theory of thermodynamic equilibrium. Mathematical issues are considered as long as they shed light on the physical outcomes and/or provide a useful technique for the direct study of variational problems. In addition, a thorough account of variational principles discovered in various branches of continuum mechanics is given. In this book, the first volume, the author covers the variational principles for systems with a finite number of degrees of freedom; the variational principles of thermodynamics; the basics of continuum mechanics; the variational principles for classical models of continuum mechanics, such as elastic and plastic bodies, and ideal and viscous fluids; and direct methods of calculus of variations. (orig.)

  19. Molecular Fundaments of Mechanical Properties of Spider Silk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘志娟; 刘敏; 李春萍; 李栋高; 盛家镛

    2003-01-01

    Dragline,framework and cocoon silk fibers of Araneus Ventricosus were used for this study.To investigate the microstructure mechanisms of stress-strain behavior of spider silk,firstly,amino acid compositions were analyzed and molecular conformations and crystallinity were measured with Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction respectively.The results showed that there were more amino acids with large side groups and polar ones in spider silk than those of Bombyx silk,and the amino acid distribution varied with different spider silk.The molecular structures were mainly α-helix and β-sheet,and random coil and β-turn existed as well.The proportions and arrangement of these conformations of dragline silk were different from framework and cocoon silk fibers.Microstructure was one of important factors of excellent mechanical properties of spider silk.Crystallinity of spider silk was very low,which implied that the roles of crystal on spider silk were not as great as other protein fibers.

  20. Grain coarsening of calcite: Fundamental mechanisms and biogenic inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    In a saturated solution, submicrometer calcite (CaCO3) crystals recrystallize and coarsen to minimize surface area. The thermodynamic driving force is described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation, but the rates and mechanism are poorly understood. Calcite grain coarsening has many implications...... in industry and nature, but the specific focus of this research project was to understand how small, biogenic calcite particles in chalk have resisted grain coarsening for over 60 million years in saturated reservoir fluids. A new method was developed to produce pure calcite powder that has submicrometer...... coarsening – small grains coarsen by aggregation at high temperatures, followed by Ostwald ripening. Alginate, a model for the acidic polysaccharides produced by coccolithiphores, inhibited coarsening at a steady rate. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm preserved particles for at least 60 days before...

  1. Fundamental mechanisms in Li-air battery electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Jonathan

    The lithium-air (or Li-O2) batteries have received wide attention as an enabling technology for a mass market entry of electric vehicles due to a potential capacity much higher than current Li-ion technology. The technology is a relatively new battery concept proposed in 1996, and the current...... was used to characterize our carbon-based reference system as well as new ionic liquid-based electrolytes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been used extensively to describe reaction mechanisms inside the battery; the origin of the measured overpotentials; and the onset potential...... battery system better than any other method available. Finally, calculations were made to support that an open system configuration is a realistic option in terms of air purification, if H2O and CO2 levels at 1 ppm are allowed....

  2. The Achilles tendon: fundamental properties and mechanisms governing healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights recent research on Achilles tendon healing, and comments on the current clinical controversy surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of injury. The processes of Achilles tendon healing, as demonstrated through changes in its structure, composition, and biomechanics, are reviewed. Finally, a review of tendon developmental biology and mechano transductive pathways is completed to recognize recent efforts to augment injured Achilles tendons, and to suggest potential future strategies for therapeutic intervention and functional tissue engineering. Despite an abundance of clinical evidence suggesting that current treatments and rehabilitation strategies for Achilles tendon ruptures are equivocal, significant questions remain to fully elucidate the basic science mechanisms governing Achilles tendon injury, healing, treatment, and rehabilitation. PMID:25332943

  3. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.R.; Bush, P.V.; Dahlin, R.S.

    1996-03-20

    The US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC) initiated this project as part of a program to study the control of fine particles from coal combustion. Our project focus was flue gas conditioning. Various conditioning processes have lowered operating costs and increased collection efficiency at utility particulate control devices. By improving fine particle collection, flue gas conditioning also helps to control the emission of toxic metals, which are concentrated in the fine particle fraction. By combining a review of pertinent literature, laboratory characterization of a variety of fine powders and ashes, pilot-scale studies of conditioning mechanisms, and field experiences, Southern Research Institute has been able to describe many of the key processes that account for the effects that conditioning can have on fine-particle collection. The overall goal of this research project was to explain the mechanisms by which various flue gas conditioning processes alter the performance of particulate control devices. Conditioning involves the modification of one or more of the parameters that determine the magnitude of the forces acting on the fly ash particles. Resistivity, chemistry, cohesivity, size distribution, and particle morphology are among the basic properties of fly ash that significantly influence fine particle collection. Modifications of particulate properties can result in improved or degraded control device performance. These modifications can be caused by (1) changes to the process design or operation that affect properties of the flue gas, (2) addition of particulate matter such as flue-gas desulfurization sorbents to the process effluent stream, (3) injection of reactive gases or liquids into the flue gas. We recommend that humidification be seriously considered as a flue gas conditioning option. 80 refs., 69 figs., 23 tabs.

  4. When fast is better: protein folding fundamentals and mechanisms from ultrafast approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Victor; Cerminara, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Protein folding research stalled for decades because conventional experiments indicated that proteins fold slowly and in single strokes, whereas theory predicted a complex interplay between dynamics and energetics resulting in myriad microscopic pathways. Ultrafast kinetic methods turned the field upside down by providing the means to probe fundamental aspects of folding, test theoretical predictions and benchmark simulations. Accordingly, experimentalists could measure the timescales for all relevant folding motions, determine the folding speed limit and confirm that folding barriers are entropic bottlenecks. Moreover, a catalogue of proteins that fold extremely fast (microseconds) could be identified. Such fast-folding proteins cross shallow free energy barriers or fold downhill, and thus unfold with minimal co-operativity (gradually). A new generation of thermodynamic methods has exploited this property to map folding landscapes, interaction networks and mechanisms at nearly atomic resolution. In parallel, modern molecular dynamics simulations have finally reached the timescales required to watch fast-folding proteins fold and unfold in silico All of these findings have buttressed the fundamentals of protein folding predicted by theory, and are now offering the first glimpses at the underlying mechanisms. Fast folding appears to also have functional implications as recent results connect downhill folding with intrinsically disordered proteins, their complex binding modes and ability to moonlight. These connections suggest that the coupling between downhill (un)folding and binding enables such protein domains to operate analogically as conformational rheostats.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trepo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex process that remains still partly understood. That might be explained by the multiplicity of etiologic factors, the genetic/epigenetic heterogeneity of tumors bulks and the ignorance of the liver cell types that give rise to tumorigenic cells that have stem cell-like properties. The DNA stress induced by hepatocyte turnover, inflammation and maybe early oncogenic pathway activation and sometimes viral factors, leads to DNA damage response which activates the key tumor suppressive checkpoints p53/p21Cip1 and p16INK4a/pRb responsible of cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence as reflected by the cirrhosis stage. Still obscure mechanisms, but maybe involving the Wnt signaling and Twist proteins, would allow pre-senescent hepatocytes to bypass senescence, acquire immortality by telomerase reactivation and get the last genetic/epigenetic hits necessary for cancerous transformation. Among some of the oncogenic pathways that might play key driving roles in hepatocarcinogenesis, c-myc and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling seem of particular interest. Finally, antiproliferative and apoptosis deficiencies involving TGF-β, Akt/PTEN, IGF2 pathways for instance are prerequisite for cancerous transformation. Of evidence, not only the transformed liver cell per se but the facilitating microenvironment is of fundamental importance for tumor bulk growth and metastasis.

  6. Fundamental study of mechanical and chemical degradation mechanisms of PEM fuel cell membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Wonseok

    One of the important factors determining the lifetime of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is membrane degradation and failure. The lack of effective mitigation methods is largely due to the currently very limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms for mechanical and chemical degradations of fuel cell membranes. In order to understand degradation of membranes in fuel cells, two different experimental approaches were developed; one is fuel cell testing under open circuit voltage (OCV) with bi-layer configuration of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and the other is a modified gas phase Fenton's test. Accelerated degradation tests for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are frequently conducted under open circuit voltage (OCV) conditions at low relative humidity (RH) and high temperature. With the bi-layer MEA technique, it was found that membrane degradation is highly localized across thickness direction of the membrane and qualitatively correlated with location of platinum (Pt) band through mechanical testing, Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, fluoride emission, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) measurement. One of the critical experimental observations is that mechanical behavior of membranes subjected to degradation via Fenton's reaction exhibit completely different behavior with that of membranes from the OCV testing. This result led us to believe that other critical factors such as mechanical stress may affect on membrane degradation and therefore, a modified gas phase Fenton's test setup was developed to test the hypothesis. Interestingly, the results showed that mechanical stress directly accelerates the degradation rate of ionomer membranes, implying that the rate constant for the degradation reaction is a function of mechanical stress in addition to commonly known factors such as temperature and humidity. Membrane degradation induced by

  7. Molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial persisters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maisonneuve, Etienne; Gerdes, Kenn

    2014-01-01

    All bacteria form persisters, cells that are multidrug tolerant and therefore able to survive antibiotic treatment. Due to the low frequencies of persisters in growing bacterial cultures and the complex underlying molecular mechanisms, the phenomenon has been challenging to study. However, recent...... technological advances in microfluidics and reporter genes have improved this scenario. Here, we summarize recent progress in the field, revealing the ubiquitous bacterial stress alarmone ppGpp as an emerging central regulator of multidrug tolerance and persistence, both in stochastically and environmentally...... induced persistence. In several different organisms, toxin-antitoxin modules function as effectors of ppGpp-induced persistence....

  8. Quantum Mechanics of Fundamental Systems: The Quest for Beauty and Simplicity

    CERN Document Server

    Zanelli, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    A collection of contributed papers by former collaborators and colleagues of the author. It includes such topics as, General Relativity, Quantum Gravity, String Theory; from mathematical structures underlying the fundamental interactions, to cosmological scenarios describing the universe at its birth

  9. Underlying Mechanisms Affecting Institutionalisation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a formal SADC Course Development Network (CDN) in 1999 with Swedish International. Development ..... Strategy in 2000 raised a fundamental concern that in Swaziland there were no short courses ..... Personal Communication. Education ...

  10. Evolved Mechanisms Versus Underlying Conditional Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astorga Miguel López

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The social contracts theory claims that, in social exchange circumstances, human reasoning is not necessarily led by logic, but by certain evolved mental mechanisms that are useful for catching offenders. An emblematic experiment carried out with the intention to prove this thesis is the first experiment described by Fiddick, Cosmides, and Tooby in their paper of 2000. Lopez Astorga has questioned that experiment claiming that its results depend on an underlying conditional logical form not taken into account by Fiddick, Cosmides, and Tooby. In this paper, I propose an explanation alternative to that of Lopez Astorga, which does not depend on logical forms and is based on the mental models theory. Thus, I conclude that this other alternative explanation is one more proof that the experiment in question does not demonstrate the fundamental thesis of the social contracts theory.

  11. Analytical Solutions to the Fundamental Frequency of Arbitrary Laminated Plates under Various Boundary Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingqin Luo; Ming Hong; Yuan Liu

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, as the composite laminated plates are widely used in engineering practice such as aerospace, marine and building engineering, the vibration problem of the composite laminated plates is becoming more and more important. Frequency, especially the fundamental frequency, has been considered as an important factor in vibration problem. In this paper, a calculation method of the fundamental frequency of arbitrary laminated plates under various boundary conditions is proposed. The vibration differential equation of the laminated plates is established at the beginning of this paper and the frequency formulae of specialty orthotropic laminated plates under various boundary conditions and antisymmetric angle-ply laminated plates with simply-supported edges are investigated. They are proved to be correct. Simple algorithm of the fundamental frequency for multilayer antisymmetric and arbitrary laminated plates under various boundary conditions is studied by a series of typical examples. From the perspective of coupling, when the number of laminated plates layersN > 8–10, some coupling influence on the fundamental frequency can be neglected. It is reasonable to use specialty orthotropic laminated plates with the same thickness but less layers to calculate the corresponding fundamental frequency of laminated plates. Several examples are conducted to prove correctness of this conclusion. At the end of this paper, the influence of the selected number of layers of specialty orthotropic laminates on the fundamental frequency is investigated. The accuracy and complexity are determined by the number of layers. It is necessary to use proper number of layers of special orthotropic laminates with the same thickness to simulate the fundamental frequency in different boundary conditions.

  12. Glottal open quotient in singing: Measurements and correlation with laryngeal mechanisms, vocal intensity, and fundamental frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Nathalie; D'Alessandro, Christophe; Doval, Boris; Castellengo, Michèle

    2005-03-01

    This article presents the results of glottal open-quotient measurements in the case of singing voice production. It explores the relationship between open quotient and laryngeal mechanisms, vocal intensity, and fundamental frequency. The audio and electroglottographic signals of 18 classically trained male and female singers were recorded and analyzed with regard to vocal intensity, fundamental frequency, and open quotient. Fundamental frequency and open quotient are derived from the differentiated electroglottographic signal, using the DECOM (DEgg Correlation-based Open quotient Measurement) method. As male and female phonation may differ in respect to vocal-fold vibratory properties, a distinction is made between two different glottal configurations, which are called laryngeal mechanisms: mechanism 1 (related to chest, modal, and male head register) and mechanism 2 (related to falsetto for male and head register for female). The results show that open quotient depends on the laryngeal mechanisms. It ranges from 0.3 to 0.8 in mechanism 1 and from 0.5 to 0.95 in mechanism 2. The open quotient is strongly related to vocal intensity in mechanism 1 and to fundamental frequency in mechanism 2. .

  13. Capacity as a Fundamental Metric for Mechanism Design in the Information Economy

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The auction theory literature has so far focused mostly on the design of mechanisms that takes the revenue or the efficiency as a yardstick. However, scenarios where the {\\it capacity}, which we define as \\textit{``the number of bidders the auctioneer wants to have a positive probability of getting the item''}, is a fundamental concern are ubiquitous in the information economy. For instance, in sponsored search auctions (SSA's) or in online ad-exchanges, the true value of an ad-slot for an advertiser is inherently derived from the conversion-rate, which in turn depends on whether the advertiser actually obtained the ad-slot or not; thus, unless the capacity of the underlying auction is large, key parameters, such as true valuations and advertiser-specific conversion rates, will remain unknown or uncertain leading to inherent inefficiencies in the system. In general, the same holds true for all information goods/digital goods. We initiate a study of mechanisms, which take capacity as a yardstick, in addition t...

  14. Neural mechanisms underlying breathing complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Hess

    Full Text Available Breathing is maintained and controlled by a network of automatic neurons in the brainstem that generate respiratory rhythm and receive regulatory inputs. Breathing complexity therefore arises from respiratory central pattern generators modulated by peripheral and supra-spinal inputs. Very little is known on the brainstem neural substrates underlying breathing complexity in humans. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher these mechanisms in healthy humans and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. COPD is the most frequent chronic lung disease in the general population mainly due to tobacco smoke. In patients, airflow obstruction associated with hyperinflation and respiratory muscles weakness are key factors contributing to load-capacity imbalance and hence increased respiratory drive. Unexpectedly, we found that the patients breathed with a higher level of complexity during inspiration and expiration than controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we scanned the brain of the participants to analyze the activity of two small regions involved in respiratory rhythmogenesis, the rostral ventro-lateral (VL medulla (pre-Bötzinger complex and the caudal VL pons (parafacial group. fMRI revealed in controls higher activity of the VL medulla suggesting active inspiration, while in patients higher activity of the VL pons suggesting active expiration. COPD patients reactivate the parafacial to sustain ventilation. These findings may be involved in the onset of respiratory failure when the neural network becomes overwhelmed by respiratory overload We show that central neural activity correlates with airflow complexity in healthy subjects and COPD patients, at rest and during inspiratory loading. We finally used a theoretical approach of respiratory rhythmogenesis that reproduces the kernel activity of neurons involved in the automatic breathing. The model reveals how a chaotic activity in

  15. Continuum Mechanics using Mathematica® Fundamentals, Applications and Scientific Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Antonio; Marasco, Addolorata

    2006-01-01

    This book's methodological approach familiarizes readers with the mathematical tools required to correctly define and solve problems in continuum mechanics. The book covers essential principles and fundamental applications, and provides a solid basis for a deeper study of more challenging and specialized problems related to elasticity, fluid mechanics, plasticity, materials with memory, piezoelectricity, ferroelectricity, magneto-fluid mechanics, and state changes. Key topics and features: * Concise presentation strikes a balance between fundamentals and applications * Requisite mathematical background carefully collected in two introductory chapters and two appendices * Recent developments highlighted through coverage of more significant applications to areas such as porous media, electromagnetic fields, and phase transitions Continuum Mechanics using Mathematica® is aimed at advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and researchers in applied mathematics, mathematical physics, and engineering. It may ser...

  16. O DIREITO FUNDAMENTAL DOS MENORES DE DEZOITO ANOS À NÃO PERSECUÇÃO PENAL / UNDER EIGHTEEN YEARS FUNDAMENTAL RIGHT TO NO CRIMINAL PROSECUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Leonardo Copetti Santos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims, generally, to demonstrate the positivity and the fundamentality of the right of people under 18 to non-criminal prosecution. Secondly, given the primordiality and the consequent inviolability of this right, it is proposed to examine the material unconstitutionality of the PEC 171-D/1993 - which provides the reduction of criminal responsibility age -, for violating head-protection cap established by Federal Constitution for the under-18s in relation to the state criminal prosecution. The theoretical basis on which is founded the article has, eminently, constitutional guarantee nature and criminal minimalism. The method used was Weber’s typological one, once the central thesis of the work is constructed from a comparative collation of the rule of the art. 228 of the 1988 Federal Constitution in relation to an ideal type of fundamental rights, drawn from a synthesis of what different researchers understand how essential elements and features of a fundamental right. The approach methodology was eminently bibliographic, with some inserts in document analysis, especially constitutional law. Finally, the results indicate to the existence of a fundamental right of people below eighteen years of no criminal prosecution provided constitutionally, for the standard of art. 228 of the Federal Constitution fits perfectly in the proposed ideal type of fundamental right. Due to the finding of positive existence of this fundamental right, the recognition of the serious unconstitutionality materialized through related constitutional amendment is clear, for violating the constitutional provision that states the fundamental right to non-criminal prosecution of anyone under 18.

  17. A study on the fundamental mechanism and the evolutionary driving forces behind aerobic fermentation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Hagman

    Full Text Available Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae rapidly converts sugars to ethanol and carbon dioxide at both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The later phenomenon is called Crabtree effect and has been described in two forms, long-term and short-term effect. We have previously studied under fully controlled aerobic conditions forty yeast species for their central carbon metabolism and the presence of long-term Crabtree effect. We have also studied ten steady-state yeast cultures, pulsed them with glucose, and followed the central carbon metabolism and the appearance of ethanol at dynamic conditions. In this paper we analyzed those wet laboratory data to elucidate possible mechanisms that determine the fate of glucose in different yeast species that cover approximately 250 million years of evolutionary history. We determine overflow metabolism to be the fundamental mechanism behind both long- and short-term Crabtree effect, which originated approximately 125-150 million years ago in the Saccharomyces lineage. The "invention" of overflow metabolism was the first step in the evolution of aerobic fermentation in yeast. It provides a general strategy to increase energy production rates, which we show is positively correlated to growth. The "invention" of overflow has also simultaneously enabled rapid glucose consumption in yeast, which is a trait that could have been selected for, to "starve" competitors in nature. We also show that glucose repression of respiration is confined mainly among S. cerevisiae and closely related species that diverged after the whole genome duplication event, less than 100 million years ago. Thus, glucose repression of respiration was apparently "invented" as a second step to further increase overflow and ethanol production, to inhibit growth of other microbes. The driving force behind the initial evolutionary steps was most likely competition with other microbes to faster consume and convert sugar into biomass, in niches that

  18. Metacognitive mechanisms underlying lucid dreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filevich, Elisa; Dresler, Martin; Brick, Timothy R; Kühn, Simone

    2015-01-21

    Lucid dreaming is a state of awareness that one is dreaming, without leaving the sleep state. Dream reports show that self-reflection and volitional control are more pronounced in lucid compared with nonlucid dreams. Mostly on these grounds, lucid dreaming has been associated with metacognition. However, the link to lucid dreaming at the neural level has not yet been explored. We sought for relationships between the neural correlates of lucid dreaming and thought monitoring. Human participants completed a questionnaire assessing lucid dreaming ability, and underwent structural and functional MRI. We split participants based on their reported dream lucidity. Participants in the high-lucidity group showed greater gray matter volume in the frontopolar cortex (BA9/10) compared with those in the low-lucidity group. Further, differences in brain structure were mirrored by differences in brain function. The BA9/10 regions identified through structural analyses showed increases in blood oxygen level-dependent signal during thought monitoring in both groups, and more strongly in the high-lucidity group. Our results reveal shared neural systems between lucid dreaming and metacognitive function, in particular in the domain of thought monitoring. This finding contributes to our understanding of the mechanisms enabling higher-order consciousness in dreams. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351082-07$15.00/0.

  19. Fundamental ecology is fundamental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courchamp, Franck; Dunne, Jennifer A; Le Maho, Yvon; May, Robert M; Thébaud, Christophe; Hochberg, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The primary reasons for conducting fundamental research are satisfying curiosity, acquiring knowledge, and achieving understanding. Here we develop why we believe it is essential to promote basic ecological research, despite increased impetus for ecologists to conduct and present their research in the light of potential applications. This includes the understanding of our environment, for intellectual, economical, social, and political reasons, and as a major source of innovation. We contend that we should focus less on short-term, objective-driven research and more on creativity and exploratory analyses, quantitatively estimate the benefits of fundamental research for society, and better explain the nature and importance of fundamental ecology to students, politicians, decision makers, and the general public. Our perspective and underlying arguments should also apply to evolutionary biology and to many of the other biological and physical sciences. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A Note on the Fundamental Theorem of Asset Pricing under Model Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Bayraktar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We show that the recent results on the Fundamental Theorem of Asset Pricing and the super-hedging theorem in the context of model uncertainty can be extended to the case in which the options available for static hedging (hedging options are quoted with bid-ask spreads. In this set-up, we need to work with the notion of robust no-arbitrage which turns out to be equivalent to no-arbitrage under the additional assumption that hedging options with non-zero spread are non-redundant. A key result is the closedness of the set of attainable claims, which requires a new proof in our setting.

  1. Tribo-chemical mechanisms of copper chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) - Fundamental investigations and integrated modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shantanu

    In this work, copper Chemical Mechanical Planarization is identified primarily as a wear enhanced corrosion process (as opposed to the corrosion enhanced wear process assumed in existing modeling work), where intermittent abrasive action enhances the local oxidation rate, and is followed by time-dependant passivation of copper. Based on this mechanism, an integrated tribo-chemical model of material removal at the abrasive scale was developed based on oxidation of copper. This considers abrasive and pad properties, process parameters, and slurry chemistry. Three important components of this model -- the passivation kinetics of copper in CMP slurry chemicals; the mechanical properties of passive films on copper; and the interaction frequency of copper and abrasives -- are introduced. The first two components, in particular the passivation kinetics of copper, are extensively studied experimentally, while the third component is addressed theoretically. The passivation kinetics of copper (i.e. decrease in oxidation currents as passive films form on bare copper) were investigated by potential step chronoamperometry. Low cost microelectrodes were developed (first of its kind for studying copper CMP) to reduce many of the problems of traditional macroelectrodes, such as interference from capacitive charging, IR drops and low diffusion limited current. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used on copper microelectrodes in CMP slurry constituents to obtain equivalent circuit elements associated with different electrochemical phenomena (capacitive, kinetics, diffusion etc.) at different polarization potentials. The circuit elements were used to simulate chronoamperometry in a system where copper actively corrodes at anodic potentials; from the simulation and the experimental results, the current decay in this system was attributed entirely to capacitive charging. The circuit elements were also used to explain the chronoamperometry results in passivating and

  2. New fundamental quantum mechanical operator-ordering identities for the coordinate and momentum operators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN HongYi

    2012-01-01

    In quantum mechanics theory one of the basic operator orderings is Q - P and P - Q ordering,where Q and P are the coordinate operator and the momentum operator,respectively.We derive some new fundamental operator identities about their mutual reordering.The technique of integration within Q - P ordering and P - Q ordering is introduced.The Q - P ordered and P - Q ordered formulas of the Wigner operator are also deduced which makes arranging the operators in either Q - P or P - Q ordering much more convenient.

  3. Fundamental transport mechanisms, fabrication and potential applications of nanoporous atomically thin membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael S. H.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Jang, Doojoon; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-06-01

    Graphene and other two-dimensional materials offer a new approach to controlling mass transport at the nanoscale. These materials can sustain nanoscale pores in their rigid lattices and due to their minimum possible material thickness, high mechanical strength and chemical robustness, they could be used to address persistent challenges in membrane separations. Here we discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the emerging field of nanoporous atomically thin membranes, focusing on the fundamental mechanisms of gas- and liquid-phase transport, membrane fabrication techniques and advances towards practical application. We highlight potential functional characteristics of the membranes and discuss applications where they are expected to offer advantages. Finally, we outline the major scientific questions and technological challenges that need to be addressed to bridge the gap from theoretical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments to real-world applications.

  4. Fundamental Distinctions in Physics underlying Nonsteady Forcings of Wind Turbine Power vs. Drivetrain by Atmospheric Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, James; Lavely, Adam; Nandi, Tarak

    2016-11-01

    Whereas the primary function of a wind turbine (WT) is the generation of electricity, wind farm profitability is decreased both by integrated losses in power and increases in premature failures of drivetrain components resulting from energetic nonsteady aerodynamic forcings of WT rotors by atmospheric and wake turbulence. Here we contrast the physics underlying dominant nonsteady atmospheric turbulence forcings of the bending moments in the WT rotor plane (torque/power) vs. the out-of-plane bending moments (OPBM) that underlie premature drivetrain component failure. Using an advanced actuator line model of the 5 MW NREL and the 1.5 MW GE wind turbine rotors embedded within a high-fidelity spectral LES of a typical daytime convective atmospheric boundary layer, we show that (1) the physics underlying large torque vs. OBPM fluctuations are associated with fundamentally different turbulence eddy characteristics and (2) nonsteady response centers on 4 characteristic time scales associated advection of eddies and load response of blades cutting through internal turbulence eddy structure. Supported by DOE. Computer resources by NSF/XSEDE.

  5. Peeling mechanism of tomato under infrared heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical behaviors of peeling tomatoes using infrared heat are thermally induced peel loosening and subsequent cracking. However, the mechanism of peel loosening and cracking due to infrared heating remains unclear. This study aimed at investigating the mechanism of peeling tomatoes under infrared h...

  6. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  7. Possible Mechanism for the Generation of a Fundamental Unit of Charge (long version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lestone, John Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-16

    Various methods for calculating particle-emission rates from hot systems are reviewed. Semi-classically derived photon-emission rates often contain the term exp(-ε/T) which needs to be replaced with the corresponding Planckian factor of [exp(-ε/T)-1]-1 to obtain the correct rate. This replacement is associated with the existence of stimulated emission. Simple arguments are used to demonstrate that black holes can also undergo stimulated emission, as previously determined by others. We extend these concepts to fundamental particles, and assume they can be stimulated to emit virtual photons with a cross section of πλ2, in the case of an isolated particle when the incident virtual-photon energy is < 2πmc2. Stimulated-virtual photons can be exchanged with other particles generating a force. With the inclusion of near-field effects, the model choices presented give a calculated fundamental unit of charge of 1.6022x10-19 C. If these choices are corroborated by detailed calculations then an understanding of the numerical value of the fine structure constant may emerge. The present study suggests charge might be an emergent property generated by a simple interaction mechanism between point-like particles and the electromagnetic vacuum, similar to the process that generates the Lamb shift.

  8. Fundamental mechanism for all-optical helicity-dependent switching of magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Switching magnetizations with femtosecond circularly polarized lasers may have revolutionary impacts on magnetic data storage and relevant applications. Achievements in ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic materials of various structures strongly imply a general phenomenon of fundamental atom-laser interaction. Rotating an atom’s wave function with the rotating electric field of a circularly polarized laser, I show the quantum mechanics for the atom is equivalent to that in a static electric field of the same magnitude and a tremendous static magnetic field which interacts with the atom in somewhat different ways. When some conditions are satisfied, transitions of atoms in these two crossed effective fields lead to a highly nonequilibrium state with orbital magnetic moments inclining to the effective magnetic field. The switching finally completes after the pulse duration via relaxation. PMID:28117460

  9. Fundamental mechanisms that influence the estimate of heat transfer to gas turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    Estimates of the heat transfer from the gas to stationary (vanes) or rotating blades poses a major uncertainty due to the complexity of the heat transfer processes. The gas flow through these blade rows is three dimensional with complex secondary viscous flow patterns that interact with the endwalls and blade surfaces. In addition, upstream disturbances, stagnation flow, curvature effects, and flow acceleration complicate the thermal transport mechanisms in the boundary layers. Some of these fundamental heat transfer effects are discussed. The chief purpose of the discussion is to acquaint those in the heat transfer community, not directly involved in gas turbines, of the seriousness of the problem and to recommend some basic research that would improve the capability for predicting gas-side heat transfer on turbine blades and vanes.

  10. Replicative Homeostasis: A fundamental mechanism mediating selective viral replication and escape mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sallie Richard

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C (HCV, hepatitis B (HBV, the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV, and other viruses that replicate via RNA intermediaries, cause an enormous burden of disease and premature death worldwide. These viruses circulate within infected hosts as vast populations of closely related, but genetically diverse, molecules known as "quasispecies". The mechanism(s by which this extreme genetic and antigenic diversity is stably maintained are unclear, but are fundamental to understanding viral persistence and pathobiology. The persistence of HCV, an RNA virus, is especially problematic and HCV stability, maintained despite rapid genomic mutation, is highly paradoxical. This paper presents the hypothesis, and evidence, that viruses capable of persistent infection autoregulate replication and the likely mechanism mediating autoregulation – Replicative Homeostasis – is described. Replicative homeostasis causes formation of stable, but highly reactive, equilibria that drive quasispecies expansion and generates escape mutation. Replicative homeostasis explains both viral kinetics and the enigma of RNA quasispecies stability and provides a rational, mechanistic basis for all observed viral behaviours and host responses. More importantly, this paradigm has specific therapeutic implication and defines, precisely, new approaches to antiviral therapy. Replicative homeostasis may also modulate cellular gene expression.

  11. Optical anisotropy induced by mechanical strain around the fundamental gap of GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Lastras-Martinez, A.; Lastras-Martinez, L.F. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Balderas-Navarro, R.E. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    We report on a theoretical-experimental study of reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) of GaAs (001) crystals under uniaxial stress. The study was carried out in the energy region around the fundamental transition. RAS spectra in the energy range from 1.2-1.7 eV were measured with a photoelastic-modulator-based spectrometer. To induce an optical anisotropy, the GaAs crystals were thinned down to 400 {mu}m and an calibrated uniaxial stress was applied by deflection. RAS showed a line shape consisting of an oscillation at around E{sub 0}. On the basis of a perturbative approach employing the Pikus-Bir Hamiltonian, we calculated the RAS line shape and found a close agreement with the experimental spectra. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Fundamental reaction mechanism and free energy profile for (-)-cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by cocaine esterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjun; Hamza, Adel; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2009-08-26

    The fundamental reaction mechanism of cocaine esterase (CocE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of (-)-cocaine and the corresponding free energy profile have been studied by performing pseudobond first-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy (QM/MM-FE) calculations. On the basis of the QM/MM-FE results, the entire hydrolysis reaction consists of four reaction steps, including the nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of (-)-cocaine benzoyl ester by the hydroxyl group of Ser117, dissociation of (-)-cocaine benzoyl ester, nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of (-)-cocaine benzoyl ester by water, and finally dissociation between the (-)-cocaine benzoyl group and Ser117 of CocE. The third reaction step involving the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule was found to be rate-determining, which is remarkably different from (-)-cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by wild-type butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; where the formation of the prereactive BChE-(-)-cocaine complex is rate-determining) or its mutants containing Tyr332Gly or Tyr332Ala mutation (where the first chemical reaction step is rate-determining). Besides, the role of Asp259 in the catalytic triad of CocE does not follow the general concept of the "charge-relay system" for all serine esterases. The free energy barrier calculated for the rate-determining step of CocE-catalyzed hydrolysis of (-)-cocaine is 17.9 kcal/mol, which is in good agreement with the experimentally derived activation free energy of 16.2 kcal/mol. In the present study, where many sodium ions are present, the effects of counterions are found to be significant in determining the free energy barrier. The finding of the significant effects of counterions on the free energy barrier may also be valuable in guiding future mechanistic studies on other charged enzymes.

  13. Fundamental Rheology of Disperse Systems Based on Single-Particle Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder Pal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of the fundamental rheology of dilute disperse systems is presented. The exact rheological constitutive equations based on rigorous single-particle mechanics are discussed for a variety of disperse systems. The different types of inclusions (disperse phase considered are: rigid-solid spherical particles with and without electric charge, rigid-porous spherical particles, non-rigid (soft solid particles, liquid droplets with and without surfactant, bubbles with and without surfactant, capsules, core-shell particles, non-spherical solid particles, and ferromagnetic spherical and non-spherical particles. In general, the state of the art is good in terms of the theoretical development. However, more experimental work is needed to verify the theoretical models and to determine their range of validity. This is especially true for dispersions of porous particles, capsules, core-shell particles, and magnetic particles. The main limitation of the existing theoretical developments on the rheology of disperse systems is that the matrix fluid is generally assumed to be Newtonian in nature. Rigorous theoretical models for the rheology of disperse systems consisting of non-Newtonian fluid as the matrix phase are generally lacking, especially at arbitrary flow strengths.

  14. Motions of the running horse and cheetah revisited: fundamental mechanics of the transverse and rotary gallop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, John E A; Gutmann, Anne

    2009-06-06

    Mammals use two distinct gallops referred to as the transverse (where landing and take-off are contralateral) and rotary (where landing and take-off are ipsilateral). These two gallops are used by a variety of mammals, but the transverse gallop is epitomized by the horse and the rotary gallop by the cheetah. In this paper, we argue that the fundamental difference between these gaits is determined by which set of limbs, fore or hind, initiates the transition of the centre of mass from a downward-forward to upward-forward trajectory that occurs between the main ballistic (non-contact) portions of the stride when the animal makes contact with the ground. The impulse-mediated directional transition is a key feature of locomotion on limbs and is one of the major sources of momentum and kinetic energy loss, and a main reason why active work must be added to maintain speed in locomotion. Our analysis shows that the equine gallop transition is initiated by a hindlimb contact and occurs in a manner in some ways analogous to the skipping of a stone on a water surface. By contrast, the cheetah gallop transition is initiated by a forelimb contact, and the mechanics appear to have much in common with the human bipedal run. Many mammals use both types of gallop, and the transition strategies that we describe form points on a continuum linked even to functionally symmetrical running gaits such as the tölt and amble.

  15. A numerical study of fundamental shock noise mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis - Cornell Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1995-01-01

    The results of this thesis demonstrate that direct numerical simulation can predict sound generation in unsteady aerodynamic flows containing shock waves. Shock waves can be significant sources of sound in high speed jet flows, on helicopter blades, and in supersonic combustion inlets. Direct computation of sound permits the prediction of noise levels in the preliminary design stage and can be used as a tool to focus experimental studies, thereby reducing cost and increasing the probability of a successfully quiet product in less time. This thesis reveals and investigates two mechanisms fundamental to sound generation by shocked flows: shock motion and shock deformation. Shock motion is modeled by the interaction of a sound wave with a shock. During the interaction, the shock wave begins to move and the sound pressure is amplified as the wave passes through the shock. The numerical approach presented in this thesis is validated by the comparison of results obtained in a quasi-one dimensional simulation with linear theory. Analysis of the perturbation energy demonstrated for the first time that acoustic energy is generated by the interaction. Shock deformation is investigated by the numerical simulation of a ring vortex interacting with a shock. This interaction models the passage of turbulent structures through the shock wave. The simulation demonstrates that both acoustic waves and contact surfaces are generated downstream during the interaction. Analysis demonstrates that the acoustic wave spreads cylindrically, that the sound intensity is highly directional, and that the sound pressure level increases significantly with increasing shock strength. The effect of shock strength on sound pressure level is consistent with experimental observations of shock noise, indicating that the interaction of a ring vortex with a shock wave correctly models a dominant mechanism of shock noise generation.

  16. Mechanisms underlying the hepatotoxic effects of ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Márcia; Pontes, Helena; Remião, Fernando; Bastos, Maria L; Carvalho, Félix

    2010-08-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) is a worldwide illegally used amphetamine-derived designer drug known to be hepatotoxic to humans. Jaundice, hepatomegaly, centrilobular necrosis, hepatitis and fibrosis represent some of the adverse effects caused by MDMA in the liver. Although there is irrefutable evidence of MDMA-induced hepatocellular damage, the mechanisms responsible for that toxicity remain to be thoroughly clarified. One well thought-of mechanism imply MDMA metabolism in the liver into reactive metabolites as responsible for the MDMA-elicited hepatotoxicity. However, other factors, including MDMA-induced hyperthermia, the increase in neurotransmitters efflux, the oxidation of biogenic amines, polydrug abuse pattern, and environmental features accompanying illicit MDMA use, may increase the risk for liver complications. Liver damage patterns of MDMA in animals and humans and current research on the mechanisms underlying the hepatotoxic effects of MDMA will be highlighted in this review.

  17. Mechanical characteristics and microcosmic mechanisms of granite under temperature loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiao-li; GAO Feng; SHEN Xiao-ming; XIE He-ping

    2008-01-01

    The relationships between mechanical characteristics of rock and microcosmic mechanism at high temperatures were investigated by MTS815, as well as the stress-strain behavior of granite under the action of temperatures ranging from room tem-perature to 1200 ℃. Based on a micropore structure analyzer and SEM, the changes in rock porosity and micro'structural mor-phology of sample fractures and brittle-plastic characteristics under high temperatures were analyzed. The results are as follows: 1) Mechanical characteristics do not show obvious variations before 800 ℃; strength decreases suddenly after 800 ℃ and bearing capacity is almost lost at 1200 ℃. 2) Rock porosity increases with rising temperatures; the threshold temperature is about 800 ℃;at this temperature its effect is basically uniform with strength decreasing rapidly. 3) The failure type of granite is a brittle tensile fracture at temperatures below 800 ℃ which transforms into plasticity at temperatures higher than 800 ℃ and crystal formation takes place at this time. Chemical reactions take place at 1200 ℃. Failure of granite under high temperature is a common result of thermal stress as indicated by an increase in the thermal expansion coefficient, transformation to crystal formation of minerals and structural chemical reactions.

  18. DNA under Force: Mechanics, Electrostatics, and Hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiang Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the basic intra- and inter-molecular forces of DNA has helped us to better understand and further predict the behavior of DNA. Single molecule technique elucidates the mechanics of DNA under applied external forces, sometimes under extreme forces. On the other hand, ensemble studies of DNA molecular force allow us to extend our understanding of DNA molecules under other forces such as electrostatic and hydration forces. Using a variety of techniques, we can have a comprehensive understanding of DNA molecular forces, which is crucial in unraveling the complex DNA functions in living cells as well as in designing a system that utilizes the unique properties of DNA in nanotechnology.

  19. Surface Damage Mechanism of Monocrystalline Si Under Mechanical Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Quanli; To, Suet; Guo, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Single-point diamond scratching and nanoindentation on monocrystalline silicon wafer were performed to investigate the surface damage mechanism of Si under the contact loading. The results showed that three typical stages of material removal appeared during dynamic scratching, and a chemical reaction of Si with the diamond indenter and oxygen occurred under the high temperature. In addition, the Raman spectra of the various points in the scratching groove indicated that the Si-I to β-Sn structure (Si-II) and the following β-Sn structure (Si-II) to amorphous Si transformation appeared under the rapid loading/unloading condition of the diamond grit, and the volume change induced by the phase transformation resulted in a critical depth (ductile-brittle transition) of cut (˜60 nm ± 15 nm) much lower than the theoretical calculated results (˜387 nm). Moreover, it also led to abnormal load-displacement curves in the nanoindentation tests, resulting in the appearance of elbow and pop-out effects (˜270 nm at 20 s, 50 mN), which were highly dependent on the loading/unloading conditions. In summary, phase transformation of Si promoted surface deformation and fracture under both static and dynamic mechanical loading.

  20. Unraveling the Fundamental Mechanisms of Solvent-Additive-Induced Optimization of Power Conversion Efficiencies in Organic Photovoltaic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Nuradhika; Das, Sanjib; Zhu, Jiahua; Kumar, Rajeev; Chen, Jihua; Xiao, Kai; Gu, Gong; Browning, James F; Sumpter, Bobby G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Lauter, Valeria

    2016-08-10

    The realization of controllable morphologies of bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is one of the key factors enabling high-efficiency devices. We provide new insights into the fundamental mechanisms essential for the optimization of power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) with additive processing to PBDTTT-CF:PC71BM system. We have studied the underlying mechanisms by monitoring the 3D nanostructural modifications in BHJs and correlated the modifications with the optical analysis and theoretical modeling of charge transport. Our results demonstrate profound effects of diiodooctane (DIO) on morphology and charge transport in the active layers. For small amounts of DIO (3 vol %), DIO facilitates a loosely packed mixed morphology with large clusters of PC71BM, leading to deterioration in PCE. Theoretical modeling of charge transport reveals that DIO increases the mobility of electrons and holes (the charge carriers) by affecting the energetic disorder and electric field dependence of the mobility. Our findings show the implications of phase separation and carrier transport pathways to achieve optimal device performances.

  1. Influence of spherical aberrations on fundamental mode beam quality under different laser resonators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Zhen; Hu Miao; Ge Jian-Hong; Zhao Zhi-Gang; Wang Sha; Liu Chong; Chen Jun

    2009-01-01

    Spherical aberrations of the thermal lens of the active media are severe when solid state lasers are strongly pumped.The fundamental mode profile deteriorates due to the aberrations. Self-consistent modes of a resonator with aberrations are calculated by using the Fox-Li diffraction iterative algorithm. Calculation results show that the aberration induced fundamental mode beam quality deterioration depends greatly on the resonator design. The tolerance of a flat-flat resonator to the aberration coefficient is about 30λ in the middle of stability, where λ is the wavelength of laser beam. But for a dynamically stable resonator, 2λ of spherical aberration will create diffraction loss of more than 40%, if inappropriate design criteria are used. A birefringence compensated laser resonator with two Nd:YAG rods is experimentally studied. The experimental data are in quite good agreement with simulation results.

  2. The corporate centre in a financial conglomerate : governance under fundamental industry changes

    OpenAIRE

    Fiole, Eelco Rokus Willem

    2002-01-01

    In part 1, we discuss 1) the fundamental changes in the financial services industry, 2) financial conglomerate structures and 3) value-based-management. These are core components for understanding the challenges and intentions of corporate level management of financial conglomerates. The financial services industry, financial conglomeration and value orientation In the first chapter, we highlight the major trend of consolidation in the financial services industry. This trend...

  3. The corporate centre in a financial conglomerate : governance under fundamental industry changes

    OpenAIRE

    Fiole, Eelco Rokus Willem

    2002-01-01

    In part 1, we discuss 1) the fundamental changes in the financial services industry, 2) financial conglomerate structures and 3) value-based-management. These are core components for understanding the challenges and intentions of corporate level management of financial conglomerates. The financial services industry, financial conglomeration and value orientation In the first chapter, we highlight the major trend of consolidation in the financial services industry. This trend...

  4. Mechanical stability of iron under hydrostatic stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, K. L.; Thakur, O. P.; Thakur, K. P.

    1991-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the mechanics of iron subjected to arbitrary fluid pressure has been carried out. Apart from the classical elastic moduli ( k, μ, and μ') and conventional elastic moduli (Green and stretch moduli) computations are carried out for a family of generalised moduli of which the conventional moduli are just specific members. With the generalised moduli the mechanical stability of iron is investigated through Born criteria. It is found that classical stability, Green stability and stretch stability are all represented uniquely by the present generalised scheme. The definition of effective classical moduli under stresses enabled the amalgamation of the Born criteria of lattice stability into the single classical criteria of lattice stability of cubic crystal under hydrostatic loading environment. Computations are also carried out to investigate the coordinate and stress dependence of Young's modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, mean velocity of elastic wave, and Debye temperature. Surprisingly, it is found that all these properties of solids play an important role in representing the mechanical stability of the solid. The path of uniaxial loading of iron is also investigated along with its internal energy variation on this path. This indicated the existance of stress-free fcc phase of iron on the path of uniaxial deformation at cell length a=3.6444 Å giving enthalpy of transformation (bcc→fcc) of 1.1 kJ/mol in good agreement with experimental results.

  5. Fundamentals of piezoelectric sensorics mechanical, dielectric, and thermodynamical properties of piezoelectric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tichý, Jan; Kittinger, Erwin; Prívratská, Jana; Privatska, Jana; Janovec, Vaclav

    2010-01-01

    This book presents the physics of piezoleletric sensors in a straight-forward and easy-to-grasp way, from the fundamentals of phenomenological crystal physics through more complex concepts, to its explanation of several important piezoelectric materials.

  6. Fundamental principles of data assimilation underlying the Verdandi library: applications to biophysical model personalization within euHeart

    OpenAIRE

    Chapelle, Dominique; Fragu, Marc; Mallet, Vivien; Moireau, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We present the fundamental principles of data assimilation underlying the Verdandi library, and how they are articulated with the modular architecture of the library. This translates -- in particular -- into the definition of standardized interfaces through which the data assimilation library interoperates with the model simulation software and the so-called observation manager. We also survey various examples of data assimilation applied to the personalization of biop...

  7. Mechanisms underlying astringency: introduction to an oral tribology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Rutuja; Brossard, Natalia; Chen, Jianshe

    2016-03-01

    Astringency is one of the predominant factors in the sensory experience of many foods and beverages ranging from wine to nuts. The scientific community is discussing mechanisms that explain this complex phenomenon, since there are no conclusive results which correlate well with sensory astringency. Therefore, the mechanisms and perceptual characteristics of astringency warrant further discussion and investigation. This paper gives a brief introduction of the fundamentals of oral tribology forming a basis of the astringency mechanism. It discusses the current state of the literature on mechanisms underlying astringency describing the existing astringency models. The review discusses the crucial role of saliva and its physiology which contributes significantly in astringency perception in the mouth. It also provides an overview of research concerned with the physiological and psychophysical factors that mediate the perception of this sensation, establishing the ground for future research. Thus, the overall aim of the review is to establish the critical roles of oral friction (thin-film lubrication) in the sensation of astringency and possibly of some other specific sensory features.

  8. Deformation Mechanisms of Gum Metals Under Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Rohini Priya

    defect structures to applied loading, we perform ex-situ nanoindentation. Nanoindentation is a convenient method as the plastic deformation is localized and probes a nominally defect free volume of the material. We subsequently characterize the defect structures in these alloys with both conventional TEM and advanced techniques such as HAADF HRSTEM and nanoprobe diffraction. These advanced techniques allow for a more thorough understanding of the observed deformation features. The main findings from this investigation are as follows. As expected we observe that a non-equilibrium phase, o, is present in the leaner beta-stabilized alloy, ST Ref-1. We do not find any direct evidence of secondary phases in STGM, and we find the beta phase in CWGM, along with lath microstructure with subgrain structure consisting of dislocation cell networks. Upon nanoindentation, we find twinning accompanied by beta nucleation on the twin boundary in ST Ref-1 samples. This result is consistent with previous findings and is reasonable considering the alloy is unstable with respect to beta transformation. We find deformation nanotwinning in cold worked gum metals under nanoindentation, which is initially surprising. We argue that when viewed as a nanocrystalline material, such a deformation mechanism is consistent with previous work, and furthermore, a deformation nanotwinned structure does not preclude an ideal shear mechanism from operating in the alloy. Lastly, we observe continuous lattice rotations in STGM under nanoindentation via nanoprobe diffraction. With this technique, for the first time we can demonstrate that the lattice rotations are truly continuous at the nanoscale. We can quantify this lattice rotation, and find that even though the rotation is large, it may be mediated by a reasonable geometrically necessary dislocation density, and note that similar rotations are typically observed in other materials under nanoindentation. HRSTEM and conventional TEM data confirm the

  9. An Underlying Geometrical Manifold for Hamiltonian Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Horwitz, L P; Levitan, J; Lewkowicz, M

    2015-01-01

    We show that there exists an underlying manifold with a conformal metric and compatible connection form, and a metric type Hamiltonian (which we call the geometrical picture) that can be put into correspondence with the usual Hamilton-Lagrange mechanics. The requirement of dynamical equivalence of the two types of Hamiltonians, that the momenta generated by the two pictures be equal for all times, is sufficient to determine an expansion of the conformal factor, defined on the geometrical coordinate representation, in its domain of analyticity with coefficients to all orders determined by functions of the potential of the Hamilton-Lagrange picture, defined on the Hamilton-Lagrange coordinate representation, and its derivatives. Conversely, if the conformal function is known, the potential of a Hamilton-Lagrange picture can be determined in a similar way. We show that arbitrary local variations of the orbits in the Hamilton-Lagrange picture can be generated by variations along geodesics in the geometrical pictu...

  10. A Case for the Need of Using Scaffolding Methods in Teaching Introductory, Fundamental Engineering Mechanics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan-Ashraf, Peggy C.; Freeman, Steven A.; Shelley, Mack C.

    2015-01-01

    In the past ten years, engineering classrooms have seen an exponential growth in the use of technology, more than during any other previous decade. Unprecedented advancements, such as the advent of innovative gadgets and fundamental instructional alterations in engineering classrooms, have introduced changes in both teaching and learning. Student…

  11. A Case for the Need of Using Scaffolding Methods in Teaching Introductory, Fundamental Engineering Mechanics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan-Ashraf, Peggy C.; Freeman, Steven A.; Shelley, Mack C.

    2015-01-01

    In the past ten years, engineering classrooms have seen an exponential growth in the use of technology, more than during any other previous decade. Unprecedented advancements, such as the advent of innovative gadgets and fundamental instructional alterations in engineering classrooms, have introduced changes in both teaching and learning. Student…

  12. Two distinct neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Takezawa, Masanori; Nakawake, Yo; Kunimatsu, Akira; Yamasue, Hidenori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyashita, Yasushi; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-03-18

    Cooperation is a hallmark of human society. Humans often cooperate with strangers even if they will not meet each other again. This so-called indirect reciprocity enables large-scale cooperation among nonkin and can occur based on a reputation mechanism or as a succession of pay-it-forward behavior. Here, we provide the functional and anatomical neural evidence for two distinct mechanisms governing the two types of indirect reciprocity. Cooperation occurring as reputation-based reciprocity specifically recruited the precuneus, a region associated with self-centered cognition. During such cooperative behavior, the precuneus was functionally connected with the caudate, a region linking rewards to behavior. Furthermore, the precuneus of a cooperative subject had a strong resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with the caudate and a large gray matter volume. In contrast, pay-it-forward reciprocity recruited the anterior insula (AI), a brain region associated with affective empathy. The AI was functionally connected with the caudate during cooperation occurring as pay-it-forward reciprocity, and its gray matter volume and rsFC with the caudate predicted the tendency of such cooperation. The revealed difference is consistent with the existing results of evolutionary game theory: although reputation-based indirect reciprocity robustly evolves as a self-interested behavior in theory, pay-it-forward indirect reciprocity does not on its own. The present study provides neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity and suggests that pay-it-forward reciprocity may not occur as myopic profit maximization but elicit emotional rewards.

  13. Approach to unbalance power active compensation under linear load unbalances and fundamental voltage asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segui-Chilet, S.; Gimeno-Sales, F.J.; Orts, S.; Alcaniz, M.; Masot, R. [Instituto de Tecnologia Electrica - Grupo de Tecnologia Electronica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Garcera, G.; Figueres, E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    This paper proposes a new definition of the unbalance power that allows the selective compensation of inefficiencies caused by linear loads by means of a three-phase shunt active power compensator (APC). Symmetrical components of current and voltage are used to evaluate the unbalance power in these systems and to define the compensating currents. The instantaneous power flows with unbalanced linear loads connected to a three-phase electrical system are analyzed following the normal procedure used for the quantification of the reactive power. Equations to calculate the unbalance power and the effective apparent power are obtained from the analysis of the instantaneous power flows. The output currents of the selective APC are defined using the instantaneous unbalance power approach. Power quantities and APC compensating current are defined for IEEE Std. 1459 and for the instantaneous unbalance power approach. Two examples are used to compare the power quantities and the APC operation. The main effects of unbalanced linear load and of fundamental voltage asymmetries are analyzed. Simulations of a shunt APC emphasize the advantages of the calculation of the compensating currents based on the proposed instantaneous unbalance power approach. A comparison with the results obtained by calculation of the compensating currents based on IEEE Std. 1459 is carried out. A new power factor is also defined and compared with other conventional definitions. (author)

  14. Beyond barriers: fundamental 'disconnects' underlying the treatment of breast cancer patients' sexual health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Meghan C; May, Suepattra G; Rendle, Katharine A S; Frosch, Dominick L; Kurian, Allison W

    2014-01-01

    Sexual health concerns represent one of the most frequently experienced and longest-lasting effects of breast cancer treatment, but research suggests that service providers rarely discuss sexual health with their patients. Existing research examining barriers to addressing patients' sexual health concerns has focused on discrete characteristics of the provider-patient interaction without considering the broader context in which these interactions occur. Drawing on the experiences of 21 breast cancer survivors, this paper explores three ways in which fundamental cultural and structural characteristics of the cancer care system in the USA may prevent breast cancer survivors from addressing their sexual health concerns, including: (1) when patients discussed sexual health with their providers, their providers approached sexuality as primarily physical, while participants experienced complex, multidimensional sexual health concerns; (2) specialisation within cancer care services made it difficult for patients to identify the appropriate provider to address their concerns; and (3) the structure of cancer care literally disconnects patients from the healthcare system at the time when sexual side effects commonly emerged. These data suggest that addressing breast cancer survivors' sexual health concerns requires a multifaceted approach to health systems change.

  15. Fundamental understanding of the thermal degradation mechanisms of waste tires and their air pollutant generation in a N2 atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Eilhann; Castaldi, Marco J

    2009-08-01

    The thermal decomposition of waste tires has been characterized via thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) tests, and significant mass loss has been observed between 300 and 500 degrees C. A series of gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) measurements, in which the instrument was coupled to a TGA unit, have been carried out to investigate the thermal degradation mechanisms as well as the air pollutant generation including volatile organic carbons (VOCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a nitrogen atmosphere. In order to understand fundamental information on the thermal degradation mechanisms of waste tires, the main constituents of tires, poly-isoprene rubber (IR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR), have been studied under the same conditions. All of the experimental work indicated that the bond scission on each monomer of the main constituents of tires was followed by hydrogenation and gas phase reactions. This helped to clarify the independent pathways and species attributable to IR and SBR during the pyrolysis process. To extend that understanding to a more practical level, a flow-through reactor was used to test waste tire, SBR and IR samples in the temperature range of 500-800 degrees C at a heating rate of approximately 200 degrees C. Lastly, the formation of VOCs (approximately 1-50 PPMV/10 mg of sample) and PAHs (approximately 0.2-7 PPMV/10 mg of sample) was observed at relatively low temperatures compared to conventional fuels, and its quantified concentration was significantly high due to the chemical structure of SBR and IR. The measurement of chemicals released during pyrolysis suggests not only a methodology for reducing the air pollutants but also the feasibility of petrochemical recovery during thermal treatment.

  16. Mechanisms underlying prorenin actions on hypothalamic neurons implicated in cardiometabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Pitra

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: We identified novel neuronal targets and cellular mechanisms underlying PR/PRR actions in critical hypothalamic neurons involved in cardiometabolic regulation. This fundamental mechanistic information regarding central PR/PRR actions is essential for the development of novel RAS-based therapeutic targets for the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders in obesity and hypertension.

  17. A Greatly Under-Appreciated Fundamental Principle of Physical Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    If a species does not have a finite lifetime in the reaction medium, it cannot be a mechanistic intermediate. This principle was first enunciated by Jencks, as the concept of an enforced mechanism. For instance, neither primary nor secondary carbocations have long enough lifetimes to exist in an aqueous medium, so SN1 reactions involving these substrates are not possible, and an SN2 mechanism is enforced. Only tertiary carbocations and those stabilized by resonance (benzyl cations, acylium ions) are stable enough to be reaction intermediates. More importantly, it is now known that neither H3O+ nor HO− exist as such in dilute aqueous solution. Several recent high-level calculations on large proton clusters are unable to localize the positive charge; it is found to be simply “on the cluster” as a whole. The lifetime of any ionized water species is exceedingly short, a few molecular vibrations at most; the best experimental study, using modern IR instrumentation, has the most probable hydrated proton structure as H13O6+, but only an estimated quarter of the protons are present even in this form at any given instant. Thanks to the Grotthuss mechanism of chain transfer along hydrogen bonds, in reality a proton or a hydroxide ion is simply instantly available anywhere it is needed for reaction. Important mechanistic consequences result. Any charged oxygen species (e.g., a tetrahedral intermediate) is also not going to exist long enough to be a reaction intermediate, unless the charge is stabilized in some way, usually by resonance. General acid catalysis is the rule in reactions in concentrated aqueous acids. The Grotthuss mechanism also means that reactions involving neutral water are favored; the solvent is already highly structured, so the entropy involved in bringing several solvent molecules to the reaction center is unimportant. Examples are given. PMID:22272074

  18. A Greatly Under-Appreciated Fundamental Principle of Physical Organic Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin A. Cox

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available If a species does not have a finite lifetime in the reaction medium, it cannot be a mechanistic intermediate. This principle was first enunciated by Jencks, as the concept of an enforced mechanism. For instance, neither primary nor secondary carbocations have long enough lifetimes to exist in an aqueous medium, so SN1 reactions involving these substrates are not possible, and an SN2 mechanism is enforced. Only tertiary carbocations and those stabilized by resonance (benzyl cations, acylium ions are stable enough to be reaction intermediates. More importantly, it is now known that neither H3O+ nor HO– exist as such in dilute aqueous solution. Several recent high-level calculations on large proton clusters are unable to localize the positive charge; it is found to be simply “on the cluster” as a whole. The lifetime of any ionized water species is exceedingly short, a few molecular vibrations at most; the best experimental study, using modern IR instrumentation, has the most probable hydrated proton structure as H13O6+, but only an estimated quarter of the protons are present even in this form at any given instant. Thanks to the Grotthuss mechanism of chain transfer along hydrogen bonds, in reality a proton or a hydroxide ion is simply instantly available anywhere it is needed for reaction. Important mechanistic consequences result. Any charged oxygen species (e.g., a tetrahedral intermediate is also not going to exist long enough to be a reaction intermediate, unless the charge is stabilized in some way, usually by resonance. General acid catalysis is the rule in reactions in concentrated aqueous acids. The Grotthuss mechanism also means that reactions involving neutral water are favored; the solvent is already highly structured, so the entropy involved in bringing several solvent molecules to the reaction center is unimportant. Examples are given.

  19. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  20. Underlying mechanisms for commuting and migration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simini, Filippo; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo; Bagrow, James

    2012-02-01

    Both frequent commuting and long-term migration are complex human processes that strongly depend on socio-demographic, spatial, political, and even economic factors. We can describe both processes using weighted networks, in which nodes represent geographic locations and link weights denote the flux of individuals who commute (or migrate) between locations. Although both processes concern the movements of individuals, they are very different: commuting takes place on a daily (or weekly) basis and always between the same two locations, while migration is a rare, one-way displacement. Despite these differences, a recently proposed stochastic model, the Radiation model, provides evidence that both processes may be successfully described by the same underlying mechanism. For example, quantities of interest for either process, such as the distributions of trip length and destination populations, appear remarkably similar to the model's predictions. We explore the similarities and differences between commuting and migration both empirically, using census data for the United States, and theoretically, by comparing these commuting and migration networks to the predictions given by the Radiation model.

  1. Directional motion of liquid under mechanical vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costalonga, Maxime; Brunet, Philippe; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2014-11-01

    When a liquid is submitted to mechanical vibrations, steady flows or motion can be generated by non-linear effects. One example is the steady acoustic streaming one can observe when an acoustic wave propagates in a fluid. At the scale of a droplet, steady motion of the whole amount of liquid can arise from zero-mean periodic forcing. As It has been observed by Brunet et al. (PRL 2007), a drop can climb an inclined surface when submitted to vertical vibrations above a threshold in acceleration. Later, Noblin et al. (PRL 2009) showed the velocity and the direction of motion of a sessile drop submitted to both horizontal and vertical vibrations can be tuned by the phase shift between these two excitations. Here we present an experimental study of the mean motion of a sessile drop under slanted vibrations, focusing on the effects of drop properties, as well as the inclination angle of the axis of vibrations. It is shown that the volume and viscosity strongly affect the drop mean velocity, and can even change the direction of its motion. In the case of a low viscous drop, gravity can become significant and be modulated by the inclination of the axis of vibrations. Contact line dynamic during the drop oscillations is also investigated.

  2. An underlying geometrical manifold for Hamiltonian mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, L. P.; Yahalom, A.; Levitan, J.; Lewkowicz, M.

    2017-02-01

    We show that there exists an underlying manifold with a conformal metric and compatible connection form, and a metric type Hamiltonian (which we call the geometrical picture), that can be put into correspondence with the usual Hamilton-Lagrange mechanics. The requirement of dynamical equivalence of the two types of Hamiltonians, that the momenta generated by the two pictures be equal for all times, is sufficient to determine an expansion of the conformal factor, defined on the geometrical coordinate representation, in its domain of analyticity with coefficients to all orders determined by functions of the potential of the Hamiltonian-Lagrange picture, defined on the Hamilton-Lagrange coordinate representation, and its derivatives. Conversely, if the conformal function is known, the potential of a Hamilton-Lagrange picture can be determined in a similar way. We show that arbitrary local variations of the orbits in the Hamilton-Lagrange picture can be generated by variations along geodesics in the geometrical picture and establish a correspondence which provides a basis for understanding how the instability in the geometrical picture is manifested in the instability of the the original Hamiltonian motion.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Psychological Stress and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Yu Jin; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Park, Seorim; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Follo, Matilde Yung; Cocco, Lucio; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress is an emotion experienced when people are under mental pressure or encounter unexpected problems. Extreme or repetitive stress increases the risk of developing human disease, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), immune diseases, mental disorders, and cancer. Several studies have shown an association between psychological stress and cancer growth and metastasis in animal models and case studies of cancer patients. Stress induces the secretion of stress-related mediators, such as catecholamine, cortisol, and oxytocin, via the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis or the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). These stress-related hormones and neurotransmitters adversely affect stress-induced tumor progression and cancer therapy. Catecholamine is the primary factor that influences tumor progression. It can regulate diverse cellular signaling pathways through adrenergic receptors (ADRs), which are expressed by several types of cancer cells. Activated ADRs enhance the proliferation and invasion abilities of cancer cells, alter cell activity in the tumor microenvironment, and regulate the interaction between cancer and its microenvironment to promote tumor progression. Additionally, other stress mediators, such as glucocorticoids and oxytocin, and their cognate receptors are involved in stress-induced cancer growth and metastasis. Here, we will review how each receptor-mediated signal cascade contributes to tumor initiation and progression and discuss how we can use these molecular mechanisms for cancer therapy.

  4. Vascular Adventitia Calcification and Its Underlying Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    Full Text Available Previous research on vascular calcification has mainly focused on the vascular intima and media. However, we show here that vascular calcification may also occur in the adventitia. The purpose of this work is to help elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms underlying vascular calcification. The calcified lesions were examined by Von Kossa staining in ApoE-/- mice which were fed high fat diets (HFD for 48 weeks and human subjects aged 60 years and older that had died of coronary heart disease, heart failure or acute renal failure. Explant cultured fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (SMCswere obtained from rat adventitia and media, respectively. After calcification induction, cells were collected for Alizarin Red S staining. Calcified lesions were observed in the aorta adventitia and coronary artery adventitia of ApoE-/-mice, as well as in the aorta adventitia of human subjects examined. Explant culture of fibroblasts, the primary cell type comprising the adventitia, was successfully induced for calcification after incubation with TGF-β1 (20 ng/ml + mineralization media for 4 days, and the phenotype conversion vascular adventitia fibroblasts into myofibroblasts was identified. Culture of SMCs, which comprise only a small percentage of all cells in the adventitia, in calcifying medium for 14 days resulted in significant calcification.Vascular calcification can occur in the adventitia. Adventitia calcification may arise from the fibroblasts which were transformed into myofibroblasts or smooth muscle cells.

  5. Human Cooperation and Its Underlying Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Sabrina; Park, Soyoung Q

    2017-01-01

    Cooperation is a uniquely human behavior and can be observed across cultures. In order to maintain cooperative behavior in society, people are willing to punish deviant behavior on their own expenses and even without any personal benefits. Cooperation has been object of research in several disciplines. Psychologists, economists, sociologists, biologists, and anthropologists have suggested several motives possibly underlying cooperative behavior. In recent years, there has been substantial progress in understanding neural mechanisms enforcing cooperation. Psychological as well as economic theories were tested for their plausibility using neuroscientific methods. For example, paradigms from behavioral economics were adapted to be tested in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. Also, related brain functions were modulated by using transmagnetic brain stimulation (TMS). While cooperative behavior has often been associated with positive emotions, noncooperative behavior was found to be linked to negative emotions. On a neural level, the temporoparietal junction (TPJ), the striatum, and other reward-related brain areas have been shown to be activated by cooperation, whereas noncooperation has mainly been associated with activity in the insula.

  6. ULTRASONIC STUDIES OF THE FUNDAMENTAL MECHANISMS OF RECRYSTALLIZATION AND SINTERING OF METALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TURNER, JOSEPH A.

    2005-11-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction of an ultrasonic wave with complex media, with specific emphases on recrystallization and sintering of metals. A combined analytical, numerical, and experimental research program was implemented. Theoretical models of elastic wave propagation through these complex materials were developed using stochastic wave field techniques. The numerical simulations focused on finite element wave propagation solutions through complex media. The experimental efforts were focused on corroboration of the models developed and on the development of new experimental techniques. The analytical and numerical research allows the experimental results to be interpreted quantitatively.

  7. Radiology fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Harjit

    2011-01-01

    ""Radiology Fundamentals"" is a concise introduction to the dynamic field of radiology for medical students, non-radiology house staff, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiology assistants, and other allied health professionals. The goal of the book is to provide readers with general examples and brief discussions of basic radiographic principles and to serve as a curriculum guide, supplementing a radiology education and providing a solid foundation for further learning. Introductory chapters provide readers with the fundamental scientific concepts underlying the medical use of imag

  8. Fundamental roles of reactive oxygen species and protective mechanisms in the female reproductive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Futoshi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Controlled oxidation, such as disulfide bond formation in sperm nuclei and during ovulation, plays a fundamental role in mammalian reproduction. Excess oxidation, however, causes oxidative stress, resulting in the dysfunction of the reproductive process. Antioxidation reactions that reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species are of prime importance in reproductive systems in maintaining the quality of gametes and support reproduction. While anti-oxidative enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, play a central role in eliminating oxidative stress, reduction-oxidation (redox systems, comprised of mainly glutathione and thioredoxin, function to reduce the levels of oxidized molecules. Aldo-keto reductase, using NADPH as an electron donor, detoxifies carbonyl compounds resulting from the oxidation of lipids and proteins. Thus, many antioxidative and redox enzyme genes are expressed and aggressively protect gametes and embryos in reproductive systems.

  9. Molecular Electrical Doping of Organic Semiconductors: Fundamental Mechanisms and Emerging Dopant Design Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Ingo; Heimel, Georg; Oehzelt, Martin; Winkler, Stefanie; Koch, Norbert

    2016-03-15

    Today's information society depends on our ability to controllably dope inorganic semiconductors, such as silicon, thereby tuning their electrical properties to application-specific demands. For optoelectronic devices, organic semiconductors, that is, conjugated polymers and molecules, have emerged as superior alternative owing to the ease of tuning their optical gap through chemical variability and their potential for low-cost, large-area processing on flexible substrates. There, the potential of molecular electrical doping for improving the performance of, for example, organic light-emitting devices or organic solar cells has only recently been established. The doping efficiency, however, remains conspicuously low, highlighting the fact that the underlying mechanisms of molecular doping in organic semiconductors are only little understood compared with their inorganic counterparts. Here, we review the broad range of phenomena observed upon molecularly doping organic semiconductors and identify two distinctly different scenarios: the pairwise formation of both organic semiconductor and dopant ions on one hand and the emergence of ground state charge transfer complexes between organic semiconductor and dopant through supramolecular hybridization of their respective frontier molecular orbitals on the other hand. Evidence for the occurrence of these two scenarios is subsequently discussed on the basis of the characteristic and strikingly different signatures of the individual species involved in the respective doping processes in a variety of spectroscopic techniques. The critical importance of a statistical view of doping, rather than a bimolecular picture, is then highlighted by employing numerical simulations, which reveal one of the main differences between inorganic and organic semiconductors to be their respective density of electronic states and the doping induced changes thereof. Engineering the density of states of doped organic semiconductors, the Fermi

  10. Electrocatalysis of formic acid on palladium and platinum surfaces: from fundamental mechanisms to fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kun; Zhang, Han-Xuan; Zou, Shouzhong; Cai, Wen-Bin

    2014-10-14

    Formic acid as a natural biomass and a CO2 reduction product has attracted considerable interest in renewable energy exploitation, serving as both a promising candidate for chemical hydrogen storage material and a direct fuel for low temperature liquid fed fuel cells. In addition to its chemical dehydrogenation, formic acid oxidation (FAO) is a model reaction in the study of electrocatalysis of C1 molecules and the anode reaction in direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). Thanks to a deeper mechanistic understanding of FAO on Pt and Pd surfaces brought about by recent advances in the fundamental investigations, the "synthesis-by-design" concept has become a mainstream idea to attain high-performance Pt- and Pd-based nanocatalysts. As a result, a large number of efficient nanocatalysts have been obtained through different synthesis strategies by tailoring geometric and electronic structures of the two primary catalytic metals. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of recent progress in the mechanistic studies of FAO, the synthesis of novel Pd- and Pt-based nanocatalysts as well as their practical applications in DFAFCs with a focus on discussing studies significantly contributing to these areas in the past five years.

  11. Computational contact and impact mechanics fundamentals of modeling interfacial phenomena in nonlinear finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laursen, Tod A

    2003-01-01

    This book comprehensively treats the formulation and finite element approximation of contact and impact problems in nonlinear mechanics. Intended for students, researchers and practitioners interested in numerical solid and structural analysis, as well as for engineers and scientists dealing with technologies in which tribological response must be characterized, the book includes an introductory but detailed overview of nonlinear finite element formulations before dealing with contact and impact specifically. Topics encompassed include the continuum mechanics, mathematical structure, variational framework, and finite element implementations associated with contact/impact interaction. Additionally, important and currently emerging research topics in computational contact mechanics are introduced, encompassing such topics as tribological complexity, conservative treatment of inelastic impact interaction, and novel spatial discretization strategies.

  12. The fundamental role of mechanical properties in the progression of cancer disease and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2014-07-01

    The role of mechanical properties in cancer disease and inflammation is still underinvestigated and even ignored in many oncological and immunological reviews. In particular, eight classical hallmarks of cancer have been proposed, but they still ignore the mechanics behind the processes that facilitate cancer progression. To define the malignant transformation of neoplasms and finally reveal the functional pathway that enables cancer cells to promote cancer progression, these classical hallmarks of cancer require the inclusion of specific mechanical properties of cancer cells and their microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix as well as embedded cells such as fibroblasts, macrophages or endothelial cells. Thus, this review will present current cancer research from a biophysical point of view and will therefore focus on novel physical aspects and biophysical methods to investigate the aggressiveness of cancer cells and the process of inflammation. As cancer or immune cells are embedded in a certain microenvironment such as the extracellular matrix, the mechanical properties of this microenvironment cannot be neglected, and alterations of the microenvironment may have an impact on the mechanical properties of the cancer or immune cells. Here, it is highlighted how biophysical approaches, both experimental and theoretical, have an impact on the classical hallmarks of cancer and inflammation. It is even pointed out how these biophysical approaches contribute to the understanding of the regulation of cancer disease and inflammatory responses after tissue injury through physical microenvironmental property sensing mechanisms. The recognized physical signals are transduced into biochemical signaling events that guide cellular responses, such as malignant tumor progression, after the transition of cancer cells from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype or an inflammatory response due to tissue injury. Moreover, cell adaptation to mechanical alterations, in

  13. Peer influence: neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallen, Mirre; Smidts, A.; Sanfey, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    People often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants completed

  14. Peer influence: Neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Stallen (Mirre); A. Smidts (Ale); A.G. Sanfey (Alan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPeople often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participant

  15. Peer influence: neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallen, Mirre; Smidts, A.; Sanfey, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    People often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants completed

  16. Peer influence: Neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Stallen (Mirre); A. Smidts (Ale); A.G. Sanfey (Alan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPeople often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

  17. Fundamental mechanisms for conversion of volatiles in biomass and waste combustion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glarborg, P.; Hindiyarti, L.; Marshall, P.; Livbjerg, H.; Dagaut, P.; Jensen, Anker; Frandsen, Flemming

    2007-03-15

    This project deals with the volatile oxidation chemistry in biomass and waste fired systems, emphasizing reactions important for pollutants emissions (NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, HCl, aerosols). The project aims to extend existing models and databases with a number of chemical subsystems that are presently not well understood, but are particularly important in connection with combustion of biomass and waste. The project is divided into 3 tasks. Task 1: Conversion of chlorine, sulfur and alkali gas phase components in combustion of biomass. Task 2: Formation mechanisms for NO{sub x} in the freeboard of grate combustion of biomass. Task 3: Oxidation mechanisms for oxygenated hydrocarbons in the volatiles from pyrolysis of biomass. (au)

  18. Fundamental Mechanisms, Predictive Modeling, and Novel Aerospace Applications of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    rich low temperature chemistry Pressure: 1 atm DME model: Zhao et al., Int. J. Chem. Kinet ., (40) 2008 37 Flow tube experiments DME : rich low... Kinetic enhancement Fuel fragmentsTemperature increase Transport enhancementThermal enhancement Radicals H2, CO CH4 Understanding: Good poor O, NO O2(a∆g...plasma flame kinetic mechanism Develop numerical methods to achieve efficient modeling of detailed plasma flame chemistry 5 Outline 1. Background 2

  19. Curved Nanotube Structures under Mechanical Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Yazdani Sarvestani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Configuration of carbon nanotube (CNT has been the subject of research to perform theoretical development for analyzing nanocomposites. A new theoretical solution is developed to study curved nanotube structures subjected to mechanical loadings. A curved nanotube structure is considered. A nonlocal displacement-based solution is proposed by using a displacement approach of Toroidal Elasticity based on Eringen’s theory of nonlocal continuum mechanics. The governing equations of curved nanotube structures are developed in toroidal coordinate system. The method of successive approximation is used to discretize the displacement-based governing equations and find the general solution subjected to bending moment. The numerical results show that all displacement components increase with increasing the nonlocal parameter. The present theoretical study highlights the significance of the geometry and nonlocal parameter effects on mechanical behavior of nanotube structures.

  20. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  1. Molecular mechanisms underlying the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Norihito

    2011-10-01

    A wide range of biological processes exhibit circadian rhythm, enabling plants to adapt to the environmental day-night cycle. This rhythm is generated by the so-called 'circadian clock'. Although a number of genetic approaches have identified >25 clock-associated genes involved in the Arabidopsis clock mechanism, the molecular functions of a large part of these genes are not known. Recent comprehensive studies have revealed the molecular functions of several key clock-associated proteins. This progress has provided mechanistic insights into how key clock-associated proteins are integrated, and may help in understanding the essence of the clock's molecular mechanisms.

  2. Micro-Plasto-Hydrodynamic Lubrication a Fundamental Mechanism in Cold Rolling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugier, Maxime; Boman, Romain; Legrand, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents recent investigations in Micro-Plasto-Hydrodynamic (MPH) lubrication. Industrial evidences of the existence of MPH lubrication mechanism for cold rolling processes are presented. A new lubrication model developed for strip drawing processes is then applied to predict the MPH...... lubrication initiation and MPH lubrication extension along the tool-piece solid contacts initially in boundary lubrication regime. Finally, it is shown how this new MPH lubrication model can be implemented in a cold rolling model to maximize mills capabilities, determine optimum rolling oils properties...

  3. Fundamental Studies of the Mechanical Behavior of Microelectronic Thin Film Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Si I-xGex Strained Layers (D.B.Noble) ................................................ 55 I. Oral Presentations Resulting from AFOSR Grants No. 89-0185...120 8 7 0 100 6 4 60 80 , E 60 0 F. ac sorption D - 21 - A desorption ( Vih ) Q 1 I - I - - a- 1 -10 0 10 20 30 40 annealing time (min) Fig. 8 D...III. ORAL PRESENTATIONS RESULTING FROM AFOSR GRANTS NO. 86- 0051 AND 86-0051 1. W.DhjX, "Mechanical Properties of Microelectronic Thin Film Materials

  4. Fundamentally updating fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gail; Barton, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Recent educational research indicates that the six competencies of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses initiative are best introduced in early prelicensure clinical courses. Content specific to quality and safety has traditionally been covered in senior level courses. This article illustrates an effective approach to using quality and safety as an organizing framework for any prelicensure fundamentals of nursing course. Providing prelicensure students a strong foundation in quality and safety in an introductory clinical course facilitates early adoption of quality and safety competencies as core practice values.

  5. Money Multiplier under Reserve Option Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Halit AKTURK; Gocen, Hasan; Duran, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a generalized money (M2) multiplier formula to the literature for a monetary system with Reserve Option Mechanism (ROM). Various features of the proposed multiplier are then explored using monthly Turkish data during the decade 2005 to 2015. We report a step increase in the magnitude and a slight upward adjustment in the long-run trend of the multiplier with the adoption of ROM. We provide evidence for substantial change in the seasonal pattern of the multiplier, cash ra...

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamichi, Norihito

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of biological processes exhibit circadian rhythm, enabling plants to adapt to the environmental day–night cycle. This rhythm is generated by the so-called ‘circadian clock’. Although a number of genetic approaches have identified >25 clock-associated genes involved in the Arabidopsis clock mechanism, the molecular functions of a large part of these genes are not known. Recent comprehensive studies have revealed the molecular functions of several key clock-associated proteins. Thi...

  7. Fundamental mechanisms of telomerase action in yeasts and mammals: understanding telomeres and telomerase in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Christine A.

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant activation of telomerase occurs in 85–90% of all cancers and underpins the ability of cancer cells to bypass their proliferative limit, rendering them immortal. The activity of telomerase is tightly controlled at multiple levels, from transcriptional regulation of the telomerase components to holoenzyme biogenesis and recruitment to the telomere, and finally activation and processivity. However, studies using cancer cell lines and other model systems have begun to reveal features of telomeres and telomerase that are unique to cancer. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the mechanisms of telomerase recruitment and activation using insights from studies in mammals and budding and fission yeasts. Finally, we discuss the differences in telomere homeostasis between normal cells and cancer cells, which may provide a foundation for telomere/telomerase targeted cancer treatments. PMID:28330934

  8. Investigation of Mechanisms Underlying Odor Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    olfactory epithelium of the rat using a procedure similar to that used in .amphibian forms (e.g., Kubie & Moulton, 1979). The detailed description of most...distinct differences in responsiveness of the underlying receptor sheet depending upon the region stimulated (e.g., Kauer & Moulton, 1979; Kubie M...patterns of olfactory bulb neurons using odor stimulation of small nasal areas in the salamander. J. Physiol. (London), 1974, 243, 717-737. Kubie , J.S

  9. Fundamental Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, Hannu; Oja, Heikki; Poutanen, Markku; Donner, Karl Johan

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental Astronomy gives a well-balanced and comprehensive introduction to the topics of classical and modern astronomy. While emphasizing both the astronomical concepts and the underlying physical principles, the text provides a sound basis for more profound studies in the astronomical sciences. The fifth edition of this successful undergraduate textbook has been extensively modernized and extended in the parts dealing with the Milky Way, extragalactic astronomy and cosmology as well as with extrasolar planets and the solar system (as a consequence of recent results from satellite missions and the new definition by the International Astronomical Union of planets, dwarf planets and small solar-system bodies). Furthermore a new chapter on astrobiology has been added. Long considered a standard text for physical science majors, Fundamental Astronomy is also an excellent reference and entrée for dedicated amateur astronomers.

  10. Fundamental study of microelectronic chip response under laser ultrasonic-interferometric inspection using C-scan method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Gong, Jie; Ume, I. Charles

    2014-02-01

    In modern surface mount packaging technologies, such as flip chips, chip scale packages, and ball grid arrays(BGA), chips are attached to the substrates/printed wiring board (PWB) using solder bump interconnections. The quality of solder bumps between the chips and the substrate/board is difficult to inspect. Laser ultrasonic-interferometric technique was proved to be a promising approach for solder bump inspection because of its noncontact and nondestructive characteristics. Different indicators extracted from received signals have been used to predict the potential defects, such as correlation coefficient, error ratio, frequency shifting, etc. However, the fundamental understanding of the chip behavior under laser ultrasonic inspection is still missing. Specifically, it is not sure whether the laser interferometer detected out-of-plane displacements were due to wave propagation or structural vibration when the chip was excited by pulsed laser. Plus, it is found that the received signals are chip dependent. Both challenges impede the interpretation of acquired signals. In this paper, a C-scan method was proposed to study the underlying phenomenon during laser ultrasonic inspection. The full chip was inspected. The response of the chip under laser excitation was visualized in a movie resulted from acquired signals. Specifically, a BGA chip was investigated to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. By characterizing signals using discrete wavelet transform(DWT), both ultrasonic wave propagation and vibration were observed. Separation of them was successfully achieved using ideal band-pass filter and visualized in resultant movies, too. The observed ultrasonic waves were characterized and their respective speeds were measured by applying 2-D FFT. The C-scan method, combined with different digital signal processing techniques, was proved to be an very effective methodology to learn the behavior of chips under laser excitation. This general procedure can be

  11. Fundamental studies of growth mechanisms in physical vapour deposition of aluminium

    CERN Document Server

    Knorr, N J

    2000-01-01

    temperature could be independently controlled due to the low deposition rate of the aluminium. The depositions were performed in a UHV environment to ensure that film growth was not mediated by contamination. The ion energy range used was 10-75eV and the substrate temperature varied from -100 deg C to 200 deg C. The depositions were onto silicon (100) with a native oxide surface, except for a set of depositions which were performed on to silicon with the native oxide surface removed. The cleanliness of the depositions was verified using in-situ XPS analysis and after deposition the structure of the aluminium films was inferred from measurements using SEM, TEM, AFM XRD and Nano-indendation. This information allowed the mechanisms of growth of the aluminium films to be investigated. In addition to the extensive array of IBDR depositions a series of aluminium films were deposited using evaporation and sputtering. These films were grown at substrate temperatures between room temperate and 200 deg C. The use of ev...

  12. The RAGE Axis: a Fundamental Mechanism Signaling Danger to the Vulnerable Vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shi Fang; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily molecule RAGE transduces the effects of multiple ligands, including advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), S100/calgranulins, high mobility group box-1, amyloid-β peptide and β-sheet fibrils. In diabetes, hyperglycemia likely stimulates the initial burst of production of ligands that interact with RAGE and activate signaling mechanisms. Consequently, increased generation of pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic molecules and reactive oxygen species trigger further cycles of oxidative stress via RAGE, thus setting the stage for augmented damage to diabetic tissues in the face of further insults. Many of the ligand families of RAGE have been identified in atherosclerotic plaques and in the infarcted heart. Together with increased expression of RAGE in diabetic settings, we propose that release and accumulation of RAGE ligands contribute to exaggerated cellular damage. Stopping the vicious cycle of AGE-RAGE and RAGE axis signaling in the vulnerable heart and great vessels may be essential in controlling and preventing the consequences of diabetes. PMID:20299674

  13. Fundamental mechanical limitations on the visualization of elasticity contrast in elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnekanti, H; Ophir, J; Huang, Y; Céspedes, I

    1995-01-01

    Elastography is a new ultrasonic imaging technique that produces images (elastograms) of the elastic properties of complaint tissue. To determine the Young's modulus it is necessary to measure or estimate any five of seven relevant variables. In elastography, the measured quantity is the normal strain component in the direction of the applied load, and the three normal components of stress may be estimated using the modified Love's analytical models while assuming a value close to 0.5 (incompressible) for Poisson's ratio. The distribution of Young's moduli can thus be computed and displayed in the form of two-dimensional images called elastrograms. The analytical models used for the estimation of the three normal components of stress assume that the target is semi-infinite and homogeneous in composition. The objective of this article is to determine some of the errors associated with the assumption of homogeneity of the target. Experiments using computer simulations were performed to study the efficiency with which elastograms display the contrast in the Young's modulus of a lesion or target, with respect to its background under certain conditions. It was observed (using the definition of contrast-transfer efficiency of elastography as the ratio of the elasticity contrast as measured from an elastogram, to the true contrast) that elastograms were consistently efficient in quantitatively depicting the elasticity contrast of hard lesions; however, they showed suboptimal contrast-transfer efficiency in cases of soft lesions in a hard background. In general, elastograms are efficient in displaying the elasticity contrast of hard or soft lesions which have a low contrast level with respect to the surroundings, irrespective of their size and location.

  14. Environmental genotoxicity: Probing the underlying mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Theodorakis, C. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Environmental pollution is a complex issue because of the diversity of anthropogenic agents, both chemical and physical, that have been detected and catalogued. The consequences to biota from exposure to genotoxic agents present an additional problem because of the potential for these agents to produce adverse change at the cellular and organismal levels. Past studies in genetic toxicology at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have focused on structural damage to the DNA of environmental species that may occur after exposure to genotoxic agents and the use of this information to document exposure and to monitor remediation. In an effort to predict effects at the population, community and ecosystem levels, current studies in genetic ecotoxicology are attempting to characterize the biological mechanisms at the gene level that regulate and limit the response of an individual organism to genotoxic factors in their environment.

  15. Nonlinear Mechanics of MEMS Rectangular Microplates under Electrostatic Actuation

    KAUST Repository

    Saghir, Shahid

    2016-12-01

    initially curved microplates. Microplates often experience an initial curvature imperfection, due to the micro fabrication process, which affects significantly their mechanical behavior. In this case a clamped-free-clamped-free microplate is considered. We validate the reduced order model by comparing the calculated static behavior and the fundamental natural frequency with those computed by a finite element model. As case studies, we consider two commonly encountered profiles of the initial curvature imperfection and study their effects on both the static and dynamic responses of the microplates. Next, an initially curved microplate made of silicon nitride is studied. The static behavior of the microplate is investigated when applying a DC voltage. Then, the dynamic behavior of the microplate is examined under the application of a harmonic AC voltage, superimposed to a DC voltage. Simulation results calculated by the reduced order model are compared with experimental data for model validation purpose, which show good agreement.

  16. MECHANISMS UNDERLYING MATERNAL VENOUS ADAPTATION IN PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Cresta Wedel; Mandala, Maurizio; Barron, Carolyn; Bernstein, Ira; Osol, George

    2009-01-01

    To define the effects of pregnancy on mechanical properties and reactivity, mesenteric veins from late pregnant (LP) and virgin control (NP) rats were pressurized to determine gestational changes in size and distensibility. Reactivity studies used an adrenergic constrictor (norepinephrine, NE) and an endothelium-mediated vasodilator (acetylcholine, ACh). The contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to endothelial function was evaluated with pharmacologic inhibition of NO synthase. Roles of NO and cGMP in smooth muscle vasodilation were determined by using an NO donor with and without cGMP inhibition using ODQ, a selective inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase. In pregnancy, endothelium-dependent vasodilation markedly increased (largely due to endogenous NO), smooth muscle response to NO decreased (primarily related to cGMP production), and NE sensitivity decreased considerably, with no changes in vessel size or distensibility. Our results identify a pro-vasodilatory state in the systemic venous system which would serve to facilitate the accommodation to plasma volume expansion requisite for normal pregnancy. PMID:19318688

  17. Changes of trabecular bone under control of biologically mechanical mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Zhang, C. Q.; Dong, X.; Wu, H.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, a biological process of bone remodeling was considered as a closed loop feedback control system, which enables bone to optimize and renew itself over a lifetime. A novel idea of combining strain-adaptive and damage-induced remodeling algorithms at Basic Multicellular Unit (BMU) level was introduced. In order to make the outcomes get closer to clinical observation, the stochastic occurrence of microdamage was involved and a hypothesis that remodeling activation probability is related to the value of damage rate was assumed. Integrated with Finite Element Analysis (FEA), the changes of trabecular bone in morphology and material properties were simulated in the course of five years. The results suggest that deterioration and anisotropy of trabecluar bone are inevitable with natural aging, and that compression rather than tension can be applied to strengthen the ability of resistance to fracture. This investigation helps to gain more insight the mechanism of bone loss and identify improved treatment and prevention for osteoporosis or stress fracture.

  18. Imprinting in Plants and Its Underlying Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyu Zhang; Abed Chaudhury; Xianjun Wu

    2013-01-01

    Genomic imprinting (or imprinting) refers to an epigenetic phenomenon by which the allelic expression of a gene depends on the parent of origin.It has evolved independently in placental mammals and flowering plants.In plants,imprinting is mainly found in endosperm.Recent genome-wide surveys in Arabidopsis,rice,and maize identified hundreds of imprinted genes in endosperm.Since these genes are of diverse functions,endosperm development is regulated at different regulatory levels.The imprinted expression of only a few genes is conserved between Arabidopsis and monocots,suggesting that imprinting evolved quickly during speciation.In Arabidopsis,DEMETER (DME) mediates hypomethylation in the maternal genome at numerous loci (mainly transposons and repeats) in the central cell and results in many differentially methylated regions between parental genomes in the endosperm,and subsequent imprinted expression of some genes.In addition,histone modification mediated by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins is also involved in regulating imprinting.DMEinduced hypomethylated alleles in the central cell are considered to produce small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) which are imported to the egg to reinforce DNA methylation.In parallel,the activity of DME in the vegetative cell of the male gametophyte demethylates many regions which overlap with the demethylated regions in the central cell.siRNAs from the demethylated regions are hypothesized to be also transferred into sperm to reinforce DNA methylation.Imprinting is partly the result of genome-wide epigenetic reprogramming in the central cell and vegetative cell and evolved under different selective pressures.

  19. A novel ion transport membrane reactor for fundamental investigations of oxygen permeation and oxy-combustion under reactive flow conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kirchen, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors present an attractive technology for combined air separation and fuel conversion in applications such as syngas production, oxidative coupling or oxy-combustion, with the promise of lower capital and operating costs, as well higher product selectivities than traditional technologies. The oxygen permeation rate through a given ITM is defined by the membrane temperature and oxygen chemical potential difference across it. Both of these parameters can be strongly influenced by thermochemical reactions occurring in the vicinity of the membrane, though in the literature they are often characterized in terms of the well mixed product stream at the reactor exit. This work presents the development of a novel ITM reactor for the fundamental investigation of the coupling between fuel conversion and oxygen permeation under well defined fluid dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, including provisions for spatially resolved, in-situ investigations. A planar, finite gap stagnation flow reactor with optical and probe access to the reaction zone is used to facilitate in-situ measurements and cross-validation with detailed numerical simulations. Using this novel reactor, baseline measurements are presented to elucidate the impact of the sweep gas fuel (CH4) fraction on the oxygen permeation and fuel conversion. In addition, the difference between well-mixed gas compositions measured at the reactor outlet and those measured in the vicinity of the membrane surface are discussed, demonstrating the unique utility of the reactor. © 2012 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neural sensitivity to statistical regularities as a fundamental biological process that underlies auditory learning: the role of musical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Clément; Schön, Daniele

    2014-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that humans and other nonhuman mammals are sensitive to the statistical structure of auditory input. Indeed, neural sensitivity to statistical regularities seems to be a fundamental biological property underlying auditory learning. In the case of speech, statistical regularities play a crucial role in the acquisition of several linguistic features, from phonotactic to more complex rules such as morphosyntactic rules. Interestingly, a similar sensitivity has been shown with non-speech streams: sequences of sounds changing in frequency or timbre can be segmented on the sole basis of conditional probabilities between adjacent sounds. We recently ran a set of cross-sectional and longitudinal experiments showing that merging music and speech information in song facilitates stream segmentation and, further, that musical practice enhances sensitivity to statistical regularities in speech at both neural and behavioral levels. Based on recent findings showing the involvement of a fronto-temporal network in speech segmentation, we defend the idea that enhanced auditory learning observed in musicians originates via at least three distinct pathways: enhanced low-level auditory processing, enhanced phono-articulatory mapping via the left Inferior Frontal Gyrus and Pre-Motor cortex and increased functional connectivity within the audio-motor network. Finally, we discuss how these data predict a beneficial use of music for optimizing speech acquisition in both normal and impaired populations.

  1. Underlying mechanisms of improving physical activity behavior after rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Streppel, Kitty R M; van der Beek, Allard J; van der Woude, Luc H V; van Harten, Wim H; van Mechelen, Willem; van der Woude, Lucas

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regular physical activity is beneficial for the health and functioning of people with a disability. Effective components of successful physical activity promotion interventions should be identified and disseminated. PURPOSE: To study the underlying mechanisms of the combined sport stimul

  2. Underlying mechanisms of improving physical activity behavior after rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, van der Hidde P.; Streppel, Kitty R.M.; Beek, van der Allard J.; Woude, Luc H.V.; Harten, van Wim H.; Mechelen, van Willem

    2008-01-01

    Background: Regular physical activity is beneficial for the health and functioning of people with a disability. Effective components of successful physical activity promotion interventions should be identified and disseminated. Purpose: To study the underlying mechanisms of the combined sport stimul

  3. Fundamentals of phosphors

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, William M; Yamamoto, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    Drawing from the second edition of the best-selling Handbook of Phosphors, Fundamentals of Phosphors covers the principles and mechanisms of luminescence in detail and surveys the primary phosphor materials as well as their optical properties. The book addresses cutting-edge developments in phosphor science and technology including oxynitride phosphors and the impact of lanthanide level location on phosphor performance.Beginning with an explanation of the physics underlying luminescence mechanisms in solids, the book goes on to interpret various luminescence phenomena in inorganic and organic materials. This includes the interpretation of the luminescence of recently developed low-dimensional systems, such as quantum wells and dots. The book also discusses the excitation mechanisms by cathode-ray and ionizing radiation and by electric fields to produce electroluminescence. The book classifies phosphor materials according to the type of luminescence centers employed or the class of host materials used and inte...

  4. [An incentive mechanism for environment management under unsymmetrical information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J; Zheng, Z; Fu, G

    2001-01-01

    Information unsymmtry is a big obstacle in environment management. In this paper, an incentive mechanism for implementation of effluent charge under unsymmetrical information was designed. This mechanism will provide incentives for true information and lower down the transaction cost in environment management.

  5. Monitoring of Structures and Mechanical Systems Using Virtual Visual Sensors for Video Analysis: Fundamental Concept and Proof of Feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schumacher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM has become a viable tool to provide owners of structures and mechanical systems with quantitative and objective data for maintenance and repair. Traditionally, discrete contact sensors such as strain gages or accelerometers have been used for SHM. However, distributed remote sensors could be advantageous since they don’t require cabling and can cover an area rather than a limited number of discrete points. Along this line we propose a novel monitoring methodology based on video analysis. By employing commercially available digital cameras combined with efficient signal processing methods we can measure and compute the fundamental frequency of vibration of structural systems. The basic concept is that small changes in the intensity value of a monitored pixel with fixed coordinates caused by the vibration of structures can be captured by employing techniques such as the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT. In this paper we introduce the basic concept and mathematical theory of this proposed so-called virtual visual sensor (VVS, we present a set of initial laboratory experiments to demonstrate the accuracy of this approach, and provide a practical in-service monitoring example of an in-service bridge. Finally, we discuss further work to improve the current methodology.

  6. Fundamental degradation mechanisms of layered oxide Li-ion battery cathode materials: Methodology, insights and novel approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausbrand, R., E-mail: hausbrand@surface.tu-darmstadt.de; Cherkashinin, G.; Ehrenberg, H.; Gröting, M.; Albe, K.; Hess, C.; Jaegermann, W.

    2015-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Description of recent in operando and in situ analysis methodology. • Surface science approach using photoemission for analysis of cathode surfaces and interfaces. • Ageing and fatigue of layered oxide Li-ion battery cathode materials from the atomistic point of view. • Defect formation and electronic structure evolution as causes for cathode degradation. • Significance of interfacial energy alignment and contact potential for side reactions. - Abstract: This overview addresses the atomistic aspects of degradation of layered LiMO{sub 2} (M = Ni, Co, Mn) oxide Li-ion battery cathode materials, aiming to shed light on the fundamental degradation mechanisms especially inside active cathode materials and at their interfaces. It includes recent results obtained by novel in situ/in operando diffraction methods, modelling, and quasi in situ surface science analysis. Degradation of the active cathode material occurs upon overcharge, resulting from a positive potential shift of the anode. Oxygen loss and eventual phase transformation resulting in dead regions are ascribed to changes in electronic structure and defect formation. The anode potential shift results from loss of free lithium due to side reactions occurring at electrode/electrolyte interfaces. Such side reactions are caused by electron transfer, and depend on the electron energy level alignment at the interface. Side reactions at electrode/electrolyte interfaces and capacity fade may be overcome by the use of suitable solid-state electrolytes and Li-containing anodes.

  7. [Mechanism of cardiac atrophy under weightlessness/simulated weightlessness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guo-Hui; Ling, Shu-Kuan; Li, Ying-Xian

    2016-04-25

    Cardiac remodeling is the heart's response to external or internal stimuli. Weightlessness/simulated weightlessness leads to cardiac atrophy and heart function declining. Understanding the mechanism of cardiac atrophy under weightlessness is important to help astronaut recover from unloading-induced cardiovascular changes after spaceflight. Unloading-induced changes of hemodynamics, metabolic demands and neurohumoral regulation contribute to cardiac atrophy and function declining. During this process, Ca(2+)-related signaling, NF-κB signaling, ERK signaling, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and autophagy are involved in weightlessness-induced cardiac atrophy. This article reviews the underlying mechanism of cardiac atrophy under weightlessness/simulated weightlessness.

  8. Fundamental Studies of Phase Transformations and Mechanical Properties in the Heat Affected Zone of 10 wt% Nickel Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Erin J.

    United States naval applications require the use of steels with high strength and resistance to fracture at low temperatures to provide good ballistic properties. In recent years, 10 wt% Ni steel has been developed with strength and toughness values exceeding those of steels currently used, and is now being considered as a candidate material to replace existing high-strength, low alloy steels. This steel has excellent toughness from the mechanically induced transformation of interlath austenite films to martensite. These austenite films are formed via a carefully developed quenching, lamellarizing, and tempering heat treatment. However, before 10 wt% Ni steel can be implemented for full-scale applications, the effects of the rapid heating and cooling rates associated with welding thermal cycles on phase transformations and mechanical properties must be understood. In this research, a fundamental understanding of phase transformations and mechanical properties in the heat-affected zone of fusion welds in 10 wt% Ni steel was developed through heating and cooling rate dilatometry experiments, gas tungsten arc welding, and simulation of gas metal arc welding. First, an investigation into the effects of heating and cooling rate on the phase transformations in 10 wt% Ni steel was performed. The Ac1 and Ac3 temperatures during heating were determined as a function of heating rate, and sluggish transformation during fast heating rates manifested itself as a high Ac3 temperature of 1050°C as opposed to a temperature of 850°C at slow heating rates. A continuous cooling transformation diagram produced for 10 wt% Ni steel reveals that martensite will form over a very wide range of cooling rates, which reflects a very high hardenability of this alloy. This is significant because the range of cooling rates for which the diagram was constructed over easily covers the range associated with fusion welding, so there would not be the need for precise control over the weld

  9. Acupuncture De-qi: From Characterization to Underlying Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Peng Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available De-qi refers to the participant’s subjective sensations and objective body responses as well as the acupuncturist’s perceptions while the acupuncturist needles certain acupoints in the participant’s body. In recent years, De-qi is getting increasing attention of the researchers and many efforts have been made to understand its mechanism. By the broad literature survey, this paper explores the subjective De-qi sensation of the patients, its influencing factors, and the resulting physiological responses. The purpose of this paper is expected to find out a possible mechanism of De-qi and to provide certain scientific evidence for acupuncture fundamental research and clinical practice.

  10. Peer influence: neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallen, Mirre; Smidts, Ale; Sanfey, Alan G

    2013-01-01

    People often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants completed a perceptual decision-making task while undergoing fMRI, during which they were exposed to the judgments of both in-group and out-group members. Our data suggest that conformity to the in-group is mediated by both positive affect as well as the cognitive capacity of perspective taking. Examining the processes that drive in-group conformity by utilizing a basic decision-making paradigm combined with neuroimaging methods provides important insights into the potential mechanisms of conformity. These results may provide an integral step in developing more effective campaigns using group conformity as a tool for behavioral change.

  11. Peer influence: Neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirre eStallen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available People often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Participants completed a perceptual decision-making task while undergoing fMRI, during which they were exposed to the judgments of both in-group and out-group members. Our data suggest that conformity to the in-group is mediated by both positive affect as well as the cognitive capacity of perspective taking. Examining the processes that drive in-group conformity by utilizing a basic decision-making paradigm combined with neuroimaging methods provides important insights into the potential mechanisms of conformity. These results may provide an integral step in developing more effective campaigns using group conformity as a tool for behavioral change.

  12. An Adaptive Mechanism for Accurate Query Answering under Differential Privacy

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chao

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism for answering sets of count- ing queries under differential privacy. Given a workload of counting queries, the mechanism automatically selects a different set of "strategy" queries to answer privately, using those answers to derive answers to the workload. The main algorithm proposed in this paper approximates the optimal strategy for any workload of linear counting queries. With no cost to the privacy guarantee, the mechanism improves significantly on prior approaches and achieves near-optimal error for many workloads, when applied under (\\epsilon, \\delta)-differential privacy. The result is an adaptive mechanism which can help users achieve good utility without requiring that they reason carefully about the best formulation of their task.

  13. Cooperative Mechanism of Supply Chain Under Asymmetric Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭敏; 王红卫; 瞿坦

    2003-01-01

    The cooperative mechanism is one main issue in the decentralized supply chain system, especially in an asymmetric information structure. We analyze the non-cooperative game behavior of a 2-echelon distribution supply chain, compare the results with the system optimal solution, and give the supplier dominated cooperative mechanisms. We also analyze the validity of our contract under the asymmetric retailers' holding cost information and give some useful conclusions.

  14. Pathogenesis of ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and mechanisms underlying its relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Congcong; Chang, Lixian; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2017-05-23

    ETV6/RUNX1 (E/R) is the most common fusion gene in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Multiple lines of evidence imply a "two-hit" model for the molecular pathogenesis of E/R-positive ALL, whereby E/R rearrangement is followed by a series of secondary mutations that trigger overt leukemia. The cellular framework in which E/R arises and the maintenance of a pre-leukemic condition by E/R are fundamental to the mechanism that underlies leukemogenesis. Accordingly, a variety of studies have focused on the relationship between the clones giving rise to the primary and recurrent E/R-positive ALL. We review here the most recent insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying E/R-positive ALL, as well as the molecular abnormalities prevailing at relapse.

  15. Molecular mechanisms underlying the fetal programming of adult disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Thin; Hardy, Daniel B

    2012-08-01

    Adverse events in utero can be critical in determining quality of life and overall health. It is estimated that up to 50 % of metabolic syndrome diseases can be linked to an adverse fetal environment. However, the mechanisms linking impaired fetal development to these adult diseases remain elusive. This review uncovers some of the molecular mechanisms underlying how normal physiology may be impaired in fetal and postnatal life due to maternal insults in pregnancy. By understanding the mechanisms, which include epigenetic, transcriptional, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), we also highlight how intervention in fetal and neonatal life may be able to prevent these diseases long-term.

  16. Emotional responses to music: the need to consider underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juslin, Patrik N; Västfjäll, Daniel

    2008-10-01

    Research indicates that people value music primarily because of the emotions it evokes. Yet, the notion of musical emotions remains controversial, and researchers have so far been unable to offer a satisfactory account of such emotions. We argue that the study of musical emotions has suffered from a neglect of underlying mechanisms. Specifically, researchers have studied musical emotions without regard to how they were evoked, or have assumed that the emotions must be based on the "default" mechanism for emotion induction, a cognitive appraisal. Here, we present a novel theoretical framework featuring six additional mechanisms through which music listening may induce emotions: (1) brain stem reflexes, (2) evaluative conditioning, (3) emotional contagion, (4) visual imagery, (5) episodic memory, and (6) musical expectancy. We propose that these mechanisms differ regarding such characteristics as their information focus, ontogenetic development, key brain regions, cultural impact, induction speed, degree of volitional influence, modularity, and dependence on musical structure. By synthesizing theory and findings from different domains, we are able to provide the first set of hypotheses that can help researchers to distinguish among the mechanisms. We show that failure to control for the underlying mechanism may lead to inconsistent or non-interpretable findings. Thus, we argue that the new framework may guide future research and help to resolve previous disagreements in the field. We conclude that music evokes emotions through mechanisms that are not unique to music, and that the study of musical emotions could benefit the emotion field as a whole by providing novel paradigms for emotion induction.

  17. Neural Circuitry and Plasticity Mechanisms Underlying Delay Eyeblink Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, John H.; Steinmetz, Adam B.

    2011-01-01

    Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning has been used extensively as a model system for examining the neural mechanisms underlying associative learning. Delay eyeblink conditioning depends on the intermediate cerebellum ipsilateral to the conditioned eye. Evidence favors a two-site plasticity model within the cerebellum with long-term depression of…

  18. Fundamental processes on TiO2(110) studied under dark and UV-light conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas Ørbæk

    2010-01-01

    microscope (STM), with its unique spatial resolution and versatility, is a suitable tool for investigating fundamental properties of such systems at the atomic level. The main topics covered in this thesis are the structures, diffusion and reactions of water (H2O), ethanol (EtOH) and oxygen (O2......) on differently prepared, well-defined TiO2(110) model surfaces. Moreover, the photoreactions of EtOH on TiO2(110) surfaces were studied and different reaction pathways were identified arising from different adsorption sites. Finally, the nucleation, growth and stability of silver (Ag) nanoclusters on TiO2......(110) surfaces were investigated and charge transfer processes recognized. All findings are supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and complementary measurements using photoemission spectroscopy (PES), temperature programmed desorption/reaction (TPD/TPR) spectroscopy, and isothermal mass...

  19. Reactive Transport Modelling of CO2 Storage in Saline Aquifers to Elucidate Fundamental Processes, Trapping Mechanisms, and Sequestration Partitioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J W; Nitao, J J; Knauss, K G

    2004-07-26

    The ultimate fate of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers for environmental isolation is governed by three interdependent yet conceptually distinct processes: CO{sub 2} migration as a buoyant immiscible fluid phase, direct chemical interaction of this rising plume with ambient saline waters, and its indirect chemical interaction with aquifer and cap-rock minerals through the aqueous wetting phase. Each process is directly linked to a corresponding trapping mechanism: immiscible plume migration to hydrodynamic trapping, plume-water interaction to solubility trapping, and plume-mineral interaction to mineral trapping. In this study, reactive transport modeling of CO{sub 2} storage in a shale-capped sandstone aquifer at Sleipner has elucidated and established key parametric dependencies of these fundamental processes, the associated trapping mechanisms, and sequestration partitioning among them during consecutive 10-year prograde (active-injection) and retrograde (post-injection) regimes. Intra-aquifer permeability structure controls the path of immiscible CO{sub 2} migration, thereby establishing the spatial framework of plume-aquifer interaction and the potential effectiveness of solubility and mineral trapping. Inter-bedded thin shales--which occur at Sleipner--retard vertical and promote lateral plume migration, thereby significantly expanding this framework and enhancing this potential. Actual efficacy of these trapping mechanisms is determined by compositional characteristics of the aquifer and cap rock: the degree of solubility trapping decreases with increasing formation-water salinity, while that of mineral trapping is proportional to the bulk concentration of carbonate-forming elements--principally Fe, Mg, Ca, Na, and Al. In the near-field environment of Sleipner-like settings, 80-85% by mass of injected CO{sub 2} remains and migrates as an immiscible fluid phase, 15-20% dissolves into formation waters, and less than 1% precipitates as carbonate minerals

  20. Fundamentals of Refrigeration; Air Conditioning and Heating Mechanics 1--Appliance Repair 2: 9013.01 and 9025.05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Providing the student with an understanding of the basic refrigeration fundamentals, the course introduces the various types of tools and equipment used in this trade. The course consists of 90 clock hours and is organized into six instructional blocks. The student will gain an understanding of trade terminology, heat and temperature, transfer of…

  1. [Neuronal mechanisms underlying pain-induced negative emotions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Masabumi

    2012-11-01

    Pain consists of sensory-discriminative and negative emotional components. Although the neuronal basis of the sensory component of pain has been studied extensively, the neuronal mechanisms underlying the negative emotional component are not well understood. Recently, behavioral studies using a conditioned place paradigm have successfully elucidated the neuronal circuits and mechanisms underlying the negative emotional component of pain. Excitotoxic lesions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), central amygdaloid nucleus, basolateral amygdaloid nucleus (BLA), or bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) suppress intraplantar formalin-induced aversive responses. Glutamatergic transmission within the ACC and BLA via N-methyl-D-asparate (NMDA) receptors has been shown to play a critical role in these aversive responses. In the BNST, especially its ventral part, noradrenergic transmission via β-adrenergic receptors has been shown to be important for pain-induced aversion. Because persistent pain is frequently associated with psychological and emotional dysfunctions, studies on the neuronal circuits and molecular mechanisms involved in the negative emotional component of pain may have considerable clinical importance in the treatment of chronic pain. Here, I have reviewed behavioral studies investigating the neuronal mechanisms underlying the negative emotional component of pain and have introduced our data showing the pivotal role of amygdala and BNST in pain-induced aversion.

  2. Mechanical Analysis of Concrete Specimen under Restrained Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xinwei; NIU Changren; R D Hooton

    2005-01-01

    In order to quantify the development of the tensile stresses and obtain a reliable estimation of the cracking risk, the concrete was subjected to restrained conditions. The fully restrained condition was achieved by keeping the length constant of a concrete specimen. Comparing the free shrinkage with the restrained shrinkage,tensile creep could be discriminated from shrinkage. The testing method was introduced in details, and the mechanical behaviors under tensile load were analyzed. Results show that concrete exhibits a pronounced viscoelasticity. Under restrained condition, the self induced tensile stress increases with time. The lower the water to cement ratio, the larger the tensile stress at the same age. The tensile creep of hardening concrete is much larger than that of hardened concrete. The relationships among autogenous shrinkage under free condition, elastic strain and creep under restrained condition are described, and the mathematical model for the calculation of elastic strain and creep is proposed.

  3. Nanomaterial-modulated autophagy: underlying mechanisms and functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Wei, Min; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an essential lysosome-dependent process that controls the quality of the cytoplasm and maintains cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction of this protein degradation system is correlated with various disorders. A growing body of evidence suggests that nanomaterials (NMs) have autophagy-modulating effects, thus predicting a valuable and promising application potential of NMs in the diagnosis and treatment of autophagy-related diseases. NMs exhibit unique physical, chemical and biofunctional properties, which may endow NMs with capabilities to modulate autophagy via various mechanisms. The present review highlights the impacts of various NMs on autophagy and their functional consequences. The possible underlying mechanisms for NM-modulated autophagy are also discussed.

  4. Damage Evolution On Mechanical Parts Under Cyclic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestriez, P.; Bogard, F.; Shan, J. L.; Guo, Y. Q.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents a fatigue damage model, based on the continuum damage mechanics and general thermodynamic theory, proposed by Lemaitre and Chaboche, for rolling bearings under very numerous loading cycles. A flow surface of fatigue using the Sines criterion is adopted. The coupling between the hardening plasticity and damage effects is considered in the constitutive equations. An explicit algorithm of weak coupling leads to a calculation very fast. This fatigue damage model is implemented into Abaqus/Explicit using a Vumat user's subroutine. Moreover, the damage variable in function of time is transformed into a function of number of cycles. An algorithm of cycle jump, with a criterion for choosing the number increment of cycles, is proposed, which allows to largely reduce the CPU time. The present damage simulation allows to determine the lifetime of mechanical parts under cyclic loading.

  5. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Nagode

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of th...

  6. Shared Neural Mechanisms Underlying Social Warmth and Physical Warmth

    OpenAIRE

    Inagaki, TK; Eisenberger, NI

    2013-01-01

    Many of people's closest bonds grow out of socially warm exchanges and the warm feelings associated with being socially connected. Indeed, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying thermoregulation may be shared by those that regulate social warmth, the experience of feeling connected to other people. To test this possibility, we placed participants in a functional MRI scanner and asked them to (a) read socially warm and neutral messages from friends and family and (b) hold warm and neutral-t...

  7. Mechanisms Underlying Dysregulation of Electrolyte Absorption in IBD Associated Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Priyamvada, Shubha; Gomes, Rochelle; Gill, Ravinder K.; Saksena, Seema; Alrefai, Waddah A.; Pradeep K Dudeja

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic inflammation of the intestine affects the normal fluid and electrolyte absorption leading to diarrhea, the hallmark symptom of IBD. The management of IBD associated diarrhea still remains to be a challenge, and extensive studies over the last two decades have focused on investigating the molecular mechanisms underly...

  8. Modeling of Hysteresis Losses in Ferromagnetic Laminations under Mechanical Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Rasilo, Paavo; Singh, Deepak; Aydin, Ugur; Martin, Floran; Kouhia, Reijo; Belahcen, Anouar; Arkkio, Antero

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach for predicting magnetic hysteresis loops and losses in ferromagnetic laminations under mechanical stress is presented. The model is based on combining a Helmholtz free energy -based anhysteretic magnetoelastic constitutive law to a vector Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model. This paper focuses only on unidirectional and parallel magnetic fields and stresses, albeit the model is developed in full 3-D configuration in order to account also for strains perpendicular to the loading d...

  9. Control of a perturbed under-actuated mechanical system

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia

    2015-11-05

    In this work, the trajectory tracking problem for an under-actuated mechanical system in presence of unknown input disturbances is addressed. The studied inertia wheel inverted pendulum falls in the class of non minimum phase systems. The proposed high order sliding mode control architecture including a controller and differentiator allows to track accurately the predefined trajectory and to stabilize the internal dynamics. The robustness of the proposed approach is illustrated through different perturbation and output noise configurations.

  10. Neural mechanisms underlying morphine withdrawal in addicted patients: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Babhadiashar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is one of the most potent alkaloid in opium, which has substantial medical uses and needs and it is the first active principle purified from herbal source. Morphine has commonly been used for relief of moderate to severe pain as it acts directly on the central nervous system; nonetheless, its chronic abuse increases tolerance and physical dependence, which is commonly known as opiate addiction. Morphine withdrawal syndrome is physiological and behavioral symptoms that stem from prolonged exposure to morphine. A majority of brain regions are hypofunctional over prolonged abstinence and acute morphine withdrawal. Furthermore, several neural mechanisms are likely to contribute to morphine withdrawal. The present review summarizes the literature pertaining to neural mechanisms underlying morphine withdrawal. Despite the fact that morphine withdrawal is a complex process, it is suggested that neural mechanisms play key roles in morphine withdrawal.

  11. An NMDA Receptor-Dependent Mechanism Underlies Inhibitory Synapse Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinglong Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the mammalian brain, GABAergic synaptic transmission provides inhibitory balance to glutamatergic excitatory drive and controls neuronal output. The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of GABAergic synapses remain largely unclear. Here, we report that NMDA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (NMDARs in individual immature neurons are the upstream signaling molecules essential for GABAergic synapse development, which requires signaling via Calmodulin binding motif in the C0 domain of the NMDAR GluN1 subunit. Interestingly, in neurons lacking NMDARs, whereas GABAergic synaptic transmission is strongly reduced, the tonic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors is increased, suggesting a compensatory mechanism for the lack of synaptic inhibition. These results demonstrate a crucial role for NMDARs in specifying the development of inhibitory synapses, and suggest an important mechanism for controlling the establishment of the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition in the developing brain.

  12. Optical tests of a space mechanism under an adverse environment: GAIA secondary mirror mechanism under vaccum and thermal controlled conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Zapata, Gonzalo; Sánchez Rodríguez, Antonio; Belenguer Dávila, Tomás; Urgoiti, Eduardo; Ramírez Quintana, Argiñe

    2007-09-01

    In this work, the optical evaluation of a mechanism for space applications under vacuum and temperature controlled conditions at the facilities of the Space Instrumentation Laboratory (LINES) of the Aerospace Technical Nacional Institute of Spain (INTA) is reported. The mechanism was developed by the Spanish company SENER to fulfill the high performance requirements from ESA technology preparatory program for GAIA Astrometric Mission; in particular, a five degrees of freedom (dof), three translations and two rotations positioning mechanism for the secondary mirror of the GAIA instrument. Both interferometric tests and autocollimator measurements have been combined in order to extract the information about the accuracy of the mechanism movements as well as their repeatability under adverse environmental conditions: vacuum and thermal controlled conditions, up to a 10 -6mbar and 100K. The scope of this paper will cover the measurements concept selection, the presentation of verification activities, the results of such dedicated optical measurements, the correlation with the mechanical models and a brief description of the design process followed to meet the test requirements.

  13. Stellar performance: mechanisms underlying Milky Way orientation in dung beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, James J; El Jundi, Basil; Smolka, Jochen; Khaldy, Lana; Nilsson, Dan-Eric; Byrne, Marcus J; Dacke, Marie

    2017-04-05

    Nocturnal dung beetles (Scarabaeus satyrus) are currently the only animals that have been demonstrated to use the Milky Way for reliable orientation. In this study, we tested the capacity of S. satyrus to orient under a range of artificial celestial cues, and compared the properties of these cues with images of the Milky Way simulated for a beetle's visual system. We find that the mechanism that permits accurate stellar orientation under the Milky Way is based on an intensity comparison between different regions of the Milky Way. We determined the beetles' contrast sensitivity for this task in behavioural experiments in the laboratory, and found that the resulting threshold of 13% is sufficient to detect the contrast between the southern and northern arms of the Milky Way under natural conditions. This mechanism should be effective under extremely dim conditions and on nights when the Milky Way forms a near symmetrical band that crosses the zenith. These findings are discussed in the context of studies of stellar orientation in migratory birds and itinerant seals.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Mechanical Response of Typical Cement Concrete Pavements under Impact Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Fei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the mechanical response of cement concrete pavements under impact loading, four types of typical cement concrete pavement structures are investigated experimentally and numerically under an impact load. Full-scale three-dimensional pavement slots are tested under an impact load and are monitored for the mechanical characteristics including the deflection of the pavement surface layer, the strain distribution at the bottom of the slab, and the plastic damage and cracking under the dynamic impact load. Numerical analysis is performed by developing a three-dimensional finite element model and by utilizing a cement concrete damage model. The results show that the calculation results based on the cement concrete damage model are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results based on the three-dimensional test slot experiment. The peak values of stress and strain as monitored by the sensors are analyzed and compared with the numerical results, indicating that the errors of numerical results from the proposed model are mostly within 10%. The rationality of the finite element model is verified, and the model is expected to be a suitable reference for the analysis and design of cement concrete pavements.

  15. Peripheral Receptor Mechanisms Underlying Orofacial Muscle Pain and Hyperalgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloman, Jami L.

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) are severely debilitating and affect approximately 12% of the population. Identifying peripheral nociceptive mechanisms underlying mechanical hyperalgesia, a prominent feature of persistent muscle pain, could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. This study provides evidence of functional interactions between ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1/TRPA1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and proposes that these interactions underlie the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. In the masseter muscle, direct P2X3 activation, via the selective agonist αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, or the TRPA1 antagonist, AP18. P2X3 was co-expressed with both TRPV1 and TRPA1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Moreover, in a subpopulation of P2X3 /TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly potentiated following P2X3 activation. Inhibition of Ca2+-dependent kinases, PKC and CaMKII, prevented P2X3-mechanical hyperalgesia whereas blockade of Ca2+-independent PKA did not. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal sensory neurons. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 minutes, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Similar data were obtained regarding another nonselective cation channel, the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). Our data propose P2X3 and NMDARs interact with TRPV1 in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization underlying masseter hyperalgesia. This study offers novel mechanisms by which individual pro-nociceptive ligand

  16. Empirical extraction of mechanisms underlying real world network generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhack, Royi; Muchnik, Lev; Erez, Tom; Tsaban, Lea; Goldenberg, Jacob; Solomon, Sorin; Louzoun, Yoram

    2010-11-01

    The generation mechanisms of real world networks have been described using multiple models. The mathematical features of these models are usually extrapolated from statistical properties of a snapshot of these networks. We here propose an alternative method based on direct measurement of a sequence of consecutive snapshots to uncover the dynamics underlying real world generation. We assume that the probability of adding a node or an edge depends only on local features surrounding the newly added node/edge, and directly measure the contribution of these features to the node/edge addition probability. These measurements are performed using newly defined N-node local structures. Each N-node local structure represents the configuration of edges surrounding a newly added edge. The N-node local structure measurements reproduce for some networks the now classical addition of edges between high degree node mechanisms. It also provides quantitative estimates of more complex mechanisms driving other networks’ evolution, such as the effect of common first and second neighbors. This new methodology reveals the relative importance of different generation mechanisms. We show, for example, that the main mechanism driving hyperlink addition between two websites is the existence of a third website linking to both the source and the target of the new hyperlink.

  17. Mechanical properties of a collagen fibril under simulated degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David C; Szleifer, Igal; Dhaher, Yasin

    2017-11-01

    Collagen fibrils are a very important component in most of the connective tissue in humans. An important process associated with several physiological and pathological states is the degradation of collagen. Collagen degradation is usually mediated by enzymatic and non-enzymatic processes. In this work we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the influence of simulated degradation on the mechanical properties of the collagen fibril. We applied tensile stress to the collagen fiber at different stages of degradation. We compared the difference in the fibril mechanical priorities due the removal of enzymatic crosslink, surface degradation and volumetric degradation. As anticipated, our results indicated that, regardless of the degradation scenario, fibril mechanical properties is reduced. The type of degradation mechanism (crosslink, surface or volumetric) expressed differential effect on the change in the fibril stiffness. Our simulation results showed dramatic change in the fibril stiffness with a small amount of degradation. This suggests that the hierarchical structure of the fibril is a key component for the toughness and is very sensitive to changes in the organization of the fibril. The overall results are intended to provide a theoretical framework for the understanding the mechanical behavior of collagen fibrils under degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Large Chip Production Mechanism under the Extreme Load Cutting Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xianli; HE Genghuang; YAN Fugang; CHENG Yaonan; LIU Li

    2015-01-01

    There has existed a great deal of theory researches in term of chip production and chip breaking characteristics under conventional cutting and high speed cutting conditions, however, there isn’t sufficient research on chip formation mechanism as well as its influence on cutting state regarding large workpieces under extreme load cutting. This paper presents a model of large saw-tooth chip through applying finite element simulation method, which gives a profound analysis about the characteristics of the extreme load cutting as well as morphology and removal of the large chip. In the meantime, a calculation formula that gives a quantitative description of the saw-tooth level regarding the large chip is established on the basis of cutting experiments on high temperature and high strength steel 2.25Cr-1Mo-0.25V. The cutting experiments are carried out by using the scanning electron microscope and super depth of field electron microscope to measure and calculate the large chip produced under different cutting parameters, which can verify the validity of the established model. The calculating results show that the large saw-toothed chip is produced under the squeezing action between workpiece and cutting tools. In the meanwhile, the chip develops a hardened layer where contacts the cutting tool and the saw-tooth of the chip tend to form in transverse direction. This research creates the theoretical model for large chip and performs the cutting experiments under the extreme load cutting condition, as well as analyzes the production mechanism of the large chip in the macro and micro conditions. Therefore, the proposed research could provide theoretical guidance and technical support in improving productivity and cutting technology research.

  19. Adaptive response: some underlying mechanisms and open questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya G. Dimova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms are affected by different DNA damaging agents naturally present in the environment or released as a result of human activity. Many defense mechanisms have evolved in organisms to minimize genotoxic damage. One of them is induced radioresistance or adaptive response. The adaptive response could be considered as a nonspecific phenomenon in which exposure to minimal stress could result in increased resistance to higher levels of the same or to other types of stress some hours later. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the adaptive response may lead to an improvement of cancer treatment, risk assessment and risk management strategies, radiation protection, e.g. of astronauts during long-term space flights. In this mini-review we discuss some open questions and the probable underlying mechanisms involved in adaptive response: the transcription of many genes and the activation of numerous signaling pathways that trigger cell defenses - DNA repair systems, induction of proteins synthesis, enhanced detoxification of free radicals and antioxidant production.

  20. Peptide Formation Mechanism on Montmorillonite Under Thermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchida, Shigeshi; Masuda, Harue; Shinoda, Keiji

    2014-02-01

    The oligomerization of amino acids is an essential process in the chemical evolution of proteins, which are precursors to life on Earth. Although some researchers have observed peptide formation on clay mineral surfaces, the mechanism of peptide bond formation on the clay mineral surface has not been clarified. In this study, the thermal behavior of glycine (Gly) adsorbed on montmorillonite was observed during heating experiments conducted at 150 °C for 336 h under dry, wet, and dry-wet conditions to clarify the mechanism. Approximately 13.9 % of the Gly monomers became peptides on montmorillonite under dry conditions, with diketopiperazine (cyclic dimer) being the main product. On the other hand, peptides were not synthesized in the absence of montmorillonite. Results of IR analysis showed that the Gly monomer was mainly adsorbed via hydrogen bonding between the positively charged amino groups and negatively charged surface sites (i.e., Lewis base sites) on the montmorillonite surface, indicating that the Lewis base site acts as a catalyst for peptide formation. In contrast, peptides were not detected on montmorillonite heated under wet conditions, since excess water shifted the equilibrium towards hydrolysis of the peptides. The presence of water is likely to control thermodynamic peptide production, and clay minerals, especially those with electrophilic defect sites, seem to act as a kinetic catalyst for the peptide formation reaction.

  1. Time for a fundamental reform of subsidisation under the Renewable Energy Law. The quota model; Zeit fuer eine grundlegende Reform der EEG-Foerderung. Das Quotenmodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haucap, Justus [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Duesseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE); Kuehling, Juergen [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Oeffentliches Recht, Immobilienrecht, Infrastrukturrecht und Informationsrecht

    2013-03-15

    The energy turnaround is one of the greatest challenges of the future. Its success hinges on whether the costs of converting the power supply system remain affordable. The existing subsidy model under the German Renewable Energy Law provides no guarantee for this, and it therefore urgently in need of a fundamental revision. A sensible alternative towards establishing an efficient subsidy system in Germany that conforms to its constitution as well as to European law would be to introduce a quota model such as that used with great success in Sweden.

  2. Mechanisms underlying KCNQ1channel cell volume sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammami, Sofia

    Cells are constantly exposed to changes in cell volume during cell metabolism, nutrient uptake, cell proliferation, cell migration and salt and water transport. In order to cope with these perturbations, potassium channels in line with chloride channels have been shown to be likely contributors...... to the process of cell volume adjustments. A great diversity of potassium channels being members of either the 6TM, 4 TM or 2 TM K+ channel gene family have been shown to be strictly regulated by small, fast changes in cell volume. However, the precise mechanism underlying the K+ channel sensitivity to cell...... mechanism of regulation. Besides being regulated by cell volume, KCNQ1 is also modulated by the interaction of the ß subunit KCNE1 giving rise to the cardiac IKs delayed rectifier potassium current. Apart from altering the kinetic characteristics of the KCNQ1 channel current, KCNE1 also augments the KCNQ1...

  3. Mechanisms Underlying T Cell Immunosenescence: Aging and Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenjuan; Rao, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the human immune system to protect against infectious disease declines with age and efficacy of vaccination reduces significantly in the elderly. Aging of the immune system, also termed as immunosenescence, involves many changes in human T cell immunity that is characterized by a loss in naïve T cell population and an increase in highly differentiated CD28- memory T cell subset. There is extensive data showing that latent persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is also associated with age-related immune dysfunction in the T cells, which might enhance immunosenescence. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying age-related and HCMV-related immunosenescence is critical for the development of effective age-targeted vaccines and immunotherapies. In this review, we will address the role of both aging and HCMV infection that contribute to the T cell senescence and discuss the potential molecular mechanisms in aged T cells. PMID:28082969

  4. Quasi-nano wear mechanism under repeated impact contact loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new quasi-nano wear mechanism (QNWM) has been proposed in this paper based on the facts of wear curve turning under high energy impact contact loading.Its characteristic is that the wear rate of QNWM is only 1/10-1/3 that of delamination mechanism at the same energy density.The diameters of wear debris and pits on the worn surfaces fall into the quasi-nanometer scale (about 50-120 nm).The necessary and sufficient conditions,which bring about the QNWM,are:(i) the nano-structure (nano-crystalline + amorphous phase) in impact contact surface layer has formed by the intensive impact strain;(ii) the delamination wear cracking in sub-surface layer must be restrained;(iii) the microcracks of QNWM are produced in amorphous phase of surface nano-structure layer rather than in nano-crystalline.

  5. Mechanical Design of AM Fabricated Prismatic Rods under Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzhirov Alexander V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the stress-strain state of viscoelastic prismatic rods fabricated or repaired by additive manufacturing technologies under torsion. An adequate description of the processes involved is given by methods of a new scientific field, mechanics of growing solids. Three main stages of the deformation process (before the beginning of growth, in the course of growth, and after the termination of growth are studied. Two versions of statement of two problems are given: (i given the torque, find the stresses, displacements, and torsion; (ii given the torsion, find the stresses, displacements, and torque. Solution methods using techniques of complex analysis are presented. The results can be used in mechanical and instrument engineering.

  6. Effective dielectric function of TiO2 nanoparticles under laser pumping in the fundamental absorption band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Yuvchenko, S. A.

    2017-06-01

    A nonlinear optical response of TiO2 nanoparticles under pumping by 355-nm laser radiation is experimentally investigated. Using the data obtained by z-scanning with simultaneous measurement of the scattering intensity, the effective permittivity of particles is reconstructed as a function of the pump intensity. It is found that graphical mapping of the relationship between the real and imaginary parts of the permittivity can be obtained using an affine transformation of a similar map of the frequency-dependent dielectric function for the Lorentz model. It is shown that an increase in the pump intensity should lead to a red shift of the absorption maximum of nanoparticles and a rise in the plasma frequency, which is estimated (using a single-oscillator Lorenz model) from the obtained values of the real and imaginary parts of the effective permittivity for the probe radiation wavelength in use.

  7. Biochemical mechanisms of signaling: perspectives in plants under arsenic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Ejazul; Khan, Muhammad Tahir; Irem, Samra

    2015-04-01

    Plants are the ultimate food source for humans, either directly or indirectly. Being sessile in nature, they are exposed to various biotic and abiotic stresses because of changing climate that adversely effects their growth and development. Contamination of heavy metals is one of the major abiotic stresses because of anthropogenic as well as natural factors which lead to increased toxicity and accumulation in plants. Arsenic is a naturally occurring metalloid toxin present in the earth crust. Due to its presence in terrestrial and aquatic environments, it effects the growth of plants. Plants can tolerate arsenic using several mechanisms like phytochelation, vacuole sequestration and activation of antioxidant defense systems. Several signaling mechanisms have evolved in plants that involve the use of proteins, calcium ions, hormones, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide as signaling molecules to cope with arsenic toxicity. These mechanisms facilitate plants to survive under metal stress by activating their defense systems. The pathways by which these stress signals are perceived and responded is an unexplored area of research and there are lots of gaps still to be filled. A good understanding of these signaling pathways can help in raising the plants which can perform better in arsenic contaminated soil and water. In order to increase the survival of plants in contaminated areas there is a strong need to identify suitable gene targets that can be modified according to needs of the stakeholders using various biotechnological techniques. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of plants grown under arsenic stress and will give an insight of the different sensory systems in plants. Furthermore, it provides the knowledge about several pathways that can be exploited to develop plant cultivars which are resistant to arsenic stress or can reduce its uptake to minimize the risk of arsenic toxicity through food chain thus ensuring food security.

  8. Mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride-inhibited protein synthesis in liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism underlying carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced alterations of protein synthesis in liver. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given CCl4 (1 mL/100 g body weight) and 3H-leucine incorporation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the liver, in vitro response of hepatocyte nuclei nucleotide triphosphatase (NTPase) to free radicals, and nuclear export of total mRNA with 3'-poly A+ were measured respectively. Survival response of HepG2 cells to CCl4 treatment was assessed by methyl thia...

  9. Physical mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of kangaroo shoulder cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Li, Tong; Singh, Sanjleena; Senadeera, Wijitha; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-09-01

    Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to human shoulder, kangaroo was chosen as a model to study shoulder cartilage. Comprehensive enzymatic degradation and indentation tests were applied on kangaroo shoulder cartilage to study mechanisms underlying its strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior. We report that superficial collagen plays a more significant role than proteoglycans in facilitating strain-rate-dependent behavior of the kangaroo shoulder cartilage. By comparing the mechanical properties of degraded and normal cartilages, it was noted that proteoglycan and collagen degradation significantly compromised strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of the cartilage. Superficial collagen contributed equally to the tissue behavior at all strain-rates. This is different to the studies reported on knee cartilage and confirms the importance of superficial collagen on shoulder cartilage mechanical behavior. A porohyperelastic numerical model also indicated that collagen disruption would lead to faster damage of the shoulder cartilage than when proteoglycans are depleted.

  10. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress-strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history.

  11. Shared neural mechanisms underlying social warmth and physical warmth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Tristen K; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2013-11-01

    Many of people's closest bonds grow out of socially warm exchanges and the warm feelings associated with being socially connected. Indeed, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying thermoregulation may be shared by those that regulate social warmth, the experience of feeling connected to other people. To test this possibility, we placed participants in a functional MRI scanner and asked them to (a) read socially warm and neutral messages from friends and family and (b) hold warm and neutral-temperature objects (a warm pack and a ball, respectively). Findings showed an overlap between physical and social warmth: Participants felt warmer after reading the positive (compared with neutral) messages and more connected after holding the warm pack (compared with the ball). In addition, neural activity during social warmth overlapped with neural activity during physical warmth in the ventral striatum and middle insula, but neural activity did not overlap during another pleasant task (soft touch). Together, these results suggest that a common neural mechanism underlies physical and social warmth.

  12. Mechanisms Underlying the Antidepressant Response and Treatment Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Rose Levinstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a complex and heterogeneous disorder affecting millions of Americans. There are several different medications and other treatments that are available and effective for many patients with depression. However, a substantial percentage of patients fail to achieve remission with these currently available interventions, and relapse rates are high. Therefore, it is necessary to determine both the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and the differences between responders and non-responders to treatment. Delineation of these mechanisms largely relies on experiments that utilize animal models. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the various mouse models that are currently used to assess the antidepressant response, such as chronic mild stress, social defeat, and chronic corticosterone. We discuss how these mouse models can be used to advance our understanding of the differences between responders and non-responders to antidepressant treatment. We also provide an overview of experimental treatment modalities that are used for treatment-resistant depression, such as deep brain stimulation and ketamine administration. We will then review the various genetic polymorphisms and transgenic mice that display resistance to antidepressant treatment. Finally, we synthesize the published data to describe a potential neural circuit underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance.

  13. Food preferences and underlying mechanisms after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behary, Preeshila; Miras, Alexander D

    2015-11-01

    Bariatric surgery leads to significant long-term weight loss, particularly Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). The mechanisms underlying weight loss have not been fully uncovered. The aim of this review is to explore the changes in food preferences, as a novel mechanism contributing to weight loss, and also focus on the underlying processes modulating eating behaviour after bariatric surgery. Patients after gastric bypass are less hungry and prefer healthier food options. They develop an increased acuity to sweet taste, which is perceived as more intense. The appeal of sweet fatty food decreases, with functional MRI studies showing a corresponding reduction in activation of the brain reward centres to high-energy food cues. Patients experiencing post-ingestive symptoms with sweet and fatty food develop conditioned aversive behaviours towards the triggers. Gut hormones are elevated in RYGB and have the potential to influence the taste system and food hedonics. Current evidence supports a beneficial switch in food preferences after RYGB. Changes within the sensory and reward domain of taste and the development of post-ingestive symptoms appear to be implicated. Gut hormones may be the mediators of these alterations and therefore exploiting this property might prove beneficial for designing future obesity treatment.

  14. Cell Mechanisms of Bone Tissue Loss Under Space Flight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Natalia

    Investigations on the space biosatellites has shown that the bone skeleton is one of the most im-portant targets of the effect space flight factors on the organism. Bone tissue cells were studied by electron microscopy in biosamples of rats' long bones flown on the board american station "SLS-2" and in experiments with modelling of microgravity ("tail suspension" method) with using autoradiography. The analysis of data permits to suppose that the processes of remod-eling in bone tissue at microgravity include the following succession of cell-to-cell interactions. Osteocytes as mechanosensory cells are first who respond to a changing "mechanical field". The next stage is intensification of osteolytic processes in osteocytes, leading to a volume en-largement of the osteocytic lacunae and removal of the "excess bone". Then mechanical signals have been transmitted through a system of canals and processes of the osteocytic syncitium to certain superficial bone zones and are perceived by osteoblasts and bone-lining cells (superficial osteocytes), as well as by the bone-marrow stromal cells. The sensitivity of stromal cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoblasts, under microgravity was shown in a number of works. As a response to microgravity, the system of stromal cells -preosteoblasts -osteoblasts displays retardation of proliferation, differentiation and specific functions of osteogenetic cells. This is supported by the 3H-thymidine studies of the dynamics of differentiation of osteogenetic cells in remodeling zones. But unloading is not adequate and in part of the osteocytes are apoptotic changes as shown by our electron microscopic investigations. An osteocytic apoptosis can play the role in attraction the osteoclasts and in regulation of bone remodeling. The apoptotic bodies with a liquid flow through a system of canals are transferred to the bone surface, where they fulfil the role of haemoattractants for monocytes come here and form osteoclasts. The osteoclasts destroy

  15. Effects of manual hyperinflation in preterm newborns under mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Camila Chaves; Nicolau, Carla Marques; Juliani, Regina Celia Turola Passos; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow; Krebs, Vera Lucia Jornada

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of manual hyperinflation, performed with a manual resuscitator with and without the positive end-expiratory pressure valve, on the respiratory function of preterm newborns under mechanical ventilation. Methods Cross-sectional study of hemodynamically stable preterm newborns with gestational age of less than 32 weeks, under mechanical ventilation and dependent on it at 28 days of life. Manual hyperinflation was applied randomly, alternating the use or not of the positive end-expiratory pressure valve, followed by tracheal aspiration for ending the maneuver. For nominal data, the two-tailed Wilcoxon test was applied at the 5% significance level and 80% power. Results Twenty-eight preterm newborns, with an average birth weight of 1,005.71 ± 372.16g, an average gestational age of 28.90 ± 1.79 weeks, an average corrected age of 33.26 ± 1.78 weeks, and an average mechanical ventilation time of 29.5 (15 - 53) days, were studied. Increases in inspiratory and expiratory volumes occurred between time-points A5 (before the maneuver) and C1 (immediately after tracheal aspiration) in both the maneuver with the valve (p = 0.001 and p = 0.009) and without the valve (p = 0.026 and p = 0.001), respectively. There was also an increase in expiratory resistance between time-points A5 and C1 (p = 0.044). Conclusion Lung volumes increased when performing the maneuver with and without the valve, with a significant difference in the first minute after aspiration. There was a significant difference in expiratory resistance between the time-points A5 (before the maneuver) and C1 (immediately after tracheal aspiration) in the first minute after aspiration within each maneuver. PMID:27737427

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying noncoding risk variations in psychiatric genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X; Chang, H; Li, M

    2017-01-03

    Recent large-scale genetic approaches such as genome-wide association studies have allowed the identification of common genetic variations that contribute to risk architectures of psychiatric disorders. However, most of these susceptibility variants are located in noncoding genomic regions that usually span multiple genes. As a result, pinpointing the precise variant(s) and biological mechanisms accounting for the risk remains challenging. By reviewing recent progresses in genetics, functional genomics and neurobiology of psychiatric disorders, as well as gene expression analyses of brain tissues, here we propose a roadmap to characterize the roles of noncoding risk loci in the pathogenesis of psychiatric illnesses (that is, identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining the genetic risk conferred by those genomic loci, and recognizing putative functional causative variants). This roadmap involves integration of transcriptomic data, epidemiological and bioinformatic methods, as well as in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. These tools will promote the translation of genetic discoveries to physiological mechanisms, and ultimately guide the development of preventive, therapeutic and prognostic measures for psychiatric disorders.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 3 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.241.

  17. Autophagy as a Possible Underlying Mechanism of Nanomaterial Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cohignac

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of nanotechnologies is raising safety concerns because of the potential effects of engineered nanomaterials on human health, particularly at the respiratory level. Since the last decades, many in vivo studies have been interested in the pulmonary effects of different classes of nanomaterials. It has been shown that some of them can induce toxic effects, essentially depending on their physico-chemical characteristics, but other studies did not identify such effects. Inflammation and oxidative stress are currently the two main mechanisms described to explain the observed toxicity. However, the exact underlying mechanism(s still remain(s unknown and autophagy could represent an interesting candidate. Autophagy is a physiological process in which cytoplasmic components are digested via a lysosomal pathway. It has been shown that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis and the progression of human diseases, and is able to modulate the oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory responses. A growing amount of literature suggests that a link between nanomaterial toxicity and autophagy impairment could exist. In this review, we will first summarize what is known about the respiratory effects of nanomaterials and we will then discuss the possible involvement of autophagy in this toxicity. This review should help understand why autophagy impairment could be taken as a promising candidate to fully understand nanomaterials toxicity.

  18. Piezoelectric compliant mechanism energy harvesters under large base excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaokun; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Rahn, Christopher D.

    2016-09-01

    A piezoelectric compliant mechanism (PCM) energy harvester is designed, modeled, and analyzed that consists of a polyvinylidene diflouoride, PVDF unimorph clamped at its base and attached to a compliant mechanism at its tip. The compliant hinge stiffness is carefully tuned to approach a low frequency first mode with an efficient (nearly quadratic) shape that provides a uniform strain distribution. A nonlinear model of the PCM energy harvester under large base excitation is derived to determine the maximum power that can be generated by the device. Experiments with a fabricated PCM energy harvester prototype show that the compliant mechanism introduces a stiffening effect and a much wider bandwidth than a benchmark proof mass cantilever design. The PCM bridge structure self-limits the displacement and maximum strain at large excitations compared with the proof mass cantilever, improving the device robustness. The PCM outperforms the cantilever in both average power and power-strain sensitivity at high accelerations due to the PCM axial stretching effect and its more uniform strain distribution.

  19. Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2016-01-01

    This book includes my lectures, together with their problem sets and solutions, on 1) classical mechanics (one semester), 2) thermodynamics and statistical mechanics (one semester), and 3) quantum mechanics (one semester), which I have been giving to graduate students of theoretical physics at Annaba University since 2010 .

  20. Exploration of mechanisms underlying the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of single chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Trung Dung; Gu, YuanTong, E-mail: yuantong.gu@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-05-05

    Based on the characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy, we report that the mechanical property of single chondrocytes has dependency on the strain-rates. By comparing the mechanical deformation responses and the Young's moduli of living and fixed chondrocytes at four different strain-rates, we explore the deformation mechanisms underlying this dependency property. We found that the strain-rate-dependent mechanical property of living cells is governed by both of the cellular cytoskeleton and the intracellular fluid when the fixed chondrocytes are mainly governed by their intracellular fluid, which is called the consolidation-dependent deformation behavior. Finally, we report that the porohyperelastic constitutive material model which can capture the consolidation-dependent behavior of both living and fixed chondrocytes is a potential candidature to study living cell biomechanics.

  1. On Mechanics and Thermodynamics of a stellar galaxy in a two-component virial system and the Fundamental Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Secco, L

    2005-01-01

    The paper confirms the existence of a special configuration (among the infinite number of virial states) which a B stellar(Baryonic) component may assume inside a given D dark halo potential well.This satisfies the d'Alembert Principle of virtual works and its typical dimension works as a scale length (tidal radius)induced on the gravitational field of the bright component by the dark one.Its dynamic and thermodynamic properties are here analyzed in connection with the physical reason for the existence of the Fundamental Plane (FP) for ellipticals.The analysis is performed by using 2-component models with two power-law density profiles and two homogeneous cores and compared with some observable scaling relations for pressure supported ellipticals.The virial equilibrium stages of the 2-component system have to occur after a previous violent relaxation phase. If the stellar B component is allowed to cool slowly its virial evolution consists of a sequence of contractions with enough time to rearrange the virial ...

  2. Marketing fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, W H

    2001-01-01

    This chapter outlines current marketing practice from a managerial perspective. The role of marketing within an organization is discussed in relation to efficiency and adaptation to changing environments. Fundamental terms and concepts are presented in an applied context. The implementation of marketing plans is organized around the four P's of marketing: product (or service), promotion (including advertising), place of delivery, and pricing. These are the tools with which marketers seek to better serve their clients and form the basis for competing with other organizations. Basic concepts of strategic relationship management are outlined. Lastly, alternate viewpoints on the role of advertising in healthcare markets are examined.

  3. Fundamental Study on Applicability of Powder-Based 3D Printer for Physical Modeling in Rock Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereshtenejad, Sayedalireza; Song, Jae-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Applications of 3D printing technology become more widespread in many research fields because of its rapid development and valuable capabilities. In rock mechanics and mining engineering, this technology has the potential to become a useful tool that might help implement a number of research studies previously considered impractical. Most commercial 3D printers cannot print prototypes with mechanical properties that match precisely those of natural rock samples. Therefore, some additional enhancements are required for 3D printers to be effectively utilized for rock mechanics applications. In this study, we printed and studied specimens using a powder-based commercial ZPrinter® 450 with ZP® 150 powder and Zb® 63 binder used as raw materials. The specimens printed by this 3D printer exhibited relatively low strength and ductile behavior, implying that it needs further improvements. Hence, we focused on several ways to determine the best combination of printing options and post-processing including the effects of the printing direction, printing layer thickness, binder saturation level, and heating process on the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and stress-strain behavior of the printed samples. The suggested procedures have demonstrated their effectiveness by obtaining the printed samples that behave similarly to the natural rocks with low UCS. Although our optimization methods were particularly successful, further improvements are required to expand 3D printer application in the area of rock mechanics.

  4. Experimental study on sliding shaft lining mechanical mechanisms under ground subsidence conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚直书; 杨俊杰; 孙文若

    2003-01-01

    Aimed at more than 60 shaft linings damaged in Huaibei, Datun, Xuzhou and Yanzhou mine areas, this paper presents a new type of sliding shaft lining with asphalt blocks sliding layer. By model test, it is obtained that the deformation characteristics and the mechanical mechanisms of the sliding shaft lining under the condition of ground subsidence. The research results provide a testing basis for the sliding shaft lining design. By now, this kind of sliding shaft lining had been applied in 9 shafts in China and Bangladesh.

  5. A fundamental study of the impact of pressure on the adsorption mechanism in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2016-07-29

    A fundamental investigation of the pressure effect on individual adsorption sites was undertaken based on adsorption energy distribution and adsorption isotherm measurements. For this purpose, we measured adsorption equilibrium data at pressures ranging from 100 to 1000bar at constant flow and over a wide concentration range for three low-molecular-weight solutes, antipyrine, sodium 2-naphthalenesulfonate, and benzyltriethylammonium chloride, on an Eternity C18 stationary phase. The adsorption energy distribution was bimodal for all solutes, remaining clearly so at all pressures. The bi-Langmuir model best described the adsorption in these systems and two types of adsorption sites were identified, one with a low and another with a high energy of interaction. Evidence exists that the low-energy interactions occur at the interface between the mobile and stationary phases and that the high-energy interactions occur nearer the silica surface, deeper in the C18 layer. The contribution of each type of adsorption site to the retention factor was calculated and the change in solute molar volume from the mobile to stationary phase during the adsorption process was estimated for each type of site. The change in solute molar volume was 2-4 times larger at the high-energy site, likely because of the greater loss of solute solvation layer when penetrating deeper into the C18 layer. The association equilibrium constant increased with increasing pressure while the saturation capacity of the low-energy site remained almost unchanged. The observed increase in saturation capacity for the high-energy site did not affect the column loading capacity, which was almost identical at 50- and 950-bar pressure drops over the column.

  6. Mechanisms underlying epithelium-dependent relaxation in rat bronchioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroigaard, Christel; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Simonsen, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanisms underlying epithelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EpDHF)-type relaxation in rat bronchioles. Immunohistochemistry was performed, and rat bronchioles and pulmonary arteries were mounted in microvascular myographs for functional studies. An opener of small...... (SK(Ca)) and intermediate (IK(Ca))-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, NS309 (6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime) was used to induce EpDHF-type relaxation. IK(Ca) and SK(Ca)3 positive immunoreactions were observed mainly in the epithelium and endothelium of bronchioles and arteries......, respectively. In 5-hydroxytryptamine (1 microM)-contracted bronchioles (828 +/- 20 microm, n = 84) and U46619 (0.03 microM)-contracted arteries (720 +/- 24 microm, n = 68), NS309 (0.001-10 microM) induced concentration-dependent relaxations that were reduced by epithelium/endothelium removal and by blocking IK...

  7. Conserved Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Homeostasis of the Golgi Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathal Wilson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Golgi complex performs a central function in the secretory pathway in the sorting and sequential processing of a large number of proteins destined for other endomembrane organelles, the plasma membrane, or secretion from the cell, in addition to lipid metabolism and signaling. The Golgi apparatus can be regarded as a self-organizing system that maintains a relatively stable morphofunctional organization in the face of an enormous flux of lipids and proteins. A large number of the molecular players that operate in these processes have been identified, their functions and interactions defined, but there is still debate about many aspects that regulate protein trafficking and, in particular, the maintenance of these highly dynamic structures and processes. Here, we consider how an evolutionarily conserved underlying mechanism based on retrograde trafficking that uses lipids, COPI, SNAREs, and tethers could maintain such a homeodynamic system.

  8. Mechanical behaviour of TWIP steel under shear loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, G.; Butuc, M. C.; Barlat, F.

    2016-08-01

    Twinning induced plasticity steels (TWIP) are very good candidate for automotive industry applications because they potentially offer large energy absorption before failure due to their exceptional strain hardening capability and high strength. However, their behaviour is drastically influenced by the loading conditions. In this work, the mechanical behaviour of a TWIP steel sheet sample was investigated at room temperature under monotonic and reverse simple shear loading. It was shown that all the expected features of load reversal such as Bauschinger effect, transient strain hardening with high rate and permanent softening, depend on the prestrain level. This is in agreement with the fact that these effects, which occur during reloading, are related to the rearrangement of the dislocation structure induced during the predeformation. The homogeneous anisotropic hardening (HAH) approach proposed by Barlat et al. (2011) [1] was successfully employed to predict the experimental results.

  9. Neural mechanisms underlying nicotine addiction: acute positive reinforcement and withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, S S; Koob, G F; Markou, A

    2000-02-01

    The neurobiology of nicotine addiction is reviewed within the context of neurobiological and behavioral theories postulated for other drugs of abuse. The roles of various neurotransmitter systems, including acetylcholine, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and opioid peptides in acute nicotine reinforcement and withdrawal from chronic administration are examined followed by a discussion of potential neuroadaptations within these neurochemical systems that may lead to the development of nicotine dependence. The link between nicotine administration, depression and schizophrenia are also discussed. Finally, a theoretical model of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying acute nicotine withdrawal and protracted abstinence involves alterations within dopaminergic, serotonergic, and stress systems that are hypothesized to contribute to the negative affective state associated with nicotine abstinence.

  10. Mechanisms underlying allergy vaccination with recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-06-19

    Hundred years ago therapeutic vaccination with allergen-containing extracts has been introduced as a clinically effective, disease-modifying, allergen-specific and long-lasting form of therapy for allergy, a hypersensitivity disease affecting more than 25% of the population. Today, the structures of most of the disease-causing allergens have been elucidated and recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives with reduced allergenic activity have been engineered to reduce side effects during allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). These recombinant hypoallergens have been characterized in vitro, in experimental animal models and in clinical trials in allergic patients. This review provides a summary of the molecular, immunological and preclinical evaluation criteria applied for this new generation of allergy vaccines. Furthermore, we summarize the mechanisms underlying SIT with recombinant hypoallergens which are thought to be responsible for their therapeutic effect.

  11. Damage Mechanics of Ferrite Ductile Iron under Uniaxial Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-hai; LI Guo-lu; FU Han-guang; HAO Xiao-yan; LIU Gen-sheng

    2003-01-01

    According to the principle of damage mechanics, the damage characteristics of ferrite nodular cast iron under uniaxial stress were studied by measuring electric resistance. The results show that the damage in nodular cast iron occurs when the applied stress is more than a certain extent, and the damage variable increases with stress. The evolutional law of damage variable as a function of stress was obtained. The damage threshold of nodular cast iron increases with nodularity, but it is below the yield strength, which provides reference significance to the design of machinery structure and the choice of materials. The critical damage variable is not related to the nodularity, which is about 0.060-0.068.

  12. POSSIBLE MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChervyakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals. It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols.

  13. Data on the mechanisms underlying succinate-induced aortic contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália A. Gonzaga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the mechanisms underlying the vascular contraction induced by succinate. The data presented here are related to the article entitled “Pharmacological characterization of the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects of succinate” (L.N. Leite, N.A. Gonzaga, J.A. Simplicio, G.T. Vale, J.M. Carballido, J.C. Alves-Filho, C.R. Tirapelli, 2016 [1]. Succinate acts as a signaling molecule by binding to a G-protein-coupled receptor termed GPR91, “Citric acid cycle intermediates as ligands for orphan G-protein-coupled receptors” (W. He, F.J. Miao, D.C. Lin, R.T. Schwandner, Z. Wang, J. Gao, J.L. Chen, H. Tian, L. Ling, 2004 [2]. Here we include data on the contractile effect of succinate in the aorta. Succinate contracted both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings isolated from male Wistar rats or C57BL/6 mice. Succinate was less effective at inducing contraction in arteries isolated from GPR91-deficient mice, when compared to its vascular effect in aortas from wild type mice. SB203508 (p38MAK inhibitor, SP600125 (JNK inhibitor and Y27632 (Rho-kinase inhibitor reduced succinate-induced contraction in both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded rat aortic rings, while PD98059 (ERK1/2 inhibitor did not affect succinate-induced contraction. The contractile response induced by succinate on endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded rat aortic rings was reduced by indomethacin (non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, H7 (protein kinase C inhibitor, verapamil (Ca2+ channel blocker and tiron (superoxide anion scavenger.

  14. Neurocomputational mechanisms underlying subjective valuation of effort costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giehl, Kathrin; Sillence, Annie

    2017-01-01

    In everyday life, we have to decide whether it is worth exerting effort to obtain rewards. Effort can be experienced in different domains, with some tasks requiring significant cognitive demand and others being more physically effortful. The motivation to exert effort for reward is highly subjective and varies considerably across the different domains of behaviour. However, very little is known about the computational or neural basis of how different effort costs are subjectively weighed against rewards. Is there a common, domain-general system of brain areas that evaluates all costs and benefits? Here, we used computational modelling and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the mechanisms underlying value processing in both the cognitive and physical domains. Participants were trained on two novel tasks that parametrically varied either cognitive or physical effort. During fMRI, participants indicated their preferences between a fixed low-effort/low-reward option and a variable higher-effort/higher-reward offer for each effort domain. Critically, reward devaluation by both cognitive and physical effort was subserved by a common network of areas, including the dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the intraparietal sulcus, and the anterior insula. Activity within these domain-general areas also covaried negatively with reward and positively with effort, suggesting an integration of these parameters within these areas. Additionally, the amygdala appeared to play a unique, domain-specific role in processing the value of rewards associated with cognitive effort. These results are the first to reveal the neurocomputational mechanisms underlying subjective cost–benefit valuation across different domains of effort and provide insight into the multidimensional nature of motivation. PMID:28234892

  15. Encapsulation of C60 fullerenes into single-walled carbon nanotubes: Fundamental mechanical principles and conventional applied mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Hill, James M.

    2007-10-01

    A well-known self-assembled hybrid carbon nanostructure is a nanopeapod which may be regarded as the prototype nanocarrier for drug delivery. While the investigation of the packing of C60 molecules inside a carbon nanotube is usually achieved through either experimentation or large scale computation, this paper adopts elementary mechanical principles and classical applied mathematical modeling techniques to formulate explicit analytical criteria and ideal model behavior for such encapsulation. In particular, we employ the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approximation to determine three encapsulation mechanisms for a C60 fullerene entering a tube: (i) through the tube open end (head-on), (ii) around the edge of the tube open end, and (iii) through a defect opening on the tube wall. These three encapsulation mechanisms are undertaken for each of the three specific carbon nanotubes (10,10), (16,16), and (20,20). We assume that all configurations are in vacuum and the C60 fullerene is initially at rest. Double integrals are performed to determine the energy of the system and analytical expressions are obtained in terms of hypergeometric functions. Our results suggest that the C60 fullerene is most likely to be encapsulated by head-on through the open tube end and that encapsulation around the tube edge is least likely to occur because of the large van der Waals energy barriers which exist at the tube ends.

  16. Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Environmental Toxicants: Epigenetics as an Underlying Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Quoc Vuong Tran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of neurodevelopmental disorders, especially autism spectrum disorders (ASD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, calls for more research into the identification of etiologic and risk factors. The Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD hypothesizes that the environment during fetal and childhood development affects the risk for many chronic diseases in later stages of life, including neurodevelopmental disorders. Epigenetics, a term describing mechanisms that cause changes in the chromosome state without affecting DNA sequences, is suggested to be the underlying mechanism, according to the DOHaD hypothesis. Moreover, many neurodevelopmental disorders are also related to epigenetic abnormalities. Experimental and epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to prenatal environmental toxicants is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. In addition, there is also evidence that environmental toxicants can result in epigenetic alterations, notably DNA methylation. In this review, we first focus on the relationship between neurodevelopmental disorders and environmental toxicants, in particular maternal smoking, plastic-derived chemicals (bisphenol A and phthalates, persistent organic pollutants, and heavy metals. We then review studies showing the epigenetic effects of those environmental factors in humans that may affect normal neurodevelopment.

  17. Potential mechanisms underlying CDK5 related Osteosarcoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Hang-Xing; Bi, Qing; Han, Yong; Zhao, Chen; Zou, Hai

    2017-05-01

    Identification of new prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets is of crucial importance for patients with osteosarcoma. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is overexpressed in several tumor types. However, the exact role CDK5 plays in osteosarcoma is still unknown. In this study, we explored the association between CDK5 expression and the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients using publicly available gene expression datasets. Potential molecular mechanisms underlying its pro-malignant role in cancer progression were also discussed. We demonstrated that tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is activated while antigen presentation is repressed in patients with CDK5 overexpression and poor survival. This results indicated that sufficient energy production and tumor immune escape are important characteristics and potential therapeutic targets for this subgroup of osteosarcoma patients. Furthermore, several critical hub genes that are associated with CDK5 related osteosarcoma progression such as MELK were identified. This study discussed the pro-malignant role of CDK5 and potential mechanisms involved. Further preclinical and clinical studies to develop CDK5 based treatments are warranted.

  18. Thermal stability of nafion membranes under mechanical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintilii, M.; Struis, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of adequately modified fluoro-ionomer membranes (NAFION{sup R}) is demonstrated for the selective separation of methanol synthesis products from the raw reactor gas at temperatures around 200{sup o}C. For an economically relevant application of this concept on a technical scale the Nafion membranes should be thin ({approx_equal}10 {mu}m) and thermally stable over a long period of time (1-2 years). In cooperation with industry (Methanol Casale SA, Lugano (CH)), we test the thermal stability of Nafion hollow fibers and supported Nafion thin sheet membranes at temperatures between 160 and 200{sup o}C under mechanical stress by applying a gas pressure difference over the membrane surface ({Delta}P{<=} 40 bar). Tests with the hollow fibers revealed that Nafion has visco-elastic properties. Tests with 50 {mu}m thin Nafion sheets supported by a porous metal carrier at 200{sup o}C and {Delta}P=39 bar showed no mechanical defects over a period of 92 days. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.

  19. Using Drosophila to discover mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald W. Alfa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of glucose homeostasis are remarkably well conserved between the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and mammals. From the initial characterization of insulin signaling in the fly came the identification of downstream metabolic pathways for nutrient storage and utilization. Defects in these pathways lead to phenotypes that are analogous to diabetic states in mammals. These discoveries have stimulated interest in leveraging the fly to better understand the genetics of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. Type 2 diabetes results from insulin insufficiency in the context of ongoing insulin resistance. Although genetic susceptibility is thought to govern the propensity of individuals to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus under appropriate environmental conditions, many of the human genes associated with the disease in genome-wide association studies have not been functionally studied. Recent advances in the phenotyping of metabolic defects have positioned Drosophila as an excellent model for the functional characterization of large numbers of genes associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we examine results from studies modeling metabolic disease in the fruit fly and compare findings to proposed mechanisms for diabetic phenotypes in mammals. We provide a systematic framework for assessing the contribution of gene candidates to insulin-secretion or insulin-resistance pathways relevant to diabetes pathogenesis.

  20. Continuing to illuminate the mechanisms underlying UV-mediated melanomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, Ryan W; Liu-Smith, Feng; Meyskens, Frank L

    2014-09-05

    The incidence of melanoma is one of the fastest growing of all tumor types in the United States and the number of cases worldwide has doubled in the past 30 years. Melanoma, which arises from melanocytes, is an extremely aggressive tumor that invades the vascular and lymphatic systems to establish tumors elsewhere in the body. Melanoma is a particularly resilient cancer and systemic therapy approaches have achieved minimal success against metastatic melanoma resulting in only a few FDA-approved treatments with limited benefit. Leading treatments offer minimal efficacy with response rates generally under 15% in the long term with no clear effect on melanoma-related mortality. Even the recent success of the specific BRAF mutant inhibitor vemurafenib has been tempered somewhat since acquired resistance is rapidly observed. Thus, understanding the mechanism(s) of melanoma carcinogenesis is paramount to combating this deadly disease. Not only for the treatment of melanoma but, ultimately, for prevention. In this report, we will summarize our work to date regarding the characterization of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-mediated melanomagenesis and highlight several promising avenues of ongoing research.

  1. Mechanisms underlying the social enhancement of vocal learning in songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Matheson, Laura E; Sakata, Jon T

    2016-06-14

    Social processes profoundly influence speech and language acquisition. Despite the importance of social influences, little is known about how social interactions modulate vocal learning. Like humans, songbirds learn their vocalizations during development, and they provide an excellent opportunity to reveal mechanisms of social influences on vocal learning. Using yoked experimental designs, we demonstrate that social interactions with adult tutors for as little as 1 d significantly enhanced vocal learning. Social influences on attention to song seemed central to the social enhancement of learning because socially tutored birds were more attentive to the tutor's songs than passively tutored birds, and because variation in attentiveness and in the social modulation of attention significantly predicted variation in vocal learning. Attention to song was influenced by both the nature and amount of tutor song: Pupils paid more attention to songs that tutors directed at them and to tutors that produced fewer songs. Tutors altered their song structure when directing songs at pupils in a manner that resembled how humans alter their vocalizations when speaking to infants, that was distinct from how tutors changed their songs when singing to females, and that could influence attention and learning. Furthermore, social interactions that rapidly enhanced learning increased the activity of noradrenergic and dopaminergic midbrain neurons. These data highlight striking parallels between humans and songbirds in the social modulation of vocal learning and suggest that social influences on attention and midbrain circuitry could represent shared mechanisms underlying the social modulation of vocal learning.

  2. Different neurophysiological mechanisms underlying word and rule extraction from speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Diego Balaguer, Ruth; Toro, Juan Manuel; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2007-11-14

    The initial process of identifying words from spoken language and the detection of more subtle regularities underlying their structure are mandatory processes for language acquisition. Little is known about the cognitive mechanisms that allow us to extract these two types of information and their specific time-course of acquisition following initial contact with a new language. We report time-related electrophysiological changes that occurred while participants learned an artificial language. These changes strongly correlated with the discovery of the structural rules embedded in the words. These changes were clearly different from those related to word learning and occurred during the first minutes of exposition. There is a functional distinction in the nature of the electrophysiological signals during acquisition: an increase in negativity (N400) in the central electrodes is related to word-learning and development of a frontal positivity (P2) is related to rule-learning. In addition, the results of an online implicit and a post-learning test indicate that, once the rules of the language have been acquired, new words following the rule are processed as words of the language. By contrast, new words violating the rule induce syntax-related electrophysiological responses when inserted online in the stream (an early frontal negativity followed by a late posterior positivity) and clear lexical effects when presented in isolation (N400 modulation). The present study provides direct evidence suggesting that the mechanisms to extract words and structural dependencies from continuous speech are functionally segregated. When these mechanisms are engaged, the electrophysiological marker associated with rule-learning appears very quickly, during the earliest phases of exposition to a new language.

  3. Dopaminergic mechanisms underlying catalepsy, fear and anxiety: do they interact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Ana Caroline; de Oliveira, Amanda Ribeiro; Reimer, Adriano Edgar; Brandão, Marcus Lira

    2013-11-15

    Haloperidol is a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist that induces catalepsy when systemically administered to rodents. The haloperidol-induced catalepsy is a state of akinesia and rigidity very similar to that seen in Parkinson's disease. There exists great interest in knowing whether or not some degree of emotionality underlies catalepsy. If so, what kind of emotional distress would permeate such motor disturbance? This study is an attempt to shed some light on this issue through an analysis of ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) of 22 kHz, open-field test, and contextual conditioned fear in rats with some degree of catalepsy induced by haloperidol. Systemic administration of haloperidol caused catalepsy and decreased exploratory activity in the open-field. There was no difference in the emission of USVs between groups during the catalepsy or the exploratory behavior in the open-field test. In the contextual conditioned fear, when administered before training session, haloperidol did not change the emission of USVs or the freezing response. When administered before testing session, haloperidol enhanced the freezing response and decreased the emission of USVs on the test day. These findings suggest that the involvement of dopaminergic mechanisms in threatening situations depends on the nature of the aversive stimulus. Activation of D2 receptors occurs in the setting up of adaptive responses to conditioned fear stimuli so that these mechanisms seem to be important for the emission of 22 kHz USVs during the testing phase of the contextual conditioned fear, but not during the training session or the open-field test (unconditioned fear stimuli). Catalepsy, on the other hand, is the result of the blockage of D2 receptors in neural circuits associated to motor behavior that appears to be dissociated from those directly linked to dopamine-mediated neural mechanisms associated to fear.

  4. Different neurophysiological mechanisms underlying word and rule extraction from speech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth De Diego Balaguer

    Full Text Available The initial process of identifying words from spoken language and the detection of more subtle regularities underlying their structure are mandatory processes for language acquisition. Little is known about the cognitive mechanisms that allow us to extract these two types of information and their specific time-course of acquisition following initial contact with a new language. We report time-related electrophysiological changes that occurred while participants learned an artificial language. These changes strongly correlated with the discovery of the structural rules embedded in the words. These changes were clearly different from those related to word learning and occurred during the first minutes of exposition. There is a functional distinction in the nature of the electrophysiological signals during acquisition: an increase in negativity (N400 in the central electrodes is related to word-learning and development of a frontal positivity (P2 is related to rule-learning. In addition, the results of an online implicit and a post-learning test indicate that, once the rules of the language have been acquired, new words following the rule are processed as words of the language. By contrast, new words violating the rule induce syntax-related electrophysiological responses when inserted online in the stream (an early frontal negativity followed by a late posterior positivity and clear lexical effects when presented in isolation (N400 modulation. The present study provides direct evidence suggesting that the mechanisms to extract words and structural dependencies from continuous speech are functionally segregated. When these mechanisms are engaged, the electrophysiological marker associated with rule-learning appears very quickly, during the earliest phases of exposition to a new language.

  5. Mechanisms underlying temperature extremes in Iberia: a Lagrangian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A. Santos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the occurrence of temperature extremes in Iberia are analysed considering a Lagrangian perspective of the atmospheric flow, using 6-hourly ERA-Interim reanalysis data for the years 1979–2012. Daily 2-m minimum temperatures below the 1st percentile and 2-m maximum temperatures above the 99th percentile at each grid point over Iberia are selected separately for winter and summer. Four categories of extremes are analysed using 10-d backward trajectories initialized at the extreme temperature grid points close to the surface: winter cold (WCE and warm extremes (WWE, and summer cold (SCE and warm extremes (SWE. Air masses leading to temperature extremes are first transported from the North Atlantic towards Europe for all categories. While there is a clear relation to large-scale circulation patterns in winter, the Iberian thermal low is important in summer. Along the trajectories, air mass characteristics are significantly modified through adiabatic warming (air parcel descent, upper-air radiative cooling and near-surface warming (surface heat fluxes and radiation. High residence times over continental areas, such as over northern-central Europe for WCE and, to a lesser extent, over Iberia for SWE, significantly enhance these air mass modifications. Near-surface diabatic warming is particularly striking for SWE. WCE and SWE are responsible for the most extreme conditions in a given year. For WWE and SCE, strong temperature advection associated with important meridional air mass transports are the main driving mechanisms, accompanied by comparatively minor changes in the air mass properties. These results permit a better understanding of mechanisms leading to temperature extremes in Iberia.

  6. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Jason R.

    1995-01-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to -184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool. Delayed crack initiation observed in a few cases is attributed to a

  7. Chelation: a fundamental mechanism of action of AGE inhibitors, AGE breakers, and other inhibitors of diabetes complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Ryoji; Murray, David B; Metz, Thomas O; Baynes, John W

    2012-03-01

    This article outlines evidence that advanced glycation end product (AGE) inhibitors and breakers act primarily as chelators, inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions that catalyze AGE formation. We then present evidence that chelation is the most likely mechanism by which ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldose reductase inhibitors inhibit AGE formation in diabetes. Finally, we note several recent studies demonstrating therapeutic benefits of chelators for diabetic cardiovascular and renal disease. We conclude that chronic, low-dose chelation therapy deserves serious consideration as a clinical tool for prevention and treatment of diabetes complications.

  8. Mechanical Modeling of a WIPP Drum Under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeffrey A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-11-25

    Mechanical modeling was undertaken to support the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) technical assessment team (TAT) investigating the February 14th 2014 event where there was a radiological release at the WIPP. The initial goal of the modeling was to examine if a mechanical model could inform the team about the event. The intention was to have a model that could test scenarios with respect to the rate of pressurization. It was expected that the deformation and failure (inability of the drum to contain any pressure) would vary according to the pressurization rate. As the work progressed there was also interest in using the mechanical analysis of the drum to investigate what would happen if a drum pressurized when it was located under a standard waste package. Specifically, would the deformation be detectable from camera views within the room. A finite element model of a WIPP 55-gallon drum was developed that used all hex elements. Analyses were conducted using the explicit transient dynamics module of Sierra/SM to explore potential pressurization scenarios of the drum. Theses analysis show similar deformation patterns to documented pressurization tests of drums in the literature. The calculated failure pressures from previous tests documented in the literature vary from as little as 16 psi to 320 psi. In addition, previous testing documented in the literature shows drums bulging but not failing at pressures ranging from 69 to 138 psi. The analyses performed for this study found the drums failing at pressures ranging from 35 psi to 75 psi. When the drums are pressurized quickly (in 0.01 seconds) there is significant deformation to the lid. At lower pressurization rates the deformation of the lid is considerably less, yet the lids will still open from the pressure. The analyses demonstrate the influence of pressurization rate on deformation and opening pressure of the drums. Analyses conducted with a substantial mass on top of the closed drum demonstrate that the

  9. Fundamental considerations on the mechanisms of silver cementation onto zinc particles in the Merril-Crowe process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viramontes Gamboa, G; Medina Noyola, M; López Valdivieso, A

    2005-02-15

    Studies on the Merrill-Crowe process as applied to silver recovery have shown that one half of the used zinc powder is wasted in water reduction at high cyanide concentrations, while the other half reduces silver ions from the cyanide solution. However, the cementation mechanisms as an electrochemical process taking place on the zinc surface do not explain the split of the electric current resulting from the anodic dissolution of zinc into two equal values. This study demonstrates that the mechanism for silver precipitation at high and low cyanide concentrations differs considerably. At low cyanide concentrations cementation is essentially an electrochemically-controlled process following a shrinking-core behavior. At high cyanide concentrations, the process seems not to be electrochemically controlled. The areas for zinc dissolution and silver deposition are not connected by an electrical-conducting medium and reduction of silver-cyano complex ions takes place by hydrogen adsorbed onto silver growing outward from the cementing zinc particles. The results are based on scanning electron microscopy of solids recovered from cementations in stirred reactors and in situ observations by optical microscopy of the cementation process on the edge of thin zinc disks in cyanide solutions.

  10. Chelation: A Fundamental Mechanism of Action of AGE Inhibitors, AGE Breakers, and Other Inhibitors of Diabetes Complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Rhoji; Murray, David B.; Metz, Thomas O.; Baynes, John

    2012-03-01

    Advanced glycation or glycoxidation end-products (AGE) increase in tissue proteins with age, and their rate of accumulation is increased in diabetes, nephropathy and inflammatory diseases. AGE inhibitors include a range of compounds that are proposed to act by trapping carbonyl and dicarbonyl intermediates in AGE formation. However, some among the newer generation of AGE inhibitors lack reactive functional groups that would trap reaction intermediates, indicating an alternative mechanism of action. We propose that AGE inhibitors function primarily as chelators, inhibiting metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. The AGE-inhibitory activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers is also consistent with their chelating activity. Finally, compounds described as AGE breakers, or their hydrolysis products, also have strong chelating activity, suggesting that these compounds also act through their chelating activity. We conclude that chelation is the common, and perhaps the primary, mechanism of action of AGE inhibitors and breakers, and that chronic, mild chelation therapy should prove useful in treatment of diabetes and age-related diseases characterized by oxidative stress, inflammation and increased chemical modification of tissue proteins by advanced glycoxidation and lipoxidation end-products.

  11. Coping styles and behavioural flexibility : towards underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppens, Caroline M; de Boer, Sietse F; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2010-01-01

    A coping style (also termed behavioural syndrome or personality) is defined as a correlated set of individual behavioural and physiological characteristics that is consistent over time and across situations. This relatively stable trait is a fundamental and adaptively significant phenomenon in the b

  12. A model of the mechanism of cooperativity and associativity of long-term potentiation in the hippocampus: a fundamental mechanism of associative memory and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, T; Hara, K

    1991-01-01

    Long-Term Potentiation (LTP) has three properties: (1) input specificity, (2) cooperativity and (3) associativity. In a previous paper, we proposed an integrated model of the mechanisms of the induction and maintenance of LTP with input specificity. In this paper, a model of the mechanism of cooperative and associative LTP is described. According to computer simulations of the model, its mechanism is based on the spread of synaptic potentials.

  13. Differences in fundamental reaction mechanisms between high and low-LET in recent advancements and applications of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Mahnaz; Clochard, Marie-Claude; Gifford, Ian; Barkatt, Aaron; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad

    2014-12-01

    Differences among the mechanisms of energy deposition by high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, consisting of neutrons, protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions on one hand, and low-LET radiation, exemplified by electron beam and gamma radiation on the other, are utilized in the selection of types of radiation used for specific applications. Thus, high-LET radiation is used for modification of carbon nanotubes, ion track grafting, and the synthesis of membranes and nanowires, as well as for characterization of materials by means of neutron scattering. Recent applications of low-LET irradiation include minimization of radiolytic degradation upon sterilization of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), radiolytic synthesis of nanogels for drug delivery systems, grafting of polymers in the synthesis of adsorbents for uranium from seawater, and reductive remediation of PCBs.1

  14. Video analysis of concussion injury mechanism in under-18 rugby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Sharief; O'Connor, Sam; Lambert, Michael; Brown, James C; Burger, Nicholas; Mc Fie, Sarah; Readhead, Clint; Viljoen, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanism of injury is necessary for the development of effective injury prevention strategies. Video analysis of injuries provides valuable information on the playing situation and athlete-movement patterns, which can be used to formulate these strategies. Therefore, we conducted a video analysis of the mechanism of concussion injury in junior-level rugby union and compared it with a representative and matched non-injury sample. Methods Injury reports for 18 concussion events were collected from the 2011 to 2013 under-18 Craven Week tournaments. Also, video footage was recorded for all 3 years. On the basis of the injury events, a representative ‘control’ sample of matched non-injury events in the same players was identified. The video footage, which had been recorded at each tournament, was then retrospectively analysed and coded. 10 injury events (5 tackle, 4 ruck, 1 aerial collision) and 83 non-injury events were analysed. Results All concussions were a result of contact with an opponent and 60% of players were unaware of the impending contact. For the measurement of head position on contact, 43% had a ‘down’ position, 29% the ‘up and forward’ and 29% the ‘away’ position (n=7). The speed of the injured tackler was observed as ‘slow’ in 60% of injurious tackles (n=5). In 3 of the 4 rucks in which injury occurred (75%), the concussed player was acting defensively either in the capacity of ‘support’ (n=2) or as the ‘jackal’ (n=1). Conclusions Training interventions aimed at improving peripheral vision, strengthening of the cervical muscles, targeted conditioning programmes to reduce the effects of fatigue, and emphasising safe and effective playing techniques have the potential to reduce the risk of sustaining a concussion injury. PMID:27900149

  15. Rules and mechanisms governing octahedral tilts in perovskites under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, H. J.; Guennou, Mael; Íñiguez, Jorge; Kreisel, Jens; Bellaiche, L.

    2017-08-01

    The rotation of octahedra (octahedral tilting) is common in A B O3 perovskites and relevant to many physical phenomena, ranging from electronic and magnetic properties, metal-insulator transitions to improper ferroelectricity. Hydrostatic pressure is an efficient way to tune and control octahedral tiltings. However, the pressure behavior of such tiltings can dramatically differ from one material to another, with the origins of such differences remaining controversial. In this paper, we discover several new mechanisms and formulate a set of simple rules that allow us to understand how pressure affects oxygen octahedral tiltings via the use and analysis of first-principles results for a variety of compounds. Besides the known A -O interactions, we reveal that the interactions between specific B ions and oxygen ions contribute to the tilting instability. We explain the previously reported trend that the derivative of the oxygen octahedral tilting with respect to pressure (dR /dP ) usually decreases with both the tolerance factor and the ionization state of the A ion by illustrating the key role of A -O interactions and their change under pressure. Furthermore, three new mechanisms/rules are discovered, namely that (i) the octahedral rotations in A B O3 perovskites with empty low-lying d states on the B site are greatly enhanced by pressure, in order to lower the electronic kinetic energy; (ii) dR /dP is enhanced when the system possesses weak tilt instabilities, and (iii) for the most common phase exhibited by perovskites—the orthorhombic Pbnm state—the in-phase and antiphase octahedral rotations are not automatically both suppressed or both enhanced by the application of pressure because of a trilinear coupling between these two rotation types and an antipolar mode involving the A ions. We further predict that the polarization associated with the so-called hybrid improper ferroelectricity could be manipulated by hydrostatic pressure by indirectly controlling the

  16. Mechanisms underlying stage-1 TRPL channel translocation in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Ha Lieu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TRP channels function as key mediators of sensory transduction and other cellular signaling pathways. In Drosophila, TRP and TRPL are the light-activated channels in photoreceptors. While TRP is statically localized in the signaling compartment of the cell (the rhabdomere, TRPL localization is regulated by light. TRPL channels translocate out of the rhabdomere in two distinct stages, returning to the rhabdomere with dark-incubation. Translocation of TRPL channels regulates their availability, and thereby the gain of the signal. Little, however, is known about the mechanisms underlying this trafficking of TRPL channels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first examine the involvement of de novo protein synthesis in TRPL translocation. We feed flies cycloheximide, verify inhibition of protein synthesis, and test for TRPL translocation in photoreceptors. We find that protein synthesis is not involved in either stage of TRPL translocation out of the rhabdomere, but that re-localization to the rhabdomere from stage-1, but not stage-2, depends on protein synthesis. We also characterize an ex vivo eye preparation that is amenable to biochemical and genetic manipulation. We use this preparation to examine mechanisms of stage-1 TRPL translocation. We find that stage-1 translocation is: induced with ATP depletion, unaltered with perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton or inhibition of endocytosis, and slowed with increased membrane sterol content. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that translocation of TRPL out of the rhabdomere is likely due to protein transport, and not degradation/re-synthesis. Re-localization from each stage to the rhabdomere likely involves different strategies. Since TRPL channels can translocate to stage-1 in the absence of ATP, with no major requirement of the cytoskeleton, we suggest that stage-1 translocation involves simple diffusion through the apical membrane, which may be regulated by release of a

  17. Molecular mechanisms underlying phosphate sensing, signaling, and adaptation in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoliang Zhang; Hong Liao; William J. Lucas

    2014-01-01

    As an essential plant macronutrient, the low availability of phosphorus (P) in most soils imposes serious limitation on crop production. Plants have evolved complex responsive and adaptive mechanisms for acquisition, remobiliza-tion and recycling of phosphate (Pi) to maintain P homeostasis. Spatio-temporal molecular, physiological, and biochemical Pi deficiency responses developed by plants are the consequence of local and systemic sensing and signaling pathways. Pi deficiency is sensed local y by the root system where hormones serve as important signaling components in terms of develop-mental reprogramming, leading to changes in root system architecture. Root-to-shoot and shoot-to-root signals, delivered through the xylem and phloem, respectively, involving Pi itself, hormones, miRNAs, mRNAs, and sucrose, serve to coordinate Pi deficiency responses at the whole-plant level. A combination of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranslational events contribute to global y regulating a wide range of Pi deficiency responses. In this review, recent advances are evaluated in terms of progress toward developing a comprehen-sive understanding of the molecular events underlying control over P homeostasis. Application of this knowledge, in terms of developing crop plants having enhanced attributes for P use efficiency, is discussed from the perspective of agricultural sustainability in the face of diminishing global P supplies.

  18. Neural mechanisms underlying the induction and relief of perceptual curiosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke eJepma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Curiosity is one of the most basic biological drives in both animals and humans, and has been identified as a key motive for learning and discovery. Despite the importance of curiosity and related behaviors, the topic has been largely neglected in human neuroscience; hence little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying curiosity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate what happens in our brain during the induction and subsequent relief of perceptual curiosity. Our core findings were that (i the induction of perceptual curiosity, through the presentation of ambiguous visual input, activated the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex, brain regions sensitive to conflict and arousal; (ii the relief of perceptual curiosity, through visual disambiguation, activated regions of the striatum that have been related to reward processing; and (iii the relief of perceptual curiosity was associated with hippocampal activation and enhanced incidental memory. These findings provide the first demonstration of the neural basis of human perceptual curiosity. Our results provide neurobiological support for a classic psychological theory of curiosity, which holds that curiosity is an aversive condition of increased arousal whose termination is rewarding and facilitates memory.

  19. Beyond membrane channelopathies: alternative mechanisms underlying complex human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Dean BOUDOULAS; Peter J MOHLER

    2011-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease has flourished in large part due to the discovery of gene mutations linked with membrane ion channels and transporters. In fact, ion channel defects ("channelopathies" - the focus of this review series) have been associated with a spectrum of serious human disease phenotypes including cystic fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetes, skeletal muscle defects, and neurological disorders. However, we now know that human disease, particularly excitable cell disease, may be caused by defects in non-ion channel polypeptides including in cellular components residing well beneath the plasma membrane. For example, over the past few years, a new class of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias has been linked with cytoplasmic proteins that include sub-membrane adapters such as ankyrin-B (ANK2),ankyrin-G (ANK3), and alpha-1 syntrophin, membrane coat proteins including caveolin-3 (CAV3), signaling platforms including yotiao (AKAPg), and cardiac enzymes (GPD1L). The focus of this review is to detail the exciting role of lamins, yet another class of gene products that have provided elegant new insight into human disease.

  20. Neural mechanisms underlying the induction and relief of perceptual curiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepma, Marieke; Verdonschot, Rinus G; van Steenbergen, Henk; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Curiosity is one of the most basic biological drives in both animals and humans, and has been identified as a key motive for learning and discovery. Despite the importance of curiosity and related behaviors, the topic has been largely neglected in human neuroscience; hence little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying curiosity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate what happens in our brain during the induction and subsequent relief of perceptual curiosity. Our core findings were that (1) the induction of perceptual curiosity, through the presentation of ambiguous visual input, activated the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), brain regions sensitive to conflict and arousal; (2) the relief of perceptual curiosity, through visual disambiguation, activated regions of the striatum that have been related to reward processing; and (3) the relief of perceptual curiosity was associated with hippocampal activation and enhanced incidental memory. These findings provide the first demonstration of the neural basis of human perceptual curiosity. Our results provide neurobiological support for a classic psychological theory of curiosity, which holds that curiosity is an aversive condition of increased arousal whose termination is rewarding and facilitates memory.

  1. Cellular mechanisms underlying spatiotemporal features of cholinergic retinal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin J.; Félix, Aude L.; Feller, Marla B.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to vision, a transient network of recurrently connected cholinergic interneurons, called starburst amacrine cells (SACs), generates spontaneous retinal waves. Despite an absence of robust inhibition, cholinergic retinal waves initiate infrequently and propagate within finite boundaries. Here we combine a variety of electrophysiological and imaging techniques and computational modeling to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these spatial and temporal properties of waves in developing mouse retina. Waves initiate via rare spontaneous depolarizations of SACs. Waves propagate through recurrent cholinergic connections between SACs and volume release of ACh as demonstrated using paired recordings and a cell-based ACh optical sensor. Perforated patch recordings and two-photon calcium imaging reveal that individual SACs have slow afterhyperpolarizations that induce SACs to have variable depolarizations during sequential waves. Using a computational model in which the properties of SACs are based on these physiological measurements, we reproduce the slow frequency, speed, and finite size of recorded waves. This study represents a detailed description of the circuit that mediates cholinergic retinal waves and indicates that variability of the interneurons that generate this network activity may be critical for the robustness of waves across different species and stages of development. PMID:22262883

  2. Neural mechanisms underlying the induction and relief of perceptual curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepma, Marieke; Verdonschot, Rinus G.; van Steenbergen, Henk; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Curiosity is one of the most basic biological drives in both animals and humans, and has been identified as a key motive for learning and discovery. Despite the importance of curiosity and related behaviors, the topic has been largely neglected in human neuroscience; hence little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying curiosity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate what happens in our brain during the induction and subsequent relief of perceptual curiosity. Our core findings were that (1) the induction of perceptual curiosity, through the presentation of ambiguous visual input, activated the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), brain regions sensitive to conflict and arousal; (2) the relief of perceptual curiosity, through visual disambiguation, activated regions of the striatum that have been related to reward processing; and (3) the relief of perceptual curiosity was associated with hippocampal activation and enhanced incidental memory. These findings provide the first demonstration of the neural basis of human perceptual curiosity. Our results provide neurobiological support for a classic psychological theory of curiosity, which holds that curiosity is an aversive condition of increased arousal whose termination is rewarding and facilitates memory. PMID:22347853

  3. Degradation Mechanism of Polyimide Film Under Square Impulse Voltages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yang; WU Guangning; XIA Jinfeng; ZHU Guangya; WANG Peng; CAO Kaijiang

    2013-01-01

    Partial discharge (PD) under a sequence of high-repetition-rate square pulses is one of the key factors leading to premature failure of insulation systems of inverter-fed motors.Polyimide (PI) film is an important type of insulating material used in the inverter-fed motors.In this paper,micro-morphology and structure change of PI film aged by bipolar continuous square impulse voltage (BCSIV) with amplitude above partial discharge inception voltage (PDIV) are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM).The chemical bonds of PI chain are analyzed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).The results show that the degradation mechanism of PI film is the fracturing of chemical bonds caused by the erosion from PDs.Three layers are displayed in both 100 HN film and 100 CR film.The degradation path of PI film is initiated from surface and then gradually extends to the interior with continuous aging.Nano-fillers can retard the degradation of PI film and prolong its lifetime.

  4. Dissociable mechanisms underlying individual differences in visual working memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbinaite, Rasa; Johnson, Addie; de Jong, Ritske; Morey, Candice C; van Rijn, Hedderik

    2014-10-01

    Individuals scoring relatively high on measures of working memory tend to be more proficient at controlling attention to minimize the effect of distracting information. It is currently unknown whether such superior attention control abilities are mediated by stronger suppression of irrelevant information, enhancement of relevant information, or both. Here we used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) with the Eriksen flanker task to track simultaneously the attention to relevant and irrelevant information by tagging target and distractors with different frequencies. This design allowed us to dissociate attentional biasing of perceptual processing (via SSVEPs) and stimulus processing in the frontal cognitive control network (via time-frequency analyses of EEG data). We show that while preparing for the upcoming stimulus, high- and low-WMC individuals use different strategies: High-WMC individuals show attentional suppression of the irrelevant stimuli, whereas low-WMC individuals demonstrate attentional enhancement of the relevant stimuli. Moreover, behavioral performance was predicted by trial-to-trial fluctuations in strength of distractor-suppression for high-WMC participants. We found no evidence for WMC-related differences in cognitive control network functioning, as measured by midfrontal theta-band power. Taken together, these findings suggest that early suppression of irrelevant information is a key underlying neural mechanism by which superior attention control abilities are implemented.

  5. Molecular mechanisms underlying phosphate sensing, signaling, and adaptation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoliang; Liao, Hong; Lucas, William J

    2014-03-01

    As an essential plant macronutrient, the low availability of phosphorus (P) in most soils imposes serious limitation on crop production. Plants have evolved complex responsive and adaptive mechanisms for acquisition, remobilization and recycling of phosphate (Pi) to maintain P homeostasis. Spatio-temporal molecular, physiological, and biochemical Pi deficiency responses developed by plants are the consequence of local and systemic sensing and signaling pathways. Pi deficiency is sensed locally by the root system where hormones serve as important signaling components in terms of developmental reprogramming, leading to changes in root system architecture. Root-to-shoot and shoot-to-root signals, delivered through the xylem and phloem, respectively, involving Pi itself, hormones, miRNAs, mRNAs, and sucrose, serve to coordinate Pi deficiency responses at the whole-plant level. A combination of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranslational events contribute to globally regulating a wide range of Pi deficiency responses. In this review, recent advances are evaluated in terms of progress toward developing a comprehensive understanding of the molecular events underlying control over P homeostasis. Application of this knowledge, in terms of developing crop plants having enhanced attributes for P use efficiency, is discussed from the perspective of agricultural sustainability in the face of diminishing global P supplies.

  6. Mechanisms underlying the antihypertensive effects of garlic bioactives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouk, Reem; Abdou, Aya; Shetty, Kalidas; Sarkar, Dipayan; Eid, Ali H

    2014-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide with hypertension being a major contributing factor to cardiovascular disease-associated mortality. On a population level, non-pharmacological approaches, such as alternative/complementary medicine, including phytochemicals, have the potential to ameliorate cardiovascular risk factors, including high blood pressure. Several epidemiological studies suggest an antihypertensive effect of garlic (Allium sativum) and of many its bioactive components. The aim of this review is to present an in-depth discussion regarding the molecular, biochemical and cellular rationale underlying the antihypertensive properties of garlic and its bioactive constituents with a primary focus on S-allyl cysteine and allicin. Key studies, largely from PubMed, were selected and screened to develop a comprehensive understanding of the specific role of garlic and its bioactive constituents in the management of hypertension. We also reviewed recent advances focusing on the role of garlic bioactives, S-allyl cysteine and allicin, in modulating various parameters implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. These parameters include oxidative stress, nitric oxide bioavailability, hydrogen sulfide production, angiotensin converting enzyme activity, expression of nuclear factor-κB and the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. This review suggests that garlic and garlic derived bioactives have significant medicinal properties with the potential for ameliorating hypertension and associated morbidity; however, further clinical and epidemiological studies are required to determine completely the specific physiological and biochemical mechanisms involved in disease prevention and management.

  7. Deciphering Molecular Mechanism Underlying Hypolipidemic Activity of Echinocystic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA and oleanolic acid (OA at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0 to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139 μM, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT.

  8. Biprism interferometry with electrons and ions, a valuable tool to study the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and quantum statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, Franz

    2005-05-01

    Our miniaturized electron biprism interferometer [1] proved to be many orders of magnitude less sensitive to mechanical and electromagnetic disturbances than conventional interferometers (modified electron microscopes). Experiments so far inconceivable with electron waves, e.g., to rotate an electron interferometer on a turntable and to prove the Sagnac phase shift [2,3] or to realize biprism interferences with He-ions [4] with wavelengths as small as 0.3 pm became reality. A crossed-field analyzer (Wien filter) in the beam path of our electron interferometer allows to introduce electric and magnetic Aharonov-Bohm phase differences and transit time differences between the interfering wave packets [5]. For wave packet shifts introduced by the Wien filter which exceed the coherence length, which-path information is available in principle, leading to vanishing fringe contrast. Since which-path information is not read out in this experiment, fringe contrast can be restored by compensating the longitudinal shift in a second shifting device. Only recently we succeeded to demonstrate that electrons arrive at two coherently illuminated detectors `antibunched' [6], i.e., according to the demands of Fermi statistics. At present, our intertest is focused on decoherence. Coherently split electron waves propagate over a resistive plate. Which-path information of the electrons decreases with increasing height of flight. In turn the contrast of the fringes increases [7,8].[1] F. Hasselbach, Z. Phys. B -- Condensed Matter 71(1988), 443-449.[2] F. Hasselbach, M. Nicklaus, Phys. Rev. A 48(1993), 143-151.[3] R. Neutze, F. Hasselbach, Phys. Rev. A 58(1998), 557-565.[4] F. Hasselbach, U. Maier, in Quantum Coherence and Decoherence: Proc. ISQM-Tokyo`98 p. 299-302, eds. Y.Y. Ono and K. Fujikawa, Amsterdam, Elsevier, 1999.[5] M. Nicklaus, F. Hasselbach, Phys. Rev. A 48(1993), 152-160.[6] Harald Kiesel, Andreas Renz & F. Hasselbach, Nature 418(2002), 392-394.[7] H.D. Zeh, Found. Phys. 1

  9. Antioxidant Property of Jobelyn as the Possible Mechanism Underlying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Umukoro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Amnesia or loss of memory is the cardinal hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with ageing process. Although, AD had been discovered over a century ago, drugs which could cure or halt the progression of the disease are yet to see the light of the day. However, there has been a growing interest in the use of phytomedicines with multipronged mechanisms of action that could target various aspects of the pathologies of AD. Jobelyn (JB is a potent antioxidant African polyherbal formulation with active components that have been acclaimed to show neuroprotection. T his investigation was carried out to evaluate whether JB has anti-amnesic and antioxidant activities.   Methods: The alteration of alternation behavior in the Y-maze paradigm was utilized as the test for memory function in mice. The effect of JB on a cetylcholinesterase (AChE activity, malondialdehyde (MDA level and the concentrations of glutathione (GSH in the frontal cortex and hippocampus were assessed in rats as means of providing insight into the mechanism underlying its anti-amnesic activity. The animals were given JB (1, 2.5 or 5mg/kg, i.p. daily for 7 days before the biochemical assays or test for memory functions were carried out.   Results: JB was found to produce a significant increase in the level of alternation behavior compared with the control, suggesting anti-amnesic activity. Also, JB reversed the memory impairment induced by scopolamine, which further indicates anti-amnesic property. Furthermore, JB demonstrated a significant inhibition of MDA formation in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats, indicating antioxidant property. In addition, it increased the defense armory of the brain tissues, as it significantly increased the concentrations of GSH in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats. However, JB did not demonstrate any inhibitory effect against AChE activity in the frontal cortex and

  10. Fundamentals of magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, Mario

    2013-01-01

    The Fundamentals of Magnetism is a truly unique reference text, that explores the study of magnetism and magnetic behavior with a depth that no other book can provide. It covers the most detailed descriptions of the fundamentals of magnetism providing an emphasis on statistical mechanics which is absolutely critical for understanding magnetic behavior. The books covers the classical areas of basic magnetism, including Landau Theory and magnetic interactions, but features a more concise and easy-to-read style. Perfect for upper-level graduate students and industry researchers, The Fu

  11. The Behavior of Matter Under Nonequilibrium Conditions: Fundamental Aspects and Applications: Progress Report for Period April 15,1990 - April 14, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigogine, I.

    1990-12-01

    Our report contains a brief summary of what has been achieved over the period of the contract. We have studied the behavior of matter under nonequilibrium conditions on three levels: (1) on the microscopic level in the frame of classical mechanics or of quantum theory; (2) on the stochastic level, which includes fluctuations; and (3) on the phenomenological, macroscopic level described by nonlinear equations. We first report on the level (1), then report on the levels (2) and (3).

  12. A relational solution to the problem of time in quantum mechanics and quantum gravity induces a fundamental mechanism for quantum decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Gambini, R; Pullin, J; Gambini, Rodolfo; Porto, Rafael; Pullin, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    The use of a relational time in quantum mechanics is a framework in which one promotes to quantum operators all variables in a system, and later chooses one of the variables to operate like a ``clock''. Conditional probabilities are computed for variables of the system to take certain values when the ``clock'' specifies a certain time. This framework is attractive in contexts where the assumption of usual quantum mechanics of the existence of an external, perfectly classical clock, appears unnatural, as in quantum cosmology. Until recently, there were problems with such constructions in ordinary quantum mechanics with additional difficulties in the context of constrained theories like general relativity. A scheme we recently introduced to consistently discretize general relativity removed such obstacles. Since the clock is now an object subject to quantum fluctuations, the resulting evolution in the time is not exactly unitary and pure states decohere into mixed states. Here we work out in detail the type of ...

  13. Study of mechanical behavior of AFM silicon tips under mechanical load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopycinska-Mueller, M.; Gluch, J.; Köhler, B.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we address critical issues concerning calibration of AFM based methods used for nanoscale mechanical characterization of materials. It has been shown that calibration approaches based on macroscopic models for contact mechanics may yield excellent results in terms of the indentation modulus of the sample, but fail to provide a comprehensive and actual information concerning the tip-sample contact radius or the mechanical properties of the tip. Explanations for the severely reduced indentation modulus of the tip included the inadequacies of the models used for calculations of the tip-sample contact stiffness, discrepancies in the actual and ideal shape of the tip, presence of the amorphous silicon phase within the silicon tip, as well as negligence of the actual size of the stress field created in the tip during elastic interactions. To clarify these issues, we investigated the influence of the mechanical load applied to four AFM silicon tips on their crystalline state by exposing them to systematically increasing loads, evaluating the character of the tip-sample interactions via the load-unload stiffness curves, and assessing the state of the tips from HR-TEM images. The results presented in this paper were obtained in a series of relatively simple and basic atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) experiments. The novel combination of TEM imaging of the AFM tips with the analysis of the load-unload stiffness curves gave us a detailed insight into their mechanical behavior under load conditions. We were able to identify the limits for the elastic interactions, as well as the hallmarks for phase transformation and dislocation formation and movement. The comparison of the physical dimensions of the AFM tips, geometry parameters determined from the values of the contact stiffness, and the information on the crystalline state of the tips allowed us a better understanding of the nanoscale contact.

  14. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter A. A. de Steenhuijsen Piters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The upper respiratory tract is colonized by a diverse array of commensal bacteria that harbor potential pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. As long as the local microbial ecosystem—also called “microbiome”—is in balance, these potentially pathogenic bacterial residents cause no harm to the host. However, similar to macrobiological ecosystems, when the bacterial community structure gets perturbed, potential pathogens can overtake the niche and cause mild to severe infections. Recent studies using next-generation sequencing show that S. pneumoniae, as well as other potential pathogens, might be kept at bay by certain commensal bacteria, including Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum spp. Bomar and colleagues are the first to explore a specific biological mechanism contributing to the antagonistic interaction between Corynebacterium accolens and S. pneumoniae in vitro [L. Bomar, S. D. Brugger, B. H. Yost, S. S. Davies, K. P. Lemon, mBio 7(1:e01725-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01725-15]. The authors comprehensively show that C. accolens is capable of hydrolyzing host triacylglycerols into free fatty acids, which display antipneumococcal properties, suggesting that these bacteria might contribute to the containment of pneumococcus. This work exemplifies how molecular epidemiological findings can lay the foundation for mechanistic studies to elucidate the host-microbe and microbial interspecies interactions underlying the bacterial community structure. Next, translation of these results to an in vivo setting seems necessary to unveil the magnitude and importance of the observed effect in its natural, polymicrobial setting.

  15. Ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac toxicity of the organochloride solvent trichloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Wu, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Hui; Sun, Hai-Ying; Wong, Tak-Ming; Li, Gui-Rong

    2011-12-18

    Trichloromethane (chloroform) is widely used for industrial chemical synthesis and also as an organic solvent in laboratories or ingredient of pesticides. Sudden death resulted from cardiac arrhythmias has been reported in clinic with acute trichloromethane intoxication. The present study was designed to investigate ionic mechanisms underlying arrhythmogenic effect (cardiac toxicity) of trichloromethane in isolated rat hearts and ventricular myocytes and HEK 293 cells stably expressing human Nav1.5, HCN2, or hERG channel using conventional electrophysiological approaches. It was found that trichloromethane (5mM) induced bradycardia and atrial-ventricular conduction blockade or ventricular fibrillation, and inhibited cardiac contractile function in isolated rat hearts. It shortened action potential duration (APD) in isolated rat ventricular myocytes, and increased the threshold current for triggering action potential, but had no effect on the inward rectifier K(+) current I(K1). However, trichloromethane significantly inhibited the L-type calcium current I(Ca.L) and the transient outward potassium current I(to) in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50)s: 1.01 and 2.4mM, respectively). In HEK 293 cells stably expressing cardiac ion channel genes, trichloromethane reduced hNav1.5, HCN2, and hERG currents with IC(50)s of 8.2, 3.3, and 4.0mM, respectively. These results demonstrate for the first time that trichloromethane can induce bradycardia or ventricular fibrillation, and the arrhythmogenic effect of trichloromethane is related to the inhibition of multiple ionic currents including I(Ca.L), I(to), I(Na), HCN2, and hERG channels.

  16. Mechanisms underlying the link between cannabis use and prospective memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Cuttler

    Full Text Available While the effects of cannabis use on retrospective memory have been extensively examined, only a limited number of studies have focused on the links between cannabis use and prospective memory. We conducted two studies to examine the links between cannabis use and both time-based and event-based prospective memory as well as potential mechanisms underlying these links. For the first study, 805 students completed an online survey designed to assess cannabis consumption, problems with cannabis use indicative of a disorder, and frequency of experiencing prospective memory failures. The results showed small to moderate sized correlations between cannabis consumption, problems with cannabis use, and prospective memory. However, a series of mediation analyses revealed that correlations between problems with cannabis use and prospective memory were driven by self-reported problems with retrospective memory. For the second study, 48 non-users (who had never used cannabis, 48 experimenters (who had used cannabis five or fewer times in their lives, and 48 chronic users (who had used cannabis at least three times a week for one year were administered three objective prospective memory tests and three self-report measures of prospective memory. The results revealed no objective deficits in prospective memory associated with chronic cannabis use. In contrast, chronic cannabis users reported experiencing more internally-cued prospective memory failures. Subsequent analyses revealed that this effect was driven by self-reported problems with retrospective memory as well as by use of alcohol and other drugs. Although our samples were not fully characterized with respect to variables such as neurological disorders and family history of substance use disorders, leaving open the possibility that these variables may play a role in the detected relationships, the present findings indicate that cannabis use has a modest effect on self-reported problems with

  17. Mechanisms underlying the long-term survival of the monocot Dracaena marginata under drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupa, Radek; Plichta, Roman; Paschová, Zuzana; Nadezhdina, Nadezhda; Gebauer, Roman

    2017-09-01

    Efficient water management is essential for the survival of vascular plants under drought stress. While interrelations among drought stress, plant anatomy and physiological functions have been described in woody dicots, similar research is very limited for non-palm arborescent and shrubby monocots despite their generally high drought tolerance. In this study, potted transplants of Dracaena marginata Lam. in primary growth stage were exposed to several short- and long-term drought periods. Continuous measurements of sap flow and stem diameter, the evaluation of capacitance and leaf conductance, the quantification of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), and organ-specific anatomical analyses were performed to reveal the mechanisms promoting plant resistance to limited soil moisture. The plants showed sensitive stomata regulation in the face of drying soil, but only intermediate resistance to water loss through cuticular transpiration. The water losses were compensated by water release from stem characterized by densely interconnected, parenchyma-rich ground tissue and considerable hydraulic capacitance. Our results suggest that the high concentration of osmotically active NSC in aboveground organs combined with the production of root pressures supported water uptake and the restoration of depleted reserves after watering. The described anatomical features and physiological mechanisms impart D. marginata with high resistance to irregular watering and long-term water scarcity. These findings should help to improve predictions with respect to the impacts of droughts on this plant group. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Plant-insect interactions under bacterial influence: ecological implications and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugio, Akiko; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giron, David; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Plants and insects have been co-existing for more than 400 million years, leading to intimate and complex relationships. Throughout their own evolutionary history, plants and insects have also established intricate and very diverse relationships with microbial associates. Studies in recent years have revealed plant- or insect-associated microbes to be instrumental in plant-insect interactions, with important implications for plant defences and plant utilization by insects. Microbial communities associated with plants are rich in diversity, and their structure greatly differs between below- and above-ground levels. Microbial communities associated with insect herbivores generally present a lower diversity and can reside in different body parts of their hosts including bacteriocytes, haemolymph, gut, and salivary glands. Acquisition of microbial communities by vertical or horizontal transmission and possible genetic exchanges through lateral transfer could strongly impact on the host insect or plant fitness by conferring adaptations to new habitats. Recent developments in sequencing technologies and molecular tools have dramatically enhanced opportunities to characterize the microbial diversity associated with plants and insects and have unveiled some of the mechanisms by which symbionts modulate plant-insect interactions. Here, we focus on the diversity and ecological consequences of bacterial communities associated with plants and herbivorous insects. We also highlight the known mechanisms by which these microbes interfere with plant-insect interactions. Revealing such mechanisms in model systems under controlled environments but also in more natural ecological settings will help us to understand the evolution of complex multitrophic interactions in which plants, herbivorous insects, and micro-organisms are inserted.

  19. Fundamentals of turbomachines

    CERN Document Server

    Dick, Erik

    2015-01-01

    This book explores the working principles of all kinds of turbomachines. The same theoretical framework is used to analyse the different machine types. Fundamentals are first presented and theoretical concepts are then elaborated for particular machine types, starting with the simplest ones.For each machine type, the author strikes a balance between building basic understanding and exploring knowledge of practical aspects. Readers are invited through challenging exercises to consider how the theory applies to particular cases and how it can be generalised.   The book is primarily meant as a course book. It teaches fundamentals and explores applications. It will appeal to senior undergraduate and graduate students in mechanical engineering and to professional engineers seeking to understand the operation of turbomachines. Readers will gain a fundamental understanding of turbomachines. They will also be able to make a reasoned choice of turbomachine for a particular application and to understand its operation...

  20. Inelastic deformation mechanisms in a transverse MMC lamina under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newaz, Golam M.; Majumdar, Bhaskar S.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to study the inelastic deformation mechanisms in (90)(sub 8) Ti 15-3/SCS-6 lamina subjected to pure compression. Both mechanical behavior and microstructural evaluation were undertaken at room temperature, 538 and 650 C. Results indicate that mechanical response and deformation characteristics are significantly different in monotonic tension and compression. The inelastic deformation mechanisms in compression are controlled by radial fiber fracture, matrix plasticity and fiber-matrix debonding. The radial fiber fracture is a new damage mode observed for metal-matrix composites (MMC).

  1. [Neural mechanism underlying autistic savant and acquired savant syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Keisuke; Kato, Motoichiro

    2008-07-01

    , especially that of the prefrontal cortex and the posterior regions of the brain. (3) Autistic models, including those based on weak central coherence theory (Frith, 1989), that focus on how savant skills emerge from an autistic brain. Based on recent neuroimaging studies of ASD, Just et al. (2004) suggested the underconnectivity theory, which emphasizes the disruption of long-range connectivity and the relative intact or even more enhanced local connectivity in the autistic brain. All the models listed above have certain advantages and shortcomings. At the end of this review, we propose another integrative model of savant syndrome. In this model, we predict an altered balance of local/global connectivity patterns that contribute to an altered functional segregation/integration ratio. In particular, we emphasize the crucial role played by the disruption of global connectivity in a parallel distributed cortical network, which might result in impairment in integrated cognitive processing, such as impairment in executive function and social cognition. On the other hand, the reduced inter-regional collaboration could lead to a disinhibitory enhancement of neural activity and connectivity in local cortical regions. In addition, enhanced connectivity in the local brain regions is partly due to the abnormal organization of the cortical network as a result of developmental and pathological states. This enhanced local connectivity results in the specialization and facilitation of low-level cognitive processing. The disruption of connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and other regions is considered to be a particularly important factor because the prefrontal region shows the most influential inhibitory control on other cortical areas. We propose that these neural mechanisms as the underlying causes for the emergence of savant ability in ASD and FTD patients.

  2. [Study on main pharmacodynamics and underlying mechanisms of 999 Ganmaoling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi-Hua; He, Rong; Peng, Bo; Ye, Zu-Guang; Li, Jian-Rong; Zhang, Yue-Fei; Dai, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    To observe synergistic effects of 999 Ganmaoling (GML) and its Chinese/Western materia medica (CMM and WMM) on pharmacodynamic action and to study underlying mechanisms, their anti-inflammatory, antipyretic effects were compared by assaying the increased capillary permeability induced by glacial acetic acid in mice, ear swelling induced by Xylene in mice, non-specific pleurisy induced by carrageenan in rats, and yeast induced fever in rats. Crystal violet (CV) and microbial activity (XTT) assay were used to evaluate the inhibition of GML and its CMM and WMM on KPN biofilm formation, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was applied for observing KPN biofilm morphology changes. The results showed that compared with control group, GML could reduce exudation amount of Evans-Blue and the degree of Ear swelling significantly, and CMM and WMM have no significant effects. The concentration of TNF-α and IL-1β of rat pleural effusion in GML, CMM and WMM group decreased significantly. The concentration of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-8 in GML group, TNF-α, IL-8 in WMM group and IL-8 in CMM in rats serum decreased significantly. The body temperature in rats decreased significantly in GML and WMM group after 4-8 h of administration. CMM group showed no significant difference in rat body temperature compare with control. Compared with control group, GML (55-13.75 g•L⁻¹) could inhibit KPN biofilm formation and reduce number of viable cells in the KPN biofilm. CMM (45-22.5 g•L⁻¹) and WMM (10 g•L⁻¹) could also inhibit KPN biofilm formation and reduce number of viable cells (P<0.01). Result of SEM also showed that GML (55 g•L⁻¹) and its CMM (45 g•L⁻¹) and WMM (10 g•L⁻¹) could interfere the bacterial arrangement of KPN biofilm and extracellular matrix. GML and its CMM & WMM could inhibit the formation of KPN biofilm, CMM & WMM in GML showed synergism and complementation in inhibit KPN biofilm. Results showed that GML had obvious anti-inflammatory and

  3. Mechanisms underlying induction of allergic sensitization by Pru p 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordesillas, L; Cubells-Baeza, N; Gómez-Casado, C; Berin, C; Esteban, V; Barcik, W; O'Mahony, L; Ramirez, C; Pacios, L F; Garrido-Arandia, M; Díaz-Perales, A

    2017-06-15

    Recently, the nature of the lipid-ligand of Pru p 3, one of the most common plant food allergens in southern Europe, has been identified as a derivative of the alkaloid camptothecin bound to phytosphingosine. However, the origin of its immunological activity is still unknown. We sought to evaluate the role of the Pru p 3 lipid-ligand in the immunogenic activity of Pru p 3. In vitro cultures of different cell types (monocyte-derived dendritic cells [moDCs], PBMCs [peripheral blood mononuclear cells] and epithelial and iNKT-hybridoma cell lines) have been used to determine the immunological capacity of the ligand, by measuring cell proliferation, maturation markers and cytokine production. To study the capacity of the lipid-ligand to promote sensitization to Pru p 3 in vivo, a mouse model of anaphylaxis to peach has been produced and changes in the humoral and basophil responses have been analysed. The lipid-ligand of Pru p 3 induced maturation of moDCsc and proliferation of PBMCs. Its immunological activity resided in the phytosphingosine tail of the ligand. The adjuvant activity of the ligand was also confirmed in vivo, where the complex of Pru p 3-ligand induced higher levels of IgE than Pru p 3 alone. The immunological capacity of the Pru p 3 ligand was mediated by CD1d, as maturation of moDCs was inhibited by anti-CD1d antibodies and Pru p 3-ligand co-localized with CD1d on epithelial cells. Finally, Pru p 3-ligand presented by CD1d was able to interact with iNKTs. The Pru p 3 lipid-ligand could act as an adjuvant to promote sensitization to Pru p 3, through its recognition by CD1d receptors. This intrinsic adjuvant activity of the accompanying lipid cargo could be a general essential feature of the mechanism underlying the phenomenon of allergenicity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Epigenetic mechanisms underlying learning and the inheritance of learned behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Brian G; Maddox, Stephanie A; Klengel, Torsten; Ressler, Kerry J

    2015-02-01

    Gene expression and regulation is an important sculptor of the behavior of organisms. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate gene expression not by altering the genetic alphabet but rather by the addition of chemical modifications to proteins associated with the alphabet or of methyl marks to the alphabet itself. Being dynamic, epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation serve as an important bridge between environmental stimuli and genotype. In this review, we outline epigenetic mechanisms by which gene expression is regulated in animals and humans. Using fear learning as a framework, we then delineate how such mechanisms underlie learning and stress responsiveness. Finally, we discuss how epigenetic mechanisms might inform us about the transgenerational inheritance of behavioral traits that are being increasingly reported.

  5. Mechanisms and pharmacogenetic signals underlying thiazide diuretics blood pressure response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Mohamed H; Johnson, Julie A

    2016-04-01

    Thiazide (TZD) diuretics are among the most commonly prescribed antihypertensives globally; however their chronic blood pressure (BP) lowering mechanism remains unclear. Herein we discuss the current evidence regarding specific mechanisms regulating the antihypertensive effects of TZDs, suggesting that TZDs act via multiple complex and interacting mechanisms, including natriuresis with short term use and direct vasodilatory effects chronically. Additionally, we review pharmacogenomics signals that have been associated with TZDs BP-response in several cohorts (i.e. NEDD4L, PRKCA, EDNRA-GNAS, and YEATS4) and discuss how these genes might be related to TZD BP-response mechanism. Understanding the association between these genes and TZD BP mechanism might facilitate the development of new drugs and therapeutic approaches based on a deeper understanding of the determinants of BP-response.

  6. Fundamental astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kröger, Pekka; Oja, Heikki; Poutanen, Markku; Donner, Karl

    2017-01-01

    Now in its sixth edition this successful undergraduate textbook gives a well-balanced and comprehensive introduction to the topics of classical and modern astronomy. While emphasizing both the astronomical concepts and the underlying physical principles, the text provides a sound basis for more profound studies in the astronomical sciences. The chapters on galactic and extragalactic astronomy as well as cosmology were extensively modernized in the previous edition. In this new edition they have been further revised to include more recent results. The long chapter on the solar system has been split into two parts: the first one deals with the general properties, and the other one describes individual objects. A new chapter on exoplanets has been added to the end of the book next to the chapter on astrobiology. In response to the fact that astronomy has evolved enormously over the last few years, only a few chapters of this book have been left unmodified. Long considered a standard text for physical science maj...

  7. Mechanical response of collagen molecule under hydrostatic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Karanvir, E-mail: karans@iitrpr.ac.in; Kumar, Navin

    2015-04-01

    Proteins like collagen are the basic building blocks of various body tissues (soft and hard). Collagen molecules find their presence in the skeletal system of the body where they bear mechanical loads from different directions, either individually or along with hydroxy-apatite crystals. Therefore, it is very important to understand the mechanical behavior of the collagen molecule which is subjected to multi-axial state of loading. The estimation of strains of collagen molecule along different directions resulting from the changes in hydrostatic pressure magnitude, can provide us new insights into its mechanical behavior. In the present work, full atomistic simulations have been used to study global (volumetric) as well as local (along different directions) mechanical properties of the hydrated collagen molecule which is subjected to different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. To estimate the local mechanical properties, the strains of collagen molecule along its longitudinal and transverse directions have been acquired at different hydrostatic pressure magnitudes. In spite of non-homogeneous distribution of atoms within the collagen molecule, the calculated values of local mechanical properties have been found to carry the same order of magnitude along the longitudinal and transverse directions. It has been demonstrated that the values of global mechanical properties like compressibility, bulk modulus, etc. as well as local mechanical properties like linear compressibility, linear elastic modulus, etc. are functions of magnitudes of applied hydrostatic pressures. The mechanical characteristics of collagen molecule based on the atomistic model have also been compared with that of the continuum model in the present work. The comparison showed up orthotropic material behavior for the collagen molecule. The information on collagen molecule provided in the present study can be very helpful in designing the future bio-materials.

  8. Evaluation of the behavior of ceramic powders under mechanical vibration and its effect on the mechanics of auto-granulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Nicholas

    In ceramic powder processing, the correlations between the constituent particles and the product structure-property outcomes are well established. However, the influence of static powder properties on the dynamic bulk powder behavior in such advance powder processes remains elusive. A multi-scale evaluation is necessary to understand the full effects of the particle ensemble on the bulk powder behavior, ranging from the particle micro-scale to the bulk powder macro-scale. Fine powders, with particle size of 10 ?m or less, often exhibit cohesive behavior. Cohesion in powders can cause poor flowability, affect agglomerate formation, as well as induce powder caking, all of which can be detrimental to the processing of the powders and/or final product structure-property outcomes. For this reason, it is critical to correlate the causal properties of the powders to this detrimental behavior. In this study, the bulk behavior of ceramic powders is observed under a simple powder process: harmonic, mechanical vibration. Four powder samples, two titania and two alumina powders, were studied. The main difference between the two powder variants of each material is particle size. The two alumina (Al2O3) powder samples had a primary particle size at 50% less than, or d50 of, 0.5 and 2.3 microm and the titania (TiO2) powder samples had a d 50 particle size of 0.1 and 1 microm. Due to mechanical vibration, the titania powder variant with a primary particle size of 0.1 microm exhibited a clustering behavior known as auto-granulation. Auto-granulation is the growth of particle clusters within a dry, fine powder bed without the addition of any binder or liquid to the system. The amplitude and frequency of the mechanical vibration was varied to view the effect on the equilibrium granule size and density. Furthermore, imaging of cross-sections of the granules was conducted to provide insight into to the internal microstructure and measure the packing fraction of the constituent

  9. Epigenetic Mechanisms Underlying Developmental Plasticity in Horned Beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Valena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available All developmental plasticity arises through epigenetic mechanisms. In this paper we focus on the nature, origins, and consequences of these mechanisms with a focus on horned beetles, an emerging model system in evolutionary developmental genetics. Specifically, we introduce the biological significance of developmental plasticity and summarize the most important facets of horned beetle biology. We then compare and contrast the epigenetic regulation of plasticity in horned beetles to that of other organisms and discuss how epigenetic mechanisms have facilitated innovation and diversification within and among taxa. We close by highlighting opportunities for future studies on the epigenetic regulation of plastic development in these and other organisms.

  10. Fundamental reaction pathway for peptide metabolism by proteasome: insights from first-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Donghui; Fang, Lei; Tang, Mingsheng; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2013-10-31

    Proteasome is the major component of the crucial non-lysosomal protein degradation pathway in the cells, but the detailed reaction pathway is unclear. In this study, first-principles quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy calculations have been performed to explore, for the first time, possible reaction pathways for proteasomal proteolysis/hydrolysis of a representative peptide, succinyl-leucyl-leucyl-valyl-tyrosyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Suc-LLVY-AMC). The computational results reveal that the most favorable reaction pathway consists of six steps. The first is a water-assisted proton transfer within proteasome, activating Thr1-O(γ). The second is a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of a Tyr residue of substrate by the negatively charged Thr1-O(γ), followed by the dissociation of the amine AMC (third step). The fourth step is a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon of the Tyr residue of substrate by a water molecule, accompanied by a proton transfer from the water molecule to Thr1-N(z). Then, Suc-LLVY is dissociated (fifth step), and Thr1 is regenerated via a direct proton transfer from Thr1-N(z) to Thr1-O(γ). According to the calculated energetic results, the overall reaction energy barrier of the proteasomal hydrolysis is associated with the transition state (TS3(b)) for the third step involving a water-assisted proton transfer. The determined most favorable reaction pathway and the rate-determining step have provided a reasonable interpretation of the reported experimental observations concerning the substituent and isotopic effects on the kinetics. The calculated overall free energy barrier of 18.2 kcal/mol is close to the experimentally derived activation free energy of ∼18.3-19.4 kcal/mol, suggesting that the computational results are reasonable.

  11. Explorative multifactor approach for investigating global survival mechanisms of Campylobacter jejuni under environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Birgitte; Oust, Astrid; Langsrud, Øyvind; Dorrell, Nick; Marsden, Gemma L; Hinds, Jason; Kohler, Achim; Wren, Brendan W; Rudi, Knut

    2005-04-01

    Explorative approaches such as DNA microarray experiments are becoming increasingly important in microbial research. Despite these major technical advancements, approaches to study multifactor experiments are still lacking. We have addressed this problem by using rotation testing and a novel multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) approach (50-50 MANOVA) to investigate interacting experimental factors in a complex experimental design. Furthermore, a new rotation testing based method was introduced to calculate false-discovery rates for each response. This novel analytical concept was used to investigate global survival mechanisms in the environment of the major food-borne pathogen C. jejuni. We simulated nongrowth environmental conditions by investigating combinations of the factors temperature (5 and 25 degrees C) and oxygen tension (anaerobic, microaerobic, and aerobic). Data were generated with DNA microarrays for information about gene expression patterns and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to study global macromolecular changes in the cell. Microarray analyses showed that most genes were either unchanged or down regulated compared to the reference (day 0) for the conditions tested and that the 25 degrees C anaerobic condition gave the most distinct expression pattern with the fewest genes expressed. The few up-regulated genes were generally stress related and/or related to the cell envelope. We found, using FT-IR spectroscopy, that the amount of polysaccharides and oligosaccharides increased under the nongrowth survival conditions. Potential mechanisms for survival could be to down regulate most functions to save energy and to produce polysaccharides and oligosaccharides for protection against harsh environments. Basic knowledge about the survival mechanisms is of fundamental importance in preventing transmission of this bacterium through the food chain.

  12. Mechanical fatigue performance of PCL-chondroprogenitor constructs after cell culture under bioreactor mechanical stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panadero, Juan Alberto; Sencadas, Vitor; Silva, Sonia C M; Ribeiro, Clarisse; Correia, Vitor; Gama, Francisco M; Gomez Ribelles, José Luis; Lanceros-Mendez, Senentxu

    2016-02-01

    In tissue engineering of cartilage, polymeric scaffolds are implanted in the damaged tissue and subjected to repeated compression loading cycles. The possibility of failure due to mechanical fatigue has not been properly addressed in these scaffolds. Nevertheless, the macroporous scaffold is susceptible to failure after repeated loading-unloading cycles. This is related to inherent discontinuities in the material due to the micropore structure of the macro-pore walls that act as stress concentration points. In this work, chondrogenic precursor cells have been seeded in poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with fibrin and some were submitted to free swelling culture and others to cyclic loading in a bioreactor. After cell culture, all the samples were analyzed for fatigue behavior under repeated loading-unloading cycles. Moreover, some components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) were identified. No differences were observed between samples undergoing free swelling or bioreactor loading conditions, neither respect to matrix components nor to mechanical performance to fatigue. The ECM did not achieve the desired preponderance of collagen type II over collagen type I which is considered the main characteristic of hyaline cartilage ECM. However, prediction in PCL with ECM constructs was possible up to 600 cycles, an enhanced performance when compared to previous works. PCL after cell culture presents an improved fatigue resistance, despite the fact that the measured elastic modulus at the first cycle was similar to PCL with poly(vinyl alcohol) samples. This finding suggests that fatigue analysis in tissue engineering constructs can provide additional information missed with traditional mechanical measurements.

  13. High voltage engineering fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Kuffel, E; Hammond, P

    1984-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive treatment of high voltage engineering fundamentals at the introductory and intermediate levels. It covers: techniques used for generation and measurement of high direct, alternating and surge voltages for general application in industrial testing and selected special examples found in basic research; analytical and numerical calculation of electrostatic fields in simple practical insulation system; basic ionisation and decay processes in gases and breakdown mechanisms of gaseous, liquid and solid dielectrics; partial discharges and modern discharge detectors; and over

  14. Numerical investigation of pulmonary drug delivery under mechanical ventilation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arindam; van Rhein, Timothy

    2012-11-01

    The effects of mechanical ventilation waveform on fluid flow and particle deposition were studied in a computer model of the human airways. The frequency with which aerosolized drugs are delivered to mechanically ventilated patients demonstrates the importance of understanding the effects of ventilation parameters. This study focuses specifically on the effects of mechanical ventilation waveforms using a computer model of the airways of patient undergoing mechanical ventilation treatment from the endotracheal tube to generation G7. Waveforms were modeled as those commonly used by commercial mechanical ventilators. Turbulence was modeled with LES. User defined particle force models were used to model the drag force with the Cunningham correction factor, the Saffman lift force, and Brownian motion force. The endotracheal tube (ETT) was found to be an important geometric feature, causing a fluid jet towards the right main bronchus, increased turbulence, and a recirculation zone in the right main bronchus. In addition to the enhanced deposition seen at the carinas of the airway bifurcations, enhanced deposition was also seen in the right main bronchus due to impaction and turbulent dispersion resulting from the fluid structures created by the ETT. Authors acknowledge financial support through University of Missouri Research Board Award.

  15. Advanced waterflooding in chalk reservoirs: Understanding of underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahid, Adeel; Sandersen, Sara Bülow; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, a number of studies have shown SO42−, Ca2+ and Mg2+ to be potential determining ions, which may be added to the injected brine for improving oil recovery during waterflooding in chalk reservoirs. However the understanding of the mechanism leading to an increase in oil recove...... of a microemulsion phase could be the possible reasons for the observed increase in oil recovery with sulfate ions at high temperature in chalk reservoirs besides the mechanism of the rock wettability alteration, which has been reported in most previous studies.......Over the last decade, a number of studies have shown SO42−, Ca2+ and Mg2+ to be potential determining ions, which may be added to the injected brine for improving oil recovery during waterflooding in chalk reservoirs. However the understanding of the mechanism leading to an increase in oil recovery...

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurogenetic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Irfan A; Mehler, Mark F

    2014-10-01

    There have been considerable advances in uncovering the complex genetic mechanisms that underlie nervous system disease pathogenesis, particularly with the advent of exome and whole genome sequencing techniques. The emerging field of epigenetics is also providing further insights into these mechanisms. Here, we discuss our understanding of the interplay that exists between genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in these disorders, highlighting the nascent field of epigenetic epidemiology-which focuses on analyzing relationships between the epigenome and environmental exposures, development and aging, other health-related phenotypes, and disease states-and next-generation research tools (i.e., those leveraging synthetic and chemical biology and optogenetics) for examining precisely how epigenetic modifications at specific genomic sites affect disease processes.

  17. Mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; De Giorgio, Roberto; Dothel, Giovanni; Zecchi, Lisa; Bellacosa, Lara; Carini, Giovanni; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2011-08-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is currently considered a key pathophysiological mechanism involved in pain perception in large subgroups of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In IBS, visceral hypersensitivity has been described in 20%-90% of patients. The contribution of the central nervous system and psychological factors to visceral hypersensitivity in patients with IBS may be significant, although still debated. Peripheral factors have gained increasing attention following the recognition that infectious enteritis may trigger the development of persistent IBS symptoms, and the identification of mucosal immune, neural, endocrine, microbiological, and intestinal permeability abnormalities. Growing evidence suggests that these factors play an important role in pain transmission from the periphery to the brain via sensory nerve pathways in large subsets of patients with IBS. In this review, we will report on recent data on mechanisms involved in visceral hypersensitivity in IBS, with particular attention paid to peripheral mechanisms.

  18. Cognitive interventions for addiction medicine: Understanding the underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilverstand, Anna; Parvaz, Muhammad A; Moeller, Scott J; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging provides a tool for investigating the neurobiological mechanisms of cognitive interventions in addiction. The aim of this review was to describe the brain circuits that are recruited during cognitive interventions, examining differences between various treatment modalities while highlighting core mechanisms, in drug addicted individuals. Based on a systematic Medline search we reviewed neuroimaging studies on cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive inhibition of craving, motivational interventions, emotion regulation, mindfulness, and neurofeedback training in addiction. Across intervention modalities, common results included the normalization of aberrant activity in the brain's reward circuitry, and the recruitment and strengthening of the brain's inhibitory control network. Results suggest that different cognitive interventions act, at least partly, through recruitment of a common inhibitory control network as a core mechanism. This implies potential transfer effects between training modalities. Overall, results confirm that chronically hypoactive prefrontal regions implicated in cognitive control in addiction can be normalized through cognitive means.

  19. Mechanisms underlying the inhibition of interferon signaling by viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasthanam, Anand S

    2014-02-15

    A hallmark of the antiviral response is the induction of interferons. First discovered in 1957 by Issac and Lindeman, interferons are noted for their ability to interfere with viral replication. Interferons act via autocrine and paracrine pathways to induce an antiviral state in infected cells and in neighboring cells containing interferon receptors. Interferons are the frontline defenders against viral infection and their primary function is to locally restrict viral propagation. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to escape the host interferon response, thus gaining a replicative advantage in host cells. This review will discuss recent findings on the mechanisms viruses use to evade the host interferon response. This knowledge is important because the treatment of viral infections is a challenge of global proportions and a better understanding of the mechanisms viruses use to persist in the host may uncover valuable insights applicable to the discovery of novel drug targets.

  20. Strain-driven criticality underlies nonlinear mechanics of fibrous networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A; Rens, R; Vahabi, M; Jansen, K A; Koenderink, G H; MacKintosh, F C

    2016-01-01

    Networks with only central force interactions are floppy when their average connectivity is below an isostatic threshold. Although such networks are mechanically unstable, they can become rigid when strained. It was recently shown that the transition from floppy to rigid states as a function of simple shear strain is continuous, with hallmark signatures of criticality (Nat. Phys. 12, 584 (2016)). The nonlinear mechanical response of collagen networks was shown to be quantitatively described within the framework of such mechanical critical phenomenon. Here, we provide a more quantitative characterization of critical behavior in subisostatic networks. Using finite size scaling we demonstrate the divergence of strain fluctuations in the network at well-defined critical strain. We show that the characteristic strain corresponding to the onset of strain stiffening is distinct from but related to this critical strain in a way that depends on critical exponents. We confirm this prediction experimentally for collagen...

  1. Statistical Structures Underlying Quantum Mechanics and Social Science

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, R

    2003-01-01

    Common observations of the unpredictability of human behavior and the influence of one question on the answer to another suggest social science experiments are probabilistic and may be mutually incompatible with one another, characteristics attributed to quantum mechanics (as distinguished from classical mechanics). This paper examines this superficial similarity in depth using the Foulis-Randall Operational Statistics language. In contradistinction to physics, social science deals with complex, open systems for which the set of possible experiments is unknowable and outcome interference is a graded phenomenon resulting from the ways the human brain processes information. It is concluded that social science is, in some ways, "less classical" than quantum mechanics, but that generalized "quantum" structures may provide appropriate descriptions of social science experiments. Specific challenges to extending "quantum" structures to social science are identified.

  2. Nematodynamics modelling under extreme mechanical and electric stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoddeo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Nematic liquid crystals confined in asymmetric π-cells and subjected to intense electrical and mechanical stresses undergo strong distortions which can be relaxed by means of the order reconstruction, a fast switching mechanism connecting topologically different textures, assuming bulk and/or surface characteristics depending on both amplitude of the applied electric fields and anchoring angles of the nematic molecules on the confining surfaces. In the frame of the Landau-de Gennes order tensor theory, we provide a numerical model implemented with a moving mesh finite element method appropriate to describe the nematic order dynamics, allowing to map the switching properties of the nematic texture.

  3. Tuning of redox regulatory mechanisms, reactive oxygen species and redox homeostasis under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain eSazzad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a crucial environmental constraint which limits biomass production at many sites on a global scale. Saline growth conditions cause osmotic and ionic imbalances, oxidative stress and perturb metabolism, e.g. the photosynthetic electron flow. The plant ability to tolerate salinity is determined by multiple biochemical and physiological mechanisms protecting cell functions, in particular by regulating proper water relations and maintaining ion homeostasis. Redox homeostasis is a fundamental cell property. Its regulation includes control of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, sensing deviation from and readjustment of the cellular redox state. All these redox related functions have been recognized as decisive factors in salinity acclimation and adaptation. This review focuses on the core response of plants to overcome the challenges of salinity stress through regulation of ROS generation and detoxification systems and to maintain redox homeostasis. Emphasis is given to the role of NADH oxidase (RBOH, alternative oxidase (AOX, the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX and the malate valve with the malate dehydrogenase isoforms under salt stress. Overwhelming evidence assigns an essential auxiliary function of ROS and redox homeostasis to salinity acclimation of plants.

  4. Thermal optimality of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shuli; Luo, Yiqi; Fei, Shenfeng; Yuan, Wenping; Schimel, David; Law, Beverly E; Ammann, Christof; Arain, M Altaf; Arneth, Almut; Aubinet, Marc; Barr, Alan; Beringer, Jason; Bernhofer, Christian; Black, T Andrew; Buchmann, Nina; Cescatti, Alessandro; Chen, Jiquan; Davis, Kenneth J; Dellwik, Ebba; Desai, Ankur R; Etzold, Sophia; Francois, Louis; Gianelle, Damiano; Gielen, Bert; Goldstein, Allen; Groenendijk, Margriet; Gu, Lianhong; Hanan, Niall; Helfter, Carole; Hirano, Takashi; Hollinger, David Y; Jones, Mike B; Kiely, Gerard; Kolb, Thomas E; Kutsch, Werner L; Lafleur, Peter; Lawrence, David M; Li, Linghao; Lindroth, Anders; Litvak, Marcy; Loustau, Denis; Lund, Magnus; Marek, Michal; Martin, Timothy A; Matteucci, Giorgio; Migliavacca, Mirco; Montagnani, Leonardo; Moors, Eddy; Munger, J William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter; Olejnik, Janusz; Kyaw Tha Paw U; Pilegaard, Kim; Rambal, Serge; Raschi, Antonio; Scott, Russell L; Seufert, Günther; Spano, Donatella; Stoy, Paul; Sutton, Mark A; Varlagin, Andrej; Vesala, Timo; Weng, Ensheng; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Yang, Bai; Zhang, Zhongda; Zhou, Xuhui

    2012-05-01

    • It is well established that individual organisms can acclimate and adapt to temperature to optimize their functioning. However, thermal optimization of ecosystems, as an assemblage of organisms, has not been examined at broad spatial and temporal scales. • Here, we compiled data from 169 globally distributed sites of eddy covariance and quantified the temperature response functions of net ecosystem exchange (NEE), an ecosystem-level property, to determine whether NEE shows thermal optimality and to explore the underlying mechanisms. • We found that the temperature response of NEE followed a peak curve, with the optimum temperature (corresponding to the maximum magnitude of NEE) being positively correlated with annual mean temperature over years and across sites. Shifts of the optimum temperature of NEE were mostly a result of temperature acclimation of gross primary productivity (upward shift of optimum temperature) rather than changes in the temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration. • Ecosystem-level thermal optimality is a newly revealed ecosystem property, presumably reflecting associated evolutionary adaptation of organisms within ecosystems, and has the potential to significantly regulate ecosystem-climate change feedbacks. The thermal optimality of NEE has implications for understanding fundamental properties of ecosystems in changing environments and benchmarking global models.

  5. Evolution of the asexual queen succession system and its underlying mechanisms in termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    One major advantage of sexual reproduction over asexual reproduction is its promotion of genetic variation, although it reduces the genetic contribution to offspring. Queens of social insects double their contribution to the gene pool, while overuse of asexual reproduction may reduce the ability of the colony to adapt to environmental stress because of the loss of genetic diversity. Recent studies have revealed that queens of some termite species can solve this tradeoff by using parthenogenesis to produce the next generation of queens and sexual reproduction to produce other colony members. This reproductive system, known as asexual queen succession (AQS), has been identified in the subterranean termites Reticulitermes speratus, Reticulitermes virginicus and Reticulitermes lucifugus and in the Neotropical higher termites Embiratermes neotenicus and Cavitermes tuberosus The studies presented here have uncovered the unusual modes of reproduction in termites and have aimed to identify their underlying mechanisms. The study of AQS, the mixed use of sexual and asexual reproduction, is of fundamental importance as it may provide a key to solve the evolutionary paradox of sex.

  6. MECHANICAL BEHAVIORS OF SATURATED SAND UNDER COMPLICATED LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaoShengjun

    2004-01-01

    The different physical states of saturated sand, including shear elasticity, positive dilatancy, and negative dilatancy (preliminary negative dilatancy, secondary negative dilatancy and reversal negative dilatancy) are revealed based on the pore water pressure response of saturated sand in undrained dynamic torsional tests of thin cylinder samples and also checked by the drained cyclic triaxial tests under a given mean effective normal stress. According to the effective stress path of different physical states under the undrained cyclic torsional tests the physical state transformation surface, stress history boundary and yield surface are determined, and the state boundary surface is also determined by the range of effective frictional stress state movement.Based on the moving yield surface without rotation, and the expanding stress history boundary surface relevant to the stress path variations under different physical states in 3D stress space,a physical state model is proposed to provide a new approach to calculating the transient pore water pressure under the undrained condition,and the volume strain of dilatation under drained condition in this paper.

  7. Mechanical behaviour of adhesive joint under tensile and shear loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, X.; Kolstein, M.H.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Due to various advantages of Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) decks, the FRP to steel composite bridge system is being increasingly used in new bridge structures as well as rehabilitation projects for old bridges. This paper focuses on the mechanical behaviours and failure modes of the adhesively-bond

  8. Believing versus interacting: Behavioural and neural mechanisms underlying interpersonal coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konvalinka, Ivana; Bauer, Markus; Kilner, James

    When two people engage in a bidirectional interaction with each other, they use both bottom-up sensorimotor mechanisms such as monitoring and adapting to the behaviour of the other, as well as top-down cognitive processes, modulating their beliefs and allowing them to make decisions. Most researc...

  9. A possible mechanism of current in medium under electromagnetic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Tao

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a possible mechanism of current in medium is presented. Comparison between this current and the magnetization current was made. Expression for this current was derived. This work is helpful to understanding the interaction between medium and electromagnetic wave.

  10. A review of mechanisms underlying anticarcinogenicity by brassica vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, D.T.H.; Verhagen, H.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Poppel, G. van

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms by which brassica vegetables might decrease the risk of cancer are reviewed in this paper. Brassicas, including all types of cabbages, broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts, may be protective against cancer due to their relatively high glucosinolate content. Glucosinolates are us

  11. Dislocation mechanism of deuterium retention in tungsten under plasma implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinko, V I; Grigorev, P; Bakaev, A; Terentyev, D; van Oost, G; Gao, F; Van Neck, D; Zhurkin, E E

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a new theoretical model for deuterium (D) retention in tungsten-based alloys on the basis of its being trapped at dislocations and transported to the surface via the dislocation network with parameters determined by ab initio calculations. The model is used to explain experimentally observed trends of D retention under sub-threshold implantation, which does not produce stable lattice defects to act as traps for D in conventional models. Saturation of D retention with implantation dose and effects due to alloying of tungsten with, e.g. tantalum, are evaluated, and comparison of the model predictions with experimental observations under high-flux plasma implantation conditions is presented.

  12. Dynamics of mechanical system for electromechanical integrated toroidal drive under electric disturbance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许立忠; 郝秀红

    2014-01-01

    Based on electromagnetics and mechanics, electromechanical coupled dynamic equations for the drive were developed. Using method of perturbation, free vibrations of the mechanical system under electric disturbance were investigated. The forced responses of the mechanical system to mechanical excitation under electric disturbance were also presented. It is known that for the system with electric disturbance, as time grows, beat occurs. When electric disturbing frequency is near to the natural frequencies of the mechanical system or their integer multiple, resonance vibrations occur. The forced responses of the mechanical system to mechanical excitation under electric disturbance are compound vibrations decided by mechanical excitation, electric disturbance and parameters of the system. The coupled resonance vibration caused by electric disturbance and mechanical excitation was discussed as well. The conditions under which above coupled resonance occurs were presented. The results show that when the difference of the excitation frequency and the perturbation frequency is equal to some order of natural frequency, coupled resonance vibrations occur.

  13. Mechanisms underlying social inequality in post-menopausal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla Arthur

    2014-10-01

    This thesis is based on studies conducted in the period 2010-2014 at Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen and at Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York. The results are presented in three scientific papers and a synopsis. The main objective of the thesis was to determine mechanisms underlying social inequality (defined by educational level) in postmenopausal breast cancer (BC) by addressing mediating effects through hormone therapy (HT) use, BMI, lifestyle and reproductive factors. The results of previous studies suggest that the higher risk of postmenopausal BC among women of high socioeconomic position (SEP) may be explained by reproductive factors and health behaviors. Women of higher SEP generally have fewer children and give birth at older ages than women of low SEP, and these factors have been found to affect the risk of BC - probably through altered hormone levels. Adverse effects on BC risk have also been documented for modifiable health behaviors that may affect hormone levels, such as alcohol consumption, high BMI, physical inactivity, and HT use. Alcohol consumption and HT use are likewise more common among women of higher SEP. The analyses were based on the Social Inequality in Cancer (SIC) cohort and a subsample of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS). The SIC cohort was derived by pooling 6 individual studies from the Copenhagen area including 33,562 women (1,733 BC cases) aged 50-70 years at baseline. The subsample of WHI-OS consisted of two case-cohort studies with measurements of endogenous estradiol (N = 1,601) and insulin (N = 791). Assessment of mediation often relies on comparing multiplicative models with and without the potential mediator. Such approaches provide potentially biased results, because they do not account for mediator-outcome confounding, exposure-dependent mediator-outcome confounding, exposure-mediator interaction and interactions

  14. Mental imagery in music performance: underlying mechanisms and potential benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    This paper examines the role of mental imagery in music performance. Self-reports by musicians, and various other sources of anecdotal evidence, suggest that covert auditory, motor, and/or visual imagery facilitate multiple aspects of music performance. The cognitive and motor mechanisms that underlie such imagery include working memory, action simulation, and internal models. Together these mechanisms support the generation of anticipatory images that enable thorough action planning and movement execution that is characterized by efficiency, temporal precision, and biomechanical economy. In ensemble performance, anticipatory imagery may facilitate interpersonal coordination by enhancing online predictions about others' action timing. Overlap in brain regions subserving auditory imagery and temporal prediction is consistent with this view. It is concluded that individual differences in anticipatory imagery may be a source of variation in expressive performance excellence and the quality of ensemble cohesion. Engaging in effortful musical imagery is therefore justified when artistic perfection is the goal. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lymphatic Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwen Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most challenging human malignancies, pancreatic cancer is characterized by its insidious symptoms, low rate of surgical resection, high risk of local invasion, metastasis and recurrence, and overall dismal prognosis. Lymphatic metastasis, above all, is recognized as an early adverse event in progression of pancreatic cancer and has been described to be an independent poor prognostic factor. It should be noted that the occurrence of lymphatic metastasis is not a casual or stochastic but an ineluctable and designed event. Increasing evidences suggest that metastasis-initiating cells (MICs and the microenvironments may act as a double-reed style in this crime. However, the exact mechanisms on how they function synergistically for this dismal clinical course remain largely elusive. Therefore, a better understanding of its molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic lymphatic metastasis is urgently required. In this review, we will summarize the latest advances on lymphatic metastasis in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Genomic Instability in Brca-Deficient Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Instability during DNA Replication." 10: April 12, 2013-University of Zurich Cancer Mini-Symposium in Grindelwald, Switzerland - “Genome Stability during...53BP1DB, 53BP18A, o 45 min recovery) and immunoprecipitation was performed with anti- FLAG antib immunoprecipitated protein (right). (B) Isogenic...explore the mechanism of PTIP recruitment to DSBs, we expressed FLAG -tagged PTIP in WT, 53BP1/, and ATM/ MEFs and irradiated them with 10 Gy (Figure 6A

  17. Functional methods underlying classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kryukov, Alexey A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper investigates the physical content of a recently proposed mathematical framework that unifies the standard formalisms of classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory. In the framework states of a classical particle are identified with Dirac delta functions. The classical space is "made" of these functions and becomes a submanifold in a Hilbert space of states of the particle. The resulting embedding of the classical space into the space of states is highly non-trivial and accou...

  18. The Survival Advantage: Underlying Mechanisms and Extant Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A. Kazanas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, researchers have begun to investigate the function of memory in our evolutionary history. According to Nairne and colleagues (e.g., Nairne, Pandeirada, and Thompson, 2008; Nairne, Thompson, and Pandeirada, 2007, the best mnemonic strategy for learning lists of unrelated words may be one that addresses the same problems that our Pleistocene ancestors faced: fitness-relevant problems including securing food and water, as well as protecting themselves from predators. Survival processing has been shown to promote better recall and recognition memory than many well-known mnemonic strategies (e.g., pleasantness ratings, imagery, generation, etc.. However, the survival advantage does not extend to all types of stimuli and tasks. The current review presents research that has replicated Nairne et al.'s (2007 original findings, in addition to the research designs that fail to replicate the survival advantage. In other words, there are specific manipulations in which survival processing does not appear to benefit memory any more than other strategies. Potential mechanisms for the survival advantage are described, with an emphasis on those that are the most plausible. These proximate mechanisms outline the memory processes that may contribute to the advantage, although the ultimate mechanism may be the congruity between the survival scenario and Pleistocene problem-solving.

  19. Theoretical considerations underlying Na(+) uptake mechanisms in freshwater fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Scott K; Tresguerres, Martin; Goss, Greg G

    2008-11-01

    Ion and acid-base regulating mechanisms have been studied at the fish gill for almost a century. Original models proposed for Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake, and their linkage with H(+) and HCO(3)(-) secretion have changed substantially with the development of more sophisticated physiological techniques. At the freshwater fish gill, two dominant mechanisms for Na(+) uptake from dilute environments have persisted in the literature. The use of an apical Na(+)/H(+) exchanger driven by a basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase versus an apical Na(+) channel electrogenically coupled to an apical H(+)-ATPase have been the source of debate for a number of years. Advances in molecular biology have greatly enhanced our understanding of the basic ion transport mechanisms at the fish gill. However, it is imperative to ensure that thermodynamic principles are followed in the development of new models for gill ion transport. This review will focus on the recent molecular advances for Na(+) uptake in freshwater fish. Emphasis will be placed on thermodynamic constraints that prevent electroneutral apical NHE function in most freshwater environments. By combining recent advances in molecular and functional physiology of fish gills with thermodynamic considerations of ion transport, our knowledge in the field should continue to grow in a logical manner.

  20. Structural and mechanical properties of transition metal borides Nb2MB2 (M=Tc, Ru, and Os) under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofeng; Yan, Haiyan; Wei, Qun

    2016-10-01

    First-principle total energy calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of transition metal borides Nb2MB2 (M=Tc, Ru, and Os) within the tetragonal superstructure P4/mnc structure. The mechanically and dynamically stabilities of three borides have been demonstrated by the elastic constants and phonons calculations under pressure. Among these three compounds, Nb2TcB2 exhibits the biggest bulk and Young's modulus, smallest Poission's ratio, and highest harness. Density of states of them revealed that the strong B-B, Nb-B and M-B covalent bonds are major driving forces for their high bulk and shear moduli as well as small Poisson's ratio.

  1. Neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback control of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourville, Jason A; Reilly, Kevin J; Guenther, Frank H

    2008-02-01

    The neural substrates underlying auditory feedback control of speech were investigated using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and computational modeling. Neural responses were measured while subjects spoke monosyllabic words under two conditions: (i) normal auditory feedback of their speech and (ii) auditory feedback in which the first formant frequency of their speech was unexpectedly shifted in real time. Acoustic measurements showed compensation to the shift within approximately 136 ms of onset. Neuroimaging revealed increased activity in bilateral superior temporal cortex during shifted feedback, indicative of neurons coding mismatches between expected and actual auditory signals, as well as right prefrontal and Rolandic cortical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed increased influence of bilateral auditory cortical areas on right frontal areas during shifted speech, indicating that projections from auditory error cells in posterior superior temporal cortex to motor correction cells in right frontal cortex mediate auditory feedback control of speech.

  2. Mechanical Behaviour of Bolted Joints Under Impact Rates of Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    P., Pascoe , K., Polak, C., & Stroud, D. (1986). The Behaviour of Single-Lap Bolted Joints in CFRP Laminates. Composite Structures, 41-55...Interferometry. J Nondestruct Eval, 135-142. Smith, P., Pascoe , K., Polak, C., & Stroud, D. (1986). The Behaviour of Single-Lap Bolted Joints in...in [Kretsis & Matthews, 1985], [Smith, Pascoe , Polak, & Stroud, 1986],[Godwin & Matthews, 1980] UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED implies that under

  3. Mechanisms of Fluid-Mud Interactions Under Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    surface a corrugated appearance (Figure 12). Through careful analysis of these tests, it has been concluded that the waves are the result of a resonant...square meter per month. Analysis of X-radiographs from this field program has contributed to development of new theory relating hydrodynamics of...Shear near the base of the mobile fluid mud layer mixes coarser underlying rippled sediment with overlying finer sediment, producing laminations

  4. Electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of silicane under tensile strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamdagni, Pooja, E-mail: j.poojaa1228@gmail.com; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Physics Department, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India 171005 (India); Kumar, Ashok [Physics Department, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India, 160014 (India); Thakur, Anil [Physics Department, Govt. Collage Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India,173212 (India)

    2015-05-15

    The electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of fully hydrogenated silicene i.e. silicane in stable configuration are studied by means of density functional theory based calculations. The band gap of silicane monolayer can be flexibly reduced to zero when subjected to bi-axial tensile strain, leading to semi-conducting to metallic transition, whereas the static dielectric constant for in-plane polarization increases monotonically with increasing strain. Also the EEL function show the red shift in resonance peak with tensile strain. Our results offer useful insight for the application of silicane monolayer in nano-optical and electronics devices.

  5. What is Fundamental?

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Discussing what is fundamental in a variety of fields, biologist Richard Dawkins, physicist Gerardus 't Hooft, and mathematician Alain Connes spoke to a packed Main Auditorium at CERN 15 October. Dawkins, Professor of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford University, explained simply the logic behind Darwinian natural selection, and how it would seem to apply anywhere in the universe that had the right conditions. 't Hooft, winner of the 1999 Physics Nobel Prize, outlined some of the main problems in physics today, and said he thinks physics is so fundamental that even alien scientists from another planet would likely come up with the same basic principles, such as relativity and quantum mechanics. Connes, winner of the 1982 Fields Medal (often called the Nobel Prize of Mathematics), explained how physics is different from mathematics, which he described as a "factory for concepts," unfettered by connection to the physical world. On 16 October, anthropologist Sharon Traweek shared anecdotes from her ...

  6. Molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture on neuropathic pain**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziyong Ju; Huashun Cui; Xiaohui Guo; Huayuan Yang; Jinsen He; Ke Wang

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture has been used to treat neuropathic pain for a long time, but its mechanisms of action remain unknown. In this study, we observed the effects of electroacupuncture and manual acu-puncture on neuropathic pain and on ephrin-B/EphB signaling in rats models of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. The results showed that manual acupuncture and elec-puncture significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity fol owing chronic constriction injury, es-pecial y electroacupuncture treatment. Real-time PCR results revealed that ephrin-B1/B3 and EphB1/B2 mRNA expression levels were significantly increased in the spinal dorsal horns of chronic constriction injury rats. Electroacupuncture and manual acupuncture suppressed the high sion of ephrin-B1 mRNA, and elevated EphB3/B4 mRNA expression. Electroacupuncture signifi-cantly enhanced the mRNA expression of ephrin-B3 and EphB3/B6 in the dorsal horns of neuro-pathic pain rats. Western blot results revealed that electroacupuncture in particular, and manual acupuncture, significantly up-regulated ephrin-B3 protein levels in rat spinal dorsal horns. The re-sults of this study suggest that acupuncture could activate ephrin-B/EphB signaling in neuropathic pain rats and improve neurological function.

  7. Partitioning-based mechanisms under personalized differential privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoran; Xiong, Li; Ji, Zhanglong; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2017-01-01

    Differential privacy has recently emerged in private statistical aggregate analysis as one of the strongest privacy guarantees. A limitation of the model is that it provides the same privacy protection for all individuals in the database. However, it is common that data owners may have different privacy preferences for their data. Consequently, a global differential privacy parameter may provide excessive privacy protection for some users, while insufficient for others. In this paper, we propose two partitioning-based mechanisms, privacy-aware and utility-based partitioning, to handle personalized differential privacy parameters for each individual in a dataset while maximizing utility of the differentially private computation. The privacy-aware partitioning is to minimize the privacy budget waste, while utility-based partitioning is to maximize the utility for a given aggregate analysis. We also develop a t-round partitioning to take full advantage of remaining privacy budgets. Extensive experiments using real datasets show the effectiveness of our partitioning mechanisms. PMID:28932827

  8. Mechanisms underlying vertebrate limb regeneration: lessons from the salamander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockes, Jeremy P; Gates, Phillip B

    2014-06-01

    Limb regeneration in adult salamanders proceeds by formation of a mound of progenitor cells called the limb blastema. It provides several pointers for regenerative medicine. These include the role of differentiated cells in the origin of the blastema, the role of regenerating axons of peripheral nerves and the importance of cell specification in conferring morphogenetic autonomy on the blastema. One aspect of regeneration that has received less attention is the ability to undergo multiple episodes without detectable change in the outcome, and with minimal effect of aging. We suggest that, although such pointers are valuable, it is important to understand why salamanders are the only adult tetrapod vertebrates able to regenerate their limbs. Although this remains a controversial issue, the existence of salamander-specific genes that play a significant role in the mechanism of regeneration provides evidence for the importance of local evolution, rather than a purely ancestral mechanism. The three-finger protein called Prod1 is discussed in the present article as an exemplar of this approach.

  9. Ethanol Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum: Underlying Mechanisms and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrish Kumar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is the main constituent of alcoholic beverages that exerts toxicity to neuronal development. Ethanol affects synaptogenesis and prevents proper brain development. In humans, synaptogenesis takes place during the third trimester of pregnancy, and in rodents this period corresponds to the initial few weeks of postnatal development. In this period neuronal maturation and differentiation begin and neuronal cells start migrating to their ultimate destinations. Although the neuronal development of all areas of the brain is affected, the cerebellum and cerebellar neurons are more susceptible to the damaging effects of ethanol. Ethanol’s harmful effects include neuronal cell death, impaired differentiation, reduction of neuronal numbers, and weakening of neuronal plasticity. Neuronal development requires many hormones and growth factors such as retinoic acid, nerve growth factors, and cytokines. These factors regulate development and differentiation of neurons by acting through various receptors and their signaling pathways. Ethanol exposure during development impairs neuronal signaling mechanisms mediated by the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptors, the retinoic acid receptors, and by growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. In combination, these ethanol effects disrupt cellular homeostasis, reduce the survival and migration of neurons, and lead to various developmental defects in the brain. Here we review the signaling mechanisms that are required for proper neuronal development, and how these processes are impaired by ethanol resulting in harmful consequences to brain development.

  10. Obesity and cancer--mechanisms underlying tumour progression and recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiyoung; Morley, Thomas S; Kim, Min; Clegg, Deborah J; Scherer, Philipp E

    2014-08-01

    Over the past several years, the field of cancer research has directed increased interest towards subsets of obesity-associated tumours, which include mammary, renal, oesophageal, gastrointestinal and reproductive cancers in both men and women. The increased risk of breast cancer that is associated with obesity has been widely reported; this has drawn much attention and as such, warrants investigation of the key mechanisms that link the obese state with cancer aetiology. For instance, the obese setting provides a unique adipose tissue microenvironment with concomitant systemic endocrine alterations that favour both tumour initiation and progression. Major metabolic differences exist within tumours that distinguish them from non-transformed healthy tissues. Importantly, considerable metabolic differences are induced by tumour cells in the stromal vascular fraction that surrounds them. The precise mechanisms that underlie the association of obesity with cancer and the accompanying metabolic changes that occur in the surrounding microenvironment remain elusive. Nonetheless, specific therapeutic agents designed for patients with obesity who develop tumours are clearly needed. This Review discusses recent advances in understanding the contributions of obesity to cancer and their implications for tumour treatment.

  11. Obesity and cancer—mechanisms underlying tumour progression and recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min; Clegg, Deborah J.; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, the field of cancer research has directed increased interest towards subsets of obesity-associated tumours, which include mammary, renal, oesophageal, gastrointestinal and reproductive cancers in both men and women. The increased risk of breast cancer that is associated with obesity has been widely reported; this has drawn much attention and as such, warrants investigation of the key mechanisms that link the obese state with cancer aetiology. For instance, the obese setting provides a unique adipose tissue microenvironment with concomitant systemic endocrine alterations that favour both tumour initiation and progression. Major metabolic differences exist within tumours that distinguish them from non-transformed healthy tissues. Importantly, considerable metabolic differences are induced by tumour cells in the stromal vascular fraction that surrounds them. The precise mechanisms that underlie the association of obesity with cancer and the accompanying metabolic changes that occur in the surrounding microenvironment remain elusive. Nonetheless, specific therapeutic agents designed for patients with obesity who develop tumours are clearly needed. This Review discusses recent advances in understanding the contributions of obesity to cancer and their implications for tumour treatment. PMID:24935119

  12. Silk Fibroin-Sophorolipid Gelation: Deciphering the Underlying Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Parul; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, Vinod K; Ravindranathan, Sapna; Rajamohanan, Pattuparambil R; Prabhune, Asmita; Nisal, Anuya

    2016-10-10

    Silk fibroin (SF) protein, produced by silkworm Bombyx mori, is a promising biomaterial, while sophorolipid (SL) is an amphiphilic functional biosurfactant synthesized by nonpathogenic yeast Candida bombicola. SL is a mixture of two forms, acidic (ASL) and lactonic (LSL), which when added to SF results in accelerated gelation of silk fibroin. LSL is known to have multiple biological functionalities and hence hydrogels of these green molecules have promising applications in the biomedical sector. In this work, SANS, NMR, and rheology are employed to examine the assembling properties of individual and mixed SLs and their interactions with SF to understand the mechanism that leads to rapid gelation. SANS and NMR studies show that ASL assembles to form charged micelles, while LSL forms micellar assemblies and aggregates of a mass fractal nature. ASL and LSL together form larger mixed micelles, all of which interact differently with SF. It is shown that preferential binding of LSL to SF causes rapid unfolding of the SF chain leading to the formation of intermolecular beta sheets, which trigger fast gelation. Based on the observations, a mechanism for gelation of SF in the presence of different sophorolipids is proposed.

  13. Understanding ultrasound induced sonoporation: definitions and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentacker, I; De Cock, I; Deckers, R; De Smedt, S C; Moonen, C T W

    2014-06-01

    In the past two decades, research has underlined the potential of ultrasound and microbubbles to enhance drug delivery. However, there is less consensus on the biophysical and biological mechanisms leading to this enhanced delivery. Sonoporation, i.e. the formation of temporary pores in the cell membrane, as well as enhanced endocytosis is reported. Because of the variety of ultrasound settings used and corresponding microbubble behavior, a clear overview is missing. Therefore, in this review, the mechanisms contributing to sonoporation are categorized according to three ultrasound settings: i) low intensity ultrasound leading to stable cavitation of microbubbles, ii) high intensity ultrasound leading to inertial cavitation with microbubble collapse, and iii) ultrasound application in the absence of microbubbles. Using low intensity ultrasound, the endocytotic uptake of several drugs could be stimulated, while short but intense ultrasound pulses can be applied to induce pore formation and the direct cytoplasmic uptake of drugs. Ultrasound intensities may be adapted to create pore sizes correlating with drug size. Small molecules are able to diffuse passively through small pores created by low intensity ultrasound treatment. However, delivery of larger drugs such as nanoparticles and gene complexes, will require higher ultrasound intensities in order to allow direct cytoplasmic entry.

  14. Gastric sensitivity and reflexes: basic mechanisms underlying clinical problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpiroz, Fernando; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Grundy, David; Tack, Jan

    2014-02-01

    Both reflex and sensory mechanisms control the function of the stomach, and disturbances in these mechanisms may explain the pathophysiology of disorders of gastric function. The objective of this report is to perform a literature-based critical analysis of new, relevant or conflicting information on gastric sensitivity and reflexes, with particular emphasis on the comprehensive integration of basic and clinical research data. The stomach exerts both phasic and tonic muscular (contractile and relaxatory) activity. Gastric tone determines the capacity of the stomach and mediates both gastric accommodation to a meal as well as gastric emptying, by partial relaxation or progressive recontraction, respectively. Perception and reflex afferent pathways from the stomach are activated independently by specific stimuli, suggesting that the terminal nerve endings operate as specialized receptors. Particularly, perception appears to be related to stimulation of tension receptors, while the existence of volume receptors in the stomach is uncertain. Reliable techniques have been developed to measure gastric perception and reflexes both in experimental and clinical conditions, and have facilitated the identification of abnormal responses in patients with gastric disorders. Gastroparesis is characterised by impaired gastric tone and contractility, whereas patients with functional dyspepsia have impaired accommodation, associated with antral distention and increased gastric sensitivity. An integrated view of fragmented knowledge allows the design of pathophysiological models in an attempt to explain disorders of gastric function, and may facilitate the development of mechanistically orientated treatments.

  15. Mechanisms Underlying the Antidepressant Response of Acupuncture via PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huili Jiang; Xuhui Zhang; Yu Wang; Huimin Zhang; Jing Li; Xinjing Yang; Bingcong Zhao; Chuntao Zhang; Miao Yu; Mingmin Xu; Qiuyun Yu; Xingchen Liang; Xiang Li; Peng Shi; Tuya Bao

    2017-01-01

    .... The objective was to identify the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response of acupuncture through PKA signaling pathway in depression rats by employing the PKA signaling pathway inhibitor...

  16. Mechanisms Underlying Mammalian Hybrid Sterility in Two Feline Interspecies Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Brian W; Seabury, Christopher M; Brashear, Wesley A; Li, Gang; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-01

    The phenomenon of male sterility in interspecies hybrids has been observed for over a century, however, few genes influencing this recurrent phenotype have been identified. Genetic investigations have been primarily limited to a small number of model organisms, thus limiting our understanding of the underlying molecular basis of this well-documented "rule of speciation." We utilized two interspecies hybrid cat breeds in a genome-wide association study employing the Illumina 63 K single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Collectively, we identified eight autosomal genes/gene regions underlying associations with hybrid male sterility (HMS) involved in the function of the blood-testis barrier, gamete structural development, and transcriptional regulation. We also identified several candidate hybrid sterility regions on the X chromosome, with most residing in close proximity to complex duplicated regions. Differential gene expression analyses revealed significant chromosome-wide upregulation of X chromosome transcripts in testes of sterile hybrids, which were enriched for genes involved in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Our expression results parallel those reported in Mus hybrids, supporting the "Large X-Effect" in mammalian HMS and the potential epigenetic basis for this phenomenon. These results support the value of the interspecies feline model as a powerful tool for comparison to rodent models of HMS, demonstrating unique aspects and potential commonalities that underpin mammalian reproductive isolation.

  17. Mechanical Alterations Associated with Repeated Treadmill Sprinting under Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocherie, Franck; Morin, Jean-Benoit; Racinais, Sébastien; Millet, Grégoire P.; Périard, Julien D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Examine the mechanical alterations associated with repeated treadmill sprinting performed in HOT (38°C) and CON (25°C) conditions. Methods Eleven recreationally active males performed a 30-min warm-up followed by three sets of five 5-s sprints with 25-s recovery and 3-min between sets in each environment. Constant-velocity running for 1-min at 10 and 20 km.h-1 was also performed prior to and following sprinting. Results Mean skin (37.2±0.7 vs. 32.7±0.8°C; P<0.001) and core (38.9±0.2 vs. 38.8±0.3°C; P<0.05) temperatures, together with thermal comfort (P<0.001) were higher following repeated sprinting in HOT vs. CON. Step frequency and vertical stiffness were lower (-2.6±1.6% and -5.5±5.5%; both P<0.001) and contact time (+3.2±2.4%; P<0.01) higher in HOT for the mean of sets 1–3 compared to CON. Running distance per sprint decreased from set 1 to 3 (-7.0±6.4%; P<0.001), with a tendency for shorter distance covered in HOT vs. CON (-2.7±3.4%; P = 0.06). Mean vertical (-2.6±5.5%; P<0.01), horizontal (-9.1±4.4%; P<0.001) and resultant ground reaction forces (-3.0±2.8%; P<0.01) along with vertical stiffness (-12.9±2.3%; P<0.001) and leg stiffness (-8.4±2.7%; P<0.01) decreased from set 1 to 3, independently of conditions. Propulsive power decreased from set 1 to 3 (-16.9±2.4%; P<0.001), with lower propulsive power values in set 2 (-6.6%; P<0.05) in HOT vs. CON. No changes in constant-velocity running patterns occurred between conditions, or from pre-to-post repeated-sprint exercise. Conclusions Thermal strain alters step frequency and vertical stiffness during repeated sprinting; however without exacerbating mechanical alterations. The absence of changes in constant-velocity running patterns suggests a strong link between fatigue-induced velocity decrements during sprinting and mechanical alterations. PMID:28146582

  18. Functional methods underlying classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, A.

    2013-04-01

    The paper investigates the physical content of a recently proposed mathematical framework that unifies the standard formalisms of classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory. In the framework states of a classical particle are identified with Dirac delta functions. The classical space is "made" of these functions and becomes a submanifold in a Hilbert space of states of the particle. The resulting embedding of the classical space into the space of states is highly non-trivial and accounts for numerous deep relations between classical and quantum physics and relativity. One of the most striking results is the proof that the normal probability distribution of position of a macroscopic particle (equivalently, position of the corresponding delta state within the classical space submanifold) yields the Born rule for transitions between arbitrary quantum states.

  19. Mechanisms underlying rapid aldosterone effects in the kidney.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomas, Warren

    2011-03-17

    The steroid hormone aldosterone is a key regulator of electrolyte transport in the kidney and contributes to both homeostatic whole-body electrolyte balance and the development of renal and cardiovascular pathologies. Aldosterone exerts its action principally through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), which acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor in target tissues. Aldosterone also stimulates the activation of protein kinases and secondary messenger signaling cascades that act independently on specific molecular targets in the cell membrane and also modulate the transcriptional action of aldosterone through MR. This review describes current knowledge regarding the mechanisms and targets of rapid aldosterone action in the nephron and how aldosterone integrates these responses into the regulation of renal physiology.

  20. Mechanisms underlying rapid aldosterone effects in the kidney.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomas, Warren

    2012-02-01

    The steroid hormone aldosterone is a key regulator of electrolyte transport in the kidney and contributes to both homeostatic whole-body electrolyte balance and the development of renal and cardiovascular pathologies. Aldosterone exerts its action principally through the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), which acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor in target tissues. Aldosterone also stimulates the activation of protein kinases and secondary messenger signaling cascades that act independently on specific molecular targets in the cell membrane and also modulate the transcriptional action of aldosterone through MR. This review describes current knowledge regarding the mechanisms and targets of rapid aldosterone action in the nephron and how aldosterone integrates these responses into the regulation of renal physiology.

  1. Molecular mechanism for cavitation in water under tension

    CERN Document Server

    Menzl, Georg; Geiger, Philipp; Caupin, Frédéric; Abascal, Jose L F; Valeriani, Chantal; Dellago, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Despite its relevance in biology and engineering, the molecular mechanism driving cavitation in water remains unknown. Using computer simulations, we investigate the structure and dynamics of vapor bubbles emerging from metastable water at negative pressures. We find that in the early stages of cavitation, bubbles are irregularly shaped and become more spherical as they grow. Nevertheless, the free energy of bubble formation can be perfectly reproduced in the framework of classical nucleation theory (CNT) if the curvature dependence of the surface tension is taken into account. Comparison of the observed bubble dynamics to the predictions of the macroscopic Rayleigh--Plesset (RP) equation, augmented with thermal fluctuations, demonstrates that the growth of nanoscale bubbles is governed by viscous forces. Combining the dynamical prefactor determined from the RP equation with the free energy of CNT yields an analytical expression for the cavitation rate that reproduces the simulation results very well over a w...

  2. Aging and emotional memory: cognitive mechanisms underlying the positivity effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniol, Julia; Voss, Andreas; Grady, Cheryl L

    2008-12-01

    Younger adults tend to remember negative information better than positive or neutral information (negativity bias). The negativity bias is reduced in aging, with older adults occasionally exhibiting superior memory for positive, as opposed to negative or neutral, information (positivity bias). Two experiments with younger (N=24 in Experiment 1, N=25 in Experiment 2; age range: 18-35 years) and older adults (N=24 in both experiments; age range: 60-85 years) investigated the cognitive mechanisms responsible for age-related differences in recognition memory for emotional information. Results from diffusion model analyses (R. Ratcliff, 1978) indicated that the effects of valence on response bias were similar in both age groups but that Age x Valence interactions emerged in memory retrieval. Specifically, older adults experienced greater overall familiarity for positive items than younger adults. We interpret this finding in terms of an age-related increase in the accessibility of positive information in long-term memory.

  3. Fundamentals of Polarized Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The analytical and numerical basis for describing scattering properties of media composed of small discrete particles is formed by the classical electromagnetic theory. Although there are several excellent textbooks outlining the fundamentals of this theory, it is convenient for our purposes to begin with a summary of those concepts and equations that are central to the subject of this book and will be used extensively in the following chapters. We start by formulating Maxwell's equations and constitutive relations for time- harmonic macroscopic electromagnetic fields and derive the simplest plane-wave solution that underlies the basic optical idea of a monochromatic parallel beam of light. This solution naturally leads to the introduction of such fundamental quantities as the refractive index and the Stokes parameters. Finally, we define the concept of a quasi-monochromatic beam of light and discuss its implications.

  4. Mechanisms underlying probucol-induced hERG-channel deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi YQ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuan-Qi Shi,1,* Cai-Chuan Yan,1,* Xiao Zhang,1 Meng Yan,1 Li-Rong Liu,1 Huai-Ze Geng,1 Lin Lv,1 Bao-Xin Li1,21Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, 2State-Province Key Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Engineering, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The hERG gene encodes the pore-forming α-subunit of the rapidly activating delayed rectifier potassium channel (IKr, which is important for cardiac repolarization. Reduction of IhERG due to genetic mutations or drug interferences causes long QT syndrome, leading to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias (torsades de pointes or sudden death. Probucol is a cholesterol-lowering drug that could reduce hERG current by decreasing plasma membrane hERG protein expression and eventually cause long QT syndrome. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of probucol effects on IhERG and hERG-channel expression. Our data demonstrated that probucol reduces SGK1 expression, known as SGK isoform, in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in downregulation of phosphorylated E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 expression, but not the total level of Nedd4-2. As a result, the hERG protein reduces, due to the enhanced ubiquitination level. On the contrary, carbachol could enhance the phosphorylation level of Nedd4-2 as an alternative to SGK1, and thus rescue the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of hERG channels caused by probucol. These discoveries provide a novel mechanism of probucol-induced hERG-channel deficiency, and imply that carbachol or its analog may serve as potential therapeutic compounds for the handling of probucol cardiotoxicity.Keywords: long QT, hERG potassium channels, probucol, SGK1, Nedd4-2

  5. Mechanical characterization of stomach tissue under uniaxial tensile action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Z G; Li, W; Zhou, Z R

    2015-02-26

    In this article, the tensile properties of gastric wall were investigated by using biomechanical test and theoretical analysis. The samples of porcine stomach strips from smaller and greater curvature of the stomach were cut in longitudinal and circumferential direction, respectively. The loading-unloading, stress relaxation, strain creep, tensile fracture tests were performed at mucosa-submucosa, serosa-muscle and intact layer, respectively. Results showed that the biomechanical properties of the porcine stomach depended on the layers, orientations and locations of the gastric wall and presented typical viscoelastic, nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical properties. During loading-unloading test, the stress of serosa-muscle layer in the longitudinal direction was 15-20% more than that in the circumferential direction at 12% stretch ratio, while it could reach about 40% for the intact layer and 50% for the mucosa-submucosa layer. The results of stress relaxation and strain creep showed that the variation degree was obviously faster in the circumferential direction than that in the longitudinal direction, and the ultimate residual values were also different for the different layers, orientations and locations. In the process of fracture test, the serosa-muscle layer fractured firstly followed by the mucosa-submucosa layer when the intact layer was tested, the longitudinal strips firstly began to fracture and the required stress value was about twice as much as that in the circumferential strips. The anisotropy and heterogeneity of mechanical characterization of the porcine stomach were related to its complicated geometry, structure and functions. The results would help us to understand the biomechanics of soft organ tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Algorithmic mechanisms for reliable crowdsourcing computation under collusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Anta, Antonio; Georgiou, Chryssis; Mosteiro, Miguel A; Pareja, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We consider a computing system where a master processor assigns a task for execution to worker processors that may collude. We model the workers' decision of whether to comply (compute the task) or not (return a bogus result to save the computation cost) as a game among workers. That is, we assume that workers are rational in a game-theoretic sense. We identify analytically the parameter conditions for a unique Nash Equilibrium where the master obtains the correct result. We also evaluate experimentally mixed equilibria aiming to attain better reliability-profit trade-offs. For a wide range of parameter values that may be used in practice, our simulations show that, in fact, both master and workers are better off using a pure equilibrium where no worker cheats, even under collusion, and even for colluding behaviors that involve deviating from the game.

  7. Algorithmic mechanisms for reliable crowdsourcing computation under collusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernández Anta

    Full Text Available We consider a computing system where a master processor assigns a task for execution to worker processors that may collude. We model the workers' decision of whether to comply (compute the task or not (return a bogus result to save the computation cost as a game among workers. That is, we assume that workers are rational in a game-theoretic sense. We identify analytically the parameter conditions for a unique Nash Equilibrium where the master obtains the correct result. We also evaluate experimentally mixed equilibria aiming to attain better reliability-profit trade-offs. For a wide range of parameter values that may be used in practice, our simulations show that, in fact, both master and workers are better off using a pure equilibrium where no worker cheats, even under collusion, and even for colluding behaviors that involve deviating from the game.

  8. Neural mechanisms underlying melodic perception and memory for pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, R J; Evans, A C; Meyer, E

    1994-04-01

    The neural correlates of music perception were studied by measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes with positron emission tomography (PET). Twelve volunteers were scanned using the bolus water method under four separate conditions: (1) listening to a sequence of noise bursts, (2) listening to unfamiliar tonal melodies, (3) comparing the pitch of the first two notes of the same set of melodies, and (4) comparing the pitch of the first and last notes of the melodies. The latter two conditions were designed to investigate short-term pitch retention under low or high memory load, respectively. Subtraction of the obtained PET images, superimposed on matched MRI scans, provides anatomical localization of CBF changes associated with specific cognitive functions. Listening to melodies, relative to acoustically matched noise sequences, resulted in CBF increases in the right superior temporal and right occipital cortices. Pitch judgments of the first two notes of each melody, relative to passive listening to the same stimuli, resulted in right frontal-lobe activation. Analysis of the high memory load condition relative to passive listening revealed the participation of a number of cortical and subcortical regions, notably in the right frontal and right temporal lobes, as well as in parietal and insular cortex. Both pitch judgment conditions also revealed CBF decreases within the left primary auditory cortex. We conclude that specialized neural systems in the right superior temporal cortex participate in perceptual analysis of melodies; pitch comparisons are effected via a neural network that includes right prefrontal cortex, but active retention of pitch involves the interaction of right temporal and frontal cortices.

  9. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Studies on initiation, growth and sintering in the formation of utility boiler deposits: Topical technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Austin, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    Three laboratory-scale devices were utilized to investigate the mechanisms of the initiation, growth and sintering process involved in the formation of boiler deposits. Sticking apparatus investigations were conducted to study deposit initiation by comparing the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on four types of steel-based heat exchanger materials under the conditions found in a utility boiler and an entrained slagging gasifier. In addition, the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on a reduced steel surface were investigated. All the ash drops studied in this investigation were produced from bituminous coals.

  10. Consensus paper: pathological mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilla-Dueñas, A; Ashizawa, T; Brice, A; Magri, S; McFarland, K N; Pandolfo, M; Pulst, S M; Riess, O; Rubinsztein, D C; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, T; Scoles, D R; Stevanin, G; Taroni, F; Underwood, B R; Sánchez, I

    2014-04-01

    Intensive scientific research devoted in the recent years to understand the molecular mechanisms or neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are identifying new pathways and targets providing new insights and a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis in these diseases. In this consensus manuscript, the authors discuss their current views on the identified molecular processes causing or modulating the neurodegenerative phenotype in spinocerebellar ataxias with the common opinion of translating the new knowledge acquired into candidate targets for therapy. The following topics are discussed: transcription dysregulation, protein aggregation, autophagy, ion channels, the role of mitochondria, RNA toxicity, modulators of neurodegeneration and current therapeutic approaches. Overall point of consensus includes the common vision of neurodegeneration in SCAs as a multifactorial, progressive and reversible process, at least in early stages. Specific points of consensus include the role of the dysregulation of protein folding, transcription, bioenergetics, calcium handling and eventual cell death with apoptotic features of neurons during SCA disease progression. Unresolved questions include how the dysregulation of these pathways triggers the onset of symptoms and mediates disease progression since this understanding may allow effective treatments of SCAs within the window of reversibility to prevent early neuronal damage. Common opinions also include the need for clinical detection of early neuronal dysfunction, for more basic research to decipher the early neurodegenerative process in SCAs in order to give rise to new concepts for treatment strategies and for the translation of the results to preclinical studies and, thereafter, in clinical practice.

  11. Neurobiological mechanisms underlying the blocking effect in aversive learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eippert, Falk; Gamer, Matthias; Büchel, Christian

    2012-09-19

    Current theories of classical conditioning assume that learning depends on the predictive relationship between events, not just on their temporal contiguity. Here we employ the classic experiment substantiating this reasoning-the blocking paradigm-in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether human amygdala responses in aversive learning conform to these assumptions. In accordance with blocking, we demonstrate that significantly stronger behavioral and amygdala responses are evoked by conditioned stimuli that are predictive of the unconditioned stimulus than by conditioned stimuli that have received the same pairing with the unconditioned stimulus, yet have no predictive value. When studying the development of this effect, we not only observed that it was related to the strength of previous conditioned responses, but also that predictive compared with nonpredictive conditioned stimuli received more overt attention, as measured by fMRI-concurrent eye tracking, and that this went along with enhanced amygdala responses. We furthermore observed that prefrontal regions play a role in the development of the blocking effect: ventromedial prefrontal cortex (subgenual anterior cingulate) only exhibited responses when conditioned stimuli had to be established as nonpredictive for an outcome, whereas dorsolateral prefrontal cortex also showed responses when conditioned stimuli had to be established as predictive. Most importantly, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex connectivity to amygdala flexibly switched between positive and negative coupling, depending on the requirements posed by predictive relationships. Together, our findings highlight the role of predictive value in explaining amygdala responses and identify mechanisms that shape these responses in human fear conditioning.

  12. The neural sociometer: brain mechanisms underlying state self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, Naomi I; Inagaki, Tristen K; Muscatell, Keely A; Byrne Haltom, Kate E; Leary, Mark R

    2011-11-01

    On the basis of the importance of social connection for survival, humans may have evolved a "sociometer"-a mechanism that translates perceptions of rejection or acceptance into state self-esteem. Here, we explored the neural underpinnings of the sociometer by examining whether neural regions responsive to rejection or acceptance were associated with state self-esteem. Participants underwent fMRI while viewing feedback words ("interesting," "boring") ostensibly chosen by another individual (confederate) to describe the participant's previously recorded interview. Participants rated their state self-esteem in response to each feedback word. Results demonstrated that greater activity in rejection-related neural regions (dorsal ACC, anterior insula) and mentalizing regions was associated with lower-state self-esteem. Additionally, participants whose self-esteem decreased from prescan to postscan versus those whose self-esteem did not showed greater medial prefrontal cortical activity, previously associated with self-referential processing, in response to negative feedback. Together, the results inform our understanding of the origin and nature of our feelings about ourselves.

  13. RISK FACTORS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL TARGETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKolodecik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the review:Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer.Recent Findings:Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-kB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis. Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogneic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16 can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary:Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions.

  14. Risk factors for pancreatic cancer: underlying mechanisms and potential targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodecik, Thomas; Shugrue, Christine; Ashat, Munish; Thrower, Edwin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review: Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer. Recent findings: Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-κB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis (AP). Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogenic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16) can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary: Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions. PMID:24474939

  15. Raynaud's Phenomenon: A Brief Review of the Underlying Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardoun, Manal M; Nassif, Joseph; Issa, Khodr; Baydoun, Elias; Eid, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is characterized by exaggerated cold-induced vasoconstriction. This augmented vasoconstriction occurs by virtue of a reflex response to cooling via the sympathetic nervous system as well as by local activation of α2C adrenoceptors (α2C-AR). In a cold-initiated, mitochondrion-mediated mechanism involving reactive oxygen species and the Rho/ROCK pathway, cytoskeletal rearrangement in vascular smooth muscle cells orchestrates the translocation of α2C-AR to the cell membrane, where this receptor readily interacts with its ligand. Different parameters are involved in this spatial and functional rescue of α2C-AR. Of notable relevance is the female hormone, 17β-estradiol, or estrogen. This is consistent with the high prevalence of RP in premenopausal women compared to age-matched males. In addition to dissecting the role of these various players, the contribution of pollution as well as genetic background to the onset and prevalence of RP are also discussed. Different therapeutic approaches employed as treatment modalities for this disease are also highlighted and analyzed. The lack of an appropriate animal model for RP mandates that more efforts be undertaken in order to better understand and eventually treat this disease. Although several lines of treatment are utilized, it is important to note that precaution is often effective in reducing severity or frequency of RP attacks.

  16. Raynaud's Phenomenon: a Brief Review of the Underlying Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal Fardoun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Raynaud's phenomenon (RP is characterized by exaggerated cold-induced vasoconstriction. This augmented vasoconstriction occurs by virtue of a reflex response to cooling via the sympathetic nervous system as well as by local activation of α2C adrenoceptors (α2C-AR. In a cold-initiated, mitochondrion-mediated mechanism involving reactive oxygen species and the Rho/ROCK pathway, cytoskeletal rearrangement in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs orchestrates the translocation of α2C-AR to the cell membrane, where this receptor readily interacts with its ligand. Different parameters are involved in this spatial and functional rescue of α2C-AR. Of notable relevance is the female hormone, 17β-estradiol, or estrogen. This is consistent with the high prevalence of RP in pre-menopausal women compared to age-matched males. In addition to dissecting the role of these various players, the contribution of pollution as well as genetic background to the onset and prevalence of RP are also discussed. Different therapeutic approaches employed as treatment modalities for this disease are also highlighted and analyzed. The lack of an appropriate animal model for RP mandates that more efforts be undertaken in order to better understand and eventually treat this disease. Although several lines of treatment are utilized, it is important to note that precaution is often effective in reducing severity or frequency of RP attacks.

  17. Psychophysiological mechanisms underlying spatial attention in children with primary headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovelli, Elisa; Tarantino, Samuela; De Ranieri, Cristiana; Vollono, Catello; Galli, Federica; De Luca, Massimiliano; Capuano, Alessandro; Porro, Arianna; Balestri, Martina; Guidetti, Vincenzo; Vigevano, Federico; Biondi, Gianni; Drewes, Asbjoern M; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2012-09-01

    Neurophysiological studies to evaluate spatial attention in children with primary headache are lacking. Tactile spatial attention modulates the N140 somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) amplitude. The aims of the study are: (1) to investigate the effect of spatial attention on the N140 amplitude in children with migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) and in healthy children, and (2) to correlate the neurophysiological results with a neuropsychological test for spatial attention. We studied 16 patients with migraine without aura (MoA), 12 TTH children and 10 healthy subjects. "Deux Barrage" test for spatial attention was administered. SEPs were recorded in a neutral condition (NC) and in a spatial attention condition (SAC). No significant differences in neuropsychological measures were found between MoA, TTH and healthy subjects. The N140 amplitude increase during SAC, as compared to NC, was significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls. Migraineurs showed a positive correlation between the N140 amplitude increase during SAC and their neuropsychological performance. Although spatial attention performances in children with headache are as good as in controls, the N140 amplitude increase during SAC in headache patients suggests that the psychophysiological mechanisms subtending spatial attention are different from those in healthy children. Copyright © 2011 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neural mechanisms underlying social conformity in an ultimatum game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu eWei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When individuals’ actions are incongruent with those of the group they belong to, they may change their initial behavior in order to conform to the group norm. This phenomenon is known as social conformity. In the present study, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate brain activity in response to group opinion during an ultimatum game. Results showed that participants changed their choices when these choices conflicted with the normative opinion of the group they were members of, especially in conditions of unfair treatment. The fMRI data revealed that a conflict with group norms activated the brain regions involved in norm violations and behavioral adjustment. Furthermore, in the reject-unfair condition, we observed that a conflict with group norms activated the medial frontal gyrus. These findings contribute to recent research examining neural mechanisms involved in detecting violations of social norms, and provide information regarding the neural representation of conformity behavior in an economic game.

  19. Fracture mechanisms of glass particles under dynamic compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parab, Niranjan D.; Guo, Zherui; Hudspeth, M.; Claus, Benjamin; Fezzaa, Kamel; Sun, Tao; Chen, Weinong W.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, dynamic fracture mechanisms of single and contacting spherical glass particles were observed using high speed synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging. A modified Kolsky bar setup was used to apply controlled dynamic compressive loading on the soda-lime glass particles. Four different configurations of particle arrangements with one, two, three, and five particles were studied. In single particle experiments, cracking initiated near the contact area between the particle and the platen, subsequently fragmenting the particle in many small sub-particles. In multi-particle experiments, a crack was observed to initiate from the point just outside the contact area between two particles. The initiated crack propagated at an angle to the horizontal loading direction, resulting in separation of a fragment. However, this fragment separation did not affect the ability of the particle to withstand further contact loading. On further compression, large number of cracks initiated in the particle with the highest number of particle-particle contacts near one of the particle-particle contacts. The initiated cracks roughly followed the lines joining the contact points. Subsequently, the initiated cracks along with the newly developed sub-cracks bifurcated rapidly as they propagated through the particle and fractured the particle explosively into many small fragments, leaving the other particles nearly intact.

  20. Mechanical Model for Dynamic Behavior of Concrete Under Impact Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanxiang

    Concrete is a geo-material which is used substantively in the civil building and military safeguard. One coupled model of damage and plasticity to describe the complex behavior of concrete subjected to impact loading is proposed in this research work. The concrete is assumed as homogeneous continuum with pre-existing micro-cracks and micro-voids. Damage to concrete is caused due to micro-crack nucleation, growth and coalescence, and defined as the probability of fracture at a given crack density. It induces a decrease of strength and stiffness of concrete. Compaction of concrete is physically a collapse of the material voids. It produces the plastic strain in the concrete and, at the same time, an increase of the bulk modulus. In terms of crack growth model, micro-cracks are activated, and begin to propagate gradually. When crack density reaches a critical value, concrete takes place the smashing destroy. The model parameters for mortar are determined using plate impact experiment with uni-axial strain state. Comparison with the test results shows that the proposed model can give consistent prediction of the impact behavior of concrete. The proposed model may be used to design and analysis of concrete structures under impact and shock loading. This work is supported by State Key Laboratory of Explosion science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology (YBKT14-02).

  1. Neural mechanism underlying autobiographical memory modulated by remoteness and emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ruiyang; Fu, Yan; Wang, DaHua; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2012-03-01

    Autobiographical memory is the ability to recollect past events from one's own life. Both emotional tone and memory remoteness can influence autobiographical memory retrieval along the time axis of one's life. Although numerous studies have been performed to investigate brain regions involved in retrieving processes of autobiographical memory, the effect of emotional tone and memory age on autobiographical memory retrieval remains to be clarified. Moreover, whether the involvement of hippocampus in consolidation of autobiographical events is time dependent or independent has been controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect of memory remoteness (factor1: recent and remote) and emotional valence (factor2: positive and negative) on neural correlates underlying autobiographical memory by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. Although all four conditions activated some common regions known as "core" regions in autobiographical memory retrieval, there are some other regions showing significantly different activation for recent versus remote and positive versus negative memories. In particular, we found that bilateral hippocampal regions were activated in the four conditions regardless of memory remoteness and emotional valence. Thus, our study confirmed some findings of previous studies and provided further evidence to support the multi-trace theory which believes that the role of hippocampus involved in autobiographical memory retrieval is time-independent and permanent in memory consolidation.

  2. Molecular mechanism underlying RAG1/RAG2 synaptic complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S; Gilmore, Jamie; Kriatchko, Aleksei N; Kumar, Sushil; Swanson, Patrick C; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2009-07-31

    Two lymphoid cell-specific proteins, RAG1 and RAG2 (RAG), initiate V(D)J recombination by assembling a synaptic complex with recombination signal sequences (RSSs) abutting two different antigen receptor gene coding segments, and then introducing a DNA double strand break at the end of each RSS. Despite the biological importance of this system, the structure of the synaptic complex, and the RAG protein stoichiometry and arrangement of DNA within the synaptosome, remains poorly understood. Here we applied atomic force microscopy to directly visualize and characterize RAG synaptic complexes. We report that the pre-cleavage RAG synaptic complex contains about twice the protein content as a RAG complex bound to a single RSS, with a calculated mass consistent with a pair of RAG heterotetramers. In the synaptic complex, the RSSs are predominantly oriented in a side-by-side configuration with no DNA strand crossover. The mass of the synaptic complex, and the conditions under which it is formed in vitro, favors an association model of assembly in which isolated RAG-RSS complexes undergo synapsis mediated by RAG protein-protein interactions. The replacement of Mg2+ cations with Ca2+ leads to a dramatic change in protein stoichiometry for all RAG-RSS complexes, suggesting that the cation composition profoundly influences the type of complex assembled.

  3. Molecular Mechanism Underlying RAG1/RAG2 Synaptic Complex Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Gilmore, Jamie; Kriatchko, Aleksei N.; Kumar, Sushil; Swanson, Patrick C.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2009-01-01

    Two lymphoid cell-specific proteins, RAG1 and RAG2 (RAG), initiate V(D)J recombination by assembling a synaptic complex with recombination signal sequences (RSSs) abutting two different antigen receptor gene coding segments, and then introducing a DNA double strand break at the end of each RSS. Despite the biological importance of this system, the structure of the synaptic complex, and the RAG protein stoichiometry and arrangement of DNA within the synaptosome, remains poorly understood. Here we applied atomic force microscopy to directly visualize and characterize RAG synaptic complexes. We report that the pre-cleavage RAG synaptic complex contains about twice the protein content as a RAG complex bound to a single RSS, with a calculated mass consistent with a pair of RAG heterotetramers. In the synaptic complex, the RSSs are predominantly oriented in a side-by-side configuration with no DNA strand crossover. The mass of the synaptic complex, and the conditions under which it is formed in vitro, favors an association model of assembly in which isolated RAG-RSS complexes undergo synapsis mediated by RAG protein-protein interactions. The replacement of Mg2+ cations with Ca2+ leads to a dramatic change in protein stoichiometry for all RAG-RSS complexes, suggesting that the cation composition profoundly influences the type of complex assembled. PMID:19502597

  4. FUNDAMENTALS OF BIOMECHANICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Knudson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION This book provides a broad and in-depth theoretical and practical description of the fundamental concepts in understanding biomechanics in the qualitative analysis of human movement. PURPOSE The aim is to bring together up-to-date biomechanical knowledge with expert application knowledge. Extensive referencing for students is also provided. FEATURES This textbook is divided into 12 chapters within four parts, including a lab activities section at the end. The division is as follows: Part 1 Introduction: 1.Introduction to biomechanics of human movement; 2.Fundamentals of biomechanics and qualitative analysis; Part 2 Biological/Structural Bases: 3.Anatomical description and its limitations; 4.Mechanics of the musculoskeletal system; Part 3 Mechanical Bases: 5.Linear and angular kinematics; 6.Linear kinetics; 7.Angular kinetics; 8.Fluid mechanics; Part 4 Application of Biomechanics in Qualitative Analysis :9.Applying biomechanics in physical education; 10.Applying biomechanics in coaching; 11.Applying biomechanics in strength and conditioning; 12.Applying biomechanics in sports medicine and rehabilitation. AUDIENCE This is an important reading for both student and educators in the medicine, sport and exercise-related fields. For the researcher and lecturer it would be a helpful guide to plan and prepare more detailed experimental designs or lecture and/or laboratory classes in exercise and sport biomechanics. ASSESSMENT The text provides a constructive fundamental resource for biomechanics, exercise and sport-related students, teachers and researchers as well as anyone interested in understanding motion. It is also very useful since being clearly written and presenting several ways of examples of the application of biomechanics to help teach and apply biomechanical variables and concepts, including sport-related ones

  5. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eBellesi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity, is invariably associated with slower EEG activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals or lightening of sleep could have significant practical implications. Here we first review the evidence that it is possible to enhance sleep slow waves in humans using transcranial direct-current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Since these methods are currently impractical and their safety is questionable, especially for chronic long-term exposure, we then discuss novel data suggesting that it is possible to enhance slow waves using sensory stimuli. We consider the physiology of the K-complex, a peripheral evoked slow wave, and show that, among different sensory modalities, acoustic stimulation is the most effective in increasing the magnitude of slow waves, likely through the activation of non-lemniscal ascending pathways to the thalamo-cortical system. In addition, we discuss how intensity and frequency of the acoustic stimuli, as well as exact timing and pattern of stimulation, affect sleep enhancement. Finally, we discuss automated algorithms that read the EEG and, in real-time, adjust the stimulation parameters in a closed-loop manner to obtain an increase in sleep slow waves and avoid undesirable arousals. In conclusion, while discussing the mechanisms that underlie the generation of sleep slow waves, we review the converging evidence showing that acoustic stimulation is safe and represents an ideal tool for slow wave sleep enhancement.

  6. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellesi, Michele; Riedner, Brady A; Garcia-Molina, Gary N; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity (SWA), is invariably associated with slower electroencephalogram (EEG) activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals or lightening of sleep could have significant practical implications. Here we first review the evidence that it is possible to enhance sleep slow waves in humans using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Since these methods are currently impractical and their safety is questionable, especially for chronic long-term exposure, we then discuss novel data suggesting that it is possible to enhance slow waves using sensory stimuli. We consider the physiology of the K-complex (KC), a peripheral evoked slow wave, and show that, among different sensory modalities, acoustic stimulation is the most effective in increasing the magnitude of slow waves, likely through the activation of non-lemniscal ascending pathways to the thalamo-cortical system. In addition, we discuss how intensity and frequency of the acoustic stimuli, as well as exact timing and pattern of stimulation, affect sleep enhancement. Finally, we discuss automated algorithms that read the EEG and, in real-time, adjust the stimulation parameters in a closed-loop manner to obtain an increase in sleep slow waves and avoid undesirable arousals. In conclusion, while discussing the mechanisms that underlie the generation of sleep slow waves, we review the converging evidence showing that acoustic stimulation is safe and represents an ideal tool for slow wave sleep (SWS) enhancement.

  7. Mechanism underlying prolongevity induced by bifidobacteria in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Tomomi; Ikeda, Takanori; Yasui, Chikako; Saeki, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-02-01

    Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria are probiotic bacteria that modify host defense systems and have the ability to extend the lifespan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we attempted to elucidate the mechanism by which bifidobacteria prolong the lifespan of C. elegans. When the nematode was fed Bifidobacterium infantis (BI) mixed at various ratios with the standard food bacterium Escherichia coli strain OP50 (OP), the mean lifespan of worms was extended in a dose-dependent manner. Worms fed BI displayed higher locomotion and produced more offspring than control worms. The growth curves of nematodes were similar regardless of the amount of BI mixed with OP, suggesting that BI did not induce prolongevity effects through caloric restriction. Notably, feeding worms the cell wall fraction of BI alone was sufficient to promote prolongevity. The accumulation of protein carbonyls and lipofuscin, a biochemical marker of aging, was also lower in worms fed BI; however, the worms displayed similar susceptibility to heat, hydrogen peroxide, and paraquat, an inducer of free radicals, as the control worms. As a result of BI feeding, loss-of-function mutants of daf-16, jnk-1, aak-2, tol-1, and tir-1 exhibited a longer lifespan than OP-fed control worms, but BI failed to extend the lifespan of pmk-1, skn-1, and vhp-1 mutants. As skn-1 induces phase 2 detoxification enzymes, our findings suggest that cell wall components of bifidobacteria increase the average lifespan of C. elegans via activation of skn-1, regulated by the p38 MAPK pathway, but not by general activation of the host defense system via DAF-16.

  8. Particle behavior and char burnout mechanisms under pressurized combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C.M.; Spliethoff, H.; Hein, K.R.G.

    1999-07-01

    Combined cycle systems with coal-fired gas turbines promise highest cycle efficiencies for this fuel. Pressurized pulverized coal combustion, in particular, yields high cycle efficiencies due to the high flue gas temperatures possible. The main problem, however, is to ensure a flue gas clean enough to meet the high gas turbine standards with a dirty fuel like coal. On the one hand, a profound knowledge of the basic chemical and physical processes during fuel conversion under elevated pressures is required whereas on the other hand suitable hot gas cleaning systems need to be developed. The objective of this work was to provide experimental data to enable a detailed description of pressurized coal combustion processes. A series of experiments were performed with two German hvb coals, Ensdorf and Goettelborn, and one German brown coal, Garzweiler, using a semi-technical scale pressurized entrained flow reactor. The parameters varied in the experiments were pressure, gas temperature and bulk gas oxygen concentration. A two-color pyrometer was used for in-situ determination of particle surface temperatures and particle sizes. Flue gas composition was measured and solid residue samples taken and subsequently analyzed. The char burnout reaction rates were determinated varying the parameters pressure, gas temperature and initial oxygen concentration. Variation of residence time was achieved by taking the samples at different points along the reaction zone. The most influential parameters on char burnout reaction rates were found to be oxygen partial pressure and fuel volatile content. With increasing pressure the burn-out reactions are accelerated and are mostly controlled by product desorption and pore diffusion being the limiting processes. The char burnout process is enhanced by a higher fuel volatile content.

  9. Neural mechanisms underlying balance control in Tai Chi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatts, Strawberry

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of Tai Chi (TC) to improve neuromuscular response characteristics underlying dynamic balance recovery in balance-impaired seniors at high risk for falling was examined during perturbed walking. Twenty-two subjects were randomized into TC or control groups. Nineteen subjects (68-92 years, BERG 44 or less) completed the study. TC training incorporated repetitive exercises using TC's essential motor/biomechanical strategies, techniques, and postural components. Control training used axial exercises, balance awareness/education and stress reduction. Groups trained 1.5 h/day, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. After post-testing, controls received TC training. Subjects walked across a force plate triggered to move forward 15 cm at 40 cm/s at heelstrike. Tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius responses during balance recovery were recorded from electromyograms. Four clinical measures of balance were also examined. TC subjects, but not controls, significantly reduced tibialis anterior response time from 148.92 +/- 45.11 ms to 98.67 +/- 17.22 ms (p < or = 0.004) and decreased co-contraction of antagonist muscles (p < or = 0.003) of the perturbed leg. All clinical balance measures significantly improved after TC. TC training transferred to improved neuromuscular responses controlling the ankle joint during perturbed gait in balance-impaired seniors who had surgical interventions to their back, hips, knees and arthritis. The fast, accurate neuromuscular activation crucial for efficacious response to slips also transferred to four clinical measures of functional balance. Significant enhancement was achieved with 3 weeks of training.

  10. Mechanism of attenuation of leptin signaling under chronic ligand stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamberg-Lemper Simone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that acts via its hypothalamic receptor (LEPRb to regulate energy balance. A downstream effect essential for the weight-regulatory action of leptin is the phosphorylation and activation of the latent transcription factor STAT3 by LEPRb-associated Janus kinases (JAKs. Obesity is typically associated with chronically elevated leptin levels and a decreased ability of LEPRb to activate intracellular signal transduction pathways (leptin resistance. Here we have studied the roles of the intracellular tyrosine residues in the negative feedback regulation of LEPRb-signaling under chronic leptin stimulation. Results Mutational analysis showed that the presence of either Tyr985 and Tyr1077 in the intracellular domain of LEPRb was sufficient for the attenuation of STAT3 phosphorylation, whereas mutation of both tyrosines rendered LEPRb resistant to feedback regulation. Overexpression and RNA interference-mediated downregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 revealed that both Tyr985 and Tyr1077 were capable of supporting the negative modulatory effect of SOCS3 in reporter gene assays. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of SOCS1 was enhanced by the presence of Tyr985 but not Tyr1077. Finally, the reduction of the STAT-phosphorylating activity of the LEPRb complex after 2 h of leptin stimulation was not accompanied by the dephosphorylation or degradation of LEPRb or the receptor-associated JAK molecule, but depended on Tyr985 and/or Tyr1077. Conclusions Both Tyr985 and Tyr1077 contribute to the negative regulation of LEPRb signaling. The inhibitory effects of SOCS1 and SOCS3 differ in the dependence on the tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain of LEPRb.

  11. Fundamentals of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lindmayer, Joseph

    1965-01-01

    Semiconductor properties ; semiconductor junctions or diodes ; transistor fundamentals ; inhomogeneous impurity distributions, drift or graded-base transistors ; high-frequency properties of transistors ; band structure of semiconductors ; high current densities and mechanisms of carrier transport ; transistor transient response and recombination processes ; surfaces, field-effect transistors, and composite junctions ; additional semiconductor characteristics ; additional semiconductor devices and microcircuits ; more metal, insulator, and semiconductor combinations for devices ; four-pole parameters and configuration rotation ; four-poles of combined networks and devices ; equivalent circuits ; the error function and its properties ; Fermi-Dirac statistics ; useful physical constants.

  12. Fundamental of biomedical engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sawhney, GS

    2007-01-01

    About the Book: A well set out textbook explains the fundamentals of biomedical engineering in the areas of biomechanics, biofluid flow, biomaterials, bioinstrumentation and use of computing in biomedical engineering. All these subjects form a basic part of an engineer''s education. The text is admirably suited to meet the needs of the students of mechanical engineering, opting for the elective of Biomedical Engineering. Coverage of bioinstrumentation, biomaterials and computing for biomedical engineers can meet the needs of the students of Electronic & Communication, Electronic & Instrumenta

  13. Corticonic models of brain mechanisms underlying cognition and intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    underlying intelligence and other higher level brain functions.

  14. Neutrons and Fundamental Symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaster, Bradley [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2016-01-11

    The research supported by this project addressed fundamental open physics questions via experiments with subatomic particles. In particular, neutrons constitute an especially ideal “laboratory” for fundamental physics tests, as their sensitivities to the four known forces of nature permit a broad range of tests of the so-called “Standard Model”, our current best physics model for the interactions of subatomic particles. Although the Standard Model has been a triumphant success for physics, it does not provide satisfactory answers to some of the most fundamental open questions in physics, such as: are there additional forces of nature beyond the gravitational, electromagnetic, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear forces?, or why does our universe consist of more matter than anti-matter? This project also contributed significantly to the training of the next generation of scientists, of considerable value to the public. Young scientists, ranging from undergraduate students to graduate students to post-doctoral researchers, made significant contributions to the work carried out under this project.

  15. Fundamentals of attosecond optics

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zenghu

    2011-01-01

    Attosecond optical pulse generation, along with the related process of high-order harmonic generation, is redefining ultrafast physics and chemistry. A practical understanding of attosecond optics requires significant background information and foundational theory to make full use of these cutting-edge lasers and advance the technology toward the next generation of ultrafast lasers. Fundamentals of Attosecond Optics provides the first focused introduction to the field. The author presents the underlying concepts and techniques required to enter the field, as well as recent research advances th

  16. Project on Transfer Mechanism of Radioactive Source Term Under Severe Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Xue-ting; JI; Song-tao; CHEN; Lin-lin

    2012-01-01

    <正>The "Transfer mechanism of radioactive source term under severe accident" is a sub-project of the research program of "Mechanism and phenomenology of severe accident". An aerosol transfer mechanism experimental facility is built to simulate the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) of advanced pressurizer reactors to research effects to the transfer process of fission products under severe accident. An advanced CFD method is also utilized to research the effects. The objective of this project is to understand

  17. Coupled mechanical-electrical-thermal modeling for short-circuit prediction in a lithium-ion cell under mechanical abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Sprague, Michael A.; Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    2015-09-01

    In order to better understand the behavior of lithium-ion batteries under mechanical abuse, a coupled modeling methodology encompassing the mechanical, electrical and thermal response is presented for predicting short-circuit under external crush. The combined mechanical-electrical-thermal response is simulated in a commercial finite element software LS-DYNA® using a representative-sandwich finite-element model, where electrical-thermal modeling is conducted after an instantaneous mechanical crush. The model includes an explicit representation of each individual component such as the active material, current collector, separator, etc., and predicts their mechanical deformation under quasi-static indentation. Model predictions show good agreement with experiments: the fracture of the battery structure under an indentation test is accurately predicted. The electrical-thermal simulation predicts the current density and temperature distribution in a reasonable manner. Whereas previously reported models consider the mechanical response exclusively, we use the electrical contact between active materials following the failure of the separator as a criterion for short-circuit. These results are used to build a lumped representative sandwich model that is computationally efficient and captures behavior at the cell level without resolving the individual layers.

  18. Fundamentals of Structural Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Connor, Jerome J

    2013-01-01

    Fundamentals of Structural Engineering provides a balanced, seamless treatment of both classic, analytic methods and contemporary, computer-based techniques for conceptualizing and designing a structure. The book’s principle goal is to foster an intuitive understanding of structural behavior based on problem solving experience for students of civil engineering and architecture who have been exposed to the basic concepts of engineering mechanics and mechanics of materials. Making it distinct from many other undergraduate textbooks, the authors of this text recognize the notion that engineers reason about behavior using simple models and intuition they acquire through problem solving. The approach adopted in this text develops this type of intuition  by presenting extensive, realistic problems and case studies together with computer simulation, which allows rapid exploration of  how a structure responds to changes in geometry and physical parameters. This book also: Emphasizes problem-based understanding of...

  19. Discussion on some fundamental problems in unsaturated soil mechanics%非饱和土力学中几个基本问题的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Unsaturated soil mechanics has become an active researching area in recent years. However the understanding of some fundamental problems is inconsistent and some basic concepts are confusing. This paper aims at the fundamental problems, e.g. the choices of state variables and effective stress of unsaturated soils, the definition of suction, the limitation of axis-translation technique and the characterization of unsaturated soil structure. In these problems, the choices of state variables and effective stress of unsaturated soils play an important role in the theory of unsaturated soil mechanics and constructing constitutive models. Firstly, this paper briefly reviews expressions of effective stress of unsaturated soils and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Secondly, this paper points out that there does not exist such matric suction beyond a certain limit in real site because of cavitation of capillary water. However the laboratory axis-translation technique conceals the possibility of cavitation and modifies soil behavior. Thus the validity of theories of shear strength and deformation of unsaturated soils based on it is a question worth study. Thirdly, the paper suggests that the characterization of unsaturated soil structure should include the distributions of pore water and pore air, the interaction among all phases (e.g. capillary and physical-chemical forces), except for the elements of saturated soil structure, e.g. fabric and inter-particle actions. Finally, this paper further combs the confusable concepts. The purposes of these discussions are to attract attention of domestic scholars on these problems, to set up correct understanding about them, and to promote development of unsaturated soil mechanics.%  近些年非饱和土力学的研究非常活跃,但对一些基本问题的认识并不一致,有时甚至概念混淆。针对非饱和土力学的几个基本问题:非饱和土状态变量的选择、

  20. Fracture mechanics in new designed power module under thermo-mechanical loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand Camille

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermo-mechanically induced failure is a major reliability issue in the microelectronic industry. On this account, a new type of Assembly Interconnected Technology used to connect MOSFETs in power modules has been developed. The reliability is increased by using a copper clip soldered on the top side of the chip, avoiding the use of aluminium wire bonds, often responsible for the failure of the device. Thus the new designed MOSFET package does not follow the same failure mechanisms as standard modules. Thermal and power cycling tests were performed on these new packages and resulting failures were analyzed. Thermo-mechanical simulations including cracks in the aluminium metallization and intermetallics (IMC were performed using Finite Element Analysis in order to better understand crack propagation and module behaviour.

  1. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  2. Electrical Response of Cement-Based Piezoelectric Ceramic Composites under Mechanical Loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biqin Dong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical responses of cement-based piezoelectric ceramic composites under mechanical loadings are studied. A simple high order model is presented to explain the nonlinear phenomena, which is found in the electrical response of the composites under large mechanical loadings. For general situation, this nonlinear piezoelectric effect is quite small, and the composite is suitable for dynamic mechanical sensor as holding high static stability. The experimental results are consistent with the relationship quite well. The study shows that cement-based piezoelectric composite is suitable for potential application as dynamic mechanical sensor with excellent dynamic response and high static stability.

  3. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadhim, Munira A

    2012-08-22

    The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "non-targeted responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell

  4. On the Fundamental Properties of Linear Parameter-Varying Dynamic Systems Under Parametrical Multi-Perturbations. Applications to Time-Delay Systems. Preliminary Results

    CERN Document Server

    De la Sen, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with a unifying approach to the problems of computing the admissible sets of parametrical multi perturbations in appropriate bounded sets such that some fundamental properties of parameter-varying linear dynamic systems are maintained provided that the so-called (i.e. perturbation-free) nominal system possesses such properties. The sets of parametrical multi perturbations include any combinations of parametrical multi perturbations in the matrix of dynamics as well as in the control, output and input-output interconnection matrices which belong to some prescribed bounded domain in the complex space. The various properties which are investigated are controllability, observability, output controllability and existence of minimal state-space realizations together with the associate existence or not of associate decoupling, transmission and invariant zeros. All the matrices of parameters including the nominal and the disturbed ones which parameterize the dynamic system may be real or complex. The...

  5. Interactivity effects in social media marketing on brand engagement: an investigation of underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; van Noort, G.; Eisend, M.; Langner, T.

    2011-01-01

    Although, SNS advertising spending increases, research on SNS campaigning is still underexposed. First, this study aims to investigate the effect of SNS campaign interactivity on the receivers brand engagement, taking four underlying mechanisms into account (brand identification, campaign divergence

  6. Mechanisms underlying the effects of prenatal psychosocial stress on child outcomes: beyond the HPA axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, R.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Weerth, C. de

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from preclinical and clinical studies indicates that maternal psychosocial stress and anxiety during pregnancy adversely affect child outcomes. However, knowledge on the possible mechanisms underlying these relations is limited. In the present paper, we review the most often

  7. Interactivity effects in social media marketing on brand engagement: an investigation of underlying mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; van Noort, G.; Eisend, M.; Langner, T.

    2011-01-01

    Although, SNS advertising spending increases, research on SNS campaigning is still underexposed. First, this study aims to investigate the effect of SNS campaign interactivity on the receivers brand engagement, taking four underlying mechanisms into account (brand identification, campaign

  8. News with an attitude: assessing the mechanisms underlying the effects of opinionated news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boukes, M.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Moorman, M.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Opinionated news targets communities of likeminded viewers, relies on dramaturgical storytelling techniques, and shares characteristics with political satire. Accordingly, opinionated news should be understood as a specific form of political entertainment. We have investigated the mechanisms underly

  9. Fundamentals of Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisacane, Vincent L.

    2005-06-01

    Fundamentals of Space Systems was developed to satisfy two objectives: the first is to provide a text suitable for use in an advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate course in both space systems engineering and space system design. The second is to be a primer and reference book for space professionals wishing to broaden their capabilities to develop, manage the development, or operate space systems. The authors of the individual chapters are practicing engineers that have had extensive experience in developing sophisticated experimental and operational spacecraft systems in addition to having experience teaching the subject material. The text presents the fundamentals of all the subsystems of a spacecraft missions and includes illustrative examples drawn from actual experience to enhance the learning experience. It included a chapter on each of the relevant major disciplines and subsystems including space systems engineering, space environment, astrodynamics, propulsion and flight mechanics, attitude determination and control, power systems, thermal control, configuration management and structures, communications, command and telemetry, data processing, embedded flight software, survuvability and reliability, integration and test, mission operations, and the initial conceptual design of a typical small spacecraft mission.

  10. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms of biofilms development and dispersal: BIAM (Biofilm Intensity and Architecture Measurement), a new tool for studying biofilms as a function of their architecture and fluorescence intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudin, Marine; Cinquin, Bertrand; Sclavi, Bianca; Pareau, Dominique; Lopes, Filipa

    2017-09-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is one of the most relevant technologies for studying biofilms in situ. Several tools have been developed to investigate and quantify the architecture of biofilms. However, an approach to quantify correctly the evolution of intensity of a fluorescent signal as a function of the structural parameters of a biofilm is still lacking. Here we present a tool developed in the ImageJ open source software that can be used to extract both structural and fluorescence intensity from CLSM data: BIAM (Biofilm Intensity and Architecture Measurement). This is of utmost significance when studying the fundamental mechanisms of biofilm growth, differentiation and development or when aiming to understand the effect of external molecules on biofilm phenotypes. In order to provide an example of the potential of such a tool in this study we focused on biofilm dispersion. cis-2-Decenoic acid (CDA) is a molecule known to induce biofilm dispersion of multiple bacterial species. The mechanisms by which CDA induces dispersion are still poorly understood. To investigate the effects of CDA on biofilms, we used a reporter strain of Escherichia coli (E. coli) that expresses the GFPmut2 protein under control of the rrnBP1 promoter. Experiments were done in flow cells and image acquisition was made with CLSM. Analysis carried out using the new tool, BIAM, indicates that CDA affects the fluorescence intensity of the biofilm structures as well as biofilm architectures. Indeed, our results demonstrate that CDA removes more than 35% of biofilm biovolume and suggest that it results in an increase of the biofilm's mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) by more than 26% compared to the control biofilm in the absence of CDA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Microbial Mechanisms Underlying Acidity-induced Reduction in Soil Respiration Under Nitrogen Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, S.; Li, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are receiving increasing amounts of reactive nitrogen (N) due to anthropogenic activities, which largely changes soil respiration and its feedback to climate change. N enrichment can not only increase N availability but also induce soil acidification, both may affect soil microbial activity and root growth with a consequent impact on soil respiration. However, it remains unclear whether elevated N availability or soil acidity has greater impact on soil respiration (Rs). We conducted a manipulative experiment to simulate N enrichment (10 g m-2 yr-1 NH4NO3) and soil acidity (0.552 mol H+ m-2 yr-1 sulfuric acid) and studied their effects on Rs and its components in a temperate forest. Our results showed that soil pH was reduced by 0.2 under N addition or acid addition treatment. Acid addition significantly decreased autotrophic respiration (Ra) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) by 21.5% and 22.7% in 2014, 34.8% and 21.9% in 2015, respectively, resulting in a reduction of Rs by 22.2% in 2014 and 26.1% in 2015. Nitrogen enrichment reduced Ra, Rh, Rs by 21.9%, 16.2%, 18.6% in 2014 and 22.1%, 5.9%, 11.7% in 2015, respectively. The reductions of Rs and its components were attributable to decrease of fine root biomass, microbial biomass, and cellulose degrading enzymes. N addition did not change microbial community but acid addition increased both fungal and arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi PLFAs, and N plus acid addition significantly enhanced fungal to bacterial ratio. All the hydrolase enzymes were reduced more by soil acidity (43-50%) than nitrogen addition (30-39%). Structural equation model showed that soil acidity played more important role than N availability in reducing soil respiration mainly by changing microbial extracellular enzymes. We therefore suggest that N deposition induced indirect effect of soil acidification on microbial properties is critical and should be taken into account to better understand and predict ecosystem C cycling in

  12. Mechanical behavior and failure mechanism of pre-cracked specimen under uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Lin, Baiquan; Yang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    As a desirable permeability enhancement method, hydraulic slotting has been widely used for enhanced coal bed methane (ECBM) recovery in China. Aiming at the problem that the action mechanism of the slot on the mechanical properties of the slotted coal is still unclear, this paper investigates the effects of flaw inclination on the strength, deformation and cracking process of the pre-cracked specimens. The result shows that the stress-strain curves can be divided into three categories based on the stress behaviors, dropping step by step or dropping sharply, after the peak. With an increase of the flaw inclination, the strength and elastic modulus of the pre-cracked specimen increases gradually, which is verified by the numerical simulation and theoretical results. Analysis of the cracking processes indicates that the initiation position of the first crack in specimens with various flaw inclinations is different, which is caused by the various distributions of tensile and compressive stress concentration zones. The distribution of the stress field controls the cracking process which will in turn affect the stress field distribution. With the propagation of the cracks, the tensile stress concentration zones expand and the concentration degree lowers gradually, while the compressive stress concentration zones show the opposite variation trend. Based on the above results, an optimized slot arrangement method has been proposed for the field application of hydraulic slotting.

  13. The MOND Fundamental Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, V F; Diaferio, A; Tortora, C; Molinaro, R

    2010-01-01

    Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) has been shown to be able to fit spiral galaxy rotation curves as well as giving a theoretical foundation for empirically determined scaling relations, such as the Tully - Fisher law, without the need for a dark matter halo. As a complementary analysis, one should investigate whether MOND can also reproduce the dynamics of early - type galaxies (ETGs) without dark matter. As a first step, we here show that MOND can indeed fit the observed central velocity dispersion $\\sigma_0$ of a large sample of ETGs assuming a simple MOND interpolating functions and constant anisotropy. We also show that, under some assumptions on the luminosity dependence of the Sersic n parameter and the stellar M/L ratio, MOND predicts a fundamental plane for ETGs : a log - linear relation among the effective radius $R_{eff}$, $\\sigma_0$ and the mean effective intensity $\\langle I_e \\rangle$. However, we predict a tilt between the observed and the MOND fundamental planes.

  14. Cognitive mechanisms underlying disorganization of thought in a genetic syndrome (47,XXY)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rijn, Sophie; Aleman, Andre; De Sonneville, Leo; Swaab, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    Because of the risk for development of psychopathology such as psychotic symptoms, it has been suggested that studying men with the XXY karyotype may help in the search for underlying cognitive, neural and genetic mechanisms. The aim of this study was to identify cognitive mechanisms that may contri

  15. Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics course

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    The course will provide an introduction to some of the basic theoretical techniques used to describe the fundamental particles and their interactions. Of central importance to our understanding of these forces are the underlying symmetries of nature and I will review the nature of these symmetries and how they are used to build a predictive theory. I discuss how the combination of quantum mechanics and relativity leads to the quantum field theory (QFT) description of the states of matter and their interactions. The Feynman rules used to determine the QFT predictions for experimentally measurable processes are derived and applied to the calculation of decay widths and cross sections.

  16. Preface: Proceedings of the ESF Exploratory Workshop on Glassy Liquids under Pressure: Fundamentals and Applications (Ustroń, Poland, 10-12 October 2007) Proceedings of the ESF Exploratory Workshop on Glassy Liquids under Pressure: Fundamentals and Applications (Ustroń, Poland, 10-12 October 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd-Rzoska, Aleksandra; Rzoska, Sylwester J.; Tamarit, Josep Ll

    2008-06-01

    This preface focuses on the importance of pressure studies for explaining the glass transitions puzzle. Subsequently, some issues related to the European Science Foundation Exploratory Workshop (ESF EW) Glassy Liquids under Pressure: Fundamentals and Applications (Ustroń, Poland, 10-12 October 2007) are recalled. Most liquids crystallize on 'normal' cooling at the melting temperature Tm. However, some liquids can skip crystallization and undergo supercooling down to glass temperature Tg. Turnbull 1 proposed an empirical link between these temperatures indicating good glass forming ability (GFA) for Tg/Tm « 2/3. Values of the GFA factor Tg/Tm → 1/2 were suggested for 'poor' glass formers, where crystallization is difficult to avoid. Recently, the significance of the pressure dependence of the GFA factor was also noted 2. Reaching the glass transition is associated with a series of phenomena, namely 3: (i) the thermal expansion coefficient at constant pressure changes smoothly from values common for a liquid to those of a crystal, showing anomalous behaviour near Tg, (ii) viscosity reaches a value of η = 1013 P and the structural relaxation time τ ≈ 100 s, (iii) the specific heat drop occurs, giving rise to the famous Kauzmann paradox. On cooling towards glass transition, the 'pretransitional' behaviour can be observed for dynamic properties even well above Tg + 100 K 3. This includes the non-Arrhenius evolution of such magnitudes as viscosity, primary (structural-, α-) relaxation time, electric conductivity or diffusion coefficient associated with increasingly non-Debye distribution of relaxation times 3. Such behaviour is associated with short-time scale relaxation processes. The most characteristic is the secondary (β-) relaxation 4, 5 which merges with the 'structural' dynamics near τ(TB) = 10-7+/-1s, the hypothetically universal (magic) time-scale 6. Below TB the split in the evolution of the translation and orientation related properties occurs 4, 5

  17. Digital Fourier analysis fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Kido, Ken'iti

    2015-01-01

    This textbook is a thorough, accessible introduction to digital Fourier analysis for undergraduate students in the sciences. Beginning with the principles of sine/cosine decomposition, the reader walks through the principles of discrete Fourier analysis before reaching the cornerstone of signal processing: the Fast Fourier Transform. Saturated with clear, coherent illustrations, "Digital Fourier Analysis - Fundamentals" includes practice problems and thorough Appendices for the advanced reader. As a special feature, the book includes interactive applets (available online) that mirror the illustrations.  These user-friendly applets animate concepts interactively, allowing the user to experiment with the underlying mathematics. For example, a real sine signal can be treated as a sum of clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating vectors. The applet illustration included with the book animates the rotating vectors and the resulting sine signal. By changing parameters such as amplitude and frequency, the reader ca...

  18. Electro-oxidation process and mechanism of molybdenite decomposition under ultrasonic effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    According to the characteristics and shortcomings of the traditional roasting process and the electro-oxidation process in the molybdenum metallurgical industry,the ultrasound electro-oxidation process was proposed to strengthen the oxidative decomposition or leaching of molybdenum.Laboratory work was carried out in an electrochemical cell with 15 nun electrode spacing at 25℃ under ultrasonic effect.The optimum conditions were found through experiments.The electro-oxidation mechanism of molybdenite decomposition under ultrasonic was investigated.A model of electro-oxidation mechanism of molybdenum under ultrasonic was given.

  19. Mechanical analysis on individualized finite element of temporal-mandibular joint under overlarge jaw opening status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingxu; Yang, Jianjun; Zhou, Ruizhi; Li, Ningyi; Xia, Junnan; Gu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Analyze the stress status of temporal-mandibular joint (TMJ) of a healthy volunteer under the overlarge jaw opening status through the finite element method, with the purpose of clarifying the loading features of each structure in the joint area, and achieving further understanding of the pathogenesis of the temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Collect the CBCT and MRI data of a volunteer respectively under the maximum jaw opening, establish the finite element model (FEM) of TMJ under the maximum jaw opening status through a series of software, image segmentation, rectification, meshing, material evaluation and other related processing, simulate the mechanical environment of this joint area under this status, and analyze the stress status of the articular disc, condyle cartilage, and condyle process. Based on CT and MRI image data, build 3D model and FEM of TMJ, fully simulate the mechanical environment under the large jaw opening status, and calculate the stress value of the articular disc, condyle process and condylar cartilage. This research result reminds us that the normal people's articular disc are easy to generate stress concentration under large jaw opening, but its stress is far less than the one under the tight biting status. Perhaps the TMJ symptom induced under the large jaw opening status is mainly caused by the displacement of the articular disc. Under the large jaw opening status, the condylar cartilage plays a vital role in dispersing the stress. This method can be applied for carrying out individualized mechanical analysis on the patients with TMD.

  20. Exchange Rates and Fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Charles; West, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near-random walk behavior if fundamentals are I (1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs,…

  1. Brake Fundamentals. Automotive Articulation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Larry; And Others

    Designed for secondary and postsecondary auto mechanics programs, this curriculum guide contains learning exercises in seven areas: (1) brake fundamentals; (2) brake lines, fluid, and hoses; (3) drum brakes; (4) disc brake system and service; (5) master cylinder, power boost, and control valves; (6) parking brakes; and (7) trouble shooting. Each…

  2. Fundamentals of Biomass pellet production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens Kai; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2005-01-01

    Pelletizing experiments along with modelling of the pelletizing process have been carried out with the aim of understanding the fundamental physico-chemical mechanisms that control the quality and durability of biomass pellets. A small-scale California pellet mill (25 kg/h) located with the Biomass...

  3. Fundamental Movement Skills Development under the Influence of a Gymnastics Program and Everyday Physical Activity in Seven-Year-Old Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culjak, Zoran; Miletic, Durdica; Kalinski, Suncica Delas; Kezic, Ana; Zuvela, Frane

    2014-04-01

    The objectives of this study were: a) to examine the influence of an 18-week basic artistic gymnastics program on fundamental movement skills (FMS) development in seven-year-old children; b) to determine correlations between children's daily activities and successful performance of FMS and basic artistic gymnastics skills. Seventy five first grade primary school children took part in this study. A physical education teacher specialized in artistic gymnastics conducted a gymnastics program for 18 weeks, three times a week. The level of gymnastics skills and FMS were identified at the beginning and at the end of the program. The level of gymnastics skills was evaluated by performance of eight artistic gymnastics skills, while FMS were evaluated by the use of FMS-polygon. Physical activity and inactivity was evaluated by using a proxy-questionnaire "Netherlands Physical Activity Questionnaire˝ (NPAQ). According to the dependent samples t test, significant differences were found in the FMS-polygon and all gymnastics skills before and after the 18-week gymnastics program. Increasing correlations were established over time between gymnastics skills and the FMS-polygon. Unorganized daily activity of children significantly correlated with their mastering of gymnastics skills and FMS. The presented findings confirm: (1) the thesis that basic artistic gymnastics skills and FMS could be developed simultaneously, (2) the theory of positive transfer of similar skills between FMS and artistic gymnastic skills. Mastering basic artistic gymnastics skills will provoke improvement of FMS and finally become a prerequisite for successful introduction of learning more complex gymnastics skills. The obtained results imply that an increase of children's unorganized daily activities can improve the mastering of basic gymnastics skills and simultaneously the development of FMS.

  4. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  5. Researches of mechanical behaviour of the bone micro volumes and porous ceramics under uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakova, T. V.; Buyakova, S. P.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    The research results of the mechanics are presented and the effective mechanical characteristics under uniaxial compression of the simulative micro volume of the compact bone are defined subject to the direction of the collagen-mineral fibers, porosity and mineral content. The experimental and computer studies of the mechanics are performed and the effective mechanical characteristics of the porous zirconium oxide ceramics are defined. The recommendations are developed on the selection of the ceramic samples designed to replace the fragment of the compact bone of a definite structure and mineral content.

  6. Research of mechanics of the compact bone microvolume and porous ceramics under uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakova, T. V.; Buyakova, S. P.; Kul'kov, S. N.

    2015-11-01

    The research results of the mechanics are presented and the effective mechanical characteristics under uniaxial compression of the simulative microvolume of the compact bone are defined subject to the direction of the collagen-mineral fibers, porosity and mineral content. The experimental studies of the mechanics are performed and the effective mechanical characteristics of the produced porous zirconium oxide ceramics are defined. The recommendations are developed on the selection of the ceramic samples designed to replace the fragment of the compact bone of a definite structure and mineral content.

  7. Deformation and failure mechanisms of graphite/epoxy composites under static loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of deformation and failure of graphite epoxy composites under static loading were clarified. The influence of moisture and temperature upon these mechanisms were also investigated. Because the longitudinal tensile properties are the most critical to the performance of the composite, these properties were investigated in detail. Both ultimate and elastic mechanical properties were investigated, but the study of mechanisms emphasized those leading to failure of the composite. The graphite epoxy composite selected for study was the system being used in several NASA sponsored flight test programs.

  8. Fundamentals of nanomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Silvan; Roukes, Michael Lee

    2016-01-01

    This authoritative book introduces and summarizes the latest models and skills required to design and optimize nanomechanical resonators, taking a top-down approach that uses macroscopic formulas to model the devices. The authors cover the electrical and mechanical aspects of nano electromechanical system (NEMS) devices. The introduced mechanical models are also key to the understanding and optimization of nanomechanical resonators used e.g. in optomechanics. Five comprehensive chapters address: The eigenmodes derived for the most common continuum mechanical structures used as nanomechanical resonators; The main sources of energy loss in nanomechanical resonators; The responsiveness of micro and nanomechanical resonators to mass, forces, and temperature; The most common underlying physical transduction mechanisms; The measurement basics, including amplitude and frequency noise. The applied approach found in this book is appropriate for engineering students and researchers working with micro and nanomechanical...

  9. The Behavior of Matter under Nonequilibrium Conditions: Fundamental Aspects and Applications in Energy-oriented Problems: Progress Report for Period September 1984--November 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigogine, I.

    1987-10-07

    This report briefly discusses progress on the following topics: state selection dynamics; polymerization under nonequilibrium conditions; inhomogeneous fluctuations in hydrodynamics and in completely mixed reactors; homoclinic bifurcations and mixed-mode oscillations; intrinsic randomness and spontaneous symmetry breaking in explosive systems; and microscopic means of irreversibility.

  10. Mechanical properties of gold twinned nanocubes under different triaxial tensile rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zailin; Zhang, Guowei; Luo, Gang; Sun, Xiaoqing; Zhao, Jianwei

    2016-08-01

    The gold twinned nanocubes under different triaxial tensile rates are explored by molecular dynamics simulation. Hydrostatic stress and Mises stress are defined in order to understand triaxial stresses. Twin boundaries prevent dislocations between twin boundaries from developing and dislocation angles are inconspicuous, which causes little difference between triaxial stresses. The mechanical properties of the nanocubes under low and high tensile rates are different. The curves of nanocubes under high tensile rates are more abrupt than those under low tensile rates. When the tensile rate is extremely big, the loadings are out of the nanocubes and there are not deformation and fracture in the internal nanocubes.

  11. The fundamentals of mathematical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fikhtengol'ts, G M

    1965-01-01

    The Fundamentals of Mathematical Analysis, Volume 1 is a textbook that provides a systematic and rigorous treatment of the fundamentals of mathematical analysis. Emphasis is placed on the concept of limit which plays a principal role in mathematical analysis. Examples of the application of mathematical analysis to geometry, mechanics, physics, and engineering are given. This volume is comprised of 14 chapters and begins with a discussion on real numbers, their properties and applications, and arithmetical operations over real numbers. The reader is then introduced to the concept of function, i

  12. Mechanical response under contact loads of AlCrN-coated tool materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J.; Botero, C. A.; Cornu, N.; Ramírez, G.; Mestra, A.; Llanes, L.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanical behavior under contact loading of systems consisting of PVD AlCrN film deposited onto two distinct hard substrates - cemented carbides and tool steel is studied by means of indentation testing techniques, under monotonic and cyclic condition. Experimental work includes assessment of critical applied loads for emergence of circular cracks at the coating surface, as well as evaluation of both surface and subsurface damage evolution. Results indicate that both coated systems are susceptible to mechanical degradation associated with repetitive contact load. Furthermore, significant differences on contact fatigue behavior between the two studied coated systems are evidenced under consideration of cracking evolution at top surface and penetration towards the substrate. In this regard, the intrinsic mechanical properties of the substrate are pointed out as key feature for rationalizing the experimental findings.

  13. Quantum versus classical foundation of statistical mechanics under experimentally realistic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Peter; Evstigneev, Mykhaylo

    2013-11-01

    Focusing on isolated macroscopic systems, described in terms of either a quantum mechanical or a classical model, our two key questions are how far does an initial ensemble (usually far from equilibrium and largely unknown in detail) evolve towards a stationary long-time behavior (equilibration) and how far is this steady state in agreement with the microcanonical ensemble as predicted by statistical mechanics (thermalization). A recently developed quantum mechanical treatment of the problem is briefly summarized, putting particular emphasis on the realistic modeling of experimental measurements and nonequilibrium initial conditions. Within this framework, equilibration can be proven under very weak assumptions about those measurements and initial conditions, while thermalization still requires quite strong additional hypotheses. An analogous approach within the framework of classical mechanics is developed and compared with the quantum case. In particular, the assumptions to guarantee classical equilibration are now rather strong, while thermalization then follows under relatively weak additional conditions.

  14. Evaluation of explosive sublimation as the mechanism of nanosecond laser ablation of tungsten under vacuum conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oderji, Hassan Yousefi; Farid, Nazar; Sun, Liying; Fu, Cailong; Ding, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    A non-equilibrium mechanism for nanosecond laser ablation is suggested herein, and its predictions are compared to the results of W experiments performed under vacuum conditions. A mechanism of particle formation is explained via this model, with partial sublimation of the superheated irradiated zone of the target considered to be the mechanism of laser ablation. In this study, a mixture of vapor and particles was explosively generated and subsequently prevented the rest of a laser pulse from reaching its intended target. This mechanism was found to play an essential role in the ablation of W under vacuum conditions, and it provides a theoretical justification for particle formation. Moreover, special considerations were taken into account for the expansion of plasma into a vacuum. The model was evaluated by measuring the mass of ablated particles using a quartz crystal deposition monitor and time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The results of this model were found to be in good agreement with experimental values.

  15. Mechanical behavior of the U-anchor of super-CFRP rod under tensile loading

    OpenAIRE

    Djamaluddin, Rudy; yamaguchi, Kohei; Hino, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    - A suitable anchoring system is required to anchor a CFRP tendon due to its sensitivity in lateral pressure. Recent developed anchors are still relying on lateral pressure in anchoring CFRP tendons. A new CFRP unit equipped with U-anchor at both end of the rod body without any jointing (namely of Super CFRP, S-CFRP) has been developed. This paper presents the mechanical behavior as well as failure mechanism of U-anchor under direct loading and loaded under embedded within concrete, respec...

  16. The Behavior of Matter under Nonequilibrium Conditions: Fundamental Aspects and Applications: Progress Report for Period August 15, 1989 - April 14, 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigogine, I.

    1989-10-01

    As in the previous period, our work has been concerned with the study of the properties of nonequilibrium systems and especially with the mechanism of self-organization. As is well-known, the study of self-organization began with the investigation of hydrodynamical or chemical instabilities studied from the point of view of macroscopic physics. The main outcome is that nonequilibrium generates spatial correlations of macroscopic physics. The main outcome is that nonequilibrium generated spatial correlations of macroscopic range whose characteristics length is an intrinsic property and whose amplitude is determined by nonequilibrium constraints. A survey of the macroscopic approach to nonequilibrium states is given in the paper. "Nonequilibrium States and Long Range Correlations in Chemical Dynamics", by G. Nicolis at al. However, over the last few years important progress has been made in the simulation of nonequilibrium situations using mainly molecular dynamics. It appears now that processes corresponding to self-organization as well as the appearance of long-range correlations can be obtained in this way starting from a program involving Newtonian dynamics (generally the laws of interaction correspond to hard spheres or hard disks). Examples of such types of studies leading to Benard instabilities, to chemical clocks, or to spatial structure formation are given in this report. As a result, we may now view self-organization as a direct expression of tan appropriate microscopic dynamics. This is the reason why we have devoted much work to the study of large Poincare systems (LPS) involving continuous sets of resonances. These systems have been shown to lead, according to the constraints, either to equilibrium situations or to nonequilibrium states involving long range correlations. We discuss LPS in the frame of classical mechanics.

  17. Adsorption mechanism of different coal ranks under variable temperature and pressure conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qing-ling

    2008-01-01

    Variable temperature and pressure adsorption tests were conducted on four coal samples with different coal ranks, under simulated temperatures and pressures corresponding to coal reservoirs at different depths. The regularity of the variation in the amounts of adsorption by coals under variable temperature and pressure and 30 ~C isothermal conditions are compared and the adsorption characteristics of coal under the composite effect of temperature and pressure were obtained. The adsorption test and data processing method of coal under variable temperature and pressure are presented and the effect of the mechanism of tempera-ture and pressure on the adsorption capacity of coal has been studied. The research results are of significant importance in the in-vestigation of coalbed methane storage mechanism and for the prediction of the amounts of coalbed methane at various depths.

  18. Mechanical model for yield strength of nanocrystalline materials under high strain rate loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱荣涛; 周剑秋; 马璐; 张振忠

    2008-01-01

    To understand the high strain rate deformation mechanism and determine the grain size,strain rate and porosity dependent yield strength of nanocrystalline materials,a new mechanical model based on the deformation mechanism of nanocrystalline materials under high strain rate loading was developed.As a first step of the research,the yield behavior of the nanocrystalline materials under high strain rate loading was mainly concerned in the model and uniform deformation was assumed for simplification.Nanocrystalline materials were treated as composites consisting of grain interior phase and grain boundary phase,and grain interior and grain boundary deformation mechanisms under high strain rate loading were analyzed,then Voigt model was applied to coupling grain boundary constitutive relation with mechanical model for grain interior phase to describe the overall yield mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline materials.The predictions by the developed model on the yield strength of nanocrysatlline materials at high strain rates show good agreements with various experimental data.Further discussion was presented for calculation results and relative experimental observations.

  19. Mechanisms underlying the noradrenergic modulation of longitudinal coordination during swimming in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrywest, Simon D; McDearmid, Jonathan R; Kjaerulff, Ole

    2003-01-01

    the mechanisms underlying the reduction of RC-delay s by NA. When recording from motor neurons caudal to the twelfth postotic cleft, the mid-cycle inhibition was weak and sometimes absent, compared to more rostral locations. NA enhanced and even unmasked inhibition in these caudal neurons and enhanced inhibition......, will preferentially facilitate rebound firing in caudal neurons, advancing their firing relative to more rostral neurons, whilst additionally increasing the networks ability to sustain the longer cycle periods under NA....

  20. CFD Analysis of Migration Mechanism of Source Term Under Severe Accident

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Lin-lin; SUN; Xue-ting; JI; Song-tao

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the migration of source term under severe accident is one of the important aspects of‘Studies on Migration Mechanism of the Source Term under Severe Accident’,which is a significant task of the National Large Advanced PWR Research Program.This research aims at building up a method for analyzing fission product behavior in the containment with CFD code.The effect of PCCS(Passive

  1. Model test study of evaporation mechanism of sand under constant atmospheric condition

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Yu Jun; Ding, Wenqi; SONG, Weikang

    2014-01-01

    The evaporation mechanism of Fontainebleau sand using a large-scale model chamber is studied. First, the evaporation test on a layer of water above sand surface is performed under various atmospheric conditions, validating the performance of the chamber and the calculation method of actual evaporation rate by comparing the calculated and measured cumulative evaporations. Second,the evaporation test on sand without water layer is conducted under constant atmospheric condition. Both the evoluti...

  2. Fundamentals of gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, V

    2014-01-01

    Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics, Second Edition isa comprehensively updated new edition and now includes a chapter on the gas dynamics of steam. It covers the fundamental concepts and governing equations of different flows, and includes end of chapter exercises based on the practical applications. A number of useful tables on the thermodynamic properties of steam are also included.Fundamentals of Gas Dynamics, Second Edition begins with an introduction to compressible and incompressible flows before covering the fundamentals of one dimensional flows and normal shock wav

  3. Crystal science fundamentals

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, V.; Halfpenny, PJ; Roberts, KJ

    2017-01-01

    The fundamentals of crystal science notably crystallography, crystal chemistry, crystal defects, crystal morphology and the surface chemistry of crystals are introduced with particular emphasis on organic crystals.

  4. Modeling and numerical analysis of granite rock specimen under mechanical loading and fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luc Leroy Ngueyep. Mambou; Joseph Ndop; Jean-Marie Bienvenu Ndjaka

    2015-01-01

    The effect of ISO 834 fire on the mechanical properties of granite rock specimen submitted to uniaxial loading is numerically investigated. Based on Newton’s second law, the rate-equation model of granite rock specimen under mechanical load and fire is established. The effect of heat treatment on the me-chanical performance of granite is analyzed at the center and the ends of specimen. At the free end of granite rock specimen, it is shown that from 20 ?C to 500 ?C, the internal stress and internal strain are weak; whereas above 500 ?C, they start to increase rapidly, announcing the imminent collapse. At the center of specimen, the analysis of the internal stress and internal strain reveals that the fire reduces the mechanical performance of granite significantly. Moreover, it is found that after 3 min of exposure to fire, the mechanical energy necessary to fragment the granite can be reduced up to 80%.

  5. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filaments under Extreme Conditions and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao

    Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected to large-deformation as well as participate in signal transduction. However, it is still poorly understood how the nanoscopic structure, as well as the biochemical properties of these protein molecules contribute to their biomechanical functions. In this research we investigate the material function of intermediate filaments under various extreme mechanical conditions as well as disease states. We use a full atomistic model and study its response to mechanical stresses. Learning from the mechanical response obtained from atomistic simulations, we build mesoscopic models following the finer-trains-coarser principles. By using this multiple-scale model, we present a detailed analysis of the mechanical properties and associated deformation mechanisms of intermediate filament network. We reveal the mechanism of a transition from alpha-helices to beta-sheets with subsequent intermolecular sliding under mechanical force, which has been inferred previously from experimental results. This nanoscale mechanism results in a characteristic nonlinear force-extension curve, which leads to a delocalization of mechanical energy and prevents catastrophic fracture. This explains how intermediate filament can withstand extreme mechanical deformation of > 1 00% strain despite the presence of structural defects. We combine computational and experimental techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, a premature aging disease. We find that the mutated lamin tail .domain is more compact and stable than the normal one. This altered structure and stability may enhance the association of intermediate filaments with the nuclear membrane, providing a molecular mechanism of the disease. We study the nuclear membrane association

  6. Mechanisms underlying the effects of prenatal psychosocial stress on child outcomes: beyond the HPA axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, R.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Weerth, C. de

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from preclinical and clinical studies indicates that maternal psychosocial stress and anxiety during pregnancy adversely affect child outcomes. However, knowledge on the possible mechanisms underlying these relations is limited. In the present paper, we review the most often pr

  7. The Mediated MIMIC Model for Understanding the Underlying Mechanism of DIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Shao, Can; Lathrop, Quinn N.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its flexibility, the multiple-indicator, multiple-causes (MIMIC) model has become an increasingly popular method for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF). In this article, we propose the mediated MIMIC model method to uncover the underlying mechanism of DIF. This method extends the usual MIMIC model by including one variable…

  8. Compressive damage mechanism of GFRP composites under off-axis loading: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H.W.; Li, H.Y.; Gui, L.L.;

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies of the microscale mechanisms of damage formation and evolution in unidirectional glass fiber reinforced polymer composites (GFRP) under axial and off-axis compressive loading are carried out. A series of compressive testing of the composites with different a...

  9. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying postural instability in Parkinson's disease using dynamic posturography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonnekes, J.H.; Kam, D. de; Geurts, A.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    Postural instability, one of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), has devastating consequences for affected patients. Better strategies to prevent falls are needed, but this calls for an improved understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying postural instability. We must also impr

  10. Relative Damage Stress: Dominant Mechanical Factor for the Failure of Soldered Joints under Temperature Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By temperature normalization of the concept of equivalent damage stress proposed by Lemaitre,a new concept of relative damage stress has been put forward as the dominant mechanical factor for the failure of soldered joints under temperature cycling. Finite element numerical simulation results showed that the highest value of relative damage stress occurred at the high temperaturehold time during temperature cycling history.

  11. Experimental Investigation on Mechanical Behavior and Permeability Evolution of a Porous Limestone Under Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B.; Xie, S. Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the mechanical behavior and permeability evolution of a typical porous limestone, the Anstrude limestone. Hydrostatic and triaxial compression tests are first performed under drained condition to study the basic mechanical behavior of the porous rock. Permeability measurement under both hydrostatic and triaxial compression is carried out for investigating effects of stress state on the permeability evolution along the axial direction of sample. The obtained results allow to identifying two basic plastic deformation mechanisms, the plastic shearing and pore collapse, and their effects on the permeability evolution. Under low confining pressures, the permeability diminution in the elastic phase is controlled by deviatoric stress. After the onset of plastic shearing, the deviatoric stress induces a plastic volumetric dilatation and a permeability increase. When the deviatoric stress reaches the peak strength or after the onset of shear bands, the permeability slightly decreases. Under high confining pressures, the deviatoric stress also induces a permeability diminution before the onset of plastic pore collapse. After the onset of pore collapse, the deviatoric stress leads to a plastic volumetric compaction and permeability decrease. When the deviatoric stress reaches the onset of plastic shearing, the two plastic mechanisms are in competition, the permeability continuously decreases but with a reduced rate. Finally, after the compaction-dilatation transition, the plastic shearing dominates the deformation process while the pore collapse still controls the permeability evolution.

  12. Motivational and control mechanisms underlying adolescent cannabis use disorders: a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cousijn, J.; van Benthem, P.; van der Schee, E.; Spijkerman, R.

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis use disorders (CUDs) are the most prevalent substance use disorders among adolescents in treatment. Yet, little is known about the neuropsychological mechanisms underlying adolescent CUDs. Studies in adult cannabis users suggest a significant role for cognitive control and cannabis-oriented

  13. Asymmetric migration of human keratinocytes under mechanical stretch and cocultured fibroblasts in a wound repair model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyuan Lü

    Full Text Available Keratinocyte migration during re-epithelization is crucial in wound healing under biochemical and biomechanical microenvironment. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms whereby mechanical tension and cocultured fibroblasts or keratinocytes modulate the migration of keratinocytes or fibroblasts. Here we applied a tensile device together with a modified transwell assay to determine the lateral and transmembrane migration dynamics of human HaCaT keratinocytes or HF fibroblasts. A novel pattern of asymmetric migration was observed for keratinocytes when they were cocultured with non-contact fibroblasts, i.e., the accumulative distance of HaCaT cells was significantly higher when moving away from HF cells or migrating from down to up cross the membrane than that when moving close to HF cells or when migrating from up to down, whereas HF migration was symmetric. This asymmetric migration was mainly regulated by EGF derived from fibroblasts, but not transforming growth factor α or β1 production. Mechanical stretch subjected to fibroblasts fostered keratinocyte asymmetric migration by increasing EGF secretion, while no role of mechanical stretch was found for EGF secretion by keratinocytes. These results provided a new insight into understanding the regulating mechanisms of two- or three-dimensional migration of keratinocytes or fibroblasts along or across dermis and epidermis under biomechanical microenvironment.

  14. Failure Mechanisms and Life Prediction of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zju, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) will play an increasingly important role in gas turbine engines because of their ability to further raise engine temperatures. However, the issue of coating durability is of major concern under high-heat-flux conditions. In particular, the accelerated coating delamination crack growth under the engine high heat-flux conditions is not well understood. In this paper, a laser heat flux technique is used to investigate the coating delamination crack propagation under realistic temperature-stress gradients and thermal cyclic conditions. The coating delamination mechanisms are investigated under various thermal loading conditions, and are correlated with coating dynamic fatigue, sintering and interfacial adhesion test results. A coating life prediction framework may be realized by examining the crack initiation and propagation driving forces for coating failure under high-heat-flux test conditions.

  15. Fundamental Measurements in Economics and in the Theory of Consciousness (Manifestation of quantum-mechanical properties of economic objects in slit measurements)

    CERN Document Server

    Tuluzov, I G

    2011-01-01

    A new constructivist approach to modeling in economics and theory of consciousness is proposed. The state of elementary object is defined as a set of its measurable consumer properties. A proprietor's refusal or consent for the offered transaction is considered as a result of elementary economic measurement. We were also able to obtain the classical interpretation of the quantum-mechanical law of addition of probabilities by introducing a number of new notions. The principle of "local equity" assumes the transaction completed (regardless of the result) of the states of transaction partners are not changed in connection with the reception of new information on proposed offers or adopted decisions (consent or refusal of the transaction). However it has no relation to the paradoxes of quantum theory connected with non-local interaction of entangled states. In the economic systems the mechanism of entangling has a classical interpretation, while the quantum-mechanical formalism of the description of states appear...

  16. Does Motor Simulation Theory Explain the Cognitive Mechanisms Underlying Motor Imagery? A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Helen; Moran, Aidan

    2017-01-01

    Motor simulation theory (MST; Jeannerod, 2001) purports to explain how various action-related cognitive states relate to actual motor execution. Specifically, it proposes that motor imagery (MI; imagining an action without executing the movements involved) shares certain mental representations and mechanisms with action execution, and hence, activates similar neural pathways to those elicited during the latter process. Furthermore, MST postulates that MI works by rehearsing neural motor systems off-line via a hypothetical simulation process. In this paper, we review evidence cited in support of MST and evaluate its efficacy in understanding the cognitive mechanisms underlying MI. In doing so, we delineate the precise postulates of simulation theory and clarify relevant terminology. Based on our cognitive-level analysis, we argue firstly that the psychological mechanisms underlying MI are poorly understood and require additional conceptual and empirical analysis. In addition, we identify a number of potentially fruitful lines of inquiry for future investigators of MST and MI.

  17. Progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanlei; Chang, Xinlong; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Youhong

    A multiscale model based bridge theory is proposed for the progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading. The ablation model is adopted to calculate ablation temperature changing and ablation surface degradation. The polynomial strengthening model of matrix is used to improve bridging model for reducing parameter input. Stiffness degradation methods of bridging model are also improved in order to analyze the stress redistribution more accurately when the damage occurs. Thermal-mechanical analyses of the composite plate are performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit program with the developed model implemented in the VUMAT. The simulation results show that this model can be used to proclaim the mesoscale damage mechanism of composite laminates under coupled loading.

  18. Mechanical shield support for longwall working under artificial roof used at the Petrosani collieries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koronka, F.

    1979-04-01

    The article presents a new mechanical shield support meant for longwall workings under artificial roof in the Valea Jiului mines, tested and used with good results in the third seam of the Lupeni and Lonea collieries. Evaluating the results of the underground tests, it is concluded that the mechanical shield support meets the requirements of the working conditions under artificial roof in the third seam. One of the advantages it provides is that it can be easily adapted to the height variations of the longwalls, controlling the underground pressure, ensuring complete working security for the working personnel and providing a gentle lowering of the artificial roof without damaging the wire mesh. The mechanical shield support is compact, easy to set up and dismount and easy to control. (In Romanian)

  19. [Progress of studies on mechanisms of acupuncture underlying regulation of cardiac function via autonomic nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Li; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Acupuncture therapy has been confirmed to be effective in treating cardiovascular diseases in clinical practice. Acupuncture-induced balance of the autonomic nervous system activities is one of its key mechanisms. In the present paper, the authors review progress of studies on acupuncture treatment of cardiovascular diseases from 1) regulating cardiac sympathetic-beta-adrenergic receptor activity and myocardial intracellular GTP-binding protein (Gs)-adenylylcyclase (AC)-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase (PKA) signaling, and 2) balancing cardiac sympathetic and vagal nerve activities. Due to limited experimental conditions, in-depth studies about the mechanisms of acupuncture intervention underlying improvement of cardiovascular functions are relatively fewer up to now. Along with the further development of modern biology, the mechanism of acupuncture intervention underlying regulation of cardiac function via autonomic nerve system will be revealed in detail.

  20. Static and Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of Hydroxyapatite-Polyacrylic Acid Composites Under Simulated Body Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana S. Katti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have investigated mechanical response of hydroxyapatite/polyacrylic composites under dry, wet and simulated body fluid conditions. Hydroxyapatite (HAP is mineralized under two conditions; one, in presence of polyacrylic acid (in situ HAP, second, in absence of polyacrylic acid (ex situ HAP. Further, in situ and ex situ HAP are mixed with polyacrylic acid to make HAP/PAAc composites. Interfacial interactions between PAAc and HAP have been studied using photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (PAS-FTIR. The mechanical response of the composites under wet condition is studied by soaking composite samples in simulated body fluid (SBF. Under wet conditions, SBF and water weaken the HAP-HAP interface significantly. PAS-FTIR data suggests that PAAc attaches to HAP through the dissociated carboxylate groups. The water and SBF soaked samples showed creep-like behavior and exhibit large residual strain after unloading. Loading under different strain rates has significant effect on mechanical properties of these composites. Both in situ and ex situ 70:30 composites exhibit highest elastic modulus at strain rate of 0.01 sec-1. XRD study indicates formation of Ca2P2O7 phase in ex situ composite after soaking in SBF and water for 3 hours, whereas in situ composites showed presence of only hydroxyapatite phase after soaking in SBF and water for same duration of time.

  1. Fundamentals of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2003-01-01

    No other book on the market today can match the success of Halliday, Resnick and Walker's Fundamentals of Physics! In a breezy, easy-to-understand style the book offers a solid understanding of fundamental physics concepts, and helps readers apply this conceptual understanding to quantitative problem solving.

  2. Dependence and Fundamentality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Zylstra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available I argue that dependence is neither necessary nor sufficient for relative fundamentality. I then introduce the notion of 'likeness in nature' and provide an account of relative fundamentality in terms of it and the notion of dependence. Finally, I discuss some puzzles that arise in Aristotle's Categories, to which the theory developed is applied.

  3. Intercomparison of chemical mechanisms for air quality policy formulation and assessment under North American conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derwent, Richard

    2017-02-22

    The intercomparison of seven chemical mechanisms for their suitability for air quality policy formulation and assessment is described. Box modelling techniques were employed using 44 sets of background environmental conditions covering North America to constrain the chemical development of the longer-lived species. The selected mechanisms were modified to enable an unbiased assessment of the adequacy of the parameterisations of photochemical ozone production from VOC oxidation in the presence of NOx. Photochemical ozone production rates responded differently to 30% NOx and VOC reductions with the different mechanisms, despite the striking similarities between the base case ozone production rates. The 30% reductions in NOx and VOCs also produced changes in OH. The responses in OH to 30% reductions in NOx and VOCs appeared to be more sensitive to mechanism choice, compared with the responses in the photochemical ozone production rates. Whereas 30% NOx reductions generally led to decreases in OH, 30% reductions in VOCs led to increases in OH, irrespective of mechanism choice and background environmental conditions. The different mechanisms therefore gave different OH responses to NOx and VOC reductions and so would give different responses in terms of changes in the fate and behaviour of air toxics, acidification and eutrophication and fine particle formation compared with others, in response to ozone control strategies. Policy-makers need to understand that there are likely to be inherent differences in the responses to ozone control strategies between different mechanisms, depending on background environmental conditions and the extents of NOx and VOC reductions under consideration. IMPLICATIONS The purpose of this paper is to compare predicted ozone responses to NOx and VOC reductions with seven chemical mechanisms under North American conditions. The good agreement found between the tested mechanisms should provide some support for their application in the air

  4. The Mechanical Analysis and Experimental Study of Shock Wave Effect of Electrical Discharge under Water In Filth Cleaning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Qilin; Zhang Lei; Zhou Jinjin

    2004-01-01

    Filth adhering to metal pipes can be cleaned by shock wave generated by electrical discharge under water. The mechanism of shock wave effect of electrical discharge under water on filth cleaning is analyzed by building a mechanical model. A metal pipe coated with cement to simulate real filth is cleaned by using electrical discharge under water. The experimental results confirm the mechanical analysis and also show the technology of electrical discharge under water is an very effective method for filth cleaning.

  5. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  6. Transformational Leadership and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Test of Underlying Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohe, Christoph; Hertel, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Based on social exchange theory, we examined and contrasted attitudinal mediators (affective organizational commitment, job satisfaction) and relational mediators (trust in leader, leader-member exchange; LMX) of the positive relationship between transformational leadership and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). Hypotheses were tested using meta-analytic path models with correlations from published meta-analyses (761 samples with 227,419 individuals overall). When testing single-mediator models, results supported our expectations that each of the mediators explained the relationship between transformational leadership and OCB. When testing a multi-mediator model, LMX was the strongest mediator. When testing a model with a latent attitudinal mechanism and a latent relational mechanism, the relational mechanism was the stronger mediator of the relationship between transformational leadership and OCB. Our findings help to better understand the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between transformational leadership and OCB.

  7. Novel Model of Tendon Regeneration Reveals Distinct Cell Mechanisms Underlying Regenerative and Fibrotic Tendon Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Kristen; Chien, Chun; Bell, Rebecca; Laudier, Damien; Tufa, Sara F.; Keene, Douglas R.; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly; Huang, Alice H.

    2017-01-01

    To date, the cell and molecular mechanisms regulating tendon healing are poorly understood. Here, we establish a novel model of tendon regeneration using neonatal mice and show that neonates heal via formation of a ‘neo-tendon’ that differentiates along the tendon specific lineage with functional restoration of gait and mechanical properties. In contrast, adults heal via fibrovascular scar, aberrant differentiation toward cartilage and bone, with persistently impaired function. Lineage tracing identified intrinsic recruitment of Scx-lineage cells as a key cellular mechanism of neonatal healing that is absent in adults. Instead, adult Scx-lineage tenocytes are not recruited into the defect but transdifferentiate into ectopic cartilage; in the absence of tenogenic cells, extrinsic αSMA-expressing cells persist to form a permanent scar. Collectively, these results establish an exciting model of tendon regeneration and uncover a novel cellular mechanism underlying regenerative vs non-regenerative tendon healing. PMID:28332620

  8. Transformational Leadership and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Test of Underlying Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Nohe

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on social exchange theory, we examined and contrasted attitudinal mediators (affective organizational commitment, job satisfaction and relational mediators (trust in leader, leader-member exchange; LMX of the positive relationship between transformational leadership and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB. Hypotheses were tested using meta-analytic path models with correlations from published meta-analyses (761 samples with 227,419 individuals overall. When testing single-mediator models, results supported our expectations that each of the mediators explained the relationship between transformational leadership and OCB. When testing a multi-mediator model, LMX was the strongest mediator. When testing a model with a latent attitudinal mechanism and a latent relational mechanism, the relational mechanism was the stronger mediator of the relationship between transformational leadership and OCB. Our findings help to better understand the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between transformational leadership and OCB.

  9. Effects of delaying transplanting on agronomic traits and grain yield of rice under mechanical transplantation pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihua Liu

    Full Text Available A delay in the mechanical transplantation (MT of rice seedlings frequently occurs in Huanghuai wheat-rice rotation cropping districts of China, due to the late harvest of wheat, the poor weather conditions and the insufficiency of transplanters, missing the optimum transplanting time and causing seedlings to age. To identify how delaying transplanting rice affects the agronomic characteristics including the growth duration, photosynthetic productivity and dry matter remobilization efficiency and the grain yield under mechanical transplanting pattern, an experiment with a split-plot design was conducted over two consecutive years. The main plot includes two types of cultivation: mechanical transplanting and artificial transplanting (AT. The subplot comprises four japonica rice cultivars. The results indicate that the rice jointing, booting, heading and maturity stages were postponed under MT when using AT as a control. The tiller occurrence number, dry matter weight per tiller, accumulative dry matter for the population, leaf area index, crop growth rate, photosynthetic potential, and dry matter remobilization efficiency of the leaf under MT significantly decreased compared to those under AT. In contrast, the reduction rate of the leaf area during the heading-maturity stage was markedly enhanced under MT. The numbers of effective panicles and filled grains per panicle and the grain yield significantly decreased under MT. A significant correlation was observed between the dry matter production, remobilization and distribution characteristics and the grain yield. We infer that, as with rice from old seedlings, the decrease in the tiller occurrence, the photosynthetic productivity and the assimilate remobilization efficiency may be important agronomic traits that are responsible for the reduced grain yield under MT.

  10. Bactericidal Mechanisms of Ag2O/TNBs under both Dark and Light Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yinjia; Dai, Zhaoyi; Liu, Fei; Kim, Hyunjung; Tong, Meiping; Hou, Yanglong

    2013-04-01

    Ag2O deposited titanium dioxides nanobelts (Ag2O/TNBs) were fabricated and used to investigate the toxic effects on aquatic microorganisms. The disinfection activities of Ag2O/TNBs on two representative bacterial strains: Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive B. subtilis, were examined under both dark and light conditions. Ag2O/TNBs exhibited stronger bactericidal activities than TNBs under both dark and light conditions. For both cell types, disinfection effects of Ag2O/TNBs were greater under light conditions relative to those under dark conditions. The bactericidal mechanisms of Ag2O/TNBs under both dark and light conditions were explored. Under dark conditions, neither Ag+ ions released from Ag2O/TNBs nor TNBs contributed to the bactericidal activities of Ag2O/TNBs. Under light conditions, both the released Ag+ions and TNBs yet were found to have contributions to the bactericidal effects of Ag2O/TNBs. Active species (H2O2, ?O2-, ande-) generated by Ag2O/TNBs played important roles in the disinfection processes under both dark and light conditions. Without the presence of active species, the direct contact of Ag2O/TNBs with bacterial cells had no bactericidal effect.

  11. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Topical report No. 2, Literature review and assembly of theories on the interactions of ash and conditioning agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  12. Carbon Footprint Management of Road Freight Transport under the Carbon Emission Trading Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing concern over environmental issues has considerably increased the number of regulations and legislation that aim to curb carbon emissions. Carbon emission trading mechanism, which is one of the most effective means, has been broadly adopted by several countries. This paper presents a road truck routing problem under the carbon emission trading mechanism. By introducing a calculation method of carbon emissions that considers the load and speed of the vehicle among other factors, a road truck routing optimizing model under the cap and trade mechanism based on the Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP is described. Compared with the classical TSP model that only considers the economic cost, this model suggests that the truck routing decision under the cap and trade mechanism is more effective in reducing carbon emissions. A modified tabu search algorithm is also proposed to obtain solutions within a reasonable amount of computation time. We theoretically and numerically examine the impacts of carbon trading, carbon cap, and carbon price on truck routing decision, carbon emissions, and total cost. From the results of numerical experiments, we derive interesting observations about how to control the total cost and reduce carbon emissions.

  13. NUMERICAL SIMULATION STUDY ON ROCK BREAKING MECHANISM AND PROCESS UNDER HIGH PRESSURE WATER JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Hong-jian; WANG Rui-he; ZHANG Yan-qing

    2005-01-01

    The numerical simulation method to study rock breaking process and mechanism under high pressure water jet was developed with the continuous mechanics and the FEM theory. The rock damage model and the damage-coupling model suited to analyze the whole process of water jet breaking rock were established with continuum damage mechanics and micro damage mechanics. The numerical results show the dynamic response of rock under water jet and the evolvement of hydrodynamic characteristic of jet during rock breaking is close to reality, and indicates that the body of rock damage and breakage under the general continual jet occurs within several milliseconds, the main damage form is tensile damage caused by rock unload and jet impact, and the evolvement of rock damage shows a step-change trend. On the whole,the numerical results can agree with experimental conclusions, which manifest that the analytical method is feasible and can be applied to guide the research and application of jet breaking rock theory.

  14. A p53-dependent mechanism underlies macrocytic anemia in a mouse model of human 5q- syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Jillian L; Drynan, Lesley F; Hewett, Duncan R; Holmes, Luke R; Lorenzo-Abalde, Silvia; Lane, Alison L; Jolin, Helen E; Pannell, Richard; Middleton, Angela J; Wong, See Heng; Warren, Alan J; Wainscoat, James S; Boultwood, Jacqueline; McKenzie, Andrew N J

    2010-01-01

    The identification of the genes associated with chromosomal translocation breakpoints has fundamentally changed understanding of the molecular basis of hematological malignancies. By contrast, the study of chromosomal deletions has been hampered by the large number of genes deleted and the complexity of their analysis. We report the generation of a mouse model for human 5q- syndrome using large-scale chromosomal engineering. Haploinsufficiency of the Cd74-Nid67 interval (containing Rps14, encoding the ribosomal protein S14) caused macrocytic anemia, prominent erythroid dysplasia and monolobulated megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. These effects were associated with defective bone marrow progenitor development, the appearance of bone marrow cells expressing high amounts of the tumor suppressor p53 and increased bone marrow cell apoptosis. Notably, intercrossing with p53-deficient mice completely rescued the progenitor cell defect, restoring common myeloid progenitor and megakaryocytic-erythroid progenitor, granulocyte-monocyte progenitor and hematopoietic stem cell bone marrow populations. This mouse model suggests that a p53-dependent mechanism underlies the pathophysiology of the 5q- syndrome.

  15. Asymmetric flexural behavior from bamboo's functionally graded hierarchical structure: underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Meisam K; Samaei, Arash T; Gheshlaghi, Behnam; Lu, Jian; Lu, Yang

    2015-04-01

    As one of the most renewable resources on Earth, bamboo has recently attracted increasing interest for its promising applications in sustainable structural purposes. Its superior mechanical properties arising from the unique functionally-graded (FG) hierarchical structure also make bamboo an excellent candidate for bio-mimicking purposes in advanced material design. However, despite its well-documented, impressive mechanical characteristics, the intriguing asymmetry in flexural behavior of bamboo, alongside its underlying mechanisms, has not yet been fully understood. Here, we used multi-scale mechanical characterizations assisted with advanced environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) to investigate the asymmetric flexural responses of natural bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) strips under different loading configurations, during "elastic bending" and "fracture failure" stages, with their respective deformation mechanisms at microstructural level. Results showed that the gradient distribution of the vascular bundles along the thickness direction is mainly responsible for the exhibited asymmetry, whereas the hierarchical fiber/parenchyma cellular structure plays a critical role in alternating the dominant factors for determining the distinctly different failure mechanisms. A numerical model has been likewise adopted to validate the effective flexural moduli of bamboo strips as a function of their FG parameters, while additional experiments on uniaxial loading of bamboo specimens were performed to assess the tension-compression asymmetry, for further understanding of the microstructure evolution of bamboo's outer and innermost layers under different bending states. This work could provide insights to help the processing of novel bamboo-based composites and enable the bio-inspired design of advanced structural materials with desired flexural behavior.

  16. Consumption of Red/Processed Meat and Colorectal Carcinoma: Possible Mechanisms Underlying the Significant Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, Ulf; Bergman Laurila, Jonas; Grafström, Roland; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiology and experimental studies provide an overwhelming support of the notion that diets high in red or processed meat accompany an elevated risk of developing pre-neoplastic colorectal adenoma and frank colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The underlying mechanisms are disputed; thus several hypotheses have been proposed. A large body of reports converges, however, on haem and nitrosyl haem as major contributors to the CRC development, presumably acting through various mechanisms. Apart from a potentially higher intestinal mutagenic load among consumers on a diet rich in red/processed meat, other mechanisms involving subtle interference with colorectal stem/progenitor cell survival or maturation are likewise at play. From an overarching perspective, suggested candidate mechanisms for red/processed meat-induced CRC appear as three partly overlapping tenets: (i) increased N-nitrosation/oxidative load leading to DNA adducts and lipid peroxidation in the intestinal epithelium, (ii) proliferative stimulation of the epithelium through haem or food-derived metabolites that either act directly or subsequent to conversion, and (iii) higher inflammatory response, which may trigger a wide cascade of pro-malignant processes. In this review, we summarize and discuss major findings of the area in the context of potentially pertinent mechanisms underlying the above-mentioned association between consumption of red/processed meat and increased risk of developing CRC.

  17. An analytical model of the mechanical properties of bulk coal under confined stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.X.; Wang, Z.T.; Rudolph, V.; Massarotto, P.; Finley, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an analytical model which can be used to relate the structural parameters of coal to its mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio under a confined stress condition. This model is developed primarily to support process modeling of coalbed methane (CBM) or CO2-enhanced CBM (ECBM) recovery from coal seam. It applied an innovative approach by which stresses acting on and strains occurring in coal are successively combined in rectangular coordinates, leading to the aggregated mechanical constants. These mechanical properties represent important information for improving CBM/ECBM simulations and incorporating within these considerations of directional permeability. The model, consisting of constitutive equations which implement a mechanically consistent stress-strains correlation, can be used as a generalized tool to study the mechanical and fluid behaviors of coal composites. An example using the model to predict the stress-strain correlation of coal under triaxial confined stress by accounting for the elastic and brittle (non-elastic) deformations is discussed. The result shows a good agreement between the prediction and the experimental measurement. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fundamentals of electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Schubert, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    This book, Electronic Devices and Circuit Application, is the first of four books of a larger work, Fundamentals of Electronics. It is comprised of four chapters describing the basic operation of each of the four fundamental building blocks of modern electronics: operational amplifiers, semiconductor diodes, bipolar junction transistors, and field effect transistors. Attention is focused on the reader obtaining a clear understanding of each of the devices when it is operated in equilibrium. Ideas fundamental to the study of electronic circuits are also developed in the book at a basic level to

  19. Mechanism of degradation of electrolyte solutions for dye-sensitized solar cells under ultraviolet light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Shohei; Katoh, Ryuzi

    2015-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of the degradation of I-/I3--containing electrolyte solutions for dye-sensitized solar cells under UV light irradiation. The yellow electrolyte solutions underwent achromatization during irradiation, indicating the reduction of I3-. We propose a mechanism involving the production of holes in TiO2, reaction of the holes with solvent molecules, and subsequent reduction of I3- by electrons remaining in the TiO2. Although the quantum yield of the photodegradation reaction is estimated to be low (3 × 10-3), this reaction can nevertheless be expected to affect the long-term stability of dye-sensitized solar cell devices.

  20. The role of TRPA1 in muscle pain and mechanical hypersensitivity under inflammatory conditions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgar, J; Zhang, Y; Saloman, J L; Wang, S; Chung, M-K; Ro, J Y

    2015-12-03

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) is expressed in muscle afferents and direct activation of these receptors induces acute mechanical hypersensitivity. However, the functional role of TRPA1 under pathological muscle pain conditions and mechanisms by which TRPA1 mediate muscle pain and hyperalgesia are not clearly understood. Two rodent behavioral models validated to assess craniofacial muscle pain conditions were used to study ATP- and N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced acute mechanical hypersensitivity and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced persistent mechanical hypersensitivity. The rat grimace scale (RGS) was utilized to assess inflammation-induced spontaneous muscle pain. Behavioral pharmacology experiments were performed to assess the effects of AP18, a selective TRPA1 antagonist under these conditions. TRPA1 expression levels in trigeminal ganglia (TG) were examined before and after CFA treatment in the rat masseter muscle. Pre-treatment of the muscle with AP18 dose-dependently blocked the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity induced by NMDA and α,β-methylene adenosine triphosphate (αβmeATP), a specific agonist for NMDA and P2X3 receptor, respectively. CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and spontaneous muscle pain responses were significantly reversed by post-treatment of the muscle with AP18 when CFA effects were most prominent. CFA-induced myositis was accompanied by significant up-regulation of TRPA1 expression in TG. Our findings showed that TRPA1 in muscle afferents plays an important role in the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity and in the maintenance of persistent muscle pain and hypersensitivity. Our data suggested that TRPA1 may serve as a downstream target of pro-nociceptive ion channels, such as P2X3 and NMDA receptors in masseter afferents, and that increased TRPA1 expression under inflammatory conditions may contribute to the maintenance of persistent muscle pain

  1. The underlying mechanism of action for various medicinal properties of Piper betle (betel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslan, H; Suhaimi, F H; Thent, Zar Chi; Das, S

    2015-01-01

    Piper betle (betel) plant belongs to the Piperaceae family. Piper. betle is widely known for its potent medicinal properties. Various active compounds are present in Piper. betle such as allylpyrocatechol, hydroxychavicol, piperbetol, ethylpiperbetol, piperol A, piperol B, chavibetol, and alkaloids which account for these beneficial medicinal properties. In the present narrative review, we looked into the various active compounds present in the Piper betle and attempted to understand their underlying mechanism of action. Proper understanding of the molecular biology involving the mechanism of action may help in better drug formulation and provide better therapeutic actions in the field of alternative and complementary medicine.

  2. Mechanical failure of zigzag graphene nanoribbons under tensile strain induced by edge reconstruction

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Yingchun

    2012-10-01

    The structural and mechanical properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) under uniaxial tensile strain are studied by density functional theory. The ideal strength of a zigzag GNR (120 GPa) is close to that of pristine graphene. However, for a GNR with both edges reconstructed to pentagon–heptagon pairs (from hexagon–hexagon pairs) it decreases to 94 GPa and the maximum tensile strain is reduced to 15%. Our results constitute a comprehensive picture of the edge structure effect on the mechanical properties of GNRs.

  3. Damage mechanism of single-layer reticulated domes under severe earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiao-ye; FAN Feng; ZHI Xu-dong; SHEN Shi-zhao

    2009-01-01

    To study the damage mechanism of single-layer reticulated domes subject to severe earthquakes,three limit states of single-layer reticulated domes under earthquakes are defined firstly in this paper. Then, two failure modes are presented by analyzing damage behaviors, and their characteristics are pointed out respectively. Furthermore, the damage process is analyzed and the causes of structural damage in different levels are studied. Finally, by comparing deformation and vibration status of domes with different failure modes, the principles of different failures are revealed and an integrated frame of damage mechanism is set up.

  4. Study of the changes in the magnetic properties of stainless steels under mechanical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iankov, R.; Rusanov, V.; Paneva, D.; Mitov, I.; Trautwein, A. X.

    2016-12-01

    Six types of stainless steels (SS) were studied for changes in its structure and magnetic properties under mechanical treatment. Depending on intensity and duration of the process of plastic deformation and the SS type the paramagnetic austenite structure transforms partially to completely into ferrite structure with ferromagnetic behaviour. Some of the SS tested were found slightly modified yet in the process of its manufacturing. Only one SS type with high Ni content preserved its structure and paramagnetic properties even after very intense mechanical treatment.

  5. 建构主义视野下《护理学基础》精品课程的建设与效果%Establishment of the excellent course Fundamental of Nursing under constructivist perspective theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓; 刘成凤; 高鹏; 杨瑞贞; 顾琳琳; 赵光远

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of the excellent course Fundamental of Nursing under constructivist perspective theory. Methods The excellent course Fundamental of Nursing was established based on constructivist perspective theory and implemented in the experimental group, and compared with the control group received traditional teaching. Results Among the experimental group,more lhan 85.00% of students believed that the new leaching methods under constructivist perspective could enhance their interest in the course,promote their willingness to participate actively in class activities,deepen their understanding and memory of the contents, strengthen their team spirit and improve their overall capability. The theory and skills scores in the experimental group were higher than those in the control group ( P <0. 01). Conclusion The establishment of excellent course Fundamental of Nursing under constructivist perspective theory can promote the quality of teaching and enhance the training of nursing students.%目的 探讨建构主义理论指导《护理学基础》精品课程建设的实践与效果.方法 实验组在建构主义理论指导下进行《护理学基础》精品课程建设并实施教学,与采用传统方法教学的对照组进行比较.结果 85.00%以上的学生认为建构主义理论指导下的教学方法能提高学生学习的主动性和积极性、激发学习兴趣、加深对知识的理解和记忆、提高各方面的能力、增强团队合作精神;实验组学生的理论成绩、操作考核成绩均高于对照组(P<0.01).结论 建构主义理论指导下的《护理学基础》精品课程建设促进了《护理学基础》教学质量的提高和护理人才的培养.

  6. Degradation mechanism of rock under impact loadings by integrated investigation on crack and damage development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周子龙; 江益辉; 邹洋; 翁磊

    2014-01-01

    Failure of rock under impact loadings involves complex micro-fracturing and progressive damage. Strength increase and splitting failure have been observed during dynamic tests of rock materials. However, the failure mechanism still remains unclear. In this work, based on laboratory tests, numerical simulations with the particle flow code (PFC) were carried out to reproduce the micro-fracturing process of granite specimens. Shear and tensile cracks were both recorded to investigate the failure mode of rocks under different loading conditions. At the same time, a dynamic damage model based on the Weibull distribution was established to predict the deformation and degradation behavior of specimens. It is found that micro-cracks play important roles in controlling the dynamic deformation and failure process of rock under impact loadings. The sharp increase in the number of cracks may be the reason for the strength increase of rock under high strain rates. Tensile cracks tend to be the key reason for splitting failure of specimens. Numerical simulation of crack propagation by PFC can give vivid description of the failure process. However, it is not enough for evaluation of material degradation. The dynamic damage model is able to predict the stress−strain relationship of specimens reasonably well, and can be used to explain the degradation of specimens under impact loadings at macro-scale. Crack and damage can describe material degradation at different scales and can be used together to reveal the failure mechanism of rocks.

  7. CISM course on mechanical behaviour of soils under environmentally induced cyclic loads

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, David; Mechanical Behaviour of Soils Under Environmentally Induced Cyclic Loads

    2012-01-01

    The book gives a comprehensive description of the mechanical response of soils (granular and cohesive materials) under cyclic loading. It provides the geotechnical engineer with the theoretical and analytical tools necessary for the evaluation of settlements developng with time under cyclic, einvironmentally idncued loads (such as wave motion, wind actions, water table level variation) and their consequences for the serviceability and durability of structures such as the shallow or deep foundations used in offshore engineering, caisson beakwaters, ballast and airport pavements and also to interpret monitoring data, obtained from both natural and artificial slopes and earth embankments, for the purposes of risk assessment and mitigation.

  8. Reliability-based optimization of maintenance scheduling of mechanical components under fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaurepaire, P; Valdebenito, M A; Schuëller, G I; Jensen, H A

    2012-05-01

    This study presents the optimization of the maintenance scheduling of mechanical components under fatigue loading. The cracks of damaged structures may be detected during non-destructive inspection and subsequently repaired. Fatigue crack initiation and growth show inherent variability, and as well the outcome of inspection activities. The problem is addressed under the framework of reliability based optimization. The initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks are efficiently modeled using cohesive zone elements. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by a numerical example, which involves a plate with two holes subject to alternating stress.

  9. Mechanics and mechanisms of surface damage in Al-Si alloys under ultra-mild wear conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming

    Al-Si alloys intended for use in engine components must operate under ultra-mild wear (UMW) conditions to fit an acceptable amount of wear during a typical vehicle life. This study simulated surface damage in a UMW regime on five chemically etched Al-Si alloy surfaces using a pin-on-disc tribometer at low loads (0.5-2.0 N) under boundary lubricated conditions. The five alloys contained 11 to 25 wt.% Si and differed in matrix hardness, silicon particle morphology, and size. The mechanisms leading to the UMW damage and the role that the matrix hardness and microstructure play on said mechanisms were studied. Quantitative measurement methods based on statistical analysis of particle height changes and material loss from elevated aluminum using a profilometer technique were developed and used to assess UMW. The Greenwood and Tripp's numerical model was adapted to analyze the contact that occurred between Al-Si alloys with silicon particles protruding above the aluminum and steel balls. The estimation of the real contact pressure applied to the silicon particles was used to rationalize the damage mechanisms. The UMW mechanisms consisted of (i) abrasive wear on the top of the silicon particle surfaces; (ii) sinking-in of the silicon particles; (iii) piling-up of the aluminium around sunken-in particles and (vi) wear of the aluminium by the counterface, which eventually led to the initiation of UMW-II. Increasing the size or areal density of silicon particles with small aspect ratios delayed the onset of UMW-II by providing resistance against the silicon particles sinking-in and the aluminum piling-up. The UMW wear rates, however, began to decrease after long sliding cycles once an oil residue layer supported by hardened ultra-fine subsurface grains formed on the deformed aluminium matrix. The layer formation depended on the microstructure and applied load. Overall experimental observations suggested that Al-11% Si with small silicon particles exhibited optimal long

  10. Fundamentals of electrochemical science

    CERN Document Server

    Oldham, Keith

    1993-01-01

    Key Features* Deals comprehensively with the basic science of electrochemistry* Treats electrochemistry as a discipline in its own right and not as a branch of physical or analytical chemistry* Provides a thorough and quantitative description of electrochemical fundamentals

  11. Fundamentals of crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Crystallography is a basic tool for scientists in many diverse disciplines. This text offers a clear description of fundamentals and of modern applications. It supports curricula in crystallography at undergraduate level.

  12. 不对称负载下正序基波有功电流的提取算法%Detecting Method of Positive Sequence Fundamental Active Current under Unbalance Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭劲杰; 樊晓平

    2013-01-01

    研究正序基波有功电流的正确提取问题,为对电网谐波电流进行快速检测,保证电力系统的安全性,首先利用对称分量方法提取负载电流的正序分量;然后定义两个虚拟电压,利用两个虚拟电压提取正序负载电流的辅助有功分量;将得到的负载电流正序辅助有功分量经过一个低通滤波器,获得负载电流的正序基波辅助有功分量;最后经过一些公式变换提取出负载电流的正序基波有功分量.进行仿真的结果表明,改进算法在系统负载不平衡状态下仍可以准确检测出负载电流中的正序基波有功电流.%A detecting method of positive sequence fundamental active currents was presented.The positive sequence components of the load currents were first extracted by symmetrical component method.Then two invented voltages were defined.The assisting active components of the positive sequence load currents were obtained by two invented voltages.The positive sequence fundamental assisting active components of the load currents were obtained by the positive sequence assisting active components going through a low-pass filter.At last,the positive sequence fundamental active components of the load currents were extracted by some transforming equations.The simulating experiment was carried out using Matlab.The simulating results show that the method can extract the positive sequence fundamental active components from the load currents under unbalance loads.

  13. Fundamentals of structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Roy R

    2006-01-01

    From theory and fundamentals to the latest advances in computational and experimental modal analysis, this is the definitive, updated reference on structural dynamics.This edition updates Professor Craig's classic introduction to structural dynamics, which has been an invaluable resource for practicing engineers and a textbook for undergraduate and graduate courses in vibrations and/or structural dynamics. Along with comprehensive coverage of structural dynamics fundamentals, finite-element-based computational methods, and dynamic testing methods, this Second Edition includes new and e

  14. Masses of Fundamental Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Terazawa, Hidezumi

    2011-01-01

    Not only the masses of fundamental particles including the weak bosons, Higgs scalar, quarks, and leptons, but also the mixing angles of quarks and those of neutrinos are all explained and/or predicted in the unified composite model of quarks and leptons successfully. In addition, both of the two anomalies recently found by the CDF Collaboration are suggested to be taken as evidences for the substructure of the fundamental particles.

  15. Information security fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Peltier, Thomas R

    2013-01-01

    Developing an information security program that adheres to the principle of security as a business enabler must be the first step in an enterprise's effort to build an effective security program. Following in the footsteps of its bestselling predecessor, Information Security Fundamentals, Second Edition provides information security professionals with a clear understanding of the fundamentals of security required to address the range of issues they will experience in the field.The book examines the elements of computer security, employee roles and r

  16. Fracture mechanics of materials under compression along cracks (survey). Structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guz', A. N.; Nazarenko, V. M.

    1989-10-01

    The results elucidated in this paper and in [A. N. Guz' and V. M. Nazarenko, "Fracture mechanics of materials under compression along cracks (Survey). Highly-elastic material," Prikl. Mekh., 25, No. 9, 3-32 (1989)] of investigations on compression of materials along defects of crack type are exact since they are obtained within the framework of rigorous three-dimensional linearized formulations. Let us note that the fact that the mentioned result are standards for approximate approaches is of independent value. The investigations performed whose survey is represented above should be considered the beginning of a study of problems of material fracture under compression along cracks in a rigorous formulation (within the framework of the linearized mechanics of deformable bodies).

  17. Behavioral Effects of Upper Respiratory Tract Illnesses: A Consideration of Possible Underlying Cognitive Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Smith

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that both experimentally induced upper respiratory tract illnesses (URTIs and naturally occurring URTIs influence mood and performance. The present study investigated possible cognitive mechanisms underlying the URTI-performance changes. Those who developed a cold (N = 47 had significantly faster, but less accurate, performance than those who remained healthy (N = 54. Illness had no effect on manipulations designed to influence encoding, response organisation (stimulus-response compatilibility or response preparation. Similarly, there was no evidence that different components of working memory were impaired. Overall, the present research confirms that URTIs can have an effect on performance efficiency. Further research is required to identify the physiological and behavioral mechanisms underlying these effects.

  18. A Review on Solidification and Change in Mechanical Properties Under Vibratory Welding Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Welding has been applied to various industries in particular, automotive, aerospace and microelectronics. Thermal cycle produced near weld line generates residual stress and inhomogeneous plastic deformation in weldments. However there are many methods for welding the workpieces and one of the method among these is vibratory welding. It has the advantages of less investment, more convenient operation, less pollution and shorter manufacturing period. In vibratory welding, workpiece vibrates in the whole welding process and it mainly effects the welding solidification to improve the quality. Vibration facilitates the release of dissolved gases and the resulting weld beads greatly exhibit reduced porosity. Mechanical properties of the welds prepared under vibratory conditions are dependent on the structural changes of the welds This paper presents the solidification behaviour and changes occurs in mechanical properties under vibratory welding condition.

  19. First-principles calculations of structural stability and mechanical properties of tungsten carbide under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinting; Zhang, Xinyu; Qin, Jiaqian; Zhang, Suhong; Ning, Jinliang; Jing, Ran; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2014-11-01

    The structural stability and mechanical properties of WC in WC-, MoC- and NaCl-type structures under high pressure are investigated systematically by first-principles calculations. The calculated equilibrium lattice constants at zero pressure agree well with available experimental and theoretical results. The formation enthalpy indicates that the most stable WC is in WC-type, then MoC-type finally NaCl-type. By the elastic stability criteria, it is predicted that the three structures are all mechanically stable. The elastic constants Cij, bulk modulus B, shear modulus G, Young's modulus E and Poisson's ratio ν of the three structures are studied in the pressure range from 0 to 100 GPa. Furthermore, by analyzing the B/G ratio, the brittle/ductile behavior under high pressure is assessed. Moreover, the elastic anisotropy of the three structures up to 100 GPa is also discussed in detail.

  20. Size and Geometry Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Carrara Marble Under Dynamic Loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chunjiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The effects of specimen size and geometry on the dynamic mechanical properties of Carrara marble including compressive strength, failure strain and elastic modulus are investigated in this research. Four different groups of specimens of different sizes and cross-sectional geometries are loaded under a wide range of strain rates by the split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The experimental results indicate that all these mechanical properties are significantly influenced by the specimen size and geometry to different extent, hence highlighting the importance of taking into account of the specimen size and geometry in dynamic tests on rock materials. In addition, the transmission coefficient and the determination of strain rate under dynamic tests are discussed in detail.

  1. Music and Memory in Alzheimer's Disease and The Potential Underlying Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Katlyn J; Girard, Todd A; Russo, Frank A; Fiocco, Alexandra J

    2016-01-01

    With population aging and a projected exponential expansion of persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the development of treatment and prevention programs has become a fervent area of research and discovery. A growing body of evidence suggests that music exposure can enhance memory and emotional function in persons with AD. However, there is a paucity of research that aims to identify specific underlying neural mechanisms associated with music's beneficial effects in this particular population. As such, this paper reviews existing anecdotal and empirical evidence related to the enhancing effects of music exposure on cognitive function and further provides a discussion on the potential underlying mechanisms that may explain music's beneficial effect. Specifically, this paper will outline the potential role of the dopaminergic system, the autonomic nervous system, and the default network in explaining how music may enhance memory function in persons with AD.

  2. Electroluminescence and cathodoluminescence from polyethylene and polypropylene films: Spectra reconstruction from elementary components and underlying mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, B. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Teyssedre, G.; Laurent, C. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2016-01-14

    The mechanisms of electroluminescence from large band gap polymers used as insulation in electric components are still under debate. It becomes important to unravel the underlying physics of the emission because of increasing thermo-electric stress and a possible relationship between electroluminescence and field withstand. We report herein on the cathodoluminescence spectra of polyethylene and polypropylene films as a way to uncover the nature of its contributions to electroluminescence emission. It is shown that spectra from the two materials are structured around four elementary components, each of them being associated with a specific process contributing to the overall emission with different weights depending on excitation conditions and on materials. The cathodoluminescence and electroluminescence spectra of each material are reconstructed from the four spectral components and their relative contribution are discussed. It is shown that electroluminescence from polyethylene and polypropylene has the same origin pointing towards generic mechanisms in both.

  3. Electroluminescence and cathodoluminescence from polyethylene and polypropylene films: Spectra reconstruction from elementary components and underlying mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, B.; Teyssedre, G.; Laurent, C.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of electroluminescence from large band gap polymers used as insulation in electric components are still under debate. It becomes important to unravel the underlying physics of the emission because of increasing thermo-electric stress and a possible relationship between electroluminescence and field withstand. We report herein on the cathodoluminescence spectra of polyethylene and polypropylene films as a way to uncover the nature of its contributions to electroluminescence emission. It is shown that spectra from the two materials are structured around four elementary components, each of them being associated with a specific process contributing to the overall emission with different weights depending on excitation conditions and on materials. The cathodoluminescence and electroluminescence spectra of each material are reconstructed from the four spectral components and their relative contribution are discussed. It is shown that electroluminescence from polyethylene and polypropylene has the same origin pointing towards generic mechanisms in both.

  4. Computer simulation study of nanoparticle interaction with a lipid membrane under mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kan; Wang, Biao; Zhang, Yong; Zheng, Yue

    2013-01-07

    Pore formation of lipid bilayers under mechanical stress is critical to biological processes. A series of coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayers with carbon nanoparticles different in size have been performed. Surface tension was applied to study the disruption of lipid bilayers by nanoparticles and the formation of pores inside the bilayers. The presence of small nanoparticles enhances the probability of water penetration thus decreasing the membrane rupture tension, while big nanoparticles have the opposite effect. Nanoparticle volume affects bilayer strength indirectly, and particle surface density can complicate the interaction. The structural, dynamic, elastic properties and lateral densities of lipid bilayers with nanoparticles under mechanical stress were analyzed. The results demonstrate the ability of nanoparticles to adjust the structural and dynamic properties of a lipid membrane, and to efficiently regulate the pore formation behavior and hydrophobicity of membranes.

  5. Mechanisms underlying fatigue: a voxel-based morphometric study of chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Yasuyoshi

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatigue is a crucial sensation that triggers rest, yet its underlying neuronal mechanisms remain unclear. Intense long-term fatigue is a symptom of chronic fatigue syndrome, which is used as a model to study the mechanisms underlying fatigue. Methods Using magnetic resonance imaging, we conducted voxel-based morphometry of 16 patients and 49 age-matched healthy control subjects. Results We found that patients with chronic fatigue syndrome had reduced gray-matter volume in the bilateral prefrontal cortex. Within these areas, the volume reduction in the right prefrontal cortex paralleled the severity of the fatigue of the subjects. Conclusion These results are consistent with previous reports of an abnormal distribution of acetyl-L-carnitine uptake, which is one of the biochemical markers of chronic fatigue syndrome, in the prefrontal cortex. Thus, the prefrontal cortex might be an important element of the neural system that regulates sensations of fatigue.

  6. Experimental research of mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue under rotational shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Kan; Wang, Mingyu; Gao, Changqing; Ma, Chao

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue with a series of rotational shear stress control experiments. To this end, several experiments including stress sweep tests, frequency sweep tests and quasi-static creep tests were designed and conducted with a standard rheometer (HAAKE RheoStress6000). The effects of the loading stress rates to mechanical properties of brain tissue were also studied in stress sweep tests. The results of stress sweep tests performed on the same brain showed that brain tissue had an obvious regional inhomogeneity and the mechanical damage occurred at the rotational shear stress of 10-15Pa. The experimental data from three different loading stress rates demonstrated that the mechanical behavior of porcine brain tissue was loading stress rate dependent. With the decrease of loading stress rate, a stiffer mechanical characteristic of brain tissue was observed and the occurrence of mechanical damage can be delayed to a higher stress. From the results of frequency sweep tests we found that brain tissue had almost completely elastic properties at high frequency area. The nonlinear creep response under the rotational shear stress of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9Pa was shown in results of creep tests. A new nonlinear viscoelastic solid model was proposed for creep tests and matched well with the test data. Considering the regional differences, loading stress rates and test conditions effects, loss tangent tan δ in porcine brain tissue showed a high uniformity of 0.25-0.45.

  7. Contact force and mechanical loss of multistage cable under tension and bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ru, Yanyun; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical model for calculating the stress and strain states of cabling structures with different loadings has been developed in this paper. We solve the problem for the first- and second-stage cable with tensile or bending strain. The contact and friction forces between the strands are presented by two-dimensional contact model. Several theoretical models have been proposed to verify the results when the triplet subjected to the tensile strain, including contact force, contact stresses, and mechanical loss. It is found that loadings will affect the friction force and the mechanical loss of the triplet. The results show that the contact force and mechanical loss are dependent on the twist pitch. A shorter twist pitch can lead to higher contact force, while the trend of mechanical loss with twist pitch is complicated. The mechanical loss may be reduced by adjusting the twist pitch reasonably. The present model provides a simple analysis method to investigate the mechanical behaviors in multistage-structures under different loads.

  8. From Sound to Significance: Exploring the Mechanisms Underlying Emotional Reactions to Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juslin, Patrik N; Barradas, Gonçalo; Eerola, Tuomas

    2015-01-01

    A common approach to studying emotional reactions to music is to attempt to obtain direct links between musical surface features such as tempo and a listener's responses. However, such an analysis ultimately fails to explain why emotions are aroused in the listener. In this article we explore an alternative approach, which aims to account for musical emotions in terms of a set of psychological mechanisms that are activated by different types of information in a musical event. This approach was tested in 4 experiments that manipulated 4 mechanisms (brain stem reflex, contagion, episodic memory, musical expectancy) by selecting existing musical pieces that featured information relevant for each mechanism. The excerpts were played to 60 listeners, who were asked to rate their felt emotions on 15 scales. Skin conductance levels and facial expressions were measured, and listeners reported subjective impressions of relevance to specific mechanisms. Results indicated that the target mechanism conditions evoked emotions largely as predicted by a multimechanism framework and that mostly similar effects occurred across the experiments that included different pieces of music. We conclude that a satisfactory account of musical emotions requires consideration of how musical features and responses are mediated by a range of underlying mechanisms.

  9. Safe mining face advance and support installation practice in mechanical miner workings under different geotechnical conditions.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Canbulat, I

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Final Project Report Safe mining face advance and support installation practice in mechanical miner workings under different geotechnical conditions I Canbulat and JN van der Merwe Research agency : CSIR : Division of Mining Technology Project..., including changing the organisation of work and the design of safe systems of work, necessary to (a) eliminate any recorded risk; (b) control the risk at source; (c) minimise the risk; and (d) in so far as the risk remains (i) provide for personal...

  10. Mechanisms Underlying Apoptosis-Inducing Effects of Kaempferol in HT-29 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun Sook Lee; Han Jin Cho; Rina Yu; Ki Won Lee; Hyang Sook Chun; Jung Han Yoon Park

    2014-01-01

    We previously noted that kaempferol, a flavonol present in vegetables and fruits, reduced cell cycle progression of HT-29 cells. To examine whether kaempferol induces apoptosis of HT-29 cells and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms, cells were treated with various concentrations (0–60 μmol/L) of kaempferol and analyzed by Hoechst staining, Annexin V staining, JC-1 labeling of the mitochondria, immunoprecipitation, in vitro kinase assays, Western blot analyses, and caspase-8 assays...

  11. The effects and underlying mechanisms of mirror therapy – literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Urška Puh; Sonja Hlebš

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mirror therapy is a relatively new therapeutic modality, where movement of the unaffected limb is used to facilitate performance of the affected limb. Literature review of clinical studies regarding the effectiveness of mirror therapy in different groups of patients was performed. The review focussed on randomised controlled trials and studies, which explore the underlying mechanisms of mirror therapy. Conclusions: The majority of randomised controlled ...

  12. The chemical and mechanical behaviors of polymer / reactive metal systems under high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yubin

    As one category of energetic materials, impact-initiated reactive materials are able to release a high amount of stored chemical energy under high strain rate impact loading, and are used extensively in civil and military applications. In general, polymers are introduced as binder materials to trap the reactive metal powders inside, and also act as an oxidizing agent for the metal ingredient. Since critical attention has been paid on the metal / metal reaction, only a few types of polymer / reactive metal interactions have been studied in the literature. With the higher requirement of materials resistant to different thermal and mechanical environments, the understanding and characterization of polymer / reactive metal interactions are in great demand. In this study, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) 7A / Ti (Titanium) composites were studied under high strain rates by utilizing the Taylor impact and SHPB tests. Taylor impact tests with different impact velocities, sample dimensions and sample configurations were conducted on the composite, equipped with a high-speed camera for tracking transient images during the sudden process. SHPB and Instron tests were carried out to obtain the stress vs. strain curves of the composite under a wide range of strain rates, the result of which were also utilized for fitting the constitutive relations of the composite based on the modified Johnson-Cook strength model. Thermal analyses by DTA tests under different flow rates accompanied with XRD identification were conducted to study the reaction mechanism between PTFE 7A and Ti when only heat was provided. Numerical simulations on Taylor impact tests and microstructural deformations were also performed to validate the constitutive model built for the composite system, and to investigate the possible reaction mechanism between two components. The results obtained from the high strain rate tests, thermal analyses and numerical simulations were combined to provide a systematic study on

  13. A key mechanism underlying sensory experience-dependent maturation of neocortical GABAergic circuits in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Chunzhao; Wang, Xinjun; Sakata, Kazuko; Lu, Bai; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying experience-dependent refinement of cortical connections, especially GABAergic inhibitory circuits, are unknown. By using a line of mutant mice that lack activity-dependent BDNF expression (bdnf-KIV), we show that experience regulation of cortical GABAergic network is mediated by activity-driven BDNF expression. Levels of endogenous BDNF protein in the barrel cortex are strongly regulated by sensory inputs from whiskers. There is a severe alteration of excitation and inhi...

  14. Neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attribution outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Brosch, Tobias; Schiller, Daniela; Mojdehbakhsh, Rachel; Uleman, James S.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    When forming impressions and trying to figure out why other people behave the way they do, we should take into account not only dispositional factors (i.e. personality traits) but also situational constraints as potential causes for a behavior. However, in their attributions, people often ignore the importance of situational factors. To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attributions, we decomposed the attribution process by separately...

  15. Neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attribution outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Brosch, Tobias; Schiller, Daniela; Mojdehbakhsh, Rachel; Uleman, James S.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    When forming impressions and trying to figure out why other people behave the way they do, we should take into account not only dispositional factors (i.e. personality traits) but also situational constraints as potential causes for a behavior. However, in their attributions, people often ignore the importance of situational factors. To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attributions, we decomposed the attribution process by separately...

  16. Different Variants of Fundamental Portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarczyński Waldemar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes the fundamental portfolio of securities. This portfolio is an alternative for the classic Markowitz model, which combines fundamental analysis with portfolio analysis. The method’s main idea is based on the use of the TMAI1 synthetic measure and, in limiting conditions, the use of risk and the portfolio’s rate of return in the objective function. Different variants of fundamental portfolio have been considered under an empirical study. The effectiveness of the proposed solutions has been related to the classic portfolio constructed with the help of the Markowitz model and the WIG20 market index’s rate of return. All portfolios were constructed with data on rates of return for 2005. Their effectiveness in 2006- 2013 was then evaluated. The studied period comprises the end of the bull market, the 2007-2009 crisis, the 2010 bull market and the 2011 crisis. This allows for the evaluation of the solutions’ flexibility in various extreme situations. For the construction of the fundamental portfolio’s objective function and the TMAI, the study made use of financial and economic data on selected indicators retrieved from Notoria Serwis for 2005.

  17. Scaling laws and deformation mechanisms of nanoporous copper under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuping Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the scaling laws and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of Cu monocrystal samples containing randomly placed nanovoids under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression. At onset of yielding, plastic deformation is accommodated by dislocations emitted from void surfaces as shear loops. The collapse of voids are observed by continuous emissions of dislocations from void surfaces and their interactions with further plastic deformation. The simulation results also suggest that the effect modulus, the yield stress and the energy aborption density of samples under uniaxial strain are linearly proportional to the relative density ρ. Moreover, the yield stress, the average flow stress and the energy aborption density of samples with the same relative density show a strong dependence on the void diameter d, expressed by exponential relations with decay coefficients much higher than -1/2. The corresponding atomistic mechanisms for scaling laws of the relative density and the void diameter were also presented. The present results should provide insights for understanding deformation mechanisms of nanoporous metals under extreme conditions.

  18. Scaling laws and deformation mechanisms of nanoporous copper under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Xiaolei

    2014-12-01

    A series of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the scaling laws and the related atomistic deformation mechanisms of Cu monocrystal samples containing randomly placed nanovoids under adiabatic uniaxial strain compression. At onset of yielding, plastic deformation is accommodated by dislocations emitted from void surfaces as shear loops. The collapse of voids are observed by continuous emissions of dislocations from void surfaces and their interactions with further plastic deformation. The simulation results also suggest that the effect modulus, the yield stress and the energy aborption density of samples under uniaxial strain are linearly proportional to the relative density ρ. Moreover, the yield stress, the average flow stress and the energy aborption density of samples with the same relative density show a strong dependence on the void diameter d, expressed by exponential relations with decay coefficients much higher than -1/2. The corresponding atomistic mechanisms for scaling laws of the relative density and the void diameter were also presented. The present results should provide insights for understanding deformation mechanisms of nanoporous metals under extreme conditions.

  19. Dissecting the mechanisms underlying short-interval intracortical inhibition using exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucic, Steve; Cheah, Benjamin C; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2011-07-01

    Recently, 2 physiologically distinct phases of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) have been identified, a larger phase at interstimulus interval (ISI) 3 ms and a smaller phase at ISI 1 ms. While the former is mediated by synaptic processes, the mechanisms underlying the first phase of SICI remain a matter of debate. Separately, it is known that fatiguing hand exercise reduces SICI, a measure of cortical excitability. Consequently, the present study assessed effects of fatiguing hand exercise on the 2 SICI phases, using threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques, to yield further information on underlying mechanisms. Studies were undertaken on 22 subjects, with SICI assessed at baseline, after each voluntary contraction (VC) period of 120 s and 5, 10, and 20 min after last VC, with responses recorded over abductor pollicis brevis. Exercise resulted in significant reduction of SICI at ISI 1 ms (SICI(baseline) 9.5 ± 2.7%; SICI(MAXIMUM REDUCTION) 2.5 ± 2.5%, P < 0.05) and 3 ms (SICI(baseline) 16.8 ± 1.7%; SICI(MAXIMUM REDUCTION) 11.6 ± 2.1%, P < 0.05), with the time course of reduction being different for the 2 phases. Taken together, findings from the present study suggest that synaptic processes were the predominant mechanism underlying the different phases of SICI.

  20. Mechano-adaptive sensory mechanism of α-catenin under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Koichiro; Han, Sung-Woong; Hirano, Yoshinori; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hakoshima, Toshio; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The contractile forces in individual cells drive the tissue processes, such as morphogenesis and wound healing, and maintain tissue integrity. In these processes, α-catenin molecule acts as a tension sensor at cadherin-based adherens junctions (AJs), accelerating the positive feedback of intercellular tension. Under tension, α-catenin is activated to recruit vinculin, which recruits actin filaments to AJs. In this study, we revealed how α-catenin retains its activated state while avoiding unfolding under tension. Using single-molecule force spectroscopy employing atomic force microscopy (AFM), we found that mechanically activated α-catenin fragment had higher mechanical stability than a non-activated fragment. The results of our experiments using mutated and segmented fragments showed that the key intramolecular interactions acted as a conformational switch. We also found that the conformation of α-catenin was reinforced by vinculin binding. We demonstrate that α-catenin adaptively changes its conformation under tension to a stable intermediate state, binds to vinculin, and finally settles into a more stable state reinforced by vinculin binding. Our data suggest that the plastic characteristics of α-catenin, revealed in response to both mechanical and biochemical cues, enable the functional-structural dynamics at the cellular and tissue levels.