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Sample records for functions potentiate cell-to-cell

  1. Identification of a Functional Plasmodesmal Localization Signal in a Plant Viral Cell-To-Cell-Movement Protein

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    Cheng Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our fundamental knowledge of the protein-sorting pathways required for plant cell-to-cell trafficking and communication via the intercellular connections termed plasmodesmata has been severely limited by the paucity of plasmodesmal targeting sequences that have been identified to date. To address this limitation, we have identified the plasmodesmal localization signal (PLS in the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV cell-to-cell-movement protein (MP, which has emerged as the paradigm for dissecting the molecular details of cell-to-cell transport through plasmodesmata. We report here the identification of a bona fide functional TMV MP PLS, which encompasses amino acid residues between positions 1 and 50, with residues Val-4 and Phe-14 potentially representing critical sites for PLS function that most likely affect protein conformation or protein interactions. We then demonstrated that this PLS is both necessary and sufficient for protein targeting to plasmodesmata. Importantly, as TMV MP traffics to plasmodesmata by a mechanism that is distinct from those of the three plant cell proteins in which PLSs have been reported, our findings provide important new insights to expand our understanding of protein-sorting pathways to plasmodesmata.

  2. Rice dwarf phytoreovirus segment S6-encoded nonstructural protein has a cell-to-cell movement function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Bao, Yi M; Wei, Chun H; Kang, Zhen S; Zhong, Yong W; Mao, Peng; Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhang L; Schiemann, Joachim; Nelson, Richard S

    2004-05-01

    Rice dwarf virus (RDV) is a member of the genus Phytoreovirus, which is composed of viruses with segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. Proteins that support the intercellular movement of these viruses in the host have not been identified. Microprojectile bombardment was used to determine which open reading frames (ORFs) support intercellular movement of a heterologous virus. A plasmid containing an infectious clone of Potato virus X (PVX) defective in cell-to-cell movement and expressing either beta-glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used for cobombardment with plasmids containing ORFs from RDV gene segments S1 through S12 onto leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX was restored by cobombardment with a plasmid containing S6. In the absence of S6, no other gene segment supported movement. Identical results were obtained with Nicotiana tabacum, a host that allows fewer viruses to infect and spread within its tissue. S6 supported the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX in sink and source leaves of N. benthamiana. A mutant S6 lacking the translation start codon did not complement the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX. An S6 protein product (Pns6)-enhanced GFP fusion was observed near or within cell walls of epidermal cells from N. tabacum. By immunocytochemistry, unfused Pns6 was localized to plasmodesmata in rice leaves infected with RDV. S6 thus encodes a protein with characteristics identical to those of other viral proteins required for the cell-to-cell movement of their genome and therefore is likely required for the cell-to-cell movement of RDV.

  3. Functional characterization of an AQP0 missense mutation, R33C, that causes dominant congenital lens cataract, reveals impaired cell-to-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sindhu S; Gandhi, Jason; Mustehsan, Mohammed H; Eren, Semih; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2013-11-01

    Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) performs dual functions in the lens fiber cells, as a water pore and as a cell-to-cell adhesion molecule. Mutations in AQP0 cause severe lens cataract in both humans and mice. An arginine to cysteine missense mutation at amino acid 33 (R33C) produced congenital autosomal dominant cataract in a Chinese family for five generations. We re-created this mutation in wild type human AQP0 (WT-AQP0) cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis, and cloned and expressed the mutant AQP0 (AQP0-R33C) in heterologous expression systems. Mutant AQP0-R33C showed proper trafficking and membrane localization like WT-AQP0. Functional studies conducted in Xenopus oocytes showed no significant difference (P > 0.05) in water permeability between AQP0-R33C and WT-AQP0. However, the cell-to-cell adhesion property of AQP0-R33C was significantly reduced (P cataract suggest that the conserved positive charge of Extracellular Loop A may play an important role in bringing fiber cells closer. The proposed schematic models illustrate that cell-to-cell adhesion elicited by AQP0 is vital for lens transparency and homeostasis.

  4. Cell-to-cell signaling influences the fate of prostate cancer stem cells and their potential to generate more aggressive tumors.

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    Luisa Salvatori

    Full Text Available An increasing number of malignancies has been shown to be initiated and propelled by small subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSC. However, whether tumor aggressiveness is driven by CSC and by what extent this property may be relevant within the tumor mass is still unsettled. To address this issue, we isolated a rare tumor cell population on the basis of its CD44(+CD24(- phenotype from the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line DU145 and established its CSC properties. The behavior of selected CSC was investigated with respect to the bulk DU145 cells. The injection of CSC in nude mice generated highly vascularized tumors infiltrating the adjacent tissues, showing high density of neuroendocrine cells and expressing low levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin as well as high levels of vimentin. On the contrary, when a comparable number of unsorted DU145 cells were injected the resulting tumors were less aggressive. To investigate the different features of tumors in vivo, the influence of differentiated tumor cells on CSC was examined in vitro by growing CSC in the absence or presence of conditioned medium from DU145 cells. CSC grown in permissive conditions differentiated into cell populations with features similar to those of cells held in aggressive tumors generated from CSC injection. Differently, conditioned medium induced CSC to differentiate into a cell phenotype comparable to cells of scarcely aggressive tumors originated from bulk DU145 cell injection. These findings show for the first time that CSC are able to generate differentiated cells expressing either highly or scarcely aggressive phenotype, thus influencing prostate cancer progression. The fate of CSC was determined by signals released from tumor environment. Moreover, using microarray analysis we selected some molecules which could be involved in this cell-to-cell signaling, hypothesizing their potential value for prognostic or therapeutic applications.

  5. Extraction and identification of exosomes from drug-resistant breast cancer cells and their potential role in cell-to-cell drug-resistance transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许金金

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore whether docetaxel-resistant cells(MCF-7/Doc)and doxorubicin-resistant cells(MCF-7/ADM)can secrete Exosomes and their potential role in cell-cell drug-resistance transfer.Methods Exosomes were extracted from the cell culture supernatants of MCF-7/Doc and MCF-7/ADM cells by fractionation ultracentrifugation,and were identified by transmission

  6. Structure-function analysis of the gE-gI complex of feline herpesvirus: mapping of gI domains required for gE-gI interaction, intracellular transport, and cell-to-cell spread

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Mijnes, J.D.; Lutters, B.C.; Vlot, A.C.; Anken, E. van; Rottier, P.J.M.; Groot, R.J. de

    1997-01-01

    Alphaherpesvirus glycoproteins gE and gI form a noncovalently associated hetero-oligomeric complex, which is involved in cell-to-cell spread. In the absence of gI, feline herpesvirus (FHV) gE is transport incompetent and fully retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we assess the effect of

  7. Potential Functions in Chemical Thermodynamics

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    Araujo, Roger J.

    1998-11-01

    The first and second laws of thermodynamics are stated in equation form. The equation containing the combined laws is used to identify potential functions appropriate to various sets of constraints. An ion-exchange reaction and a redox reaction in a melt are considered as illustrations of the importance of using the potential function appropriate to the constraints.

  8. Diagram of Cell to Cell Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Diagram depicts the importance of cell-cell communication as central to the understanding of cancer growth and progression, the focus of the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05) investigation. Microgravity studies will allow us to unravel the signaling and communication between these cells with the host and potential development of therapies for the treatment of cancer metastasis. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  9. Diagram of Cell to Cell Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Diagram depicts the importance of cell-cell communication as central to the understanding of cancer growth and progression, the focus of the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05) investigation. Microgravity studies will allow us to unravel the signaling and communication between these cells with the host and potential development of therapies for the treatment of cancer metastasis. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  10. Bacterial quorum sensing: functional features and potential applications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangwani, Neelam; Dash, Hirak Ranjan; Chauhan, Ashvini; Das, Surajit

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) represents an exceptional pattern of cell-to-cell communication in bacteria using self-synthesized signalling molecules known as autoinducers. Various features regulated by QS in bacteria include virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, genetic competence and bioluminescence, among others. Other than the diverse signalling properties of autoinducers, there are non-signalling properties also associated with these signalling molecules which make them potential antimicrobial agents and metal chelators. Additionally, QS signal antagonism has also been shown to be a promising alternative for blocking pathogenic diseases. Besides, QS has impressive design features useful in tissue engineering and biosensor technology. Although many aspects of QS are well understood, several other features remain largely unknown, especially in biotechnology applications. This review focuses on the functional features and potential applications of QS signalling molecules in biotechnology.

  11. The Tomato spotted wilt virus cell-to-cell movement protein (NSM) triggers a hypersensitive response in Sw-5 containing resistant tomato lines and Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with the functional Sw-5b resistance gene copy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallwass, M.; Silva de Oliveira, A.; Dianese, E.C.; Lohuis, D.; Boiteux, L.S.; Inoue-Nagata, A.K.; Resende, de R.O.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Although the Sw-5 gene cluster has been cloned, and Sw-5b has been identified as the functional gene copy that confers resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), its avirulence (Avr) determinant has not been identified to date. Nicotiana tabacum SR1 plants transformed with a copy of the Sw-5b

  12. Quantum mechanics without potential function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhaidari, A. D., E-mail: haidari@sctp.org.sa [Saudi Center for Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 32741, Jeddah 21438 (Saudi Arabia); Ismail, M. E. H. [Department of Mathematics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    In the standard formulation of quantum mechanics, one starts by proposing a potential function that models the physical system. The potential is then inserted into the Schrödinger equation, which is solved for the wavefunction, bound states energy spectrum, and/or scattering phase shift. In this work, however, we propose an alternative formulation in which the potential function does not appear. The aim is to obtain a set of analytically realizable systems, which is larger than in the standard formulation and may or may not be associated with any given or previously known potential functions. We start with the wavefunction, which is written as a bounded infinite sum of elements of a complete basis with polynomial coefficients that are orthogonal on an appropriate domain in the energy space. Using the asymptotic properties of these polynomials, we obtain the scattering phase shift, bound states, and resonances. This formulation enables one to handle not only the well-known quantum systems but also previously untreated ones. Illustrative examples are given for two- and three-parameter systems.

  13. New connections: Cell to cell HIV-1 transmission, resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies, and an envelope sorting motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S Abigail; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 infection from cell to cell may provide an efficient mode of viral spread in vivo and could therefore present a significant challenge for preventative or therapeutic strategies based on broadly neutralizing antibodies. Indeed, Li et al show that the potency and magnitude of multiple HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibody classes are decreased during cell to cell infection in a context dependent manner. A functional motif in gp41 appears to contribute to this differential susceptibility by modulating exposure of neutralization epitopes.

  14. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

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    Asako eUchiyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010. To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV, which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP, Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread.

  15. Tetherin restricts productive HIV-1 cell-to-cell transmission.

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    Nicoletta Casartelli

    Full Text Available The IFN-inducible antiviral protein tetherin (or BST-2/CD317/HM1.24 impairs release of mature HIV-1 particles from infected cells. HIV-1 Vpu antagonizes the effect of tetherin. The fate of virions trapped at the cell surface remains poorly understood. Here, we asked whether tetherin impairs HIV cell-to-cell transmission, a major means of viral spread. Tetherin-positive or -negative cells, infected with wild-type or DeltaVpu HIV, were used as donor cells and cocultivated with target lymphocytes. We show that tetherin inhibits productive cell-to-cell transmission of DeltaVpu to targets and impairs that of WT HIV. Tetherin accumulates with Gag at the contact zone between infected and target cells, but does not prevent the formation of virological synapses. In the presence of tetherin, viruses are then mostly transferred to targets as abnormally large patches. These viral aggregates do not efficiently promote infection after transfer, because they accumulate at the surface of target cells and are impaired in their fusion capacities. Tetherin, by imprinting virions in donor cells, is the first example of a surface restriction factor limiting viral cell-to-cell spread.

  16. Human Cytomegalovirus US28 Facilitates Cell-to-Cell Viral Dissemination

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    Vanessa M. Noriega

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV encodes a number of viral proteins with homology to cellular G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. These viral GPCRs, including US27, US28, UL33, and UL78, have been ascribed numerous functions during infection, including activating diverse cellular pathways, binding to immunomodulatory chemokines, and impacting virus dissemination. To investigate the role of US28 during virus infection, two variants of the clinical isolate TB40/E were generated: TB40/E-US28YFP expressing a C-terminal yellow fluorescent protein tag, and TB40/E-FLAGYFP in which a FLAG-YFP cassette replaces the US28 coding region. The TB40/E-US28YFP protein localized as large perinuclear fluorescent structures at late times post-infection in fibroblasts, endothelial, and epithelial cells. Interestingly, US28YFP is a non-glycosylated membrane protein throughout the course of infection. US28 appears to impact cell-to-cell spread of virus, as the DUS28 virus (TB40/E-FLAGYFP generated a log-greater yield of extracellular progeny whose spread could be significantly neutralized in fibroblasts. Most strikingly, in epithelial cells, where dissemination of virus occurs exclusively by the cell-to-cell route, TB40/E-FLAGYFP (DUS28 displayed a significant growth defect. The data demonstrates that HCMV US28 may contribute at a late stage of the viral life cycle to cell-to-cell dissemination of virus.

  17. RNA transport during TMV cell-to-cell movement

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    Eduardo José ePeña

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies during the last twenty-five years have provided increasing evidence for the ability of plants to support the cell-to-cell and systemic transport of RNA molecules and that this process plays a role in plant development and in the systemic orchestration of cellular responses against pathogens and other environmental challenges. Since RNA viruses exploit the cellular RNA transport machineries for spreading their genomes between cells they represent convenient models to investigate the underlying mechanisms. In this regard, the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV has been studied for several years. The RNA of TMV moves cell-to-cell in a non-encapsidated form in a process depending on virus-encoded movement protein (MP. Here, we discuss the current state of the art in studies using TMV and its MP as a model for RNA transport. While the ability of plants to transport viral and cellular RNA molecules is consistent with RNA transport phenomena in other systems, further studies are needed to increase our ability to visualize viral RNA in vivo and to distinguish RNA-transport related processes from those involved in antiviral defense.

  18. RNA transport during TMV cell-to-cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Eduardo J; Heinlein, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Studies during the last 25 years have provided increasing evidence for the ability of plants to support the cell-to-cell and systemic transport of RNA molecules and that this process plays a role in plant development and in the systemic orchestration of cellular responses against pathogens and other environmental challenges. Since RNA viruses exploit the cellular RNA transport machineries for spreading their genomes between cells they represent convenient models to investigate the underlying mechanisms. In this regard, the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has been studied for many years. The RNA of TMV moves cell-to-cell in a non-encapsidated form in a process depending on virus-encoded movement protein (MP). Here, we discuss the current state of the art in studies using TMV and its MP as a model for RNA transport. While the ability of plants to transport viral and cellular RNA molecules is consistent with RNA transport phenomena in other systems, further studies are needed to increase our ability to visualize viral RNA (vRNA) in vivo and to distinguish RNA-transport related processes from those involved in antiviral defense.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

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    Christine Gross

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1 polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2 cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation.

  20. Global Dynamics of a Virus Dynamical Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and Cure Rate

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    Tongqian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure effect of a virus model with both cell-to-cell transmission and cell-to-virus transmission is studied. By the method of next generation matrix, the basic reproduction number is obtained. The locally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium is considered by investigating the characteristic equation of the model. The globally asymptotic stability of the virus-free equilibrium is proved by constructing suitable Lyapunov function, and the sufficient condition for the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium is obtained by constructing suitable Lyapunov function and using LaSalle invariance principal.

  1. Plasmodesmata-Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication in the Shoot Apical Meristem: How Stem Cells Talk.

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    Kitagawa, Munenori; Jackson, David

    2017-03-01

    Positional information is crucial for the determination of plant cell fates, and it is established based on coordinated cell-to-cell communication, which in turn is essential for plant growth and development. Plants have evolved a unique communication pathway, with tiny channels called plasmodesmata (PD) spanning the cell wall. PD interconnect most cells in the plant and generate a cytoplasmic continuum, to mediate short- and long-distance trafficking of various molecules. Cell-to-cell communication through PD plays a role in transmitting positional signals, however, the regulatory mechanisms of PD-mediated trafficking are still largely unknown. The induction and maintenance of stem cells in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) depends on PDmediated cell-to-cell communication, hence, it is an optimal model for dissecting the regulatory mechanisms of PD-mediated cell-to-cell communication and its function in specifying cell fates. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge of PD-mediated cell-to-cell communication in the SAM, and discuss mechanisms underlying molecular trafficking through PD and its role in plant development.

  2. Plasmodesmata-Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication in the Shoot Apical Meristem: How Stem Cells Talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munenori Kitagawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Positional information is crucial for the determination of plant cell fates, and it is established based on coordinated cell-to-cell communication, which in turn is essential for plant growth and development. Plants have evolved a unique communication pathway, with tiny channels called plasmodesmata (PD spanning the cell wall. PD interconnect most cells in the plant and generate a cytoplasmic continuum, to mediate short- and long-distance trafficking of various molecules. Cell-to-cell communication through PD plays a role in transmitting positional signals, however, the regulatory mechanisms of PD-mediated trafficking are still largely unknown. The induction and maintenance of stem cells in the shoot apical meristem (SAM depends on PDmediated cell-to-cell communication, hence, it is an optimal model for dissecting the regulatory mechanisms of PD-mediated cell-to-cell communication and its function in specifying cell fates. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge of PD-mediated cell-to-cell communication in the SAM, and discuss mechanisms underlying molecular trafficking through PD and its role in plant development.

  3. Hartree potential dependent exchange functional

    CERN Document Server

    Constantin, L A; Della Sala, F

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel non-local ingredient for the construction of exchange density functionals: the reduced Hartree parameter, which is invariant under the uniform scaling of the density and represents the exact exchange enhancement factor for one- and two-electron systems. The reduced Hartree parameter is used together with the conventional meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) semilocal ingredients (i.e. the electron density, its gradient and the kinetic energy density) to construct a new generation exchange functional, termed u-meta-GGA. This u-meta-GGA functional is exact for {the exchange of} any one- and two-electron systems, is size-consistent and non-empirical, satisfies the uniform density scaling relation, and recovers the modified gradient expansion derived from the semiclassical atom theory. For atoms, ions, jellium spheres, and molecules, it shows a good accuracy, being often better than meta-GGA exchange functionals. Our construction validates the use of the reduced Hartree ingredie...

  4. Computing the threshold of the influence of intercellular nanotubes on cell-to-cell communication integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailović, Dragutin T.; Kostić, Vladimir R.; Balaž, Igor; Kapor, Darko

    2016-10-01

    We examine the threshold of the influence of the tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) on the cell-to-cell communication integrity. A deterministic model is introduced with the Michaelis-Menten dynamics and the intercellular exchange of substance. The influence of TNTs are considered as a functional perturbation of the main communication and treated as the matrix nearness problems. We analyze communication integrity in terms of the \\emph{pseudospectra} of the exchange, to find the \\emph{distance to instability}. The threshold of TNTs influence is computed for Newman-Gastner and Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi gap junction (GJ) networks.

  5. Cell to substratum and cell to cell interactions of microalgae.

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    Ozkan, Altan; Berberoglu, Halil

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports the cell to substratum and cell to cell interactions of a diverse group of microalgae based on the Extended Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek (XDLVO) approach using the previously reported physico-chemical surface properties. The microalgae included 10 different species of green algae and diatoms from both freshwater and saltwater environments while the substrata included glass, indium-tin oxide (ITO), stainless steel, polycarbonate, polyethylene, and polystryrene. The results indicated that acid-base interactions were the dominating mechanism of interaction for microalgae. For green algae, if at least one of the interacting surfaces was hydrophobic, adhesion at primary minimum was predicted without any energy barrier. However, most diatom systems featured energy barriers for adhesion due to repulsive van der Waals interactions. The results reported in this study are expected to provide useful data and insight into the interaction mechanisms of microalgae cells with each other and with substrata for a number of practical applications including prevention of biofouling of photobioreactors and other man-made surfaces, promotion of biofilm formation in algal biofilm photobioreactors, and developing bioflocculation strategies for energy efficient harvesting of algal biomass. Particularly, Botryococcus braunii and Cerithiopsis fusiformis were identified as promising species for biofloccuation and biofilm formation in freshwater and saltwater aquatic systems, respectively. Finally, based on the observed trends in this study, use of hydrophilic algae and hydrophilic coatings over surfaces are recommended for minimizing biofouling in aquatic systems.

  6. Blood-neural barrier: its diversity and coordinated cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2008-05-31

    The cerebral microvessels possess barrier characteristics which are tightly sealed excluding many toxic substances and protecting neural tissues. The specialized blood-neural barriers as well as the cerebral microvascular barrier are recognized in the retina, inner ear, spinal cord, and cerebrospinal fluid. Microvascular endothelial cells in the brain closely interact with other components such as astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular microglia and neurons to form functional 'neurovascular unit'. Communication between endothelial cells and other surrounding cells enhances the barrier functions, consequently resulting in maintenance and elaboration of proper brain homeostasis. Furthermore, the disruption of the neurovascular unit is closely involved in cerebrovascular disorders. In this review, we focus on the location and function of these various blood-neural barriers, and the importance of the cell-to-cell communication for development and maintenance of the barrier integrity at the neurovascular unit. We also demonstrate the close relation between the alteration of the blood-neural barriers and cerebrovascular disorders.

  7. Deuteron wave function and OPE potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, S.; Rosa-Clot, M.

    1987-06-01

    The deuteron wave function is calculated integrating from outside the Schredinger equation using as input its asymptotic behaviour. Some potentials are tested and the one pion exchange potential (OPEP) is shown to be the main responsible of the wave function structure up to distances of about 1 fm. The relevance of the short range part of the potential is analyzed and it is shown that a substantial enhancement of the OPEP central part is needed in the deuteron channel.

  8. Cytorhabdovirus P3 genes encode 30K-like cell-to-cell movement proteins.

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    Mann, Krin S; Bejerman, Nicolas; Johnson, Karyn N; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-02-01

    Plant viruses encode movement proteins (MP) to facilitate cell-to-cell transport through plasmodesmata. In this study, using trans-complementation of a movement-defective turnip vein-clearing tobamovirus (TVCV) replicon, we show for the first time for cytorhabdoviruses (lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) and alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV)) that their P3 proteins function as MP similar to the TVCV P30 protein. All three MP localized to plasmodesmata when ectopically expressed. In addition, we show that these MP belong to the 30K superfamily since movement was inhibited by mutation of an aspartic acid residue in the critical 30K-specific LxD/N50-70G motif. We also report that Nicotiana benthamiana microtubule-associated VOZ1-like transcriptional activator interacts with LNYV P3 and TVCV P30 but not with ADV P3 or any of the MP point mutants. This host protein, which is known to interact with P3 of sonchus yellow net nucleorhabdovirus, may be involved in aiding the cell-to-cell movement of LNYV and TVCV.

  9. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Catriona, E-mail: catriona.kelly@qub.ac.uk [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom); Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H. [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. {yields} Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. {yields} Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  10. Learning (potential) and social functioning in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woonings, FMJ; Appelo, MT; Kluiter, H; Slooff, CJ; van den Bosch, RJ

    2003-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia has well-known functional consequences. The ability to learn (learning potential). may be an important mediator. This study examines the relationship between learning and functional status in schizophrenia patients before and after participation in a rehabilita

  11. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  12. Strategy for signaling molecule detection by using an integrated microfluidic device coupled with mass spectrometry to study cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Sifeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Haifang; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-01-15

    Cell-to-cell communication is a very important physiological behavior in life entity, and most of human behaviors are related to it. Although cell-to-cell communications are attracting much attention and financial support, rare methods have been successfully developed for in vitro cell-to-cell communication study. In this work, we developed a novel method for cell-to-cell communication study on an integrated microdevice, and signaling molecule and metabolites were online-detected by an electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (ESI-Q-TOF-MS) after on-chip solid-phase extraction. Moreover, we presented a "Surface Tension Plug" on a microchip to control cell-to-cell communication. The microdevice consists of three functional sections: cell coculture channel, targets pretreatment, and targets detection sections. To verify the feasibility of cell-to-cell communications on the integrated microdevice, we studied the communication between the 293 and the L-02 cells. Epinephrine and glucose were successfully detected using an ESI-Q-TOF-MS with short analysis time (communication study.

  13. Local statistics allow quantification of cell-to-cell variability from high-throughput microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handfield, Louis-François; Strome, Bob; Chong, Yolanda T; Moses, Alan M

    2015-03-15

    Quantifying variability in protein expression is a major goal of systems biology and cell-to-cell variability in subcellular localization pattern has not been systematically quantified. We define a local measure to quantify cell-to-cell variability in high-throughput microscope images and show that it allows comparable measures of variability for proteins with diverse subcellular localizations. We systematically estimate cell-to-cell variability in the yeast GFP collection and identify examples of proteins that show cell-to-cell variability in their subcellular localization. Automated image analysis methods can be used to quantify cell-to-cell variability in microscope images. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Interference of bacterial cell-to-cell communication: A new concept of antimicrobial chemotherapy breaks antibiotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetada eHirakawa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria use a cell-to-cell communication activity termed Quorum sensing to coordinate group behaviors in a cell-density dependent manner. Quorum sensing influences the expression profile of diverse genes, including antibiotic tolerance and virulence determinants, via specific chemical compounds called Auto-inducers. During quorum sensing, Gram-negative bacteria typically use an acylated homoserine lactone (AHL called auto-inducer 1 (AI-1. Since the first discovery of quorum sensing in a marine bacterium, it has been recognized that more than 100 species possess this mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. In addition to being of interest from a biological standpoint, quorum sensing is a potential target for antimicrobial chemotherapy. This unique concept of antimicrobial control relies on reducing the burden of virulence rather than killing the bacteria. It is believed that this approach will not only suppress the development of antibiotic resistance, but will also improve the treatment of refractory infections triggered by multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. In this paper, we review and track recent progress in studies on AHL inhibitors/modulators from a biological standpoint. It has been discovered that both natural and synthetic compounds can disrupt quorum sensing by a variety of means, such as jamming signal transduction, inhibition of signal production and break-down and trapping of signal compounds. We also focus on the regulatory elements that attenuate quorum sensing activities and discuss their unique properties. Understanding the biological roles of regulatory elements might be useful in developing inhibitor applications and understanding how quorum sensing is controlled.

  15. Green's functions potential fields on surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Melnikov, Yuri A

    2017-01-01

    This book is comprehensive in its classical mathematical physics presentation, providing the reader with detailed instructions for obtaining Green's functions from scratch. Green's functions is an instrument easily accessible to practitioners who are engaged in design and exploitation of machines and structures in modern engineering practice. To date, there are no books available on the market that are devoted to the Green's function formalism for equations covered in this volume. The reader, with an undergraduate background in applied mathematics, can become an active user of the Green's function approach. For the first time, Green's functions are discussed for a specific class of problems dealing with potential fields induced in thin-wall structures and therefore, the reader will have first-hand access to a novel issue. This Work is accessible to researchers in applied mathematics, mechanics, and relevant disciplines such as engineering, as well as to upper level undergraduates and graduate students.

  16. Functionalized carbon nanotubes for potential medicinal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Bai, Yuhong; Yan, Bing

    2010-06-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes display unique properties that enable a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity. High aspect ratio, unique optical property and the likeness as small molecule make carbon nanotubes an unusual allotrope of element carbon. After functionalization, carbon nanotubes display potentials for a variety of medicinal applications, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and central nervous system disorders, and applications in tissue engineering. These potential applications are particularly encouraged by their ability to penetrate biological membranes and relatively low toxicity.

  17. Over-expression of putative transcriptional coactivator KELP interferes with Tomato mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Ogata, Takuya; Deguchi, Masakazu; Nagai, Shoko; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) encodes a movement protein (MP) that is necessary for virus cell-to-cell movement. We have demonstrated previously that KELP, a putative transcriptional coactivator of Arabidopsis thaliana, and its orthologue from Brassica campestris can bind to ToMV MP in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of the transient over-expression of KELP on ToMV infection and the intracellular localization of MP in Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of the virus. In co-bombardment experiments, the over-expression of KELP inhibited virus cell-to-cell movement. The N-terminal half of KELP (KELPdC), which had been shown to bind to MP, was sufficient for inhibition. Furthermore, the over-expression of KELP and KELPdC, both of which were co-localized with ToMV MP, led to a reduction in the plasmodesmal association of MP. In the absence of MP expression, KELP was localized in the nucleus and the cytoplasm by the localization signal in its N-terminal half. It was also shown that ToMV amplified normally in protoplasts prepared from leaf tissue that expressed KELP transiently. These results indicate that over-expressed KELP interacts with MP in vivo and exerts an inhibitory effect on MP function for virus cell-to-cell movement, but not on virus amplification in individual cells.

  18. Gap-junction-mediated cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Jean-Claude; Derangeon, Mickaël

    2013-04-01

    Cells of multicellular organisms need to communicate with each other and have evolved various mechanisms for this purpose, the most direct and quickest of which is through channels that directly connect the cytoplasms of adjacent cells. Such intercellular channels span the two plasma membranes and the intercellular space and result from the docking of two hemichannels. These channels are densely packed into plasma-membrane spatial microdomains termed "gap junctions" and allow cells to exchange ions and small molecules directly. A hemichannel is a hexameric torus of junctional proteins around an aqueous pore. Vertebrates express two families of gap-junction proteins: the well-characterized connexins and the more recently discovered pannexins, the latter being related to invertebrate innexins ("invertebrate connexins"). Some gap-junctional hemichannels also appear to mediate cell-extracellular communication. Communicating junctions play crucial roles in the maintenance of homeostasis, morphogenesis, cell differentiation and growth control in metazoans. Gap-junctional channels are not passive conduits, as previously long regarded, but use "gating" mechanisms to open and close the central pore in response to biological stimuli (e.g. a change in the transjunctional voltage). Their permeability is finely tuned by complex mechanisms that have just begun to be identified. Given their ubiquity and diversity, gap junctions play crucial roles in a plethora of functions and their dysfunctions are involved in a wide range of diseases. However, the exact mechanisms involved remain poorly understood.

  19. Potential Function and Thermodynamic Property of UO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-lin Zeng; Si-yu Xu; Xue-hai Ju

    2013-01-01

    Potential energy scan for uranium oxide (UO) was performed by ab initio configuration interaction (CI) method and density functional theory methods at the PBE1 and the B3LYP levels in combination with the (ECP80MWB_AVQZ+2f) basis set for uranium and 6-311+G* for oxygen.The dissociation energies of UO,after being corrected for the zero-point vibrational energy,are 2.38,3.76,and 3.31 eV at the CI,PBE1,and B3LYP levels,respectively.The calculated energy was fitted to potential functions of Morse,Lennard-Jones,and Rydberg.Only the Morse function is eligible for the potential.The anharmonicity constant is 0.00425.The anharmonic frequency is 540.95 cm-1 deduced from the PBE1 results.Thermodynamic properties of entropy and heat capacity at 298.2-1500 K were calculated using DFT-UPBE1 results and Morse parameters.The relationship between entropy and temperature was established.

  20. Effective potential in density matrix functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, A; Amovilli, C

    2004-10-01

    In the previous paper it was shown that in the ground state the diagonal of the spin independent second-order density matrix n can be determined by solving a single auxiliary equation of a two-particle problem. Thus the problem of an arbitrary system with even electrons can be reduced to a two-particle problem. The effective potential of the two-particle equation contains a term v(p) of completely kinetic origin. Virial theorem and hierarchy of equations are derived for v(p) and simple approximations are proposed. A relationship between the effective potential u(p) of the shape function equation and the potential v(p) is established.

  1. Simulated microgravity allows to demonstrate cell-to-cell communication in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroleo, Felice; van Houdt, Rob; Mergeay, Max; Hendrickx, Larissa; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    . Understanding how cell-to-cell communication regulates photosynthesis and potentially cell aggregation may be an unique tool to understand, characterize and then optimize biodegradation processes in photobioreactors, in space or on Earth. Mastroleo F., Van Houdt R., Leroy B., Benotmane M. A., Janssen A., Mergeay M., Vanhavere F., Hendrickx L., Wattiez R. and Leys N. Experimental design and environmental parameters affect Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H response to space flight. ISME J 2009;3:1402-1419. The presented work was financially supported by the European Space Agency (ESA-PRODEX), the Belgian Science Policy (Belspo) (PRODEX agreements No C90247 No 90094) and the SCK•CEN PhD AWM grant of F. Mastroleo. We are grateful to C. Lasseur and C. Paillé, both from ESTEC/ESA, for their constant support and advice.

  2. Pathologic function and therapeutic potential of exosomes in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailawadi, Shaina; Wang, Xiaohong; Gu, Haitao; Fan, Guo-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The heart is a very complex conglomeration of organized interactions between various different cell types that all aid in facilitating myocardial function through contractility, sufficient perfusion, and cell-to-cell reception. In order to make sure that all features of the heart work effectively, it is imperative to have a well-controlled communication system among the different types of cells. One of the most important ways that the heart regulates itself is by the use of extracellular vesicles, more specifically, exosomes. Exosomes are types of nano-vesicles, naturally released from living cells. They are believed to play a critical role in intercellular communication through the means of certain mechanisms including direct cell-to-cell contact, long-range signals as well as electrical and extracellular chemical molecules. Exosomes contain many unique features like surface proteins/receptors, lipids, mRNAs, microRNAs, transcription factors and other proteins. Recent studies indicate that the exosomal contents are highly regulated by various stress and disease conditions, in turn reflective of the parent cell status. At present, exosomes are well appreciated to be involved in the process of tumor and infection disease. However, the research on cardiac exosomes is just emerging. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the pathologic effects of exosomes on cardiac remodeling under stress and disease conditions, including cardiac hypertrophy, peripartum cardiomyopathy, diabetic cardiomyopathy and sepsis-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. In addition, the cardio-protective effects of stress-preconditioned exosomes and stem cell-derived exosomes are also summarized. Finally, we discuss how to epigenetically reprogram exosome contents in host cells which makes them beneficial for the heart.

  3. Oseltamivir expands quasispecies of influenza virus through cell-to-cell transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kotaro; Murano, Kensaku; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2015-03-16

    The population of influenza virus consists of a huge variety of variants, called quasispecies, due to error-prone replication. Previously, we reported that progeny virions of influenza virus become infected to adjacent cells via cell-to-cell transmission pathway in the presence of oseltamivir. During cell-to-cell transmission, viruses become infected to adjacent cells at high multiplicity since progeny virions are enriched on plasma membrane between infected cells and their adjacent cells. Co-infection with viral variants may rescue recessive mutations with each other. Thus, it is assumed that the cell-to-cell transmission causes expansion of virus quasispecies. Here, we have demonstrated that temperature-sensitive mutations remain in progeny viruses even at non-permissive temperature by co-infection in the presence of oseltamivir. This is possibly due to a multiplex infection through the cell-to-cell transmission by the addition of oseltamivir. Further, by the addition of oseltamivir, the number of missense mutation introduced by error-prone replication in segment 8 encoding NS1 was increased in a passage-dependent manner. The number of missense mutation in segment 5 encoding NP was not changed significantly, whereas silent mutation was increased. Taken together, we propose that oseltamivir expands influenza virus quasispecies via cell-to-cell transmission, and may facilitate the viral evolution and adaptation.

  4. A Nonlinear Mixed Effects Approach for Modeling the Cell-To-Cell Variability of Mig1 Dynamics in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Almquist

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen a rapid development of experimental techniques that allow data collection from individual cells. These techniques have enabled the discovery and characterization of variability within a population of genetically identical cells. Nonlinear mixed effects (NLME modeling is an established framework for studying variability between individuals in a population, frequently used in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but its potential for studies of cell-to-cell variability in molecular cell biology is yet to be exploited. Here we take advantage of this novel application of NLME modeling to study cell-to-cell variability in the dynamic behavior of the yeast transcription repressor Mig1. In particular, we investigate a recently discovered phenomenon where Mig1 during a short and transient period exits the nucleus when cells experience a shift from high to intermediate levels of extracellular glucose. A phenomenological model based on ordinary differential equations describing the transient dynamics of nuclear Mig1 is introduced, and according to the NLME methodology the parameters of this model are in turn modeled by a multivariate probability distribution. Using time-lapse microscopy data from nearly 200 cells, we estimate this parameter distribution according to the approach of maximizing the population likelihood. Based on the estimated distribution, parameter values for individual cells are furthermore characterized and the resulting Mig1 dynamics are compared to the single cell times-series data. The proposed NLME framework is also compared to the intuitive but limited standard two-stage (STS approach. We demonstrate that the latter may overestimate variabilities by up to almost five fold. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of the inferred population model are used to predict the distribution of key characteristics of the Mig1 transient response. We find that with decreasing levels of post-shift glucose, the transient

  5. A Nonlinear Mixed Effects Approach for Modeling the Cell-To-Cell Variability of Mig1 Dynamics in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Joachim; Bendrioua, Loubna; Adiels, Caroline Beck; Goksör, Mattias; Hohmann, Stefan; Jirstrand, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has seen a rapid development of experimental techniques that allow data collection from individual cells. These techniques have enabled the discovery and characterization of variability within a population of genetically identical cells. Nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) modeling is an established framework for studying variability between individuals in a population, frequently used in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but its potential for studies of cell-to-cell variability in molecular cell biology is yet to be exploited. Here we take advantage of this novel application of NLME modeling to study cell-to-cell variability in the dynamic behavior of the yeast transcription repressor Mig1. In particular, we investigate a recently discovered phenomenon where Mig1 during a short and transient period exits the nucleus when cells experience a shift from high to intermediate levels of extracellular glucose. A phenomenological model based on ordinary differential equations describing the transient dynamics of nuclear Mig1 is introduced, and according to the NLME methodology the parameters of this model are in turn modeled by a multivariate probability distribution. Using time-lapse microscopy data from nearly 200 cells, we estimate this parameter distribution according to the approach of maximizing the population likelihood. Based on the estimated distribution, parameter values for individual cells are furthermore characterized and the resulting Mig1 dynamics are compared to the single cell times-series data. The proposed NLME framework is also compared to the intuitive but limited standard two-stage (STS) approach. We demonstrate that the latter may overestimate variabilities by up to almost five fold. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of the inferred population model are used to predict the distribution of key characteristics of the Mig1 transient response. We find that with decreasing levels of post-shift glucose, the transient response of Mig1 tend

  6. The evolution of cell-to-cell communication in a sporulating bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Nowak, Martin A; Tarnita, Corina E

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally microorganisms were considered to be autonomous organisms that could be studied in isolation. However, over the last decades cell-to-cell communication has been found to be ubiquitous. By secreting molecular signals in the extracellular environment microorganisms can indirectly assess the cell density and respond in accordance. In one of the best-studied microorganisms, Bacillus subtilis, the differentiation processes into a number of distinct cell types have been shown to depend on cell-to-cell communication. One of these cell types is the spore. Spores are metabolically inactive cells that are highly resistant against environmental stress. The onset of sporulation is dependent on cell-to-cell communication, as well as on a number of other environmental cues. By using individual-based simulations we examine when cell-to-cell communication that is involved in the onset of sporulation can evolve. We show that it evolves when three basic premises are satisfied. First, the population of cells has to affect the nutrient conditions. Second, there should be a time-lag between the moment that a cell decides to sporulate and the moment that it turns into a mature spore. Third, there has to be environmental variation. Cell-to-cell communication is a strategy to cope with environmental variation, by allowing cells to predict future environmental conditions. As a consequence, cells can anticipate environmental stress by initiating sporulation. Furthermore, signal production could be considered a cooperative trait and therefore evolves when it is not too costly to produce signal and when there are recurrent colony bottlenecks, which facilitate assortment. Finally, we also show that cell-to-cell communication can drive ecological diversification. Different ecotypes can evolve and be maintained due to frequency-dependent selection.

  7. The evolution of cell-to-cell communication in a sporulating bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi van Gestel

    Full Text Available Traditionally microorganisms were considered to be autonomous organisms that could be studied in isolation. However, over the last decades cell-to-cell communication has been found to be ubiquitous. By secreting molecular signals in the extracellular environment microorganisms can indirectly assess the cell density and respond in accordance. In one of the best-studied microorganisms, Bacillus subtilis, the differentiation processes into a number of distinct cell types have been shown to depend on cell-to-cell communication. One of these cell types is the spore. Spores are metabolically inactive cells that are highly resistant against environmental stress. The onset of sporulation is dependent on cell-to-cell communication, as well as on a number of other environmental cues. By using individual-based simulations we examine when cell-to-cell communication that is involved in the onset of sporulation can evolve. We show that it evolves when three basic premises are satisfied. First, the population of cells has to affect the nutrient conditions. Second, there should be a time-lag between the moment that a cell decides to sporulate and the moment that it turns into a mature spore. Third, there has to be environmental variation. Cell-to-cell communication is a strategy to cope with environmental variation, by allowing cells to predict future environmental conditions. As a consequence, cells can anticipate environmental stress by initiating sporulation. Furthermore, signal production could be considered a cooperative trait and therefore evolves when it is not too costly to produce signal and when there are recurrent colony bottlenecks, which facilitate assortment. Finally, we also show that cell-to-cell communication can drive ecological diversification. Different ecotypes can evolve and be maintained due to frequency-dependent selection.

  8. MEMS-based dynamic cell-to-cell culture platforms using electrochemical surface modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiyoung; Yoon, Sang-Hee; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Lin, Liwei

    2011-05-01

    MEMS-based biological platforms with the capability of both spatial placements and time releases of living cells for cell-to-cell culture experiments have been designed and demonstrated utilizing electrochemical surface modification effects. The spatial placement is accomplished by electrochemical surface modification of substrate surfaces to be either adhesive or non-adhesive for living cells. The time control is achieved by the electrical activation of the selective indium tin oxide co-culture electrode to allow the migration of living cells onto the electrode to start the cell-to-cell culture studies. Prototype devices have a three-electrode design with an electrode size of 50 × 50 µm2 and the separation gaps of 2 µm between them. An electrical voltage of -1.5 V has been used to activate the electrodes independently and sequentially to demonstrate the dynamic cell-to-cell culture experiments of NIH 3T3 fibroblast and Madin Darby canine kidney cells. As such, this MEMS platform could be a basic yet versatile tool to characterize transient cell-to-cell interactions.

  9. The Evolution of Cell-to-Cell Communication in a Sporulating Bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Nowak, Martin A.; Tarnita, Corina E.

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally microorganisms were considered to be autonomous organisms that could be studied in isolation. However, over the last decades cell-to-cell communication has been found to be ubiquitous. By secreting molecular signals in the extracellular environment microorganisms can indirectly assess

  10. Health potential for functional green teas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Niels

    2008-12-01

    Obesity is a major health problem in the developed and developing world. Many "functional" foods and ingredients are advocated for their effects on body composition but few have consistent scientific support for their efficacy. However, an increasing amount of mechanistic and clinical evidence is building for green tea. The tea plant is naturally rich in a group of antioxidants known as catechins. Unlike black tea, green tea production involves little processing and fermentation and therefore, green tea brews are rich in catechins. Green tea has been suggested to have a number of potential health benefits in areas such as cardiovascular disease, cancer prevention, glucose homeostasis and dental health. Although there is some promising evidence in all of these areas, more data from human intervention trials are needed. A lot of attention has lately been focused on the beneficial effects of green tea on body composition and particularly visceral fat, which has been shown to have a strong link with different components of the metabolic syndrome such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Most, but not all, of the positive results come from a number Asian studies, in which overweight subjects (men and women) consumed green tea for approximately 12 weeks. Finally, green tea may also have measurable acute effects on energy metabolism and fat oxidation and in particular during physical activity, as evidenced by other studies specifically looking at these endpoints. Small cumulative effects on energy metabolism could also be responsible for the longer-tem effects of green tea on body composition, and these long-term effects may also be most apparent in the context of moderate physical activity. However, more research is needed to further clarify the exact mechanisms of action and to extrapolate these findings to non-Asian populations.

  11. Rho-ROCK and Rac-PAK signaling pathways have opposing effects on the cell-to-cell spread of Marek's Disease Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Richerioux

    Full Text Available Marek's Disease Virus (MDV is an avian alpha-herpesvirus that only spreads from cell-to-cell in cell culture. While its cell-to-cell spread has been shown to be dependent on actin filament dynamics, the mechanisms regulating this spread remain largely unknown. Using a recombinant BAC20 virus expressing an EGFPVP22 tegument protein, we found that the actin cytoskeleton arrangements and cell-cell contacts differ in the center and periphery of MDV infection plaques, with cells in the latter areas showing stress fibers and rare cellular projections. Using specific inhibitors and activators, we determined that Rho-ROCK pathway, known to regulate stress fiber formation, and Rac-PAK, known to promote lamellipodia formation and destabilize stress fibers, had strong contrasting effects on MDV cell-to-cell spread in primary chicken embryo skin cells (CESCs. Inhibition of Rho and its ROCKs effectors led to reduced plaque sizes whereas inhibition of Rac or its group I-PAKs effectors had the adverse effect. Importantly, we observed that the shape of MDV plaques is related to the semi-ordered arrangement of the elongated cells, at the monolayer level in the vicinity of the plaques. Inhibition of Rho-ROCK signaling also resulted in a perturbation of the cell arrangement and a rounding of plaques. These opposing effects of Rho and Rac pathways in MDV cell-to-cell spread were validated for two parental MDV recombinant viruses with different ex vivo spread efficiencies. Finally, we demonstrated that Rho/Rac pathways have opposing effects on the accumulation of N-cadherin at cell-cell contact regions between CESCs, and defined these contacts as adherens junctions. Considering the importance of adherens junctions in HSV-1 cell-to-cell spread in some cell types, this result makes of adherens junctions maintenance one potential and attractive hypothesis to explain the Rho/Rac effects on MDV cell-to-cell spread. Our study provides the first evidence that MDV cell-to-cell

  12. Myosin-Va-dependent cell-to-cell transfer of RNA from Schwann cells to axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, José R; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José R; Xu, Lei; Wallrabe, Horst; Calliari, Aldo; Rosso, Gonzalo; Cal, Karina; Mercer, John A

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the role of protein synthesis in axons, we have identified the source of a portion of axonal RNA. We show that proximal segments of transected sciatic nerves accumulate newly-synthesized RNA in axons. This RNA is synthesized in Schwann cells because the RNA was labeled in the complete absence of neuronal cell bodies both in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that the transfer is prevented by disruption of actin and that it fails to occur in the absence of myosin-Va. Our results demonstrate cell-to-cell transfer of RNA and identify part of the mechanism required for transfer. The induction of cell-to-cell RNA transfer by injury suggests that interventions following injury or degeneration, particularly gene therapy, may be accomplished by applying them to nearby glial cells (or implanted stem cells) at the site of injury to promote regeneration.

  13. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casadevall Arturo

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the pathogen, and this commonly occurs with the human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV and CD4+ T cells and macrophages. In this report we have used time-lapse imaging to determine if this occurs with Cn. Results Live imaging of Cryptococcus neoformans interactions with murine macrophages revealed cell-to-cell spread of yeast cells from infected donor cells to uninfected cells. Although this phenomenon was relatively rare its occurrence documents a new capacity for this pathogen to infect adjacent cells without exiting the intracellular space. Cell-to-cell spread appeared to be an actin-dependent process. In addition, we noted that cryptococcal phagosomal extrusion was followed by the formation of massive vacuoles suggesting that intracellular residence is accompanied by long lasting damage to host cells. Conclusion C. neoformans can escape the intracellular confines of macrophages in an actin dependent manner by cell-to-cell transfer of the yeast leading to infection of adjacent cells. In addition, complete extrusion of internalized Cn cells can lead to the formation of a massive vacuole which may be a sign of damage to the host macrophage. These observations document new outcomes for the interaction of C. neoformans with host cells that provide precedents for cell biological effects that may contribute to the pathogenesis of cryptococcal infections.

  14. Cell-to-cell spread and massive vacuole formation after Cryptococcus neoformans infection of murine macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Casadevall Arturo; Alvarez Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The interaction between macrophages and Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) is critical for containing dissemination of this pathogenic yeast. However, Cn can either lyse macrophages or escape from within them through a process known as phagosomal extrusion. Both events result in live extracellular yeasts capable of reproducing and disseminating in the extracellular milieu. Another method of exiting the intracellular confines of cells is through host cell-to-cell transfer of the ...

  15. Quantifying Cell-to-Cell Variation in Power-Law Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, PingGen; Mizutani, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Maloney, John M.; Fabry, Ben; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Okajima, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    Among individual cells of the same source and type, the complex shear modulus G∗ exhibits a large log-normal distribution that is the result of spatial, temporal, and intrinsic variations. Such large distributions complicate the statistical evaluation of pharmacological treatments and the comparison of different cell states. However, little is known about the characteristic features of cell-to-cell variation. In this study, we investigated how this variation depends on the spatial location within the cell and on the actin filament cytoskeleton, the organization of which strongly influences cell mechanics. By mechanically probing fibroblasts arranged on a microarray, via atomic force microscopy, we observed that the standard deviation σ of G∗ was significantly reduced among cells in which actin filaments were depolymerized. The parameter σ also exhibited a subcellular spatial dependence. Based on our findings regarding the frequency dependence of σ of the storage modulus G′, we proposed two types of cell-to-cell variation in G′ that arise from the purely elastic and the frequency-dependent components in terms of the soft glassy rheology model of cell deformability. We concluded that the latter inherent cell-to-cell variation can be reduced greatly by disrupting actin networks, by probing at locations within the cell nucleus boundaries distant from the cell center, and by measuring at high loading frequencies. PMID:24010652

  16. Metabolic Adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to Oxygen Stress by Cell-to-Cell Clumping and Flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N.; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K.; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S.; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists. PMID:26407887

  17. Metabolic adaptations of Azospirillum brasilense to oxygen stress by cell-to-cell clumping and flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber N; Khalsa-Moyers, Gurusahai K; Mukherjee, Tanmoy; Green, Calvin S; Mishra, Priyanka; Purcell, Alicia; Aksenova, Anastasia; Hurst, Gregory B; Alexandre, Gladys

    2015-12-01

    The ability of bacteria to monitor their metabolism and adjust their behavior accordingly is critical to maintain competitiveness in the environment. The motile microaerophilic bacterium Azospirillum brasilense navigates oxygen gradients by aerotaxis in order to locate low oxygen concentrations that can support metabolism. When cells are exposed to elevated levels of oxygen in their surroundings, motile A. brasilense cells implement an alternative response to aerotaxis and form transient clumps by cell-to-cell interactions. Clumping was suggested to represent a behavior protecting motile cells from transiently elevated levels of aeration. Using the proteomics of wild-type and mutant strains affected in the extent of their clumping abilities, we show that cell-to-cell clumping represents a metabolic scavenging strategy that likely prepares the cells for further metabolic stresses. Analysis of mutants affected in carbon or nitrogen metabolism confirmed this assumption. The metabolic changes experienced as clumping progresses prime cells for flocculation, a morphological and metabolic shift of cells triggered under elevated-aeration conditions and nitrogen limitation. The analysis of various mutants during clumping and flocculation characterized an ordered set of changes in cell envelope properties accompanying the metabolic changes. These data also identify clumping and early flocculation to be behaviors compatible with the expression of nitrogen fixation genes, despite the elevated-aeration conditions. Cell-to-cell clumping may thus license diazotrophy to microaerophilic A. brasilense cells under elevated oxygen conditions and prime them for long-term survival via flocculation if metabolic stress persists.

  18. Chikungunya virus neutralization antigens and direct cell-to-cell transmission are revealed by human antibody-escape mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Yin Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an alphavirus responsible for numerous epidemics throughout Africa and Asia, causing infectious arthritis and reportedly linked with fatal infections in newborns and elderly. Previous studies in animal models indicate that humoral immunity can protect against CHIKV infection, but despite the potential efficacy of B-cell-driven intervention strategies, there are no virus-specific vaccines or therapies currently available. In addition, CHIKV has been reported to elicit long-lasting virus-specific IgM in humans, and to establish long-term persistence in non-human primates, suggesting that the virus might evade immune defenses to establish chronic infections in man. However, the mechanisms of immune evasion potentially employed by CHIKV remain uncharacterized. We previously described two human monoclonal antibodies that potently neutralize CHIKV infection. In the current report, we have characterized CHIKV mutants that escape antibody-dependent neutralization to identify the CHIKV E2 domain B and fusion loop "groove" as the primary determinants of CHIKV interaction with these antibodies. Furthermore, for the first time, we have also demonstrated direct CHIKV cell-to-cell transmission, as a mechanism that involves the E2 domain A and that is associated with viral resistance to antibody-dependent neutralization. Identification of CHIKV sub-domains that are associated with human protective immunity, will pave the way for the development of CHIKV-specific sub-domain vaccination strategies. Moreover, the clear demonstration of CHIKV cell-to-cell transmission and its possible role in the establishment of CHIKV persistence, will also inform the development of future anti-viral interventions. These data shed new light on CHIKV-host interactions that will help to combat human CHIKV infection and inform future studies of CHIKV pathogenesis.

  19. Analyzing animal movement patterns using potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. K. Preisler; A. A. Ager; M. J. Wisdom

    2013-01-01

    The advent of GPS technology has made it possible to study human-wildlife interactions on large landscapes and quantify behavioral responses to recreation and other anthropogenic disturbances at increasingly fine scales. Of particular interest are the potential impacts on habitat use patterns, energetics, and cascading impacts on fecundity and other life history traits...

  20. Relationship and Discrepancies Among Typical Interatomic Potential Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIM Teik-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ We develop a simultaneous relationship among parameters of the generalized version of the Lennard-Jones,Morse, Rydberg and Buckingham pair potentials, and the two-body portion of the Kaxiras-Pandey potential function by introducing a set of scaling factors. These potential functions are selected according to their frequent adoption in condensed matter and molecular computation. In addition to verifying the parametric relations,theoretical plots of these potential curves show that each of these potential functions is unique in terms of their characteristic shape. However, gaps between these potential functions are narrowed for interatomic interactions possessing lower separation energy and longer interatomic equilibrium distance. Finally, comparison with the ab initio results shows that the extended-Rydberg potential energy curve gives the best agreement among the five empirical potential functions, for the specific case of hydrogen molecule.

  1. Time Eigenstates for Potential Functions without Extremal Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabino Torres-Vega

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper, we introduced a way to generate a time coordinate system for classical and quantum systems when the potential function has extremal points. In this paper, we deal with the case in which the potential function has no extremal points at all, and we illustrate the method with the harmonic and linear potentials.

  2. Exploring the contextual sensitivity of factors that determine cell-to-cell variability in receptor-mediated apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Gaudet

    Full Text Available Stochastic fluctuations in gene expression give rise to cell-to-cell variability in protein levels which can potentially cause variability in cellular phenotype. For TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand variability manifests itself as dramatic differences in the time between ligand exposure and the sudden activation of the effector caspases that kill cells. However, the contribution of individual proteins to phenotypic variability has not been explored in detail. In this paper we use feature-based sensitivity analysis as a means to estimate the impact of variation in key apoptosis regulators on variability in the dynamics of cell death. We use Monte Carlo sampling from measured protein concentration distributions in combination with a previously validated ordinary differential equation model of apoptosis to simulate the dynamics of receptor-mediated apoptosis. We find that variation in the concentrations of some proteins matters much more than variation in others and that precisely which proteins matter depends both on the concentrations of other proteins and on whether correlations in protein levels are taken into account. A prediction from simulation that we confirm experimentally is that variability in fate is sensitive to even small increases in the levels of Bcl-2. We also show that sensitivity to Bcl-2 levels is itself sensitive to the levels of interacting proteins. The contextual dependency is implicit in the mathematical formulation of sensitivity, but our data show that it is also important for biologically relevant parameter values. Our work provides a conceptual and practical means to study and understand the impact of cell-to-cell variability in protein expression levels on cell fate using deterministic models and sampling from parameter distributions.

  3. Grape seed oil: a potential functional food?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Branco SHINAGAWA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Grape seed oil (GSO is not often consumed in Brazil and little is known of its nutritional value. Around the world there are already studies that point to the high levels of minority bioactive compounds and their relation to health benefits. The main constituent of GSO is linoleic fatty acid, some works are controversial and there is no consensus in literature regarding their effect on the animal organism. Thus, this study aimed to present a review of GSO and show the potential health effects of its major components, not only linoleic acid, but also γ-tocotrienol and β-sitosterol, and finally, their influence on lipid-modulating, anti and pro oxidative parameters.

  4. An important role for syndecan-1 in herpes simplex virus type-1 induced cell-to-cell fusion and virus spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghadah A Karasneh

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1 is a common human pathogen that relies heavily on cell-to-cell spread for establishing a lifelong latent infection. Molecular aspects of HSV-1 entry into host cells have been well studied; however, the molecular details of the spread of the virus from cell-to-cell remain poorly understood. In the past, the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG during HSV-1 infection has focused solely on the role of HS chains as an attachment receptor for the virus, while the core protein has been assumed to perform a passive role of only carrying the HS chains. Likewise, very little is known about the involvement of any specific HSPGs in HSV-1 lifecycle. Here we demonstrate that a HSPG, syndecan-1, plays an important role in HSV-1 induced membrane fusion and cell-to-cell spread. Interestingly, the functions of syndecan-1 in fusion and spread are independent of the presence of HS on the core protein. Using a mutant CHO-K1 cell line that lacks all glycosaminoglycans (GAGs on its surface (CHO-745 we demonstrate that the core protein of syndecan-1 possesses the ability to modulate membrane fusion and viral spread. Altogether, we identify a new role for syndecan-1 in HSV-1 pathogenesis and demonstrate HS-independent functions of its core protein in viral spread.

  5. HAMLET: functional properties and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho C S, James; Rydström, Anna; Trulsson, Maria; Bålfors, Johannes; Storm, Petter; Puthia, Manoj; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina

    2012-10-01

    Human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) is the first member in a new family of protein-lipid complexes that kills tumor cells with high selectivity. The protein component of HAMLET is α-lactalbumin, which in its native state acts as a substrate specifier in the lactose synthase complex, thereby defining a function essential for the survival of lactating mammals. In addition, α-lactalbumin acquires tumoricidal activity after partial unfolding and binding to oleic acid. The lipid cofactor serves the dual role as a stabilizer of the altered fold of the protein and a coactivator of specific steps in tumor cell death. HAMLET is broadly tumoricidal, suggesting that the complex identifies conserved death pathways suitable for targeting by novel therapies. Sensitivity to HAMLET is defined by oncogene expression including Ras and c-Myc and by glycolytic enzymes. Cellular targets are located in the cytoplasmic membrane, cytoskeleton, mitochondria, proteasomes, lysosomes and nuclei, and specific signaling pathways are rapidly activated, first by interactions of HAMLET with the cell membrane and subsequently after HAMLET internalization. Therapeutic effects of HAMLET have been demonstrated in human skin papillomas and bladder cancers, and HAMLET limits the progression of human glioblastomas, with no evidence of toxicity for normal brain or bladder tissue. These findings open up new avenues for cancer therapy and the understanding of conserved death responses in tumor cells.

  6. Determinants of cell-to-cell variability in protein kinase signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Jeschke

    Full Text Available Cells reliably sense environmental changes despite internal and external fluctuations, but the mechanisms underlying robustness remain unclear. We analyzed how fluctuations in signaling protein concentrations give rise to cell-to-cell variability in protein kinase signaling using analytical theory and numerical simulations. We characterized the dose-response behavior of signaling cascades by calculating the stimulus level at which a pathway responds ('pathway sensitivity' and the maximal activation level upon strong stimulation. Minimal kinase cascades with gradual dose-response behavior show strong variability, because the pathway sensitivity and the maximal activation level cannot be simultaneously invariant. Negative feedback regulation resolves this trade-off and coordinately reduces fluctuations in the pathway sensitivity and maximal activation. Feedbacks acting at different levels in the cascade control different aspects of the dose-response curve, thereby synergistically reducing the variability. We also investigated more complex, ultrasensitive signaling cascades capable of switch-like decision making, and found that these can be inherently robust to protein concentration fluctuations. We describe how the cell-to-cell variability of ultrasensitive signaling systems can be actively regulated, e.g., by altering the expression of phosphatase(s or by feedback/feedforward loops. Our calculations reveal that slow transcriptional negative feedback loops allow for variability suppression while maintaining switch-like decision making. Taken together, we describe design principles of signaling cascades that promote robustness. Our results may explain why certain signaling cascades like the yeast pheromone pathway show switch-like decision making with little cell-to-cell variability.

  7. Asymptotic behaviors of a cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection model perturbed by white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we analyze a mathematical model of cell-to-cell HIV-1 infection to CD4+ T cells perturbed by stochastic perturbations. First of all, we investigate that there exists a unique global positive solution of the system for any positive initial value. Then by using Lyapunov analysis methods, we study the asymptotic property of this solution. Moreover, we discuss whether there is a stationary distribution for this system and if it owns the ergodic property. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the theoretical results.

  8. Cell-to-cell transmission can overcome multiple donor and target cell barriers imposed on cell-free HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Peng; Agosto, Luis M; Ilinskaya, Anna; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Truong, Rosaline; Derse, David; Uchil, Pradeep D; Heidecker, Gisela; Mothes, Walther

    2013-01-01

    Virus transmission can occur either by a cell-free mode through the extracellular space or by cell-to-cell transmission involving direct cell-to-cell contact. The factors that determine whether a virus spreads by either pathway are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the relative contribution of cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission to the spreading of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We demonstrate that HIV can spread by a cell-free pathway if all the steps of the viral replication cycle are efficiently supported in highly permissive cells. However, when the cell-free path was systematically hindered at various steps, HIV transmission became contact-dependent. Cell-to-cell transmission overcame barriers introduced in the donor cell at the level of gene expression and surface retention by the restriction factor tetherin. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies that efficiently inhibit cell-free HIV were less effective against cell-to-cell transmitted virus. HIV cell-to-cell transmission also efficiently infected target T cells that were relatively poorly susceptible to cell-free HIV. Importantly, we demonstrate that the donor and target cell types influence critically the extent by which cell-to-cell transmission can overcome each barrier. Mechanistically, cell-to-cell transmission promoted HIV spread to more cells and infected target cells with a higher proviral content than observed for cell-free virus. Our data demonstrate that the frequently observed contact-dependent spread of HIV is the result of specific features in donor and target cell types, thus offering an explanation for conflicting reports on the extent of cell-to-cell transmission of HIV.

  9. Cell-to-cell transmission can overcome multiple donor and target cell barriers imposed on cell-free HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhong

    Full Text Available Virus transmission can occur either by a cell-free mode through the extracellular space or by cell-to-cell transmission involving direct cell-to-cell contact. The factors that determine whether a virus spreads by either pathway are poorly understood. Here, we assessed the relative contribution of cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission to the spreading of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. We demonstrate that HIV can spread by a cell-free pathway if all the steps of the viral replication cycle are efficiently supported in highly permissive cells. However, when the cell-free path was systematically hindered at various steps, HIV transmission became contact-dependent. Cell-to-cell transmission overcame barriers introduced in the donor cell at the level of gene expression and surface retention by the restriction factor tetherin. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies that efficiently inhibit cell-free HIV were less effective against cell-to-cell transmitted virus. HIV cell-to-cell transmission also efficiently infected target T cells that were relatively poorly susceptible to cell-free HIV. Importantly, we demonstrate that the donor and target cell types influence critically the extent by which cell-to-cell transmission can overcome each barrier. Mechanistically, cell-to-cell transmission promoted HIV spread to more cells and infected target cells with a higher proviral content than observed for cell-free virus. Our data demonstrate that the frequently observed contact-dependent spread of HIV is the result of specific features in donor and target cell types, thus offering an explanation for conflicting reports on the extent of cell-to-cell transmission of HIV.

  10. ANK, a host cytoplasmic receptor for the Tobacco mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement protein, facilitates intercellular transport through plasmodesmata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Ueki

    Full Text Available Plasmodesma (PD is a channel structure that spans the cell wall and provides symplastic connection between adjacent cells. Various macromolecules are known to be transported through PD in a highly regulated manner, and plant viruses utilize their movement proteins (MPs to gate the PD to spread cell-to-cell. The mechanism by which MP modifies PD to enable intercelluar traffic remains obscure, due to the lack of knowledge about the host factors that mediate the process. Here, we describe the functional interaction between Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV MP and a plant factor, an ankyrin repeat containing protein (ANK, during the viral cell-to-cell movement. We utilized a reverse genetics approach to gain insight into the possible involvement of ANK in viral movement. To this end, ANK overexpressor and suppressor lines were generated, and the movement of MP was tested. MP movement was facilitated in the ANK-overexpressing plants, and reduced in the ANK-suppressing plants, demonstrating that ANK is a host factor that facilitates MP cell-to-cell movement. Also, the TMV local infection was largely delayed in the ANK-suppressing lines, while enhanced in the ANK-overexpressing lines, showing that ANK is crucially involved in the infection process. Importantly, MP interacted with ANK at PD. Finally, simultaneous expression of MP and ANK markedly decreased the PD levels of callose, β-1,3-glucan, which is known to act as a molecular sphincter for PD. Thus, the MP-ANK interaction results in the downregulation of callose and increased cell-to-cell movement of the viral protein. These findings suggest that ANK represents a host cellular receptor exploited by MP to aid viral movement by gating PD through relaxation of their callose sphincters.

  11. Programmed Cell-to-Cell Variability in Ras Activity Triggers Emergent Behaviors during Mammary Epithelial Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Variability in signaling pathway activation between neighboring epithelial cells can arise from local differences in the microenvironment, noisy gene expression, or acquired genetic changes. To investigate the consequences of this cell-to-cell variability in signaling pathway activation on coordinated multicellular processes such as morphogenesis, we use DNA-programmed assembly to construct three-dimensional MCF10A microtissues that are mosaic for low-level expression of activated H-Ras. We find two emergent behaviors in mosaic microtissues: cells with activated H-Ras are basally extruded or lead motile multicellular protrusions that direct the collective motility of their wild-type neighbors. Remarkably, these behaviors are not observed in homogeneous microtissues in which all cells express the activated Ras protein, indicating that heterogeneity in Ras activity, rather than the total amount of Ras activity, is critical for these processes. Our results directly demonstrate that cell-to-cell variability in pathway activation within local populations of epithelial cells can drive emergent behaviors during epithelial morphogenesis.

  12. Natural sequence variants of yeast environmental sensors confer cell-to-cell expression variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrmann, Steffen; Bottin-Duplus, Hélène; Leonidou, Andri; Mollereau, Esther; Barthelaix, Audrey; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M; Yvert, Gaël

    2013-10-08

    Living systems may have evolved probabilistic bet hedging strategies that generate cell-to-cell phenotypic diversity in anticipation of environmental catastrophes, as opposed to adaptation via a deterministic response to environmental changes. Evolution of bet hedging assumes that genotypes segregating in natural populations modulate the level of intraclonal diversity, which so far has largely remained hypothetical. Using a fluorescent P(met17)-GFP reporter, we mapped four genetic loci conferring to a wild yeast strain an elevated cell-to-cell variability in the expression of MET17, a gene regulated by the methionine pathway. A frameshift mutation in the Erc1p transmembrane transporter, probably resulting from a release of laboratory strains from negative selection, reduced P(met17)-GFP expression variability. At a second locus, cis-regulatory polymorphisms increased mean expression of the Mup1p methionine permease, causing increased expression variability in trans. These results demonstrate that an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) can simultaneously have a deterministic effect in cis and a probabilistic effect in trans. Our observations indicate that the evolution of transmembrane transporter genes can tune intraclonal variation and may therefore be implicated in both reactive and anticipatory strategies of adaptation.

  13. Effect of promoter architecture on the cell-to-cell variability in gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sanchez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to recent experimental evidence, promoter architecture, defined by the number, strength and regulatory role of the operators that control transcription, plays a major role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effort that addresses the question of how changes in promoter architecture affect variability in gene expression in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. In this article we make such a systematic investigation, based on a microscopic model of gene regulation that incorporates stochastic effects. In particular, we show how operator strength and operator multiplicity affect this variability. We examine different modes of transcription factor binding to complex promoters (cooperative, independent, simultaneous and how each of these affects the level of variability in transcriptional output from cell-to-cell. We propose that direct comparison between in vivo single-cell experiments and theoretical predictions for the moments of the probability distribution of mRNA number per cell can be used to test kinetic models of gene regulation. The emphasis of the discussion is on prokaryotic gene regulation, but our analysis can be extended to eukaryotic cells as well.

  14. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states.

  15. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Vehicles for Brain Cell-to-Cell Interactions in Physiological as well as Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Schiera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are involved in a great variety of physiological events occurring in the nervous system, such as cross talk among neurons and glial cells in synapse development and function, integrated neuronal plasticity, neuronal-glial metabolic exchanges, and synthesis and dynamic renewal of myelin. Many of these EV-mediated processes depend on the exchange of proteins, mRNAs, and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, which occurs among glial and neuronal cells. In addition, production and exchange of EVs can be modified under pathological conditions, such as brain cancer and neurodegeneration. Like other cancer cells, brain tumours can use EVs to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance, and to transfer molecules into the surrounding cells, thus transforming their phenotype. Moreover, EVs can function as a way to discard material dangerous to cancer cells, such as differentiation-inducing proteins, and even drugs. Intriguingly, EVs seem to be also involved in spreading through the brain of aggregated proteins, such as prions and aggregated tau protein. Finally, EVs can carry useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of diseases. Herein we summarize possible roles of EVs in brain physiological functions and discuss their involvement in the horizontal spreading, from cell to cell, of both cancer and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  16. Zeta-function approach to Casimir energy with singular potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Khusnutdinov, N R

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of zeta-function approach the Casimir energy for three simple model system: single delta potential, step function potential and three delta potentials is analyzed. It is shown that the energy contains contributions which are peculiar to the potentials. It is suggested to renormalize the energy using the condition that the energy of infinitely separated potentials is zero which corresponds to subtraction all terms of asymptotic expansion of zeta-function. The energy obtained in this way obeys all physically reasonable conditions. It is finite in the Dirichlet limit and it may be attractive or repulsive depending on the strength of potential. The effective action is calculated and it is shown that the surface contribution appears. The renormalization of the effective action is discussed.

  17. Development towards cell-to-cell monolithic integration of a thin-film solar cell and lithium-ion accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, Solomon N.; Merdzhanova, Tsvetelina; Yu, Shicheng; Tempel, Hermann; Kungl, Hans; Eichel, Rüdiger-A.; Rau, Uwe; Astakhov, Oleksandr

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the potentials of monolithic integrated thin-film silicon solar cell and lithium ion cell in a simple cell-to-cell integration without any control electronics as a compact power solution for portable electronic devices. To demonstrate this we used triple-junction thin-film silicon solar cell connected directly to a lithium ion battery cell to charge the battery and in turn discharge the battery through the solar cell. Our results show that with appropriate voltage matching the solar cell provides efficient charging for lab-scale lithium ion storage cell. Despite the absence of any control electronics the discharge rate of the Li-ion cell through the non-illuminated solar cell can be much lower than the charging rate when the current voltage (IV) characteristics of the solar cell is matched properly to the charge-discharge characteristics of the battery. This indicates good sustainability of the ultimately simple integrated device. At the maximum power point, solar energy-to-battery charging efficiency of 8.5% which is nearly the conversion efficiency of the solar cell was obtained indicating potential for loss-free operation of the photovoltaic (PV)-battery integration. For the rest of the charging points, an average of 8.0% charging efficiency was obtained.

  18. A Global Minimization Algorithm for Empirical Contact Potential Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Global minimization algorithm is indispensable for solving protein folding problems based on thermodynamic hypothesis. A contact difference (CD) based on pseudo potential function, for simulating empirical contact potential functions and testing global minimization algorithm was proposed. The present article describes a conformational sampling and global minimization algorithm, which is called WL, based on Monte Carlo simulation and simulated annealing. Itcan be used to locate CD's globe minimum and refold extended protein structures, as small as 0. 03 nm, from the native structures, back to ones with root mean square distance(RMSD). These results demonstrate that the global minimization problems for empirical contact potential functions may be solvable.

  19. Cell-to-cell communication in plants, animals, and fungi: a comparative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemendal, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is a prerequisite for differentiation and development in multicellular organisms. This communication has to be tightly regulated to ensure that cellular components such as organelles, macromolecules, hormones, or viruses leave the cell in a precisely organized way. During evolution, plants, animals, and fungi have developed similar ways of responding to this biological challenge. For example, in higher plants, plasmodesmata connect adjacent cells and allow communication to regulate differentiation and development. In animals, two main general structures that enable short- and long-range intercellular communication are known, namely gap junctions and tunneling nanotubes, respectively. Finally, filamentous fungi have also developed specialized structures called septal pores that allow intercellular communication via cytoplasmic flow. This review summarizes the underlying mechanisms for intercellular communication in these three eukaryotic groups and discusses its consequences for the regulation of differentiation and developmental processes.

  20. Type I interferon promotes cell-to-cell spread of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Suzanne E; Sit, Brandon; Shaker, Andrew; Currie, Elissa; Tan, Joël M J; van Rijn, Jorik; Higgins, Darren E; Brumell, John H

    2017-03-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) play a critical role in antiviral immune responses, but can be deleterious to the host during some bacterial infections. Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) induces a type I IFN response by activating cytosolic antiviral surveillance pathways. This is beneficial to the bacteria as mice lacking the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR1(-/-) ) are resistant to systemic infection by Lm. The mechanisms by which type I IFNs promote Lm infection are unclear. Here, we show that IFNAR1 is required for dissemination of Lm within infection foci in livers of infected mice and for efficient cell-to-cell spread in vitro in macrophages. IFNAR1 promotes ActA polarization and actin-based motility in the cytosol of host cells. Our studies suggest type I IFNs directly impact the intracellular life cycle of Lm and provide new insight into the mechanisms used by bacterial pathogens to exploit the type I IFN response. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Small RNA Control of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Vibrio Harveyi and Vibrio Cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-to-cell communication, by which bacteria coordinate gene expression and behavior on a population-wide scale. Quorum sensing is accomplished through production, secretion, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules termed autoinducers. The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae and the marine bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi incorporate information from multiple autoinducers, and also environmental signals and metabolic cues into their quorum-sensing pathways. At the core of these pathways lie several homologous small regulatory RNA molecules, the Quorum Regulatory RNAs. Small noncoding RNAs have emerged throughout the bacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms as key regulators of behavioral and developmental processes. Here, I review our present understanding of the role of the Qrr small RNAs in integrating quorum-sensing signals and in regulating the individual cells response to this information.

  2. Single-cell Hi-C reveals cell-to-cell variability in chromosome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Takashi; Lubling, Yaniv; Stevens, Tim J; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Yaffe, Eitan; Dean, Wendy; Laue, Ernest D; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2013-10-03

    Large-scale chromosome structure and spatial nuclear arrangement have been linked to control of gene expression and DNA replication and repair. Genomic techniques based on chromosome conformation capture (3C) assess contacts for millions of loci simultaneously, but do so by averaging chromosome conformations from millions of nuclei. Here we introduce single-cell Hi-C, combined with genome-wide statistical analysis and structural modelling of single-copy X chromosomes, to show that individual chromosomes maintain domain organization at the megabase scale, but show variable cell-to-cell chromosome structures at larger scales. Despite this structural stochasticity, localization of active gene domains to boundaries of chromosome territories is a hallmark of chromosomal conformation. Single-cell Hi-C data bridge current gaps between genomics and microscopy studies of chromosomes, demonstrating how modular organization underlies dynamic chromosome structure, and how this structure is probabilistically linked with genome activity patterns.

  3. Single cell Hi-C reveals cell-to-cell variability in chromosome structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Yaffe, Eitan; Dean, Wendy; Laue, Ernest D.; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale chromosome structure and spatial nuclear arrangement have been linked to control of gene expression and DNA replication and repair. Genomic techniques based on chromosome conformation capture assess contacts for millions of loci simultaneously, but do so by averaging chromosome conformations from millions of nuclei. Here we introduce single cell Hi-C, combined with genome-wide statistical analysis and structural modeling of single copy X chromosomes, to show that individual chromosomes maintain domain organisation at the megabase scale, but show variable cell-to-cell chromosome territory structures at larger scales. Despite this structural stochasticity, localisation of active gene domains to boundaries of territories is a hallmark of chromosomal conformation. Single cell Hi-C data bridge current gaps between genomics and microscopy studies of chromosomes, demonstrating how modular organisation underlies dynamic chromosome structure, and how this structure is probabilistically linked with genome activity patterns. PMID:24067610

  4. Cell-to-cell communication in plants, animals, and fungi: a comparative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemendal, Sandra; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication is a prerequisite for differentiation and development in multicellular organisms. This communication has to be tightly regulated to ensure that cellular components such as organelles, macromolecules, hormones, or viruses leave the cell in a precisely organized way. During evolution, plants, animals, and fungi have developed similar ways of responding to this biological challenge. For example, in higher plants, plasmodesmata connect adjacent cells and allow communication to regulate differentiation and development. In animals, two main general structures that enable short- and long-range intercellular communication are known, namely gap junctions and tunneling nanotubes, respectively. Finally, filamentous fungi have also developed specialized structures called septal pores that allow intercellular communication via cytoplasmic flow. This review summarizes the underlying mechanisms for intercellular communication in these three eukaryotic groups and discusses its consequences for the regulation of differentiation and developmental processes.

  5. Cell-to-Cell stochastic fluctuations in apoptotic signaling can decide between life and death

    CERN Document Server

    Raychaudhuri, S; Nguyen, T; Khan, E M; Goldkorn, T

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis, or genetically programmed cell death, is a crucial cellular process that maintains the balance between life and death in cells. The precise molecular mechanism of apoptosis signaling and how these two pathways are differentially activated under distinct apoptotic stimuli is poorly understood. We developed a Monte Carlo-based stochastic simulation model that can characterize distinct signaling behaviors in the two major pathways of apoptotic signaling using a novel probability distribution-based approach. Specifically, we show that for a weak death signal, such as low levels of death ligand Fas (CD95) binding or under stress conditions, the type 2 mitochondrial pathway dominates apoptotic signaling. Our results also show signaling in the type 2 pathway is stochastic, where the population average over many cells does not capture the cell-to-cell fluctuations in the time course (~1 - 10 hours) of downstream caspase-3 activation. On the contrary, the probability distribution of caspase-3 activation for...

  6. Alpha-synuclein cell-to-cell transfer and seeding in grafted dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Angot

    Full Text Available Several people with Parkinson's disease have been treated with intrastriatal grafts of fetal dopaminergic neurons. Following autopsy, 10-22 years after surgery, some of the grafted neurons contained Lewy bodies similar to those observed in the host brain. Numerous studies have attempted to explain these findings in cell and animal models. In cell culture, α-synuclein has been found to transfer from one cell to another, via mechanisms that include exosomal transport and endocytosis, and in certain cases seed aggregation in the recipient cell. In animal models, transfer of α-synuclein from host brain cells to grafted neurons has been shown, but the reported frequency of the event has been relatively low and little is known about the underlying mechanisms as well as the fate of the transferred α-synuclein. We now demonstrate frequent transfer of α-synuclein from a rat brain engineered to overexpress human α-synuclein to grafted dopaminergic neurons. Further, we show that this model can be used to explore mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein. Thus, we present evidence both for the involvement of endocytosis in α-synuclein uptake in vivo, and for seeding of aggregation of endogenous α-synuclein in the recipient neuron by the transferred α-synuclein. Finally, we show that, at least in a subset of the studied cells, the transmitted α-synuclein is sensitive to proteinase K. Our new model system could be used to test compounds that inhibit cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein and therefore might retard progression of Parkinson neuropathology.

  7. Obtaining Kohn–Sham potential without taking the functional derivative

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj K Harbola; K D Sen

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade and a half, many new accurate density functionals, based on the generalized gradient approximation, have been proposed, and they give energies close to chemical accuracy. However, accuracy of the energy functional does not guarantee that its functional derivative, which gives the corresponding potential, is also accurate all over space. For example, although the Becke88 exchange–energy functional gives very good exchange energies, its functional derivative goes as $-\\frac{1}{r^2}$ in comparison to the correct $-\\frac{1}{r}$ for $r \\rightarrow \\infty$, where is the distance of the electron from a finite system. On the other hand, accuracy of the potential is of prime importance if one is interested in properties other than the total energy; properties such as optical response depend crucially on the potential in the outer regions of a system. In this paper we present a different approach, based on the ideas of Harbola and Sahni, to obtain the potential directly from the energy density of a given approximation, without taking recourse to the functional derivative route. This leads to a potential that is as accurate as the functional itself. We demonstrate the accuracy of our approach by presenting some results obtained from the Becke88 functional.

  8. Low-density subculture: a technical note on the importance of avoiding cell-to-cell contact during mesenchymal stromal cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Richard; Richardson, Stephen M; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2015-10-01

    Numerous scientific studies and clinical trials are carried out each year exploring the use of mesenchymal stromal cells in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, the effective and reliable expansion of this very important cell type remains a challenge. In this study the importance of cell-to-cell contact during expansion has been explored on the proliferation and differentiation potential of the produced cells. Cells were cultured up to passage 5 under conditions where cell-to-cell contact was either probable (40-70% confluence; see supporting information, Protocol A) or where it was unlikely (10-50% confluence; see supporting information, Protocol B). The effect of the two different conditions on expansion efficiency; proliferation rate and tri-lineage differentiation potential was assessed. Differences in immunophenotype, cell size and senescence were also investigated. Protocol B cultures expanded twice as fast as those cultured with Protocol A. In passage 5 experiments low confluence expanded cells displayed a 10% higher overall proliferation rate, and produced 23% more cells in growth, 12% more in osteogenic, 77% more in adipogenic, but 27% less in chondrogenic medium. Differentiation potential wasn't decisively affected at the mRNA level. However, Protocol B favoured bone and cartilage differentiation at the secretional level. Protocol A populations showed reduced purity, expressing CD105 in only 76% compared to the 96.7% in Protocol B cultures. Protocol A populations also contained significantly more (+4.2%) senescent cells, however, no difference was found in cell size between the two protocols. The findings of this study suggest that cell-to-cell contact, and therefore high confluence levels, is detrimental to MSC quality.

  9. Real-time obstacle avoidance using harmonic potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Oh; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a new formulation of the artificial potential approach to the obstacle avoidance problem for a mobile robot or a manipulator in a known environment. Previous formulations of artificial potentials for obstacle avoidance have exhibited local minima in a cluttered environment. To build an artificial potential field, harmonic functions that completely eliminate local minima even for a cluttered environment are used. The panel method is employed to represent arbitrarily shaped obstacles and to derive the potential over the whole space. Based on this potential function, an elegant control strategy is proposed for the real-time control of a robot. The harmonic potential, the panel method, and the control strategy are tested with a bar-shaped mobile robot and a three-degree-of-freedom planar redundant manipulator.

  10. Quadrupolar, Triple [Delta]-Function Potential in One Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    The energy and parity eigenstates for quadrupolar, triple [delta]-function potential are analysed. Using the analytical solutions in specific domains, simple expressions are obtained for even- and odd-parity bound-state energies. The Heisenberg uncertainty product is observed to have a minimum for a specific strength of the potential. The…

  11. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of Dipeptide Repeat Proteins Linked to C9orf72-ALS/FTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Westergard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common genetic change underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. RNA transcripts containing these expansions undergo repeat-associated non-ATG translation (RAN-T to form five dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs. DPRs are found as aggregates throughout the CNS of C9orf72-ALS/FTD patients, and some cause degeneration when expressed in vitro in neuronal cultures and in vivo in animal models. The spread of characteristic disease-related proteins drives the progression of pathology in many neurodegenerative diseases. While DPR toxic mechanisms continue to be investigated, the potential for DPRs to spread has yet to be determined. Using different experimental cell culture platforms, including spinal motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from C9orf72-ALS patients, we found evidence for cell-to-cell spreading of DPRs via exosome-dependent and exosome-independent pathways, which may be relevant to disease.

  12. Physical and chemical analysis of lithium-ion battery cell-to-cell failure events inside custom fire chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Neil S.; Field, Christopher R.; Hammond, Mark H.; Williams, Bradley A.; Myers, Kristina M.; Lubrano, Adam L.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Tuttle, Steven G.

    2015-04-01

    A 5-cubic meter decompression chamber was re-purposed as a fire test chamber to conduct failure and abuse experiments on lithium-ion batteries. Various modifications were performed to enable remote control and monitoring of chamber functions, along with collection of data from instrumentation during tests including high speed and infrared cameras, a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, real-time gas analyzers, and compact reconfigurable input and output devices. Single- and multi-cell packages of LiCoO2 chemistry 18650 lithium-ion batteries were constructed and data was obtained and analyzed for abuse and failure tests. Surrogate 18650 cells were designed and fabricated for multi-cell packages that mimicked the thermal behavior of real cells without using any active components, enabling internal temperature monitoring of cells adjacent to the active cell undergoing failure. Heat propagation and video recordings before, during, and after energetic failure events revealed a high degree of heterogeneity; some batteries exhibited short burst of sparks while others experienced a longer, sustained flame during failure. Carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, dimethyl carbonate, and ethylene carbonate were detected via gas analysis, and the presence of these species was consistent throughout all failure events. These results highlight the inherent danger in large format lithium-ion battery packs with regards to cell-to-cell failure, and illustrate the need for effective safety features.

  13. Role of Rice stripe virus NSvc4 in cell-to-cell movement and symptom development in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi eXu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our previous work has demonstrated that the NSvc4 protein of Rice stripe virus (RSV functions as a cell-to-cell movement protein. However, the mechanisms whereby RSV traffics through plasmodesmata (PD are unknown. Here we provide evidence that the NSvc4 moves on the actin filament and endoplasmic reticulum (ER network, but not microtubules, to reach cell wall PD. Disruption of cytoskeleton using different inhibitors altered NSvc4 localization to PD, thus impeding RSV infection of Nicotiana benthamiana. Sequence analyses and deletion mutagenesis experiment revealed that the N-terminal 125 amino acids (AAs of the NSvc4 determine PD targeting and that a transmembrane domain spanning AAs 106 to 125 is critical for PD localization. We also found that the NSvc4 protein can localize to chloroplasts in infected cells. Analyses using deletion mutants revealed that the N-terminal 73 AAs are essential for chloroplast localization. Furthermore, expression of NSvc4 from a Potato virus X (PVX vector resulted in more severe disease symptoms than PVX alone in systemically infected N. benthamiana leaves. Expression of NSvc4 in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf-9 cells did not elicit tubule formation, but instead resulted in punctate foci at the plasma membrane. These findings shed new light on our understanding of the movement mechanisms whereby RSV infects host plants.

  14. Density functional theory based generalized effective fragment potential method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Kiet A., E-mail: kiet.nguyen@wpafb.af.mil, E-mail: ruth.pachter@wpafb.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); UES, Inc., Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Pachter, Ruth, E-mail: kiet.nguyen@wpafb.af.mil, E-mail: ruth.pachter@wpafb.af.mil [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Day, Paul N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); General Dynamics Information Technology, Inc., Dayton, Ohio 45431 (United States)

    2014-06-28

    We present a generalized Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) based effective fragment potential (EFP2-DFT) method for the treatment of solvent effects. Similar to the original Hartree-Fock (HF) based potential with fitted parameters for water (EFP1) and the generalized HF based potential (EFP2-HF), EFP2-DFT includes electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, polarization, and dispersion potentials, which are generated for a chosen DFT functional for a given isolated molecule. The method does not have fitted parameters, except for implicit parameters within a chosen functional and the dispersion correction to the potential. The electrostatic potential is modeled with a multipolar expansion at each atomic center and bond midpoint using Stone's distributed multipolar analysis. The exchange-repulsion potential between two fragments is composed of the overlap and kinetic energy integrals and the nondiagonal KS matrices in the localized molecular orbital basis. The polarization potential is derived from the static molecular polarizability. The dispersion potential includes the intermolecular D3 dispersion correction of Grimme et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010)]. The potential generated from the CAMB3LYP functional has mean unsigned errors (MUEs) with respect to results from coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples with a complete basis set limit (CCSD(T)/CBS) extrapolation, of 1.7, 2.2, 2.0, and 0.5 kcal/mol, for the S22, water-benzene clusters, water clusters, and n-alkane dimers benchmark sets, respectively. The corresponding EFP2-HF errors for the respective benchmarks are 2.41, 3.1, 1.8, and 2.5 kcal/mol. Thus, the new EFP2-DFT-D3 method with the CAMB3LYP functional provides comparable or improved results at lower computational cost and, therefore, extends the range of applicability of EFP2 to larger system sizes.

  15. Clinical Testing of Otolith Function: Perceptual Thresholds and Myogenic Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Yuri; BREMOVA, TATIANA; Kremmyda, Olympia; Strupp, Michael; MacNeilage, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP/oVEMP) tests are widely used clinical tests of otolith function. However, VEMP testing may not be the ideal measure of otolith function given the significant inter-individual variability in responses and given that the stimuli used to elicit VEMPs are not physiological. We therefore evaluated linear motion perceptual threshold testing compared with cVEMP and oVEMP testing as measures of saccular and utricular function, respective...

  16. A Functional Inspection Model for the Immeasurable Potential Failure State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen-ge; LI Shi-qi; ZHAO Di

    2008-01-01

    Functional inspection is a type of preventive maintenance of Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). We, in this paper, establish a functional inspection model(FIM)--the cost model and the availability model for the immeasurable potential failure state based on the delay time concept. This model can be used to determine the appropriate Functional Inspection Interval(FII) to achieve the goal of specific cost and availability and to assist in maintenance decision making.

  17. Image-potential states and work function of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesner, Daniel; Fauster, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Image-potential states of graphene on various substrates have been investigated by two-photon photoemission and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. They are used as a probe for the graphene-substrate interaction and resulting changes in the (local) work function. The latter is driven by the work function difference between graphene and the substrate. This results in a charge transfer which also contributes to core-level shifts in x-ray photoemission. In this review article, we give an overview over the theoretical models and the experimental data for image-potential states and work function of graphene on various substrates.

  18. Constructive Function Theory on Sets of the Complex Plane through Potential Theory and Geometric Function Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Andrievskii, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    This is a survey of some recent results concerning polynomial inequalities and polynomial approximation of functions in the complex plane. The results are achieved by the application of methods and techniques of modern geometric function theory and potential theory.

  19. Generating Functionals for Quantum Field Theories with Random Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Mudit

    2015-01-01

    We consider generating functionals for computing correlators in quantum field theories with random potentials. Examples of such theories include condensed matter systems with quenched disorder (e.g. spin glass) or cosmological systems in context of the string theory landscape (e.g. cosmic inflation). We use the so-called replica trick to define two different generating functionals for calculating correlators of the quantum fields averaged over a given distribution of random potentials. The first generating functional is appropriate for calculating averaged (in-out) amplitudes and involves a single replica of fields, but the replica limit is taken to an (unphysical) negative one number of fields outside of the path integral. When the number of replicas is doubled the generating functional can also be used for calculating averaged probabilities (squared amplitudes) using the in-in construction. The second generating functional involves an infinite number of replicas, but can be used for calculating both in-out ...

  20. Can Cell to Cell Thermal Runaway Propagation be Prevented in a Li-ion Battery Module?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Judith; Lopez, Carlos; Orieukwu, Josephat

    2014-01-01

    Increasing cell spacing decreased adjacent cell damage center dotElectrically connected adjacent cells drained more than physically adjacent cells center dotRadiant barrier prevents propagation when fully installed between BP cells center dotBP cells vent rapidly and expel contents at 100% SOC -Slower vent with flame/smoke at 50% -Thermal runaway event typically occurs at 160 degC center dotLG cells vent but do not expel contents -Thermal runaway event typically occurs at 200 degC center dotSKC LFP modules did not propagate; fuses on negative terminal of cell may provide a benefit in reducing cell to cell damage propagation. New requirement in NASA-Battery Safety Requirements document: JSC 20793 Rev C 5.1.5.1 Requirements - Thermal Runaway Propagation a. For battery designs greater than a 80-Wh energy employing high specific energy cells (greater than 80 watt-hours/kg, for example, lithium-ion chemistries) with catastrophic failure modes, the battery shall be evaluated to ascertain the severity of a worst-case single-cell thermal runaway event and the propensity of the design to demonstrate cell-to-cell propagation in the intended application and environment. NASA has traditionally addressed the threat of thermal runaway incidents in its battery deployments through comprehensive prevention protocols. This prevention-centered approach has included extensive screening for manufacturing defects, as well as robust battery management controls that prevent abuse-induced runaway even in the face of multiple system failures. This focused strategy has made the likelihood of occurrence of such an event highly improbable. b. The evaluation shall include all necessary analysis and test to quantify the severity (consequence) of the event in the intended application and environment as well as to identify design modifications to the battery or the system that could appreciably reduce that severity. In addition to prevention protocols, programs developing battery designs with

  1. The control of neural cell-to-cell interactions through non-contact electrical field stimulation using graphene electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Chaejeong; Yoo, Jeongwan; Lee, Siyoung; Jo, Areum; Jung, Susie; Yoo, Hyosun; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Minah

    2011-01-01

    Electric field stimulation has become one of the most promising therapies for a variety of neurological diseases. However, the safety and effectiveness of the stimulator are critical in determining the outcome. Because there are few safe and effective in vivo and/or in vitro stimulator devices, we demonstrate a method that allows for non-contact electric field stimulation with a specific strength that is able to control cell-to-cell interaction in vitro. Graphene, a form of graphite, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was used to create a non-cytotoxic in vitro graphene/PET film stimulator. A transient non-contact electric field was produced by charge-balanced biphasic stimuli through the graphene/PET film electrodes and applied to cultured neural cells. We found that weak electric field stimulation (pulse duration of 10 s) as low as 4.5 mV/mm for 32 min was particularly effective in shaping cell-to-cell interaction. Under weak electric field stimulation, we observed a significant increase in the number of cells forming new cell-to-cell couplings and in the number of cells strengthening existing cell-to-cell couplings. The underlying mechanism of the altered cellular interactions may be related to an altered regulation of the endogenous cytoskeletal proteins fibronectin, actin, and vinculin. In conclusion, this technique may open a new therapeutic approach for augmenting cell-to-cell coupling in cell transplantation therapy in the central nervous system. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Malaria parasites form filamentous cell-to-cell connections during reproduction in the mosquito midgut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingrid Rupp; Gabriele Pradel; Ludmilla Sologub; Kim C Williamson; Matthias Scheuermayer; Luc Reininger; Christian Doerig; Saliha Eksi; Davy U Kombilaa; Matthias Frank

    2011-01-01

    Physical contact is important for the interaction between animal cells, but it can represent a major challenge for protists like malaria parasites. Recently, novel filamentous cell-cell contacts have been identified in different types of eukaryotic cells and termed nanotubes due to their morphological appearance. Nanotubes represent small dynamic membranous extensions that consist of F-actin and are considered an ancient feature evolved by eukaryotic cells to establish contact for communication. We here describe similar tubular structures in the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, which emerge from the surfaces of the forming gametes upon gametocyte activation in the mosquito midgut. The filaments can exhibit a length of>100 μm and contain the F-actin isoform actin 2. They actively form within a few minutes after gametocyte activation and persist until the zygote transforms into the ookinete. The filaments originate from the parasite plasma membrane, are close ended and express adhesion proteins on their surfaces that are typically found in gametes, like Pfs230, Pfs48/45 or Pfs25, but not the zygote surface protein Pfs28. We show that these tubular structures represent long-distance cell-to-cell connections between sexual stage parasites and demonstrate that they meet the characteristics of nanotubes. We propose that malaria parasites utilize these adhesive "nanotubes" in order to facilitate intercellular contact between gametes during reproduction in the mosquito midgut.

  3. Spreading of a prion domain from cell-to-cell by vesicular transport in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen I Nussbaum-Krammer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion proteins can adopt self-propagating alternative conformations that account for the infectious nature of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs and the epigenetic inheritance of certain traits in yeast. Recent evidence suggests a similar propagation of misfolded proteins in the spreading of pathology of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. Currently there is only a limited number of animal model systems available to study the mechanisms that underlie the cell-to-cell transmission of aggregation-prone proteins. Here, we have established a new metazoan model in Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the prion domain NM of the cytosolic yeast prion protein Sup35, in which aggregation and toxicity are dependent upon the length of oligopeptide repeats in the glutamine/asparagine (Q/N-rich N-terminus. NM forms multiple classes of highly toxic aggregate species and co-localizes to autophagy-related vesicles that transport the prion domain from the site of expression to adjacent tissues. This is associated with a profound cell autonomous and cell non-autonomous disruption of mitochondrial integrity, embryonic and larval arrest, developmental delay, widespread tissue defects, and loss of organismal proteostasis. Our results reveal that the Sup35 prion domain exhibits prion-like properties when expressed in the multicellular organism C. elegans and adapts to different requirements for propagation that involve the autophagy-lysosome pathway to transmit cytosolic aggregation-prone proteins between tissues.

  4. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV.

  5. Microbial linguistics: perspectives and applications of microbial cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Robert J; Lee, Sung Kuk; Kim, Taesung; Ghim, Cheol-Min

    2011-01-01

    Inter-cellular communication via diffusible small molecules is a defining character not only of multicellular forms of life but also of single-celled organisms. A large number of bacterial genes are regulated by the change of chemical milieu mediated by the local population density of its own species or others. The cell density-dependent "autoinducer" molecules regulate the expression of those genes involved in genetic competence, biofilm formation and persistence, virulence, sporulation, bioluminescence, antibiotic production, and many others. Recent innovations in recombinant DNA technology and micro-/nano-fluidics systems render the genetic circuitry responsible for cell-to-cell communication feasible to and malleable via synthetic biological approaches. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular biology of bacterial intercellular communication and the novel experimental protocols and platforms used to investigate this phenomenon. A particular emphasis is given to the genetic regulatory circuits that provide the standard building blocks which constitute the syntax of the biochemical communication network. Thus, this review gives focus to the engineering principles necessary for rewiring bacterial chemo-communication for various applications, ranging from population-level gene expression control to the study of host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Histochemical approaches to assess cell-to-cell transmission of misfolded proteins in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Natale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation, aggregation and transmission of abnormal proteins are common features in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Huntington’s disease. The mechanisms underlying protein alterations in neurodegenerative diseases remain controversial. Novel findings highlighted altered protein clearing systems as common biochemical pathways which generate protein misfolding, which in turn causes protein aggregation and protein spreading. In fact, proteinaceous aggregates are prone to cell-to-cell propagation. This is reminiscent of what happens in prion disorders, where the prion protein misfolds thus forming aggregates which spread to neighbouring cells. For this reason, the term prionoids is currently used to emphasize how several misfolded proteins are transmitted in neurodegenerative diseases following this prion-like pattern. Histochemical techniques including the use of specific antibodies covering both light and electron microscopy offer a powerful tool to describe these phenomena and investigate specific molecular steps. These include: prion like protein alterations; glycation of prion-like altered proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGEs; mechanisms of extracellular secretion; interaction of AGEs with specific receptors placed on neighbouring cells (RAGEs. The present manuscript comments on these phenomena aimed to provide a consistent scenario of the available histochemical approaches to dissect each specific step.

  7. Plasmodesmal-mediated cell-to-cell transport in wheat roots is modulated by anaerobic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, R. E.; Fujiwara, T.; Lucas, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transport of small molecules and ions occurs in plants through plasmodesmata. Plant roots are frequently subjected to localized anaerobic stress, with a resultant decrease in ATP. In order to determine the effect of this stress on plasmodesmal transport, fluorescent dyes of increasing molecular weight (0.46 to 1OkDa) were injected into epidermal and cortical cells of 3-day-old wheat roots, and their movement into neighboring cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy. Anaerobiosis was generated by N2 gas or simulated by the presence of sodium azide, both of which reduced the ATP levels in the tissue by over 80%. In the absence of such stress, the upper limit for movement, or size exclusion limit (SEL), of cortical plasmodesmata was roots, indicating that plasmodesmata may be conduits for nucleotide (ATP and ADP) exchange between cells. Upon imposition of stress, the SEL rose to between 5 and 10 kDa. This response of plasmodesmata to a decrease in the level of ATP suggests that they are constricted by an ATP-dependent process so as to maintain a restricted SEL. When roots are subjected to anaerobic stress, an increase in SEL may permit enhanced delivery of sugars to the affected cells of the root where anaerobic respiration could regenerate the needed ATP.

  8. Rate dependence of cell-to-cell variations of lithium-ion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fuqiang; Chen, Lufan; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Ping

    2016-10-11

    Lithium-ion cells are commonly used in a multicell configuration in power devices and electric vehicles, making the cell-to-cell variation (CtCV) a key factor to consider in system design and management. Previous studies on CtCV have two major limitations: the number of cells is usually less than one hundred, and the cells are usually commercial cells already subjected to cell-screenings. In this article, we first make a statistical analysis on the CtCV of 5473 fresh cells from an automotive battery manufacturer before the cell-screening process. Secondly, 198 cells are randomly selected from these 5473 cells and the rate dependence of the CtCV is examined, focusing on the correlations of capacity versus weight and capacity versus resistance, corresponding to thermodynamic and kinetic factors, respectively. The rate dependence of these two correlations is explained from a phenomenological model. Finally, eight cells from the 198 cells are further characterized with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method to elucidate the kinetic origins of the CtCV.

  9. Effect of Interaction between Chromatin Loops on Cell-to-Cell Variability in Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuoqi Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available According to recent experimental evidence, the interaction between chromatin loops, which can be characterized by three factors-connection pattern, distance between regulatory elements, and communication form, play an important role in determining the level of cell-to-cell variability in gene expression. These quantitative experiments call for a corresponding modeling effect that addresses the question of how changes in these factors affect variability at the expression level in a systematic rather than case-by-case fashion. Here we make such an effort, based on a mechanic model that maps three fundamental patterns for two interacting DNA loops into a 4-state model of stochastic transcription. We first show that in contrast to side-by-side loops, nested loops enhance mRNA expression and reduce expression noise whereas alternating loops have just opposite effects. Then, we compare effects of facilitated tracking and direct looping on gene expression. We find that the former performs better than the latter in controlling mean expression and in tuning expression noise, but this control or tuning is distance-dependent, remarkable for moderate loop lengths, and there is a limit loop length such that the difference in effect between two communication forms almost disappears. Our analysis and results justify the facilitated chromatin-looping hypothesis.

  10. On matrix model partition functions for QCD with chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Akemann, G; Vernizzi, G

    2004-01-01

    Partition functions of two different matrix models for QCD with chemical potential are computed for an arbitrary number of quark and complex conjugate anti-quark flavors. In the large-N limit of weak nonhermiticity complete agreement is found between the two models. This supports the universality of such fermionic partition functions, that is of products of characteristic polynomials in the complex plane. In the strong nonhermiticity limit agreement is found for an equal number of quark and conjugate flavours. For a general flavor content the equality of partition functions holds only for small chemical potential. The chiral phase transition is analyzed for an arbitrary number of quarks, where the free energy presents a discontinuity of first order at a critical chemical potential. In the case of nondegenerate flavors there is first order phase transition for each separate mass scale.

  11. Chitosan-Functionalized Graphene Oxide as a Potential Immunoadjuvant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Yan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of graphene oxide (GO as a potential vaccine adjuvant has recently attracted considerable attention. However, appropriate surface functionalization of GO is crucial to improve its biocompatibility and enhance its adjuvant activity. In this study, we developed a simple method to prepare chitosan (CS-functionalized GO (GO-CS and further investigated its potential as a nanoadjuvant. Compared with GO, GO-CS possessed considerably smaller size, positive surface charge, and better thermal stability. The functionalization of GO with CS was effective in decreasing the non-specific protein adsorption and improving its biocompatibility. Furthermore, GO-CS significantly activated RAW264.7 cells and stimulated more cytokines for mediating cellular immune response, which was mainly due to the synergistic immunostimulatory effect of both GO and CS. GO-CS exhibits strong potential as a safe nanoadjuvant for vaccines and immunotherapy.

  12. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: New Frontiers of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Ciardiello

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular Vesicles (EVs have received considerable attention in recent years, both as mediators of intercellular communication pathways that lead to tumor progression, and as potential sources for discovery of novel cancer biomarkers. For many years, research on EVs has mainly investigated either the mechanism of biogenesis and cargo selection and incorporation, or the methods of EV isolation from available body fluids for biomarker discovery. Recent studies have highlighted the existence of different populations of cancer-derived EVs, with distinct molecular cargo, thus pointing to the possibility that the various EV populations might play diverse roles in cancer and that this does not happen randomly. However, data attributing cancer specific intercellular functions to given populations of EVs are still limited. A deeper functional, biochemical and molecular characterization of the various EV classes might identify more selective clinical markers, and significantly advance our knowledge of the pathogenesis and disease progression of many cancer types.

  13. Robustness of MEK-ERK Dynamics and Origins of Cell-to-Cell Variability in MAPK Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Filippi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling processes can exhibit pronounced cell-to-cell variability in genetically identical cells. This affects how individual cells respond differentially to the same environmental stimulus. However, the origins of cell-to-cell variability in cellular signaling systems remain poorly understood. Here, we measure the dynamics of phosphorylated MEK and ERK across cell populations and quantify the levels of population heterogeneity over time using high-throughput image cytometry. We use a statistical modeling framework to show that extrinsic noise, particularly that from upstream MEK, is the dominant factor causing cell-to-cell variability in ERK phosphorylation, rather than stochasticity in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of ERK. We furthermore show that without extrinsic noise in the core module, variable (including noisy signals would be faithfully reproduced downstream, but the within-module extrinsic variability distorts these signals and leads to a drastic reduction in the mutual information between incoming signal and ERK activity.

  14. Teaching Potential Energy Functions and Stability with Slap Bracelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hook, Stephen J.

    2005-10-01

    The slap bracelet, an inexpensive child's toy, makes it easy to engage students in hands-on exploration of potential energy curves as well as of stable, unstable, and meta-stable states. Rather than just observing the teacher performing a demonstration, the students can manipulate the equipment themselves and make their own observations, which are then pooled to focus a class discussion on potential energy functions and stability.

  15. Thermal density functional theory, ensemble density functional theory, and potential functional theory for warm dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora

    Warm dense matter (WDM) is a high energy phase between solids and plasmas, with characteristics of both. It is present in the centers of giant planets, within the earth's core, and on the path to ignition of inertial confinement fusion. The high temperatures and pressures of warm dense matter lead to complications in its simulation, as both classical and quantum effects must be included. One of the most successful simulation methods is density functional theory-molecular dynamics (DFT-MD). Despite great success in a diverse array of applications, DFT-MD remains computationally expensive and it neglects the explicit temperature dependence of electron-electron interactions known to exist within exact DFT. Finite-temperature density functional theory (FT DFT) is an extension of the wildly successful ground-state DFT formalism via thermal ensembles, broadening its quantum mechanical treatment of electrons to include systems at non-zero temperatures. Exact mathematical conditions have been used to predict the behavior of approximations in limiting conditions and to connect FT DFT to the ground-state theory. An introduction to FT DFT is given within the context of ensemble DFT and the larger field of DFT is discussed for context. Ensemble DFT is used to describe ensembles of ground-state and excited systems. Exact conditions in ensemble DFT and the performance of approximations depend on ensemble weights. Using an inversion method, exact Kohn-Sham ensemble potentials are found and compared to approximations. The symmetry eigenstate Hartree-exchange approximation is in good agreement with exact calculations because of its inclusion of an ensemble derivative discontinuity. Since ensemble weights in FT DFT are temperature-dependent Fermi weights, this insight may help develop approximations well-suited to both ground-state and FT DFT. A novel, highly efficient approach to free energy calculations, finite-temperature potential functional theory, is derived, which has the

  16. Harmonic Functions and Potentials on Finite or Infinite Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Anandam, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Random walks, Markov chains and electrical networks serve as an introduction to the study of real-valued functions on finite or infinite graphs, with appropriate interpretations using probability theory and current-voltage laws. The relation between this type of function theory and the (Newton) potential theory on the Euclidean spaces is well-established. The latter theory has been variously generalized, one example being the axiomatic potential theory on locally compact spaces developed by Brelot, with later ramifications from Bauer, Constantinescu and Cornea. A network is a graph with edge-w

  17. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein restricts cell-to-cell spread of Shigella flexneri at the cell periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Young; Gertler, Frank B; Goldberg, Marcia B

    2015-11-01

    Shigella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause diarrhoeal disease in humans. Shigella utilize the host actin cytoskeleton to enter cells, move through the cytoplasm of cells and pass into adjacent cells. Ena/VASP family proteins are highly conserved proteins that participate in actin-dependent dynamic cellular processes. We tested whether Ena/VASP family members VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein), Mena (mammalian-enabled) or EVL (Ena-VASP-like) contribute to Shigella flexneri spread through cell monolayers. VASP and EVL restricted cell-to-cell spread without significantly altering actin-based motility, whereas Mena had no effect on these processes. Phosphorylation of VASP on Ser153, Ser235 and Thr274 regulated its subcellular distribution and function. VASP derivatives that lack the Ena/VASP homology 1 (EVH1) domain or contain a phosphoablative mutation of Ser153 were defective in restricting S. flexneri spread, indicating that the EVH1 domain and phosphorylation on Ser153 are required for this process. The EVH1 domain and Ser153 of VASP were required for VASP localization to focal adhesions, and localization of VASP to focal adhesions and/or the leading edge was required for restriction of spread. The contribution of the EVH1 domain was from both the donor and the recipient cell, whereas the contribution of Ser153 phosphorylation was only from the donor cell. Thus, unlike host proteins characterized in Shigella pathogenesis that promote bacterial spread, VASP and EVL function to limit it. The ability of VASP and EVL to limit spread highlights the critical role of focal adhesion complexes and/or the leading edge in bacterial passage between cells.

  18. Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus coat protein is essential for cell-to-cell and long-distance movement but not for viral RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengniao Niu

    Full Text Available Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L., two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro.

  19. Effect of functionalization on drug delivery potential of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonam; Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, Keerti; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    The main aim of the present investigation was to explore the effect of functionalization on drug delivery potential of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and to compare the in vitro and in vivo cancer targeting potential of doxorubicin HCL (DOX)-loaded ox-/multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), DOX-loaded PEG-MWCNTs and DOX-loaded FA-PEG-MWCNTs. The DOX/PEG-FA-MWCNTs showed enhanced cytotoxicity and were most preferentially taken up by the cancerous cells. The obtained results also support the extended resistance time and sustained release profile of drug-loaded surface-engineered MWCNTs. Overall, we concluded that the developed MWCNTs nanoformulations have higher cancer targeting potential.

  20. Continuous Control Artificial Potential Function Methods and Optimal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Method, namely r̈VDSVAPF = −K̇SKR∇φ−KSK̇R∇φ−KSKRH(φ)ṙ −KD (KSKR∇φ+ ṙ) . The above dynamics are very nonlinear due to the trigonometric functions (inside...constraints (on KS and θ) and the deletion of trigonometric functions . The suspected reasons for the larger computa- tional expense are twofold. First, this...Continuous Control Artificial Potential Function Methods and Optimal Control THESIS R. Andrew Fields, Civ, USAF AFIT-ENY-14-M-20 DEPARTMENT OF THE

  1. Bosonic Partition Functions at Nonzero (Imaginary) Chemical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerstein, M

    2016-01-01

    We consider bosonic random matrix partition functions at nonzero chemical potential and compare the chiral condensate, the baryon number density and the baryon number susceptibility to the result of the corresponding fermionic partition function. We find that as long as results are finite, the phase transition of the fermionic theory persists in the bosonic theory. However, in case that bosonic partition function diverges and has to be regularized, the phase transition of the fermionic theory does not occur in the bosonic theory, and the bosonic theory is always in the broken phase.

  2. Harmonic expansion of the effective potential in a functional renormalization group at finite chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaföldi, G. G.; Jakovác, A.; Pósfay, P.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method to study the functional renormalization group (FRG) at finite chemical potential. The method consists of mapping the FRG equations within the Fermi surface into a differential equation defined on a rectangle with zero boundary conditions. To solve this equation we use an expansion of the potential in a harmonic basis. With this method we determined the phase diagram of a simple Yukawa-type model; as expected, the bosonic fluctuations decrease the strength of the transition.

  3. Parametrization of analytic interatomic potential functions using neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malshe, M; Narulkar, R; Raff, L M; Hagan, M; Bukkapatnam, S; Komanduri, R

    2008-07-28

    A generalized method that permits the parameters of an arbitrary empirical potential to be efficiently and accurately fitted to a database is presented. The method permits the values of a subset of the potential parameters to be considered as general functions of the internal coordinates that define the instantaneous configuration of the system. The parameters in this subset are computed by a generalized neural network (NN) with one or more hidden layers and an input vector with at least 3n-6 elements, where n is the number of atoms in the system. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is employed to efficiently affect the optimization of the weights and biases of the NN as well as all other potential parameters being treated as constants rather than as functions of the input coordinates. In order to effect this minimization, the usual Jacobian employed in NN operations is modified to include the Jacobian of the computed errors with respect to the parameters of the potential function. The total Jacobian employed in each epoch of minimization is the concatenation of two Jacobians, one containing derivatives of the errors with respect to the weights and biases of the network, and the other with respect to the constant parameters of the potential function. The method provides three principal advantages. First, it obviates the problem of selecting the form of the functional dependence of the parameters upon the system's coordinates by employing a NN. If this network contains a sufficient number of neurons, it will automatically find something close to the best functional form. This is the case since Hornik et al., [Neural Networks 2, 359 (1989)] have shown that two-layer NNs with sigmoid transfer functions in the first hidden layer and linear functions in the output layer are universal approximators for analytic functions. Second, the entire fitting procedure is automated so that excellent fits are obtained rapidly with little human effort. Third, the method provides a

  4. Parallels and distinctions in the direct cell-to-cell spread of the plant and animal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    The paradigm that viruses can move directly, and in some cases covertly, between contacting target cells is now well established for several virus families. The underlying mechanisms of cell-to-cell spread, however, remain to be fully elucidated and may differ substantially depending on the viral exit/entry route and the cellular tropism. Here, two divergent cell-to-cell spread mechanisms are exemplified: firstly by human retroviruses, which rely upon transient adhesive structures that form between polarized immune cells termed virological synapses, and secondly by herpesviruses that depend predominantly on pre-existing stable cellular contacts, but may also form virological synapses. Plant viruses can also spread directly between contacting cells, but are obliged by the rigid host cell wall to move across pore structures termed plasmodesmata. This review will focus primarily on recent advances in our understanding of animal virus cell-to-cell spread using examples from these two virus families to highlight differences and similarities, and will conclude by comparing and contrasting the cell-to-cell spread of animal and plant viruses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Newer Approaches to Identify Potential Untoward Effects in Functional Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, Palma Ann; Birkenbach, Victoria L; Hayes, A Wallace

    2016-01-01

    Globalization has greatly accelerated the numbers and variety of food and beverage products available worldwide. The exchange among greater numbers of countries, manufacturers, and products in the United States and worldwide has necessitated enhanced quality measures for nutritional products for larger populations increasingly reliant on functionality. These functional foods, those that provide benefit beyond basic nutrition, are increasingly being used for their potential to alleviate food insufficiency while enhancing quality and longevity of life. In the United States alone, a steady import increase of greater than 15% per year or 24 million shipments, over 70% products of which are food related, is regulated under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This unparalleled growth has resulted in the need for faster, cheaper, and better safety and efficacy screening methods in the form of harmonized guidelines and recommendations for product standardization. In an effort to meet this need, the in vitro toxicology testing market has similarly grown with an anticipatory 15% increase between 2010 and 2015 of US$1.3 to US$2.7 billion. Although traditionally occupying a small fraction of the market behind pharmaceuticals and cosmetic/household products, the scope of functional food testing, including additives/supplements, ingredients, residues, contact/processing, and contaminants, is potentially expansive. Similarly, as functional food testing has progressed, so has the need to identify potential adverse factors that threaten the safety and quality of these products.

  6. The V domain of dog PVRL4 (nectin-4) mediates canine distemper virus entry and virus cell-to-cell spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S. [The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); IWK Health Centre, Canadian Center for Vaccinology, Goldbloom Pavilion, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); Richardson, Christopher D., E-mail: chris.richardson@dal.ca [The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); IWK Health Centre, Canadian Center for Vaccinology, Goldbloom Pavilion, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); The Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    The entry of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a multistep process that involves the attachment of CDV hemagglutinin (H) to its cellular receptor, followed by fusion between virus and cell membranes. Our laboratory recently identified PVRL4 (nectin-4) to be the epithelial receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that the V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry and virus cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, four key amino acid residues within the V domain of dog PVRL4 and two within the CDV hemagglutinin were shown to be essential for receptor-mediated virus entry. - Highlights: • PVRL4 (nectin-4) is the epithelial cell receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. • V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry, cell-to-cell spread, and syncytia formation. • Chimeric PVRL1 backbone substituted with the V domain of PVRL4 can function as a receptor. • Amino acids (F132/P133/A134/G135) within the V domain are essential for PVRL4 receptor activity. • Amino acids (P493/Y539) within CDV H protein are essential for PVRL4 receptor interaction.

  7. The Power of Simplicity: Sea Urchin Embryos as in Vivo Developmental Models for Studying Complex Cell-to-cell Signaling Network Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Ryan C; Martinez-Bartolomé, Marina; Burr, Stephanie D

    2017-02-16

    Remarkably few cell-to-cell signal transduction pathways are necessary during embryonic development to generate the large variety of cell types and tissues in the adult body form. Yet, each year more components of individual signaling pathways are discovered, and studies indicate that depending on the context there is significant cross-talk among most of these pathways. This complexity makes studying cell-to-cell signaling in any in vivo developmental model system a difficult task. In addition, efficient functional analyses are required to characterize molecules associated with signaling pathways identified from the large data sets generated by next generation differential screens. Here, we illustrate a straightforward method to efficiently identify components of signal transduction pathways governing cell fate and axis specification in sea urchin embryos. The genomic and morphological simplicity of embryos similar to those of the sea urchin make them powerful in vivo developmental models for understanding complex signaling interactions. The methodology described here can be used as a template for identifying novel signal transduction molecules in individual pathways as well as the interactions among the molecules in the various pathways in many other organisms.

  8. The Glycoprotein and the Matrix Protein of Rabies Virus Affect Pathogenicity by Regulating Viral Replication and Facilitating Cell-to-Cell Spread▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Li, Jianwei; Schnell, Matthias J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    While the glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is known to play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of rabies, the function of the RV matrix protein (M) in RV pathogenicity is not completely clear. To further investigate the roles of these proteins in viral pathogenicity, we constructed chimeric recombinant viruses by exchanging the G and M genes of the attenuated SN strain with those of the highly pathogenic SB strain. Infection of mice with these chimeric viruses revealed a significant increase in the pathogenicity of the SN strain bearing the RV G from the pathogenic SB strain. Moreover, the pathogenicity was further increased when both G and M from SB were introduced into SN. Interestingly, the replacement of the G or M gene or both in SN by the corresponding genes of SB was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of viral replication and viral RNA synthesis. In addition, a chimeric SN virus bearing both the M and G genes from SB exhibited more efficient cell-to-cell spread than a chimeric SN virus in which only the G gene was replaced. Together, these data indicate that both G and M play an important role in RV pathogenesis by regulating virus replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread. PMID:18094173

  9. The glycoprotein and the matrix protein of rabies virus affect pathogenicity by regulating viral replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Li, Jianwei; Schnell, Matthias J; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2008-03-01

    While the glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is known to play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of rabies, the function of the RV matrix protein (M) in RV pathogenicity is not completely clear. To further investigate the roles of these proteins in viral pathogenicity, we constructed chimeric recombinant viruses by exchanging the G and M genes of the attenuated SN strain with those of the highly pathogenic SB strain. Infection of mice with these chimeric viruses revealed a significant increase in the pathogenicity of the SN strain bearing the RV G from the pathogenic SB strain. Moreover, the pathogenicity was further increased when both G and M from SB were introduced into SN. Interestingly, the replacement of the G or M gene or both in SN by the corresponding genes of SB was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of viral replication and viral RNA synthesis. In addition, a chimeric SN virus bearing both the M and G genes from SB exhibited more efficient cell-to-cell spread than a chimeric SN virus in which only the G gene was replaced. Together, these data indicate that both G and M play an important role in RV pathogenesis by regulating virus replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

  10. Semiclassical partition function for the double-well potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroff, D.; Bessa, A.; de Carvalho, C. A. A.; Fraga, E. S.; Jorás, S. E.

    2014-07-01

    We compute the partition function and specific heat for a quantum-mechanical particle under the influence of a quartic double-well potential nonperturbatively, using the semiclassical method. Near the region of bounded motion in the inverted potential, the usual quadratic approximation fails due to the existence of multiple classical solutions and caustics. Using the tools of catastrophe theory, we identify the relevant classical solutions, showing that at most two have to be considered. This corresponds to the first step towards the study of spontaneous symmetry breaking and thermal phase transitions in the nonperturbative framework of the boundary effective theory.

  11. Semiclassical partition function for the double-well potential

    CERN Document Server

    Kroff, D; de Carvalho, C A A; Fraga, E S; Jorás, S E

    2013-01-01

    We compute the partition function and specific heat for a quantum mechanical particle under the influence of a quartic double-well potential non-perturbatively, using the semiclassical method. Near the region of bounded motion in the inverted potential, the usual quadratic approximation fails due to the existence of multiple classical solutions and caustics. Using the tools of catastrophe theory, we identify the relevant classical solutions, showing that at most two have to be considered. This corresponds to the first step towards the study of spontaneous symmetry breaking and thermal phase transitions in the non-perturbative framework of the boundary effective theory.

  12. Molecular properties,functions,and potential applications of NAD kinases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Shi; Yongfu Li; Ye Li; Xiaoyuan Wang

    2009-01-01

    NAD kinase catalyzes the phosphorylation of NAD(H)to form NADP(H),using ATP as phosphoryl donor.It is the only key enzyme leading to the de novo NADP+/NADPH biosynthesis.Coenzymes such as NAD(H)and NADP(H)are known for their important functions.Recent studies have partially demonstrated that NAD kinase plays a crucial role in the regulation of NAD(H)/NADP(H)conversion.Here,the molecular properties,physiologic functions,and potential applications of NAD kinase are discussed.

  13. Work function measurements by the field emission retarding potential method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, R. W.; Mackie, W.; Swanson, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the theoretical foundation of the field electron retarding potential method, and review of its experimental application to the measurement of single crystal face work functions. The results obtained from several substrates are discussed. An interesting and useful fallout from the experimental approach described is the ability to accurately measure the elastic and inelastic reflection coefficient for impinging electrons to near zero-volt energy.

  14. Electrostatic potential of several small molecules from density functional theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A number of density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to calculate the electrostatic potential for the series of molecules N2, F2, NH3, H2O, CHF3, CHCl3, C6H6, TiF4, CO(NH2)2 and C4H5N3O compared with QCISD (quadratic configuration interaction method including single and double substitutions) results. Comparisons were made between the DFT computed results and the QCISD ab initio ones and MP2 ab initio ones, compared with the root-mean-square deviation and electrostatic potential difference contours figures. It was found that the hybrid DFT method B3LYP, yields electrostatic potential in good agreement with the QCISD results. It is suggest this is a useful approach, especially for large molecules that are difficult to study by ab initio methods.

  15. Advanced Ring-Shaped Microelectrode Assay Combined with Small Rectangular Electrode for Quasi-In vivo Measurement of Cell-to-Cell Conductance in Cardiomyocyte Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hamada, Tomoyo; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-06-01

    To predict the risk of fatal arrhythmia induced by cardiotoxicity in the highly complex human heart system, we have developed a novel quasi-in vivo electrophysiological measurement assay, which combines a ring-shaped human cardiomyocyte network and a set of two electrodes that form a large single ring-shaped electrode for the direct measurement of irregular cell-to-cell conductance occurrence in a cardiomyocyte network, and a small rectangular microelectrode for forced pacing of cardiomyocyte beating and for acquiring the field potential waveforms of cardiomyocytes. The advantages of this assay are as follows. The electrophysiological signals of cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped network are superimposed directly on a single loop-shaped electrode, in which the information of asynchronous behavior of cell-to-cell conductance are included, without requiring a set of huge numbers of microelectrode arrays, a set of fast data conversion circuits, or a complex analysis in a computer. Another advantage is that the small rectangular electrode can control the position and timing of forced beating in a ring-shaped human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPS)-derived cardiomyocyte network and can also acquire the field potentials of cardiomyocytes. First, we constructed the human iPS-derived cardiomyocyte ring-shaped network on the set of two electrodes, and acquired the field potential signals of particular cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped cardiomyocyte network during simultaneous acquisition of the superimposed signals of whole-cardiomyocyte networks representing cell-to-cell conduction. Using the small rectangular electrode, we have also evaluated the response of the cell network to electrical stimulation. The mean and SD of the minimum stimulation voltage required for pacing (VMin) at the small rectangular electrode was 166+/-74 mV, which is the same as the magnitude of amplitude for the pacing using the ring-shaped electrode (179+/-33 mV). The results showed that the

  16. Casimir Energies and Pressures for $\\delta$-function Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, K A

    2004-01-01

    The Casimir energies and pressures for a massless scalar field associated with $\\delta$-function potentials in 1+1 and 3+1 dimensions are calculated. For parallel plane surfaces, the results are finite, coincide with the pressures associated with Dirichlet planes in the limit of strong coupling, and for weak coupling do not possess a power-series expansion in 1+1 dimension. The relation between Casimir energies and Casimir pressures is clarified,and the former are shown to involve surface terms. The Casimir energy for a $\\delta$-function spherical shell in 3+1 dimensions has an expression that reduces to the familiar result for a Dirichlet shell in the strong-coupling limit. However, the Casimir energy for finite coupling possesses a logarithmic divergence first appearing in third order in the weak-coupling expansion, which seems unremovable. The corresponding energies and pressures for a derivative of a $\\delta$-function potential for the same spherical geometry generalizes the TM contributions of electrodyn...

  17. Potential Mechanisms and Functions of Intermittent Neural Synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Ahn

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neural synchronization is believed to play an important role in different brain functions. Synchrony in cortical and subcortical circuits is frequently variable in time and not perfect. Few long intervals of desynchronized dynamics may be functionally different from many short desynchronized intervals although the average synchrony may be the same. Recent analysis of imperfect synchrony in different neural systems reported one common feature: neural oscillations may go out of synchrony frequently, but primarily for a short time interval. This study explores potential mechanisms and functional advantages of this short desynchronizations dynamics using computational neuroscience techniques. We show that short desynchronizations are exhibited in coupled neurons if their delayed rectifier potassium current has relatively large values of the voltage-dependent activation time-constant. The delayed activation of potassium current is associated with generation of quickly-rising action potential. This “spikiness” is a very general property of neurons. This may explain why very different neural systems exhibit short desynchronization dynamics. We also show how the distribution of desynchronization durations may be independent of the synchronization strength. Finally, we show that short desynchronization dynamics requires weaker synaptic input to reach a pre-set synchrony level. Thus, this dynamics allows for efficient regulation of synchrony and may promote efficient formation of synchronous neural assemblies.

  18. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Vaibhav [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R. [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific and College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Shukla, Deepak, E-mail: dshukla@uic.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-18

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  19. Relative Roles of Gap Junction Channels and Cytoplasm in Cell-to-Cell Diffusion of Fluorescent Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safranyos, Richard G. A.; Caveney, Stanley; Miller, James G.; Petersen, Nils O.

    1987-04-01

    Intercellular (tissue) diffusion of molecules requires cytoplasmic diffusion and diffusion through gap junctional (or cell-to-cell) channels. The rates of tissue and cytoplasmic diffusion of fluorescent tracers, expressed as an effective diffusion coefficient, De, and a cytoplasmic diffusion coefficient, Dcyt, have been measured among the developing epidermal cells of a larval beetle, Tenebrio molitor L., to determine the contribution of the junctional channels to intercellular diffusion. Tracer diffusion was measured by injecting fluorescent tracers into cells and quantitating the rate of subsequent spread into adjacent cells. Cytoplasmic diffusion was determined by fluorescence photobleaching. These experiments show that gap junctional channels constitute approximately 70-80% of the total cell-to-cell resistance to the diffusion of organic tracers at high concentrations in this tissue. At low concentrations, however, the binding of tracer to cytoplasm slows down the cytoplasmic diffusion, which may limit intercellular diffusion.

  20. Factors potentially affecting the function of kidney grafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Jun; ZHENG Xin; XIE Ze-lin; SUN Wen; ZHANG Lei; TIAN Ye; GUO Yu-wen

    2013-01-01

    Background Donor and recipient risk factors on graft function have been well characterized.The contribution of demographic factors,such as age,gender,and other potential factors of donor and recipient at the time of transplantation on the function of a graft is much less well understood.In this study,we analyzed the effects of factors such as age,gender,etc.,on the short-term and long-term graft function in kidney transplant recipients from living donor.Methods A total of 335 living donors and their recipients,who had kidney transplantation in our center from May 2004 to December 2009,were included.Serum creatinine level was used as the assessment criterion (serum creatinine level lower than 115 mmol/L is normal).Factors related to graft function such as age,gender,blood relation by consanguinity,human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch,ABO type,etc.,were analyzed separately.Results Donor age is the key factor affecting both the short-term and long-term function of a grafted kidney from a living donor.The group with donors younger than 48 years showed the best kidney function post transplantation.Match of gender and age is another important factor that influences the function of grafted kidney from a living donor.The older donor to younger recipient group had the worst outcome after kidney transplantation.After 36 months post transplantation,female donor to male recipient group had worse kidney function compared to other groups.We also found that calcinerin inhibitor used in the maintenance period may influence the function of a grafted kidney.No significant statistical differences were found in consanguinity,blood type,and mismatch of HLA.Conclusions Donor age is an important factor affecting the function of a grafted kidney from a living donor.We also recommend taking nephron,immunology factor,infection,and demographic information all into consideration when assessing the outcome of kidney transplantation.

  1. ANALYSIS OF THE DEMOGRAPHIC POTENTIAL IN FUNCTION OF TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijalce Gjorgievski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Man is the prime mover of the overall social economic and political life of the entire globe and therefore he is studied from various aspects depending on the needs of what we want to obtain information on the demographic potential and its features.In this paper, the subject of study will be processing potential through its demographic characteristics (number condition, age structure, natural increase, economic activity, religious composition, etc. for the tourism economy. We know that the basic elements of tourism are the natural and cultural wealth that detect, evaluate and put into operation in tourism. However, it has its function, the basic factor are the people who need to visit those places, so it is very important to understand the demographic characteristics of people in every region of the globe in order to come to some understanding of the habits, needs and affinities of people depending on age, nationality and religious affiliation, etc. when choosing their travel destination.

  2. Immunoglobulin A in Bovine Milk: A Potential Functional Food?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakebread, Julie A; Humphrey, Rex; Hodgkinson, Alison J

    2015-08-26

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is an anti-inflammatory antibody that plays a critical role in mucosal immunity. It is found in large quantities in human milk, but there are lower amounts in bovine milk. In humans, IgA plays a significant role in providing protection from environmental pathogens at mucosal surfaces and is a key component for the establishment and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis via innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. To date, many of the dairy-based functional foods are derived from bovine colostrum, targeting the benefits of IgG. IgA has a higher pathogenic binding capacity and greater stability against proteolytic degradation when ingested compared with IgG. This provides IgA-based products greater potential in the functional food market that has yet to be realized.

  3. The potential of discs from a "mean Green function"

    CERN Document Server

    Trova, A; Hersant, F

    2012-01-01

    By using various properties of the complete elliptic integrals, we have derived an alternative expression for the gravitational potential of axially symmetric bodies, which is free of singular kernel in contrast with the classical form. This is mainly a radial integral of the local surface density weighted by a regular "mean Green function" which depends explicitly on the body's vertical thickness. Rigorously, this result stands for a wide variety of configurations, as soon as the density structure is vertically homogeneous. Nevertheless, the sensitivity to vertical stratification | the Gaussian profile has been considered | appears weak provided that the surface density is conserved. For bodies with small aspect ratio (i.e. geometrically thin discs), a first-order Taylor expansion furnishes an excellent approximation for this mean Green function, the absolute error being of the fourth order in the aspect ratio. This formula is therefore well suited to studying the structure of self-gravitating discs and ring...

  4. Parametric Potential Determination by the Canonical Function Method

    CERN Document Server

    Tannous, C; Langlois, J M

    1999-01-01

    The canonical function method (CFM) is a powerful means for solving the Radial Schrodinger Equation. The mathematical difficulty of the RSE lies in the fact it is a singular boundary value problem. The CFM turns it into a regular initial value problem and allows the full determination of the spectrum of the Schrodinger operator without calculating the eigenfunctions. Following the parametrisation suggested by Klapisch and Green, Sellin and Zachor we develop a CFM to optimise the potential parameters in order to reproduce the experimental Quantum Defect results for various Rydberg series of He, Ne and Ar as evaluated from Moore's data.

  5. MEIS1 functions as a potential AR negative regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Liang [Department of Urology, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Department of Urology, Civil Aviation General Hospital/Civil Aviation Medical College of Peking University, Beijing 100123 (China); Li, Mingyang [Department of Gastroenterology, Nan Lou Division, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Feng, Fan [Department of Pharmacy, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Yutao [Beijing Institute for Neuroscience, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Hang, Xingyi [National Scientific Data Sharing Platform for Population and Health, Beijing 100730 (China); Cui, Jiajun, E-mail: cuijn@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Cancer and Cell Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Gao, Jiangping, E-mail: jpgao@163.com [Department of Urology, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2014-10-15

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in human prostate carcinoma progression and transformation. However, the activation of AR is regulated by co-regulators. MEIS1 protein, the homeodomain transcription factor, exhibited a decreased level in poor-prognosis prostate tumors. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between MEIS1 and AR. We found that overexpression of MEIS1 inhibited the AR transcriptional activity and reduced the expression of AR target gene. A potential protein–protein interaction between AR and MEIS1 was identified by the immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to androgen response element in prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene promoter sequences. In addition, MEIS1 promoted the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT in the presence of R1881. Finally, MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our data suggests that MEIS1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor. - Highlights: • A potential interaction was identified between MEIS1 and AR signaling. • Overexpression of MEIS1 reduced the expression of AR target gene. • MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation. • MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells.

  6. The Envelope Cytoplasmic Tail of HIV-1 Subtype C Contributes to Poor Replication Capacity through Low Viral Infectivity and Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Morgane; Masquelier, Cécile; Beraud, Cyprien; Rybicki, Arkadiusz; Servais, Jean-Yves; Iserentant, Gilles; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail (gp41CT) of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) mediates Env incorporation into virions and regulates Env intracellular trafficking. Little is known about the functional impact of variability in this domain. To address this issue, we compared the replication of recombinant virus pairs carrying the full Env (Env viruses) or the Env ectodomain fused to the gp41CT of NL4.3 (EnvEC viruses) (12 subtype C and 10 subtype B pairs) in primary CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDMs). In CD4+ T-cells, replication was as follows: B-EnvEC = B-Env>C-EnvEC>C-Env, indicating that the gp41CT of subtype C contributes to the low replicative capacity of this subtype. In MDMs, in contrast, replication capacity was comparable for all viruses regardless of subtype and of gp41CT. In CD4+ T-cells, viral entry, viral release and viral gene expression were similar. However, infectivity of free virions and cell-to-cell transmission of C-Env viruses released by CD4+ T-cells was lower, suggestive of lower Env incorporation into virions. Subtype C matrix only minimally rescued viral replication and failed to restore infectivity of free viruses and cell-to-cell transmission. Taken together, these results show that polymorphisms in the gp41CT contribute to viral replication capacity and suggest that the number of Env spikes per virion may vary across subtypes. These findings should be taken into consideration in the design of vaccines. PMID:27598717

  7. Neutral genetic drift can alter promiscuous protein functions, potentially aiding functional evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhongyi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the mutations accumulated by naturally evolving proteins are neutral in the sense that they do not significantly alter a protein's ability to perform its primary biological function. However, new protein functions evolve when selection begins to favor other, "promiscuous" functions that are incidental to a protein's original biological role. If mutations that are neutral with respect to a protein's primary biological function cause substantial changes in promiscuous functions, these mutations could enable future functional evolution. Results Here we investigate this possibility experimentally by examining how cytochrome P450 enzymes that have evolved neutrally with respect to activity on a single substrate have changed in their abilities to catalyze reactions on five other substrates. We find that the enzymes have sometimes changed as much as four-fold in the promiscuous activities. The changes in promiscuous activities tend to increase with the number of mutations, and can be largely rationalized in terms of the chemical structures of the substrates. The activities on chemically similar substrates tend to change in a coordinated fashion, potentially providing a route for systematically predicting the change in one activity based on the measurement of several others. Conclusion Our work suggests that initially neutral genetic drift can lead to substantial changes in protein functions that are not currently under selection, in effect poising the proteins to more readily undergo functional evolution should selection favor new functions in the future. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Martijn Huynen, Fyodor Kondrashov, and Dan Tawfik (nominated by Christoph Adami.

  8. Ergothioneine; antioxidant potential, physiological function and role in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Irwin K; Halliwell, Barry

    2012-05-01

    Since its discovery, the unique properties of the naturally occurring amino acid, L-ergothioneine (EGT; 2-mercaptohistidine trimethylbetaine), have intrigued researchers for more than a century. This widely distributed thione is only known to be synthesized by non-yeast fungi, mycobacteria and cyanobacteria but accumulates in higher organisms at up to millimolar levels via an organic cation transporter (OCTN1). The physiological role of EGT has yet to be established. Numerous in vitro assays have demonstrated the antioxidant and cytoprotective capabilities of EGT against a wide range of cellular stressors, but an antioxidant role has yet to be fully verified in vivo. Nevertheless the accumulation, tissue distribution and scavenging properties, all highlight the potential for EGT to function as a physiological antioxidant. This article reviews our current state of knowledge. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antioxidants and Antioxidant Treatment in Disease.

  9. Structure, function and nutritional potential of milk osteopontin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Brian Søndergaard; Sørensen, Esben Skipper

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multifunctional protein present in most tissues and body fluids, with the highest concentrations found in milk. Processes for isolation of OPN from bovine milk for use in infant formula have been developed and studies have investigated the effects of oral administration...... of milk OPN. At the same time, plasma OPN levels have been shown to be elevated in some types of cancer, and OPN has been suggested as a potential diagnostic marker for cancer. OPN exists in several different isoforms in vivo, of which presumably only a minority is directly or indirectly implicated...... in cancer related events. In this article, we review the differences between milk-derived OPN and OPN derived from transformed cells and compare the structure of OPN from human and bovine milk. Furthermore, current knowledge about the function of OPN in milk and recent findings about the effect of orally...

  10. Fenugreek: Potential Applications as a Functional Food and Nutraceutical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Khorshidian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fenugreek (Trigonella  foenum graecum, native to southern Europe and Asia, is an annual herb with white flowers and hard, yellowish brown and angular seeds, known from ancient times, for nutritional value beside of its medicinal effects. Fenugreek seeds are rich source of gum, fiber, alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins and volatile content. Due to its high content of fiber, fenugreek could be used as food stabilizer, adhesive and emulsifying agent to change food texture for some special purposes. Some evidence suggests that fenugreek may also be regarded as antidiabetic, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, antibacterial agent, antianorexia agent, and gastric stimulant, as well as remedy for hypocholesterolemia and hypoglycemia. The present article is aimed to review the potential applications of fenugreek as a functional food and nutraceutical agent.

  11. Functional and technological potential of dehydrated Phaseolus vulgaris L. flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Jiménez, A K; Reynoso-Camacho, R; Mendoza-Díaz, S; Loarca-Piña, G

    2014-10-15

    The effect of cooking followed by dehydration was evaluated on the bioactive composition, antioxidant activity and technological properties of two varieties (Negro 8025 and Bayo Madero) of common beans. Quercetin, rutin, and phenolic acids were the most abundant phenolics found. Cooking processes resulted in decreased values of some phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity. A subsequent dehydration increased TEAC values, resistant starch content and decreased starch digestibility. Oligosaccharides and dietary fibre were preserved in both treatments. Variety had a strong impact on phytochemical profile, being Negro 8025 that exhibited the highest content of most of the compounds assessed. Water absorption index (WAI) and oil absorption capacity (OAC) were determined in order to measure technological suitability. Dehydration produced flours with stable WAI and low oil pick up. The results suggest that the flours of Negro 8025 beans have a good potential to be considered as functional ingredient for healthy food products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cell-to-cell movement of Potato virus X: the role of p12 and p8 encoded by the second and third open reading frames of the triple gene block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, A; Meshi, T

    2001-10-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) requires three proteins, p25, p12, and p8, encoded by the triple gene block plus the coat protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement. When each of these proteins was co-expressed with a cytosolic green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana by the microprojectile bombardment-mediated gene delivery method, only p12 enhanced diffusion of co-expressed GFP, indicating an ability to alter plasmodesmal permeability. p25, p12, and CP, expressed transiently in the initially infected cells, transcomplemented the corresponding movement-defective mutants to spread through two or more cell boundaries. Thus, these proteins probably move from cell to cell with the genomic RNA. In contrast, p8 only functioned intracellularly and was not absolutely required for cell-to-cell movement. Since overexpression of p12 overcame the p8 deficiency, p8 appears to facilitate the functioning of p12, presumably by mediating its intracellular trafficking. Considering the likelihood that p12 and p8 are membrane proteins, it is suggested that intercellular as well as intracellular movement of PVX involves a membrane-mediated process.

  13. Accurate ionization potential of semiconductors from efficient density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin-Hui

    2016-07-01

    Despite its huge successes in total-energy-related applications, the Kohn-Sham scheme of density functional theory cannot get reliable single-particle excitation energies for solids. In particular, it has not been able to calculate the ionization potential (IP), one of the most important material parameters, for semiconductors. We illustrate that an approximate exact-exchange optimized effective potential (EXX-OEP), the Becke-Johnson exchange, can be used to largely solve this long-standing problem. For a group of 17 semiconductors, we have obtained the IPs to an accuracy similar to that of the much more sophisticated G W approximation (GWA), with the computational cost of only local-density approximation/generalized gradient approximation. The EXX-OEP, therefore, is likely as useful for solids as for finite systems. For solid surfaces, the asymptotic behavior of the vx c has effects similar to those of finite systems which, when neglected, typically cause the semiconductor IPs to be underestimated. This may partially explain why standard GWA systematically underestimates the IPs and why using the same GWA procedures has not been able to get an accurate IP and band gap at the same time.

  14. Functional significance of the emotion-related late positive potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen B.R.E. Brown

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The late positive potential (LPP is an event-related potential component over visual cortical areas that is modulated by the emotional intensity of a stimulus. However, the functional significance of this neural modulation remains elusive. We conducted two experiments in which we studied the relation between LPP amplitude, subsequent perceptual sensitivity to a non-emotional stimulus (Experiment 1 and visual cortical excitability, as reflected by P1/N1 components evoked by this stimulus (Experiment 2. During the LPP modulation elicited by unpleasant stimuli, perceptual sensitivity and the P1 component were not affected. In contrast, we found some evidence for a decreased N1 amplitude during the LPP modulation, and consistent negative (but nonsignificant across-subject correlations between the magnitudes of the LPP modulation and corresponding changes in d-prime or P1/N1 amplitude. The results provide preliminary evidence that the LPP reflects a global inhibition of ongoing activity in visual cortex, resulting in the selective survival of activity associated with the processing of the emotional stimulus.

  15. Free-virus and cell-to-cell transmission in models of equine infectious anemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Linda J S; Schwartz, Elissa J

    2015-12-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a lentivirus in the retrovirus family that infects horses and ponies. Two strains, referred to as the sensitive strain and the resistant strain, have been isolated from an experimentally-infected pony. The sensitive strain is vulnerable to neutralization by antibodies whereas the resistant strain is neutralization-insensitive. The sensitive strain mutates to the resistant strain. EIAV may infect healthy target cells via free virus or alternatively, directly from an infected target cell through cell-to-cell transfer. The proportion of transmission from free-virus or from cell-to-cell transmission is unknown. A system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is formulated for the virus-cell dynamics of EIAV. In addition, a Markov chain model and a branching process approximation near the infection-free equilibrium (IFE) are formulated. The basic reproduction number R0 is defined as the maximum of two reproduction numbers, R0s and R0r, one for the sensitive strain and one for the resistant strain. The IFE is shown to be globally asymptotically stable for the ODE model in a special case when the basic reproduction number is less than one. In addition, two endemic equilibria exist, a coexistence equilibrium and a resistant strain equilibrium. It is shown that if R0>1, the infection persists with at least one of the two strains. However, for small infectious doses, the sensitive strain and the resistant strain may not persist in the Markov chain model. Parameter values applicable to EIAV are used to illustrate the dynamics of the ODE and the Markov chain models. The examples highlight the importance of the proportion of cell-to-cell versus free-virus transmission that either leads to infection clearance or to infection persistence with either coexistence of both strains or to dominance by the resistant strain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A New Role for the HTLV-1 p8 Protein: Increasing Intercellular Conduits and Viral Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Schwartz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses like HIV-1 and HTLV-1 can be transmitted efficiently by direct contact between infected and target cells. For HIV-1, various modes of cell-to-cell transfer have been reported, including virological synapses, polysynapses, filopodial bridges, and nanotube-like structures. So far, only synapses and biofilms have been described for HTLV-1 transmission. Recently, Van Prooyen et al. [1] identified an additional mode of HTLV-1 transmission through cellular conduits induced by the viral accessory protein p8.

  17. Cell-to-cell communication: Time and length scales of ligand internalization in cultures of suspended cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Coppey, Mathieu; Sealfon, Stuart C.; Shvartsman, Stanislav

    2008-06-01

    A problem of cell-to-cell communication by diffusible ligands is analyzed for the case when cells are distributed in three dimensions and diffusible ligands are secreted by cells and reversibly bind to cell surface receptors. Following its binding to a receptor, the ligand can either dissociate and be released back in the medium or be absorbed by the cell in a process that is called internalization. Using an effective medium approximation, we derive analytical expressions that characterize the time and length scales associated with the ligand trajectories leading to internalization. We discuss the applicability of our approximation and illustrate the application of our results to a specific cellular system.

  18. Alanine scanning of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV 2b protein identifies different positions for cell-to-cell movement and gene silencing suppressor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Nemes

    Full Text Available The multifunctional 2b protein of CMV has a role in the long distance and local movement of the virus, in symptom formation, in evasion of defense mediated by salicylic acid as well as in suppression of RNA silencing. The role of conserved amino acid sequence domains were analyzed previously in the protein function, but comprehensive analysis of this protein was not carried out until recently. We have analyzed all over the 2b protein by alanine scanning mutagenesis changing three consecutive amino acids (aa to alanine. We have identified eight aa triplets as key determinants of the 2b protein function in virus infection. Four of them (KKQ/22-24/AAA, QNR/31-33/AAA, RER/34-36/AAA, SPS/40-42/AAA overlap with previously determined regions indispensable in gene silencing suppressor function. We have identified two additional triplets necessary for the suppressor function of the 2b protein (LPF/55-57/AAA, NVE/10-12/AAA, and two other positions were required for cell-to-cell movement of the virus (MEL/1-3/AAA, RHV/70-72/AAA, which are not essential for suppressor activity.

  19. A functional perspective of nitazoxanide as a potential anticancer drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Santo, Nicola, E-mail: nico.disanto@duke.edu; Ehrisman, Jessie, E-mail: jessie.ehrisman@duke.edu

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Combination anti-cancer therapies are associated with increased toxicity and cross-resistance. • Some antiparasitic compounds may have anti-cancer potential. • Nitazoxanide interferes with metabolic and pro-death signaling. • Preclinical studies are needed to confirm anticancer ability of nitazoxanide. - Abstract: Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell proliferation, evasion of cell death and the ability to invade and disrupt vital tissue function. The classic model of carcinogenesis describes successive clonal expansion driven by the accumulation of mutations that eliminate restraints on proliferation and cell survival. It has been proposed that during cancer's development, the loose-knit colonies of only partially differentiated cells display some unicellular/prokaryotic behavior reminiscent of robust ancient life forms. The seeming “regression” of cancer cells involves changes within metabolic machinery and survival strategies. This atavist change in physiology enables cancer cells to behave as selfish “neo-endo-parasites” that exploit the tumor stromal cells in order to extract nutrients from the surrounding microenvironment. In this framework, it is conceivable that anti-parasitic compounds might serve as promising anticancer drugs. Nitazoxanide (NTZ), a thiazolide compound, has shown antimicrobial properties against anaerobic bacteria, as well as against helminths and protozoa. NTZ has also been successfully used to promote Hepatitis C virus (HCV) elimination by improving interferon signaling and promoting autophagy. More compelling however are the potential anti-cancer properties that have been observed. NTZ seems to be able to interfere with crucial metabolic and pro-death signaling such as drug detoxification, unfolded protein response (UPR), autophagy, anti-cytokine activities and c-Myc inhibition. In this article, we review the ability of NTZ to interfere with integrated survival mechanisms of

  20. Visual function with acupuncture tested by visual evoked potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Yoshiko; Fuse, Nobuo; Seimiya, Motohiko; Yokokura, Syunji; Watanabe, Kei; Nakazawa, Toru; Kurusu, Masayuki; Seki, Takashi; Tamai, Makoto

    2006-07-01

    Visual evoked potential (VEP) testing is used frequently and is an important ophthalmologic physiological test to examine visual functions objectively. The VEP is a complicated waveform consisting of negative waveform named N75 and N135, and positive waveform named P100. Delayed P100 latency and greatly attenuated amplitude on VEP are known characteristics for diagnosing optic nerve disease. Acupuncture has been used to treat wide clinical symptoms with minimal side effects. The confirmation of the efficacy of acupuncture generally relies on subjective symptoms. There is not much scientific evidence supporting the acupuncture treatments for eye diseases up to today. However, the VEP test can evaluate objectively and numerically the efficacy of the treatment by the acupuncture. We analyzed 19 healthy subjects (38 eyes). The P100 latencies in the group of less than 101.7 msec (total average) before acupuncture stimulations were not different than those after treatment (98.2 +/- 3.0 msec, 98.2 +/- 4.0 msec, respectively, p = 0.88, n = 17), but the latencies in those subjects with longer or equal to 101.7 msec were statistically different after acupuncture (104.6 +/- 2.8 msec, 101.9 +/- 3.7 msec, respectively, p = 0.006, n = 21). These results show that the acupuncture stimulation contributes to the P100 latencies of pattern reversal (PR)-VEP to some subjects who have delayed latencies, and this electrophysiological method is a valuable technique in monitoring the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy in the improvements of visual functions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the physiological effects by acupuncture stimulations using PR-VEP in normal subjects.

  1. Selective oestrogen receptor modulators differentially potentiate brain mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, R W; Yao, J; To, J; Hamilton, R T; Cadenas, E; Brinton, R D

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial energy-transducing capacity of the brain is important for long-term neurological health and is influenced by endocrine hormone responsiveness. The present study aimed to determine the role of oestrogen receptor (ER) subtypes in regulating mitochondrial function using selective agonists for ERα (propylpyrazoletriol; PPT) and ERβ (diarylpropionitrile; DPN). Ovariectomised female rats were treated with 17β-oestradiol (E(2) ), PPT, DPN or vehicle control. Both ER selective agonists significantly increased the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio and cytochrome oxidase (COX) activity relative to vehicle. Western blots of purified whole brain mitochondria detected ERα and, to a greater extent, ERβ localisation. Pre-treatment with DPN, an ERβ agonist, significantly increased ERβ association with mitochondria. In the hippocampus, DPN activated mitochondrial DNA-encoded COX I expression, whereas PPT was ineffective, indicating that mechanistically ERβ, and not ERα, activated mitochondrial transcriptional machinery. Both selective ER agonists increased protein expression of nuclear DNA-encoded COX IV, suggesting that activation of ERβ or ERα is sufficient. Selective ER agonists up-regulated a panel of bioenergetic enzymes and antioxidant defence proteins. Up-regulated proteins included pyruvate dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin V. In vitro, whole cell metabolism was assessed in live primary cultured hippocampal neurones and mixed glia. The results of analyses conducted in vitro were consistent with data obtained in vivo. Furthermore, lipid peroxides, accumulated as a result of hormone deprivation, were significantly reduced by E(2) , PPT and DPN. These findings suggest that the activation of both ERα and ERβ is differentially required to potentiate mitochondrial function in brain. As active components in hormone therapy, synthetically designed oestrogens as well as natural phyto-oestrogen cocktails

  2. Cell-to-cell communication in intact taste buds through ATP signalling from pannexin 1 gap junction hemichannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Roper, Stephen D

    2009-12-15

    Isolated taste cells, taste buds and strips of lingual tissue from taste papillae secrete ATP upon taste stimulation. Taste bud receptor (Type II) cells have been identified as the source of ATP secretion. Based on studies on isolated taste buds and single taste cells, we have postulated that ATP secreted from receptor cells via pannexin 1 hemichannels acts within the taste bud to excite neighbouring presynaptic (Type III) cells. This hypothesis, however, remains to be tested in intact tissues. In this report we used confocal Ca(2+) imaging and lingual slices containing intact taste buds to test the hypothesis of purinergic signalling between taste cells in a more integral preparation. Incubating lingual slices with apyrase reversibly blocked cell-to-cell communication between receptor cells and presynaptic cells, consistent with ATP being the transmitter. Inhibiting pannexin 1 gap junction hemichannels with CO(2)-saturated buffer or probenecid significantly reduced cell-cell signalling between receptor cells and presynaptic cells. In contrast, anandamide, a blocker of connexin gap junction channels, had no effect of cell-to-cell communication in taste buds. These findings are consistent with the model for peripheral signal processing via ATP and pannexin 1 hemichannels in mammalian taste buds.

  3. Olive oil and immune system functions: potential involvement in immunonutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Gerardo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil plays a crucial role as a main component of the Mediterranean diet, which has shown important benefits for the human health. According to the current knowledge, the administration of diets containing olive oil exerts some beneficial effects on the immune system functions due likely to the action of oleic acid rather than other substances contained in this fat. In the last few years, epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have evidenced the potential of certain dietary lipids (containing polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fatty acids as modulators of immune system functions due to their ability to suppress several functions of immune system in both humans and animals. As a result, these fats have been applied in the reduction of symptoms from diseases characterized by an overactivation of the immune system (autoimmune diseases or in the reduction of cancer risk. Here, we review several relevant experimental and clinical data associated with the beneficial effects of olive oil upon the health, the mechanisms of action and the immune function susceptible of being be altered by the administration of dietary lipids and particularly of olive oil. In addition, we will also discuss the detrimental effects on the immune system functions caused by the administration of certain dietary lipids attributed mainly to a reduction of host natural resistance against infectious microorganisms as well as the involvement of olive oil diets in the regulation of immune resistance.El aceite de oliva tiene un papel crucial como componente de la dieta Mediterránea, con importantes beneficios sobre la salud humana. Dietas conteniendo aceite de oliva actúan de manera favorable en las funciones del sistema inmune por la acción sobretodo del ácido oleico. Los estudios epidemiológicos, clínicos y experimentales publicados en los últimos años demuestran que ciertos lípidos de la dieta [ácidos grasos monoinsaturados (MUFA y poliinsaturados (PUFA

  4. Brain functions after sports-related concussion: insights from event-related potentials and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Nadia; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Bottari, Carolina; Johnston, Karen; Ptito, Alain

    2010-10-01

    The high incidence of concussions in contact sports and their impact on brain functions are a major cause for concern. To improve our understanding of brain functioning after sports-related concussion, advanced functional assessment techniques, namely event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have been recently used in research studies. Contrary to neuropsychological tests that measure verbal and/or motor responses, ERPs and fMRI assess the neural activities associated with cognitive/behavioral demands, and thus provide access to better comprehension of brain functioning. In fact, ERPs have excellent temporal resolution, and fMRI identifies the involved structures during a task. This article describes ERP and fMRI techniques and reviews the results obtained with these tools in sports-related concussion. Although these techniques are not yet readily available, they offer a unique clinical approach, particularly for complex cases (ie, athletes with multiple concussions, chronic symptoms) and objective measures that provide valuable information to guide management and return-to-play decision making.

  5. The Potential of "Function" as an Archival Descriptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudron, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Functional analysis has been incorporated widely into appraisal methods for decades. These methods, from documentation strategy to macroappraisal, are discussed, and the usefulness and limitations of functional analysis in appraisal are examined. Yet, while archival thinkers have focused on function in appraisal, little has been written on…

  6. Eph/ephrin-B-mediated cell-to-cell interactions govern MTS20(+) thymic epithelial cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Herradón, Sara; García-Ceca, Javier; Sánchez Del Collado, Beatriz; Alfaro, David; Zapata, Agustín G

    2016-08-01

    Thymus development is a complex process in which cell-to-cell interactions between thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are essential to allow a proper maturation of both thymic cell components. Although signals that control thymocyte development are well known, mechanisms governing TEC maturation are poorly understood, especially those that regulate the maturation of immature TEC populations during early fetal thymus development. In this study, we show that EphB2-deficient, EphB2LacZ and EphB3-deficient fetal thymuses present a lower number of cells and delayed maturation of DN cell subsets compared to WT values. Moreover, deficits in the production of chemokines, known to be involved in the lymphoid seeding into the thymus, contribute in decreased proportions of intrathymic T cell progenitors (PIRA/B(+)) in the mutant thymuses from early stages of development. These features correlate with increased proportions of MTS20(+) cells but fewer MTS20(-) cells from E13.5 onward in the deficient thymuses, suggesting a delayed development of the first epithelial cells. In addition, in vitro the lack of thymocytes or the blockade of Eph/ephrin-B-mediated cell-to-cell interactions between either thymocytes-TECs or TECs-TECs in E13.5 fetal thymic lobes coursed with increased proportions of MTS20(+) TECs. This confirms, for the first time, that the presence of CD45(+) cells, corresponding at these stages to DN1 and DN2 cells, and Eph/ephrin-B-mediated heterotypic or homotypic cell interactions between thymocytes and TECs, or between TECs and themselves, contribute to the early maturation of MTS20(+) TECs.

  7. Patching the Exchange-Correlation Potential in Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen

    2016-05-10

    A method for directly patching exchange-correlation (XC) potentials in materials is derived. The electron density of a system is partitioned into subsystem densities by dividing its Kohn-Sham (KS) potential among the subsystems. Inside each subsystem, its projected KS potential is required to become the total system's KS potential. This requirement, together with the nearsightedness principle of electronic matters, ensures that the electronic structures inside subsystems can be good approximations to the total system's electronic structure. The nearsightedness principle also ensures that subsystem densities could be well localized in their regions, making it possible to use high-level methods to invert the XC potentials for subsystem densities. Two XC patching methods are developed. In the local XC patching method, the total system's XC potential is improved in the cluster region. We show that the coupling between a cluster and its environment is important for achieving a fast convergence of the electronic structure in the cluster region. In the global XC patching method, we discuss how to patch the subsystem XC potentials to construct the XC potential in the total system, aiming to scale up high-level quantum mechanics simulations of materials. Proof-of-principle examples are given.

  8. The therapeutic potential of melatonin on neuronal function during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to improve neuronal function during normal ageing. INTRODUCTION1. Normal ageing often leads to the decline in cell function and the onset of ... in the number of age-related disease, it is important to look .... controls of the same age (Fig.

  9. Phaeobacter sp. strain Y4I utilizes two separate cell-to-cell communication systems to regulate production of the antimicrobial indigoidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cude, W Nathan; Prevatte, Carson W; Hadden, Mary K; May, Amanda L; Smith, Russell T; Swain, Caleb L; Campagna, Shawn R; Buchan, Alison

    2015-02-01

    The marine roseobacter Phaeobacter sp. strain Y4I synthesizes the blue antimicrobial secondary metabolite indigoidine when grown in a biofilm or on agar plates. Prior studies suggested that indigoidine production may be, in part, regulated by cell-to-cell communication systems. Phaeobacter sp. strain Y4I possesses two luxR and luxI homologous N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated cell-to-cell communication systems, designated pgaRI and phaRI. We show here that Y4I produces two dominantAHLs, the novel monounsaturated N-(3-hydroxydodecenoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OHC(12:1)-HSL) and the relatively common N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL), and provide evidence that they are synthesized by PhaI and PgaI, respectively.A Tn5 insertional mutation in either genetic locus results in the abolishment (pgaR::Tn5) or reduction (phaR::Tn5) of pigment production. Motility defects and denser biofilms were also observed in these mutant backgrounds, suggesting an overlap in the functional roles of these systems. Production of the AHLs occurs at distinct points during growth on an agar surface and was determined by isotope dilution high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (ID-HPLC-MS/MS) analysis.Within 2 h of surface inoculation, only 3OHC(12:1)-HSL was detected in agar extracts. As surface-attached cells became established (at approximately 10 h), the concentration of 3OHC(12:1)-HSL decreased, and the concentration of C8-HSL increased rapidly over 14 h.After longer (>24-h) establishment periods, the concentrations of the two AHLs increased to and stabilized at approximately 15 nM and approximately 600 nM for 3OHC12:1-HSL and C8-HSL, respectively. In contrast, the total amount of indigoidine increased steadily from undetectable to 642 Mby 48 h. Gene expression profiles of the AHL and indigoidine synthases (pgaI, phaI, and igiD) were consistent with their metabolite profiles. These data provide evidence that pgaRI and phaRI play overlapping roles

  10. Functional foods as potential therapeutic options for metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L; Poudyal, H; Panchal, S K

    2015-11-01

    Obesity as part of metabolic syndrome is a major lifestyle disorder throughout the world. Current drug treatments for obesity produce small and usually unsustainable decreases in body weight with the risk of major adverse effects. Surgery has been the only treatment producing successful long-term weight loss. As a different but complementary approach, lifestyle modification including the use of functional foods could produce a reliable decrease in obesity with decreased comorbidities. Functional foods may include fruits such as berries, vegetables, fibre-enriched grains and beverages such as tea and coffee. Although health improvements continue to be reported for these functional foods in rodent studies, further evidence showing the translation of these results into humans is required. Thus, the concept that these fruits and vegetables will act as functional foods in humans to reduce obesity and thereby improve health remains intuitive and possible rather than proven.

  11. AltMV TGB1 Nucleolar Localization Requires Homologous Interaction and Correlates with Cell Wall Localization Associated with Cell-to-Cell Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jiryun; Nam, Moon; Bae, Hanhong; Lee, Cheolho; Lee, Bong-Chun; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2013-12-01

    The Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) has multifunctional triple gene block (TGB) proteins, among which our studies have focused on the properties of the TGB1 protein. The TGB1 of AltMV has functions including RNA binding, RNA silencing suppression, and cell-to-cell movement, and is known to form homologous interactions. The helicase domains of AltMV TGB1 were separately mutated to identify which regions are involved in homologous TGB1 interactions. The yeast two hybrid system and Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) in planta were utilized to examine homologous interactions of the mutants. Helicase motif I of AltMV TGB1 was found to be critical to maintain homologous interactions. Mutations in the remaining helicase motifs did not inhibit TGB1 homologous interactions. In the absence of homologous interaction of TGB1, subcellular localization of helicase domain I mutants showed distinctively different patterns from that of WT TGB1. These results provide important information to study viral movement and replication of AltMV.

  12. The regulated secretory pathway in CD4(+ T cells contributes to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 cell-to-cell spread at the virological synapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Jolly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1 at the virological synapse (VS is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4(+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4(+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS. Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4(+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4(+ T cells to enhance its dissemination.

  13. The Regulated Secretory Pathway in CD4+ T cells Contributes to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Cell-to-Cell Spread at the Virological Synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Clare; Welsch, Sonja; Michor, Stefanie; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) at the virological synapse (VS) is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS). Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL) and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4+ T cells to enhance its dissemination. PMID:21909273

  14. The extended Lennard-Jones potential energy function: A simpler model for direct-potential-fit analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajigeorgiou, Photos G.

    2016-12-01

    An analytical model for the diatomic potential energy function that was recently tested as a universal function (Hajigeorgiou, 2010) has been further modified and tested as a suitable model for direct-potential-fit analysis. Applications are presented for the ground electronic states of three diatomic molecules: oxygen, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen fluoride. The adjustable parameters of the extended Lennard-Jones potential model are determined through nonlinear regression by fits to calculated rovibrational energy term values or experimental spectroscopic line positions. The model is shown to lead to reliable, compact and simple representations for the potential energy functions of these systems and could therefore be classified as a suitable and attractive model for direct-potential-fit analysis.

  15. 'Special K' and a Loss of Cell-To-Cell Adhesion in Proximal Tubule-Derived Epithelial Cells: Modulation of the Adherens Junction Complex by Ketamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E.; Jin, Tianrong; Siamantouras, Eleftherios; Liu, Issac K-K; Jefferson, Kieran P.; Squires, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a mild hallucinogenic class C drug, is the fastest growing ‘party drug’ used by 16–24 year olds in the UK. As the recreational use of Ketamine increases we are beginning to see the signs of major renal and bladder complications. To date however, we know nothing of a role for Ketamine in modulating both structure and function of the human renal proximal tubule. In the current study we have used an established model cell line for human epithelial cells of the proximal tubule (HK2) to demonstrate that Ketamine evokes early changes in expression of proteins central to the adherens junction complex. Furthermore we use AFM single-cell force spectroscopy to assess if these changes functionally uncouple cells of the proximal tubule ahead of any overt loss in epithelial cell function. Our data suggests that Ketamine (24–48 hrs) produces gross changes in cell morphology and cytoskeletal architecture towards a fibrotic phenotype. These physical changes matched the concentration-dependent (0.1–1 mg/mL) cytotoxic effect of Ketamine and reflect a loss in expression of the key adherens junction proteins epithelial (E)- and neural (N)-cadherin and β-catenin. Down-regulation of protein expression does not involve the pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ, nor is it regulated by the usual increase in expression of Slug or Snail, the transcriptional regulators for E-cadherin. However, the loss in E-cadherin can be partially rescued pharmacologically by blocking p38 MAPK using SB203580. These data provide compelling evidence that Ketamine alters epithelial cell-to-cell adhesion and cell-coupling in the proximal kidney via a non-classical pro-fibrotic mechanism and the data provides the first indication that this illicit substance can have major implications on renal function. Understanding Ketamine-induced renal pathology may identify targets for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:24009666

  16. A consensus line search algorithm for molecular potential energy functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurainski, Alexander; Hildebrandt, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter

    2009-07-15

    Force field based energy minimization of molecular structures is a central task in computational chemistry and biology. Solving this problem usually requires efficient local minimization techniques, i.e., iterative two-step methods that search first for a descent direction and then try to estimate the step width. The second step, the so called line search, typically uses polynomial interpolation schemes to estimate the next trial step. However, dependent on local properties of the objective function alternative schemes may be more appropriate especially if the objective function shows singularities or exponential behavior. As the choice of the best interpolation scheme cannot be made a priori, we propose a new consensus line search approach that performs several different interpolation schemes at each step and then decides which one is the most reliable at the current position. Although a naive consensus approach would lead to severe performance impacts, our method does not require additional evaluations of the energy function, imposing only negligible computational overhead. Additionally, our method can be easily adapted to the local behavior of other objective functions by incorporating suitable interpolation schemes or omitting non-fitting schemes. The performance of our consensus line search approach has been evaluated and compared to established standard line search algorithms by minimizing the structures of a large set of molecules using different force fields. The proposed algorithm shows better performance in almost all test cases, i.e., it reduces the number of iterations and function and gradient evaluations, leading to significantly reduced run times.

  17. TOWARDS PHASE TRANSFERABLE POTENTIAL FUNCTIONS - METHODOLOGY AND APPLICATION TO NITROGEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JORDAN, PC; VAN MAAREN, PJ; MAVRI, J; VAN DER SPOEL, D; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1995-01-01

    We describe a generalizable approach to the development of phase transferable effective intermolecular potentials and apply the method to the study of N-2 The method is based on a polarizable shell model description of the isolated molecule and uses experimental data to establish the parameters.

  18. Potential benefits of exercise on blood pressure and vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sebely; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone; Ho, Suleen

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity seems to enhance cardiovascular fitness during the course of the lifecycle, improve blood pressure, and is associated with decreased prevalence of hypertension and coronary heart disease. It may also delay or prevent age-related increases in arterial stiffness. It is unclear if specific exercise types (aerobic, resistance, or combination) have a better effect on blood pressure and vascular function. This review was written based on previous original articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indexed on PubMed from years 1975 to 2012 to identify studies on different types of exercise and the associations or effects on blood pressure and vascular function. In summary, aerobic exercise (30 to 40 minutes of training at 60% to 85% of predicted maximal heart rate, most days of the week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure and reduce augmentation index. Resistance training (three to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions at 10 repetition maximum, 3 days a week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure, whereas combination exercise training (15 minutes of aerobic and 15 minutes of resistance, 5 days a week) is beneficial to vascular function, but at a lower scale. Aerobic exercise seems to better benefit blood pressure and vascular function.

  19. Critical Thinking, Executive Functions and Their Potential Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizarraga, Maria Luisa Sanz de Acedo; Baquedano, Maria Teresa Sanz de Acedo; Villanueva, Oscar Ardaiz

    2012-01-01

    The central issue of this paper is to review the possible relationships between the constructs of critical thinking and executive functions. To do this, we first analyse the essential components of critical thinking from a psychological and neurological point of view. Second, we examine the scope of the cognitive and neurological nature of…

  20. Sign Function and Potential of the Printed Word.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Explains that semiology provides a broad perspective for analyzing the range of signs, their differences in form and function, along with the relative efficiency of different signs for different purposes and situations. Applies some general semiological notions to the printed page. (SR)

  1. Physiological functions and pathogenic potential of uric acid: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ridi, Rashika; Tallima, Hatem

    2017-09-01

    Uric acid is synthesized mainly in the liver, intestines and the vascular endothelium as the end product of an exogenous pool of purines, and endogenously from damaged, dying and dead cells, whereby nucleic acids, adenine and guanine, are degraded into uric acid. Mentioning uric acid generates dread because it is the established etiological agent of the severe, acute and chronic inflammatory arthritis, gout and is implicated in the initiation and progress of the metabolic syndrome. Yet, uric acid is the predominant anti-oxidant molecule in plasma and is necessary and sufficient for induction of type 2 immune responses. These properties may explain its protective potential in neurological and infectious diseases, mainly schistosomiasis. The pivotal protective potential of uric acid against blood-borne pathogens and neurological and autoimmune diseases is yet to be established.

  2. Adult neural stem cells-Functional potential and therapeutic applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin; ZHU Jianhong

    2004-01-01

    The adult brain has been thought traditionally as a structure with a very limited regenerative capacity. It is now evident that neurogenesis in adult mammalian brain is a prevailing phenomenon. Neural stem cells with the ability to self-renew, differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes reside in some regions of the adult brain. Adult neurogenesis can be stimulated by many physiological factors including pregnancy. More strikingly, newborn neurons in hippocampus integrally function with local neurons, thus neural stem cells might play important roles in memory and learning function. It seems that neural stem cells could transdifferentiate into other tissues, such as blood cells and muscles. Although there are some impediments in this field, some attempts have been made to employ adult neural stem cells in the cell replacement therapy for traumatic and ischemic brain injuries.

  3. Potential therapeutic effects of functionally active compounds isolated from garlic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Ban, Jung Ok; Park, Kyung-Ran; Lee, Chong Kil; Jeong, Heon-Sang; Han, Sang Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-05-01

    The medicinal properties of functionally active organosulfur compounds such as allin, diallyl disulfide, S-allylmercaptocysteine, and S-trityl-L-cysteine isolated from garlic have received great attention from a large number of investigators who have studied their pharmacological effects for the treatment of various diseases. These organosulfur compounds are able to prevent for development of cancer, cardiovascular, neurological, and liver diseases as well as allergy and arthritis. There have been also many reports on toxicities and pharmacokinetics of these compounds. The aim of this study is to review a variety of experimental and clinical reports, and describe the effectiveness, toxicities and pharmacokinetics, and possible mechanisms of pharmaceutical actions of functionally active compounds isolated from garlic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A method of calculating the Jost function for analytic potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakityansky, S.A. [University of South Africa (UNISA), Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Physics; Sofianos, S.A. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Amos, K. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1995-05-10

    A combination of the variable-constant and complex coordinate rotation methods is used to solve the two-body Schroedinger equation. The equation is replaced by a system of linear first-order differential equations, which enables one to perform direct calculation of the Jost function for all complex momenta of physical interest including the spectral points corresponding to bound and resonance states. 16 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. Analytical potential energy function for the Br + H{sub 2} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Yuzuru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    Analytical functions with a many-body expansion for the ground and first-excited-state potential energy surfaces for the Br+H{sub 2} system are newly presented in this work. These functions describe the abstraction and exchange reactions qualitatively well, although it has been found that the function for the ground-state potential surface is still quantitatively unsatisfactory. (author)

  6. The quasi-Gaussian entropy theory : Free energy calculations based on the potential energy distribution function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadei, A; Apol, MEF; DiNola, A; Berendsen, HJC

    1996-01-01

    A new theory is presented for calculating the Helmholtz free energy based on the potential energy distribution function. The usual expressions of free energy, internal energy and entropy involving the partition function are rephrased in terms of the potential energy distribution function, which must

  7. The quasi-Gaussian entropy theory : Free energy calculations based on the potential energy distribution function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadei, A; Apol, MEF; DiNola, A; Berendsen, HJC

    1996-01-01

    A new theory is presented for calculating the Helmholtz free energy based on the potential energy distribution function. The usual expressions of free energy, internal energy and entropy involving the partition function are rephrased in terms of the potential energy distribution function, which must

  8. Analysis for the Potential Function of the Digital Microstructure Image of Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUYou-Sheng; LINJi; LIHua-Mei; WUPeng-Min

    2003-01-01

    Making use of the full information obtained in our previous discussions, a new analytical solutions for the potential function of the digital microstructure image of porous media is reported in this paper. It is demonstrated that the distribution of potential function depends on the zeroth order Bessel function. All these will be helpful for analyzing the similar subjects in porous media.

  9. The potential of cover crops for improving soil function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoate, Chris; Crotty, Felicity

    2017-04-01

    Cover crops can be grown over the autumn and winter ensuring green cover throughout the year. They have been described as improving soil structure, reducing soil erosion and potentially even a form of grass weed control. These crops retain nutrients within the plant, potentially making them available for future crops, as well as increasing soil organic matter. Over the last three years, we have investigated how different cover crop regimes affect soil quality. Three separate experiments over each autumn/winter period have investigated how different cover crops affect soil biology, physics and chemistry, with each experiment building on the previous one. There have been significant effects of cover crops on soil structure, as well as significantly lower weed biomass and increased yields in the following crop - in comparison to bare stubble. For example, the effect of drilling the cover crops on soil structure in comparison to a bare stubble control that had not been driven on by machinery was quantified, and over the winter period the soil structure of the cover crop treatments changed, with compaction reduced in the cover crop treatments, whilst the bare stubble control remained unchanged. Weeds were found in significantly lower biomass in the cover crop mixes in comparison to the bare stubble control, and significantly lower weed biomass continued to be found in the following spring oat crop where the cover crops had been, indicating a weed suppressive effect that has a continued legacy in the following crop. The following spring oats have shown similar results in the last two years, with higher yields in the previous cover crop areas compared to the bare stubble controls. Overall, these results are indicating that cover crops have the potential to provide improvements to soil quality, reduce weeds and improve yields. We discuss the economic implications.

  10. Reprogramming somatic cells to cells with neuronal characteristics by defined medium both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Songwei; Guo, Yiping; Zhang, Yixin; Li, Yuan; Feng, Chengqian; Li, Xiang; Lin, Lilong; Guo, Lin; Wang, Haitao; Liu, Chunhua; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Chuanming; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Fuhui; Sun, Hao; Liang, Lining; Li, Lingyu; Su, Huanxing; Chen, Jiekai; Pei, Duanqing; Zheng, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Currently, direct conversion from somatic cells to neurons requires virus-mediated delivery of at least one transcriptional factor or a combination of several small-molecule compounds. Delivery of transcriptional factors may affect genome stability, while small-molecule compounds may require more evaluations when applied in vivo. Thus, a defined medium with only conventional growth factors or additives for cell culture is desirable for inducing neuronal trans-differentiation. Here, we report that a defined medium (5C) consisting of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), N2 supplement, leukemia inhibitory factor, vitamin C (Vc), and β-mercaptoethanol (βMe) induces the direct conversion of somatic cells to cells with neuronal characteristics. Application of 5C medium converted mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into TuJ+ neuronal-like cells, which were capable of survival after being transplanted into the mouse brain. The same 5C medium could convert primary rat astrocytes into neuronal-like cells with mature electrophysiology characteristics in vitro and facilitated the recovery of brain injury, possibly by inducing similar conversions, when infused into the mouse brain in vivo. Crucially, 5C medium could also induce neuronal characteristics in several human cell types. In summary, this 5C medium not only provides a means to derive cells with neuronal characteristics without viral transfection in vitro but might also be useful to produce neurons in vivo for neurodegenerative disease treatment.

  11. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  12. Role of cell-to-cell variability in activating a positive feedback antiviral response in human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Hu

    Full Text Available In the first few hours following Newcastle disease viral infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, the induction of IFNB1 is extremely low and the secreted type I interferon response is below the limits of ELISA assay. However, many interferon-induced genes are activated at this time, for example DDX58 (RIGI, which in response to viral RNA induces IFNB1. We investigated whether the early induction of IFNBI in only a small percentage of infected cells leads to low level IFN secretion that then induces IFN-responsive genes in all cells. We developed an agent-based mathematical model to explore the IFNBI and DDX58 temporal dynamics. Simulations showed that a small number of early responder cells provide a mechanism for efficient and controlled activation of the DDX58-IFNBI positive feedback loop. The model predicted distributions of single cell responses that were confirmed by single cell mRNA measurements. The results suggest that large cell-to-cell variation plays an important role in the early innate immune response, and that the variability is essential for the efficient activation of the IFNB1 based feedback loop.

  13. Ionic channel function in action potential generation: current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, Gytis

    2007-04-01

    Over 50 years ago, Hodgkin and Huxley laid down the foundations of our current understanding of ionic channels. An impressive progress has been made during the following years that culminated in the revelation of the details of potassium channel structure. Nevertheless, even today, we cannot separate well currents recorded in central mammalian neurons. Many modern concepts about the function of sodium and potassium currents are based on experiments performed in nonmammalian cells. The recent recognition of the fast delayed rectifier current indicates that we need to reevaluate the biophysical role of sodium and potassium currents. This review will consider high quality voltage clamp data obtained from the soma of central mammalian neurons in the view of our current knowledge about proteins forming ionic channels. Fast sodium currents and three types of outward potassium currents, the delayed rectifier, the subthreshold A-type, and the D-type potassium currents, are discussed here. An updated current classification with biophysical role of each current subtype is provided. This review shows that details of kinetics of both sodium and outward potassium currents differ significantly from the classical descriptions and these differences may be of functional significance.

  14. New Functions and Potential Applications of Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneyama, Hisayuki; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Tonouchi, Naoto

    Currently, several types of amino acids are being produced and used worldwide. Nevertheless, several new functions of amino acids have been recently discovered that could result in other applications. For example, oral stimulation by glutamate triggers the cephalic phase response to prepare for food digestion. Further, the stomach and intestines have specific glutamate-recognizing systems in their epithelial mucosa. Regarding clinical applications, addition of monosodium glutamate to the medicinal diet has been shown to markedly enhance gastric secretion in a vagus-dependent manner. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are the major components of muscles, and ingestion of BCAAs has been found to be effective for decreasing muscle pain. BCAAs are expected to be a solution for the serious issue of aging. Further, ingestion of specific amino acids could be beneficial. Glycine can be ingested for good night's sleep: glycine ingestion before bedtime significantly improved subjective sleep quality. Ingestion of alanine and glutamine effectively accelerates alcohol metabolism, and ingestion of cystine and theanine effectively prevents colds. Finally, amino acids could be used in a novel clinical diagnostic method: the balance of amino acids in the blood could be an indicator of the risk of diseases such as cancer. These newly discovered functions of amino acids are expected to contribute to the resolution of various issues.

  15. The functional locus of the lateralized readiness potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Hiroaki; Wild-Wall, Nele; Sangals, Jörg; Sommer, Werner

    2004-03-01

    The lateralized readiness potential (LRP) is considered to reflect motor activation and has been used extensively as a tool in elucidating cognitive processes. In the present study, we attempted to more precisely determine the origins of the LRP within the cognitive system. The response selection and motor programming stages were selectively manipulated by varying symbolic stimulus response compatibility and the time to peak force of an isometric finger extension response. Stimulus response compatibility and time to peak force affected response latency, as measured in the electromyogram, in a strictly additive fashion. The effects of the experimental manipulations on stimulus- and response-synchronized LRPs indicate that the LRP starts after the completion of response-hand selection and at the beginning of motor programming. These results allow a more rigorous interpretation of LRP findings in basic and applied research.

  16. A universal potential energy function and precise calculations on the molecular spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Changfeng; Yan Kun; Liu Daizhi

    2008-01-01

    By using a function with a phase factor, a universal analytic potential energy function applied to the interactions between diatoms or molecules is derived and six kinds of potential curves of common shapes are obtained by adjusting the phase factor. The spectroscopic parameters of ten diatomic molecules are calculated by using the potential energy function; as a consequence, all calculation results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  18. Three-dimensional potential flows from functions of a 3D complex variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick; Panton, Ronald L.; Martin, E. D.

    1990-01-01

    Potential, or ideal, flow velocities can be found from the gradient of an harmonic function. An ordinary complex valued analytic function can be written as the sum of two real valued functions, both of which are harmonic. Thus, 2D complex valued functions serve as a source of functions that describe two-dimensional potential flows. However, this use of complex variables has been limited to two-dimensions. Recently, a new system of three-dimensional complex variables has been developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. As a step toward application of this theory to the analysis of 3D potential flow, several functions of a three-dimensional complex variable have been investigated. The results for two such functions, the 3D exponential and 3D logarithm, are presented in this paper. Potential flows found from these functions are investigated. Important characteristics of these flows fields are noted.

  19. Multidimensional potential of boron-containing molecules in functional materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wolfgang Kaim; Narayan S Hosmane

    2010-01-01

    Boron-containing molecular systems have received much attention under theoretical aspects and from the side of synthetic organic chemistry. However, their potential for further applications such as optically interesting effects such as Non-Linear Optics (NLO), medical uses for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), or magnetism has been recognised only fairly recently. Molecular systems containing boron offer particular mechanisms to accommodate unpaired electrons which may result in stable radicals as spin-bearing materials. Among such materials are organoboron compounds in which the prototypical electron deficient (10B, 11B) boron vs. carbon centers can accept and help to delocalise added electrons in a 2-dimensionally conjugated system. Alternatively, oligoboron clusters B$_{n}$X$_{n}^{k}$ and the related carboranes or metallacarboranes are capable of adding or losing single electrons to form paramagnetic clusters with 3-dimensionally delocalised spin, according to combined experimental studies and quantum chemical calculations. The unique nuclear properties of 10B are of therapeutic value if their selective transport via appended carbon nanotubes, boron nanotubes, or magnetic nanoparticles can be effected.

  20. Central nicotinic receptors: structure, function, ligands, and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, M Novella; Gratteri, Paola; Guandalini, Luca; Martini, Elisabetta; Bonaccini, Claudia; Gualtieri, Fulvio

    2007-06-01

    The growing interest in nicotinic receptors, because of their wide expression in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues and their involvement in several important CNS pathologies, has stimulated the synthesis of a high number of ligands able to modulate their function. These membrane proteins appear to be highly heterogeneous, and still only incomplete information is available on their structure, subunit composition, and stoichiometry. This is due to the lack of selective ligands to study the role of nAChR under physiological or pathological conditions; so far, only compounds showing selectivity between alpha4beta2 and alpha7 receptors have been obtained. The nicotinic receptor ligands have been designed starting from lead compounds from natural sources such as nicotine, cytisine, or epibatidine, and, more recently, through the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. This review focuses on the structure of the new agonists, antagonists, and allosteric ligands of nicotinic receptors, it highlights the current knowledge on the binding site models as a molecular modeling approach to design new compounds, and it discusses the nAChR modulators which have entered clinical trials.

  1. New insights on arthropod toxins that potentiate erectile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Kenia P; Torres, Fernanda S; Borges, Marcia H; Matavel, Alessandra; Pimenta, Adriano M C; De Lima, Maria E

    2013-07-01

    The use of natural substances for the treatment of diseases or injuries is an ancient practice of many cultures. According to folklore, natural aphrodisiacs may help to raise libido and increase desire. The supposed aphrodisiacs mainly include a plethora of preparations of plants, among other substances. However, the real boundary between myth and reality has not been established yet in most cases and such boundaries must be drawn by scientific methods. A growing interest of the scientific community has been focused on animal venoms, especially those from arthropods, i.e. spiders and scorpions, which cause priapism, a prolonged and painful erection. This review highlights the studies that have been performed with venoms and toxins from arthropods known to cause priapism, among other toxic symptoms, pointing out some pharmacological approaches for better understanding this effect. To date, the venom of some spiders, mainly Phoneutria nigriventer, and scorpions, such as the yellow South American scorpion Tityus serrulatus, among others, have been known to cause priapism. Since erectile dysfunction (ED) is a growing health problem in the world, more common in patients with vascular diseases as diabetes and hypertension, the use of animal venoms and toxins as pharmacological tools could not only shed light to the mechanisms involved in erectile function, but also represent a possible model for new drugs to treat ED. Unfortunately, attempts to correlate the structure of those priapism-related toxins were unfruitful. Such difficulties lie firstly on the poor data concerning purified priapism-related toxins, instead of whole venoms and/or semi-purified fractions, and secondly, on the scarce available primary sequences and structural data, mainly from spider toxins. It has been shown that all these toxins modify the sodium (Na(+)) channel activity, mostly slowing down its inactivation current. Improving the knowledge on the tertiary structure of these toxins could provide

  2. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro, E-mail: akeita@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of pre- and mature adipocytes on myogenesis in vitro. • Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes affect myoblast fusion. • Preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. • Mature adipocytes lead to muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies.

  3. The Azospirillum brasilense Che1 chemotaxis pathway controls swimming velocity, which affects transient cell-to-cell clumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Amber; Russell, Matthew H; Alexandre, Gladys

    2012-07-01

    The Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway of Azospirillum brasilense contributes to chemotaxis and aerotaxis, and it has also been found to contribute to regulating changes in cell surface adhesive properties that affect the propensity of cells to clump and to flocculate. The exact contribution of Che1 to the control of chemotaxis and flocculation in A. brasilense remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Che1 affects reversible cell-to-cell clumping, a cellular behavior in which motile cells transiently interact by adhering to one another at their nonflagellated poles before swimming apart. Clumping precedes and is required for flocculation, and both processes appear to be independently regulated. The phenotypes of a ΔaerC receptor mutant and of mutant strains lacking cheA1, cheY1, cheB1, or cheR1 (alone or in combination) or with che1 deleted show that Che1 directly mediates changes in the flagellar swimming velocity and that this behavior directly modulates the transient nature of clumping. Our results also suggest that an additional receptor(s) and signaling pathway(s) are implicated in mediating other Che1-independent changes in clumping identified in the present study. Transient clumping precedes the transition to stable clump formation, which involves the production of specific extracellular polysaccharides (EPS); however, production of these clumping-specific EPS is not directly controlled by Che1 activity. Che1-dependent clumping may antagonize motility and prevent chemotaxis, thereby maintaining cells in a metabolically favorable niche.

  4. A versatile complementation assay for cell-to-cell and long distance movements by cucumber mosaic virus based agro-infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Zhao, Xiaohui; Yao, Min; Li, Chun; Miriam, Karwitha; Zhang, Xue; Tao, Xiaorong

    2014-09-22

    Microinjection, bombardment or tobamovirus and potexvirus based assay has been developed to identify the putative movement protein (MP) or to characterize plasmodesma-mediated macromolecular transport. In this study, we developed a versatile complementation assay for the cell-to-cell and long distance movements of macromolecules by agro-infiltration based on the infectious clones of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). The movement-deficient CMV reporter was constructed by replacing the MP on RNA 3 with ER targeted GFP. The ectopic expression of CMV MP was able to efficiently move the RNA3-MP::erGFP reporter from the original cell to neighboring cells, whereas CMV MP-M5 mutant was unable to initiate the movement. Importantly, the presence of CMV RNA1 and RNA2 can dramatically amplify the movement signals once the RNA3-MP::erGFP reporter moves out of the original cell. The appropriate observation time for this movement complementation assay was at 48-72 hours post infiltration (hpi), whereas the optimal incubation temperature was between 25 and 28 °C. The ectopic co-expression of MPs from other virus genera, NSm from tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) or NSvc4 from rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV), could also facilitate the movement of the RNA3::erGFP reporter from the original cell into other cells. The chimeric mutant virus created by substituting the MP of CMV RNA3 with NSm from TSWV or NSvc4 from RSV move systemically in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by agro-infiltration. This agro-infiltration complementation assay is simple, efficient and reliable. Our approach provides an alternative and powerful tool with great potentials in identifying putative movement protein and characterizing macromolecular trafficking.

  5. Colonic miRNA expression/secretion, regulated by intestinal epithelial PepT1, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Ayyadurai

    Full Text Available PepT1 is a member of the proton-oligopeptide cotransporter family SLC15, which mediates the transport of di/tripeptides from intestinal lumen into epithelial cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a small noncoding RNAs (21-23 nucleotides, post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated regions (UTRs of their target mRNAs. Although the role of most miRNAs remains elusive, they have been implicated in vital cellular functions such as intestinal epithelial cells differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of intestinal epithelial PepT1 expression on microRNA (miRNA expression/secretion in the colons of control mice and in mice with experimentally induced colonic inflammation (colitis. The colonic miRNA expression was deregulated in both colitis and control mice but the deregulation of miRNA expression/secretion was specific to colonic tissue and did not affect other tissues such as spleen and liver. Intestinal epithelial PepT1-dependent deregulation of colonic miRNA expression not only affects epithelial cells but also other cell types, such as intestinal macrophages. Importantly, we found the miRNA 23b which was known to be involved in inflammatory bowel disease was secreted and transported between cells to impose a gene-silencing effect on recipient intestinal macrophages. Based on our data, we may conclude that the expression of a specific protein, PepT1, in the intestine affects local miRNA expression/secretion in the colon on a tissue specific manner and may play an important role during the induction and progression of colitis. Colonic miRNA expression/secretion, regulated by intestinal epithelial PepT1, could play a crucial role in cell-to-cell communication during colitis.

  6. The Statics Dielectric Function and Interaction Potential In Strong Coupling With AdS/CFT

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lian; Liu, Hui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the static dielectric function and interaction potential in strong coupling limit with AdS/CFT correspondence. The dielectric function is depressed compared with that in weak coupling. The interaction potential then presents a weaker screening characteristics in strong coupling, which indicates a smaller Debye mass compared with weak coupling.

  7. betaFIT: A computer program to fit pointwise potentials to selected analytic functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Robert J.; Pashov, Asen

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes program betaFIT, which performs least-squares fits of sets of one-dimensional (or radial) potential function values to four different types of sophisticated analytic potential energy functional forms. These families of potential energy functions are: the Expanded Morse Oscillator (EMO) potential [J Mol Spectrosc 1999;194:197], the Morse/Long-Range (MLR) potential [Mol Phys 2007;105:663], the Double Exponential/Long-Range (DELR) potential [J Chem Phys 2003;119:7398], and the "Generalized Potential Energy Function (GPEF)" form introduced by Šurkus et al. [Chem Phys Lett 1984;105:291], which includes a wide variety of polynomial potentials, such as the Dunham [Phys Rev 1932;41:713], Simons-Parr-Finlan [J Chem Phys 1973;59:3229], and Ogilvie-Tipping [Proc R Soc A 1991;378:287] polynomials, as special cases. This code will be useful for providing the realistic sets of potential function shape parameters that are required to initiate direct fits of selected analytic potential functions to experimental data, and for providing better analytical representations of sets of ab initio results.

  8. Thermal expansion coefficient of graphene using molecular dynamics simulation: A comparative study on potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Hamid; Rajabpour, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of pristine graphene sheets (GSs) using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. We validated our model with previous studies employing AIREBO potential function and repeated the same simulation with the optimized Tersoff potential function. We also discussed the differences of the results and the corresponding reasons: evaluating the negative TEC of graphene by measuring the C-C bond length and out-of-plane vibrations of the GS. We finally showed that the ripples and wrinkles are more represented over the GS during the simulation with the AIREBO potential function rather than the optimized Tersoff. Comparing the results of both potential functions; it is seen that the results obtained by AIREBO potential function are in better agreement with those reported by previous scholars.

  9. OPUS-Ca: a knowledge-based potential function requiring only Calpha positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghao; Lu, Mingyang; Chen, Mingzhi; Li, Jialin; Ma, Jianpeng

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we report a knowledge-based potential function, named the OPUS-Ca potential, that requires only Calpha positions as input. The contributions from other atomic positions were established from pseudo-positions artificially built from a Calpha trace for auxiliary purposes. The potential function is formed based on seven major representative molecular interactions in proteins: distance-dependent pairwise energy with orientational preference, hydrogen bonding energy, short-range energy, packing energy, tri-peptide packing energy, three-body energy, and solvation energy. From the testing of decoy recognition on a number of commonly used decoy sets, it is shown that the new potential function outperforms all known Calpha-based potentials and most other coarse-grained ones that require more information than Calpha positions. We hope that this potential function adds a new tool for protein structural modeling.

  10. A new four-parameter empirical potential energy function for diatomic molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Rafi; Reem Al-Tuwirqi; Hanaa Farhan; I A Khan

    2007-06-01

    A new empirical four-parameter function is proposed for the construction of potential curves of 15 stable states of diatomic molecules. The parameters are evaluated in terms of experimentally known spectroscopic constants. On comparing its performance with other functions, the proposed function is found to be simple and reliable for a wide range of molecules.

  11. Analysis for the Potential Function of the Digital Microstructure Image of Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU You-Sheng; LIN Ji; LI Hua-Mei; WU Feng-Min

    2003-01-01

    Making use of the full information obtained in our previous discussions, a new analytical solutions for thepotential function of the digital microstructure image of porous media is reported in this paper. It is demonstrated that the distribution of potential function depends on the zeroth order Bessel function. All these will be helpful for analyzingthe similar subjects in porous media.

  12. Invertibility of retarded response functions for Laplace transformable potentials: Application to one-body reduced density matrix functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesbertz, K J H

    2015-08-07

    A theorem for the invertibility of arbitrary response functions is presented under the following conditions: the time dependence of the potentials should be Laplace transformable and the initial state should be a ground state, though it might be degenerate. This theorem provides a rigorous foundation for all density-functional-like theories in the time-dependent linear response regime. Especially for time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) functional theory, this is an important step forward, since a solid foundation has currently been lacking. The theorem is equally valid for static response functions in the non-degenerate case, so can be used to characterize the uniqueness of the potential in the ground state version of the corresponding density-functional-like theory. Such a classification of the uniqueness of the non-local potential in ground state 1RDM functional theory has been lacking for decades. With the aid of presented invertibility theorem presented here, a complete classification of the non-uniqueness of the non-local potential in 1RDM functional theory can be given for the first time.

  13. Dual-well potential field function for articulated manipulator trajectory planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Badawy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new attractive potential field function is proposed in this paper for manipulator trajectory planning. Existing attractive potential field constructs a global minimum through which maneuvering objects move down the gradient of the potential field toward this global minimum. The proposed method constructs a potential field with two minima. The purpose of these two minima is to create a dual attraction between links rather than affecting each link by the preceding one through kinematic constraints.

  14. Generalized gradient approximation exchange energy functional with correct asymptotic behavior of the corresponding potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona-Espíndola, Javier, E-mail: jcarmona-26@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340, México (Mexico); Gázquez, José L., E-mail: jlgm@xanum.uam.mx [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, México D. F. 09340, México (Mexico); Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México D. F. 07360, México (Mexico); Vela, Alberto [Departamento de Química, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, México D. F. 07360, México (Mexico); Trickey, S. B. [Quantum Theory Project, Department of Physics and Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118435, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8435 (United States)

    2015-02-07

    A new non-empirical exchange energy functional of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) type, which gives an exchange potential with the correct asymptotic behavior, is developed and explored. In combination with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) correlation energy functional, the new CAP-PBE (CAP stands for correct asymptotic potential) exchange-correlation functional gives heats of formation, ionization potentials, electron affinities, proton affinities, binding energies of weakly interacting systems, barrier heights for hydrogen and non-hydrogen transfer reactions, bond distances, and harmonic frequencies on standard test sets that are fully competitive with those obtained from other GGA-type functionals that do not have the correct asymptotic exchange potential behavior. Distinct from them, the new functional provides important improvements in quantities dependent upon response functions, e.g., static and dynamic polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities. CAP combined with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional gives roughly equivalent results. Consideration of the computed dynamical polarizabilities in the context of the broad spectrum of other properties considered tips the balance to the non-empirical CAP-PBE combination. Intriguingly, these improvements arise primarily from improvements in the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and not from shifts in the associated eigenvalues. Those eigenvalues do not change dramatically with respect to eigenvalues from other GGA-type functionals that do not provide the correct asymptotic behavior of the potential. Unexpected behavior of the potential at intermediate distances from the nucleus explains this unexpected result and indicates a clear route for improvement.

  15. Exact solutions of a particle in a box with a delta function potential: The factorization method

    CERN Document Server

    Pedram, Pouria

    2010-01-01

    We find the exact eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the problem of a particle in a box with a delta function potential $V(x)=\\lambda\\delta(x-x_{0})$ using the factorization method. We show that the presence of the delta function potential results in the discontinuity of the corresponding ladder operators. More importantly, the presence of the delta function potential allows us to obtain the full spectrum of the problem in the first step of the factorization procedure even for the weak coupling limit ($\\lambda\\to 0$).

  16. Continuity Conditions on Schrodinger Wave Functions at Discontinuities of the Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, David

    1979-01-01

    Several standard arguments which attempt to show that the wave function and its derivative must be continuous across jump discontinuities of the potential are reviewed and their defects discussed. (Author/HM)

  17. Quantization function for attractive, singular potential tails; Die Quantisierungsfunktion fuer attraktive, singulaere Potentialschwaenze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, Patrick N.

    2010-02-04

    The interaction between atoms and molecules with each other are deep potential wells with attractive, singular tails. Bound state energies are determined by a quantization function according to a simple quantization rule. This function is dominantly determined by the singular potential tail for near-threshold states. General expressions for the low- and high-energy contributions of the singular potential tail to the quantization function, as well as the connection to the scattering length are presented in two and three dimensions. Precise analytical expressions for the quantization function are determined for the case of potential tails proportional to -1/r{sup 4} and -1/r{sup 6} for three dimensions. (orig.)

  18. Effect of the infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) glycoprotein G on virus attachment, penetration, growth curve and direct cell-to-cell spread

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhaogang; ZHANG Manfu

    2005-01-01

    The secreted alphaherpesvirus glycoprotein G (gG) works differently from other proteins. Analysis of the role of ILTV gG in virus attachment, penetration, direct cell-to-cell spread (CTCS) and the growth curve showed that gG or its antibody had no effect on ILTV attachment and penetration and that the gG antibody reduced the virus plaque size and the one-step growth curve on chicken embryo liver (CEL) cells, but gG did not affect the virus plaque size or the one-step growth curve on CEL cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) detection showed that ILTV gG is located in the perinuclear region and the membrane of the CEL cells. These results suggested that ILTV gG might contribute to direct cell-to-cell transmission.

  19. Durability and Reliability of Electric Vehicle Batteries under Electric Utility Grid Operations. Part 1: Cell-to-Cell Variations and Preliminary Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Devie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle-to-grid (V2G and grid-to-vehicle (G2V strategies are considered to help stabilize the electric grid but their true impact on battery degradation is still unknown. The intention of this study is to test the impact of such strategies on the degradation of commercial Li-ion batteries. This first part looks into the preliminary testing performed prior to the start of degradation studies to ensure that the selected cells are compatible. Both the thermodynamic and kinetic cell-to-cell variation within the selected batch and the diagnostic-ability of the cells were investigated. The cells were found to have low cell-to-cell variations and are thus consistent. Moreover, the emulation of the full cell from the half-cell data prepared from harvested electrodes was successful and the degradation forecast showed that the main degradation modes can be differentiated.

  20. Spinless relativistic particle in energy-dependent potential and normalization of the wave function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchikha, Amar; Chetouani, Lyazid

    2014-06-01

    The problem of normalization related to a Klein-Gordon particle subjected to vector plus scalar energy-dependent potentials is clarified in the context of the path integral approach. In addition the correction relating to the normalizing constant of wave functions is exactly determined. As examples, the energy dependent linear and Coulomb potentials are considered. The wave functions obtained via spectral decomposition, were found exactly normalized.

  1. Physiopathology of blood platelets: a model system for studies of cell-to-cell interaction. Progress report, November 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    This report covers the studies on basic mechanisms of cellular interactions, utilizing platelets as a model system and, when possible, concentrating on the influence that environmental factors (nutritional, metabolic, cellular, immunologic and others) have on them. The four major sections include: platelet interaction with tumor cells; a model for the study of cell-to-cell interaction; interaction of platelets with vessel walls; and platelet interactions with immune proteins.

  2. Generalised analysis of the potential of an enterprise as a function of environmental parameters (theoretical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karapeychik Igor M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the frameworks of the author’s concept of the potential of an enterprise as the ability to conduct its immanently appropriate activity and also the idea of presentation of the size of the potential in the form of potential function from parameters of the state of an enterprise and foreign economic environment the article develops a scientific and methodical approach to construction and analysis of the potential function of an enterprise. The offered approach envisages building an economic and mathematical model of an enterprise of the optimisation type with consideration of environmental factors, determination of the size of economic potential as a maximum possible (optimal with the set condition of an enterprise and external environment of net income, statistical test of the model with possible values of external parameters (formation of statistical sampling of the graph of the potential function of an enterprise and application of statistical methods including methods of correlation, factor and regression analysis, for the study of its properties. Operability of this approach is shown on the example of the study of properties of the potential function of a model enterprise. In the course of approbation the article demonstrates its ability to reveal specific features of impact of external factors on economic potential of an enterprise; establishes, as a common regularity, differential influence of various environmental factors, caused not only by the nature of these factors, but also production and economic specific features and specific state of an enterprise. The article shows that the quantitative values of the force of influence of the said factors upon the value of economic potential, obtained during statistical analysis of the potential function of an enterprise, could serve as an instrument of ranking these factors by the priority level in the goal setting tasks at the stage of formation of the strategy of enterprise development

  3. Soil bacterial endemism and potential functional redundancy in natural broadleaf forest along a latitudinal gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuguang; Cong, Jing; Lu, Hui; Deng, Ye; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Diqiang

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms play key roles in ecosystem processes and biogeochemical cycling, however, the relationship between soil microbial taxa diversity and their function in natural ecosystems is largely unknown. To determine how soil bacteria community and function are linked from the local to regional scale, we studied soil bacteria community composition, potential function and environmental conditions in natural and mature broadleaf forests along a latitudinal gradient in China, using the Illumina 16S rRNA sequencing and GeoChip technologies. The results showed strong biogeographic endemism pattern in soil bacteria were existed, and the spatial distance and climatic variables were the key controlling factors for this pattern. Therefore, dispersal limitation and environmental selection may represent two key processes in generating and maintaining the soil bacterial biogeographic pattern. By contrast, the soil bacterial potential function is highly convergent along the latitudinal gradient and there were highly differing bacterial community compositions, and the soil chemistry may include the main factors active in shaping the soil bacterial potential function. Therefore, the soil bacterial potential function may be affected by local gradients in resource availability, and predicting soil bacterial potential function requires knowledge of abiotic and biotic environmental factors.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells rescue cardiomyoblasts from cell death in an in vitro ischemia model via direct cell-to-cell connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Levente

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are promising candidates for cell based therapies in myocardial infarction. However, the exact underlying cellular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Our aim was to explore the possible role of direct cell-to-cell interaction between ischemic H9c2 cardiomyoblasts and normal MSCs. Using an in vitro ischemia model of 150 minutes of oxygen glucose deprivation we investigated cell viability and cell interactions with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Results Our model revealed that adding normal MSCs to the ischemic cell population significantly decreased the ratio of dead H9c2 cells (H9c2 only: 0.85 ± 0.086 vs. H9c2+MSCs: 0.16 ± 0.035. This effect was dependent on direct cell-to-cell contact since co-cultivation with MSCs cultured in cell inserts did not exert the same beneficial effect (ratio of dead H9c2 cells: 0.90 ± 0.055. Confocal microscopy revealed that cardiomyoblasts and MSCs frequently formed 200-500 nm wide intercellular connections and cell fusion rarely occurred between these cells. Conclusion Based on these results we hypothesize that mesenchymal stem cells may reduce the number of dead cardiomyoblasts after ischemic damage via direct cell-to-cell interactions and intercellular tubular connections may play an important role in these processes.

  5. Two basic (hydrophilic) regions in the movement protein of Parietaria mottle virus have RNA binding activity and are required for cell-to-cell transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Coll-Bonfill, Nuria; Aramburu, Jose; Pallás, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic; Galipienso, Luis

    2014-05-12

    The movement protein (MP) of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Bioinformatics analysis identified two hydrophilic non-contiguous regions (R1 and R2) rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine and with the predicted secondary structure of an α-helix. Different approaches were used to determine the implication of the R1 and R2 regions in RNA binding, plasmodesmata (PD) targeting and cell-to-cell movement. EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay) showed that both regions have RNA-binding activity whereas that mutational analysis reported that either deletion of any of these regions, or loss of the basic amino acids, interfered with the viral intercellular movement. Subcellular localization studies showed that PMoV MP locates at PD. Mutants designed to impeded cell-to-cell movement failed to accumulate at PD indicating that basic residues in both R1 and R2 are critical for binding the MP at PD.

  6. A parabolic function to modify Thornthwaite estimates of potential evapotranspiration for the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    Errors of the Thornthwaite model can be analyzed using adjusted pan evaporation as an index of potential evapotranspiration. An examination of ratios of adjusted pan evaporation to Thornthwaite potential evapotranspiration indicates that the ratios are highest in the winter and lowest during summer months. This trend suggests a parabolic pattern. In this study a parabolic function is used to adjust Thornthwaite estimates of potential evapotranspiration. Forty locations east of the Rocky Mountains are analyzed. -from Author

  7. Theoretical study of Structural and analytical potential energy functions of GaN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using Density Function Theory,the present work has optimized the equilibrium geometry of GaN. Murrell-Sorbie analytical potential energy functions of GaN have been derived by using ab initio data and the least-square fitting method,and harmonic frequency,force constant and spectroscopic data also have been calculated.

  8. Analysis of proton radioactivity of nuclei by using proximity potential with a new universal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, C. L.; Zhang, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear potential between proton and the daughter nuclei is calculated in the frame of the proximity potential with a new universal function. We obtained and analyzed the half-lives of proton radioactivity of the mother nuclei. By comparing to the experimental data and the other calculation results of ground and isomer states of proton emitters, it is found that the present calculation results can reproduce the order of magnitude of the experimental data well. It indicates that the proximity potential with a new universal function can estimate the half-life of proton radioactivity.

  9. Alternative derivation of an exchange-only density-functional optimized effective potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, D. P.

    2007-10-01

    An alternative derivation of the exchange-only density-functional optimized effective potential equation is given. It is shown that the localized Hartree-Fock common energy denominator Green’s function approximation (LHF-CEDA) for the density-functional exchange potential proposed independently by Della Sala and Görling [J. Chem. Phys. 115, 5718 (2001)] and Gritsenko and Baerends [Phys. Rev. A 64, 42506 (2001)] can be derived as an approximation to the OEP exchange potential in a similar way that the KLI approximation [Phys. Rev. A 45, 5453 (1992)] was derived. An exact expression for the correction term to the LHF-CEDA approximation can thus be found. The correction term can be expressed in terms of the first-order perturbation-theory many-electron wave function shift when the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian is subjected to a perturbation equal to the difference between the density-functional exchange potential and the Hartree-Fock nonlocal potential, expressed in terms of the Kohn-Sham orbitals. An explicit calculation shows that the density weighted mean of the correction term is zero, confirming that the LHF-CEDA approximation can be interpreted as a mean-field approximation. The corrected LHF-CEDA equation and the optimized effective potential equation are shown to be identical, with information distributed differently between terms in the equations. For a finite system the correction term falls off at least as fast as 1/r4 for large r .

  10. A UNIVERSAL ANALYTIC POTENTIAL-ENERGY FUNCTION BASED ON A PHASE FACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.F. Yu; K. Yan; D.Z. Liu

    2006-01-01

    Using a field equation with a phase factor, a universal analytic potential-energy function applied to the interactions between diatoms or molecules is derived, and five kinds of potential curves of common shapes are obtained adjusting the phase factors. The linear thermal expansion coefficients and Young's moduli of eleven kinds of fuce-centered cubic (fcc) metals - Al, Cu, Ag, etc. Are calculated using the potential-energy function; the computational results are quite consistent with experimental values. Moreover, an analytic relation between the linear thermal expansion coefficients and Young's moduli of fcc metals is given using the potential-energy function. Finally, the force constants of fifty-five kinds of diatomic moleculars with low excitation state are computed using this theory, and they are quite consistent with RKR (Rydberg-Klein-Rees) experimental values.

  11. Structure and analytical potential energy function for the ground state of the BCx (x=0, -1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geng Zhen-Duo; Zhang Yan-Song; Fan Xiao-Wei; Lu Zhan-Sheng; Luo Gai-Xia

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the electronic states of the ground states and dissociation limits of BC and BC- are correctly determined based on group theory and atomic and molecular reaction statics. The equilibrium geometries, harmonic frequencies and dissociation energies of the ground state of BC and BC- are calculated by using density function theory and quadratic CI method including single and double substitutions. The analytical potential energy functions of these states have been fitted with Murrell-Sorbie potential energy function from our ab initio calculation results. The spectroscopic data (αe, ωe and ωeXe) of each state is calculated via the relation between analytical potential energy function and spectroscopic data. All the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  12. Density-functional errors in ionization potential with increasing system size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittleton, Sarah R.; Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M., E-mail: cisborn@ucmerced.edu [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Johnson, Erin R., E-mail: erin.johnson@dal.ca [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, 6274 Coburg Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2015-05-14

    This work investigates the effects of molecular size on the accuracy of density-functional ionization potentials for a set of 28 hydrocarbons, including series of alkanes, alkenes, and oligoacenes. As the system size increases, delocalization error introduces a systematic underestimation of the ionization potential, which is rationalized by considering the fractional-charge behavior of the electronic energies. The computation of the ionization potential with many density-functional approximations is not size-extensive due to excessive delocalization of the incipient positive charge. While inclusion of exact exchange reduces the observed errors, system-specific tuning of long-range corrected functionals does not generally improve accuracy. These results emphasize that good performance of a functional for small molecules is not necessarily transferable to larger systems.

  13. Metric-space approach to potentials and its relevance to density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, P. M.; D'Amico, I.

    2016-12-01

    External potentials play a crucial role in modeling quantum systems, since, for a given interparticle interaction, they define the system Hamiltonian. We use the metric-space approach to quantum mechanics to derive, from the energy conservation law, two natural metrics for potentials. We show that these metrics are well defined for physical potentials, regardless of whether the system is in an eigenstate or if the potential is bounded. In addition, we discuss the gauge freedom of potentials and how to ensure that the metrics preserve physical relevance. Our metrics for potentials, together with the metrics for wave functions and densities from I. D'Amico et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 050401 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.050401] paves the way for a comprehensive study of the two fundamental theorems of density-functional theory. We explore these by analyzing two many-body systems for which the related exact Kohn-Sham systems can be derived. First we consider the information provided by each of the metrics, and we find that the density metric performs best in distinguishing two many-body systems. Next we study for the systems at hand the one-to-one relationships among potentials, ground-state wave functions, and ground-state densities defined by the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem as relationships in metric spaces. We find that, in metric space, these relationships are monotonic and incorporate regions of linearity, at least for the systems considered. Finally, we use the metrics for wave functions and potentials in order to assess quantitatively how close the many-body and Kohn-Sham systems are: We show that, at least for the systems analyzed, both metrics provide a consistent picture, and for large regions of the parameter space the error in approximating the many-body wave function with the Kohn-Sham wave function lies under a threshold of 10%.

  14. The acoustical Klein-Gordon equation: the wave-mechanical step and barrier potential functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Barbara J; Pike, E Roy; Sharp, David B

    2003-09-01

    The transformed form of the Webster equation is investigated. Usually described as analogous to the Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics, it is noted that the second-order time dependency defines a Klein-Gordon problem. This "acoustical Klein-Gordon equation" is analyzed with particular reference to the acoustical properties of wave-mechanical potential functions, U(x), that give rise to geometry-dependent dispersions at rapid variations in tract cross section. Such dispersions are not elucidated by other one-dimensional--cylindrical or conical--duct models. Since Sturm-Liouville analysis is not appropriate for inhomogeneous boundary conditions, the exact solution of the Klein-Gordon equation is achieved through a Green's-function methodology referring to the transfer matrix of an arbitrary string of square potential functions, including a square barrier equivalent to a radiation impedance. The general conclusion of the paper is that, in the absence of precise knowledge of initial conditions on the area function, any given potential function will map to a multiplicity of area functions of identical relative resonance characteristics. Since the potential function maps uniquely to the acoustical output, it is suggested that the one-dimensional wave physics is both most accurately and most compactly described within the Klein-Gordon framework.

  15. Identification of potential genetic components involved in the deviant quorum-sensing signaling pathways of Burkholderia glumae through a functional genomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxi eChen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia glumae is the chief causal agent for bacterial panicle blight of rice. The acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL-mediated quorum-sensing (QS system dependent on a pair of luxI and luxR homologs, tofI and tofR, is the primary cell-to-cell signaling mechanism determining the virulence of this bacterium. Production of toxoflavin, a major virulence factor of B. glumae, is known to be dependent on the tofI/tofR QS system. In our previous study, however, it was observed that B. glumae mutants defective in tofI or tofR produced toxoflavin if they grew on the surface of a solid medium, suggesting that alternative signaling pathways independent of tofI or tofR are activated in that growth condition for the production of toxoflavin. In this study, potential genetic components involved in the tofI- and tofR-independent signaling pathways for toxoflavin production were sought through screening random mini-Tn5 mutants of B. glumae to better understand the intercellular signaling pathways of this pathogen. Fifteen and three genes were initially identified as the potential genetic elements of the tofI- and tofR-independent pathways, respectively. Especially, the ORF (bglu_2g06320 divergently transcribed from toxJ, which encodes an orphan LuxR protein and controls toxoflavin biosynthesis, was newly identified in this study as a gene required for the tofR-independent toxoflavin production and named as toxK. Among those genes, flhD, dgcB, and wyzB were further studied to validate their functions in the tofI-independent toxoflavin production, and similar studies were also conducted with qsmR and toxK for their functions in the tofR-independent toxoflavin production. This work provides a foundation for future comprehensive studies of the intercellular signaling systems of B. glumae and other related pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Uniqueness of the potential function for the vectorial Sturm-Liouville equation on a finite interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Tsorng-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, the vectorial Sturm-Liouville operator L Q = - d 2 d x 2 + Q ( x is considered, where Q(x is an integrable m × m matrix-valued function defined on the interval [0,π] The authors prove that m 2+1 characteristic functions can determine the potential function of a vectorial Sturm-Liouville operator uniquely. In particular, if Q(x is real symmetric, then m ( m + 1 2 + 1 characteristic functions can determine the potential function uniquely. Moreover, if only the spectral data of self-adjoint problems are considered, then m 2 + 1 spectral data can determine Q(x uniquely.

  17. Function-selective domain architecture plasticity potentials in eukaryotic genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkeviciute, Viktorija; Rackham, Owen J L; Gough, Julian; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai

    2015-12-01

    To help evaluate how protein function impacts on genome evolution, we introduce a new concept of 'architecture plasticity potential' - the capacity to form distinct domain architectures - both for an individual domain, or more generally for a set of domains grouped by shared function. We devise a scoring metric to measure the plasticity potential for these domain sets, and evaluate how function has changed over time for different species. Applying this metric to a phylogenetic tree of eukaryotic genomes, we find that the involvement of each function is not random but highly selective. For certain lineages there is strong bias for evolution to involve domains related to certain functions. In general eukaryotic genomes, particularly animals, expand complex functional activities such as signalling and regulation, but at the cost of reducing metabolic processes. We also observe differential evolution of transcriptional regulation and a unique evolutionary role of channel regulators; crucially this is only observable in terms of the architecture plasticity potential. Our findings provide a new layer of information to understand the significance of function in eukaryotic genome evolution. A web search tool, available at http://supfam.org/Pevo, offers a wide spectrum of options for exploring functional importance in eukaryotic genome evolution.

  18. pfSNP: An integrated potentially functional SNP resource that facilitates hypotheses generation through knowledge syntheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingbo; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Chong, Samuel S; Lee, Caroline G L

    2011-01-01

    Currently, >14,000,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are reported. Identifying phenotype-affecting SNPs among these many SNPs pose significant challenges. Although several Web resources are available that can inform about the functionality of SNPs, these resources are mainly annotation databases and are not very comprehensive. In this article, we present a comprehensive, well-annotated, integrated pfSNP (potentially functional SNPs) Web resource (http://pfs.nus.edu.sg/), which is aimed to facilitate better hypothesis generation through knowledge syntheses mediated by better data integration and a user-friendly Web interface. pfSNP integrates >40 different algorithms/resources to interrogate >14,000,000 SNPs from the dbSNP database for SNPs of potential functional significance based on previous published reports, inferred potential functionality from genetic approaches as well as predicted potential functionality from sequence motifs. Its query interface has the user-friendly "auto-complete, prompt-as-you-type" feature and is highly customizable, facilitating different combination of queries using Boolean-logic. Additionally, to facilitate better understanding of the results and aid in hypotheses generation, gene/pathway-level information with text clouds highlighting enriched tissues/pathways as well as detailed-related information are also provided on the results page. Hence, the pfSNP resource will be of great interest to scientists focusing on association studies as well as those interested to experimentally address the functionality of SNPs.

  19. The effect of empirical potential functions on modeling of amorphous carbon using molecular dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Longqiu, E-mail: longqiuli@gmail.com [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Xu, Ming; Song, Wenping [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Ovcharenko, Andrey [Western Digital Corporation, San Jose, CA (United States); Zhang, Guangyu; Jia, Ding [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Empirical potentials have a strong effect on the hybridization and structure of amorphous carbon and are of great importance in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this work, amorphous carbon at densities ranging from 2.0 to 3.2 g/cm{sup 3} was modeled by a liquid quenching method using Tersoff, 2nd REBO, and ReaxFF empirical potentials. The hybridization, structure and radial distribution function G(r) of carbon atoms were analyzed as a function of the three potentials mentioned above. The ReaxFF potential is capable to model the change of the structure of amorphous carbon and MD results are in a good agreement with experimental results and density function theory (DFT) at low density of 2.6 g/cm{sup 3} and below. The 2nd REBO potential can be used when amorphous carbon has a very low density of 2.4 g/cm{sup 3} and below. Considering the computational efficiency, the Tersoff potential is recommended to model amorphous carbon at a high density of 2.6 g/cm{sup 3} and above. In addition, the influence of the quenching time on the hybridization content obtained with the three potentials is discussed.

  20. B-Spline potential function for maximum a-posteriori image reconstruction in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Dilipkumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An iterative image reconstruction technique employing B-Spline potential function in a Bayesian framework is proposed for fluorescence microscopy images. B-splines are piecewise polynomials with smooth transition, compact support and are the shortest polynomial splines. Incorporation of the B-spline potential function in the maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction technique resulted in improved contrast, enhanced resolution and substantial background reduction. The proposed technique is validated on simulated data as well as on the images acquired from fluorescence microscopes (widefield, confocal laser scanning fluorescence and super-resolution 4Pi microscopy. A comparative study of the proposed technique with the state-of-art maximum likelihood (ML and maximum-a-posteriori (MAP with quadratic potential function shows its superiority over the others. B-Spline MAP technique can find applications in several imaging modalities of fluorescence microscopy like selective plane illumination microscopy, localization microscopy and STED.

  1. Potential energy function from differential cross-section data: An inverse quantum scattering theory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, N. H. T.; Borges, E.; Sousa, R. V.; Braga, J. P.

    Important physical and chemical information can be extracted from scattering experiments data. This kind of problem is usually ill-posed in the sense that one of the three conditions, existence, uniqueness, and continuity, is not satisfied. For example, the inversion of intermolecular potential functions from scattering data, such as experimental cross section, is an ill-posed problem which can be modeled as a Fredholm integral equation. In this work, an inversion method based on recursive neural networks is proposed to solve this inverse quantum scattering problem within the Born approximation. As physical example, the repulsive component of the potential function for the interaction Ar-Ar is obtained from differential cross-section data. The sensitivity of the potential energy function to be inverted, in relation to the differential cross-section data, is also analyzed. The present approach is simple, general, and numerically stable.

  2. Yield Functions and Plastic Potentials for BCC Metals and Possibly Other Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, R M

    2005-09-29

    Yield functions and plastic potentials are expressed in terms of the invariants of the stress tensor for polycrystalline metals and other isotropic materials. The plastic volume change data of Richmond is used to evaluate the embedded materials properties for some bcc metals and one polymer. A general form for the plastic potential is found that is intended to represent and cover a wide range of materials types.

  3. Electron localization function in full-potential representation for crystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormeci, A; Rosner, H; Wagner, F R; Kohout, M; Grin, Yu

    2006-01-26

    The electron localization function (ELF) is implemented in the first-principles, all-electron, full-potential local orbital method. This full-potential implementation increases the accuracy with which the ELF can be computed for crystalline materials. Some representative results obtained are presented and compared with the results of other methods. Although for crystal structures with directed bonding only minor differences are found, in simple elemental metals, there are differences in the valence region, which give rise to different ELF topologies.

  4. L2 discretization of Sturmian wave functions for Coulomb-like potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frapiccini, A. L.; Gonzalez, V. Y.; Randazzo, J. M.; Colavecchia, F. D.; Gasaneo, G.

    In this work we introduce a method to construct Sturmian functions for general interaction potentials in two-body problems. We expand these Sturmians on a finite L2 space, using N Laguerre basis functions to obtain a discrete set of eigenvalues for positive and negative energies. Orthogonality and closure relations are thus rewritten for these expansions; completeness is achieved through increasing the basis size. We apply the method to the Coulomb and Herman and Skillman potential. We study the behavior of the functions obtained and their convergence for an overall range of energies. The Sturmian functions are applied to solve the Schrödinger equation for an active electron in a He-like system.

  5. Alternative Splicing: A Potential Source of Functional Innovation in the Eukaryotic Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS is a common posttranscriptional process in eukaryotic organisms, by which multiple distinct functional transcripts are produced from a single gene. The release of the human genome draft revealed a much smaller number of genes than anticipated. Because of its potential role in expanding protein diversity, interest in alternative splicing has been increasing over the last decade. Although recent studies have shown that 94% human multiexon genes undergo AS, evolution of AS and thus its potential role in functional innovation in eukaryotic genomes remain largely unexplored. Here we review available evidence regarding the evolution of AS prevalence and functional role. In addition we stress the need to correct for the strong effect of transcript coverage in AS detection and set out a strategy to ultimately elucidate the extent of the role of AS in functional innovation on a genomic scale.

  6. Isgur–Wise function in a QCD-inspired potential model with WKB approximation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BHASKAR JYOTI HAZARIKA; D K CHOUDHURY

    2017-03-01

    We use Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) approximation for calculating the slope and curvature of Isgur–Wise function in a QCD-inspired potential model. This work is an extension of the approximation methods to the QCD-inspired potential model. The approach hints at an effective range of distance for calculating the slope and curvature of Isgur–Wise function. Comparison is also made with those of Dalgarno method and variationallyimproved perturbation theory (VIPT) as well as other models to show the advantages of using WKB approximation.

  7. Standard hydrogen electrode and potential of zero charge in density functional calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten; Skúlason, Egill

    2011-01-01

    Methods to explicitly account for half-cell electrode potentials have recently appeared within the framework of density functional theory. The potential of the electrode relative to the standard hydrogen electrode is typically determined by subtracting the experimental value of the absolute......) the calculated work function strongly depends on the structure of the water film covering the metal surface. In this paper, we first identify the most accurate experimental reference for the ASHEP by revisiting up-to-date literature, and validate the choice of electron reference level in single-electrode density...

  8. Formation Control of Multirobot Based on I/O Feedback Linearization and Potential Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard techniques of I/O linearization are widely applied to leader-follower approach for multirobot formation control. However general leader-follower approach cannot adapt to the environment with obstacles. Concerning that issue, a formation control method of multirobot system based on potential function is proposed in this paper, and a new control law is designed by choosing a proper potential function and employing Lyapunov stability theory, which stabilizes the formation of the multirobot system. We combine the method with a leader-follower approach to solve the problem that the latter cannot avoid obstacles. Simulation results are given to validate the method.

  9. Isgur-Wise function in a QCD-inspired potential model with WKB approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Bhaskar Jyoti; Choudhury, D. K.

    2017-03-01

    We use Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation for calculating the slope and curvature of Isgur-Wise function in a QCD-inspired potential model. This work is an extension of the approximation methods to the QCD-inspired potential model. The approach hints at an effective range of distance for calculating the slope and curvature of Isgur-Wise function. Comparison is also made with those of Dalgarno method and variationally improved perturbation theory (VIPT) as well as other models to show the advantages of using WKB approximation.

  10. Cell-to-cell transformation in Escherichia coli: a novel type of natural transformation involving cell-derived DNA and a putative promoting pheromone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Etchuuya

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is not assumed to be naturally transformable. However, several recent reports have shown that E. coli can express modest genetic competence in certain conditions that may arise in its environment. We have shown previously that spontaneous lateral transfer of non-conjugative plasmids occurs in a colony biofilm of mixed E. coli strains (a set of a donor strain harbouring a plasmid and a plasmid-free recipient strain. In this study, with high-frequency combinations of strains and a plasmid, we constructed the same lateral plasmid transfer system in liquid culture. Using this system, we demonstrated that this lateral plasmid transfer was DNase-sensitive, indicating that it is a kind of transformation in which DNase-accessible extracellular naked DNA is essential. However, this transformation did not occur with purified plasmid DNA and required a direct supply of plasmid from co-existing donor cells. Based on this feature, we have termed this transformation type as 'cell-to-cell transformation'. Analyses using medium conditioned with the high-frequency strain revealed that this strain released a certain factor(s that promoted cell-to-cell transformation and arrested growth of the other strains. This factor is heat-labile and protease-sensitive, and its roughly estimated molecular mass was between ∼9 kDa and ∼30 kDa, indicating that it is a polypeptide factor. Interestingly, this factor was effective even when the conditioned medium was diluted 10(-5-10(-6, suggesting that it acts like a pheromone with high bioactivity. Based on these results, we propose that cell-to-cell transformation is a novel natural transformation mechanism in E. coli that requires cell-derived DNA and is promoted by a peptide pheromone. This is the first evidence that suggests the existence of a peptide pheromone-regulated transformation mechanism in E. coli and in Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. A protein G fragment from the salmonid viral hemorrhagic septicemia rhabdovirus induces cell-to-cell fusion and membrane phosphatidylserine translocation at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estepa, A M; Rocha, A I; Mas, V; Pérez, L; Encinar, J A; Nuñez, E; Fernandez, A; Gonzalez Ros, J M; Gavilanes, F; Coll, J M

    2001-12-07

    The fusion-related properties of segments p9, p3, p4, and p9 + p2 surrounding the p2 phospholipid-binding domain of the protein G (pG) of the salmonid rhabdovirus of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) (Nuñez, E., Fernandez, A. M., Estepa, A., Gonzalez-Ros, J. M., Gavilanes, F., and Coll, J. M. (1998) Virology 243, 322-330; Estepa, A., and Coll, J. M. (1996) Virology 216, 60-70), have been studied at neutral and fusion (low) pH values by using its derived peptides. Cell-to-cell fusion, translocation of phosphatidylserine, and inhibition of fusion of pG-transfected cells defined the p9 + p2 (fragment 11, sequence 56-110) as a fragment with higher specific activity for anionic phospholipid aggregation than the previously reported p2. While fragment 11, p2, and p3 showed interactions with anionic phospholipids, p9 and p4 showed no interactions with any phospholipids. When added to a cell monolayer model at low pH, fragment 11 induced pH-dependent cell-to-cell fusion and translocated phosphatidylserine from the inner to the outer leaflet of the membrane. At low pH and in the presence of anionic phospholipids, fragment 11 showed more than 80% beta-sheet conformation (IR and CD spectroscopies). Finally, anti-fragment 11 antibodies inhibited low pH-dependent pG-transfected cell-to-cell fusion. All of the data support the conclusion that fragment 11 is a primary determinant of some of the viral cell fusion events in VHSV.

  12. New statistical potential for quality assessment of protein models and a survey of energy functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rykunov Dmitry

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scoring functions, such as molecular mechanic forcefields and statistical potentials are fundamentally important tools in protein structure modeling and quality assessment. Results The performances of a number of publicly available scoring functions are compared with a statistical rigor, with an emphasis on knowledge-based potentials. We explored the effect on accuracy of alternative choices for representing interaction center types and other features of scoring functions, such as using information on solvent accessibility, on torsion angles, accounting for secondary structure preferences and side chain orientation. Partially based on the observations made, we present a novel residue based statistical potential, which employs a shuffled reference state definition and takes into account the mutual orientation of residue side chains. Atom- and residue-level statistical potentials and Linux executables to calculate the energy of a given protein proposed in this work can be downloaded from http://www.fiserlab.org/potentials. Conclusions Among the most influential terms we observed a critical role of a proper reference state definition and the benefits of including information about the microenvironment of interaction centers. Molecular mechanical potentials were also tested and found to be over-sensitive to small local imperfections in a structure, requiring unfeasible long energy relaxation before energy scores started to correlate with model quality.

  13. Potential use and challenges of functional connectivity mapping in intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Todd Constable

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data to assess functional connectivity in the human brain for surgical planning in intractable epilepsy. This approach has the potential to predict outcomes for a given surgical procedure based on the pre-surgical functional organization of the brain. Functional connectivity can also identify cortical regions that are organized differently in epilepsy patients either as a direct function of the disease or through indirect compensatory responses. Functional connectivity mapping can also potentially help identify epileptogenic tissue, whether this is a single focal location or a network of seizure-generating tissues and this information can assist in guiding the implantation of electrodes for invasive monitoring. This review covers the basics of connectivity analysis and discusses particular issues associated with analyzing such data. These issues include how to define nodes, as well as differences between connectivity analyses of individual nodes, groups of nodes, and whole-brain assessment at the voxel level. The need for arbitrary thresholds in some connectivity analyses is discussed and a solution to this problem is reviewed. Overall, functional connectivity analysis is becoming an important tool for assessing functional brain organization in surgical planning in epilepsy.

  14. Vestibular function disorders and potential mechanisms in irradiation nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dianshui; Zhao, Miaoqing; Yin, Jinjun; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Hao; Xia, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Vestibular function disorders were widespread among nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. The radiation doses to the inner ears were associated with the incidence of vestibular function disorders, but the correlations were mild. The inflammatory responses and possible resolution obstacles of inflammation participated in persistent vestibular function disorders after irradiation. To investigate the incidence of vestibular function disorders in NPC patients after irradiation and potential mechanisms. Patients who received radical intensity-modulated radiotherapy for their NPC were recruited. The serum levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were detected by ELISA method. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests were used to evaluate vestibular function and correlation analyses were used to analyze the potential mechanisms of vestibular function disorders. Thirty-eight patients were included. The incidences of abnormal ocular VEMP (oVEMP) and cervical VEMP (cVEMP) were 65.79% and 80.26% at the time of completion of radiotherapy, and 61.84% and 71.05% at 3 months after radiotherapy. The mean and maximum radiation doses to the inner ears were both significantly associated with abnormal oVEMP and cVEMP (p < 0.05, all), but the correlations were all mild. The serum levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were both significantly associated with abnormal oVEMP and cVEMP after irradiation (p < 0.05, all).

  15. Extension of the coherence function to quadratic models. [applied to plasma density and potential fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. C.; Wong, W. F.; Powers, E. J.; Roth, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown how the use of higher coherence functions can recover some of the lost coherence due to nonlinear relationship between two fluctuating quantities whose degree of mutual coherence is being measured. The relationship between the two processes is modeled with the aid of a linear term and a quadratic term. As a specific example, the relationship between plasma density and potential fluctuations in a plasma is considered. The fraction of power in the auto-power spectrum of the potential fluctuations due to a linear relationship and to a quadratic relationship between the density and potential fluctuations is estimated.

  16. Precise response functions in all-electron methods: Application to the optimized-effective-potential approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzinger, Markus; Friedrich, Christoph; Görling, Andreas; Blügel, Stefan

    2012-06-01

    The optimized-effective-potential method is a special technique to construct local Kohn-Sham potentials from general orbital-dependent energy functionals. In a recent publication [M. Betzinger, C. Friedrich, S. Blügel, A. Görling, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.83.045105 83, 045105 (2011)] we showed that uneconomically large basis sets were required to obtain a smooth local potential without spurious oscillations within the full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method. This could be attributed to the slow convergence behavior of the density response function. In this paper, we derive an incomplete-basis-set correction for the response, which consists of two terms: (1) a correction that is formally similar to the Pulay correction in atomic-force calculations and (2) a numerically more important basis response term originating from the potential dependence of the basis functions. The basis response term is constructed from the solutions of radial Sternheimer equations in the muffin-tin spheres. With these corrections the local potential converges at much smaller basis sets, at much fewer states, and its construction becomes numerically very stable. We analyze the improvements for rock-salt ScN and report results for BN, AlN, and GaN, as well as the perovskites CaTiO3, SrTiO3, and BaTiO3. The incomplete-basis-set correction can be applied to other electronic-structure methods with potential-dependent basis sets and opens the perspective to investigate a broad spectrum of problems in theoretical solid-state physics that involve response functions.

  17. Full canonical information from grand-potential density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Las Heras, Daniel; Schmidt, Matthias

    2014-12-05

    We present a general and formally exact method to obtain the canonical one-body density distribution and the canonical free energy from direct decomposition of classical density functional results in the grand ensemble. We test the method for confined one-dimensional hard-core particles for which the exact grand potential density functional is explicitly known. The results agree to within high accuracy with those from exact methods and our Monte Carlo many-body simulations. The method is relevant for treating finite systems and for dynamical density functional theory.

  18. Potential extra-ribosomal functions of ribosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Zhu, Yi-Fei; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Rong; Jia, Zhengping

    2015-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs), are essential components of the ribosomes, the molecular machines that turn mRNA blueprints into proteins, as they serve to stabilize the structure of the rRNA, thus improving protein biosynthesis. In addition, growing evidence suggests that RPs can function in other cellular roles. In the present review, we summarize several potential extra-ribosomal functions of RPs in ribosomal biogenesis, transcription activity, translation process, DNA repair, replicative life span, adhesive growth, and morphological transformation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the future in-depth studies are needed to identify these novel secondary functions of RPs in S. cerevisiae.

  19. Lyapunov Functions, Stationary Distributions, and Non-equilibrium Potential for Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David F; Craciun, Gheorghe; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj; Wiuf, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    We consider the relationship between stationary distributions for stochastic models of reaction systems and Lyapunov functions for their deterministic counterparts. Specifically, we derive the well-known Lyapunov function of reaction network theory as a scaling limit of the non-equilibrium potential of the stationary distribution of stochastically modeled complex balanced systems. We extend this result to general birth-death models and demonstrate via example that similar scaling limits can yield Lyapunov functions even for models that are not complex or detailed balanced, and may even have multiple equilibria.

  20. Antioxidative and antiinflammatory potential of different functional drink concepts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartsch, Peter C; Kler, Adolf; Kriesl, Erwin

    2009-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the antioxidative effects of three different functional drink concepts especially designed to improve the body's performance and function and to possess high antioxidant activities. The concepts based on the mixture of various plant ingredients were: (1) eQ - equalize your nutrient balance, brain line [acerola-dragon fruit], (2) eQ - equalize your nutrient balance, beauty line [honey-pepper] and (3) Let's get red [intense]. By using a cell-based test assay, the study investigated the potential of the functional drinks to inactivate reactive superoxide anion radicals generated by inflammation-mediating cells as well as the effect on basal metabolism of these cells (antioxidant and antiinflammatory potential). In addition, by using a cell-free test assay the potential of the drinks to inactivate free exogenous superoxide anion radicals (scavenger effect) was investigated. The data presented here demonstrate the different radical scavenging, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of the functional drink concepts. In particular Let's get red [intense] turned out to be the most potent drink in this respect and demonstrated marked efficacy in scavenging, antioxidant and antiinflammatory action. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Lyapunov Functions, Stationary Distributions, and Non-equilibrium Potential for Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, David F; Craciun, Gheorghe; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj;

    2015-01-01

    We consider the relationship between stationary distributions for stochastic models of reaction systems and Lyapunov functions for their deterministic counterparts. Specifically, we derive the well-known Lyapunov function of reaction network theory as a scaling limit of the non-equilibrium potent......We consider the relationship between stationary distributions for stochastic models of reaction systems and Lyapunov functions for their deterministic counterparts. Specifically, we derive the well-known Lyapunov function of reaction network theory as a scaling limit of the non......-equilibrium potential of the stationary distribution of stochastically modeled complex balanced systems. We extend this result to general birth-death models and demonstrate via example that similar scaling limits can yield Lyapunov functions even for models that are not complex or detailed balanced, and may even have...

  2. Ring-Puckering Potential Energy Functions for Trimethylene Sulfide and Its Monovalent Cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Hye Jin; Ocola, Esther J; Laane, Jaan

    2017-04-13

    The spectra and ring-puckering potential energy function for trimethylene sulfide cation (TMS(+)) from vacuum ultraviolet mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectra have recently been reported. To provide an in-depth comparison of the potential function with that of trimethylene sulfide (TMS) itself, we have used ab initio MP2/cc-pVTZ calculations and DFT B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations to predict the structures of both TMS and TMS(+) and then used these to calculate coordinate-dependent ring-puckering kinetic energy functions for both species. These kinetic energy functions allowed us to calculate refined potential energy functions of the puckering for both molecules based on the previously published spectra. TMS has an experimental barrier of 271 cm(-1) and energy minima at ring-puckering angles of ±29°. For TMS(+) the barrier is 60 cm(-1) and the energy minima correspond to ring-puckering angles of ±21°. The lower barrier for the cation reflects the smaller amount of angle strain in the ring angles for TMS(+).

  3. An ab initio potential function for the ν13 vibrational mode of 1,3-butadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senent, M. L.

    1995-06-01

    The restricted potential of the ν13 torsional mode of 1,3-butadiene has been determined from ab initio calculations. The relative energy and geometry of the second rotamer were calculated with the optimized couple cluster method with double substitutions. This ab initio level provides that the second stable structure attaches to a gauche form situated at 140.8°. The potential energy function was obtained by fitting to a symmetry-adapted Fourier series the total electronic energies of several selected conformations. These energies were calculated by the Möller-Plesset perturbation theory up to the second order (MP2) with full and partial optimization of the geometry. Torsional Raman band positions and fundamental frequencies were determined from the periodic potentials with a good agreement with experimental data. The convenience of performing fully optimized calculations to determine the restricted function is also refuted.

  4. Obtaining the Varshni potential function using the 2-body Kaxiras–Pandey parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEIK-CHENG LIM

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A generalized version of the Varshni potential function was adopted by Kaxiras and Pandey for describing the 2-body energy portion of multi-body condensed matter. The former’s simplicity and resemblance to a Morse potential allows faster computation while the latter’s greater number of parameters allows better curve-fitting of spectroscopic data. This paper shows one set of parameter conversion from the Varshni function to the 2-body portion of the Kaxiras–Pandey function, and vice versa two sets of parameter conversion. The latter two sets reveal good correlation between plotted curves, and were verified by the imposition of equal energy curvatures at equilibrium and equal energy integral from equilibrium to dissociation. These parameter conversions can also be attained more easily by equating the product of indices (for short range and the summation of index reciprocals (for long range.

  5. Dynamic kinetic energy potential for orbital-free density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Pistinner, Shlomo; Coomar, Arunima; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang

    2011-04-14

    A dynamic kinetic energy potential (DKEP) is developed for time-dependent orbital-free (TDOF) density function theory applications. This potential is constructed to affect only the dynamical (ω ≠ 0) response of an orbital-free electronic system. It aims at making the orbital-free simulation respond in the same way as that of a noninteracting homogenous electron gas (HEG), as required by a correct kinetic energy, therefore enabling extension of the success of orbital-free density functional theory in the static case (e.g., for embedding and description of processes in bulk materials) to dynamic processes. The potential is constructed by expansions of terms, each of which necessitates only simple time evolution (concurrent with the TDOF evolution) and a spatial convolution at each time-step. With 14 such terms a good fit is obtained to the response of the HEG at a large range of frequencies, wavevectors, and densities. The method is demonstrated for simple jellium spheres, approximating Na(9)(+) and Na(65)(+) clusters. It is applicable both to small and large (even ultralarge) excitations and the results converge (i.e., do not blow up) as a function of time. An extension to iterative frequency-resolved extraction is briefly outlined, as well as possibly numerically simpler expansions. The approach could also be extended to fit, instead of the HEG susceptibility, either an experimental susceptibility or a theoretically derived one for a non-HEG system. The DKEP potential should be a powerful tool for embedding a dynamical system described by a more accurate method (such as time-dependent density functional theory, TDDFT) in a large background described by TDOF with a DKEP potential. The type of expansions used and envisioned should be useful for other approaches, such as memory functionals in TDDFT. Finally, an appendix details the formal connection between TDOF and TDDFT.

  6. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.

  7. Mutation of a chloroplast-targeting signal in Alternanthera mosaic virus TGB3 impairs cell-to-cell movement and eliminates long-distance virus movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Vaira, Anna Maria; Bae, Hanhong; Bragg, Jennifer N; Ruzin, Steven E; Bauchan, Gary R; Dienelt, Margaret M; Owens, Robert A; Hammond, John

    2010-08-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of potexviruses requires coordinated action of the coat protein and triple gene block (TGB) proteins. The structural properties of Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) TGB3 were examined by methods differentiating between signal peptides and transmembrane domains, and its subcellular localization was studied by Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression and confocal microscopy. Unlike potato virus X (PVX) TGB3, AltMV TGB3 was not associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, and accumulated preferentially in mesophyll cells. Deletion and site-specific mutagenesis revealed an internal signal VL(17,18) of TGB3 essential for chloroplast localization, and either deletion of the TGB3 start codon or alteration of the chloroplast-localization signal limited cell-to-cell movement to the epidermis, yielding a virus that was unable to move into the mesophyll layer. Overexpression of AltMV TGB3 from either AltMV or PVX infectious clones resulted in veinal necrosis and vesiculation at the chloroplast membrane, a cytopathology not observed in wild-type infections. The distinctive mesophyll and chloroplast localization of AltMV TGB3 highlights the critical role played by mesophyll targeting in virus long-distance movement within plants.

  8. Connecting biodiversity and potential functional role in modern euxinic environments by microbial metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens-Marès, Tomàs; Yooseph, Shibu; Goll, Johannes; Hoffman, Jeff; Vila-Costa, Maria; Borrego, Carles M; Dupont, Chris L; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2015-07-01

    Stratified sulfurous lakes are appropriate environments for studying the links between composition and functionality in microbial communities and are potentially modern analogs of anoxic conditions prevailing in the ancient ocean. We explored these aspects in the Lake Banyoles karstic area (NE Spain) through metagenomics and in silico reconstruction of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolic pathways that were tightly coupled through a few bacterial groups. The potential for nitrogen fixation and denitrification was detected in both autotrophs and heterotrophs, with a major role for nitrogen and carbon fixations in Chlorobiaceae. Campylobacterales accounted for a large percentage of denitrification genes, while Gallionellales were putatively involved in denitrification, iron oxidation and carbon fixation and may have a major role in the biogeochemistry of the iron cycle. Bacteroidales were also abundant and showed potential for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium. The very low abundance of genes for nitrification, the minor presence of anammox genes, the high potential for nitrogen fixation and mineralization and the potential for chemotrophic CO2 fixation and CO oxidation all provide potential clues on the anoxic zones functioning. We observed higher gene abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria than ammonia-oxidizing archaea that may have a geochemical and evolutionary link related to the dominance of Fe in these environments. Overall, these results offer a more detailed perspective on the microbial ecology of anoxic environments and may help to develop new geochemical proxies to infer biology and chemistry interactions in ancient ecosystems.

  9. Functional Gene Diversity and Metabolic Potential of the Microbial Community in an Estuary-Shelf Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbes play crucial roles in various biogeochemical processes in the ocean, including carbon (C, nitrogen (N, and phosphorus (P cycling. Functional gene diversity and the structure of the microbial community determines its metabolic potential and therefore its ecological function in the marine ecosystem. However, little is known about the functional gene composition and metabolic potential of bacterioplankton in estuary areas. The East China Sea (ECS is a dynamic marginal ecosystem in the western Pacific Ocean that is mainly affected by input from the Changjiang River and the Kuroshio Current. Here, using a high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip, we analyzed the functional gene diversity, composition, structure, and metabolic potential of microbial assemblages in different ECS water masses. Four water masses determined by temperature and salinity relationship showed different patterns of functional gene diversity and composition. Generally, functional gene diversity [Shannon–Weaner’s H and reciprocal of Simpson’s 1/(1-D] in the surface water masses was higher than that in the bottom water masses. The different presence and proportion of functional genes involved in C, N, and P cycling among the bacteria of the different water masses showed different metabolic preferences of the microbial populations in the ECS. Genes involved in starch metabolism (amyA and nplT showed higher proportion in microbial communities of the surface water masses than of the bottom water masses. In contrast, a higher proportion of genes involved in chitin degradation was observed in microorganisms of the bottom water masses. Moreover, we found a higher proportion of nitrogen fixation (nifH, transformation of hydroxylamine to nitrite (hao and ammonification (gdh genes in the microbial communities of the bottom water masses compared with those of the surface water masses. The spatial variation of microbial functional genes was significantly correlated

  10. Many-body Expanded Analytical Potential Energy Function for Ground State PuOH Molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yue-Xun; GAO Tao; ZHU Zheng-He

    2006-01-01

    Using the density functional method B3LYP with relativistic effective core potential (RECP) for Pu atom, the low-lying excited states (4∑+, 6∑+, 8∑+) for three structures of PuOH molecule were optimized. The results show that the ground state is X6∑+of the linear Pu-O-H (C∞v), its corresponding equilibrium geometry and dissociation energy are RPu-O=0.20595 nm, RO-H=0.09581 nm and -8.68 eV, respectively. At the same time, two other metastable structures [PuOH (Cs) and H-Pu-O (C∞v)] were found. The analytical potential energy function has also been derived for whole range using the many-body expansion method. This potential energy function represents the considerable topographical features of PuOH molecule in detail, which is adequately accurate in the whole potential surface and can be used for the molecular reaction dynamics research.

  11. Single-site Green function of the Dirac equation for full-potential electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordt, Pascal

    2012-05-30

    I present an elaborated analytical examination of the Green function of an electron scattered at a single-site potential, for both the Schroedinger and the Dirac equation, followed by an efficient numerical solution, in both cases for potentials of arbitrary shape without an atomic sphere approximation. A numerically stable way to calculate the corresponding regular and irregular wave functions and the Green function is via the angular Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations. These are solved based on an expansion in Chebyshev polynomials and their recursion relations, allowing to rewrite the Lippmann-Schwinger equations into a system of algebraic linear equations. Gonzales et al. developed this method for the Schroedinger equation, where it gives a much higher accuracy compared to previous perturbation methods, with only modest increase in computational effort. In order to apply it to the Dirac equation, I developed relativistic Lippmann-Schwinger equations, based on a decomposition of the potential matrix into spin spherical harmonics, exploiting certain properties of this matrix. The resulting method was embedded into a Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker code for density functional calculations. As an example, the method is applied by calculating phase shifts and the Mott scattering of a tungsten impurity. (orig.)

  12. Protection of Coronary Endothelial Function during Cardiac Surgery: Potential of Targeting Endothelial Ion Channels in Cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelium plays a critical role in the control of blood flow by producing vasoactive factors to regulate vascular tone. Ion channels, in particular, K+ channels and Ca2+-permeable channels in endothelial cells, are essential to the production and function of endothelium-derived vasoactive factors. Impairment of coronary endothelial function occurs in open heart surgery that may result in reduction of coronary blood flow and thus in an inadequate myocardial perfusion. Hyperkalemic exposure and concurrent ischemia-reperfusion during cardioplegic intervention compromise NO and EDHF-mediated function and the impairment involves alterations of K+ channels, that is, KATP and KCa, and Ca2+-permeable TRP channels in endothelial cells. Pharmacological modulation of these channels during ischemia-reperfusion and hyperkalemic exposure show promising results on the preservation of NO and EDHF-mediated endothelial function, which suggests the potential of targeting endothelial K+ and TRP channels for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery.

  13. Environmental conditions influence the plant functional diversity effect on potential denitrification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana E Sutton-Grier

    Full Text Available Global biodiversity loss has prompted research on the relationship between species diversity and ecosystem functioning. Few studies have examined how plant diversity impacts belowground processes; even fewer have examined how varying resource levels can influence the effect of plant diversity on microbial activity. In a field experiment in a restored wetland, we examined the role of plant trait diversity (or functional diversity, (FD and its interactions with natural levels of variability of soil properties, on a microbial process, denitrification potential (DNP. We demonstrated that FD significantly affected microbial DNP through its interactions with soil conditions; increasing FD led to increased DNP but mainly at higher levels of soil resources. Our results suggest that the effect of species diversity on ecosystem functioning may depend on environmental factors such as resource availability. Future biodiversity experiments should examine how natural levels of environmental variability impact the importance of biodiversity to ecosystem functioning.

  14. On the excited state wave functions of Dirac fermions in the random gauge potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Milani Moghaddam

    2010-04-01

    In the last decade, it was shown that the Liouville field theory is an effective theory of Dirac fermions in the random gauge potential (FRGP). We show that the Dirac wave functions in FRGP can be written in terms of descendents of the Liouville vertex operator. In the quasiclassical approximation of the Liouville theory, our model predicts 22.2 that the localization length scales with the energy as $ ∼ E^{−b^{2}(1+b^{2})^{2}}$, where is the strength of the disorder. The self-duality of the theory under the transformation → 1/ is discussed. We also calculate the distribution functions of 0 = |0 ()|2, (i.e. (0); 0 () is the ground state wave function), which behaves as the log-normal distribution function. It is also shown that in small 0, (0) behaves as a chi-square distribution.

  15. Two types of potential functions and their use in the modeling of information: two applications from the social sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Emmanuel E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider how two types of potential functions, the real and quantum potential can be shown to be of use in a social science context. The real potential function is a key ingredient in the Hamiltonian framework used in both classical and quantum mechanics. The quantum potential however emerges in a different way in quantum mechanics. In this paper we consider both potentials and we attempt to give them a social science interpretation within the setting of two applications.

  16. A Pro-Drug Approach for Selective Modulation of AI-2-Mediated Bacterial Cell-to-Cell Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman O. Sintim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The universal quorum sensing autoinducer, AI-2, is utilized by several bacteria. Analogs of AI-2 have the potential to modulate bacterial behavior. Selectively quenching the communication of a few bacteria, in the presence of several others in an ecosystem, using analogs of AI-2 is non-trivial due to the ubiquity of AI-2 processing receptors in many bacteria that co-exist. Herein, we demonstrate that when an AI-2 analog, isobutyl DPD (which has been previously shown to be a quorum sensing, QS, quencher in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium is modified with ester groups, which get hydrolyzed once inside the bacterial cells, only QS in E. coli, but not in S. typhimurium, is inhibited. The origin of this differential QS inhibition could be due to differences in analog permeation of the bacterial membranes or ester hydrolysis rates. Such differences could be utilized to selectively target QS in specific bacteria amongst a consortium of other species that also use AI-2 signaling.

  17. The Opioid System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Burtscher

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy is considered to be one of the most common and severe forms of focal epilepsies. Patients often develop cognitive deficits and emotional blunting along the progression of the disease. The high incidence of resistance to antiepileptic drugs and a frequent lack of admissibility to surgery poses an unmet medical challenge. In the urgent quest of novel treatment strategies, neuropeptides are interesting candidates, however, their therapeutic potential has not yet been exploited. This review focuses on the functional role of the endogenous opioid system with respect to temporal lobe epilepsy, specifically in the hippocampus. The role of dynorphins and kappa opioid receptors (KOPr as modulators of neuronal excitability is well understood: both the reduced release of glutamate as well of postsynaptic hyperpolarization were shown in glutamatergic neurons. In line with this, low levels of dynorphin in humans and mice increase the risk of epilepsy development. The role of enkephalins is not understood so well. On one hand, some agonists of the delta opioid receptors (DOPr display pro-convulsant properties probably through inhibition of GABAergic interneurons. On the other hand, enkephalins play a neuro-protective role under hypoxic or anoxic conditions, most probably through positive effects on mitochondrial function. Despite the supposed absence of endorphins in the hippocampus, exogenous activation of the mu opioid receptors (MOPr induces pro-convulsant effects. Recently-expanded knowledge of the complex ways opioid receptors ligands elicit their effects (including biased agonism, mixed binding, and opioid receptor heteromers, opens up exciting new therapeutic potentials with regards to seizures and epilepsy. Potential adverse side effects of KOPr agonists may be minimized through functional selectivity. Preclinical data suggest a high potential of such compounds to control seizures, with a strong predictive validity toward human

  18. The Opioid System in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Functional Role and Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtscher, Johannes; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is considered to be one of the most common and severe forms of focal epilepsies. Patients often develop cognitive deficits and emotional blunting along the progression of the disease. The high incidence of resistance to antiepileptic drugs and a frequent lack of admissibility to surgery poses an unmet medical challenge. In the urgent quest of novel treatment strategies, neuropeptides are interesting candidates, however, their therapeutic potential has not yet been exploited. This review focuses on the functional role of the endogenous opioid system with respect to temporal lobe epilepsy, specifically in the hippocampus. The role of dynorphins and kappa opioid receptors (KOPr) as modulators of neuronal excitability is well understood: both the reduced release of glutamate as well of postsynaptic hyperpolarization were shown in glutamatergic neurons. In line with this, low levels of dynorphin in humans and mice increase the risk of epilepsy development. The role of enkephalins is not understood so well. On one hand, some agonists of the delta opioid receptors (DOPr) display pro-convulsant properties probably through inhibition of GABAergic interneurons. On the other hand, enkephalins play a neuro-protective role under hypoxic or anoxic conditions, most probably through positive effects on mitochondrial function. Despite the supposed absence of endorphins in the hippocampus, exogenous activation of the mu opioid receptors (MOPr) induces pro-convulsant effects. Recently-expanded knowledge of the complex ways opioid receptors ligands elicit their effects (including biased agonism, mixed binding, and opioid receptor heteromers), opens up exciting new therapeutic potentials with regards to seizures and epilepsy. Potential adverse side effects of KOPr agonists may be minimized through functional selectivity. Preclinical data suggest a high potential of such compounds to control seizures, with a strong predictive validity toward human patients. The

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of evoked potentials for functional impairment after contusive spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy; Zhou, James; Krishnan, Rohan; Manem, Nihita; Umredkar, Shreya; Hamilton, D K; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Oudega, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a cause of potentially debilitating post-operative neurologic complications. Currently, intra-operative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) via somatosensory evoked potentials and motor-evoked potentials is used to detect and prevent impending SCI. However, no empirically validated interventions exist to halt the progression of iatrogenic SCI once it is detected. This is in part due to the lack of a suitable translational model that mimics the circumstances surrounding iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM. Here, we evaluate a model of simulated contusive iatrogenic SCI detected via IONM in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. We show that transient losses of somatosensory evoked potentials responses are 88.24% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 63.53-98.20) and 80% specific (95% CI 51.91-95.43) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. Similarly, we show that transient losses in motor-evoked potentials responses are 70.83% sensitive (95% CI 48.91-87.33) and 100% specific (95% CI 62.91-100.00) for significant functional impairment following simulated iatrogenic SCI. These results indicate that our model is a suitable replica of the circumstances surrounding clinical iatrogenic SCI.

  20. Integrative Function of Knowledge in the System of the Competitive Potential of the Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedka Nikolova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the integrative function of knowledge in the system of the competitive potential of the company. It argues that knowledge is the integrator of the different elements of the overall competitive potential of the company. The approach and the model of Michael Porter are analyzed in the study of knowledge as a key factor for success in the competitive struggle. The main objective is to explore approaches and models of knowledge management and best practices of their implementation in order to promote and adapt them to the conditions of Bulgarian business organizations in their striving after competitiveness increase.

  1. Energy spectra and wave function of trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential as an effective quantum chromodynamics potential in D-dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deta, U. A., E-mail: utamaalan@yahoo.co.id [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department of Post Graduate Program, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Indonesia and Physics Department, State University of Surabaya, Jl. Ketintang, Surabaya 60231 (Indonesia); Suparmi,; Cari,; Husein, A. S.; Yuliani, H.; Khaled, I. K. A.; Luqman, H.; Supriyanto [Theoretical Physics Group, Physics Department of Post Graduate Program, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    The Energy Spectra and Wave Function of Schrodinger equation in D-Dimensions for trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential were investigated analytically using Nikiforov-Uvarov method. This potential captures the essential traits of the quark-gluon dynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics. The approximate energy spectra are given in the close form and the corresponding approximate wave function for arbitrary l-state (l ≠ 0) in D-dimensions are formulated in the form of differential polynomials. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The wave function of this potential unnormalizable for general case. The existence of extra dimensions (centrifugal factor) and this potential increase the energy spectra of system.

  2. Effect of escitalopram on cognitive function in depression A mismatch negativity potentials study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenhe Zhou; Guozhen Yuan; Jianjun Yao; Zaohuo Cheng

    2011-01-01

    We detected the event-related potential mismatch negativity (MMN) of 30 depression patients and compared to 30 age, gender, and education-matched healthy controls. Results showed that amplitudes of frequency and duration MMN were lower in depression patients compared with control patients, indicating abnormality in auditory processing (i.e., cognitive impairment). Following escitalopram treatment for 8 weeks, the amplitudes of frequency and duration MMN were significantly increased and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores were significantly decreased in depression patients. These data suggest that escitalopram can improve cognitive function of patients with depression. Further, MMN may be a useful tool for evaluating cognitive function and treatment effects.

  3. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 function regulates cardiac hypertrophy via stretch-induced activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sheryl E; Mann, Adrien; Jones, Shannon; Robbins, Nathan; Alkhattabi, Abdullah; Worley, Mariah C; Gao, Xu; Lasko-Roiniotis, Valerie M; Karani, Rajiv; Fulford, Logan; Jiang, Min; Nieman, Michelle; Lorenz, John N; Rubinstein, Jack

    2017-03-01

    Hypertension (increased afterload) results in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy leading to left ventricular hypertrophy and subsequently, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 subtype (TRPV2) function regulates hypertrophy under increased afterload conditions. We used functional (pore specific) TRPV2 knockout mice to evaluate the effects of increased afterload-induced stretch on cardiac size and function via transverse aortic constriction (TAC) as well as hypertrophic stimuli including adrenergic and angiotensin stimulation via subcutaneous pumps. Wild-type animals served as control for all experiments. Expression and localization of TRPV2 was investigated in wild-type cardiac samples. Changes in cardiac function were measured in vivo via echocardiography and invasive catheterization. Molecular changes, including protein and real-time PCR markers of hypertrophy, were measured in addition to myocyte size. TRPV2 is significantly upregulated in wild-type mice after TAC, though not in response to beta-adrenergic or angiotensin stimulation. TAC-induced stretch stimulus caused an upregulation of TRPV2 in the sarcolemmal membrane. The absence of functional TRPV2 resulted in significantly reduced left ventricular hypertrophy after TAC, though not in response to beta-adrenergic or angiotensin stimulation. The decreased development of hypertrophy was not associated with significant deterioration of cardiac function. We conclude that TRPV2 function, as a stretch-activated channel, regulates the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in response to increased afterload.

  4. Crude oil as a microbial seed bank with unexpected functional potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Man; Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Yan; Wang, Xing-Biao; Liu, Ze-Shen; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2015-11-01

    It was widely believed that oil is a harsh habitat for microbes because of its high toxicity and hydrophobicity. However, accumulating evidence has revealed the presence of live microbes in crude oil. Therefore, it’s of value to conduct an in-depth investigation on microbial communities in crude oil. To this end, microorganisms in oil and water phases were collected from four oil-well production mixtures in Qinghai Oilfield, China, and analyzed for their taxonomic and functional compositions via pyrosequencing and GeoChip, respectively. Hierarchical clustering of 16S rRNA gene sequences and functional genes clearly separated crude oil and water phases, suggestive of distinct taxonomic and functional gene compositions between crude oil and water phases. Unexpectedly, Pseudomonas dominated oil phase where diverse functional gene groups were identified, which significantly differed from those in the corresponding water phases. Meanwhile, most functional genes were significantly more abundant in oil phase, which was consistent with their important roles in facilitating survival of their host organisms in crude oil. These findings provide strong evidence that crude oil could be a “seed bank” of functional microorganisms with rich functional potentials. This offers novel insights for industrial applications of microbial-enhanced oil recovery and bioremediation of petroleum-polluted environments.

  5. The molecular structure and analytical potential energy function of HCO (X2A')

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Dong-Lan; Cheng Xin-Lu; Yang Xiang-Dong; Xie An-Dong; Ruan Wen; Yu Xiao-Guang; Wan Hui-Jun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the equilibrium structure of HCO has been optimized by using density functional theory (DFT)/ B3P86 method and CC-PVTZ basis. It has a bent (Cs, X2A') ground state structure with an angle of 124.4095 °. The vibronic frequencies and force constants have also been calculated. Based on the principles of atomic and molecular reaction statics, the possible electronic states and reasonable dissociation limits for the ground state of HCO molecule have been determined. The analytic potential energy function of HCO (X2A') molecule has been derived by using the many-body expansion theory. The contour lines are constructed, which show the static properties of HCO (X2A'), such as the equilibrium structure, the lowest energies, etc. The potential energy surface of HCO (X2A') is reasonable and very satisfactory.

  6. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a potential wonder drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purushottam Jha; Girish J Kotwal

    2003-04-01

    Vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) was one of the first viral molecules demonstrated to have a role in blocking complement and hence in the evasion of host defense. Structurally it is very similar to the human C4b-BP and the other members of complement control protein. Functionally it is most similar to the CR1 protein. VCP blocks both major pathways of complement activation. The crystal structure of VCP was determined a little over a year ago and it is the only known structure of an intact and complete complement control protein. In addition to binding complement, VCP also binds to heparin. These two binding abilities can take place simultaneously and contribute to its many function and to its potential use in several inflammatory diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), CNS injury, xenotransplantation, etc. making it a truly fascinating molecule and potential drug.

  7. Self-consistent density functional calculation of the image potential at a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Alvarellos, J E [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain); Chacon, E [Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); GarcIa-Gonzalez, P [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Apartado 60141, 28080 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-04

    It is well known that the exchange-correlation (XC) potential at a metal surface has an image-like asymptotic behaviour given by -1/4(z-z{sub 0}), where z is the coordinate perpendicular to the surface. Using a suitable fully non-local functional prescription, we evaluate self-consistently the XC potential with the correct image behaviour for simple jellium surfaces in the range of metallic densities. This allows a proper comparison between the corresponding image-plane position, z{sub 0}, and other related quantities such as the centroid of an induced charge by an external perturbation. As a by-product, we assess the routinely used local density approximation when evaluating electron density profiles, work functions, and surface energies by focusing on the XC effects included in the fully non-local description.

  8. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A; Isborn, Christine M

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  9. A sensitive RNase protection assay to detect transcripts from potentially functional human endogenous L1 retrotransposons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodcock, D M; Williamson, M R; Doherty, J P

    1996-01-01

    A high background of read-through transcripts from degenerate human L1 retrotransposons is present in almost all human cell types. This prevents the detection of RNA transcripts from potentially functional elements. To overcome this, we have developed an RNase protection assay based on the recons...... transcripts from divergent L1 families but are either discrete shorter transcripts or specifically processed products from longer initial transcripts....

  10. Analytic eigenenergies of Dirac equation under a confining linear potential using basis functions localized in spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Kimichika

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analytical eigenenergies for a pair of confined fundamental fermion and antifermion under a linear potential derived from the Wilson loop for the non-Abelian Yang-Mills field. We use basis functions localized in spacetime, and the Hamiltonian matrix of the Dirac equation is analytically diagonalized. The squared system eigenenergies are proportional to the string tension and the absolute value of the Dirac's relativistic quantum number related to the total angular momentum, consistent with the expectation.

  11. Heterologous viral expression systems in fosmid vectors increase the functional analysis potential of metagenomic libraries

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The extraordinary potential of metagenomic functional analyses to identify activities of interest present in uncultured microorganisms has been limited by reduced gene expression in surrogate hosts. We have developed vectors and specialized E. coli strains as improved metagenomic DNA heterologous expression systems, taking advantage of viral components that prevent transcription termination at metagenomic terminators. One of the systems uses the phage T7 RNA-polymerase to drive metagenomic ge...

  12. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M., E-mail: cisborn@ucmerced.edu [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  13. Alternative Splicing: A Potential Source of Functional Innovation in the Eukaryotic Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Chen; Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a common posttranscriptional process in eukaryotic organisms, by which multiple distinct functional transcripts are produced from a single gene. The release of the human genome draft revealed a much smaller number of genes than anticipated. Because of its potential role in expanding protein diversity, interest in alternative splicing has been increasing over the last decade. Although recent studies have shown that 94% human multiexon genes undergo AS, evolution of...

  14. Taylor-Laplace Expansions of the Yukawa and Related Potential Energy Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    thle ’Yukawa po tenilt iaI i tseIf. Inl thle I iiit a,, thle 20 continued e xponei’i t 3 van is hes , t he Yu kawa pot en t i a I trains f’ rms i l the...analyses of nuclear models . The Woods-Saxon potential has a simple form: _-VO 1 l ’Ws 1+ exp[(r-rO)/p]. This function does not easily admit a Fourier

  15. One-parameter families of supersymmetric isospectral potentials from Riccati solutions in function composition form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosu, Haret C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICYT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, 78216 San Luis Potosí, S.L.P. (Mexico); Mancas, Stefan C., E-mail: mancass@erau.edu [Department of Mathematics, Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, FL 32114-3900 (United States); Chen, Pisin, E-mail: pisinchen@phys.ntu.edu.tw [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics (LeCosPA) and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-15

    In the context of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, we define a potential through a particular Riccati solution of the composition form (F∘f)(x)=F(f(x)) and obtain a generalized Mielnik construction of one-parameter isospectral potentials when we use the general Riccati solution. Some examples for special cases of F and f are given to illustrate the method. An interesting result is obtained in the case of a parametric double well potential generated by this method, for which it is shown that the parameter of the potential controls the heights of the localization probability in the two wells, and for certain values of the parameter the height of the localization probability can be higher in the smaller well. -- Highlights: •Function-composition generalization of parametric isospectral potentials is presented. •Mielnik one-parameter family of harmonic potentials is obtained as a particular case. •Graphical discussion of regular and singular regions in the parameter space is given.

  16. Are flash-evoked visual potentials useful for intraoperative monitoring of visual pathway function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedzich, C; Schramm, J; Fahlbusch, R

    1987-11-01

    Flash-evoked visual potentials (VEPs) recorded from the scalp were used in a series of 35 patients with tumors along the visual pathway: 3 orbital tumors, 25 perisellar tumors, 4 intraventricular tumors, and 3 occipital lesions. Preoperatively, various combinations of impaired visual fields and visual acuity were observed in over 90% of the patients. A postoperative decrease in visual function was observed in 3 cases. Of the 25 perisellar lesions, 13 were operated through a standard frontotemporal craniotomy and 12 were operated through a transnasal-transsphenoidal approach. VEPs were highly susceptible to volatile anesthetics, and there was a significant incidence of spontaneous latency increases and amplitude decreases in a large number of patients. There was an unacceptably high number of cases with significant VEP alteration occurring without concomitant visual function change. During trepanation or the transnasal approach, a reversible potential loss was observed in 11 patients, a profoundly altered wave form was seen in 8 cases, and a loss of single peaks was observed in 15 patients. During dissection of the tumor, a reversible potential loss or a potential with unidentifiable peaks was found in 25 cases; however, the VEPs recovered during closure or in the recovery room. There was no correlation between intraoperative VEP changes and the postoperative changes in visual function. In only 1 patient with an insignificant postoperative decrease in visual acuity from 0.4 to 0.3 was there a concomitant intraoperative potential loss. The major conclusion of our findings is that light-emitting diode flash-evoked VEPs demonstrate intraoperative changes that appear too early and too prominently to be caused solely by manipulation of the optic pathways.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Emotional functioning, attachment style, and attributions as predictors of child abuse potential in domestic violence victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Christina M

    2006-04-01

    To explore cognitive and emotional factors that may exacerbate child-abuse potential among domestic violence victims, 80 participants reported on their depression, hopelessness, anxiety, and anger as well as their attachment style and attributional style. Increased emotional difficulties as well as insecure attachment styles were significantly positively correlated with child abuse potential, although depression and anxiety were the strongest predictors. Externalizing blame for the spousal abuse was not associated with abuse risk. Women residing in shelters demonstrated significantly greater abuse risk than those in transitional housing programs, suggesting that greater temporal proximity to the spousal abuse may in part account for the increased abuse potential. Depression and hopelessness, however, appeared particularly relevant to increased abuse risk in domestic violence victims in the transitional housing system. Implications of these findings for working with battered women in terms of their emotional functioning and attachment style are discussed.

  18. Numerical density-to-potential inversions in time-dependent density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Daniel S; Wasserman, Adam

    2016-08-01

    We treat the density-to-potential inverse problem of time-dependent density functional theory as an optimization problem with a partial differential equation constraint. The unknown potential is recovered from a target density by applying a multilevel optimization method controlled by error estimates. We employ a classical optimization routine using gradients efficiently computed by the discrete adjoint method. The inverted potential has both a real and imaginary part to reduce reflections at the boundaries and other numerical artifacts. We demonstrate this method on model one-dimensional systems. The method can be straightforwardly extended to a variety of numerical solvers of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations and to systems in higher dimensions.

  19. Analytical Potential Energy Function for the Ground State X1∑+ of Lanthanum Monofluoride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin-Hong; SHANG Ren-Cheng

    2003-01-01

    The equilibrium geometry, harmonic frequency and bond dissociation energy of lanthanum monofluoride have been calculated using Density-Functional Theory (DFT), post-HF methods MP2 and CCSD(T) with the energyconsistent relativistic effective core potentials. The possible electronic state and reasonable dissociation limit of the ground state of LaF are determined based on atomic and molecular reaction statics. Potential energy curve scans for the ground state X 1∑+ have been performed at B3LYP and CCSD(T) levels, due to their better results of harmonic frequency and bond dissociation energy. We find that the potential energy calculated with CCSD(T) is about 0.6 eV larger than the bond dissociation energy, when the internuclear distance is as large as 0.8 nm. The problem that single-reference ab initio methods do not meet dissociation limit during calculations of lanthanide heavy-metal elements is analyzed. We propose the calculation scheme to derive the analytical Murrell-Sorbie potential energy function. Vibrotational spectroscopic constants Be, ωe, ωeχe, αe, βe, De and He obtained by the standard Dunham treatment coincide well with the results of rotational analyses on spectroscopic experiments.

  20. Analytical potential energy function and spectroscopyparameters for B1Ⅱ state of KH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjuan Liang; Chuanlu Yang; Lizhi Wang; Qinggang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Multi-reference configuration interaction is used to produce potential energy curves (PECs) for the excited B1II state of KH molecule. To investigate the correlation effect of core-valence electrons, five schemes are employed which include the different correlated electrons and different active spaces. The PECs are fitted into analytical potential energy functions (APEFs). The spectroscopic parameters, ro-vibrational levels, and transition frequencies are determined based on the APEFs and compared with available experimental and theoretical data. The molecular properties for B1II obtained in this letter, which are better than those available in literature, can be reproduced with calculations using the suitable correlated electrons and active space of orbitals.%Multi-reference configuration interaction is used to produce potential energy curves (PECs) for the excited B1Ⅱ state of KH molecule.To investigate the correlation effect of core-valence electrons,five schemes are employed which include the different correlated electrons and different active spaces.The PECs are fitted into analytical potential energy functions (APEFs).The spectroscopic parameters,ro-vibrational levels,and transition frequencies are determined based on the APEFs and compared with available experimental and theoretical data.The molecular properties for B1Ⅱ obtained in this letter,which are better than those available in literature,can be reproduced with calculations using the suitable correlated electrons and active space of orbitals.

  1. Conserving approximations for response functions of the Fermi gas in a random potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiš, Václav; Kolorenč, Jindřich

    2016-07-01

    One- and two-electron Green functions are simultaneously needed to determine the response functions of the electron gas in a random potential. Reliable approximations must retain consistency between the two types of Green functions expressed via Ward identities so that their output is compliant with macroscopic symmetries and conservation laws. Such a consistency is not directly guaranteed when summing nonlocal corrections to the local (dynamical) mean field. We analyze the reasons for this failure and show how the full Ward identity can generically be implemented in the diagrammatic approach to the vertex functions without breaking the analytic properties of the self-energy. We use the low-energy asymptotics of the conserving two-particle vertex determining the singular part of response and correlation functions to derive an exact representation of the diffusion constant in terms of Green functions of the perturbation theory. We then calculate explicitly the leading vertex corrections to the mean-field diffusion constant due to maximally-crossed diagrams.

  2. Cellular uptake and cell-to-cell transfer of polyelectrolyte microcapsules within a triple co-culture system representing parts of the respiratory tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Dagmar A.; Hartmann, Raimo; Fytianos, Kleanthis; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2015-06-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer microcapsules around 3.4 micrometers in diameter were added to epithelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and dendritic cells in vitro and their uptake kinetics were quantified. All three cell types were combined in a triple co-culture model, mimicking the human epithelial alveolar barrier. Hereby, macrophages were separated in a three-dimensional model from dendritic cells by a monolayer of epithelial cells. While passing of small nanoparticles has been demonstrated from macrophages to dendritic cells across the epithelial barrier in previous studies, for the micrometer-sized capsules, this process could not be observed in a significant amount. Thus, this barrier is a limiting factor for cell-to-cell transfer of micrometer-sized particles.

  3. Cell-to-Cell Transmission of HIV-1 Is Required to Trigger Pyroptotic Death of Lymphoid-Tissue-Derived CD4 T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Nicole L K; Doitsh, Gilad; Monroe, Kathryn M; Yang, Zhiyuan; Muñoz-Arias, Isa; Levy, David N; Greene, Warner C

    2015-09-01

    The progressive depletion of CD4 T cells underlies clinical progression to AIDS in untreated HIV-infected subjects. Most dying CD4 T cells correspond to resting nonpermissive cells residing in lymphoid tissues. Death is due to an innate immune response against the incomplete cytosolic viral DNA intermediates accumulating in these cells. The viral DNA is detected by the IFI16 sensor, leading to inflammasome assembly, caspase-1 activation, and the induction of pyroptosis, a highly inflammatory form of programmed cell death. We now show that cell-to-cell transmission of HIV is obligatorily required for activation of this death pathway. Cell-free HIV-1 virions, even when added in large quantities, fail to activate pyroptosis. These findings underscore the infected CD4 T cells as the major killing units promoting progression to AIDS and highlight a previously unappreciated role for the virological synapse in HIV pathogenesis.

  4. A Cell-to-Cell Battery Equalizer With Zero-Current Switching and Zero-Voltage Gap Based on Quasi-Resonant LC Converter and Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Yunlong; Zhang, Chenghui; Cui, Naxin

    2015-01-01

    voltage gap for large balancing current and ZVG between cells. Instead of a dedicated equalizer for each cell, only one balancing converter is employed and shared by all cells, reducing the size and implementation cost. Moreover, the equalization current can be regulated as needed by controlling the duty...... cycle of the BDDC, which not only prevents efficiently over-equalization but also abridges the balancing time. Simulation and experimental results show the proposed scheme exhibits outstanding balancing performance, and the energy conversion efficiency is higher than 98%. The validity of the proposed...... these difficulties, an innovative direct cell-to-cell battery equalizer based on quasi-resonant LC converter (QRLCC) and boost DC-DC converter (BDDC) is proposed. The QRLCC is employed to gain zero-current switching (ZCS), leading to a reduction of power losses. The BDDC is employed to enhance the equalization...

  5. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated...... by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results...... showed comparable amounts of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartments of the mixed-culture and 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentations containing L. thermotolerans after 4 days of fermentation, but a lower death rate of L. thermotolerans in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture...

  6. Molecular potentials and wave function mapping by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberg, Victor, E-mail: victor.kimberg@pks.mpi.de [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Miron, Catalin, E-mail: miron@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, FR-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Some studies related to the vibrational wave functions mapping phenomenon are reviewed. • The core-excited vibrational wave functions were mapped using dissociative and bound final states. • High-resolution experimental data is accompanied by ab initio calculations. • The mapping phenomenon allows one to extract constants of the molecular potentials. • The mapping techniques are general and can be applied for the study of many systems. - Abstract: The recent development of high brightness 3{sup rd} generation soft X-ray sources and high energy resolution electron spectrometers made it possible to accurately trace quantum phenomena associated to the vibrational dynamics in core-excited molecules. The present paper reviews the recent results on mapping of vibrational wave functions and molecular potentials based on electron spectroscopy. We discuss and compare the mapping phenomena in various systems, stressing the advantages of the resonant X-ray scattering for studying of the nuclear dynamics and spectroscopic constants of small molecules. The experimental results discussed in the paper are most often accompanied by state-of-the-art ab initio calculations allowing for a deeper understanding of the quantum effects. Besides its fundamental interest, the vibrational wave function mapping is shown to be useful for the analysis of core- and valence-excited molecular states based on the reflection principle.

  7. The Zeta Potential of Surface-Functionalized Metallic Nanorod Particles in Aqueous Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, G M; Rose, K A; Tok, J B; Pannu, S S; Chuang, F S; Sha, M Y; Chakarova, G; Penn, S G

    2007-05-07

    Metallic nanoparticles suspended in aqueous solutions, and functionalized with chemical and biological surface coatings, are important elements in basic and applied nanoscience research. Many applications require an understanding of the electrokinetic or colloidal properties of such particles. In this paper we describe the results of experiments to measure the zeta potential of metallic nanorod particles in aqueous saline solutions, including the effects of pH, ionic strength, metallic composition, and surface functionalization state. Particle substrates tested include gold, silver, and palladium monometallic particles as well as gold/silver bimetallic particles. Surface functionalization conditions included 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA), mercaptoethanol (ME), and mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (MESA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), as well as MUA layers subsequently derivatized with proteins. Zeta potential data for typical charge-stabilized polystyrene particles are also presented for comparison. Experimental data are compared with theory. The results of these studies are useful in predicting and controlling the aggregation, adhesion, and transport of functionalized metallic nanoparticles within microfluidic devices and other systems.

  8. Emerging Microfluidic Tools for Functional Cellular Immunophenotyping: A New Potential Paradigm for Immune Status Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqiang eChen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, accurate, and quantitative characterization of immune status of patients is of utmost importance for disease diagnosis and prognosis, evaluating efficacy of immunotherapeutics and tailoring drug treatments. Immune status of patients is often dynamic and patient-specific, and such complex heterogeneity has made accurate, real-time measurements of patient immune status challenging in the clinical setting. Recent advances in microfluidics have demonstrated promising applications of microfluidics for immune monitoring with minimum sample requirement and rapid functional immunophenotyping capability. This review will highlight recent developments of microfluidic platforms that can perform rapid and accurate cellular functional assays on patient immune cells. We will also discuss the future potential of integrated microfluidics to perform rapid, accurate, and sensitive cellular functional assays at a single-cell resolution on different types or subpopulations of immune cells, to provide an unprecedented level of information depth on the distribution of immune cell functionalities. We envision that such microfluidic immunophenotyping tools will allow comprehensive and systems-level immunomonitoring, unlocking the potential to transform experimental clinical immunology into an information-rich science.

  9. Importance of local exact exchange potential in hybrid functionals for accurate excited states

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jaewook; Hwang, Sang-Yeon; Ryu, Seongok; Choi, Sunghwan; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory has been an essential analysis tool for both theoretical and experimental chemists since accurate hybrid functionals were developed. Here we propose a local hybrid method derived from the optimized effective potential (OEP) method and compare its distinct features with conventional nonlocal ones from the Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange operator. Both are formally exact for ground states and thus show similar accuracy for atomization energies and reaction barrier heights. For excited states, the local version yields virtual orbitals with N-electron character, while those of the nonlocal version have mixed characters between N- and (N+1)-electron orbitals. As a result, the orbital energy gaps from the former well approximate excitation energies with a small mean absolute error (MAE = 0.40 eV) for the Caricato benchmark set. The correction from time-dependent density functional theory with a simple local density approximation kernel further improves its accuracy by incorporating multi-config...

  10. Prostaglandin E2 reduces the release and infectivity of new cell-free virions and cell-to-cell HIV-1 transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Clemente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The course of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 infection is influenced by a complex interplay between viral and host factors. HIV infection stimulates several proinflammatory genes, such as cyclooxigense-2 (COX-2, which leads to an increase in prostaglandin (PG levels in the plasma of HIV-1-infected patients. These genes play an indeterminate role in HIV replication and pathogenesis. The effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 on HIV infection is quite controversial and even contradictory, so we sought to determine the role of PGE2 and the signal transduction pathways involved in HIV infection to elucidate possible new targets for antiretrovirals. RESULTS: Our results suggest that PGE2 post-infection treatment acts in the late stages of the viral cycle to reduce HIV replication. Interestingly, viral protein synthesis was not affected, but a loss of progeny virus production was observed. No modulation of CD4 CXCR4 and CCR5 receptor expression, cell proliferation, or activation after PGE2 treatment was detected. Moreover, PGE2 induced an increase in intracellular cAMP (cyclic AMP levels through the EP2/EP4 receptors. PGE2 effects were mimicked by dbcAMP and by a specific Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP agonist, 8-Cpt-cAMP. Treatment with PGE2 increased Rap1 activity, decreased RhoA activity and subsequently reduced the polymerization of actin by approximately 30% compared with untreated cells. In connection with this finding, polarized viral assembly platforms enriched in Gag were disrupted, altering HIV cell-to-cell transfer and the infectivity of new virions. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that PGE2, through Epac and Rap activation, alters the transport of newly synthesized HIV-1 components to the assembly site, reducing the release and infectivity of new cell-free virions and cell-to-cell HIV-1 transfer.

  11. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-09-05

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave interactively via these cytokines to create a microenvironment that leads to the extension of ameloblastomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchigami, Takao [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kibe, Toshiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Nishizawa, Yoshiaki [Kagoshima University Faculty of Medicine, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ueda, Masahiro [Natural Science Centre for Research and Education, Kagoshima University, 1-21-24 Koorimoto, Kagoshima 890-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Norifumi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kiyono, Tohru [Department of Virology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuouku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Kishida, Michiko, E-mail: kmichiko@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  13. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Caldeira, Jorge; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-07-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results showed comparable amounts of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartments of the mixed-culture and 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentations containing L. thermotolerans after 4 days of fermentation, but a lower death rate of L. thermotolerans in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation than in the mixed-culture fermentation. Furthermore, L. thermotolerans died off even more slowly in the 3.5-5 kDa than in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation, which coincided with the presence of less of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartment of that fermentation than of the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation. Taken together, these results indicate that the death of L. thermotolerans in mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae is caused by a combination of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  15. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilby, Mary J.

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology. PMID:27504112

  16. Multi-scale characean experimental system: from electrophysiology of membrane transporters to cell-to-cell connectivity, cytoplasmic streaming and auxin metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Beilby

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology.

  17. Multi-Scale Characean Experimental System: From Electrophysiology of Membrane Transporters to Cell-to-Cell Connectivity, Cytoplasmic Streaming and Auxin Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilby, Mary J

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of characean algae could be mistaken for a higher plant: stem-like axes with leaf-like branchlets anchored in the soil by root-like rhizoids. However, all of these structures are made up of giant multinucleate cells separated by multicellular nodal complexes. The excised internodal cells survive long enough for the nodes to give rise to new thallus. The size of the internodes and their thick cytoplasmic layer minimize impalement injury and allow specific micro-electrode placement. The cell structure can be manipulated by centrifugation, perfusion of cell contents or creation of cytoplasmic droplets, allowing access to both vacuolar and cytoplasmic compartments and both sides of the cell membranes. Thousands of electrical measurements on intact or altered cells and cytoplasmic droplets laid down basis to modern plant electrophysiology. Furthermore, the giant internodal cells and whole thalli facilitate research into many other plant properties. As nutrients have to be transported from rhizoids to growing parts of the thallus and hormonal signals need to pass from cell to cell, Characeae possess very fast cytoplasmic streaming. The mechanism was resolved in the characean model. Plasmodesmata between the internodal cells and nodal complexes facilitate transport of ions, nutrients and photosynthates across the nodes. The internal structure was found to be similar to those of higher plants. Recent experiments suggest a strong circadian influence on metabolic pathways producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and serotonin/melatonin. The review will discuss the impact of the characean models arising from fragments of cells, single cells, cell-to-cell transport or whole thalli on understanding of plant evolution and physiology.

  18. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima P Damodaran

    Full Text Available To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers. These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes.

  19. Transient receptor potential channel polymorphisms are associated with the somatosensory function in neuropathic pain patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Binder

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035. Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1 and impaired (2 sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and pG (rs222747, M315I to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002, but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In this study we found no evidence that genetic

  20. Regulation and function of TRPM7 in human endothelial cells: TRPM7 as a potential novel regulator of endothelial function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Baldoli

    Full Text Available TRPM7, a cation channel of the transient receptor potential channel family, has been identified as a ubiquitous magnesium transporter. We here show that TRPM7 is expressed in endothelial cells isolated from the umbilical vein (HUVEC, widely used as a model of macrovascular endothelium. Quiescence and senescence do not modulate TRPM7 amounts, whereas oxidative stress generated by the addition of hydrogen peroxide increases TRPM7 levels. Moreover, high extracellular magnesium decreases the levels of TRPM7 by activating calpains, while low extracellular magnesium, known to promote endothelial dysfunction, stimulates TRPM7 accumulation partly through the action of free radicals. Indeed, the antioxidant trolox prevents TRPM7 increase by low magnesium. We also demonstrate the unique behaviour of HUVEC in responding to pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TRPM7 with an increase of cell growth and migration. Our results indicate that TRPM7 modulates endothelial behavior and that any condition leading to TRPM7 upregulation might impair endothelial function.

  1. Final Governing Equation of Plane Elasticity of Icosahedral Quasicrystals and General Solution Based on Stress Potential Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lian-He; FAN Tian-You

    2006-01-01

    @@ The stress potential function theory for plane elasticity of icosahedral quasicrystals is developed. By introducing stress functions, huge numbers of basic equations involving elasticity of icosahedral quasicrystals are reduced to a single partial differential equation of the 12th order.

  2. The diagnostic value of endothelial function as a potential sensor of fatigue in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Ohno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiko Ohno1,2, Teruto Hashiguchi1, Ryuichi Maenosono1, Hidetoshi Yamashita3, Yukio Taira3, Kazufumi Minowa3, Yoshihito Yamashita3, Yuko Kato3, Ko-ichi Kawahara1, Ikuro Maruyama11Department of Laboratory and Vascular Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima City, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan; 2Department of Community Health Nursing/Nursing Informatics, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima City, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan; 3Kagoshima Seikyo General Hospital, Kagoshima City, Kagoshima Prefecture, JapanPurpose: Many epidemiological research studies have shown that vital exhaustion and psychosocial factors are associated with the occurrence of cerebrocardiovascular disease (CCVD. Fatigue is thought to induce endothelial dysfunction and may be linked to the occurrence of CCVD; however, no studies have investigated this potential link. We studied to determine the effect of fatigue on endothelial function in healthy subjects with no traditional CCVD risk factors or potential confounding factors to be controlled.Subjects and methods: Peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT was used to evaluate endothelial function. The influence of the following parameters on endothelial function was analyzed in 74 office workers without traditional CCVD risk factors at health check-ups: endothelial function before and after work, subjective fatigue, lifestyle factors such as sleeping time, and psychosocial factors such as depression and social support.Results: Twenty-five subjects (33.8% had low endothelial function; reactive hyperemia (RH-PAT index <1.67, even though no abnormalities were reported in the health check-ups. There was no significant difference in endothelial function before versus after labor. Of note, endothelial function was associated with the individual’s level of subjective fatigue (t = 2.98, P = 0.008 and showed a daily fluctuation, sometimes to a pathological

  3. Some gating potentiators, including VX-770, diminish ΔF508-CFTR functional expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veit, Guido; Avramescu, Radu G; Perdomo, Doranda; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Bagdany, Miklos; Apaja, Pirjo M; Borot, Florence; Szollosi, Daniel; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Hegedus, Tamas; Verkman, Alan S; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2014-07-23

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) that result in reduced anion conductance at the apical membrane of secretory epithelia. Treatment of CF patients carrying the G551D gating mutation with the potentiator VX-770 (ivacaftor) largely restores channel activity and has shown substantial clinical benefit. However, most CF patients carry the ΔF508 mutation, which impairs CFTR folding, processing, function, and stability. Studies in homozygous ΔF508 CF patients indicated little clinical benefit of monotherapy with the investigational corrector VX-809 (lumacaftor) or VX-770, whereas combination clinical trials show limited but significant improvements in lung function. We show that VX-770, as well as most other potentiators, reduces the correction efficacy of VX-809 and another investigational corrector, VX-661. To mimic the administration of VX-770 alone or in combination with VX-809, we examined its long-term effect in immortalized and primary human respiratory epithelia. VX-770 diminished the folding efficiency and the metabolic stability of ΔF508-CFTR at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and post-ER compartments, respectively, causing reduced cell surface ΔF508-CFTR density and function. VX-770-induced destabilization of ΔF508-CFTR was influenced by second-site suppressor mutations of the folding defect and was prevented by stabilization of the nucleotide-binding domain 1 (NBD1)-NBD2 interface. The reduced correction efficiency of ΔF508-CFTR, as well as of two other processing mutations in the presence of VX-770, suggests the need for further optimization of potentiators to maximize the clinical benefit of corrector-potentiator combination therapy in CF.

  4. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Papaspyrou

    Full Text Available Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the

  5. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  6. Repression of tropolone production and induction of a Burkholderia plantarii pseudo-biofilm by carot-4-en-9,10-diol, a cell-to-cell signaling disrupter produced by Trichoderma virens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengcen; Hashimoto, Makoto; Hashidoko, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    The tropolone-tolerant Trichoderma virens PS1-7 is a biocontrol agent against Burkholderia plantarii, causative of rice seedling blight. When exposed to catechol, this fungus dose-dependently produced carot-4-en-9,10-diol, a sesquiterpene-type autoregulatory signal molecule that promotes self-conidiation of T. virens PS1-7 mycelia. It was, however, uncertain why T. virens PS1-7 attenuates the symptom development of the rice seedlings infested with B. plantarii. To reveal the antagonism by T. virens PS1-7 against B. plantarii leading to repression of tropolone production in a coculture system, bioassay-guided screening for active compounds from a 3-d culture of T. virens PS1-7 was conducted. As a result, carot-4-en-9,10-diol was identified and found to repress tropolone production of B. plantarii from 10 to 200 µM in a dose-dependent manner as well as attenuate virulence of B. plantarii on rice seedlings. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that transcriptional suppression of N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone synthase plaI in B. plantarii was the main mode of action by which carot-4-en-9,10-diol mediated the quorum quenching responsible for repression of tropolone production. In addition, the unique response of B. plantarii to carot-4-en-9,10-diol in the biofilm formed in the static culture system was also found. Although the initial stage of B. plantarii biofilm formation was induced by both tropolone and carot-4-en-9,10-diol, it was induced in different states. Moreover, the B. plantarii biofilm that was induced by carot-4-en-9,10-diol at the late stage showed defects not only in matrix structure but also cell viability. Our findings demonstrate that carot-4-en-9,10-diol released by T. virens PS1-7 acts as an interkingdom cell-to-cell signaling molecule against B. plantarii to repress tropolone production and induces pseudo-biofilm to the cells. This observation also led to another discovery that tropolone is an autoregulatory cell-to-cell signaling molecule of B

  7. Repression of tropolone production and induction of a Burkholderia plantarii pseudo-biofilm by carot-4-en-9,10-diol, a cell-to-cell signaling disrupter produced by Trichoderma virens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengcen Wang

    another discovery that tropolone is an autoregulatory cell-to-cell signaling molecule of B. plantarii that induces a functional biofilm other than a simple B. plantarii virulence factor.

  8. Functional Imaging Biomarkers: Potential to Guide an Individualised Approach to Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, R J D; Vaidyanathan, S; Scarsbrook, A F

    2015-10-01

    The identification of robust prognostic and predictive biomarkers would transform the ability to implement an individualised approach to radiotherapy. In this regard, there has been a surge of interest in the use of functional imaging to assess key underlying biological processes within tumours and their response to therapy. Importantly, functional imaging biomarkers hold the potential to evaluate tumour heterogeneity/biology both spatially and temporally. An ever-increasing range of functional imaging techniques is now available primarily involving positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Small-scale studies across multiple tumour types have consistently been able to correlate changes in functional imaging parameters during radiotherapy with disease outcomes. Considerable challenges remain before the implementation of functional imaging biomarkers into routine clinical practice, including the inherent temporal variability of biological processes within tumours, reproducibility of imaging, determination of optimal imaging technique/combinations, timing during treatment and design of appropriate validation studies. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development Of Functional Foods Sea Weeds Algae Untouched Potential And Alternative Resource - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habtamu Admassu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food by Hippocrates was obscured with the advent of modern drug therapy and nutrition science until to twentieth century. The combination of consumer desires advances in food technology and new evidence-based correlation between nutrition to disease and disease prevention has created an unprecedented opportunity to concentrate on public health issues through diet and lifestyle. There is widespread interest these days to make a choice of functional foods from natural products that might promote health through specific bio-active compounds. Considering the diversity of biochemicals and capable of exerting functional bioactivities a growing trend is developing across globe to use seaweeds in functional food development. Compounds isolated from seaweeds have various functional biological activities antibacterial activity antioxidant potential anti-inflammatory properties anti-e coagulant activity anti-viral activity and antifungal and apoptotic activity. Therefore this review focuses on several bioactive chemicals in seaweeds and their biological activities for which they are responsible as a functional food ingredient.

  10. Rats' urinary metabolomes reveal the potential roles of functional foods and exercise in obesity management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed A; Ammar, N M; Kholeif, T E; Metwally, N S; El-Sheikh, N M; Wessjohann, Ludger A; Abdel-Hamid, A Z

    2017-03-22

    The complexity of the metabolic changes in obese individuals still presents a challenge for the understanding of obesity-related metabolic disruptions and for obesity management. In this study, a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based metabolomics approach targeting urine metabolism has been applied to assess the potential roles of functional foods and exercise for obesity management in rats. Male albino rats diagnosed as obese via histopathology and biochemical assays were administered functional foods in common use for obesity management including pomegranate, grapefruit, and red cabbage juice extracts in parallel with swimming exercise. Urine samples were collected from these rats, and likewise from healthy control animals, for metabolite analysis using (GC-MS) coupled to multivariate data analysis. The results revealed a significant elevation in oxalate and phosphate levels in obese rat urine concurrent with lower lactate levels as compared to the control group. Furthermore, and to pinpoint the bioactive agents in the administered functional foods, ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) was employed for secondary metabolite profiling. The different phenolic classes found in the examined functional foods, viz. ellagitannins in pomegranate, flavanones in grapefruit and flavonols in red cabbage, are likely to mediate their anti-obesity effects. The results indicate that these functional foods and exercise were quite effective in reverting obesity-related metabolic disruptions back to normal status, as revealed by orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA).

  11. Transient Receptor Potential Channels Contribute to Pathological Structural and Functional Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jennifer; Correll, Robert N.; Trappanese, Danielle M.; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Troupes, Constantine D.; Berretta, Remus M.; Kubo, Hajime; Madesh, Muniswamy; Chen, Xiongwen; Gao, Erhe; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Houser, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The cellular and molecular basis for post myocardial infarction (MI) structural and functional remodeling is not well understood. Objective To determine if Ca2+ influx through transient receptor potential (canonical) (TRPC) channels contributes to post-MI structural and functional remodeling. Methods and Results TRPC1/3/4/6 channel mRNA increased after MI in mice and was associated with TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry. Cardiac myocyte specific expression of a dominant negative (dn: loss of function) TRPC4 channel increased basal myocyte contractility and reduced hypertrophy and cardiac structural and functional remodeling after MI while increasing survival. We used adenovirus-mediated expression of TRPC3/4/6 channels in cultured adult feline myocytes (AFMs) to define mechanistic aspects of these TRPC-related effects. TRPC3/4/6 over expression in AFMs induced calcineurin (Cn)-Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) mediated hypertrophic signaling, which was reliant on caveolae targeting of TRPCs. TRPC3/4/6 expression in AFMs increased rested state contractions and increased spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ sparks mediated by enhanced phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor. TRPC3/4/6 expression was associated with reduced contractility and response to catecholamines during steady state pacing, likely due to enhanced SR Ca2+ leak. Conclusions Ca2+ influx through TRPC channels expressed after MI activates pathological cardiac hypertrophy and reduces contractility reserve. Blocking post-MI TRPC activity improved post-MI cardiac structure and function. PMID:25047165

  12. A Case of Functional (Psychogenic Monocular Hemianopia Analyzed by Measurement of Hemifield Visual Evoked Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Yoneda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Functional monocular hemianopia is an extremely rare condition, for which measurement of hemifield visual evoked potentials (VEPs has not been previously described. Methods: A 14-year-old boy with functional monocular hemianopia was followed up with Goldmann perimetry and measurement of hemifield and full-field VEPs. Results: The patient had a history of monocular temporal hemianopia of the right eye following headache, nausea and ague. There was no relative afferent pupillary defect, and a color perception test was normal. Goldmann perimetry revealed a vertical monocular temporal hemianopia of the right eye; the hemianopia on the right was also detected with a binocular visual field test. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR angiography of the brain including the optic chiasm as well as orbital MRI revealed no abnormalities. On the basis of these results, we diagnosed the patient's condition as functional monocular hemianopia. Pattern VEPs according to the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV standard were within the normal range. The hemifield pattern VEPs for the right eye showed a symmetrical latency and amplitude for nasal and temporal hemifield stimulation. One month later, the visual field defect of the patient spontaneously disappeared. Conclusions: The latency and amplitude of hemifield VEPs for a patient with functional monocular hemianopia were normal. Measurement of hemifield VEPs may thus provide an objective tool for distinguishing functional hemianopia from hemifield loss caused by an organic lesion.

  13. The Internet and Generalized Functions of the Public Sphere: Transformative Potentials From a Comparative Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Rauchfleisch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Almost since the advent of the Internet, there has been great interest in analyzing and understanding online communication from the perspective of public sphere theory. The question of whether the properties of the Internet and, specifically, social media actually contribute to the public sphere is the matter of ongoing and somewhat heated scientific debate. The aim of the article is twofold. First, we propose a hierarchical model of generalized functions of public sphere. On a theoretical level, we interweave different strands of thought on the public sphere, and the resulting model is more inclusive and less rigid than each of those strands on their own. We identify four generalized functions: identity building, agenda-setting, control and criticism, and deliberation. The Internet does not contribute equally to these functions and we evaluate the impact of the Internet on each of these functions as a diminishing marginal utility. Second, we empirically explore the plausibility of our model in a global comparative analysis with focus on the Internet. With the help of macro-level variables which indicate the structural preconditions for a public sphere, we identify the highest possible function of the public sphere for each country to which the Internet can potentially contribute. Based on this approach, future research can be contextualized: case-study-based research can plausibly articulate expectations regarding the impact of the Internet on the public sphere.

  14. Transient receptor potential ion channel function in sensory transduction and cellular signaling cascades underlying visceral hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balemans, Dafne; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Talavera, Karel; Wouters, Mira M

    2017-06-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important mechanism underlying increased abdominal pain perception in functional gastrointestinal disorders including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease in remission. Although the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood, recent studies described upregulation and altered functions of nociceptors and their signaling pathways in aberrant visceral nociception, in particular the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family. A variety of TRP channels are present in the gastrointestinal tract (TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPA1, TRPM2, TRPM5, and TRPM8), and modulation of their function by increased activation or sensitization (decreased activation threshold) or altered expression in visceral afferents have been reported in visceral hypersensitivity. TRP channels directly detect or transduce osmotic, mechanical, thermal, and chemosensory stimuli. In addition, pro-inflammatory mediators released in tissue damage or inflammation can activate receptors of the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily leading to TRP channel sensitization and activation, which amplify pain and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we highlight the present knowledge on the functional roles of neuronal TRP channels in visceral hypersensitivity and discuss the signaling pathways that underlie TRP channel modulation. We propose that a better understanding of TRP channels and their modulators may facilitate the development of more selective and effective therapies to treat visceral hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymers containing functionalized PEO blocks:Controlled synthesis and biomedical potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A series of controllable amphiphilic block copolymers composed of poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO) as the hydrophilic block and poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL) as the hydrophobic block with the amino terminal group at the end of the PEO chain(PCL-b-PEO-NH2) were synthesized.Based on the further reaction of reactive amino groups,diblock copolymers with functional carboxyl groups(PCL-b-PEO-COOH) and functional compounds RGD(PCL-b-PEO-RGD) as well as the triblock copolymers with thermosensitive PNIPAAm blocks(PCL-b-PEO-b-PNIPAAM) were synthesized.The well-controlled structures of these copolymers with functional groups and blocks were characterized by gel permeation chromatography(GPC) and 1H NMR spectroscopy.These copolymers with functionalized hydrophilic blocks were fabricated into microspheres for the examination of biofunctions via cell culture experiments and in vitro drug release.The results indicated the significance of introducing functional groups(e.g.,NH2,COOH and RGD) into the end of the hydrophilic block of amphiphilic block copolymers for biomedical potentials in tissue engineering and controlled drug release.

  16. Use of a latency-based demand assessment to identify potential demands for functional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Nathan A; Miller, Sarah J; Mintz, Joslyn Cynkus; Mevers, Joanna Lomas; Scheithauer, Mindy C; Eshelman, Julie E; Beavers, Gracie A

    2016-12-01

    Unlike potential tangible positive reinforcers, which are typically identified for inclusion in functional analyses empirically using preference assessments, demands are most often selected arbitrarily or based on caregiver report. The present study evaluated the use of a demand assessment with 12 participants who exhibited escape-maintained problem behavior. Participants were exposed to 10 demands, with aversiveness measured by average latency to the first instance of problem behavior. In subsequent functional analyses, results of a demand condition that included the demand with the shortest latency to problem behavior resulted in identification of an escape function for 11 of the participants. In contrast, a demand condition that included the demand with the longest latency resulted in identification of an escape function for only 5 participants. The implication of these findings is that for the remaining 7 participants, selection of the demand for the functional analysis without using the results of the demand assessment could have produced a false-negative finding. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  17. Bacterial community structure and functional potential in the northeastern Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlin, Kelly M.; Questel, Jennifer M.; Hopcroft, Russell R.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2017-03-01

    We performed a molecular microbial ecological analysis in the northeastern Chukchi Sea in order to characterize bacterial community structure and genetic potential for biogeochemical cycling and oil biodegradation in a region targeted for oil and gas exploration (Burger lease area). Samples were collected from the surface, middle (20 m), and bottom (2-3 m above seafloor) of the water column during the open-water season of August and September 2012 at 17 different locations. We determined bacterial community structure with 16S rRNA genes sequencing and detected functional genes, including an array of oil biodegradation and biogeochemical cycling (carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling) genes, using the GeoChip 5.0 microarray, and then correlated molecular data to contextual physical and biogeochemical factors. Bacterial community structure differed significantly by depth (surface water vs. bottom water) and between sampling dates (August vs. September). While the relative abundance of major functional gene categories did not differ with depth, the abundance of individual functional genes for carbon cycling, nitrogen cycling, organic contaminant remediation, phosphorus cycling, sulfur cycling, virulence, and viruses differed between surface and bottom seawater samples. Aerobic oil degradation genes and taxa known to include oil-degrading bacteria were found at all three depths. These findings support previous observations that two different water masses contribute to a stratified water column in the summer open-water season of the Burger lease area, but indicate that potential function is fairly similar with depth despite differences in temperature, water chemistry, bacterial community structure, and individual functional gene alleles.

  18. The molecular structure and the analytical potential energy function of S-2 and S-3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu-Fang; Li Jun-Yu; Han Xiao-Qin; Sun Jin-Feng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the equilibrium geometry, harmonic frequency and dissociation energy of S-2 and S-3 have been calculated at QCISD/6-311++G(3d2f) and B3P86/6-311++G(3d2f) level. The S-2 ground state is of 2Ⅱg, the S-3 ground state is of 2B1 and S-3 has a bent (C2V) structure with an angle of 115.65° The results are in good agreement with these reported in other literature. For S-3 ion, the vibration frequencies and the force constants have also been calculated. Base on the general principles of microscopic reversibility, the dissociation limits has been deduced. The Murrell-Sorbie potential energy function for S-2 has been derived according to the ab initio data through the leastsquares fitting. The force constants and spectroscopic data for S-2 have been calculated, then compared with other theoretical data. The analytical potential energy function of S-3 have been obtained based on the many-body expansion theory. The structure and energy can correctly reappear on the potential surface.

  19. Fourier transformed steady-state flash evoked potentials for continuous monitoring of visual pathway function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergholz, R; Lehmann, T N; Fritz, G; Rüther, K

    2008-05-01

    Monitoring of somatosensory, motor and auditory pathway function by evoked potentials is routine in surgery placing these pathways at risk. However, visual pathway function remains yet inaccessible to a reliable monitoring. For this study, a method of continuous recordings was developed and tested. Steady-state visual evoked potentials were elicited by flash stimulation at 16 Hz and analysed using discrete Fourier transform. Amplitude and phase of the fundamental response were dynamically averaged and continuously plotted in a trend graph. The method was applied on awake individuals with normal vision and on patients undergoing neurosurgery. In most individuals it was possible to continuously record significant responses. Surprisingly, characteristic time-courses of amplitude and phase were observed in several subjects. These findings were attributed mainly to flicker-adaptation. During anesthesia, amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio were markedly smaller. Signal recognition was facilitated when potentials were recorded with a subdural electrode placed directly at the occipital pole. The anesthetic agent propofol had a major impact on the recordings.

  20. Insect antimicrobial peptides show potentiating functional interactions against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnamaeian, Mohammad; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Dobslaff, Kristin; Wiesner, Jochen; Twyman, Richard M; Zuchner, Thole; Sadd, Ben M; Regoes, Roland R; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and proteins are important components of innate immunity against pathogens in insects. The production of AMPs is costly owing to resource-based trade-offs, and strategies maximizing the efficacy of AMPs at low concentrations are therefore likely to be advantageous. Here, we show the potentiating functional interaction of co-occurring insect AMPs (the bumblebee linear peptides hymenoptaecin and abaecin) resulting in more potent antimicrobial effects at low concentrations. Abaecin displayed no detectable activity against Escherichia coli when tested alone at concentrations of up to 200 μM, whereas hymenoptaecin affected bacterial cell growth and viability but only at concentrations greater than 2 μM. In combination, as little as 1.25 μM abaecin enhanced the bactericidal effects of hymenoptaecin. To understand these potentiating functional interactions, we investigated their mechanisms of action using atomic force microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based quenching assays. Abaecin was found to reduce the minimal inhibitory concentration of hymenoptaecin and to interact with the bacterial chaperone DnaK (an evolutionarily conserved central organizer of the bacterial chaperone network) when the membrane was compromised by hymenoptaecin. These naturally occurring potentiating interactions suggest that combinations of AMPs could be used therapeutically against Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that have acquired resistance to common antibiotics.

  1. Evaluation of functional potentiality of selected commonly consumed foods of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazma Shaheen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rising tide of chronic nutrition related non-communicable diseases yoked with extant under nutrition problems makes it imperative to carry out scientific research towards the discovery of functional foods. Although the emergence of these diseases are believed to be related to a constellation of dietary, socio-economic and lifestyle related risk factors, central to the pathogenesis of these diseases (or disease states are free radicals, oxidative stress, and inflammatory processes typically accompanied by pain. Therefore, functional whole foods with physiologically active antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic compounds seem to be the most promising option to deal with the pathogenesis of existing and emerging chronic diseases burden of Bangladesh. Methods: Edible portions of 70 commonly consumed Bangladeshi foods – including one cereal, five legumes, fourteen vegetables, four tea varieties, five oil seeds, twenty spices, and twenty one fruits – were evaluated for total phenol content (TPC by Folin-Ciocalteau assay. To evaluate functional potentiality, in vitro antioxidant capacity (AC of selected food items were evaluated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl- 1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging assays, in vitro anti-inflammatory potential by observing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α using J774A.1 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, in vivo anti-inflammatory potential by measuring carrageenan induced rat paw edema reduction, and in vivo analgesic potential by acetic acid induced writhing test in mice. Results: Spices, oilseeds, and teas showed high concentration of TPC among the analyzed foods, while spices and teas exhibited notable AC. Green tea showed highest concentrations of TPC (2349 mg Gallic Acid Equivalent / g and AC (2432 µmole Trolox Equivalent/g. Fourteen food items showed potential in vitro anti-inflammatory activity with confirmatory dose response effect shown by 8 items. In vivo, black sesame

  2. A unified treatment of axisymmetric adhesive contact problems using the harmonic potential function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.-S.; Gao, X.-L.; He, Q.-C.

    2011-02-01

    A unified treatment of axisymmetric adhesive contact problems is provided using the harmonic potential function method for axisymmetric elasticity problems advanced by Green, Keer, Barber and others. The harmonic function adopted in the current analysis is the one that was introduced by Jin et al. (2008) to solve an external crack problem. It is demonstrated that the harmonic potential function method offers a simpler and more consistent way to treat non-adhesive and adhesive contact problems. By using this method and the principle of superposition, a general solution is derived for the adhesive contact problem involving an axisymmetric rigid punch of arbitrary shape and an adhesive interaction force distribution of any profile. This solution provides analytical expressions for all non-zero displacement and stress components on the contact surface, unlike existing ones. In addition, the newly derived solution is able to link existing solutions/models for axisymmetric non-adhesive and adhesive contact problems and to reveal the connections and differences among these solutions/models individually obtained using different methods at various times. Specifically, it is shown that Sneddon's solution for the axisymmetric punch problem, Boussinesq's solution for the flat-ended cylindrical punch problem, the Hertz solution for the spherical punch problem, the JKR model, the DMT model, the M-D model, and the M-D- n model can all be explicitly recovered by the current general solution.

  3. Coordinated modular functionality and prognostic potential of a heart failure biomarker-driven interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Daniel R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of potentially relevant biomarkers and a deeper understanding of molecular mechanisms related to heart failure (HF development can be enhanced by the implementation of biological network-based analyses. To support these efforts, here we report a global network of protein-protein interactions (PPIs relevant to HF, which was characterized through integrative bioinformatic analyses of multiple sources of "omic" information. Results We found that the structural and functional architecture of this PPI network is highly modular. These network modules can be assigned to specialized processes, specific cellular regions and their functional roles tend to partially overlap. Our results suggest that HF biomarkers may be defined as key coordinators of intra- and inter-module communication. Putative biomarkers can, in general, be distinguished as "information traffic" mediators within this network. The top high traffic proteins are encoded by genes that are not highly differentially expressed across HF and non-HF patients. Nevertheless, we present evidence that the integration of expression patterns from high traffic genes may support accurate prediction of HF. We quantitatively demonstrate that intra- and inter-module functional activity may be controlled by a family of transcription factors known to be associated with the prevention of hypertrophy. Conclusion The systems-driven analysis reported here provides the basis for the identification of potentially novel biomarkers and understanding HF-related mechanisms in a more comprehensive and integrated way.

  4. Extracellular vesicles: structure, function, and potential clinical uses in renal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.T. Borges

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the role of extracellular vesicles in various diseases including cancer has been increasing. Extracellular vesicles include microvesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies, and argosomes, and are classified by size, content, synthesis, and function. Currently, the best characterized are exosomes and microvesicles. Exosomes are small vesicles (40-100 nm involved in intercellular communication regardless of the distance between them. They are found in various biological fluids such as plasma, serum, and breast milk, and are formed from multivesicular bodies through the inward budding of the endosome membrane. Microvesicles are 100-1000 nm vesicles released from the cell by the outward budding of the plasma membrane. The therapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles is very broad, with applications including a route of drug delivery and as biomarkers for diagnosis. Extracellular vesicles extracted from stem cells may be used for treatment of many diseases including kidney diseases. This review highlights mechanisms of synthesis and function, and the potential uses of well-characterized extracellular vesicles, mainly exosomes, with a special focus on renal functions and diseases.

  5. Green's Function of a General PT-Symmetric Non-Hermitian Non-central Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Mourya, Brijesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We study the path integral solution of a system of particle moving in certain class of PT symmetric non-Hermitian and non-central potential. The Hamil- tonian of the system is converted to a separable Hamiltonian of Liouville type in parabolic coordinates and is further mapped into a Hamiltonian corresponding to two 2-dimensional simple harmonic oscillators (SHOs). Thus the explicit Green's functions for a general non-central PT symmetric non hermitian potential are cal- culated in terms of that of 2d SHOs. The entire spectrum for this three dimensional system is shown to be always real leading to the fact that the system remains in unbroken PT phase all the time.

  6. Potential-field estimation from satellite data using scalar and vector Slepian functions

    CERN Document Server

    Plattner, Alain

    2013-01-01

    In the last few decades a series of increasingly sophisticated satellite missions has brought us gravity and magnetometry data of ever improving quality. To make optimal use of this rich source of information on the structure of Earth and other celestial bodies, our computational algorithms should be well matched to the specific properties of the data. In particular, inversion methods require specialized adaptation if the data are only locally available, their quality varies spatially, or if we are interested in model recovery only for a specific spatial region. Here, we present two approaches to estimate potential fields on a spherical Earth, from gradient data collected at satellite altitude. Our context is that of the estimation of the gravitational or magnetic potential from vector-valued measurements. Both of our approaches utilize spherical Slepian functions to produce an approximation of local data at satellite altitude, which is subsequently transformed to the Earth's spherical reference surface. The ...

  7. Hierarchy of model Kohn–Sham potentials for orbital-dependent functionals: A practical alternative to the optimized effective potential method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohut, Sviataslau V.; Staroverov, Viktor N., E-mail: vstarove@uwo.ca [Department of Chemistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Ryabinkin, Ilya G. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-05-14

    We describe a method for constructing a hierarchy of model potentials approximating the functional derivative of a given orbital-dependent exchange-correlation functional with respect to electron density. Each model is derived by assuming a particular relationship between the self-consistent solutions of Kohn–Sham (KS) and generalized Kohn–Sham (GKS) equations for the same functional. In the KS scheme, the functional is differentiated with respect to density, in the GKS scheme—with respect to orbitals. The lowest-level approximation is the orbital-averaged effective potential (OAEP) built with the GKS orbitals. The second-level approximation, termed the orbital-consistent effective potential (OCEP), is based on the assumption that the KS and GKS orbitals are the same. It has the form of the OAEP plus a correction term. The highest-level approximation is the density-consistent effective potential (DCEP), derived under the assumption that the KS and GKS electron densities are equal. The analytic expression for a DCEP is the OCEP formula augmented with kinetic-energy-density-dependent terms. In the case of exact-exchange functional, the OAEP is the Slater potential, the OCEP is roughly equivalent to the localized Hartree–Fock approximation and related models, and the DCEP is practically indistinguishable from the true optimized effective potential for exact exchange. All three levels of the proposed hierarchy require solutions of the GKS equations as input and have the same affordable computational cost.

  8. Event-related potentials study in children with borderline intellectual functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Vaney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low general cognitive ability is a common cause for learning and academic difficulties. The present study was undertaken to objectively investigate the cognitive functioning of children having borderline intelligence using electrophysiological measures. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on children having borderline intelligence (IQ: 70-85. The cognitive functioning of children was assessed using event-related potentials. Results: Significant prolongation of the latency of P200, N200, and P300 with no significant difference in the amplitudes was seen in the children having borderline intelligence as compared to controls. Conclusions: Brain systems that are important for stimulus discrimination and using cognitive representation to guide cognition and behavior are impaired in children with borderline intelligence.

  9. Enhanced autophagy as a potential mechanism for the improved physiological function by simvastatin in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy has recently emerged as an important cellular process for the maintenance of skeletal muscle health and function. Excessive autophagy can trigger muscle catabolism, leading to atrophy. In contrast, reduced autophagic flux is a characteristic of several muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and severe inherited muscle disorder. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by CYBB/NOX2 impairs autophagy in muscles from the dmd/mdx mouse, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Statins decrease CYBB/NOX2 expression and activity and stimulate autophagy in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we treated dmd/mdx mice with simvastatin and showed decreased CYBB/NOX2-mediated oxidative stress and enhanced autophagy induction. This was accompanied by reduced muscle damage, inflammation and fibrosis, and increased muscle force production. Our data suggest that increased autophagy may be a potential mechanism by which simvastatin improves skeletal muscle health and function in muscular dystrophy.

  10. Marine bioactives as functional food ingredients: potential to reduce the incidence of chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordan, Sinéad; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The marine environment represents a relatively untapped source of functional ingredients that can be applied to various aspects of food processing, storage, and fortification. Moreover, numerous marine-based compounds have been identified as having diverse biological activities, with some reported to interfere with the pathogenesis of diseases. Bioactive peptides isolated from fish protein hydrolysates as well as algal fucans, galactans and alginates have been shown to possess anticoagulant, anticancer and hypocholesterolemic activities. Additionally, fish oils and marine bacteria are excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids, while crustaceans and seaweeds contain powerful antioxidants such as carotenoids and phenolic compounds. On the basis of their bioactive properties, this review focuses on the potential use of marine-derived compounds as functional food ingredients for health maintenance and the prevention of chronic diseases.

  11. Marine Bioactives as Functional Food Ingredients: Potential to Reduce the Incidence of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Stanton

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment represents a relatively untapped source of functional ingredients that can be applied to various aspects of food processing, storage, and fortification. Moreover, numerous marine-based compounds have been identified as having diverse biological activities, with some reported to interfere with the pathogenesis of diseases. Bioactive peptides isolated from fish protein hydrolysates as well as algal fucans, galactans and alginates have been shown to possess anticoagulant, anticancer and hypocholesterolemic activities. Additionally, fish oils and marine bacteria are excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids, while crustaceans and seaweeds contain powerful antioxidants such as carotenoids and phenolic compounds. On the basis of their bioactive properties, this review focuses on the potential use of marine-derived compounds as functional food ingredients for health maintenance and the prevention of chronic diseases.

  12. Functional splicing network reveals extensive regulatory potential of the core spliceosomal machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Tejedor, J Ramón; Vigevani, Luisa; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-01-08

    Pre-mRNA splicing relies on the poorly understood dynamic interplay between >150 protein components of the spliceosome. The steps at which splicing can be regulated remain largely unknown. We systematically analyzed the effect of knocking down the components of the splicing machinery on alternative splicing events relevant for cell proliferation and apoptosis and used this information to reconstruct a network of functional interactions. The network accurately captures known physical and functional associations and identifies new ones, revealing remarkable regulatory potential of core spliceosomal components, related to the order and duration of their recruitment during spliceosome assembly. In contrast with standard models of regulation at early steps of splice site recognition, factors involved in catalytic activation of the spliceosome display regulatory properties. The network also sheds light on the antagonism between hnRNP C and U2AF, and on targets of antitumor drugs, and can be widely used to identify mechanisms of splicing regulation.

  13. Charge transfer, chemical potentials, and the nature of functional groups: answers from quantum chemical topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendás, A Martín; Francisco, E; Blanco, M A

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the response of a quantum group within a molecule to charge transfer by using the interacting quantum atoms approach (IQA), an energy partitioning scheme within the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAM). It is shown that this response lies at the core of the concept of the functional group. The manipulation of fractional electron populations is carried out by using distribution functions for the electron number within the quantum basins. Several test systems are studied to show that similar chemical potential groups are characterized by similar energetic behavior upon interaction with other groups. The origin of the empirical additivity rules for group energies in simple hydrocarbons is also investigated. It turns out to rest on the independent saturation of both the self-energies and the interaction energies of the groups as the size of the chain increases. We also show that our results are compatible with the standard group energies of the QTAM.

  14. Heterologous viral expression systems in fosmid vectors increase the functional analysis potential of metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrón-González, L; Medina, C; Limón-Mortés, M C; Santero, E

    2013-01-01

    The extraordinary potential of metagenomic functional analyses to identify activities of interest present in uncultured microorganisms has been limited by reduced gene expression in surrogate hosts. We have developed vectors and specialized E. coli strains as improved metagenomic DNA heterologous expression systems, taking advantage of viral components that prevent transcription termination at metagenomic terminators. One of the systems uses the phage T7 RNA-polymerase to drive metagenomic gene expression, while the other approach uses the lambda phage transcription anti-termination protein N to limit transcription termination. A metagenomic library was constructed and functionally screened to identify genes conferring carbenicillin resistance to E. coli. The use of these enhanced expression systems resulted in a 6-fold increase in the frequency of carbenicillin resistant clones. Subcloning and sequence analysis showed that, besides β-lactamases, efflux pumps are not only able contribute to carbenicillin resistance but may in fact be sufficient by themselves to convey carbenicillin resistance.

  15. High-Resolution Rotational Spectrum, Dunham Coefficients, and Potential Energy Function of NaCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Peña, I.; Agundez, M.; Prieto, L. Velilla; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Zuñiga, J.; Bastida, A.; Alonso, J. L.; Requena, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report laboratory spectroscopy for the first time of the J = 1–0 and J = 2–1 lines of Na35Cl and Na37Cl in several vibrational states. The hyperfine structure has been resolved in both transitions for all vibrational levels, which permit us to predict with high accuracy the hyperfine splitting of the rotational transitions of the two isotopologues at higher frequencies. The new data have been merged with all previous works at microwave, millimeter, and infrared wavelengths and fitted to a series of mass-independent Dunham parameters and to a potential energy function. The obtained parameters have been used to compute a new dipole moment function, from which the dipole moment for infrared transitions up to Δv = 8 has been derived. Frequency and intensity predictions are provided for all rovibrational transitions up to J = 150 and v = 8, from which the ALMA data of evolved stars can be modeled and interpreted.

  16. Marine Bioactives as Functional Food Ingredients: Potential to Reduce the Incidence of Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordan, Sinéad; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    The marine environment represents a relatively untapped source of functional ingredients that can be applied to various aspects of food processing, storage, and fortification. Moreover, numerous marine-based compounds have been identified as having diverse biological activities, with some reported to interfere with the pathogenesis of diseases. Bioactive peptides isolated from fish protein hydrolysates as well as algal fucans, galactans and alginates have been shown to possess anticoagulant, anticancer and hypocholesterolemic activities. Additionally, fish oils and marine bacteria are excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids, while crustaceans and seaweeds contain powerful antioxidants such as carotenoids and phenolic compounds. On the basis of their bioactive properties, this review focuses on the potential use of marine-derived compounds as functional food ingredients for health maintenance and the prevention of chronic diseases. PMID:21747748

  17. Phase of the complex functional determinant in QCD at small chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, E S

    2008-01-01

    We construct an effective action for QCD by expanding the quark determinant in powers of the chemical potential at finite temperature in the case of massless quarks. To cut the infinite series we adopt the Weinberg power counting criterium. We compute the minimal effective action ($\\sim p^4$), expanding in the external momentum, which implies the use of the Hard Thermal Loop approximation. Our main result is a gauge invariant expression for the phase of the functional determinant in QCD. Implications for lattice simulations are briefly discussed.

  18. A density functional theory-based chemical potential equalisation approach to molecular polarizability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amita Wadehra; Swapan K Ghosh

    2005-09-01

    The electron density changes in molecular systems in the presence of external electric fields are modeled for simplicity in terms of the induced charges and dipole moments at the individual atomic sites. A chemical potential equalisation scheme is proposed for the calculation of these quantities and hence the dipole polarizability within the framework of density functional theory based linear response theory. The resulting polarizability is expressed in terms of the contributions from individual atoms in the molecule. A few illustrative numerical calculations are shown to predict the molecular polarizabilities in good agreement with available results. The usefulness of the approach to the calculation of intermolecular interaction needed for computer simulation is highlighted.

  19. Potential of Entropic Force in Markov Systems with Nonequilibrium Steady State, Generalized Gibbs Function and Criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Lowell; Qian, Hong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we revisit the notion of the “minus logarithm of stationary probability” as a generalized potential in nonequilibrium systems and attempt to illustrate its central role in an axiomatic approach to stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamics of complex systems. It is demonstrated that this quantity arises naturally through both monotonicity results of Markov processes and as the rate function when a stochastic process approaches a detrministic limit. We then undertake a more detailed mathematical analysis of the consequences of this quantity, culminating in a necessary and sufficient condition for the criticality of stochastic systems. This condition is then discussed in the context of recent results about criticality in biological systems.

  20. [Music-Acoustic Signals Controlled by Subject's Brain Potentials in the Correction of Unfavorable Functional States].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotchev, A I; Bondar, A T; Bakhchina, A V; Parin, S B; Polevaya, S A; Radchenko, G S

    2016-01-01

    Literature review and the results of own studies on the development and experimental testing of musical EEG neurofeedback technology are presented. The technology is based on exposure of subjects to music or music-like signals that are organized in strict accordance with the current values of brain potentials of the patient. The main attention is paid to the analysis of the effectiveness of several versions of the technology, using specific and meaningful for the individual narrow-frequency EEG oscillators during the correction of unfavorable changes of the functional state.

  1. Metaphylogenomic and Potential Functionality of the Limpet Patella pellucida’s Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Dudek

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the microbial diversity associated with the digestive tract of the seaweed grazing marine limpet Patella pellucida. Using a modified indirect DNA extraction protocol and performing metagenomic profiling based on specific prokaryotic marker genes, the abundance of bacterial groups was identified from the analyzed metagenome. The members of three significantly abundant phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were characterized through the literature and their predicted functions towards the host, as well as potential applications in the industrial environment assessed.

  2. Rogue Waves of Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation with Time-Dependent Linear Potential Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rogue waves of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with time-dependent linear potential function are investigated by using the similarity transformation in this paper. The first-order and second-order rogue waves solutions are obtained and the nonlinear dynamic behaviors of these solutions are discussed in detail. In addition, the amplitudes of the rogue waves under the effect of the gravity field and external magnetic field changing with the time are analyzed by using numerical simulation. The results can be used to study the matter rogue waves in the Bose-Einstein condensates and other fields of nonlinear science.

  3. Disorder in milk proteins: structure, functional disorder, and biocidal potentials of lactoperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almehdar, Hussein A; El-Fakharany, Esmail M; Uversky, Vladimir N; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2015-01-01

    This article continues a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. Besides caseins, which are the major proteinaceous constituents of any milk that can be isolated by isoelectric precipitation, milk contains a set of soluble whey proteins, such as β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, serum albumin, immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, glycomacropeptide, and proteose peptone (the last two are soluble casein derivatives). Lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are known to possess prominent biocidal activity, serving as efficient antibiotics and antiviral agents against a wide spectrum of bacteria, fungi, and viruses. LPO is a heme-containing peroxidase expressed as preproprotein. The mature protein has a single catalytic domain, structure of which is known for a protein isolated from several species. Functionally, LPO is a crucial component of the LPO system that includes LPO, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and thiocyanate (SCN(-)), being a well-studied, naturally occurring antimicrobial system in milk that is effective against many microorganisms and some viruses. Although various aspects of LPO structure and function are rather well studied and were subjects of several recent reviews, the abundance and potential functional roles of intrinsically disordered regions in this protein have never being addressed as of yet. The major goal of this article is to fill this gap and to show how intrinsic disorder is encoded in the amino acid sequence of LPO, and how intrinsic disorder is related to functions of this important milk protein.

  4. Pan-Nematoda Transcriptomic Elucidation of Essential Intestinal Functions and Therapeutic Targets With Broad Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Rosa, Bruce A; Jasmer, Douglas P; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-09-01

    The nematode intestine is continuous with the outside environment, making it easily accessible to anthelmintics for parasite control, but the development of new therapeutics is impeded by limited knowledge of nematode intestinal cell biology. We established the most comprehensive nematode intestinal functional database to date by generating transcriptional data from the dissected intestines of three parasitic nematodes spanning the phylum, and integrating the results with the whole proteomes of 10 nematodes (including 9 pathogens of humans or animals) and 3 host species and 2 outgroup species. We resolved 10,772 predicted nematode intestinal protein families (IntFams), and studied their presence and absence within the different lineages (births and deaths) among nematodes. Conserved intestinal cell functions representing ancestral functions of evolutionary importance were delineated, and molecular features useful for selective therapeutic targeting were identified. Molecular patterns conserved among IntFam proteins demonstrated large potential as therapeutic targets to inhibit intestinal cell functions with broad applications towards treatment and control of parasitic nematodes.

  5. Why do stroke patients with negative motor evoked potential show poor limb motor function recovery?*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhibin Song; Lijuan Dang; Yanling Zhou; Yanjiang Dong; Haimao Liang; Zhengfeng Zhu; Suyue Pan

    2013-01-01

    Negative motor evoked potentials after cerebral infarction, indicative of poor recovery of limb motor function, tend to be accompanied by changes in fractional anisotropy values and the cerebral pe-duncle area on the affected side, but the characteristics of these changes have not been reported. This study included 57 cases of cerebral infarction whose motor evoked potentials were tested in the 24 hours after the first inspection for diffusion tensor imaging, in which 29 cases were in the negative group and 28 cases in the positive group. Twenty-nine patients with negative motor evoked potentials were divided into two groups according to fractional anisotropy on the affected side of the cerebral peduncle: a fractional anisotropy < 0.36 group and a fractional anisotropy ≥ 0.36 group. Al patients underwent a regular magnetic resonance imaging and a diffusion tensor imaging examina-tion at 1 week, 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after cerebral infarction. The Fugl-Meyer scores of their he-miplegic limbs were tested before the magnetic resonance and diffusion tensor imaging tions. In the negative motor evoked potential group, fractional anisotropy in the affected cerebral peduncle declined progressively, which was most obvious in the first 1-3 months after the onset of cerebral infarction. The areas and area asymmetries of the cerebral peduncle on the affected side were significantly decreased at 6 and 12 months after onset. At 12 months after onset, the area asymmetries of the cerebral peduncle on the affected side were lower than the normal lower limit value of 0.83. Fugl-Meyer scores in the fractional anisotropy ≥ 0.36 group were significantly higher than in the fractional anisotropy < 0.36 group at 3-12 months after onset. The fractional anisotropy of the cerebral peduncle in the positive motor evoked potential group decreased in the first 1 month after onset, and stayed unchanged from 3-12 months; there was no change in the area of the ce-rebral peduncle in the first 1

  6. Murine metapodophalangeal sesamoid bones: morphology and potential means of mineralization underlying function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Alison H; Lowder, Elizabeth M; Jacquet, Robin D; Landis, William J

    2010-05-01

    Normal murine metapodophalangeal sesamoid bones, closely associated with tendons, were examined in terms of their structure and mineralization with reference to their potential function following crystal deposition. This study utilized radiography, whole mount staining, histology, and conventional electron microscopy to establish a maturation timeline of mineral formation in 1- to 6-week-old metapodophalangeal sesamoids from CD-1 mice. An intimate cellular and structural relationship was documented in more detail than previously described between the sesamoid bone, tendon, and fibrocartilage enthesis at the metapodophalangeal joint. Sesamoid calcification began in 1-week lateral sesamoids of the murine metacarpophalangeal joint of the second digit. All sesamoids were completely calcified by 4 weeks. Transmission electron microscopy of 2-week metacarpophalangeal sesamoids revealed extensive Type I collagen in the associated tendon and fibrocartilage insertion sites and Type II collagen and proteoglycan networks in the interior of the sesamoid. No extracellular matrix vesicles were documented. The results demonstrate that murine sesamoid bones consist of cartilage elaborated by chondrocytes that predominantly synthesize and secrete Type II collagen and proteoglycan. Type II collagen and proteoglycans appear responsible for the onset and progression of mineral formation in this tissue. These data contribute to new understanding of the biochemistry, ultrastructure, and mineralization of sesamoids in relation to other bones and calcifying cartilage and tendon of vertebrates. They also reflect on the potentially important but currently uncertain function of sesamoids as serving as a fulcrum point along a tendon, foreshortening its length and altering advantageously its biomechanical properties with respect to tendon-muscle interaction.

  7. Plants Rather than Mineral Fertilization Shape Microbial Community Structure and Functional Potential in Legacy Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridl, Jakub; Kolar, Michal; Strejcek, Michal; Strnad, Hynek; Stursa, Petr; Paces, Jan; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Plant-microbe interactions are of particular importance in polluted soils. This study sought to determine how selected plants (horseradish, black nightshade and tobacco) and NPK mineral fertilization shape the structure of soil microbial communities in legacy contaminated soil and the resultant impact of treatment on the soil microbial community functional potential. To explore these objectives, we combined shotgun metagenomics and 16S rRNA gene amplicon high throughput sequencing with data analysis approaches developed for RNA-seq. We observed that the presence of any of the selected plants rather than fertilization shaped the microbial community structure, and the microbial populations of the root zone of each plant significantly differed from one another and/or from the bulk soil, whereas the effect of the fertilizer proved to be insignificant. When we compared microbial diversity in root zones versus bulk soil, we observed an increase in the relative abundance of Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria or Bacteroidetes, taxa which are commonly considered copiotrophic. Our results thus align with the theory that fast-growing, copiotrophic, microorganisms which are adapted to ephemeral carbon inputs are enriched in the vegetated soil. Microbial functional potential indicated that some genetic determinants associated with signal transduction mechanisms, defense mechanisms or amino acid transport and metabolism differed significantly among treatments. Genetic determinants of these categories tend to be overrepresented in copiotrophic organisms. The results of our study further elucidate plant-microbe relationships in a contaminated environment with possible implications for the phyto/rhizoremediation of contaminated areas.

  8. Regulation of chondrocyte functions by transient receptor potential cation channel V6 in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tengfei; Ma, Jun; Guo, Lei; Yang, Peng; Zhou, Xuhui; Ye, Tianwen

    2017-11-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels function to maintain the dynamic balance of calcium signaling and calcium metabolism in bones. The goal of this study was to determine the potential role of TRPV6 in regulation of chondrocytes. The level of TRPV6 expression was analyzed by western blot in articular cartilage derived from the knee joints of osteoarthritis (OA) rat models and OA patients. Bone structure and osteoarthritic changes in the knee joints of TRPV6 knockout mice were examined using micro-computed and histological analysis at the age of 6 and 12 months old. Furthermore, to investigate the effects of TRPV6 on chondrocyte extracellular matrix secretion, the release of matrix degrading enzymes, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, we decreased and increased TRPV6 expression in chondrocytes with lentiviral constructs encoding shRNA targeting TRPV6 and encoding TRPV6, respectively. The results showed that the level of TRPV6 expression in an OA rat model was markedly down-regulated. TRPV6 knockout mice showed severe osteoarthritis changes, including cartilage fibrillation, eburnation, and loss of proteoglycans. In addition, deficiency of TRPV6 clearly affected chondrocyte function, such as extracellular matrix secretion, the release of matrix degrading enzymes, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Taken together, our results implicated that TRPV6 channel, as a chondro-protective factor, was involved in the pathogenesis of OA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. State-dependent alpha peak frequency shifts: Experimental evidence, potential mechanisms and functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierau, Andreas; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Lefebvre, Jérémie

    2017-09-30

    Neural populations produce complex oscillatory patterns thought to implement brain function. The dominant rhythm in the healthy adult human brain is formed by alpha oscillations with a typical power peak most commonly found between 8 and 12Hz. This alpha peak frequency has been repeatedly discussed as a highly heritable and stable neurophysiological "trait" marker reflecting anatomical properties of the brain, and individuals' general cognitive capacity. However, growing evidence suggests that the alpha peak frequency is highly volatile at shorter time scales, dependent on the individuals' "state". Based on the converging experimental and theoretical results from numerous recent studies, here we propose that alpha frequency variability forms the basis of an adaptive mechanism mirroring the activation level of neural populations which has important functional implications. We here integrate experimental and computational perspectives to shed new light on the potential role played by shifts in alpha peak frequency and discuss resulting implications. We further propose a potential mechanism by which alpha oscillations are regulated in a noisy network of spiking neurons in presence of delayed feedback. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Matrix elements for sum of power-law potentials in quantum mechanic using generalized hypergeometric functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma'zoozeh E. Abu-Amra

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we derive close form for the matrix elements for $hat H=-Delta +V$, where $V$ is a pure power-law potential. We use trial functions of the form $$ psi _n(r= sqrt{{frac{2eta ^{gamma/2}(gamma _n} {n!Gamma(gamma }}} r^{gamma - 1/2} e^{-frac{sqrt{eta }}{2}r^q} _pF_1 ( -n,a_2,ldots ,a_p;gamma;sqrt {eta } r^q, $$ for $eta, q,gamma >0$ to obtain the matrix elements for $hat H$. These formulas are then optimized with respect to variational parameters $eta ,q$ and $gamma $ to obtain accurate upper bounds for the given nonsolvable eigenvalue problem in quantum mechanics. Moreover, we write the matrix elements in terms of the generalized hypergeomtric functions. These results are generalization of those found earlier in [2], [8-16] for power-law potentials. Applications and comparisons with earlier work are presented.

  11. Simultaneous functional near-infrared brain imaging and event-related potential studies of Stroop effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jiahuan; Li, Ting; Zhang, Zhongxing; Gong, Hui

    2009-02-01

    Functional near-infrared brain imaging (fNIRI) and event-related potential (ERP) were used simultaneous to detect the prefrontal cortex (PFC) which is considered to execute cognitive control of the subjects while performing the Chinese characters color-word matching Stroop task with event-related design. The fNIRI instrument is a portable system operating at three wavelengths (735nm & 805nm &850nm) with continuous-wave. The event-related potentials were acquired by Neuroscan system. The locations of optodes corresponding to the electrodes were defined four areas symmetrically. In nine native Chinese-speaking fit volunteers, fNIRI measured the hemodynamic parameters (involving oxy-/deoxy- hemoglobin) changes when the characteristic waveforms (N500/P600) were recorded by ERP. The interference effect was obvious as a longer reaction time for incongruent than congruent and neutral stimulus. The responses of hemodynamic and electrophysiology were also stronger during incongruent compared to congruent and neutral trials, and these results are similar to those obtained with fNIRI or ERP separately. There are high correlations, even linear relationship, in the two kinds of signals. In conclusion, the multi-modality approach combining of fNIRI and ERP is feasible and could obtain more cognitive function information with hemodynamic and electrophysiology signals. It also provides a perspective to prove the neurovascular coupling mechanism.

  12. The diversified function and potential therapy of ectopic olfactory receptors in non-olfactory tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Zhao, Hong; Fu, Nian; Chen, Linxi

    2017-03-24

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are mainly distributed in olfactory neurons and play a key role in detecting volatile odorants, eventually resulting in the production of smell perception. Recently, it is also reported that ORs are expressed in non-olfactory tissues including heart, lung, sperm, skin, and cancerous tissues. Interestingly, ectopic ORs are associated with the development of diseases in non-olfactory tissues. For instance, ectopic ORs initiate the hypoxic ventilatory responses and maintain the oxygen homeostasis of breathing in the carotid body when oxygen levels decline. Ectopic ORs induce glucose homeostasis in diabetes. Ectopic ORs regulate systemic blood pressure by increasing renin secretion and vasodilation. Ectopic ORs participate in the process of tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, and invasiveness. Ectopic ORs accelerate the occurrence of obesity, angiogenesis and wound-healing processes. Ectopic ORs affect fetal hemoglobin levels in sickle cell anemia and thalassemia. Finally, we also elaborate some ligands targeting for ORs. Obviously, the diversified function and related signal pathway of ectopic ORs may play a potential therapeutic target in non-olfactory tissues. Thus, this review focuses on the latest research results about the diversified function and therapeutic potential of ectopic ORs in non-olfactory tissues. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Microbial response to simulated global change is phylogenetically conserved and linked with functional potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Anthony S; Martiny, Adam C; Allison, Steven D; Berlemont, Renaud; Goulden, Michael L; Lu, Ying; Treseder, Kathleen K; Weihe, Claudia; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2016-01-01

    The high diversity of microbial communities hampers predictions about their responses to global change. Here we investigate the potential for using a phylogenetic, trait-based framework to capture the response of bacteria and fungi to global change manipulations. Replicated grassland plots were subjected to 3+ years of drought and nitrogen fertilization. The responses of leaf litter bacteria and fungi to these simulated changes were significantly phylogenetically conserved. Proportional changes in abundance were highly correlated among related organisms, such that relatives with approximately 5% ribosomal DNA genetic distance showed similar responses to the treatments. A microbe's change in relative abundance was significantly correlated between the treatments, suggesting a compromise between numerical abundance in undisturbed environments and resistance to change in general, independent of disturbance type. Lineages in which at least 90% of the microbes shared the same response were circumscribed at a modest phylogenetic depth (τD 0.014-0.021), but significantly larger than randomized simulations predict. In several clades, phylogenetic depth of trait consensus was higher. Fungal response to drought was more conserved than was response to nitrogen fertilization, whereas bacteria responded equally to both treatments. Finally, we show that a bacterium's response to the manipulations is correlated with its potential functional traits (measured here as the number of glycoside hydrolase genes encoding the capacity to degrade different types of carbohydrates). Together, these results suggest that a phylogenetic, trait-based framework may be useful for predicting shifts in microbial composition and functioning in the face of global change.

  14. Dietary fats, teas, dairy, and nuts: potential functional foods for weight control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Functional foods are similar to conventional foods in appearance, but they have benefits that extend beyond their basic nutritional properties. For example, functional foods have been studied for the prevention of osteoporosis, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. They have yet to be related to the prevention of obesity, although obesity is one of the major health problems today. The inclusion of foods or the replacement of habitual foods with others that may enhance energy expenditure (EE) or improve satiety may be a practical way to maintain a stable body weight or assist in achieving weight loss; such foods may act as functional foods in body weight control. Some foods that might be classified as functional foods for weight control because of their effects on EE and appetite-including medium-chain triacylglycerols, diacylglycerols, tea, milk, and nuts-are reviewed here. Only human studies reporting EE, appetite, or body weight are discussed. When studies of whole food items are unavailable, studies of nutraceuticals, the capsular equivalents of functional foods, are reviewed. To date, dietary fats seem to be most promising and have been the most extensively studied for their effects on body weight control. However, the weight loss observed is small and should be considered mostly as a measure to prevent weight gain. Carefully conducted clinical studies are needed to firmly ascertain the effect of tea, milk, and nuts on body weight maintenance, to assess their potential to assist in weight-loss efforts, and to ascertain dose-response relations and mechanisms of action for the 4 food types examined.

  15. Two types of potential functions and their use in the modelling of information: two applications from the social sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel E Haven

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider how two types of potential functions, the real and quantum potential can be shown to be of use in a social science context. The real potential function is a key ingredient in the Hamiltonian framework used in both classical and quantum mechanics. The quantum potential however emerges in a different way in quantum mechanics. In this paper we consider both potentials and we attempt to give them a social science interpretation within the setting of two applications.

  16. Biochemical and Functional Characterization of Parawixia bistriata Spider Venom with Potential Proteolytic and Larvicidal Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizeli S. Gimenez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxins purified from the venom of spiders have high potential to be studied pharmacologically and biochemically. These biomolecules may have biotechnological and therapeutic applications. This study aimed to evaluate the protein content of Parawixia bistriata venom and functionally characterize its proteins that have potential for biotechnological applications. The crude venom showed no phospholipase, hemorrhagic, or anti-Leishmania activities attesting to low genotoxicity and discrete antifungal activity for C. albicans. However the following activities were observed: anticoagulation, edema, myotoxicity and proteolysis on casein, azo-collagen, and fibrinogen. The chromatographic and electrophoretic profiles of the proteins revealed a predominance of acidic, neutral, and polar proteins, highlighting the presence of proteins with high molecular masses. Five fractions were collected using cation exchange chromatography, with the P4 fraction standing out as that of the highest purity. All fractions showed proteolytic activity. The crude venom and fractions P1, P2, and P3 showed larvicidal effects on A. aegypti. Fraction P4 showed the presence of a possible metalloprotease (60 kDa that has high proteolytic activity on azo-collagen and was inhibited by EDTA. The results presented in this study demonstrate the presence of proteins in the venom of P. bistriata with potential for biotechnological applications.

  17. Biochemical and functional characterization of Parawixia bistriata spider venom with potential proteolytic and larvicidal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Gizeli S; Coutinho-Neto, Antonio; Kayano, Anderson M; Simões-Silva, Rodrigo; Trindade, Frances; de Almeida e Silva, Alexandre; Marcussi, Silvana; da Silva, Saulo L; Fernandes, Carla F C; Zuliani, Juliana P; Calderon, Leonardo A; Soares, Andreimar M; Stábeli, Rodrigo G

    2014-01-01

    Toxins purified from the venom of spiders have high potential to be studied pharmacologically and biochemically. These biomolecules may have biotechnological and therapeutic applications. This study aimed to evaluate the protein content of Parawixia bistriata venom and functionally characterize its proteins that have potential for biotechnological applications. The crude venom showed no phospholipase, hemorrhagic, or anti-Leishmania activities attesting to low genotoxicity and discrete antifungal activity for C. albicans. However the following activities were observed: anticoagulation, edema, myotoxicity and proteolysis on casein, azo-collagen, and fibrinogen. The chromatographic and electrophoretic profiles of the proteins revealed a predominance of acidic, neutral, and polar proteins, highlighting the presence of proteins with high molecular masses. Five fractions were collected using cation exchange chromatography, with the P4 fraction standing out as that of the highest purity. All fractions showed proteolytic activity. The crude venom and fractions P1, P2, and P3 showed larvicidal effects on A. aegypti. Fraction P4 showed the presence of a possible metalloprotease (60 kDa) that has high proteolytic activity on azo-collagen and was inhibited by EDTA. The results presented in this study demonstrate the presence of proteins in the venom of P. bistriata with potential for biotechnological applications.

  18. The potential of iRest in measuring the hand function performance of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Hisyam; Khor, Kang Xiang; Yeong, Che Fai; Su, Eileen Lee Ming; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T

    2017-01-01

    Clinical scales such as Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) are widely used to evaluate stroke patient's motor performance. However, there are several limitations with these assessment scales such as subjectivity, lack of repeatability, time-consuming and highly depend on the ability of the physiotherapy. In contrast, robot-based assessments are objective, repeatable, and could potentially reduce the assessment time. However, robot-based assessments are not as well established as conventional assessment scale and the correlation to conventional assessment scale is unclear. This study was carried out to identify important parameters in designing tasks that efficiently assess hand function of stroke patients and to quantify potential benefits of robotic assessment modules to predict the conventional assessment score with iRest. Twelve predictive variables were explored, relating to movement time, velocity, strategy, accuracy and smoothness from three robotic assessment modules which are Draw I, Draw Diamond and Draw Circle. Regression models using up to four predictors were developed to describe the MAS. Results show that the time given should be not too long and it would affect the trajectory error. Besides, result also shows that it is possible to use iRest in predicting MAS score. There is a potential of using iRest, a non-motorized device in predicting MAS score.

  19. Functional Assay of Cancer Cell Invasion Potential Based on Mechanotransduction of Focused Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C. Weitz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells undergo a number of biophysical changes as they transform from an indolent to an aggressive state. These changes, which include altered mechanical and electrical properties, can reveal important diagnostic information about disease status. Here, we introduce a high-throughput, functional technique for assessing cancer cell invasion potential, which works by probing for the mechanically excitable phenotype exhibited by invasive cancer cells. Cells are labeled with fluorescent calcium dye and imaged during stimulation with low-intensity focused ultrasound, a non-contact mechanical stimulus. We show that cells located at the focus of the stimulus exhibit calcium elevation for invasive prostate (PC-3 and DU-145 and bladder (T24/83 cancer cell lines, but not for non-invasive cell lines (BPH-1, PNT1A, and RT112/84. In invasive cells, ultrasound stimulation initiates a calcium wave that propagates from the cells at the transducer focus to other cells, over distances greater than 1 mm. We demonstrate that this wave is mediated by extracellular signaling molecules and can be abolished through inhibition of transient receptor potential channels and inositol trisphosphate receptors, implicating these proteins in the mechanotransduction process. If validated clinically, our technology could provide a means to assess tumor invasion potential in cytology specimens, which is not currently possible. It may therefore have applications in diseases such as bladder cancer, where cytologic diagnosis of tumor invasion could improve clinical decision-making.

  20. Structural and Functional Features of Peroxidases with a Potential as Industrial Biocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, Angel T.

    This chapter begins with a description of the main structural features of heme peroxidases representative of the two large superfamilies of plant-fungal-bacterial and animal peroxidases, and the four additional (super)families described to date. Then, we focus on several fungal peroxidases of high biotechnological potential as industrial biocatalysts. These include (1) ligninolytic peroxidases from white-rot basidiomycetes being able to oxidize high redox-potential substrates at an exposed protein radical; (2) heme-thiolate peroxidases that are structural hybrids of typical peroxidases and cytochrome P450 enzymes and, after their discovery in sooty molds, are being described in basidiomycetes with even more interesting catalytic properties, such as selective aromatic oxygenation; and (3) the so-called dye-decolorizing peroxidases that are still to be thoroughly investigated but have been identified in different basidiomycete genomes. The structural-functional description of these peroxidases includes an analysis of the heme environment and a description of their substrate oxidation sites, with the purpose of understanding their interesting catalytic properties and biotechnological potential.

  1. Biochemical and Functional Characterization of Parawixia bistriata Spider Venom with Potential Proteolytic and Larvicidal Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Gizeli S.; Coutinho-Neto, Antonio; Kayano, Anderson M.; Simões-Silva, Rodrigo; Trindade, Frances; de Almeida e Silva, Alexandre; Marcussi, Silvana; da Silva, Saulo L.; Fernandes, Carla F. C.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Soares, Andreimar M.; Stábeli, Rodrigo G.

    2014-01-01

    Toxins purified from the venom of spiders have high potential to be studied pharmacologically and biochemically. These biomolecules may have biotechnological and therapeutic applications. This study aimed to evaluate the protein content of Parawixia bistriata venom and functionally characterize its proteins that have potential for biotechnological applications. The crude venom showed no phospholipase, hemorrhagic, or anti-Leishmania activities attesting to low genotoxicity and discrete antifungal activity for C. albicans. However the following activities were observed: anticoagulation, edema, myotoxicity and proteolysis on casein, azo-collagen, and fibrinogen. The chromatographic and electrophoretic profiles of the proteins revealed a predominance of acidic, neutral, and polar proteins, highlighting the presence of proteins with high molecular masses. Five fractions were collected using cation exchange chromatography, with the P4 fraction standing out as that of the highest purity. All fractions showed proteolytic activity. The crude venom and fractions P1, P2, and P3 showed larvicidal effects on A. aegypti. Fraction P4 showed the presence of a possible metalloprotease (60 kDa) that has high proteolytic activity on azo-collagen and was inhibited by EDTA. The results presented in this study demonstrate the presence of proteins in the venom of P. bistriata with potential for biotechnological applications. PMID:24895632

  2. Functionalized Ergot-alkaloids as potential dopamine D3 receptor agonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between the molecular structure and physical properties of functionalized naturally occurred Ergot-alkaloids as potential dopamine D3 receptor agonists is presented. The molecular modeling of the ergoline-skeleton is based on the comprehensive theoretical study of the binding affinity of the isolated chemicals towards the active sites of the D3 sub-type receptor (D3R) loops. The studied proton accepting ability under physiological conditions allows classifying four types of monocationics, characterizing with the different binding modes to D3R involving selected amino acid residues to the active sites. These results marked the pharmaceutical potential and clinical usage of the reported compounds as antipsychotic drugs for Schizophrenia treatment, since they allowed evaluating the highlights of the different hypothesizes of the biochemical causes the illness. The applied complex approach for theoretical and experimental elucidation, including quantum chemistry method, electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometric (MS) methods, nuclear magnetic resonance and vibrational IR and Raman spectroscopy on the isolated fifteen novel derivatives (1)-(15) and their different protonated forms (1a)-(15a) evidenced a strong dependence of molecular conformation, physical properties and binding affinity. Thus, the semi-synthetic functionalization of the naturally occurred products (NPs), provided significant possibilities to further molecular drugs-design and development of novel derivatives with wanted biological function, using the established profile of selected classes/families of NPs. The work described chiefly the non-linear (NL) approach for the interpretation of the mass chromatograms on the performed hybrid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tandem MS/MS and MS/MS/MS experiments, discussing the merits and great diversity of instrumentation flexibility, thus achieving fundamental

  3. A transformed rational function method for (3+1)-dimensional potential Yu–Toda–Sasa–Fukuyama equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sheng Zhang; Hong-Qing Zhang

    2011-04-01

    A direct method, called the transformed rational function method, is used to construct more types of exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations by introducing new and more general rational functions. To illustrate the validity and advantages of the introduced general rational functions, the (3+1)-dimensional potential Yu–Toda–Sasa–Fukuyama (YTSF) equation is considered and new travelling wave solutions are obtained in a uniform way. Some of the obtained solutions, namely exponential function solutions, hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions, Jacobi elliptic function solutions and rational solutions, contain an explicit linear function of the independent variables involved in the potential YTSF equation. It is shown that the transformed rational function method provides more powerful mathematical tool for solving nonlinear partial differential equations.

  4. Potential structural and functional biomarkers of upper motor neuron dysfunction in ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieve, Stuart M; Menon, Parvathi; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S; Gomes, Lavier; Foster, Sheryl; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of upper motor neuron (UMN) function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) remains clinically based. Given the potential difficulties in identifying UMN signs, objective biomarkers of UMN dysfunction are important. Consequently, the present study assessed utility of cortical thickness analysis combined with threshold tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as biomakers of UMN dysfunction in ALS. Cortical thickness analysis and threshold tracking TMS studies were undertaken on 25 ALS patients and results were compared to healthy control subjects, with different control groups used for each technique. Structural and functional abnormalities were evident in both motor cortices in the ALS cohort and were heralded by marked reduction of short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI RAPB 1.4 ± 2.4%; SICI LAPB 3.6 ± 1.9%; SICI CONTROLS10.5 ± 1.1%, p <0.01), resting motor threshold (p <0.05) and cortical silent period duration (p <0.001) combined with increase in MEP amplitude (p <0.05) and intracortical facilitation (p <0.05). Significant cortical thinning was evident in the bitemporal regions (p <0.05), while precentral gyrus cortical thinning was evident in 56% of cases and when combined with TMS abnormalities disclosed UMN dysfunction in 88% of cases. In conclusion, findings from the present study establish that a combination of structural and functional assessment of corticomotoneurons may increase the yield of objectively identifying UMN dysfunction in ALS.

  5. MicroRNAs in Osteoclastogenesis and Function: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Ji

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal osteoclast formation and resorption play a fundamental role in osteoporosis pathogenesis. Over the past two decades, much progress has been made to target osteoclasts. The existing therapeutic drugs include bisphosphonates, hormone replacement therapy, selective estrogen receptor modulators, calcitonin and receptor activator of nuclear factor NF-κB ligand (RANKL inhibitor (denosumab, etc. Among them, bisphosphonates are most widely used due to their low price and high efficiency in reducing the risk of fracture. However, bisphosphonates still have their limitations, such as the gastrointestinal side-effects, osteonecrosis of the jaw, and atypical subtrochanteric fracture. Based on the current situation, research for new drugs to regulate bone resorption remains relevant. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a new group of small, noncoding RNAs of 19–25 nucleotides, which negatively regulate gene expression after transcription. Recent studies discovered miRNAs play a considerable function in bone remodeling by regulating osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function. An increasing number of miRNAs have been identified to participate in osteoclast formation, differentiation, apoptosis, and resorption. miRNAs show great promise to serve as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for osteoporosis. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of how miRNAs regulate osteoclastogenesis and function. We will further discuss the approach to develop drugs for osteoporosis based on these miRNA networks.

  6. The oncoprotein BCL11A binds to orphan nuclear receptor TLX and potentiates its transrepressive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara B Estruch

    Full Text Available Nuclear orphan receptor TLX (NR2E1 functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor and its pivotal role in brain development, glioblastoma, mental retardation and retinopathologies make it an attractive drug target. TLX is expressed in the neural stem cells (NSCs of the subventricular zone and the hippocampus subgranular zone, regions with persistent neurogenesis in the adult brain, and functions as an essential regulator of NSCs maintenance and self-renewal. Little is known about the TLX social network of interactors and only few TLX coregulators are described. To identify and characterize novel TLX-binders and possible coregulators, we performed yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H screens of a human adult brain cDNA library using different TLX constructs as baits. Our screens identified multiple clones of Atrophin-1 (ATN1, a previously described TLX interactor. In addition, we identified an interaction with the oncoprotein and zinc finger transcription factor BCL11A (CTIP1/Evi9, a key player in the hematopoietic system and in major blood-related malignancies. This interaction was validated by expression and coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. BCL11A potentiated the transrepressive function of TLX in an in vitro reporter gene assay. Our work suggests that BCL11A is a novel TLX coregulator that might be involved in TLX-dependent gene regulation in the brain.

  7. A fibrolytic potential in the human ileum mucosal microbiota revealed by functional metagenomic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrascu, Orlane; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Marinelli, Ludovica; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Abraham, Anne-Laure; Leclerc, Marion; Klopp, Christophe; Terrapon, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Blottière, Hervé M.; Doré, Joël; Béra-Maillet, Christel

    2017-01-01

    The digestion of dietary fibers is a major function of the human intestinal microbiota. So far this function has been attributed to the microorganisms inhabiting the colon, and many studies have focused on this distal part of the gastrointestinal tract using easily accessible fecal material. However, microbial fermentations, supported by the presence of short-chain fatty acids, are suspected to occur in the upper small intestine, particularly in the ileum. Using a fosmid library from the human ileal mucosa, we screened 20,000 clones for their activities against carboxymethylcellulose and xylans chosen as models of the major plant cell wall (PCW) polysaccharides from dietary fibres. Eleven positive clones revealed a broad range of CAZyme encoding genes from Bacteroides and Clostridiales species, as well as Polysaccharide Utilization Loci (PULs). The functional glycoside hydrolase genes were identified, and oligosaccharide break-down products examined from different polysaccharides including mixed-linkage β-glucans. CAZymes and PULs were also examined for their prevalence in human gut microbiome. Several clusters of genes of low prevalence in fecal microbiome suggested they belong to unidentified strains rather specifically established upstream the colon, in the ileum. Thus, the ileal mucosa-associated microbiota encompasses the enzymatic potential for PCW polysaccharide degradation in the small intestine. PMID:28091525

  8. Functional transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 channels along different segments of the renal vasculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, L; Kaßmann, M; Sendeski, M;

    2015-01-01

    with functional TRPV1 having a narrow, discrete distribution in the resistance vasculature and TRPV4 having more universal, widespread distribution along different vascular segments. We suggest that TRPV1/4 channels are potent therapeutic targets for site-specific vasodilation in the kidney....... that TRPV1/4 plays a role in endothelium-dependent vasodilation of renal blood vessels. METHODS: We studied the distribution of functional TRPV1/4 along different segments of the renal vasculature. Mesenteric arteries were studied as control vessels. RESULTS: The TRPV1 agonist capsaicin relaxed mouse...

  9. Ser/Thr kinase-like protein of Nicotiana benthamiana is involved in the cell-to-cell movement of Bamboo mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Fang Cheng

    Full Text Available To investigate the plant genes affected by Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV infection, we applied a cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism technique to screen genes with differential expression. A serine/threonine kinase-like (NbSTKL gene of Nicotiana benthamiana is upregulated after BaMV infection. NbSTKL contains the homologous domain of Ser/Thr kinase. Knocking down the expression of NbSTKL by virus-induced gene silencing reduced the accumulation of BaMV in the inoculated leaves but not in the protoplasts. The spread of GFP-expressing BaMV in the inoculated leaves is also impeded by a reduced expression of NbSTKL. These data imply that NbSTKL facilitates the cell-to-cell movement of BaMV. The subcellular localization of NbSTKL is mainly on the cell membrane, which has been confirmed by mutagenesis and fractionation experiments. Combined with the results showing that active site mutation of NbSTKL does not change its subcellular localization but significantly affects BaMV accumulation, we conclude that NbSTKL may regulate BaMV movement on the cell membrane by its kinase-like activity. Moreover, the transient expression of NbSTKL does not significantly affect the accumulation of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV and Potato virus X (PVX; thus, NbSTKL might be a specific protein facilitating BaMV movement.

  10. GAPDH--a recruits a plant virus movement protein to cortical virus replication complexes to facilitate viral cell-to-cell movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kaido

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of virus movement protein (MP-containing punctate structures on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum is required for efficient intercellular movement of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV, a bipartite positive-strand RNA plant virus. We found that these cortical punctate structures constitute a viral replication complex (VRC in addition to the previously reported aggregate structures that formed adjacent to the nucleus. We identified host proteins that interacted with RCNMV MP in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using a tandem affinity purification method followed by mass spectrometry. One of these host proteins was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-A (NbGAPDH-A, which is a component of the Calvin-Benson cycle in chloroplasts. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A reduced RCNMV multiplication in the inoculated leaves, but not in the single cells, thereby suggesting that GAPDH-A plays a positive role in cell-to-cell movement of RCNMV. The fusion protein of NbGAPDH-A and green fluorescent protein localized exclusively to the chloroplasts. In the presence of RCNMV RNA1, however, the protein localized to the cortical VRC as well as the chloroplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay and GST pulldown assay confirmed in vivo and in vitro interactions, respectively, between the MP and NbGAPDH-A. Furthermore, gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A inhibited MP localization to the cortical VRC. We discuss the possible roles of NbGAPDH-A in the RCNMV movement process.

  11. Downregulation of the NbNACa1 gene encoding a movement-protein-interacting protein reduces cell-to-cell movement of Brome mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Masanori; Inoue, Yosuke; Takeda, Yoshika; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Atsushi; Mori, Masashi; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Okuno, Tetsuro; Mise, Kazuyuki

    2007-06-01

    The 3a movement protein (MP) plays a central role in the movement of the RNA plant virus, Brome mosaic virus (BMV). To identify host factor genes involved in viral movement, a cDNA library of Nicotiana benthamiana, a systemic host for BMV, was screened with far-Western blotting using a recombinant BMV MP as probe. One positive clone encoded a protein with sequence similarity to the alpha chain of nascent-polypeptide-associated complex from various organisms, which is proposed to contribute to the fidelity of translocation of newly synthesized proteins. The orthologous gene from N. benthamiana was designated NbNACa1. The binding of NbNACa1 to BMV MP was confirmed in vivo with an agroinfiltration-immunoprecipitation assay. To investigate the involvement of NbNACa1 in BMV multiplication, NbNACa1-silenced (GSNAC) transgenic N. benthamiana plants were produced. Downregulation of NbNACa1 expression reduced virus accumulation in inoculated leaves but not in protoplasts. A microprojectile bombardment assay to monitor BMV-MP-assisted viral movement demonstrated reduced virus spread in GSNAC plants. The localization to the cell wall of BMV MP fused to green fluorescent protein was delayed in GSNAC plants. From these results, we propose that NbNACa1 is involved in BMV cell-to-cell movement through the regulation of BMV MP localization to the plasmodesmata.

  12. Both asymmetric mitotic segregation and cell-to-cell invasion are required for stable germline transmission of Wolbachia in filarial nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Landmann

    2012-04-01

    Parasitic filarial nematodes that belong to the Onchocercidae family live in mutualism with Wolbachia endosymbionts. We developed whole-mount techniques to follow the segregation patterns of Wolbachia through the somatic and germline lineages of four filarial species. These studies reveal multiple evolutionarily conserved mechanisms that are required for Wolbachia localization to the germline. During the initial embryonic divisions, Wolbachia segregate asymmetrically such that they concentrate in the posteriorly localized P2 blastomere, a precursor to the adult germline and hypodermal lineages. Surprisingly, in the next division they are excluded from the germline precursor lineage. Rather, they preferentially segregate to the C blastomere, a source of posterior hypodermal cells. Localization to the germline is accomplished by a distinct mechanism in which Wolbachia invade first the somatic gonadal cells close to the ovarian distal tip cell, the nematode stem cell niche, from the hypodermis. This tropism is associated with a cortical F-actin disruption, suggesting an active engulfment. Significantly, germline invasion occurs only in females, explaining the lack of Wolbachia in the male germline. Once in the syncytial environment of the ovaries, Wolbachia rely on the rachis to multiply and disperse into the germ cells. The utilization of cell-to-cell invasion for germline colonization may indicate an ancestral mode of horizontal transfer that preceded the acquisition of the mutualism.

  13. A Cell-to-Cell Equalizer Based on Three-Resonant-State Switched-Capacitor Converters for Series-Connected Battery Strings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Shang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the low cost, small size, and ease of control, the switched-capacitor (SC battery equalizers are promising among active balancing methods. However, it is difficult to achieve the full cell equalization for the SC equalizers due to the inevitable voltage drops across Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET switches. Moreover, when the voltage gap among cells is larger, the balancing efficiency is lower, while the balancing speed becomes slower as the voltage gap gets smaller. In order to soften these downsides, this paper proposes a cell-to-cell battery equalization topology with zero-current switching (ZCS and zero-voltage gap (ZVG among cells based on three-resonant-state SC converters. Based on the conventional inductor-capacitor (LC converter, an additional resonant path is built to release the charge of the capacitor into the inductor in each switching cycle, which lays the foundations for obtaining ZVG among cells, improves the balancing efficiency at a large voltage gap, and increases the balancing speed at a small voltage gap. A four-lithium-ion-cell prototype is applied to validate the theoretical analysis. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed topology has good equalization performances with fast equalization, ZCS, and ZVG among cells.

  14. Complex oscillatory redox dynamics with signaling potential at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembro, Jackelyn M; Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The time-keeping properties bestowed by oscillatory behavior on functional rhythms represent an evolutionarily conserved trait in living systems. Mitochondrial networks function as timekeepers maximizing energetic output while tuning reactive oxygen species (ROS) within physiological levels compatible with signaling. In this work, we explore the potential for timekeeping functions dependent on mitochondrial dynamics with the validated two-compartment mitochondrial energetic-redox (ME-R) computational model, that takes into account (a) four main redox couples [NADH, NADPH, GSH, Trx(SH)2], (b) scavenging systems (glutathione, thioredoxin, SOD, catalase) distributed in matrix and extra-matrix compartments, and (c) transport of ROS species between them. Herein, we describe that the ME-R model can exhibit highly complex oscillatory dynamics in energetic/redox variables and ROS species, consisting of at least five frequencies with modulated amplitudes and period according to power spectral analysis. By stability analysis we describe that the extent of steady state-as against complex oscillatory behavior-was dependent upon the abundance of Mn and Cu, Zn SODs, and their interplay with ROS production in the respiratory chain. Large parametric regions corresponding to oscillatory dynamics of increasingly complex waveforms were obtained at low Cu, Zn SOD concentration as a function of Mn SOD. This oscillatory domain was greatly reduced at higher levels of Cu, Zn SOD. Interestingly, the realm of complex oscillations was located at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial energetic behavior, and was characterized by oxidative stress. We conclude that complex oscillatory dynamics could represent a frequency- and amplitude-modulated H2O2 signaling mechanism that arises under intense oxidative stress. By modulating SOD, cells could have evolved an adaptive compromise between relative constancy and the flexibility required under stressful redox/energetic conditions.

  15. Particle in a box with a time-dependent δ -function potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung Ki; Yi, Su Do; Kim, Minjae

    2016-11-01

    In quantum information processing, one often considers inserting a barrier into a box containing a particle to generate one bit of Shannon entropy. We formulate this problem as a one-dimensional Schrödinger equation with a time-dependent δ -function potential. It is a natural generalization of the particle in a box, a canonical example of quantum mechanics, and we present analytic and numerical investigations on this problem. After deriving an exact Volterra-type integral equation, composed of an infinite sum of modes, we show that approximate formulas with the lowest-frequency modes correctly capture the qualitative behavior of the wave function. If we take into account hundreds of modes, our numerical calculation shows that the quantum adiabatic theorem actually gives a very good approximation even if the barrier height diverges within finite time, as long as it is sufficiently longer than the characteristic time scale of the particle. In particular, if the barrier is slowly inserted at an asymmetric position, the particle is localized by the insertion itself, in accordance with a prediction of the adiabatic theorem. On the other hand, when the barrier is inserted quickly, the wave function becomes rugged after the insertion because of the energy transfer to the particle. Regardless of the position of the barrier, the fast insertion leaves the particle unlocalized so that we can obtain meaningful information by a which-side measurement. Our numerical procedure provides a precise way to calculate the wave function throughout the process, from which one can estimate the amount of this information for an arbitrary insertion protocol.

  16. Physiological Reduction in Left Ventricular Contractile Function in Healthy Postpartum Women: Potential Overlap with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitara G Khan

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a potentially life-threatening cause of heart failure, commoner in Afro-Caribbean than Caucasian women. Its diagnosis can be challenging due to physiological changes in cardiac function that also occur in healthy women during the early postpartum period. This study aimed to (i establish the overlap between normal cardiac physiology in the immediate postpartum period and pathological changes in peripartum cardiomyopathy ii identify any ethnicity-specific changes in cardiac function and cardiac biomarkers in healthy postpartum women.We conducted a cross-sectional study of 58 healthy postpartum women within 48 hours of delivery and 18 matched non-pregnant controls. Participants underwent cardiac assessment by echocardiography and strain analysis, including 3D echocardiography in 40 postpartum women. Results were compared with 12 retrospectively studied peripartum cardiomyopathy patients. Healthy postpartum women had significantly higher left ventricular volumes and mass, and lower ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain than non-pregnant controls. These parameters were significantly more impaired in peripartum cardiomyopathy patients but with overlapping ranges of values. Healthy postpartum women had higher levels of adrenomedullin, placental growth factor (PlGF and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt1 compared to controls. The postpartum state, adrenomedullin, sFlt1 and the sFlt1:PlGF ratio were independent predictors of LV remodelling and function in healthy postpartum women.Healthy postpartum women demonstrate several echocardiographic indicators of left ventricular remodelling and reduced function, which are associated with altered levels of angiogenic and cardiac biomarkers.

  17. Potential function methods for approximately solving linear programming problems theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Bienstock, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Potential Function Methods For Approximately Solving Linear Programming Problems breaks new ground in linear programming theory. The book draws on the research developments in three broad areas: linear and integer programming, numerical analysis, and the computational architectures which enable speedy, high-level algorithm design. During the last ten years, a new body of research within the field of optimization research has emerged, which seeks to develop good approximation algorithms for classes of linear programming problems. This work both has roots in fundamental areas of mathematical programming and is also framed in the context of the modern theory of algorithms. The result of this work, in which Daniel Bienstock has been very much involved, has been a family of algorithms with solid theoretical foundations and with growing experimental success. This book will examine these algorithms, starting with some of the very earliest examples, and through the latest theoretical and computational developments.

  18. The Potential for Resident Lung Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote Functional Tissue Regeneration: Understanding Microenvironmental Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Majka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are important regulators of tissue repair or regeneration, fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are currently being considered and tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in patients with such inflammatory lung diseases including, but not limited to, chronic lung disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, pulmonary fibrosis (PF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD/emphysema and asthma. However, our current understanding of tissue resident lung MSCs remains limited. This review addresses how environmental cues impact on the phenotype and function of this endogenous stem cell pool. In addition, it examines how these local factors influence the efficacy of cell-based treatments for lung diseases.

  19. Evaluation of cognitive brain functions in caffeine users: a P3 evoked potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Abhinav; Vaney, Neelam; Tandon, O P

    2006-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed stimulant drugs of the modern world. It brings about a feeling of well-being, relaxation, increased alertness and concentration. Its effects have been studied on brain function and behavior using mood questionnaires, reaction time tests, memory tests, EEG and of late Event Related Potentials (ERPs). This study evaluates the response of caffeine on ERPs and Reaction Time (RT) using auditory "oddball" paradigm. Forty undergraduate medical students volunteered for the study and their ERPs and RT were recorded before and after 40 minutes of ingestion of caffeine. There was a non-significant decrease in latency of N1, P2, N2 and P3 and a significant decrease in Reaction Time after caffeine consumption. The amplitude of P3 showed a significant increase after intake of caffeine. The results of this study indicate that caffeine leads to facilitation of information processing and motor output response of the brain.

  20. The potential for resident lung mesenchymal stem cells to promote functional tissue regeneration: understanding microenvironmental cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronjy, Robert F; Majka, Susan M

    2012-12-01

    Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important regulators of tissue repair or regeneration, fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are currently being considered and tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in patients with such inflammatory lung diseases including, but not limited to, chronic lung disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary fibrosis (PF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema and asthma. However, our current understanding of tissue resident lung MSCs remains limited. This review addresses how environmental cues impact on the phenotype and function of this endogenous stem cell pool. In addition, it examines how these local factors influence the efficacy of cell-based treatments for lung diseases.

  1. Metrological Aspects of Surface Topographies Produced by Different Machining Operations Regarding Their Potential Functionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żak Krzysztof

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive methodology for measuring and characterizing the surface topographies on machined steel parts produced by precision machining operations. The performed case studies concern a wide spectrum of topographic features of surfaces with different geometrical structures but the same values of the arithmetic mean height Sa. The tested machining operations included hard turning operations performed with CBN tools, grinding operations with Al2O3 ceramic and CBN wheels and superfinish using ceramic stones. As a result, several characteristic surface textures with the Sa roughness parameter value of about 0.2 μm were thoroughly characterized and compared regarding their potential functional capabilities. Apart from the standard 2D and 3D roughness parameters, the fractal, motif and frequency parameters were taken in the consideration.

  2. Functional MRI/event-related potential study of sensory consonance and dissonance in musicians and nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico; Rosazza, Cristina; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Pietrocini, Emanuela; Valentini, Laura; Scaioli, Vidmer; Loveday, Catherine; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-07

    Pleasurability of individual chords, known as sensory consonance, is widely regarded as physiologically determined and has been shown to be associated with differential activity in the auditory cortex and in several other regions. Here, we present results obtained contrasting isolated four-note chords classified as consonant or dissonant in tonal music. Using event-related functional MRI, consonant chords were found to elicit a larger haemodynamic response in the inferior and middle frontal gyri, premotor cortex and inferior parietal lobule. The effect was right lateralized for nonmusicians and less asymmetric for musicians. Using event-related potentials, the degree of sensory consonance was found to modulate the amplitude of the P1 in both groups and of the N2 in musicians only.

  3. Quaternary ammonium silane-functionalized, methacrylate resin composition with antimicrobial activities and self-repair potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shi-qiang; Niu, Li-na; Kemp, Lisa K.; Yiu, Cynthia K.Y.; Ryou, Heonjune; Qi, Yi-pin; Blizzard, John D.; Nikonov, Sergey; Brackett, Martha G.; Messer, Regina L.W.; Wu, Christine D.; Mao, Jing; Brister, L. Bryan; Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Arola, Dwayne D.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    Design of antimicrobial polymers for enhancing healthcare issues and minimizing environmental problems is an important endeavor with both fundamental and practical implications. Quaternary ammonium silane-functionalized methacrylate (QAMS) represents an example of antimicrobial macromonomers synthesized by a sol-gel chemical route; these compounds possess flexible Si-O-Si bonds. In present work, a partially-hydrolyzed QAMS copolymerized with bis-GMA is introduced. This methacrylate resin was shown to possess desirable mechanical properties with both a high degree of conversion and minimal polymerization shrinkage. Kill-on-contact microbiocidal activities of this resin were demonstrated using single-species biofilms of Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 36558), Actinomyces naeslundii (ATCC 12104) and Candida albicans (ATCC 90028). Improved mechanical properties after hydration provided the proof-of-concept that QAMS-incorporated resin exhibits self-repair potential via water-induced condensation of organic modified silicate (ormosil) phases within the polymerized resin matrix. PMID:22659173

  4. A new fitting-function to describe the time evolution of a galaxy's gravitational potential

    CERN Document Server

    Buist, Hans J T

    2014-01-01

    We present a new simple functional form that may be used to model the evolution of a spherical mass distribution in a cosmological context. Two parameters control the growth of the system and this is modeled using a redshift dependent exponential for the scale mass and scale radius. In this new model, systems form inside out and the mass of a given shell can be set to never decrease, as generally expected. This feature makes it more suitable for studying the smooth growth of galactic potentials or cosmological halos than other parametrizations often used in the literature. This is further confirmed through a comparison to the growth of dark matter halos in the Aquarius simulations.

  5. Multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories—nuclear shapes and potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2016-06-01

    The intrinsic nuclear shapes deviating from a sphere not only manifest themselves in nuclear collective states but also play important roles in determining nuclear potential energy surfaces (PES’s) and fission barriers. In order to describe microscopically and self-consistently nuclear shapes and PES’s with as many shape degrees of freedom as possible included, we developed multidimensionally constrained covariant density functional theories (MDC-CDFTs). In MDC-CDFTs, the axial symmetry and the reflection symmetry are both broken and all deformations characterized by {β }λ μ with even μ are considered. We have used the MDC-CDFTs to study PES’s and fission barriers of actinides, the non-axial octupole Y 32 correlations in N = 150 isotones and shapes of hypernuclei. In this Review we will give briefly the formalism of MDC-CDFTs and present the applications to normal nuclei.

  6. Multifractal scaling of electronic transmission resonances in perfect and imperfect Fibonacci δ-function potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, PrabhatK.; Biswas, Parthapratim

    We present here a detailed multifractal scaling study for the electronic transmission resonances with the system size for an infinitely large one-dimensional perfect and imperfect quasiperiodic system represented by a sequence of δ-function potentials. The electronic transmission resonances in the energy minibands manifest more and more fragmented nature of the transmittance with the change of system size. We claim that when a small perturbation is randomly present at a few number of sites or layers, the nature of electronic states will change and this can be understood by studying the electronic transmittance with the change of system size. We report the different critical states manifested in the size variation of the transmittance corresponding to the resonant energies for both perfect and imperfect cases through multifractal scaling study for few of these resonances.

  7. Multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theories --- nuclear shapes and potential energy surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Shan-Gui

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic nuclear shapes deviating from a sphere not only manifest themselves in nuclear collective states but also play important roles in determining nuclear potential energy surfaces (PES's) and fission barriers. In order to describe microscopically and self-consistently nuclear shapes and PES's with as many shape degrees of freedom as possible included, we developed multidimensionally-constrained covariant density functional theories (MDC-CDFTs). In MDC-CDFTs, the axial symmetry and the reflection symmetry are both broken and all deformations characterized by $\\beta_{\\lambda\\mu}$ with even $\\mu$ are considered. We have used the MDC-CDFTs to study PES's and fission barriers of actinides, the non-axial octupole $Y_{32}$ correlations in $N = 150$ isotones and shapes of hypernuclei. In this Review we will give briefly the formalism of MDC-CDFTs and present the applications to normal nuclei.

  8. Potential Functions of Al2 by the Relativistic Fock-Space Coupled Cluster Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzi Kaldor

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Potential functions of the ground and low excited states of Al2 are calculated by the relativistic Fock-space coupled cluster method in the framework of the projected Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. A moderate-size basis [16s11p3d3f/6s6p3d2f] is used. 3Πu is confirmed as the ground state of the system. Its spin orbit splittings are reproduced well, with the Λ = 1, 2 states lying 32.5 and 66.1 cm−1, respectively, above the Λ = 0 minimum (experimental values are 30.4 and 63.4 cm−1. The bond is somewhat too weak, with De 0.14 eV below experiment, Re too high by 0.08 ˚A, and ωe 21 cm−1 too low. It is speculated that the better agreement obtained in earlier calculations may be due to neglect of basis set superposition errors. The description of bonding in the molecule may be improved by the use of a better basis and the inclusion of more correlation by the intermediate Hamiltonian coupled cluster method, which makes it possible to handle larger P spaces and extend the potential functions to the whole range of internuclear separations.

  9. Effect of taurine and potential interactions with caffeine on cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Shimada, Kayoko; Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Azuma, Junichi; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2014-05-01

    The major impetus behind the rise in energy drink popularity among adults is their ability to heighten mental alertness, improve physical performance and supply energy. However, accompanying the exponential growth in energy drink usage have been recent case reports and analyses from the National Poison Data System, raising questions regarding the safety of energy drinks. Most of the safety concerns have centered on the effect of energy drinks on cardiovascular and central nervous system function. Although the effects of caffeine excess have been widely studied, little information is available on potential interactions between the other active ingredients of energy drinks and caffeine. One of the active ingredients often mentioned as a candidate for interactions with caffeine is the beta-amino acid, taurine. Although taurine is considered a conditionally essential nutrient for humans and is thought to play a key role in several human diseases, clinical studies evaluating the effects of taurine are limited. However, based on this review regarding possible interactions between caffeine and taurine, we conclude that taurine should neutralize several untoward effects of caffeine excess. In agreement with this conclusion, the European Union's Scientific Committee on Food published a report in March 2003 summarizing its investigation into potential interactions of the ingredients in energy drinks. At the cardiovascular level, they concluded that "if there are any interactions between caffeine and taurine, taurine might reduce the cardiovascular effects of caffeine." Although these interactions remain to be further examined in humans, the physiological functions of taurine appear to be inconsistent with the adverse cardiovascular symptoms associated with excessive consumption of caffeine-taurine containing beverages.

  10. Evaluation of potential regulatory function of breast cancer risk locus at 6q25.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yaqiong; Ye, Chuanzhong; Guo, Xingyi; Wen, Wanqing; Long, Jirong; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao Ou; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin

    2016-02-01

    In a genome-wide association study conducted among Chinese women, we identified the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2046210 at 6q25.1 for breast cancer risk. To explore a potential regulatory role for this risk locus, we measured expression levels of nine genes at the locus in breast cancer tissue and adjacent normal tissue samples obtained from 67 patients recruited in the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study. We found that rs2046210 had a statistically significant association with the expression levels of the AKAP12 and ESR1 genes in adjacent normal breast tissues. Women who carry the AA/AG risk genotypes had higher expressions of these two genes compared to those who carry G/G genotypes (P = 0.02 and 0.04 for the AKAP12 and ESR1, respectively). However, no significant differences of SNP rs2046210 with gene expression levels were found in tumor tissues. In The Cancer Genome Atlas samples, the AA/AG risk genotypes of SNP rs2046210 were associated with a significantly higher expression level of the AKAP12 gene and a lower level of the ESR1 gene in tumor tissue. Functional analysis using ENCODE data revealed that SNP rs7763637, which is in strong linkage disequilibrium with SNP rs2046210, is likely a potential functional variant, regulating the AKAP12 gene. Taken together, these results from our study suggest that the association between the 6q25.1 locus and breast cancer risk may be mediated through SNPs that regulate expressions of the AKAP12 gene.

  11. Rapid and Objective Assessment of Neural Function in Autism Spectrum Disorder Using Transient Visual Evoked Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siper, Paige M.; Zemon, Vance; Gordon, James; George-Jones, Julia; Lurie, Stacey; Zweifach, Jessica; Tavassoli, Teresa; Wang, A. Ting; Jamison, Jesslyn; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Kolevzon, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a critical need to identify biomarkers and objective outcome measures that can be used to understand underlying neural mechanisms in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) offer a noninvasive technique to evaluate the functional integrity of neural mechanisms, specifically visual pathways, while probing for disease pathophysiology. Methods Transient VEPs (tVEPs) were obtained from 96 unmedicated children, including 37 children with ASD, 36 typically developing (TD) children, and 23 unaffected siblings (SIBS). A conventional contrast-reversing checkerboard condition was compared to a novel short-duration condition, which was developed to enable objective data collection from severely affected populations who are often excluded from electroencephalographic (EEG) studies. Results Children with ASD showed significantly smaller amplitudes compared to TD children at two of the earliest critical VEP components, P60-N75 and N75-P100. SIBS showed intermediate responses relative to ASD and TD groups. There were no group differences in response latency. Frequency band analyses indicated significantly weaker responses for the ASD group in bands encompassing gamma-wave activity. Ninety-two percent of children with ASD were able to complete the short-duration condition compared to 68% for the standard condition. Conclusions The current study establishes the utility of a short-duration tVEP test for use in children at varying levels of functioning and describes neural abnormalities in children with idiopathic ASD. Implications for excitatory/inhibitory balance as well as the potential application of VEP for use in clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27716799

  12. Selenium Accumulating Leafy Vegetables Are a Potential Source of Functional Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro E. Mabeyo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium deficiency in humans has been associated with various diseases, the risks of which can be reduced through dietary supplementation. Selenium accumulating plants may provide a beneficial nutrient for avoiding such illnesses. Thus, leafy vegetables such as Amaranthus hybridus, Amaranthus sp., Cucurbita maxima, Ipomoea batatas, Solanum villosum, Solanum scabrum, and Vigna unguiculata were explored for their capabilities to accumulate selenium when grown on selenium enriched soil and for use as a potential source of selenium enriched functional foods. Their selenium contents were determined by spectrophotometry using the complex of 3,3′-diaminobenzidine hydrochloride (DABH as a chromogen. The mean concentrations in the leaves were found to range from 7.90±0.40 to 1.95±0.12 μg/g dry weight (DW, with C. maxima accumulating the most selenium. In stems, the accumulated selenium content ranged from 1.12±0.10 μg/g in Amaranthus sp. to 5.35±0.78 μg/g DW in C. maxima and was hence significantly different (P<0.01. The cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 was used in cytotoxicity assays to determine the anticancer potential of these extracts. With exception of S. scabrum and S. villosum, no cytotoxicity was detected for the selenium enriched vegetable extracts up to 100 μg/mL concentration. Hence, following careful evaluation the studied vegetables may be considered as selenium enriched functional foods.

  13. Wavelets as basis functions to represent the coarse-graining potential in multiscale coarse graining approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiolo, M., E-mail: massimo.maiolo@zhaw.ch [SUPSI, Department of Innovative Technology, Galleria 2, 6928 Manno (Switzerland); ZHAW, Institut für Angewandte Simulation, Grüental, CH-8820 Wädenswil (Switzerland); Vancheri, A., E-mail: alberto.vancheri@supsi.ch [SUPSI, Department of Innovative Technology, Galleria 2, 6928 Manno (Switzerland); Krause, R., E-mail: rolf.krause@usi.ch [USI, Institute of Computational Science, Via Buffi 13, 6906 Lugano (Switzerland); Danani, A., E-mail: andrea.danani@supsi.ch [SUPSI, Department of Innovative Technology, Galleria 2, 6928 Manno (Switzerland)

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we apply Multiresolution Analysis (MRA) to develop sparse but accurate representations for the Multiscale Coarse-Graining (MSCG) approximation to the many-body potential of mean force. We rigorously framed the MSCG method into MRA so that all the instruments of this theory become available together with a multitude of new basis functions, namely the wavelets. The coarse-grained (CG) force field is hierarchically decomposed at different resolution levels enabling to choose the most appropriate wavelet family for each physical interaction without requiring an a priori knowledge of the details localization. The representation of the CG potential in this new efficient orthonormal basis leads to a compression of the signal information in few large expansion coefficients. The multiresolution property of the wavelet transform allows to isolate and remove the noise from the CG force-field reconstruction by thresholding the basis function coefficients from each frequency band independently. We discuss the implementation of our wavelet-based MSCG approach and demonstrate its accuracy using two different condensed-phase systems, i.e. liquid water and methanol. Simulations of liquid argon have also been performed using a one-to-one mapping between atomistic and CG sites. The latter model allows to verify the accuracy of the method and to test different choices of wavelet families. Furthermore, the results of the computer simulations show that the efficiency and sparsity of the representation of the CG force field can be traced back to the mathematical properties of the chosen family of wavelets. This result is in agreement with what is known from the theory of multiresolution analysis of signals.

  14. Slope and curvature of Isgur–Wise function using variationally improved perturbation theory in a quantum chromodynamics inspired potential model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhaskar Jyoti Hazarika; D K Choudhury

    2010-09-01

    We used variationally improved perturbation theory (VIPT) in calculating the slope and curvature of Isgur–Wise (I–W) function with the Cornell potential $− \\dfrac{4_{s}}{3r} br + c$ instead of the usual stationary state perturbation theory as done earlier. We used $−(4_{s} /3r)$, i.e. the Coulombic potential, as the parent and the linear one, i.e. $br +c$ as the perturbed potential in the theory and calculated the slope and curvature of Isgur–Wise function including three states in the summation involved in the first-order correction to wave function in the method.

  15. Prediction of the derivative discontinuity in density functional theory from an electrostatic description of the exchange and correlation potential

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    We propose a new approach to approximate the exchange and correlation (XC) functional in density functional theory. The XC potential is considered as an electrostatic potential, generated by a fictitious XC density, which is in turn a functional of the electronic density. We apply the approach to develop a correction scheme that fixes the asymptotic behavior of any approximated XC potential for finite systems. Additionally, the correction procedure gives the value of the derivative discontinuity; therefore it can directly predict the fundamental gap as a ground-state property.

  16. Differential effects of endogenous lithium on neurobehavioural functioning: a study on auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norra, Christine; Feilhauer, Johanna; Wiesmüller, Gerhard Andreas; Kunert, Hanns Jürgen

    2010-06-30

    Lithium occurs naturally in food and water. Low environmental concentrations in drinking water are associated with mental illnesses and behavioural offences, and at therapeutic dosages it is used to treat psychiatric (especially affective) disorders, partly by facilitating serotonergic (5-HT) neurotransmission. As little is known about the psychophysiological role of nutritional lithium in the general population, endogenous lithium concentrations were hypothesised to be associated with measurable effects on emotional liability and the loudness dependence (LD) that is proposed as one of the most valid indicators of 5-HT neurotransmission. Auditory evoked potentials of healthy volunteers [N=36] with high (>2.5 microg/l) or low (<1.5 microg/l) lithium serum concentrations were recorded. Emotional liability was assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Low-lithium levels correlated with Somatisation while correlations between lithium and LD were not significant. Still, LD correlated positively with Paranoid Ideation, negatively with Anxiety and, in the high-lithium group, inversely with further aspects of emotional liability (Depression, Psychological Distress). In conclusion, the effects of low levels of endogenous lithium are associated with emotional liability, and high levels with some protective effects, although findings remain inconclusive regarding LD. Potential benefits of endogenous lithium on neurobehavioural functioning, especially in high-risk individuals, would have public health implications.

  17. M-theory Potential from the $G_2$ Hitchin Functional in Superspace

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Katrin; Guha, Sunny; Linch, William D; Robbins, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We embed the component fields of eleven-dimensional supergravity into a superspace of the form $X\\times Y$ where $X$ is the standard 4D, $N=1$ superspace and $Y$ is a smooth 7-manifold. The eleven-dimensional 3-form gives rise to a tensor hierarchy of superfields gauged by the diffeomorphisms of $Y$. It contains a natural candidate for a $G_2$ structure on $Y$, and being a complex of superforms, defines a superspace Chern-Simons invariant. Adding to this a natural generalization of the Riemannian volume on $X\\times Y$ and freezing the (superspin-$\\frac32$ and 1) supergravity fields on $X$, we obtain an approximation to the eleven-dimensional supergravity action that suffices to compute the scalar potential. In this approximation the action is the sum of the superspace Chern-Simons term and a superspace generalization of the Hitchin functional for $Y$ as a $G_2$-structure manifold. Integrating out auxiliary fields, we obtain the conditions for unbroken supersymmetry and the scalar potential. The latter reprodu...

  18. Polyethylenimine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as a potential non-viral vector for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yangbo; Tang, Zhaomin; Shi, Chunli; Shi, Shuai; Qian, Zhiyong; Zhou, Shaobing

    2012-11-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized as a potential non-viral vector for gene delivery. The nanoparticles could provide the magnetic-targeting, and the cationic polymer PEI could condense DNA and avoid in vitro barriers. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, dynamic light scattering measurements, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer and atomic force microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to asses DNA binding and perform a DNase I protection assay. The Alamar blue assay was used to evaluate negative effects on the metabolic activity of cells incubated with PEI modified magnetic nanoparticles and their complexes with DNA both in the presence or absence of an external magnetic field. Flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were also performed to investigate the transfection efficiency of the DNA-loaded magnetic nanoparticles in A549 and B16-F10 tumor cells with (+M) or without (-M) the magnetic field. The in vitro transfection efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles was improved obviously in a permanent magnetic field. Therefore, the magnetic nanoparticles show considerable potential as nanocarriers for gene delivery.

  19. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked potentials in Machado-Joseph disease: Functional involvement of otolith pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Pereira, Melissa Marques; Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola

    2015-11-15

    Machado-Joseph disease is defined as an autosomal dominant ataxic disorder caused by degeneration of the cerebellum and its connections and is associated with a broad range of clinical symptoms. The involvement of the vestibular system is responsible for several symptoms and signs observed in the individuals affected by the disease. We measured cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in a sample of Machado-Joseph disease patients in order to assess functional pathways involved. Bilateral measures of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP) were obtained from 14 symptomatic patients with genetically proven Machado-Joseph disease and compared with those from a control group of 20 healthy subjects. Thirteen (93%) patients showed at least one abnormal test result; oVEMP and cVEMP responses were absent in 17/28 (61%) and 11/28 (39%) measures, respectively; and prolonged latency of cVEMP was found in 3/28 (11%) measures. Of the 13 patients with abnormal responses, 9/13 (69%) patients showed discordant abnormal responses: four with absent oVEMP and present cVEMP, two with absent cVEMP and present oVEMP, and three showed unilateral prolonged cVEMP latencies. Both otolith-related vestibulocollic and vestibulo-ocular pathways are severely affected in Machado-Joseph disease patients evaluated by VEMPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modified local diatomite as potential functional drug carrier--A model study for diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janićijević, Jelena; Krajišnik, Danina; Čalija, Bojan; Vasiljević, Bojana Nedić; Dobričić, Vladimir; Daković, Aleksandra; Antonijević, Milan D; Milić, Jela

    2015-12-30

    Diatomite makes a promising candidate for a drug carrier because of its high porosity, large surface area, modifiable surface chemistry and biocompatibility. Herein, refined diatomite from Kolubara coal basin, which complied with the pharmacopoeial requirements for heavy metals content and microbiological quality, was used as a starting material. Inorganic modification of the starting material was performed through a simple, one-step procedure. Significant increase in adsorbent loading with diclofenac sodium (DS) was achieved after the modification process (∼373mg/g) which enabled the preparation of comprimates containing therapeutic dose of the adsorbed drug. Adsorption of DS onto modified diatomite resulted in the alteration of the drug's XRD pattern and FTIR spectrum. In vitro drug release studies in phosphate buffer pH 7.5 demonstrated prolonged DS release over 8h from comprimates containing DS adsorbed on modified diatomite (up to 37% after 8h) and those containing physical mixture of the same composition (up to 45% after 8h). The results of in vivo toxicity testing on mice pointed on potential safety of both unmodified (starting) and modified diatomite. All these findings favor the application of diatomite as a potential functional drug carrier. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Corticospinal Tract: A Biomarker to Categorize Upper Limb Functional Potential in Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Ellen; Byblow, Winston D.; Feys, Hilde; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) typically present with largely divergent upper limb sensorimotor deficits and individual differences in response to upper limb rehabilitation. This review summarizes how early brain damage can cause dramatic deviations from the normal anatomy of sensory and motor tracts, resulting in unique “wiring patterns” of the sensorimotor system in CP. Based on the existing literature, we suggest that corticospinal tract (CST) anatomy and integrity constrains sensorimotor function of the upper limb and potentially also the response to treatment. However, it is not possible to infer CST (re)organization from clinical presentation alone and conventional biomarkers, such as time of insult, location, and lesion extent seem to have limited clinical utility. Here, we propose a theoretical framework based on a detailed examination of the motor system using behavioral, neurophysiological, and magnetic resonance imaging measures, akin to those used to predict potential for upper limb recovery of adults after stroke. This theoretical framework might prove useful because it provides testable hypotheses for future research with the goal to develop and validate a clinical assessment flowchart to categorize children with unilateral CP. PMID:26779464

  2. Phylogenetic and functional potential links pH and N2O emissions in pasture soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, M. D. Sainur; Biswas, Ambarish; Bakken, Lars R.; Clough, Timothy J.; de Klein, Cecile A. M.; Richards, Karl G.; Lanigan, Gary J.; Morales, Sergio E.

    2016-10-01

    Denitrification is mediated by microbial, and physicochemical, processes leading to nitrogen loss via N2O and N2 emissions. Soil pH regulates the reduction of N2O to N2, however, it can also affect microbial community composition and functional potential. Here we simultaneously test the link between pH, community composition, and the N2O emission ratio (N2O/(NO + N2O + N2)) in 13 temperate pasture soils. Physicochemical analysis, gas kinetics, 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, metagenomic and quantitative PCR (of denitrifier genes: nirS, nirK, nosZI and nosZII) analysis were carried out to characterize each soil. We found strong evidence linking pH to both N2O emission ratio and community changes. Soil pH was negatively associated with N2O emission ratio, while being positively associated with both community diversity and total denitrification gene (nir & nos) abundance. Abundance of nosZII was positively linked to pH, and negatively linked to N2O emissions. Our results confirm that pH imposes a general selective pressure on the entire community and that this results in changes in emission potential. Our data also support the general model that with increased microbial diversity efficiency increases, demonstrated in this study with lowered N2O emission ratio through more efficient conversion of N2O to N2.

  3. Runoff Potentiality of a Watershed through SCS and Functional Data Analysis Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Adham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Runoff potentiality of a watershed was assessed based on identifying curve number (CN, soil conservation service (SCS, and functional data analysis (FDA techniques. Daily discrete rainfall data were collected from weather stations in the study area and analyzed through lowess method for smoothing curve. As runoff data represents a periodic pattern in each watershed, Fourier series was introduced to fit the smooth curve of eight watersheds. Seven terms of Fourier series were introduced for the watersheds 5 and 8, while 8 terms of Fourier series were used for the rest of the watersheds for the best fit of data. Bootstrapping smooth curve analysis reveals that watersheds 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 are with monthly mean runoffs of 29, 24, 22, 23, 26, and 27 mm, respectively, and these watersheds would likely contribute to surface runoff in the study area. The purpose of this study was to transform runoff data into a smooth curve for representing the surface runoff pattern and mean runoff of each watershed through statistical method. This study provides information of runoff potentiality of each watershed and also provides input data for hydrological modeling.

  4. How close can we get waves to wave functions, including potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faletič, Sergej

    2016-05-01

    In the following article we show that mechanical waves on a braced string can have the same shapes as important wave functions in introductory quantum mechanics. A braced string is a string with additional transversal springs that serve as external "potential". The aim is not to suggest teaching quantum mechanics with these analogies. Instead, the aim is to provide students with some additional relevant experience in wave mechanics before they are introduced to quantum mechanics. We show how this experience can be used in a constructivist sense as the basis for building quantum concepts. We consider energy transfer along such string and show that penetration of a wave into a region with high "potential" is not unexpected. We also consider energy transfer between two such strings and show that it can appear point-like even though the wave is an extended object. We also suggest that applying quantization of energy transfer to wave phenomena can explain some of the more difficult to accept features of quantum mechanics.

  5. A cooperative function for multisensory stimuli in the induction of approach behavior of a potential mate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ågmo, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Intrasexual competition is an important element of natural selection in which the most attractive conspecific has a considerable reproductive advantage over the others. The conspecifics that are approached first often become the preferred mate partners, and could thus from a biological perspective have a reproductive advantage. This underlines the importance of the initial approach and raises the question of what induces this approach, or what makes a conspecific attractive. Identification of the sensory modalities crucial for the activation of approach is necessary for elucidating the central nervous processes involved in the activation of sexual motivation and eventually copulatory behavior. The initial approach to a potential mate depends on distant stimuli in the modalities of audition, olfaction, vision, and other undefined characteristics. This study investigated the role of the different modalities and the combination of these modalities in the sexual incentive value of a female rat. This study provides evidence that the presence of a single-sensory stimulus with one modality (olfaction, vision, or ‘others’, but not audition) is sufficient to attenuate the preference for a social contact with a male rat. However, a multisensory stimulus of multiple modalities is necessary to induce preference for the stimulus over social contact to a level of an intact receptive female. The initial approach behavior, therefore, seems to be induced by the combination of at least two modalities among which olfaction is crucial. This suggests that there is a cooperative function for the different modalities in the induction of approach behavior of a potential mate. PMID:28306729

  6. Distribution of Bathyarchaeota Communities Across Different Terrestrial Settings and Their Potential Ecological Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xing; Wang, Ruicheng; Wang, Hongmei; Gong, Linfeng; Man, Baiying; Xu, Ying

    2017-03-01

    High abundance and widespread distribution of the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota in marine environment have been recognized recently, but knowledge about Bathyarchaeota in terrestrial settings and their correlation with environmental parameters is fairly limited. Here we reported the abundance of Bathyarchaeota members across different ecosystems and their correlation with environmental factors by constructing 16S rRNA clone libraries of peat from the Dajiuhu Peatland, coupling with bioinformatics analysis of 16S rRNA data available to date in NCBI database. In total, 1456 Bathyarchaeota sequences from 28 sites were subjected to UniFrac analysis based on phylogenetic distance and multivariate regression tree analysis of taxonomy. Both phylogenetic and taxon-based approaches showed that salinity, total organic carbon and temperature significantly influenced the distribution of Bathyarchaeota across different terrestrial habitats. By applying the ecological concept of ‘indicator species’, we identify 9 indicator groups among the 6 habitats with the most in the estuary sediments. Network analysis showed that members of Bathyarchaeota formed the “backbone” of archaeal community and often co-occurred with Methanomicrobia. These results suggest that Bathyarchaeota may play an important ecological role within archaeal communities via a potential symbiotic association with Methanomicrobia. Our results shed light on understanding of the biogeography, potential functions of Bathyarchaeota and environment conditions that influence Bathyarchaea distribution in terrestrial settings.

  7. The parametrization of Coulomb barrier heights and positions using a new universal function in the proximity potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G. L.; Pan, M.

    2016-10-01

    The Coulomb barrier heights are calculated by using the proximity potential with a new universal function in comparison with the results of proximity potentials Prox77, AW95, Bass73, BW91, CW76, DP and Ng80. It is found that the new results of Coulomb barrier heights are better than those of most proximity potentials. Then this proximity potential with the new universal function was used to calculate the Coulomb barrier positions and heights from light fusion systems to heavy fusion systems. The parametrized formulas are obtained for Coulomb barrier height and position, and can reproduce most of calculated barrier heights and positions within the accuracy of ± 1%.

  8. The Effects of Action Potential Stimulation on Pain, Swelling and Function of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

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    Razieh Sepehri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most prevalent joint diseases. Electrical muscle stimulation is effective to improve its symptoms. Today, action potential stimulation (APS with various currents and periods is used to treat OA. This study aims at analyzing the effect of action potential stimulation in improving knee OA symptoms. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, patients with mild to moderate knee OA divided randomly in two groups each had 15 people. Along with the conventional exercises of physiotherapy, one group received 16 minutes action potential stimulation with the lowest intensity (sensible; but the other group besides receiving the conventional exercises of physiotherapy was connected into a plugged off machine for 16 minutes. Certain variables were measured and recorded four times. Results: Comparing the variables before and after intervention did not show any meaningful difference between the two groups. But within group, pain with p=0.0001 showed a meaningful decrease. Decreasing of swelling (inflammation in group 1 and 2 was meaningful with p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. For group 1, knee flexion range was improved meaningfully between first and fourth times as p<0.031, but it was not meaningful for group 2. Duration of 50 meters walking and step up and down from three steps significantly decreased in both groups. Conclusion: Although there was no significant difference in variables between two groups, but within both groups’ pain and swelling decreased and functional ability increased, thus, it can be concluded that type of APS does not play a key role in treating knee OA.

  9. Pseudopterosin A: Protection of Synaptic Function and Potential as a Neuromodulatory Agent

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    Stacee Lee Caplan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural products have provided an invaluable source of inspiration in the drug discovery pipeline. The oceans are a vast source of biological and chemical diversity. Recently, this untapped resource has been gaining attention in the search for novel structures and development of new classes of therapeutic agents. Pseudopterosins are group of marine diterpene glycosides that possess an array of potent biological activities in several therapeutic areas. Few studies have examined pseudopterosin effects during cellular stress and, to our knowledge, no studies have explored their ability to protect synaptic function. The present study probes pseudopterosin A (PsA for its neuromodulatory properties during oxidative stress using the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that oxidative stress rapidly reduces neuronal activity, resulting in the loss of neurotransmission at a well-characterized invertebrate synapse. PsA mitigates this effect and promotes functional tolerance during oxidative stress by prolonging synaptic transmission in a mechanism that differs from scavenging activity. Furthermore, the distribution of PsA within mammalian biological tissues following single intravenous injection was investigated using a validated bioanalytical method. Comparable exposure of PsA in the mouse brain and plasma indicated good distribution of PsA in the brain, suggesting its potential as a novel neuromodulatory agent.

  10. Microarray technology reveals potentially novel genes and pathways involved in non-functioning pituitary adenomas

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    Qiao, X; Wang, H; Wang, X; Zhao, B

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Microarray data of non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) were analyzed to disclose novel genes and pathways involved in NFPA tumorigenesis. Raw microarray data were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Data pre-treatment and differential analysis were conducted using packages in R. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using package GOs-tats. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using server STRING and Cytoscape. Known genes involved in pituitary adenomas (PAs), were obtained from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. A total of 604 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identifed between NFPAs and controls, including 177 up- and 427 down-regulated genes. Jak-STAT and p53 signaling pathways were significantly enriched by DEGs. The PPI network of DEGs was constructed, containing 99 up- and 288 down-regulated known disease genes (e.g. EGFR and ESR1) as well as 16 up- and 17 down-regulated potential novel NFPAs-related genes (e.g. COL4A5, LHX3, MSN, and GHSR). Genes like COL4A5, LHX3, MSN, and GHSR and pathways such as p53 signaling and Jak-STAT signaling, might participate in NFPA development. Although further validations are required, these findings might provide guidance for future basic and therapy researches. PMID:28289583

  11. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential

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    Richard Allen White III

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid and chlorophyll biosynthesis and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase. The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R2 0.900. These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale.

  12. Unconventional neurotrophic factors CDNF and MANF: Structure, physiological functions and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Maria; Saarma, Mart; Lindholm, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) and mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) promote the survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons which degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, CDNF and MANF are structurally and functionally clearly distinct from the classical, target-derived neurotrophic factors (NTFs) that are solely secreted proteins. In cells, CDNF and MANF localize in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and evidence suggests that MANF, and possibly CDNF, is important for the maintenance of ER homeostasis. MANF expression is particularly high in secretory tissues with extensive protein production and thus a high ER protein folding load. Deletion of MANF in mice results in a diabetic phenotype and the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) in the pancreatic islets. However, information about the intracellular and extracellular mechanisms of MANF and CDNF action is still limited. Here we will discuss the structural motifs and physiological functions of CDNF and MANF as well as their therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and diabetes. Currently available knockout models of MANF and CDNF in mice, zebrafish and fruit fly will increase information about the biology of these interesting proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metagenomic analysis reveals that modern microbialites and polar microbial mats have similar taxonomic and functional potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard Allen; Power, Ian M; Dipple, Gregory M; Southam, Gordon; Suttle, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Within the subarctic climate of Clinton Creek, Yukon, Canada, lies an abandoned and flooded open-pit asbestos mine that harbors rapidly growing microbialites. To understand their formation we completed a metagenomic community profile of the microbialites and their surrounding sediments. Assembled metagenomic data revealed that bacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria numerically dominated this system, although the relative abundances of taxa within the phylum varied among environments. Bacteria belonging to Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant in the microbialites and sediments, respectively. The microbialites were also home to many other groups associated with microbialite formation including filamentous cyanobacteria and dissimilatory sulfate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria, consistent with the idea of a shared global microbialite microbiome. Other members were present that are typically not associated with microbialites including Gemmatimonadetes and iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria, which participate in carbon metabolism and iron cycling. Compared to the sediments, the microbialite microbiome has significantly more genes associated with photosynthetic processes (e.g., photosystem II reaction centers, carotenoid, and chlorophyll biosynthesis) and carbon fixation (e.g., CO dehydrogenase). The Clinton Creek microbialite communities had strikingly similar functional potentials to non-lithifying microbial mats from the Canadian High Arctic and Antarctica, but are functionally distinct, from non-lithifying mats or biofilms from Yellowstone. Clinton Creek microbialites also share metabolic genes (R (2) Mexico, but are more similar to polar Arctic mats (R (2) > 0.900). These metagenomic profiles from an anthropogenic microbialite-forming ecosystem provide context to microbialite formation on a human-relevant timescale.

  14. Androgen-Forming Stem Leydig cells: Identification, Function and Therapeutic Potential

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    Yunhui Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Leydig cells are the primary source of testosterone in the male, and differentiation of Leydig cells in the testes is one of the primary events in the development of the male body and fertility. Stem Leydig cells (SLCs exist in the testis throughout postnatal life, but a lack of cell surface markers previously hindered attempts to obtain purified SLC fractions. Once isolated, the properties of SLCs provide interesting clues for the ontogeny of these cells within the embryo. Moreover, the clinical potential of SLCs might be used to reverse age-related declines in testosterone levels in aging men, and stimulate reproductive function in hypogonadal males. This review focuses on the source, identification and outlook for therapeutic applications of SLCs. Separate pools of SLCs may give rise to fetal and adult generations of Leydig cell, which may account for their observed functional differences. These differences should in turn be taken into account when assessing the consequences of environmental pollutants such as the phthalate ester, diethylhexylphthalate (DEHP.

  15. Effects of incense on brain function: evaluation using electroencephalograms and event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Mutsumi; Osawa, Mikio; Nishitani, Nobuyuki; Iwata, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of the odor of incense on brain activity, electroencephalograms (EEGs) and event-related potentials (ERPs) in a push/wait paradigm were recorded in 10 healthy adults (aged 23-39 years) with normal olfactory function. EEG was recorded from 21 electrodes on the scalp, according to the International 10-20 system, and EEG power spectra were calculated by fast Fourier transform for 3 min before and during odor presentation. ERPs were recorded from 15 electrodes on the scalp before, during and after exposure to incense with intervals of 10 min. In a push/wait paradigm, two Japanese words, 'push' as the go stimulus and 'wait' as the no-go stimulus, appeared randomly on a CRT screen with equal probability. The subjects were instructed to push a button whenever the 'push' signal appeared. Fast alpha activity (10-13 Hz) increased significantly in bilateral posterior regions during incense exposure compared to that during rose oil exposure. The peak amplitudes of no-go P3 at Fz and Cz were significantly greater during incense inhalation. The latencies of go P3 and no-go P3, and the amplitude and latencies of no-go N2 did not change by exposure to the odors of both incense, rose and odorless air. These results suggest that the odor of incense may enhance cortical activities and the function of inhibitory processing of motor response.

  16. Analysis of Saccular Function With Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential Test in Meniere's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, Sasan; Yazdani, Nasrin; Esfahani, Mahdis; Tari, Niloufar; Adil, Susan; Mahvi, Zahra; Rezazadeh, Nima

    2017-02-01

    Meniere's disease is the disorder of inner ear characterized by vertigo, tinnitus and sensorineural hearing loss. The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test could be useful in the analysis of saccular function, and diagnosis of Meniere's disease. In this study, we've analyzed the saccular function, using VEMP test in different groups of Meniere's disease. Patients were categorized as possible, probable or definite Meniere's disease groups according to the guideline of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. The exclusion criteria were neuromuscular system diseases, diseases of central nervous system, inner ear disorders, conductive hearing loss, a history of ototoxic drug consumption, being a drug abuser and a positive history of inner ear surgery or manipulations. The VEMP test is the recording of positive and negative waves from sternocleidomastoid muscle that is made by an auditory click to the ear. From the total of 100 patients, the waves of VEMP test was seen in 59 patients which 19 patients had abnormal amplitude, and latency and 40 patients were with normally recorded waves. There was a significant relationship between the severity of hearing loss and a VEMP test without any recorded waves. Most of the cases with 'no wave recorded' VEMP test, were patients with severe hearing loss. However, there wasn't any relation between the pattern of hearing loss and 'no wave recorded' VEMP test. VEMP test could be a valuable diagnostic clue especially in patients with definite Meniere's disease.

  17. Freshwater sponges have functional, sealing epithelia with high transepithelial resistance and negative transepithelial potential.

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    Emily D M Adams

    Full Text Available Epithelial tissue - the sealed and polarized layer of cells that regulates transport of ions and solutes between the environment and the internal milieu - is a defining characteristic of the Eumetazoa. Sponges, the most ancient metazoan phylum, are generally believed to lack true epithelia, but their ability to occlude passage of ions has never been tested. Here we show that freshwater sponges (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida have functional epithelia with high transepithelial electrical resistance (TER, a transepithelial potential (TEP, and low permeability to small-molecule diffusion. Curiously, the Amphimedon queenslandica sponge genome lacks the classical occluding genes [5] considered necessary to regulate sealing and control of ion transport. The fact that freshwater sponge epithelia can seal suggests that either occluding molecules have been lost in some sponge lineages, or demosponges use novel molecular complexes for epithelial occlusion; if the latter, it raises the possibility that mechanisms for occlusion used by sponges may exist in other metazoa. Importantly, our results imply that functional epithelia evolved either several times, or once, in the ancestor of the Metazoa.

  18. Caspase-14 Expression Impairs Retinal Pigment Epithelium Barrier Function: Potential Role in Diabetic Macular Edema

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    Selina Beasley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that caspase-14 is a novel molecule in retina with potential role in accelerated vascular cell death during diabetic retinopathy (DR. Here, we evaluated whether caspase-14 is implicated in retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE dysfunction under hyperglycemia. The impact of high glucose (HG, 30 mM D-glucose on caspase-14 expression in human RPE (ARPE-19 cells was tested, which showed significant increase in caspase-14 expression compared with normal glucose (5 mM D-glucose + 25 mM L-glucose. We also evaluated the impact of modulating caspase-14 expression on RPE cells barrier function, phagocytosis, and activation of other caspases using ARPE-19 cells transfected with caspase-14 plasmid or caspase-14 siRNA. We used FITC-dextran flux assay and electric cell substrate impedance sensing (ECIS to test the changes in RPE cell barrier function. Similar to HG, caspase-14 expression in ARPE-19 cells increased FITC-dextran leakage through the confluent monolayer and decreased the transcellular electrical resistance (TER. These effects of HG were prevented by caspase-14 knockdown. Furthermore, caspase-14 knockdown prevented the HG-induced activation of caspase-1 and caspase-9, the only activated caspases by HG. Phagocytic activity was unaffected by caspase-14 expression. Our results suggest that caspase-14 contributes to RPE cell barrier disruption under hyperglycemic conditions and thus plays a role in the development of diabetic macular edema.

  19. The biology of cancer testis antigens: putative function, regulation and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratta, Elisabetta; Coral, Sandra; Covre, Alessia; Parisi, Giulia; Colizzi, Francesca; Danielli, Riccardo; Nicolay, Hugues Jean Marie; Sigalotti, Luca; Maio, Michele

    2011-04-01

    Cancer testis antigens (CTA) are a large family of tumor-associated antigens expressed in human tumors of different histological origin, but not in normal tissues except for testis and placenta. This tumor-restricted pattern of expression, together with their strong in vivo immunogenicity, identified CTA as ideal targets for tumor-specific immunotherapeutic approaches, and prompted the development of several clinical trials of CTA-based vaccine therapy. Driven by this practical clinical interest, a more detailed characterization of CTA biology has been recently undertaken. So far, at least 70 families of CTA, globally accounting for about 140 members, have been identified. Most of these CTA are expressed during spermatogenesis, but their function is still largely unknown. Epigenetic events, particularly DNA methylation, appear to be the primary mechanism regulating CTA expression in both normal and transformed cells, as well as in cancer stem cells. In view of the growing interest in CTA biology, the aim of this review is to provide the most recent information on their expression, regulation and function, together with a brief summary of the major clinical trials involving CTA as therapeutic agents. The pharmacologic modulation of CTA expression profiles on neoplastic cells by DNA hypomethylating drugs will also be discussed as a feasible approach to design new combination therapies potentially able to improve the clinical efficacy of currently adopted CTA-based immunotherapeutic regimens in cancer patients.

  20. Sex differences in kappa opioid receptor function and their potential impact on addiction

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    Elena eChartoff

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral, biological and social sequelae that lead to drug addiction differ between men and women. Our efforts to understand addiction on a mechanistic level must include studies in both males and females. Stress, anxiety, and depression are tightly linked to addiction, and whether they precede or result from compulsive drug use depends on many factors, including biological sex. The neuropeptide dynorphin (DYN, an endogenous ligand at kappa opioid receptors (KORs, is necessary for stress-induced aversive states and is upregulated in the brain after chronic exposure to drugs of abuse. KOR agonists produce signs of anxiety, fear, and depression in laboratory animals and humans, findings that have led to the hypothesis that drug withdrawal-induced DYN release is instrumental in negative reinforcement processes that drive addiction. However, these studies were almost exclusively conducted in males. Only recently is evidence available that there are sex differences in the effects of KOR activation on affective state. This review focuses on sex differences in DYN and KOR systems and how these might contribute to sex differences in addictive behavior. Much of what is known about how biological sex influences KOR systems is from research on pain systems. The basic molecular and genetic mechanisms that have been discovered to underlie sex differences in KOR function in pain systems may apply to sex differences in KOR function in reward systems. Our goals are to discuss the current state of knowledge on how biological sex contributes to KOR function in the context of pain,mood and addiction and to explore potential mechanisms for sex differences in KOR function. We will highlight evidence that the function of DYN-KOR systems is influenced in a sex-dependent manner by: polymorphisms in the prodynorphin (pDYN gene, genetic linkage with the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R, heterodimerization of KORs and mu opioid receptors (MORs, and gonadal hormones

  1. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials: exploring the interactions with Caco-2 cells for potential oral drug delivery

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    Coyuco JC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jurja C Coyuco, Yuanjie Liu, Bee-Jen Tan, Gigi NC ChiuDepartment of Pharmacy, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, SingaporeAbstract: Although carbon nanomaterials (CNMs have been increasingly studied for their biomedical applications, there is limited research on these novel materials for oral drug delivery. As such, this study aimed to explore the potential of CNMs in oral drug delivery, and the objectives were to evaluate CNM cytotoxicity and their abilities to modulate paracellular transport and the P-glycoprotein (P-gp efflux pump. Three types of functionalized CNMs were studied, including polyhydroxy small-gap fullerenes (OH-fullerenes, carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT-COOH and poly(ethylene glycol functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (fSWCNT-PEG, using the well-established Caco-2 cell monolayer to represent the intestinal epithelium. All three CNMs had minimum cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cells, as demonstrated through lactose dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. Of the three CNMs, fSWCNT-COOH significantly reduced transepithelial electrical resistance and enhanced transport of Lucifer Yellow across the Caco-2 monolayer. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fSWCNT-COOH treated cells had the highest perturbation in the distribution of ZO-1, a protein marker of tight junction, suggesting that fSWCNT-COOH could enhance paracellular permeability via disruption of tight junctions. This modulating effect of fSWCNT-COOH can be reversed over time. Furthermore, cellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate, rhodamine-123, was significantly increased in cells treated with fSWCNT-COOH, suggestive of P-gp inhibition. Of note, fSWCNT-PEG could increase rhodamine-123 accumulation without modifying the tight junction. Collectively, these results suggest that the functionalized CNMs could be useful as modulators for oral drug

  2. A potential neural substrate for processing functional classes of complex acoustic signals.

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    Isabelle George

    Full Text Available Categorization is essential to all cognitive processes, but identifying the neural substrates underlying categorization processes is a real challenge. Among animals that have been shown to be able of categorization, songbirds are particularly interesting because they provide researchers with clear examples of categories of acoustic signals allowing different levels of recognition, and they possess a system of specialized brain structures found only in birds that learn to sing: the song system. Moreover, an avian brain nucleus that is analogous to the mammalian secondary auditory cortex (the caudo-medial nidopallium, or NCM has recently emerged as a plausible site for sensory representation of birdsong, and appears as a well positioned brain region for categorization of songs. Hence, we tested responses in this non-primary, associative area to clear and distinct classes of songs with different functions and social values, and for a possible correspondence between these responses and the functional aspects of songs, in a highly social songbird species: the European starling. Our results clearly show differential neuronal responses to the ethologically defined classes of songs, both in the number of neurons responding, and in the response magnitude of these neurons. Most importantly, these differential responses corresponded to the functional classes of songs, with increasing activation from non-specific to species-specific and from species-specific to individual-specific sounds. These data therefore suggest a potential neural substrate for sorting natural communication signals into categories, and for individual vocal recognition of same-species members. Given the many parallels that exist between birdsong and speech, these results may contribute to a better understanding of the neural bases of speech.

  3. A naturally occurring prfA truncation in a Listeria monocytogenes field strain contributes to reduced replication and cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Sebastian; Aguilar-Bultet, Lisandra; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Guldimann, Claudia; Drögemüller, Cord; Pfarrer, Christiane; Vidondo, Beatriz; Seuberlich, Torsten; Frey, Joachim; Oevermann, Anna

    2015-08-31

    Listeria (L.) monocytogenes is an environmental bacterium that may become an intracellular pathogen upon ingestion to cause gastroenteritis, septicaemia, abortions, and/or fatal infections of the central nervous system. We here describe a L. monocytogenes field strain (JF5171) isolated from a bovine placenta in the context of abortion, which exhibited attenuation in bovine brain-slice cultures. The whole genome of strain JF5171 was sequenced, and the invasion, replication, and intercellular spread of JF5171 were further analyzed by quantification of colony forming units and immunofluorescence studies. Phospholipase and hemolysis activity of JF5171 were also quantified along with transcription levels of actA, hly and prfA. The data obtained were compared to those of the widely used L. monocytogenes reference strain, EGD-e. JF5171 exhibited reduced replication and lower levels of phospholipase and hemolysis activity. Invasion and cell-to-cell spread was strongly decreased compared to EGD-e, and actin polymerization was absent. A frame shift deletion was identified in the JF5171 coding region of the major regulator for virulence, prfA. This resulted in a truncated C-terminus sequence (WEN* vs. WGKLN*). In addition, a point mutation resulted in a lysine to arginine substitution at amino acid position 197. Complementation with prfA from EGD-e and with (EGD-e) prfA-K197N increased the replication and spread efficiency of JF5171. In contrast, complementation with the truncated version of prfA had no effect. Taken together, these results suggest that the truncated C-terminus of prfA considerably contributes to the strongly attenuated phenotype observed in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Infectious bursal disease virus VP5 polypeptide: a phosphoinositide-binding protein required for efficient cell-to-cell virus dissemination.

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    Fernando Méndez

    Full Text Available Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV, a member of the Birnaviridae family, is a major avian pathogen responsible for an immunosuppressive disease affecting juvenile chickens. The IBDV genome is formed by two dsRNA segments. The largest one harbors two partially overlapping open reading frames encoding a non-structural polypeptide, known as VP5, and a large polyprotein, respectively. VP5 is non-essential for virus replication. However, it plays a major role in IBDV pathogenesis. VP5 accumulates at the plasma membrane (PM of IBDV-infected cells. We have analyzed the mechanism underlying the VP5 PM targeting. Updated topological prediction algorithm servers fail to identify a transmembrane domain within the VP5 sequence. However, the VP5 polycationic C-terminal region, harboring three closely spaced patches formed by two or three consecutive basic amino acid residues (lysine or arginine, might account for its PM tropism. We have found that mutations, either C-terminal VP5 deletions or replacement of basic amino acids by alanine residues, that reduce the electropositive charge of the VP5 C-terminus abolish PM targeting. Lipid overlay assays performed with an affinity-purified Flag-tagged VP5 (FVP5 protein version show that this polypeptide binds several phosphoinositides (PIP, exhibiting a clear preference for monophosphate species. Experiments performed with FVP5 mutant proteins lacking the polycationic domain demonstrate that this region is essential for PIP binding. Data gathered with IBDV mutants expressing C-terminal deleted VP5 polypeptides generated by reverse genetics demonstrate that the VP5-PIP binding domain is required both for its PM targeting in infected cells, and for efficient virus dissemination. Data presented here lead us to hypothesize that IBDV might use a non-lytic VP5-dependent cell-to-cell spreading mechanism.

  5. Supercritical fluid of particles with a Yukawa potential: A new approximation for the direct correlation function and the Widom line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareyeva, E. E.; Ryzhov, V. N.

    2016-12-01

    We propose an approximation of a direct correlation function corresponding to the linearization with respect to - βϕ( r) of a generalized mean spherical approximation for a hard-core multi-Yukawa system of particles. We use the results to study the behavior of maximums of thermodynamic response functions in the supercritical region of a fluid with a two-term Yukawa potential imitating the Lennard-Jones potential.

  6. Calculation of the vibrational spectra of RDX as a function of pressure using the Grimme DFT potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perger, Warren; Flurchick, K. M.; Slough, Wil; Valenzano, Loredana

    2011-06-01

    The density-functional theory (DFT) potential by Grimme has been proposed for describing long-range dispersion corrections. This potential has been implemented into the CRYSTAL09 program and used to calculate the vibrational spectra in RDX at equilibrium and as a function of pressure. The intensities, Born charge tensor, and high-frequency dielectric constant are reported and compared with prior theory and experiment where possible. Supported by ONR-MURI grant N00014-06-1-0459.

  7. The equine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein gp21/22a, the herpes simplex virus type 1 gM homolog, is involved in virus penetration and cell-to-cell spread of virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterrieder, N; Neubauer, A; Brandmuller, C; Braun, B; Kaaden, O R; Baines, J D

    1996-06-01

    Experiments to analyze the function of the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) glycoprotein gM homolog were conducted. To this end, an Rk13 cell line (TCgM) that stably expressed EHV-1 gM was constructed. Proteins with apparent M(r)s of 46,000 to 48,000 and 50,000 to 55,000 were detected in TCgM cells with specific anti-gM antibodies, and the gM protein pattern was indistinguishable from that in cells infected with EHV-1 strain RacL11. A viral mutant (L11deltagM) bearing an Escherichia coli lacZ gene inserted into the EHV-1 strain RacL11 gM gene (open reading frame 52) was purified, and cells infected with L11deltagM did not contain detectable gM. L11deltagM exhibited approximately 100-fold lower titers and a more than 2-fold reduction in plaque size relative to wild-type EHV-1 when grown and titrated on noncomplementing cells. Viral titers were reduced only 10-fold when L11deltagM was grown on the complementing cell line TCgM and titrated on noncomplementing cells. L11deltagM also exhibited slower penetration kinetics compared with those of the parental EHV-1 RacL11. It is concluded that EHV-1 gM plays important roles in the penetration of virus into the target cell and in spread of EHV-1 from cell to cell.

  8. Reducing lung function decline in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: potential of nintedanib

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    Woodcock HV

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hannah V Woodcock,1,2 Philip L Molyneaux,1,3 Toby M Maher1–31Interstitial Lung Disease Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, 2Centre for Respiratory Research, University College London, 3National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UKAbstract: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a chronic, progressive, fibrotic lung disease with no clear etiology and a paucity of therapeutic options. Nintedanib (previously known as BIBF 1120 is a tyrosine kinase receptor antagonist which inhibits a number of key receptors, including those for platelet derived growth factor (PDGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and fibroblast growth factor (FGF. These growth factors are profibrotic and each has been investigated as a potential standalone therapeutic target in IPF. Simultaneous inhibition of these receptors, with an analog of nintedanib, has proved to be effective in experimental animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. This observation, together with extensive safety and pharmacokinetic data from studies of nintedanib in malignancy, paved the way for the clinical development of this drug in IPF. The Phase IIb TOMORROW trial demonstrated that treatment with nintedanib may potentially slow decline in lung function, decrease the frequency of acute exacerbations, and improve quality of life in patients with IPF. While these observations are drawn from a single clinical trial, taken together with the preclinical data they suggest that nintedanib may yet become an important therapeutic option for individuals with IPF. The results of ongoing parallel, international, multicenter Phase III clinical trials are therefore eagerly awaited.Keywords: interstitial lung disease, BIBF 1120, clinical trials, usual interstitial pneumonia, acute exacerbation

  9. Regulation and functional roles of rebound potentiation at cerebellar stellate cell - Purkinje cell synapses

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    Tomoo eHirano

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Purkinje cells receive both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs and send sole output from the cerebellar cortex. Long-term depression, a type of synaptic plasticity, at excitatory parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses has been studied extensively as a primary cellular mechanism of motor learning. On the other hand, at inhibitory synapses on a Purkinje cell, postsynaptic depolarization induces long-lasting potentiation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. This synaptic plasticity is called rebound potentiation (RP, and its molecular regulatory mechanisms have been studied. The increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration caused by depolarization induces RP through enhancement of GABAA receptor (GABAAR responsiveness. RP induction depends on binding of GABAAR with GABAAR associated protein (GABARAP which is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII. Whether RP is induced or not is determined by the balance between phosphorylation and de-phosphorylation activities regulated by intracellular Ca2+ and by metabotropic GABA and glutamate receptors. Recent studies have revealed that the subunit composition of CaMKII has significant impact on RP induction. A Purkinje cell expresses both alpha- and beta-CaMKII, and the latter has much higher affinity for Ca2+/calmodulin than the former. It was shown that when the relative amount of alpha- to beta-CaMKII is large, RP induction is suppressed. The functional significance of RP has also been studied using transgenic mice in which a peptide inhibiting association of GABARAP and GABAAR is expressed selectively in Purkinje cells. The transgenic mice show abrogation of RP and subnormal adaptation of vestibulo-ocular reflex, a type of motor learning. Thus, RP is involved in a certain type of motor learning.

  10. Potential L-Type Voltage-Operated Calcium Channel Blocking Effect of Drotaverine on Functional Models.

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    Patai, Zoltán; Guttman, András; Mikus, Endre G

    2016-12-01

    Drotaverine is considered an inhibitor of cyclic-3',5'-nucleotide-phophodiesterase (PDE) enzymes; however, published receptor binding data also support the potential L-type voltage- operated calcium channel (L-VOCC) blocking effect of drotaverine. Hence, in this work, we focus on the potential L-VOCC blocking effect of drotaverine by using L-VOCC-associated functional in vitro models. Accordingly, drotaverine and reference agents were tested on KCl-induced guinea pig tracheal contraction. Drotaverine, like the L-VOCC blockers nifedipine or diltiazem, inhibited the KCl-induced inward Ca(2+)- induced contraction in a concentration- dependent fashion. The PDE inhibitor theophylline had no effect on the KCl-evoked contractions, indicating its lack of inhibition on inward Ca(2+) flow. Drotaverine was also tested on the L-VOCC-mediated resting Ca(2+) refill model. In this model, the extracellular Ca(2+) enters the cells to replenish the emptied intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Drotaverine and L-VOCC blocker reference molecules inhibited Ca(2+) replenishment of Ca(2+)-depleted preparations detected by agonist-induced contractions in post-Ca(2+) replenishment Ca(2+)-free medium. Theophylline did not modify the Ca(2+) store replenishment after contraction. It seems that drotaverine, but not theophylline, inhibits inward Ca(2+) flux. The addition of CaCl2 to Ca(2+)-free medium containing the agonist induced inward Ca(2+) flow and subsequent contraction of Ca(2+)-depleted tracheal preparations. Drotaverine, similar to the L-VOCC blockers, inhibited inward Ca(2+) flow and blunted the slope of CaCl2-induced contraction in agonist containing Ca(2+)-free medium with Ca(2+)-depleted tracheal preparations. These results show that drotaverine behaves like L-VOCC blockers but, unlike PDE inhibitors using L-VOCC associated in vitro experimental models.

  11. EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS EVALUATION PERFORMED BY EVENT RELATED POTENTIALS INCHILDREN WITH OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER

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    Tatjana ZORCEC

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obsessive-compulsive disorder [OCD] is characterized by repetitive, disturbing obsessions and/or compulsions. Obsessions are thoughts, images or feelings which are unwanted, persistent and recurrent. Compulsions are repetitive and ritual motor acts which are performed to decrease the anxiety level caused by repetitive obsessions. The onset of the OCD is typically during adolescence or early adulthood. Its prevalence among children is from 1% to 3% and it appears to be more present among boys than girls. Nowadays, the most effective way to treat OCD is to combine psychopharmacological with cognitive-behavioral treatment strategies. In the past decades researchers were more involved in investigating the role of the executive functions [EF] in psychiatric disorders.Aim of the study: to investigate EF among children with OCD by using Event Related Potentials (ERPs on the Go/NoGo tasks. Subjects and methods: The sample is comprised of 20 children from both genders, between seven and 14 years of age [М=10,33±1,83], all diagnosed with OCD. Psychological evaluation was performed with Child Behavior Check List, Kohs cubes for assessment of the intellectual capacities, Beck Depression Inventory, The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Stroop Color Word Test and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Neuropsychological evaluation was performed with the Visual Continuous Performance Test [VCPT] from which the Event Related Potentials [ERP] components were extracted.Results: There is a clear presence of obsessions and/or compulsions, absence of symptoms of depression, presence of perseverative errors and mild difficulties in mental flexibility. The ERP results cannot be understood as a disturbance of the EF in a direct sense, rather than as a disturbed normal functioning caused by the high anxiety level.Conclusion: There is no significant clinical manifestation of cognitive dysfunction among children with OCD in

  12. Multivariate evaluation of brain function by measuring regional cerebral blood flow and event-related potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Yoshihiko; Mochida, Masahiko; Shutara, Yoshikazu; Nakagawa, Kazumi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Nagata, Ken

    1998-07-01

    To measure the effect of events on human cognitive function, effects of odors by measurement regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and P300 were evaluated during the auditory odd-ball exercise. PET showed the increase in rCBF on the right hemisphere of the brain by coffee aroma. rCBF was measured by PET in 9 of right-handed healthy adults men, and P300 was by event-related potential (ERP) in each sex of 20 right-handed healthy adults. ERP showed the difference of the P300 amplitude between men and women, and showed the tendency, by odors except the lavender oil, that women had higher in the P300 amplitude than men. These results suggest the presence of effects on the cognitive function through emotional actions. Next, the relationship between rCBF and ERP were evaluated. The subjects were 9 of the right-handed healthy adults (average: 25.6{+-}3.4 years old). rCBF by PET and P300 amplitude by ERP were simultaneously recorded during the auditory odd-ball exercise using the tone-burst method (2 kHz of the low frequency aimed stimuli and 1 kHz of the high frequency non-aimed stimuli). The rCBF value was the highest at the transverse gyrus of Heschl and the lowest at the piriform cortex among 24 regions of interest (ROI) from both sides. The difference of P300 peak latent time among ROI was almost the same. The brain waves from Cz and Pz were similar and the average amplitude was highest at Pz. We found the high correlation in the right piriform cortex (Fz), and right (Fz, Cz) and left (Cz, Pz) transverse gyrus of Heschl between the P300 amplitude and rCBF. (K.H.)

  13. Functional genomic screening approaches in mechanistic toxicology and potential future applications of CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; McHale, Cliona M; Smith, Martyn T; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing variability in the extent and nature of responses to environmental exposures is a critical aspect of human health risk assessment. Chemical toxicants act by many different mechanisms, however, and the genes involved in adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) and AOP networks are not yet characterized. Functional genomic approaches can reveal both toxicity pathways and susceptibility genes, through knockdown or knockout of all non-essential genes in a cell of interest, and identification of genes associated with a toxicity phenotype following toxicant exposure. Screening approaches in yeast and human near-haploid leukemic KBM7 cells have identified roles for genes and pathways involved in response to many toxicants but are limited by partial homology among yeast and human genes and limited relevance to normal diploid cells. RNA interference (RNAi) suppresses mRNA expression level but is limited by off-target effects (OTEs) and incomplete knockdown. The recently developed gene editing approach called clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats-associated nuclease (CRISPR)-Cas9, can precisely knock-out most regions of the genome at the DNA level with fewer OTEs than RNAi, in multiple human cell types, thus overcoming the limitations of the other approaches. It has been used to identify genes involved in the response to chemical and microbial toxicants in several human cell types and could readily be extended to the systematic screening of large numbers of environmental chemicals. CRISPR-Cas9 can also repress and activate gene expression, including that of non-coding RNA, with near-saturation, thus offering the potential to more fully characterize AOPs and AOP networks. Finally, CRISPR-Cas9 can generate complex animal models in which to conduct preclinical toxicity testing at the level of individual genotypes or haplotypes. Therefore, CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful and flexible functional genomic screening approach that can be harnessed to provide

  14. Luminescence Decay Dynamics and Trace Biomaterials Detection Potential of Surface-Functionalized Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kwan H; Aijmo, Jacob; Ma, Lun; Yao, Mingzhen; Zhang, Xing; Como, John; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J; Huang, Juyang; Chen, Wei

    2008-10-22

    We have studied the luminescence decay and trace biomaterials detection potential of two surface-functionalized nanoparticles, poly(ethylene glycol) bis(carboxymethyl) ether-coated LaF(3):Ce,Tb (~20 nm) and thioglycolic acid-coated ZnS/Mn (~5 nm). Upon UV excitation, these nanoparticles emitted fluorescence peaking at 540 and 597 nm, respectively, in solution. Fluorescence imaging revealed that these nanoparticles targeted the trace biomaterials from fingerprints that were deposited on various nonporous solid substrates. Highly ordered, microscopic sweat pores within the friction ridges of the fingerprints were labeled with good spatial resolutions by the nanoparticles on aluminum and polymethylpentene substrates, but not on glass or quartz. In solution, these nanoparticles exhibited multicomponent fluorescence decays of resolved lifetimes ranging from nano-to microseconds and of average lifetimes of ~24 and 130 micros for the coated LaF(3):Ce,Tb and ZnS:Mn, respectively. The long microsecond-decay components are associated with the emitters at or near the nanocrystal core surface that are sensitive to the size, surface-functionalization, and solvent exposure of the nanoparticles. When the nanoparticles were bound to the surface of a solid substrate and in the dried state, a decrease in the microsecond decay lifetimes was observed, indicative of a change in the coating environment of the nanocrystal surface upon binding and solvent removal. The average decay lifetimes for the surface-bound ZnS:Mn in the dried state were ~60, 30, and 11 micros on quartz, aluminum, and polymethylpentene, respectively. These values were still 2 orders of magnitude longer than the typical fluorescence decay background of most substrates (e.g., ~0.36 micros for polymethylpentene) in trace forensic evidence detections. We conclude that coated ZnS: Mn nanoparticles hold great promise as a nontoxic labeling agent for ultrasensitive, time-gated, trace evidence detections in nanoforensic

  15. Potential impacts of climate change on biogeochemical functioning of Cerrado ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, M M C; Nardoto, G B; Pinto, A S; Resende, J C F; Takahashi, F S C; Vieira, L C G

    2012-08-01

    The Cerrado Domain comprises one of the most diverse savannas in the world and is undergoing a rapid loss of habitats due to changes in fire regimes and intense conversion of native areas to agriculture. We reviewed data on the biogeochemical functioning of Cerrado ecosystems and evaluated the potential impacts of regional climate changes. Variation in temperature extremes and in total amount of rainfall and altitude throughout the Cerrado determines marked differences in the composition of species. Cerrado ecosystems are controlled by interactions between water and nutrient availability. In general, nutrient cycles (N, P and base cations) are very conservative, while litter, microbial and plant biomass are important stocks. In terms of C cycling, root systems and especially the soil organic matter are the most important stocks. Typical cerrado ecosystems function as C sinks on an annual basis, although they work as source of C to the atmosphere close to the end of the dry season. Fire is an important factor altering stocks and fluxes of C and nutrients. Predicted changes in temperature, amount and distribution of precipitation vary according to Cerrado sub-regions with more marked changes in the northeastern part of the domain. Higher temperatures, decreases in rainfall with increase in length of the dry season could shift net ecosystem exchanges from C sink to source of C and might intensify burning, reducing nutrient stocks. Interactions between the heterogeneity in the composition and abundance of biological communities throughout the Cerrado Domain and current and future changes in land use make it difficult to project the impacts of future climate scenarios at different temporal and spatial scales and new modeling approaches are needed.

  16. Identifying preperimetric functional loss in glaucoma: a blue-on-yellow multifocal visual evoked potentials study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvind, Hemamalini; Graham, Stuart; Leaney, John; Grigg, John; Goldberg, Ivan; Billson, Frank; Klistorner, Alexander

    2009-06-01

    To determine the ability of blue-on-yellow multifocal visual evoked potentials (BonY mfVEP) to identify functional loss in preperimetric glaucoma. Prospective case series. Thirty patients with glaucomatous optic discs and normal standard visual fields. All patients underwent BonY mfVEP, dilated optic disc stereophotography, and optical coherence tomography (Fast RNFL protocol). Optic disc photographs were assessed by 2 independent examiners in a masked fashion. The mfVEP amplitude asymmetry and latency values were analyzed and compared topographically with findings of disc assessment. Average retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, RNFL asymmetry, and sectors with RNFL thinning were compared between patients with and without mfVEP defects. Fourteen (46.7%) patients demonstrated significant abnormality on amplitude asymmetry deviation plots of BonY mfVEP. In all 14 cases, the defect was monocular and corresponded to the eye with the worse disc. In 13 of 14 patients, the defect also corresponded to the location of the worst affected rim. Average RNFL thickness of eyes with mfVEP defects was 81.2+/-9.9 microm, significantly lower than that of patients without defects (90+/-10.5 microm; P = 0.035). Mean asymmetry of RNFL (better minus worse eye) also was significantly higher for patients with mfVEP defects compared with those without such defects (9.0+/-6.4 microm vs. 3.0+/-7 microm; P = 0.03). Average latency of both eyes of glaucomatous patients was delayed compared with that of controls, with no difference in latency between worse and better eyes of glaucoma patients. There was no association of latency delay with either the location of disc changes or mfVEP amplitude defects. Amplitude asymmetry of the BonY mfVEP seems to be a promising tool to identify functional loss in preperimetric glaucoma. Proprietary or commercial disclosure may be found after the references.

  17. Potential impacts of climate change on biogeochemical functioning of Cerrado ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MMC Bustamante

    Full Text Available The Cerrado Domain comprises one of the most diverse savannas in the world and is undergoing a rapid loss of habitats due to changes in fire regimes and intense conversion of native areas to agriculture. We reviewed data on the biogeochemical functioning of Cerrado ecosystems and evaluated the potential impacts of regional climate changes. Variation in temperature extremes and in total amount of rainfall and altitude throughout the Cerrado determines marked differences in the composition of species. Cerrado ecosystems are controlled by interactions between water and nutrient availability. In general, nutrient cycles (N, P and base cations are very conservative, while litter, microbial and plant biomass are important stocks. In terms of C cycling, root systems and especially the soil organic matter are the most important stocks. Typical cerrado ecosystems function as C sinks on an annual basis, although they work as source of C to the atmosphere close to the end of the dry season. Fire is an important factor altering stocks and fluxes of C and nutrients. Predicted changes in temperature, amount and distribution of precipitation vary according to Cerrado sub-regions with more marked changes in the northeastern part of the domain. Higher temperatures, decreases in rainfall with increase in length of the dry season could shift net ecosystem exchanges from C sink to source of C and might intensify burning, reducing nutrient stocks. Interactions between the heterogeneity in the composition and abundance of biological communities throughout the Cerrado Domain and current and future changes in land use make it difficult to project the impacts of future climate scenarios at different temporal and spatial scales and new modeling approaches are needed.

  18. Potential contribution of SIM2 and ETS2 functional polymorphisms in Down syndrome associated malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Arpita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper expression and functioning of transcription factors (TFs are essential for regulation of different traits and thus could be crucial for the development of complex diseases. Subjects with Down syndrome (DS have a higher incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL while solid tumors, like breast cancer (BC and oral cancer (OC, show rare incidences. Triplication of the human chromosome 21 in DS is associated with altered genetic dosage of different TFs. V-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2 and Single Minded 2 (SIM2 are two such TFs that regulate several downstream genes involved in developmental and neurological pathways. Here we studied functional genetic polymorphisms (fSNP in ETS2 and SIM2 encoding genes in a group of patients and control subjects to better understand association of these variants with DS phenotypes. Methods We employed an in silico approach to identify potential target pathways of ETS2 and SIM2. fSNPs in genes encoding for these two TFs were identified using available databases. Selected sites were genotyped in individuals with DS, their parents, ALL, BC, OC as well as ethnically matched control individuals. We further analyzed these data by population-based statistical methods. Results Allelic/genotypic association analysis showed significant (P  Conclusions We infer from the present investigation that the difference in frequencies of fSNPs and their independent as well as interactive effects may be the cause for altered expression of SIM2 and ETS2 in DS and malignant groups, which affects different downstream biological pathways. Thus, altered expression of SIM2 and ETS2 could be one of the reasons for variable occurrence of different malignant conditions in DS.

  19. Quantification and Potential Functions of Endogenous Agonists of Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenac, Nicolas; Bautzova, Tereza; Le Faouder, Pauline; Veldhuis, Nicholas A; Poole, Daniel P; Rolland, Corinne; Bertrand, Jessica; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Dubourdeau, Marc; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Zecchi, Lisa; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Bunnett, Nigel W; Barbara, Giovanni; Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    In mice, activation of the transient receptor potential cation channels (TRP) TRPV1, TRPV4, and TRPA1 causes visceral hypersensitivity. These receptors and their agonists might be involved in development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) metabolites, which activate TRPs, are present in colon tissues from patients with IBS and act as endogenous agonists to induce hypersensitivity. We analyzed colon biopsy samples from 40 patients with IBS (IBS biopsies) and 11 healthy individuals undergoing colorectal cancer screening (controls), collected during colonoscopy at the University of Bologna, Italy. Levels of the PUFA metabolites that activate TRPV1 (12-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene B4), TRPV4 (5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid [EET] and 8,9-EET), and TRPA1 (PGA1, 8-iso-prostaglandin A2, and 15-deoxy-Δ-prostaglandin J2) were measured in biopsies and their supernatants using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; we also measured levels of the PUFA metabolites prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and resolvins. C57Bl6 mice were given intrathecal injections of small interfering RNAs to reduce levels of TRPV4, or control small interfering RNAs, along with colonic injections of biopsy supernatants; visceral hypersensitivity was measured based on response to colorectal distension. Mouse sensory neurons were cultured and incubated with biopsy supernatants and lipids extracted from biopsies or colons of mice. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect TRPV4 in human dorsal root ganglia samples (from the National Disease Research Interchange). Levels of the TRPV4 agonist 5,6-EET, but not levels of TRPV1 or TRPA1 agonists, were increased in IBS biopsies compared with controls; increases correlated with pain and bloating scores. Supernatants from IBS biopsies, but not from controls, induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice. Small interfering RNA

  20. dPotFit: A computer program to fit diatomic molecule spectral data to potential energy functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes program dPotFit, which performs least-squares fits of diatomic molecule spectroscopic data consisting of any combination of microwave, infrared or electronic vibrational bands, fluorescence series, and tunneling predissociation level widths, involving one or more electronic states and one or more isotopologs, and for appropriate systems, second virial coefficient data, to determine analytic potential energy functions defining the observed levels and other properties of each state. Four families of analytical potential functions are available for fitting in the current version of dPotFit: the Expanded Morse Oscillator (EMO) function, the Morse/Long-Range (MLR) function, the Double-Exponential/Long-Range (DELR) function, and the 'Generalized Potential Energy Function' (GPEF) of Šurkus, which incorporates a variety of polynomial functional forms. In addition, dPotFit allows sets of experimental data to be tested against predictions generated from three other families of analytic functions, namely, the 'Hannover Polynomial' (or "X-expansion") function, and the 'Tang-Toennies' and Scoles-Aziz 'HFD', exponential-plus-van der Waals functions, and from interpolation-smoothed pointwise potential energies, such as those obtained from ab initio or RKR calculations. dPotFit also allows the fits to determine atomic-mass-dependent Born-Oppenheimer breakdown functions, and singlet-state Λ-doubling, or 2Σ splitting radial strength functions for one or more electronic states. dPotFit always reports both the 95% confidence limit uncertainty and the "sensitivity" of each fitted parameter; the latter indicates the number of significant digits that must be retained when rounding fitted parameters, in order to ensure that predictions remain in full agreement with experiment. It will also, if requested, apply a "sequential rounding and refitting" procedure to yield a final parameter set defined by a minimum number of significant digits, while ensuring no

  1. Facile Synthesis of Gd-Functionalized Gold Nanoclusters as Potential MRI/CT Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Le

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal imaging plays a key role in the earlier detection of disease. In this work, a facile bioinspired method was developed to synthesize Gd-functionalized gold nanoclusters (Gd-Au NCs. The Gd-Au NCs exhibit a uniform size, with an average size of 5.6 nm in dynamic light scattering (DLS, which is a bit bigger than gold clusters (3.74 nm, DLS, while the fluorescent properties of Gd-Au NCs are almost the same as that of Au NCs. Moreover, the Gd-Au NCs exhibit a high longitudinal relaxivity value (r1 of 22.111 s−1 per mM of Gd in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, which is six times higher than that of commercial Magnevist (A complex of gadolinium with a chelating agent, diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid, Gd-DTPA, r1 = 3.56 mM−1·s−1. Besides, as evaluated by nano single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and computed tomography (CT the Gd-Au NCs have a potential application as CT contrast agents because of the Au element. Finally, the Gd-Au NCs show little cytotoxicity, even when the Au concentration is up to 250 μM. Thus, the Gd-Au NCs can act as multi-modal imaging contrast agents.

  2. Symmetric linear potential and imperfect Brownian ratchet in molecular motor function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fang-Zhen; Hu Kuang-Hu; Su Wan-Fang; Chen Yi-Chen

    2005-01-01

    Biomolecular motors are tiny engines that transport materials at the microscopic level within biological cells. In recent years, Elston and Peskin et al have investigated the effect of the elastic properties of the tether that connects the motor to its cargo at the speed of the motor. In this paper we extend their work and present a tether in the form of symmetric linear potential. Our results show that when the driving mechanism is an imperfect Brownian ratchet, the average speed decreases as the stiffness of the tether increases in the limit of large motor diffusion coefficient, which is similar to the results of Elston and Peskin. However, a threshold for the stiffness of the tether connecting the motor to its cargo is found in our model. Only when the tether is stiffer than the threshold can the motor and its cargo function co-operatively, otherwise, the motor and its cargo depart from each other. This result is more realistic than that of the spring model of Elston and Peskin.

  3. Exploring brainstem function in multiple sclerosis by combining brainstem reflexes, evoked potentials, clinical and MRI investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnano, Immacolata; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Pilurzi, Giovanna; Cabboi, Maria Paola; Ginatempo, Francesca; Giaconi, Elena; Tolu, Eusebio; Achene, Antonio; Salis, Antonio; Rothwell, John C; Conti, Maurizio; Deriu, Franca

    2014-11-01

    To investigate vestibulo-masseteric (VMR), acoustic-masseteric (AMR), vestibulo-collic (VCR) and trigemino-collic (TCR) reflexes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); to relate abnormalities of brainstem reflexes (BSRs) to multimodal evoked potentials (EPs), clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings. Click-evoked VMR, AMR and VCR were recorded from active masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles, respectively; TCR was recorded from active sternocleidomastoid muscles, following electrical stimulation of the infraorbital nerve. EPs and MRI were performed with standard techniques. Frequencies of abnormal BSRs were: VMR 62.1%, AMR 55.1%, VCR 25.9%, TCR 58.6%. Brainstem dysfunction was identified by these tests, combined into a four-reflex battery, in 86.9% of cases, by EPs in 82.7%, MRI in 71.7% and clinical examination in 37.7% of cases. The sensitivity of paired BSRs/EPs (93.3%) was significantly higher than combined MRI/clinical testing (70%) in patients with disease duration ⩽6.4years. BSR alterations significantly correlated with clinical, EP and MRI findings. The four-BSR battery effectively increases the performance of standard EPs in early detection of brainstem impairment, otherwise undetected by clinical examination and neuroimaging. Multiple BSR assessment usefully supplements conventional testing and monitoring of brainstem function in MS, especially in newly diagnosed patients. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential applications of low-energy shock waves in functional urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hung-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2017-08-01

    A shock wave, which carries energy and can propagate through a medium, is a type of continuous transmitted sonic wave with a frequency of 16 Hz-20 MHz. It is accompanied by processes involving rapid energy transformations. The energy associated with shock waves has been harnessed and used for various applications in medical science. High-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy is the most successful application of shock waves, and has been used to disintegrate urolithiasis for 30 years. At lower energy levels, however, shock waves have enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, chemoattractant factors and recruitment of progenitor cells; shock waves have also improved tissue regeneration. Low-energy shock wave therapy has been used clinically with musculoskeletal disorders, ischemic cardiovascular disorders and erectile dysfunction, through the mechanisms of neovascularization, anti-inflammation and tissue regeneration. Furthermore, low-energy shock waves have been proposed to temporarily increase tissue permeability and facilitate intravesical drug delivery. The present review article provides information on the basics of shock wave physics, mechanisms of action on the biological system and potential applications in functional urology. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  5. Urinary Extracellular Vesicles: Potential Biomarkers of Renal Function in Diabetic Patients

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    Agnieszka Kamińska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to check the relationship between the density of urinary EVs, their size distribution, and the progress of early renal damage in type 2 diabetic patients (DMt2. Patients were enrolled to this study, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c below 7% was a threshold for properly controlled diabetic patients (CD and poorly controlled diabetic patients (UD. Patients were further divided into two groups: diabetic patients without renal failure (NRF and with renal failure (RF according to the Glomerular Filtration Rate. Density and diameter of EVs were determined by Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing. Additionally, EVs were visualized by means of Transmission and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy. Nano-liquid chromatography coupled offline with mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS/MS was applied for proteomic analysis. RF had reduced density of EVs compared to NRF. The size distribution study showed that CD had larger EVs (mode than UD (115 versus 109 nm; p<0.05; nevertheless the mean EVs diameter was smaller in controls than in the CD group (123 versus 134 nm; p<0.05. It was demonstrated that EVs are abundant in urine. Albumin, uromodulin, and number of unique proteins related to cell stress and secretion were detected in the EVs fraction. Density and size of urinary EVs reflect deteriorated renal function and can be considered as potential renal damage biomarkers.

  6. Red mold dioscorea: a potentially safe traditional function food for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Li; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2012-09-15

    A study was undertaken to evaluate whether the interaction between Monascus-fermented products and lovastatin contributes to increased risk of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis is a potentially dangerous side effect of statin drugs. In this study with hyperlipidemic hamsters fed lovastatin only, lovastatin with 1-fold red mold dioscorea (RMD), and lovastatin, the functional components of red mold fermented products, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, did not exacerbate pre-existing diseases, and actually helped in improving existing disease conditions, respectively, as compared with the control. Administration of RMD, alone or in combination with lovastatin did not cause significant rhabdomyolysis as assessed by measuring the levels of creatinine phosphokinase. Further, we did not find any study that clearly implicates the involvement of RMD, which have long been considered a food product, in liver and kidney toxicity. RMD alone or in combination with lovastatin, does not increase the risk of rhabdomyolysis, even when administered at a high dosage (including HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors >75 mg/day/adult).

  7. Lactic acid bacteria producing B-group vitamins: a great potential for functional cereals products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Russo, Pasquale; Dueñas, María Teresa; López, Paloma; Spano, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Wheat contains various essential nutrients including the B group of vitamins. However, B group vitamins, normally present in cereals-derived products, are easily removed or destroyed during milling, food processing or cooking. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as starter cultures for the fermentation of a large variety of foods and can improve the safety, shelf life, nutritional value, flavor and overall quality of the fermented products. In this regard, the identification and application of strains delivering health-promoting compounds is a fascinating field. Besides their key role in food fermentations, several LAB found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals are commercially used as probiotics and possess generally recognized as safe status. LAB are usually auxotrophic for several vitamins although certain strains of LAB have the capability to synthesize water-soluble vitamins such as those included in the B group. In recent years, a number of biotechnological processes have been explored to perform a more economical and sustainable vitamin production than that obtained via chemical synthesis. This review article will briefly report the current knowledge on lactic acid bacteria synthesis of vitamins B2, B11 and B12 and the potential strategies to increase B-group vitamin content in cereals-based products, where vitamins-producing LAB have been leading to the elaboration of novel fermented functional foods. In addition, the use of genetic strategies to increase vitamin production or to create novel vitamin-producing strains will be also discussed.

  8. Urinary Extracellular Vesicles: Potential Biomarkers of Renal Function in Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Mark; Kasprzyk, Joanna; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Woźnicka, Olga; Jany, Benedykt R.; Krok, Franciszek; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Kuźniewski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to check the relationship between the density of urinary EVs, their size distribution, and the progress of early renal damage in type 2 diabetic patients (DMt2). Patients were enrolled to this study, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) below 7% was a threshold for properly controlled diabetic patients (CD) and poorly controlled diabetic patients (UD). Patients were further divided into two groups: diabetic patients without renal failure (NRF) and with renal failure (RF) according to the Glomerular Filtration Rate. Density and diameter of EVs were determined by Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing. Additionally, EVs were visualized by means of Transmission and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy. Nano-liquid chromatography coupled offline with mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS/MS) was applied for proteomic analysis. RF had reduced density of EVs compared to NRF. The size distribution study showed that CD had larger EVs (mode) than UD (115 versus 109 nm; p < 0.05); nevertheless the mean EVs diameter was smaller in controls than in the CD group (123 versus 134 nm; p < 0.05). It was demonstrated that EVs are abundant in urine. Albumin, uromodulin, and number of unique proteins related to cell stress and secretion were detected in the EVs fraction. Density and size of urinary EVs reflect deteriorated renal function and can be considered as potential renal damage biomarkers. PMID:28105442

  9. Tibial somatosensory evoked potential can prognosticate for ambulatory function in subacute hemiplegic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Pyoungsik; Sohn, Min Kyun; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Jee, Sungju

    2016-04-01

    Early prediction of expected recovery in stroke can help in planning appropriate medical and rehabilitation interventions. Recovery of ambulation is one of the essential endpoints in stroke rehabilitation. However, the correlation of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) with clinical parameters and their predictive significance are not clearly defined. We aimed to examine the association between tibial nerve SSEP and ambulatory outcomes in subacute hemiplegic stroke patients. We reviewed medical records for hemiplegic patients with first-ever stroke who received inpatient rehabilitation from January 2009 to May 2013. We excluded patients with diabetes mellitus, quadriplegia, bilateral lesions, brainstem lesions, those aged over 80 years, and those with severe musculoskeletal problems. Tibial nerve SSEP were performed when they were transferred to the rehabilitation department. SSEP findings were divided into three groups; normal, abnormal and absent response. Berg balance scale and functional ambulation category (FAC) at discharge were compared with initial tibial SSEP findings using one-way analysis of variance. Thirty-one hemiplegic patients were included. Berg balance scale and FAC were significantly different according to the SSEP (Phemiplegic patients.

  10. General theory for calculating disorder-averaged Green's function correlators within the coherent potential approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chenyi; Guo, Hong

    2017-01-01

    We report a diagrammatic method to solve the general problem of calculating configurationally averaged Green's function correlators that appear in quantum transport theory for nanostructures containing disorder. The theory treats both equilibrium and nonequilibrium quantum statistics on an equal footing. Since random impurity scattering is a problem that cannot be solved exactly in a perturbative approach, we combine our diagrammatic method with the coherent potential approximation (CPA) so that a reliable closed-form solution can be obtained. Our theory not only ensures the internal consistency of the diagrams derived at different levels of the correlators but also satisfies a set of Ward-like identities that corroborate the conserving consistency of transport calculations within the formalism. The theory is applied to calculate the quantum transport properties such as average ac conductance and transmission moments of a disordered tight-binding model, and results are numerically verified to high precision by comparing to the exact solutions obtained from enumerating all possible disorder configurations. Our formalism can be employed to predict transport properties of a wide variety of physical systems where disorder scattering is important.

  11. Review: Eicosanoids in preterm labor and delivery: Potential roles of exosomes in eicosanoid functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, H N; Vaswani, K; Almughlliq, F; Koh, Y Q; Mitchell, M D

    2016-12-09

    Preterm delivery is a major obstetric health problem contributing to poor neonatal outcome including low birth weight, respiratory distress syndrome, gastrointestinal, immunologic, central nervous system, hearing, and vision problems. Worldwide, approximately 15 million babies are born prematurely each year. The critical question which remains is how to identify women destined to deliver preterm from those who will achieve a term delivery. Prostaglandins, in all mammals are important in the parturient process. Increased intrauterine prostaglandin production is associated with labor and in fact prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or analogs are widely used clinically for cervical ripening and labor induction. Measurements of circulating eicosanoids have been problematic because of the rapid and major clearance by the lungs and then kidneys resulting in very low concentrations in plasma. Moreover, since eicosanoids are produced by all mammalian tissues, the sources of the measured eicosanoids are unknown. Our understanding of how cells communicate has undergone a paradigm shift with the recognition of the role of exosomes in intercellular signaling. Recent publications have identified enzymes and products of arachidonic acid metabolism (eicosanoids) within exosomes. This review will explore the potential roles of exosomes in eicosanoid functions that are critical in preterm labor and delivery.

  12. Exploitation of the nutritional and functional characteristics of traditional Italian legumes: the potential of sourdough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, José Antonio; Coda, Rossana; Centomani, Isabella; Summo, Carmine; Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2015-03-02

    This study aimed at evaluating the composition of nineteen traditional Italian legumes and at investigating the potential of the sourdough fermentation with selected lactic acid bacteria to improve the nutritional and functional features. Traditional Italian legumes, all with product certifications and belonging to Phaseolus vulgaris, Cicer arietinum, Lathyrus sativus, Lens culinaris and Pisum sativum species, were used in this study. Seeds were milled, and flours were analyzed for proximate composition and subjected to sourdough fermentation at 30°C for 24h. Lactobacillus plantarum C48 and Lactobacillus brevis AM7 were used as selected starters. Compared to control doughs, without bacterial inoculum, the concentrations of free amino acids (FAA), soluble fibres, and total phenols increased for all legume sourdoughs. Raffinose decreased of up to ca. 64%. During sourdough fermentation, the level of GABA markedly increased and reached values up to 624mg/kg. Condensed tannins decreased. At the same time, almost all legume sourdoughs showed increases of the antioxidant and phytase activities. As shown by PCA analysis based on data of total FAA, GABA, raffinose, soluble/insoluble dietary fibre, condensed tannins and antioxidant and phytase activities, all legume sourdoughs were clearly differentiated from control doughs. The traditional Italian legumes are bio-diverse, and all showed high levels of nutritional elements and suitability for optimal sourdough fermentation. Legume flours subjected to sourdough fermentation would be suitable to be used alone or better in mixture with cereals, and as gluten-free ingredients for making novel and healthy foods.

  13. Electrospun functionalized polyaniline copolymer-based nanofibers with potential application in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizdavic-Nikolaidis, Marija; Ray, Sudip; Bennett, Jared R; Easteal, Allan J; Cooney, Ralph P

    2010-12-08

    Nanofibrous blends of HCl-doped poly(aniline-co-3-aminobenzoic acid) (3ABAPANI) copolymer and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were fabricated by electrospinning solutions of the polymers, in varying relative proportions, in dimethyl sulfoxide/tetrahydrofuran mixture. The morphology, mechanical and electrical properties of the nanofibers were characterized and an assessment of their bioactivity performed. To assess cell morphology and biocompatibility, pure PLA and 3ABAPANI-PLA nanofibrous mats were deposited in the form of three-dimensional networks with a high degree of connectivity, on glass substrates, and their ability to promote proliferation of COS-1 fibroblast cells was determined. The nanofibrous electrospun 3ABAPANI-PLA blends gave enhanced cell growth, potent antimicrobial capability against Staphylococcus aureus and electrical conductivity. This new class of nanofibrous blends can potentially be employed as tissue engineering scaffolds, and in particular have showed promise as the basis of a new generation of functional wound dressings that may eliminate deficiencies of currently available antimicrobial dressings.

  14. The immune system of the gut and potential adverse effects of oral nanocarriers on its function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Őrfi, Erik; Szebeni, János

    2016-11-15

    There is substantial effort in modern pharmacotherapy to use nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems (nDDS) for improving the oral absorption of drugs. An often neglected circumstance regarding this approach is that the gut is a major part of the immune system that may be vulnerable for immune-cell toxicity, or mediate humoral immune response against various components of nDDS, recognized as foreign. This review recapitulates the structure and function of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), i.e., the enteral section of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and reminds how virus-like nDDS may potentially induce immunogenicity just as attenuated or killed viruses do in oral vaccines. Furthermore, we present examples for immune toxicities of emulsifiers and polymer-containing micelles, manifested in complement activation-related pseudoallergy (CARPA). A major message of the review is that early testing of immunogenicity or other adverse immune effects of nDDS in appropriate test systems or models may be prudent to recognize the risk of rare immune problems that may surface in late-stage clinical trials or after marketing of nDDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome-wide expression analysis of soybean MADS genes showing potential function in the seed development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ming Fan

    Full Text Available The MADS family is an ancient and best-studied transcription factor and plays fundamental roles in almost every developmental process in plants. In the plant evolutionary history, the whole genome duplication (WGD events are important not only to the plant species evolution, but to expansion of members of the gene families. Soybean as a model legume crop has experience three rounds of WGD events. Members of some MIKC(C subfamilies, such as SOC, AGL6, SQUA, SVP, AGL17 and DEF/GLO, were expanded after soybean three rounds of WGD events. And some MIKC(C subfamilies, MIKC* and type I MADS families had experienced faster birth-and-death evolution and their traces before the Glycine WGD event were not found. Transposed duplication played important roles in tandem arrangements among the members of different subfamilies. According to the expression profiles of type I and MIKC paralog pair genes, the fates of MIKC paralog gene pairs were subfunctionalization, and the fates of type I MADS paralog gene pairs were nonfunctionalization. 137 out of 163 MADS genes were close to 186 loci within 2 Mb genomic regions associated with seed-relative QTLs, among which 115 genes expressed during the seed development. Although MIKC(C genes kept the important and conserved functions of the flower development, most MIKC(C genes showed potentially essential roles in the seed development as well as the type I MADS.

  16. Vibrational energies and full analytic potential energy functions of PbI and InI from pure microwave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Ho; Köckert, Hansjochen; Mullaney, John C.; Stephens, Susanna L.; Evans, Corey J.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Le Roy, Robert. J.

    2016-12-01

    Pure rotational spectra of PbI and InI are interpreted to yield a full analytic potential energy function for each molecule. Rotational spectra for PbI have been retrieved from literature sources to perform the analysis. Rotational transition frequencies for excited vibrational states of InI (0 program, dPOTFIT. The well-depth parameter, De , is fixed at a literature value, while values of the equilibrium distance re and EMO exponent-coefficient expansion (potential-shape) parameters are determined from the fits. Comparison with potential functions determined after including older mid-IR and visible electronic transition data shows that our analysis of the pure microwave data alone yields potential energy functions that accurately predict (to better than 1%) the overtone vibrational energies far beyond the range spanned by the levels for which the microwave data is available.

  17. Reference potential approach to the quantum-mechanical inverse problem: I. Calculation of phase shift and Jost function

    CERN Document Server

    Selg, M

    2005-01-01

    Elegant and mathematically rigorous methods of the quantum inverse theory are difficult to put into practice because there is always some lack of needful input information. In this situation, one may try to construct a reference potential, whose spectral characteristics would be in a reasonable agreement with the available data of the system's properties. Since the reference potential is fixed, it is always possible to calculate all its spectral characteristics, including phase shift for scattering states and Jost function, the main key to solve the inverse problem. Thereafter, one can calculate a Bargmann potential whose Jost function differs from the initial one only by a rational factor. This way it is possible, at least in principle, to construct a more reliable potential for the system. The model system investigated in this paper is diatomic xenon molecule in ground electronic state. Its reference potential is built up of several smoothly joined Morse type components, which enables to solve the related e...

  18. Gastric potential difference measurements. The gastric mucosal integrity and function studied with a new method for measurement of the electric potential difference across the stomach wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L

    1991-01-01

    be reduced by allopurinol pretreatment, possibly due to the inhibition of oxygen-derived free radical formation. Gastric PD and pH were measured in volunteers and duodenal ulcer patients during Stroop's color word conflict test, in which mental stress causes sympathetic activation. A PD reduction and a p......H increase were found along with stress induction, thereby indicating an influence of mental stress on stomach mucosal function. It is concluded that gastric PD measurement may be useful in ulcer pathogenetic research, and a sufficient gastric mucosal blood flow is stressed as being important for the mucosal......PD--the electric potential difference across the gastric mucosa--is a variable used to describe the gastric mucosal integrity and function. A new, reliable, and easily applied method for gastric PD measurements corrected for the disturbing liquid junction potentials between gastric juice and the PD...

  19. Ocean acidification at high latitudes: potential effects on functioning of the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vonda Cummings

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is a well recognised threat to marine ecosystems. High latitude regions are predicted to be particularly affected due to cold waters and naturally low carbonate saturation levels. This is of concern for organisms utilising calcium carbonate (CaCO(3 to generate shells or skeletons. Studies of potential effects of future levels of pCO(2 on high latitude calcifiers are at present limited, and there is little understanding of their potential to acclimate to these changes. We describe a laboratory experiment to compare physiological and metabolic responses of a key benthic bivalve, Laternula elliptica, at pCO(2 levels of their natural environment (430 µatm, pH 7.99; based on field measurements with those predicted for 2100 (735 µatm, pH 7.78 and glacial levels (187 µatm, pH 8.32. Adult L. elliptica basal metabolism (oxygen consumption rates and heat shock protein HSP70 gene expression levels increased in response both to lowering and elevation of pH. Expression of chitin synthase (CHS, a key enzyme involved in synthesis of bivalve shells, was significantly up-regulated in individuals at pH 7.78, indicating L. elliptica were working harder to calcify in seawater undersaturated in aragonite (Ω(Ar = 0.71, the CaCO(3 polymorph of which their shells are comprised. The different response variables were influenced by pH in differing ways, highlighting the importance of assessing a variety of factors to determine the likely impact of pH change. In combination, the results indicate a negative effect of ocean acidification on whole-organism functioning of L. elliptica over relatively short terms (weeks-months that may be energetically difficult to maintain over longer time periods. Importantly, however, the observed changes in L. elliptica CHS gene expression provides evidence for biological control over the shell formation process, which may enable some degree of adaptation or acclimation to future ocean acidification scenarios.

  20. Characterization of human pseudogene-derived non-coding RNAs for functional potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyi Guo

    Full Text Available Thousands of pseudogenes exist in the human genome and many are transcribed, but their functional potential remains elusive and understudied. To explore these issues systematically, we first developed a computational pipeline to identify transcribed pseudogenes from RNA-Seq data. Applying the pipeline to datasets from 16 distinct normal human tissues identified ∼ 3,000 pseudogenes that could produce non-coding RNAs in a manner of low abundance but high tissue specificity under normal physiological conditions. Cross-tissue comparison revealed that the transcriptional profiles of pseudogenes and their parent genes showed mostly positive correlations, suggesting that pseudogene transcription could have a positive effect on the expression of their parent genes, perhaps by functioning as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs, as previously suggested and demonstrated with the PTEN pseudogene, PTENP1. Our analysis of the ENCODE project data also found many transcriptionally active pseudogenes in the GM12878 and K562 cell lines; moreover, it showed that many human pseudogenes produced small RNAs (sRNAs and some pseudogene-derived sRNAs, especially those from antisense strands, exhibited evidence of interfering with gene expression. Further integrated analysis of transcriptomics and epigenomics data, however, demonstrated that trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me3, a posttranslational modification typically associated with gene repression and heterochromatin, was enriched at many transcribed pseudogenes in a transcription-level dependent manner in the two cell lines. The H3K9me3 enrichment was more prominent in pseudogenes that produced sRNAs at pseudogene loci and their adjacent regions, an observation further supported by the co-enrichment of SETDB1 (a H3K9 methyltransferase, suggesting that pseudogene sRNAs may have a role in regional chromatin repression. Taken together, our comprehensive and systematic characterization of pseudogene

  1. Functional Connectivity Changes in Resting-State EEG as Potential Biomarker for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameswaran Mahadeva Iyer

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is heterogeneous and overlaps with frontotemporal dementia. Spectral EEG can predict damage in structural and functional networks in frontotemporal dementia but has never been applied to ALS.18 incident ALS patients with normal cognition and 17 age matched controls underwent 128 channel EEG and neuropsychology assessment. The EEG data was analyzed using FieldTrip software in MATLAB to calculate simple connectivity measures and scalp network measures. sLORETA was used in nodal analysis for source localization and same methods were applied as above to calculate nodal network measures. Graph theory measures were used to assess network integrity.Cross spectral density in alpha band was higher in patients. In ALS patients, increased degree values of the network nodes was noted in the central and frontal regions in the theta band across seven of the different connectivity maps (p<0.0005. Among patients, clustering coefficient in alpha and gamma bands was increased in all regions of the scalp and connectivity were significantly increased (p=0.02. Nodal network showed increased assortativity in alpha band in the patients group. The Clustering Coefficient in Partial Directed Connectivity (PDC showed significantly higher values for patients in alpha, beta, gamma, theta and delta frequencies (p=0.05.There is increased connectivity in the fronto-central regions of the scalp and areas corresponding to Salience and Default Mode network in ALS, suggesting a pathologic disruption of neuronal networking in early disease states. Spectral EEG has potential utility as a biomarker in ALS.

  2. Functional Connectivity Changes in Resting-State EEG as Potential Biomarker for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Parameswaran Mahadeva; Egan, Catriona; Pinto-Grau, Marta; Burke, Tom; Elamin, Marwa; Nasseroleslami, Bahman; Pender, Niall; Lalor, Edmund C.; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is heterogeneous and overlaps with frontotemporal dementia. Spectral EEG can predict damage in structural and functional networks in frontotemporal dementia but has never been applied to ALS. Methods 18 incident ALS patients with normal cognition and 17 age matched controls underwent 128 channel EEG and neuropsychology assessment. The EEG data was analyzed using FieldTrip software in MATLAB to calculate simple connectivity measures and scalp network measures. sLORETA was used in nodal analysis for source localization and same methods were applied as above to calculate nodal network measures. Graph theory measures were used to assess network integrity. Results Cross spectral density in alpha band was higher in patients. In ALS patients, increased degree values of the network nodes was noted in the central and frontal regions in the theta band across seven of the different connectivity maps (p<0.0005). Among patients, clustering coefficient in alpha and gamma bands was increased in all regions of the scalp and connectivity were significantly increased (p=0.02). Nodal network showed increased assortativity in alpha band in the patients group. The Clustering Coefficient in Partial Directed Connectivity (PDC) showed significantly higher values for patients in alpha, beta, gamma, theta and delta frequencies (p=0.05). Discussion There is increased connectivity in the fronto-central regions of the scalp and areas corresponding to Salience and Default Mode network in ALS, suggesting a pathologic disruption of neuronal networking in early disease states. Spectral EEG has potential utility as a biomarker in ALS. PMID:26091258

  3. Saccular function in otosclerosis patients: bone conducted-vestibular evoked myogenic potential analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Amali

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular involvements have long been observed in otosclerotic patients. Among vestibular structures saccule has the closest anatomical proximity to the sclerotic foci, so it is the most prone vestibular structure to be affected during the otosclerosis process. The aim of this study was to investigate the saccular function in patients suffering from otosclerosis, by means of Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP. The material consisted of 30 otosclerosis patients and 20 control subjects. All participants underwent audiometric and VEMP testing. Analysis of tests results revealed that the mean values of Air-Conducted Pure Tone Average (AC-PTA and Bone-Conducted Pure Tone Average (BC-PTA in patients were 45.28 ± 15.57 and 19.68 ± 10.91, respectively and calculated 4 frequencies Air Bone Gap (ABG was 25.64 ± 9.95. The VEMP response was absent in 14 (28.57% otosclerotic ears. A statistically significant increase in latency of the p13 was found in the affected ears (P=0.004, differences in n23 latency did not reach a statistically significant level (P=0.112. Disparities in amplitude of p13-n23 in between two study groups was statistically meaningful (P=0.009, indicating that the patients with otosclerosis had lower amplitudes. This study tends to suggest that due to the direct biotoxic effect of the materials released from the otosclerosis foci on saccular receptors, there might be a possibility of vestibular dysfunction in otosclerotic patients.

  4. Cysteine-functionalized silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles as potential nanoadsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Daniela F.; Vasile, Eugenia; Simonescu, Claudia M.; Răzvan, Anca; Nicolescu, Alina; Nechifor, Aurelia-Cristina; Oprea, Ovidiu; Pătescu, Rodica-Elena; Onose, Cristian; Dumitru, Florina

    2017-09-01

    Fe3O4, Fe3O4@SiO2, and Fe3O4@SiO2@ICPTES-cysteine MNPs have been prepared by the deposition of silica onto magnetite nanoparticles via controlled hydrolysis of TEOS. The new formed silica surface has been functionalized by grafting 3-(triethoxysilyl) propyl isocyanate (ICPTES) and, subsequently, by condensation of isocyanate moiety with cysteine. The morphology of magnetic silica nanoparticles has been investigated by FTIR, PXRD, TEM-HRTEM/SEM/EDX as well as TG experiments. HRTEM microscopy revealed that the Fe3O4, Fe3O4@SiO2 and Fe3O4@SiO2@ICPTES-cysteine nanoparticles are all of spherical shape with particle of ca. 10-30 nm diameters and the silica-coated magnetites have a core-shell structure. Fe3O4, Fe3O4@SiO2, and Fe3O4@SiO2@ICPTES-cysteine MNPs have been tested for their sorption capacity of Pb(II) from synthetic aqueous solutions and the influence of pH solution, contact time, initial heavy metal ion concentrations, and adsorption isotherms on the sorption behavior were also studied. The kinetic studies revealed that the Pb(II) sorption process is mainly controlled by chemical mechanisms. Fe3O4@SiO2@ICPTES-cysteine, with a sorption capacity of 81.8 mg Pb(II)/g, has the potential to be an efficient Pb(II) adsorbent.

  5. Potential of satellite-derived ecosystem functional attributes to anticipate species range shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Segura, Domingo; Lomba, Angela; Sousa-Silva, Rita; Nieto-Lugilde, Diego; Alves, Paulo; Georges, Damien; Vicente, Joana R.; Honrado, João P.

    2017-05-01

    In a world facing rapid environmental changes, anticipating their impacts on biodiversity is of utmost relevance. Remotely-sensed Ecosystem Functional Attributes (EFAs) are promising predictors for Species Distribution Models (SDMs) by offering an early and integrative response of vegetation performance to environmental drivers. Species of high conservation concern would benefit the most from a better ability to anticipate changes in habitat suitability. Here we illustrate how yearly projections from SDMs based on EFAs could reveal short-term changes in potential habitat suitability, anticipating mid-term shifts predicted by climate-change-scenario models. We fitted two sets of SDMs for 41 plant species of conservation concern in the Iberian Peninsula: one calibrated with climate variables for baseline conditions and projected under two climate-change-scenarios (future conditions); and the other calibrated with EFAs for 2001 and projected annually from 2001 to 2013. Range shifts predicted by climate-based models for future conditions were compared to the 2001-2013 trends from EFAs-based models. Projections of EFAs-based models estimated changes (mostly contractions) in habitat suitability that anticipated, for the majority (up to 64%) of species, the mid-term shifts projected by traditional climate-change-scenario forecasting, and showed greater agreement with the business-as-usual scenario than with the sustainable-development one. This study shows how satellite-derived EFAs can be used as meaningful essential biodiversity variables in SDMs to provide early-warnings of range shifts and predictions of short-term fluctuations in suitable conditions for multiple species.

  6. Multimodal evoked potentials for functional quantification and prognosis in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffroy, Xavier; Maes, Nathalie; Albert, Adelin; Maquet, Pierre; Crielaard, Jean-Michel; Dive, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    Functional biomarkers able to identify multiple sclerosis (MS) patients at high risk of fast disability progression are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of multimodal (upper and lower limbs motor, visual, lower limbs somatosensory) evoked potentials (EP) to monitor disease course and identify patients exposed to unfavourable evolution. One hundred MS patients were assessed with visual, somatosensory and motor EP and rated on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) at baseline (T0) and about 6 years later (T1). The Spearman correlation (rS) was used to evaluate the relationship between conventional EP scores and clinical findings. Multiple (logistic) regression analysis estimated the predictive value of baseline electrophysiological data for three clinical outcomes: EDSS, annual EDSS progression, and the risk of EDSS worsening. In contrast to longitudinal correlations, cross-sectional correlations between the different EP scores and EDSS were all significant (0.33 ≤ rS EDSS were highly significant predictors (p EDSS progression 6 years later. The baseline global EP score was found to be an independent predictor of the EDSS annual progression rate (p < 0.001), and of the risk of disability progression over time (p < 0.005). Based on a ROC curve determination, we defined a Global EP Score cut off point (17/30) to identify patients at high risk of disability progression illustrated by a positive predictive value of 70%. This study provides a proof of the concept that electrophysiology could be added to MRI and used as another complementary prognostic tool in MS patients.

  7. Potential Abiotic Functions of Root Exudates in Rhizosphere Cycling of Soil Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; Keiluweit, M.; Bougoure, J.; Kleber, M.; Nico, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon cycling in the rhizosphere is a nexus of biophysical interactions between plant roots, microorganisms and the soil organo-mineral matrix. Plant roots are the primary source of C in mineral horizons and can significantly accelerate the rate of soil organic matter mineralization in rhizosphere soils. While a portion of this acceleration results from stimulation of microbial enzymatic capacities (the 'priming effect') - abiotic responses also play a significant role in rhizosphere cycling of soil organic matter (SOM). For example, exudate-stimulated mobilization and dissolution of metal species may release previously complexed SOM, or could affect Fe mobility via redox changes associated with microbially-driven O2 depletion. We have investigated the abiotic response of rhizosphere microenvironments, using additions of several 13C-enriched low molecular weight (LMW) root exudates and 13C-plant detritus to controlled microcosms. We hypothesized that certain abiotic effects are triggered by specific exudate compounds and that the magnitude of the effect depends on the soil physiochemical properties. Using a combination of microsensor measurements, solid-phase extractions, X-ray and IR spectroscopy, we measured how root exudates differ in their potential to create reducing microenvironments, alter metal chemisty and mineralogy, and influence the availability of SOM in the rhizosphere. High resolution X-ray microscopy (STXM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses illustrate the physical fate of the added isotope tracers in both pore water and on mineral surfaces. Our results suggest that certain root exudates facilitate abiotic reactions that increase the pool of bioavailable SOM and stimulate its microbial decomposition in the rhizosphere. In particular, the contrasting ecological functions of LMW organic acids and simple sugars in facilitating SOM breakdown in the rhizosphere will be discussed.

  8. Multireference configuration interaction potential curve and analytical potential energy function of the ground and low-lying excited states of CdSe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Feng; Yang Chuan-Lu; Hu Zhen-Yan; Wang Mei-Shan

    2007-01-01

    The potential energy curves (PECs) of the ground state (3Π) and three low-lying excited states (1∑, 3∑,1Π) of CdSe dimer have been studied by emploging quasirelativistic effective core potentials on the basis of the complete active space self-consistent field method followed by multireference configuration interaction calculation. The four PECs are fitted to analytical potential energy functions using the Murrel-Sorbie potential function. Based on the PECs,the vibrational levels of the four states are determined by solving the Schr(o)dinger equation of nuclear motion, and corresponding spectroscopic contants are accurately calculated. The equilibrium positions as well as the spectroscopic constants and the vibrational levels are reported. By our analysis, the 3Π state, of which the dissociation asymptote is Cd(1S) + Se(3p), is identified as a ground state of CdSe dimer, and the corresponding dissociation energy is estimated to be 0.39eV. However, the first excited state is only 1132.49cm-1 above the ground state and the 3∑ state is the highest in the four calculated states.

  9. Recent insights into the implications of metabolism in plasmacytoid dendritic cell innate functions: Potential ways to control these functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saas, Philippe; Varin, Alexis; Perruche, Sylvain; Ceroi, Adam

    2017-01-01

    There are more and more data concerning the role of cellular metabolism in innate immune cells, such as macrophages or conventional dendritic cells. However, few data are available currently concerning plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC), another type of innate immune cells. These cells are the main type I interferon (IFN) producing cells, but they also secrete other pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor or interleukin [IL]-6) or immunomodulatory factors (e.g., IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β). Through these functions, PDC participate in antimicrobial responses or maintenance of immune tolerance, and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several autoimmune diseases, as well as in tumor immune escape mechanisms. Recent data support the idea that the glycolytic pathway (or glycolysis), as well as lipid metabolism (including both cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism) may impact some innate immune functions of PDC or may be involved in these functions after Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/9 triggering. The kinetics of glycolysis after TLR7/9 triggering may differ between human and murine PDC. In mouse PDC, metabolism changes promoted by TLR7/9 activation may depend on an autocrine/paracrine loop, implicating type I IFN and its receptor IFNAR. This could explain a delayed glycolysis in mouse PDC. Moreover, PDC functions can be modulated by the metabolism of cholesterol and fatty acids. This may occur via the production of lipid ligands that activate nuclear receptors (e.g., liver X receptor [LXR]) in PDC or through limiting intracellular cholesterol pool size (by statin or LXR agonist treatment) in these cells. Finally, lipid-activated nuclear receptors (i.e., LXR or peroxisome prolife